5 Burst results for "Bonnie Cashin"

"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:20 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"I am obsessed with claire mccardell valentina bonnie cashin and they all made names for themselves in this industry that hidden away its own talent in the past. So if you wanna learn a little bit more about what. What is termed the american. Look that many of these designers that i just mentioned are credited with inventing. You can head back to. I think maybe season two. I think we did an episode on the american look with rebecca arnold. So that is out there. Yeah and we've done absolutely episodes on haase. Valentina and bonnie cashin so that leaves claire mccardell which is a huge oversight. We need correct that. I know season five. I flare so as mentioned earlier. You know world war one. There was this threat that initially france would be cut off from america and american designers would be able to come into their own. That did not happen but that did happen. During world war two and world war two and mark this significant shift in the fate of the american designer who despite having made significant progress throughout the nineteen thirties had largely continued to operate in the shadow of couture throughout that period and suddenly during world war two. The germans invaded perez american designers. We're left to stand on their own. The germans were in paris from june nineteen forty two august nineteen forty four and many of the leading couture houses were forced to close and those that did remain open did so under severely limited operations communication with america was broken at this point leading fashion journalists for the new york times to ask is new york prepared to become the style center. Now that the tour is no longer functioning in short the answer is yes but then maybe a little bit. No also in ninety one. After well-received fall and spring collections. For american designers and manufacturers the new york times declared nyc the fashion center of the world and in nineteen forty-three eleanor. Lambert masterminded the first ever nearer press..

claire mccardell valentina bonnie cashin rebecca arnold bonnie cashin haase Valentina america france perez paris the new york times new york fashion center of the world nyc eleanor Lambert
"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:43 min | 11 months ago

"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Keep every time. I see that. I keep thinking bonnie cash bonnie cashin. So i'm sure that both of you have a few favourite ensembles from this section as well would wanna both of you share us yes. It is difficult to pick favorites. But personally i love the eighteen forties in american fashion. I think because. I love historic photography. And this is really the first decade where you see. People in detail photographed in their attire. So one of my favorite pieces is the eighteen forties picnicking ensemble which started with a blue printed. Cotton dress and i can tell you the story of how we acquired that kevin and i were at an antique show in dallas texas. And we were speaking there. We'd been invited to speak and of course wanted to do a bit of shopping also and we separated. We were doing your own thing. Different areas of the show. I saw this dress it was on a mannequin and it was one of those moments like. Oh my gosh. what is that right. so wait over. And it just happened to be being sold by a wonderful Supporter donor of the museum. Stephen porterfield and you'll recognize his as you go through on the book we purchased and he has donated pieces to so i saw this stress. And whether any other is that we're a small team and so the curatorial team has been charged with approving all acquisitions. We don't need to take potential acquisitions to another board. So it's really assess deciding what fits with our collecting mandate what fits with our mission statement and right then and there. I decided that this was understood. Statement i want it. How much is it. The price without kevin's permission. I said we'll take it discuss things together remember. I called about the scar scarf we bought it. I was so excited. Because i knew that we could transform that into a perfect rendition. A career in. I've sprint representing a picnic. And that became a jumping off point we started acquiring pieces caller the cuffs the mid the hat and one of my favorite pieces to something else i love is an american folk art early ninety century american folk art and so we wanted to acquire a picnic basket for picnicking lady and kevin found the perfect one. You'll see page thirty four to thirty five in the catalog. And it's a large basket with tole painting so a painting technique plots calm and it depicts vibrant fruit on the top and it says along the edge of the basket at all feasts if enough. I most heartily stuff so it was perfect. It was perfect. It looks dynamic in a photograph. So i couldn't believe i found that i was looking looking looking justifying anti-basque. Let alone one. That was you know again. Dynamic designed at beautiful image on the top of it that's been tainted That charming texts. That just fits perfectly with you. Know the back. There was a picnic basket and it dates from about eighteen. Thirty five to eighteen. Forty five was spot on with the time period that we needed for this this lady that we were going to represent such qismat so for me first of all i want to say. I'm so glad that you pointed out those rain mantles. Because i have never seen ray mantles like those before and i could not believe that we've found two of them for one thing and it started out actually. I'm just sitting on my couch. We're working on this project in christina. Both did this. We were just putting in words. We're just doing word searches on the internet like rain mantle. Oilcake cake or whatever you know this kind of just just to see what might be out there especially with visual imagery fashion plates or like career in i've prince and so forth and a photo came up on interest and i normally don't like pinterest just because you never know where the images of come from there so hard to track down was able to track down this of it was in somebody's living room and it was the chocolate brown mantle. And what is that. And there was this whole discussion. That was doing on about it from about twelve. Thirteen years ago and i was able to track down the woman who was talking in a chat room. It was her friends and it was her friends friends mansell and i was able to track down and then we ended up buying it from this private collector and then found the second one to that. We thin photograph them together. So that was. That was really fun. I think for me though. One of my absolute favorites is something that we had in our collection here. Before i got here and i'm in my twenty seven year with museum and it's a page fifty two fifty three. If you have your cataloging adrian patio ensemble and i. I remember like the my earliest days going through our collection in opening up the box than seeking this fabulous adrian which i wish we could address this. We never had a reason to to address it until spring fashion and so it was perfect. And i just love it because again. It's that visual imagery that that was used on and it's kind of like a paper doll cut out kind of feel and the paper dolls expanded out but doing research. It turns out that it was designed by thomas dorsey. Junior coup is a native american and he took the influence from wampoa belts. The imagery that you see on one belts. And i thought that is fascinating and then we were able to find that. It was commented a lot in newspapers. All around the country this group of fabrics that he created he matched with a textile manufacturer. And then adrian solid the textile and ended of using it to create this patio. Gown designed that adrian created was off the shoulder. Almost peasant blouse that harkens to the mexican peasant blouses that are very popular here in southern california. So it was all of these kind of world groups coming together in this one design by adrian who was so well known around the world for you know i being a movie costume designer and then having his own fashion line that sold across the country and is i just thought it was fascinating and was so excited that we could include that in the projects and readily linked with specifically southern california sportswear. Right exactly the pool. Our pool culture going back to the nineteen twenties yvonne indefinitely. The thirties was very strong and still continue. Think of pool culture in southern california and it was a kind of ideal so it worked again one of those kind of synchronicity things of all different elements of design the time period that comes from the place southern california that comes the designer but then the design elements such as this beautiful patterning that fit together so nicely that we could tell the story in this one single garment and you know our imagery for the catalogue. it was tricky because we needed to be able to tell a story completely head to toe in one single photo. There are very few instances in Catalog where there's more than one photo of the ensemble's because we just didn't have the room. We knew that this was going to be a very large project so We needed to be able to tell stories. Both visually and through our taxed various.

bonnie cashin Stephen porterfield kevin bonnie adrian dallas sprint thomas dorsey texas pinterest mansell christina southern california Gown yvonne
"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning <hes>. And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't <hes>. What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and <hes>. We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place <hes>. We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. <hes>. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

peabody essex museum chicago history museum kunst museum cassidy zachary elizabeth keck salem massachussetts Quant essex pem Lucille gordon bonnie cashin Vitol boston belgium partner Phenomenal united states madeleine
"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"bonnie cashin" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo <hes>. Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

peabody essex museum united states Tech england chicago massachusetts partner vashon twenty twenty
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

April Kellyanne Cassidy Zachary Essex Museum Kunst Museum Elizabeth Keck Lucille Gordon Bonnie Cashin Low Mary The Netherlands Vitol Madeleine Gina Salem Chicago History Museum Belgium MFA United States Boston Kapoor