19 Burst results for "Bonanno"

"bonanno" Discussed on Bob and Sheri

Bob and Sheri

07:11 min | 3 months ago

"bonanno" Discussed on Bob and Sheri

"I've got no option but to sell you all for scientific experiments. It's the bobbin sherry show. With bob, what have I become? And cherry. I don't sit like a lady and I swear like a pirate. And now from the palatial bobbin sherry studios is bobbing cherry. Welcome. Bonjour, to the bob and sherry show and I'm gonna ask sherry the audience just to indulge us a little bit. I know we talked too much about Goodfellas and The Sopranos and just the mobbed in New York City in Philadelphia and all that. Part of is where we grew up and so on. But I thought the mob was done. I thought that Rudy Giuliani years ago just said that we're going to put the knife right in the heart of the mafia there, done. And that other prosecutors were doing the same thing over the decades, but listen to this. The fed, this is a headline ABC News. Fed's bust alleged mafia gambling operations, posing as shoe repair and coffee shops. I'm just tell me every time you know what, every time I hit a cliche, I'm going to do this. All right? Here we go. I'm just I'm reading this. Sal shoe repair in Merrick, New York, which is in Long Island, was doing more than fixing heels and Warren shoes. The genevieve organized crime family operated an illegal gambling operation out of the shop. Substantial revenue was laundered through cash transfers, federal prosecutors said in Brooklyn. Non purported members and associates of the Genovese and bonanno organized crime families were charged with racketeering and illegal gambling offenses. And other legitimate seeming things in establishments in Queens and on Long Island, including a coffee bar and la nationale soccer club. Salvatore rubino, 58 known as south as shoemaker. Was arrested. Saw the shoemaker. A Nassau county police detective, Hector Rosario, is also among the defendants. That's right, a crooked cop. He allegedly accepted money from the bonanno family in exchange for offering to arrange police raids of competing locations. So he was on the take with some of the, with one of the families with their gambling operations and on top of that, he said, yeah, give me the money. I want to say anything about you. And I'm going to call in. I'm going to call in some cops on your competition. Wow. It's still going on. The profits earned through this and other gambling locations generated substantial revenue, which was then laundered through cash transfers to the defendants through kicking up to the crime families leaders the indictment said. Among those charged are Anthony little Anthony pippa tone, a captain and a soldier in the bonanno family, Carmelo, the carmine polito, an acting captain, and prosecutors detail as I wrap this up, one called polito made in October in 2019. They taped him talking to an associate, asking him to relay a message to a guy who owed them a debt. Quote, tell him I'm gonna put him under the bridge. It's like, it's like it's right out of The Godfather. After all these years, you can not, you can not get these guys. Cold. They just continue. And let me just say that a lot of the prosecutors are Italians who put these guys behind bars. The Italian community in that part of the world is a wonderful, rich community, but every single group in America, I don't care if you're British by derivation, Irish, whatever, you got some guys that aren't doing good. But this thing is just so rich with cliches and, you know, the legacy of the mafia, which I thought didn't you think was basically done a few years ago. They had broken the back of the mafia. I sure thought it was more done than it apparently is. Yeah. I know. Sell the shoemaker. That's such a throwback gangster name. Sell the shoemaker. And you know that he didn't get it because he was a cobbler. That was real. We know how he got that. Maybe he was the guy that made this cement boots before they would dump him in the east river. You go. I think you're right. I think you're right. It's bob and sherry. It's a bob and cherry off air podcast called the odd cast. Podcasting. Podcast. With stuff we wouldn't couldn't or shouldn't do on the regular show. We've saved a spot at the table for you for barbecue. That's right. The current odd cast has excerpts from the Lamar barbecue Facebook Live broadcast. The bob and cherry off air podcast, the odd cast. We got a big buck cast to do here. Get it now on the free bobbin cherry app, bob and cherry dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. Leave us a talk. Talk back with the free bobbin sherry app. So we just had this news story for ABC News about how some mafia gambling places in New York both Long Island and in Brooklyn were busted. And we thought those mob families were gone, evidently they're not. And I called attention to the fact that by and large, like 90 9% of Italian people are fantastic, hardworking. I grew up with them in Connecticut. I love them. And my wife is visiting with her friend who is Italian, Liz. She's visiting Italy this week, and actually they're spending like two and a half weeks going all over Italy, including Sicily. Right now, it's amazing the technology of today and I'm blown away. I have my Friends, the app. Do you have find my Friends, find your Friends? Of course. Yep. Where you can find wherever Kevin is in on your iPhone. Yeah. Right. So, you know, I thought, you know, I use it mostly, oh, Mary's not here. I wonder where she is. Oh, she's over by the grocery store. I'll tell her to. I just pulled up my wife on find my Friends. She's in Venice. And there's a map, and I can see her actually walking through the streets in Venice. Do you want to hear what's around her? In Venice, Italy right now? The papa bar, the Campo de sooty, restaurant. Restaurant for rini, which I guess is a restaurant also. The Rialto bridge is there, and Burger King.

bonanno bobbin sherry studios bob Long Island Salvatore rubino Hector Rosario fed sherry Anthony little Anthony pippa Goodfellas carmine polito polito ABC News Rudy Giuliani Genovese Merrick genevieve Brooklyn Nassau county New York City
"bonanno" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"He paid a combination of about half a $1 million to the credit card victims and to Delta Air Lines who was also a victim a victim in the case based on the way they were fraudulently handling some tickets. And so it was in excess of a $10 million loss to him, which was a good hit in his pocket. Now Kaplan to this day, I've sort of looked good. I can't sort of find him. Did he sort of fall off the map? Are you having any idea? Yeah, so I do have an idea. He was charged again in New York in 2004 along with another attorney of his, who he was using down in Atlanta, a notorious mob attorney. Kaplan actually had three attorneys at one time representing him in our case. This notorious mob attorney was basically charged in New York with witness tampering, and they used evidence from the case down in Atlanta because he was also tampering with our witnesses. We just never charged him because the case would have been too big and too confusing for the jury and a decision was made not to charge him. But because as you know, the ability of RICO allows you to go back in time and take charges from different jurisdictions as long as you can prove that the enterprise is continuing. So New York, the bonanno squad went back in time and took the Atlanta witness tampering and charged Steve Kaplan and charged his attorney for tampering with chart with witnesses in Atlanta and New York in cases that they had there. The and both parties pled guilty. And keeping on. These kind of cases are amazing, you know, it's amazing to me that there really hasn't been a movie made of some of these, especially this gold club case because at the end of the day, a lot of money brought back to the government, a lot of money charge not as much time. It's not some of what you saw in New York with murders and everything else. But it was going right there on pea bot. Here was this going on. And it's sort of a captivating case of Martin that you're working on. Because later on, you went, I know you went to, you went back up north to D.C., but you also served what most people didn't realize that the FBI had folks in Afghanistan. And I want to get to that in just a moment, but I do want to give you a chance or there are other cases like the gold club or similar that is my dad who's a state trader. Many of my folks know what 30 some years there was just an interesting short war story was there one that from your time in the field office and said, you know, this is just something that I tell and it's like people just don't believe it. Well, I did leave the Atlanta office from working in headquarters city and I went to the Gainesville office, which is a small four man office in north Georgia. And there I was assigned to what we call an organized or excuse me, a safe streets task force. And we worked street level crimes. We were gangs and drugs and our job was to work with local law enforcement and help clean up these small communities that were having problems with repeat offenders that the state system was basically creating a revolving wheel where these repeat offenders would go and do a year, do two years, get parole and get right back out on the street and they were gang members, trafficking and firearms and guns and drugs and different things of that nature. So during that ten year period that I was up in Atlanta. Myself and my partner decided to open a case, we were having some issues with motorcycle gangs in north Georgia. As you know, Doug, Helen, Georgia, is a big destination for motorcycle enthusiast. Most motorcycle enthusiasts just basically put their significant other on the back of their motorcycle on the weekend and they like to put their leather jackets on and drive around the mountains in north Georgia and hang out with other motorcycle enthusiasts and the old saying is 99% of those people are law abiding citizens. But there is that 1% who lacked engage in criminal activity and they refer to themselves as one percenters. And then from there, they divide themselves into clubs that you would recognize such as the hells angels or the outlaws or the pagans or the banditos. Well, Georgia is an outlaw state, meaning that the outlaw motorcycle club claims Georgia as its territory. South Carolina has a hells angels state, for example, and Florida, our other neighbor is an outlaw state. So my partner and I opened a case on the outlaws in north Georgia. Look at the outlaws as a Major League Baseball team. And because of that, they have minor league teams that feed them. So in Georgia, we found numerous minor league teams. Teams that use the name such as the black pistons, or the southern knights. And they provided support for the outlaws and eventually if everything worked out well, they would leave their minor league team and they would get bumped up to the outlaws and the outlaws often fed their clubs from members of the smaller clubs that had made their bones or proven to be trustworthy and et cetera. And we opened the case in 2010. We took the case down in 2012 and we charged 31 individuals 25 of those were bikers and 6 of those were Mexican gang members and what we were able to do is charge them all together because we were able to buy we were able to arrange the case with informants where the Mexican gang members were selling guns to the motorcycle gang members and vice versa with drugs. And so we formed this relationship between the two gangs so that when we charged it and took it down, we actually impacted both gangs, but specifically the motorcycle gangs, we were up on a wire, listening to phone calls for 9 months. And this was the time that there was a TV show called Sons of Anarchy that was extremely popular on television. And so motorcycle enthusiasts for whatever reason were like to watch this TV show. And so at this particular time in north Georgia, just motorcycle culture was very popular. So ranging from Athens down to Macon, up to Helen, certainly in Gainesville, we took down these 31 different gang members all one night and early one morning. And most of those pled guilty, probably about 25 of those pled guilty, we had a number of trials. We most of them were convicted at trial, including gang members that had been in these gangs since the 1970s that had murder charges, murder convictions that had gotten out. Traditional bikers in that sense. And then, of course, we convicted all of the Mexican gang members. We did lose a couple of individuals at trial. You know, sometimes you go to trial, as you know, you tee it up. It's not the perfect case, but you know you've got the right guy. And sometimes you lose them, but we won, I believe out of that 31. We won 27 of those cases and got convictions on those individuals. It's just amazing you know what goes on and especially the sun's anarchic course very popular and up here in north Georgia we should see those folks riding all the time. So it is an interesting. Before we go, I want to switch gears here toward the end. You did go to Afghanistan. Most people did not realize they always thought Afghanistan was either our military or the CIA, our dark side of the thing, but the FBI was there and you were there to give sort of the legal basis in legal credence to some of the cases we were making on terrorism and other things like that. What you can, and I'm not going to dig into it because of course I understand the classified nature.

Atlanta north Georgia New York Kaplan Steve Kaplan gold club headquarters city Georgia Delta Air Lines bonanno Gainesville RICO FBI Afghanistan Helen D.C.
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

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times square meyer
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"If this progressed in a totally different direction or simplifier that more complex, whatever it is that want to find out. We're going to be studying that in the future, I think. A true scientist. Yeah. Where's the data? Exactly. Exactly. And then there was a global pandemic. That's the title of your last chapter. Yeah. So the pandemic hit while you were writing the book in 2019. How did the resilience blind spot? First of all, what is the resilience blind spot? I don't think we ever defined that. Yeah. And then how did that show itself during the pandemic? Yeah. I'm glad you asked. The questions got. So the resilience blind spot is what happens when we're exposed to potential trauma. And it's particularly becomes a blind spot when we have a mass trauma that is closed to a lot of people. When we feel and we feel bad about something. I mean, we feel really upset. It's hard not to think that it's going to last a long time. This goes back to those social psychologists like Dan Gilbert, and a lot of people know Dan Gilbert. From Daniel Gilbert, from his wonderful work, for his wonderful book, stumbling on happiness. Which is just a really excellent book very readable. And you know, he had done all this wonderful work on affective forecasting, was basically show that when we feel bad when we feel fear when we feel anger. It doesn't feel like it will go away in 20 minutes or an hour. It feels like it will last, you know, for days and weeks. And the same thing when we feel positive things. It just seems like it will last forever. So when a traumatic event happens, it potentially traumatic events. I like to call them. It feels like oh my God, I'm traumatized now. I am going to be this way for a long time. And I have many friends who have told me the same thing, you know, and been through something and they start having nightmares and start having intrusive thoughts and they're anxious, that they're traumatized now. And that's just basically not true. At least not in the first week. That's really just a normal reaction. And those reactions can be useful, but it's at that time that we can really do the work of moving on and getting beyond it. And but that's the resilience blind spot that when we are feeling these emotions, we can't even see resilience. And when it happens in a mass scale, say with the COVID virus or 9 11, we begin to think everybody's going to be this way. And I wrote about this recently an article. And one of the major newspapers, I think it was The Wall Street Journal, if I can name names. And I basically told it was on the anniversary of 9 11, the 20th anniversary called it the lesson learned from 9 11 and the lessons we keep relearning. And 9 11 was a perfect example of this. 9 11 was a horrific event. Obviously, and I was in New York at the time and it was really a distressing event. I was having nightmares. I was on edge like so many other people in the city. But the predictions, you know, the research began studies surveys began to happen within days of 9 11 and they predicted a very dire outcome, you know, huge portions of the population were feeling distressed and anxious. People in New York were already showing PTSD symptoms lots of people. And it led to these announcements that we're headed for enormous mental health crisis. And the federal emergency management agency fema, a lot of well over a $100 million. I don't remember the exact amount was well over a $100 million. To New York, so New York could provide free therapy to any and all comers. And a few months later, a lot of those at the stress and those trauma systems disappeared, or they were gone, people were feeling that anymore. And people didn't want the psychotherapy. And the treatment for 9 11, the emergency treatment. And they hadn't spent a lot of the money. So initially, they spent at an advertising, you know? It was essentially saying, come on, you really know you need treatment, but if you're afraid or stigmatized, I don't remember the exact wording of these ads. I'm paraphrasing, but it still didn't happen. And a lot of therapists were confused and, you know, or trying to find customers and people were basically kind of over it. I still remember, I mentioned this recently, I forget where I mentioned it, but about a month after 9 11, I was on the Columbia campus with my children. And there were no airplanes in the sky because all commercial flights in and out of New York were stopped. The only thing we saw were military jet fighter planes in the sky. And that was disturbing. You know, not to see these airplanes because where I live in Manhattan, it's in the flight path. So either the planes are flying up the Hudson to the east, I'm sorry to the west or up the Brooklyn and queens to the east or right over my head in Manhattan. And there were planes in the sky. Then about a month later, an airplane, a commercial airplane flew right over the campus. And I looked up and I felt this surge of I don't know relief. And I looked around and everybody in the campus was looking up at that plan. And showing this great surge of relief that I was feeling. Because that plane signified, we're getting back to normal. The blind spot was in a sense tells you no, that's not going to happen. So when the pandemic hit, I was actually in, as I mentioned, I was in I think I was in Norway at the time about to begin my trip around Europe, but I trained. And I had to come home. And I returned to New York and I had to quarantine. And I was I have to admit I was annoyed by that. I was pissed. I was because I had to quarantine. And I felt like, come on, I was in Norway. There are only there are fewer people in Norway and entire New York City, right? And nobody was really at that time taking the virus. There was seriously, but then during my quarantine at the time, my quarantine was over two weeks. Entire city was in quarantine. At the end of the month about three or four weeks later, we were up to about 800 deaths a day in New York. It was just shockingly horrible. And around that time, you know, there was a refrigerator truck makes it more write down the street from my apartment. There were hospital tents makeshift hospital tents in Central Park and nobody was out in the streets. It was, you know, I used to ride my bicycle a little bit later right down the middle of Times Square. That was just the strangest things in.

Dan Gilbert New York Daniel Gilbert federal emergency management a The Wall Street Journal PTSD Manhattan Norway Columbia Hudson Brooklyn Europe New York City Central Park Times Square
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"Good waited to use this. This work is to is to do this. Sort of in our daily life in our to start to begin to think about what's happening right now. I am a subset. Which is we're off. Waffen upset about little things of course of our daily life and i found that remarkably when i started thinking about how to teaches people to do this search using it more in my daily lives or you know i'm i'm unhappy with something. I'm i'm about apparent financial woes financial stresses. I'm a chair departments. I you know. I do all the other things that live in new york city. You know where you live. encounter some strange situation all at any moment and sometimes those things are deeply upsetting. And you find yourself feeling really bad and you commend at that point to say okay. What's happening why what's really bothered me about this. No this guy says something you know insulted on the subway or you know what. What's really bothering me about that. And what can i do about it. I'm able to are the ways. I can deal with this out trying out things and that's very effective because you begin to learn more more you'll learn how to use these skills in also improved them Research on these individual pieces can be impro- canoes. Yes in everyone. I would think so i mean you know the I think we We've found is that people are not doing well in their lives. Typically have deficits in one of these areas not all in one of these areas. That was kind of unexpected finding in our research so i think if we we try to use these different processes in these different abilities in our daily life remind quickly find out where we have sort of the weeks in. We can try to work on that and you know we can think about it. Try it you know dove into a little bit more. And i think i think all of these things indefinitely improbably in any way okay again. That's goodness okay to do something. That's not anything we've ever tested. But i am confident for most people is probably the swindon reach to cruel especially if you know can identify where. We have weeks that that we can focus on that. How much has your research mid contact with the work on hope. Shane and lopez work on hope Not at all as far as i can tell you know. We live in very busy in. Uh there's a lot of rule are always looking to different directions. Coombe were going in. The future is really this flexibility sequence in the mindset. Try to unpack or learn how it works. You know when we first proposed these things wasn't that long ago. I proposed the flexibly secrets about eight years ago. Only in a determined that well. If this doesn't last it means that somebody's improved and it's still kind of the way to think about it and it's still has mileage of getting the places still trying to understand it better but it'd be happy of this progress in a totally different direction or simple fire that more complex. Whatever it is at wanna find out. We're going to be studying that in the future.

new york city Coombe lopez Shane
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Yeah, and I think also when you speak about yourself in the third person, there's a certain kind of you can applaud yourself much more easily in a sense or remind yourself that you can do things. You have done things. And you're good at some things, you know. Yeah, yeah, for sure. Well, are there any other era tips for being able to boost your flexibility mindset and the whole sequence that you're talking about? Other than self talk and what you've talked about already? Well, I think one of the things we've learned that we haven't used this whole thing in any kind of training or intervention yet, although some colleagues of mine have mentioned that, and it kind of a loose way, one of my colleagues when they looked into the book I talk about her, she's a really, really terribly talented clinician. She's really good. And she works with people and they're great to rest. And she has been experimenting with trying to talking about them. The flexibility sequence primarily and so having people step back a little bit and think about the sequence. And again, you know, it's really focusing on what's happening in the moment rather than the whole broad spectrum, which is often looks really bad to people. Instead of focusing on the moment, what you can actually do and before you know it, you've actually gone through a lot of the pieces that will make it so it won't be so bad. So I think one of the things when the insight she had was when you're writing a middle of something really, really difficult. It's a little harder to develop or improve any of these skills. And I think of them as skills. So I think it would be really really a very good way to use this work is to do this sort of in our daily life, you know, and to start to begin to think about, you know, what's happening to me right now? Why am I upset? Which is, you know, we're off and upset about little things in the course of our daily life. And I found that remarkably when I started thinking about how to teach people to do this, started using it more in my daily life, you know, or, you know, I'm unhappy with something. You know, I'm a parent. I have financial woes or financial stresses. I'm a chair of a department, you know, you know, I do all the other things that live in New York City, you know, where you're likely to get on a subway or libel encounters some strange situation at any moment. And sometimes those things are deeply upsetting and you find yourself feeling really bad and you can then at that point just say, okay, what's happening? What's really bothering me about this? I know this guy said something in the or insulted me and the subway, you know, but what's really bothering me about that? And what can I do about it? What am I able to what are the ways I can deal with this, you know, trying out things. And that's very effective because you begin to learn more. You learn better how to use these skills. And also to improve them if you need to. There's a lot of research showing these individual pieces can be improved. That's good news. That's good news. Yeah. In everyone? I would think so. I mean, you know, I think what we've found is that the people who are not doing well in their lives, typically have deficits in one of these areas, not all of them. And one of these areas, that was a kind of an unexpected finding in our research. So I think if we try to use these different processes in these different abilities in our daily life, we might quickly find out where we have the weak spot. And then we can try to work on that part. And, you know, we can think about it, try it, you know, delve into it a little bit more. And I think all of these things can definitely improve. Probably in any way, I would say, okay, again, that's good news. Okay. And do I say something? Oh, I don't know, you know, I mean, that's not anything we've ever tested, but I am confident about that. I think for most people, is probably there's moons in the reach to improve, especially if we know if we can identify where we have what we expect that we can focus on that. How much has your research made contact with the work on hope, like Shane and Lopez's work on hope? Not at all as far as I can tell. I mean, you know, we've been very busy and, you know, there's a lot of room. We're always looking to expand a different directions. Cool. You know, yeah, and I mean, where I'm going in the future is really this flexibility sequence in the mindset. Try to unpack it more and learn how it works and you know, when we first proposed these things, it wasn't that long ago. I first proposed the flexibility sequence about 8 years ago only and at the time I thought, well, this doesn't last it means that somebody's improved it. And it's still kind of the way to think about it. And it still has mileage, so getting me places, you know, trying to understand it better, but be happy if this progressed in a totally different direction or simplifier that more complex, whatever it is that want to find out. We're going to be studying that in the future,.

New York City Lopez Shane
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"Okay this will be okay to this will pass. Is there common things people say. Did it will eventually pass eventually received into the back on. It will be okay confidence coping. You say you know you know you can do these kinds of things so you know you'll find a way to do this Challenge appraisal you know. We might say so. What really is the challenger. What do i need to do the same i think. That sort of bleeds into the flexibility secrets. The self-talk for the flexibility sequence might be like for the context sensitivity is is kind of what i just challenge appraisal. What's happening. What do i need to do. What is it that's bothering so much need bothering me so much. End the flexibility sequence. I'm sorry the part is what am i able to do. What am i good at. What can i can. I use here. That i naval to do and in the last part really the feedback partner car weeks. Decide how it's working is. Basically simple is is work is does. This seemed like is the problem. Still there i do in those you know. In in the book i listed a chart of these are basic self talk for these sequences of flexibility mindset. Nfu other examples. any i suggest people can make their own if they're comfortable with these and of course there's another kind that ethan crosses a lot of work on on what's called this itself talker objective south and then in that case you talking to third person. Use your name so you might say you might say for example. No scott you can do this or you know scott. You've done this before you know you can do this. You know things like that and that's very effective. Actually yeah. I think that relates to like kristen. Nef's research himself compassion. She often says. Treat yourself you know Like you treat a friend and say it'd be like scott like i love you. You know you can do this. And i think also when you speak in by self-serve person. There was a certain kind of you can applaud yourself much more easily in a sense or or or remind yourself that you can do things you have done good at some some things you know for sure. Are there any other era tips for being able to boost your flexibility mindset. And you're the the whole sequence that you're talking about Other than self talk and what you've talked about already. Well i think one of the things. We learned that we haven't used this whole thing in any kind of training intervention yet. Although some colleagues of mine have mentioned that the kind of loose weight one of my colleagues when they who's in the book talk about her. She's a. She's a really really terribly talented inclination. She's really good and she works with people under great duress in. She has been experimenting with trying to talking about the flexibility secrets primarily and You know having people step back a little bit and think about the sequence again you know. It's it's really focusing was happening in the moment rather than the whole in a broad spectrum which is often looks really bad the people instead of focusing on the moment where you can actually do before you know it. You've actually gone through a lot of the pieces that will make it so it won't be so So i think you know when i think of insight she had was when you're right in the middle of something really really difficult. It's a little harder to develop improve any of these skills and think of them as skills. So i think it would be really a really a very.

scott Nef ethan kristen
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"Genetic because looked at looked at genetics trajectories. There is a genetic east small piece reading else but First of all we have to think about how we become flexible in the book. Average chapter on valla mental piece to this in fact we learn to be flexible. Everybody learns to be flexible to some extent. They grew up in some of the research that we've done. We found that most people are already somewhat flexible. I was very happy to see that. Because we're getting the most people zillions. And i've been married that they do this by being flexible about each event at each time it better find that most people are flexible is what we found in a couple of different studies. Some people are extremely flexible. But bose people at least moderately flexible. So the way we this happens to develop mattis. Each one of these pieces has kind of a developmental trajectory for example being sensitive to the context. the probably call that context sensitivity. It turns out you can. You can actually see this just in thinking about the. There's research shaw. All these things develop slowly and people but think about context sensitivity a reading. The situation like what's happening. Now what do i need to do now. And is classic example with children as they go in different situations caregivers. Teachers teach them how to read the situation for the famous line. Almost infamous way child. You use your inside voice here you know. Essentially whoever's telling that the child that teach caregiver somebody else saying in this situation you have to be quiet in so children begin to learn this situation. When i when i have required situation i can just run loose in this situation. Were at polite. The situation rankin stick my finger in my friends peanut butter sandwich because nobody in the cafeteria and i grew up with lots of brothers so this is kind of a through. The course of the development is our is our brains out. We get more of skills. We really learn to read the introduce situations very well and we do this to the point where it's it's an ler behavior. It's over learn skill. In other words we get to it so well. We don't even know where. Which i think is why in the same with the other pieces. We learn different coping behaviors in emotion regulation behaviors and we learned to pay attention to whether they're working the reason. I think it's important to name it in this book is it does. Most people don't even know they do this. And so i think we can use this more effectively in our lives when we know this is actually the process. In week we can also shore up any deficits..

valla mattis shaw rankin
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"This gets us into the flexibility sequence defensively sequences three parts. angela. I mean the basis of flexibility. Is that what i call. Flexibility is this capacity or this is process. I should say of working out. What's going on a stressor. You know i. This potential traumas happened to me. it was ugly events. now thinking bothers My mind that feel bad about it in our feel it's i feel like coming Endanger may be humiliated. United nightmare last night. I can quit work it out moment edge. You know in my traumatized on traumatized. So but if that's that's thinking about it is that trump on traumatize is going be bad in the future that doesn't get us anywhere stead if we think about the fact that this happened there these ugly things associated with these things. We don't want to think about but they happen to us and it's it's making us very unhappy in the moment or making us is finding running a difficult to to get on with their lives. So what is it. It's happened to me. What is it that that i need to do here. And if we think about that we begin to see at least some kind of answer at least for the more immediate moment in this situation. What are these nightmares about what you know one of these images that are gathering so much and when we see when we think that we can then think about what can i do about it. What is it that i need to do in. We might decide. Okay i need to find a way to get off my mind. Or maybe i need to talk to people about it or maybe i need to you know. Get outta the house you know. Go for a walk. Maybe i need to somehow clear my head. Whatever we think about that. Whatever might seem appropriate moved to the second stage was a repertoire which we kind of say okay. Badar need to distract myself. Clear my head. I don't think about it much. What are we have a repertoire that we can do this. People vario the skills that they have. So what do i have in my repertoire. That will able to sort of meet this challenge in we try something and that leads to the third step was where we evaluated called. The feedback responsiveness. That we just say okay. I tried say distracting myself. Did it work isn't working in a it is. Let's keep doing it or you know if it isn't working less than modified a little bit of try different way to distract ourselves or maybe we need to you know. Try something completely different this in work. Maybe what i need to do is to talk to my my friends about. Or maybe what i need to do is give myself some time alone. Can really think about surveyed me. What i need to do is get engaged in a task. It's it's more fulfilling for me. We go to this process. We might this. Is i think in some levels. Very simple is a process of working out how to solve this. Particular problem confronted that moment. And maybe later there's another like okay. I'm not distracted myself. A little bit little bit better so frightened about what happened. Maybe i need to learn about redevelop. You know or maybe just spend time with really close friends who make me feel safe..

Badar angela vario
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"An important term for me. I've been trying to understand this for years. So we know we know that we can identify people who show these resilient outcomes. The resilient two is highly versus events. These potentially traumatic events. So we can identify those people. We can identify the things that correlate with that outcome. The things that happen early on, you know, we can measure things right at the time of the event happens. We can sometimes if we have the right kind of data, we can have study we can identify what they were like before and what characteristics and traits and behaviors they had and see if that predicts or correlates with that outcome. And we find a lot of these things. So, you know, you often read about the key 5 traits the key 7 traits the magic bullets of resilience and magic traits that resilient people. But when we study and try to identify the different things the correlate, we find more than 5 or 7 lots of them. And we other people find lots of these. And we keep finding more. So you have all these things that correlate with the resilient outcome. And. They correlate, but then when we try to use those things to actually predict. So who's going to be resilient when this next thing happens? Based on these traits, or even when it happens, we now measure these things. Certain traits, who is going to be resilient based on these traits, we find that we can't do it very well. It doesn't predict much. So in the statistical terms, the effects of each one of these factors is very small. Essentially what we're saying is that if you have one of these things, gives us a little bit of greater chance of being resilience. It moves the needle just a little bit of being resilient. And if we think of it as a pie chart, which is I'd like to do it that way. Resilience is a pie and the things that the factors that the traits of resilient people, whatever you want to call them, are slices of the pie. And these are very small slices. So that's kind of the paradox. We know what correlation results, but we don't we're not very good at predicting results based on these things. Very interesting. I mean, I would argue that the characteristic neuroticism is quite strong, isn't it? Negatively predicting resilience. I don't think it's quite strong. I mean, it correlates pretty regularly, but the correlation is probably, I don't know small. There are some though, I think, I don't know if it's a trait. So that's not likely that people are not likely to be as resilient in erotic. I don't know if we've measured that one, but it's even the things you would think optimism or social support. Social support, you know, they're able to rely on friends and relatives for emotional support and super, that's a real common trait a real resource to have that's correlated with resilience regularly, but it's never that big. When you look at the statistical terms again, the variants explain the amount of the likelihood of being resilient that we're actually we're actually explaining with that. And I'm puzzled over this for years. It's not maybe we need to add them up, maybe they have a lot of them. You know? And even recently, we've been able to do machine learning, you know, when we take a bunch of these things, 70 80 variables we have. People's blood, you know, so we can I don't mean to sound gruesome, but we have we have people we can from blood, you can measure immune functioning and stress levels in the blood and all kinds of other things. And when we have all those things together, we do a better job when we have lots of these things like 80 different factors. You do a better job of predicting which is, but then we break it down. One of these studies we published in the journal of the American medical association. We break it down, we find that if we only use the biological factors, we lose a lot of our predictive power. If we only look at the psychological factors, we lose a lot of predictive power, even more predictive power. And even with 80 together, we're still in that doing really well. We're doing pretty well. And it's harder to predict resilience than the other patterns. Because resilience is a large, it's a large group of people. So there's going to be a lot of different kinds of people in that group. So normally, we don't have access to all these hidden things in our bodies and all these many different variables. So normally, we only have access to a few of these things. So the individual factor still don't tell us much as a story. I think that is very, very interesting and puzzling. Trying to understand how that dovetails with the argument about the three aspects of the flexibility mindset optimism, confidence and coping in a challenge orientation, doesn't that contradict what you said if you're making the case there are at least three things that are important to cultivate aren't you making the argument that those three things are important? These kind of thing. Yeah, that's a great point Scott. It's a great point because it does sound like I'm contradicting myself. But the flexibility mindset, there are two pieces my answer, which I finally began to realize how we were able to be resilient despite this paradox is that it depends on the situation. Every situation is different. We have to kind of we have to we have to embrace every situation and in a sense, work it out. And we have to really get into those situations with something happens to work it out for what's happening in this particular situation. And what works in one situation doesn't work in another situation. And even when we find something that works in the situation we're facing, maybe the next day it won't work as well because the situation's changed. So there are two pieces of this flexibility process. A flexibility is how we do it. There are two pieces of this. And one is the mindset I call the flexibility mindset. Which is comprised of optimism and what's called challenge orientation. It's thinking of difficult situations as challenges rather than threats. And we might initially think of that as threats, but when we then shift to an appraisal of them, what do I need to do here? What's the problem? And then the third piece is being confident.

American medical association Scott
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"We down i just Descend more briefly. I think it's real. But i think we don't know how much we don't know what it really is because we have been able to track it or tapping so well and i blush. Looks like your research program and findings are very well lined. Although i suppose i should ask what is the difference between resilience and growth and the key thing if we can really operationalize those two. Yes so i actually wrote a paper once called post traumatic growth in resilience two sides of the same coin or different coins title. That's exactly what i'm asking you. Yeah so i think that I think that resilience is not the way we look at it as not post. Traumatic growth is basically going back to where they were before Before the event they're doing well before they vamp is we tracked people before after events are doing well before something happens is a little perturbation little disruption for nearly a couple of weeks in ender back to being on k- i don't think it's necessarily with at some of those people have grown but it but i don't know i don't think we actually got got asset in a very good way we ever. We don't know how to measure is ludwig socialist. So that's that's the the way. That's how i think of it that they're not don't necessarily overlap but at least for some people they might catch that. This is really helped me understand the differences and similarities between your program and they're and the post traumatic growth program. That's actually a topic of might expect is post traumatic growth. So i'm really trying to think this through very thoughtfully. It is true that there is a lack of studies that have control group. That can actually. I mean it's hard to have control group within person for these kinds of post traumatic growth. Things you can't obviously bring a a sodas diet you can't bring the joke. So it's it's it's it's tough to to actually scientifically answer the question. Would they have been or are they. Better off In terms of some areas of growth and if they didn't have the situation So yeah so the jury still out in the science you know. Let's listen to drum singer You know let's let's look at more data we'll will say survey can add one more thing please do. I just went through a fairly difficult time with surprising. Neurological problem took me off guard at one point. It was looking very serious and some during that during dealing with that i had these of series of tiffany's where realized i'm going to be okay. I can. I can use some of the tools that worked with some of the tweets written about the broken. Just cope with this one piece at a time and then it was almost almost happy at that point. You know i really. I realize this is really kind of growth experience so this verse was definitely growth experience. But i think that's the kind of thing that that that people really name when they talk about growth and i'm not sure we get at that but you know i think that's that's real. You know that israel. Why certainly think so. Humans in a lot of ways need to overcome adversity in meaning in their lives. We don't really get terrible meaning from estatically positive experiences. Although we do maybe we do but not to the same degree. Thank you are flavor. So what is the resilience paradox. Okay the resumes paradox. Which.

tiffany israel
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"Mapping the definition of that a criteria began to extend ad which was a bit of a pandora's box because it's now clear now we have december beauty but what is what is not a traumatic event after get over that hurdle. then the three subcategories. It's a bit of a menu driven approach. You need one of these. Three of these two of these senator from these different categories and That leads to a kind of almost impossible number of combinations of possible symptoms so that one person may get the diagnosis. Have these cluster. As long as a meet those criteria another person may have these cluster and you can literally have hundreds of thousands of these different combinations so it looks like too many people have the ptsd diagnosis very different profiles. That got even worse. The latest incarnation of the dsm the basically the bible of mental disorders merican psychiatric association puts out dsm dea said made it created another subcategories. Now there's four which increase the number of possible variations. So that's a that's a real problem because you have much heterogeneity remains to many different variations. But that's for sure And you've founded that that resiliency is not necessarily the opposite of psychopathology. That's interesting because Some people kinda may view them as opposite ends of the same poll. And so like you to explain that and also explain. You know how resilient can come across in Sudden unexpected ways low so the the the idea that resilience is not necessarily the opposite of cycle without. Ptsd in the work. That i've done for the last twenty five years. We follow people over time lease. We own date another day weekend. It her hands on n. We we look for patterns over time. Refined there's a handful of these typical pass. One of them is chronic psychopathology. With what i like about that is having a defying trajectories. We don't need the Gnosis in videos the diagnosis many flaws. So we have this diet we can. We can identify a pattern of chronic psychopathology. Truly just a trend in the data irrespective of the diagnosis. Then we identify a pattern of resilience which is really recalled. A stable trajectory healthy functioning. We find that the majority of people typically after potential dramatic events. They are able to basically get on with their lives in function. Pretty well without hot symptoms that positive experiences you know. Be close to other people You know working can concentrate than have joy in their lives. Pretty soon after the Varies but sometimes it's a few days afterwards. Sometimes it's a few weeks afterwards. Even though they were pretty shaken at the time they're able to dust themselves. Awesome is a decent metaphor milan. Those are not the only two patterns we also find some people who have a lot of trauma symptoms early on and they struggle sometimes for months in Gradually begin to get better. Might take them a year or two. He's find that. Then we find another pattern where people maybe have a fair amount of ptsd symptoms or other symptoms in. They're struggling but then they're not getting better. They sometimes get worse over time..

merican psychiatric associatio dea trauma symptoms milan
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"I never even knew that he contributed to it. So i don't ask you know. Why is the conventional wisdom about trauma so wrong. That's a great question. I think it. I think there's at least three sources that led us Trauma has really curious history. There was hardly any mention of trauma in historical record until really the nineteenth century which is very interesting then once it really wants it. Kind of began to take hold than it really became a crucial issue in a very Controvercial tension filled issue until nineteen eighty when the diagnosis was first. Ptsd diagnosis i formalized and then it really took on a life of its own i think what are the main factors that we sort of got on the wrong foot. Was that a lot of the research. Certainly a lot of the writing of trauma came from a clinical perspective so people who worked with trauma patients researchers worked with severe trauma There was a lot of interesting in understanding intriguing. Ptsd which makes perfect sense but that led to kind of skewed view when when when people work with ptsd. It begin to think that everybody must be traumatized. Because that's what they see. They don't see resilient people don't see people who've gone through End you know. Basically you know been k. They don't see those people so the news from that area was that is is really prevalent in. It's difficult intractable problem. Which eventually that that. That were paid off that treatments were developed for. Ptsd but that news trickled out into the general public. Trauma is really. Ptsd is a common response very common response and of course the media played its role. It's a good story right. And so that was kind of a story that that made its way into the public. And i think the second factor is media and i think the third factor is said human beings. We want a simple story. you know. we don't wanna complicated story one that we would. You've seen this now. The internet we want means in sound bites so these three things conspired. I think to to the idea that trauma leads to Really undesirable.

Trauma trauma ptsd
"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman

"Today we have george banana on the podcast. Dr bananas professor of psychology chair of the department of counseling and clinical psychology and director of the loss trauma and emotion. Lab teachers. college be university. He's the author of the other side of sadness and the end of trauma. George so great to finally chat with you on the podcast. it's great. I'm very very happy. You're happy to you. Invited me thank you you know. We have a lot to talk about this topic. That you study is Is extraordinarily germane to the moment. That will win. It's interesting because i think that If i read your book correctly you said you started reading it. Before the pandemic hits you almost had kind of add that extra chapter at the end about the pandemic is that right out of that out of that. Come about yes well. I was working on the book. And i plan to be in europe for a sabbatical touring around europe and giving lectures and working on the book further. So i started the book. And i was going to do the bulk of it and then the pandemic hidden head shuffled on home at quickly so i thought okay this would probably would probably make sense to include this whole experience in the book. It began to become clear that it was going to be law hall so began keeping a diary that was fortunate decision because in the last chapter of the book is about the type damage. Says good that you get the diary right on well before we get into your seminal work on resilience and ideas and your new book. Let's go back a second. 'cause we both shared a mentor Drama singer yes you know. May he rest in peace. Let's talk about That work you did with him a little bit and how it. How did it lead to work. Interest in resilience. Well that's a very interesting question Headed go from daydreaming Yeah well i didn't do. Daydreaming legit work done.

george banana Dr bananas department of counseling and c europe George
"bonanno" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Victims in our thoughts and hearts for many people this day matters because they lost someone on this day, and it's important to them that we never forget. I'm Dan Watkins. They're welcome back to the Morgan Chauffeured only on WBZ. Am, Morgan. I'll be here to midnight. Uh, Jordan will be joining me attend Jordan Rich. And Barbara Feldon joining This show The Morgan show at 11. Right now. I've got David McCallum and we are about to go to Brighton. Brighton, England with Britain. Uh, quick little segment of Boston where Harvey lives. Hello, Harvey. Hi. Hi, Morgan. This is Harvey and brighten. Hello, Harvey. Hi, Morgan. I'm not a great fan of yours. I love you. I love yourself. Thank you. Oh, no. Did my accountants on tonight also speaking to him right now? Always, David. I'm a great admire of yours for probably over 60 years. Oh, great. Yeah, I know you've had a long career, but, um, I remember seeing you probably remember this. I'm never seeing you in the six finger. You remember that episode of outer limits? Well, I was going to forget it. I got to work with Joseph Bonanno. You know, Road Psycho? Yeah. Body needs that was one of the most inspirational. Stories I've ever come across. And, uh, I love you for doing that episode, It opened my mind to the universe. I look a lot of you for doing that episode and his character name was Gillum. Walser Gillam with the character that he portrayed Yes. Well, alright, very interesting because when we were shooting that at the very end he gets in the machine. You know it. It takes him forward and back and all that. No, no, wondering at the way Yeah, exactly. We're trying to figure out what's the best way to end it that he end up with just a little pool of water on the seat monkey or what it is. But let David finish the story. He gave up on himself, which was, uh, the simplest and most simple way event ending the whole thing. Yeah, I guess coming back. People was probably the most important thing. You did another. You did another outer limits as well, Did you not David? Yeah, That's funny things unknown. Who is it was Cedric never people. Yeah, you did. Time time tilting with barber, Russian Vera Miles, Yes. Wow and I You've done a lot. Also, That's just a thimble full. Of the work this man has done on the big screen and a little screen. And you're still doing a lot today. I admire you still have it. And I'm I'm going to ask this question because when you and I spoke a couple of weeks ago the line this up Uh, you mentioned that most likely they are going to be using you less and less. I You still going to be involved? If the show maintains its momentum. I used to going to be involved within C. I s. I've told them Morgan, whatever they wanted to do. I'll do And if they want me to do more, I'll do four. But with the pandemic and with the budget for the keeping the whole crew safe testing and everything to CVS, and everybody has had to cut down on the number of shows. They produced and ducky is a character is very interesting, but I think the younger and the new members and the people that are coming in now Two NC A as the program. I think they take precedent so well, you know things from the past. All right. I'm going to ask you to bring him One more back story tale. And all right. Um, Harvey. Goodnight. Thank you for your call. Great talking to you. Thank you. YouTube. And you mentioned there was this episode. Kind of Berlin. You're on season four, or 5 to 6. Where If somebody wanted to know. What a young ducky looked like. And they ask Gibbs. So what did he look like? And you're not pleased. That they referenced. Your man from Uncle characters. Alien Corey active. That's what keeps said He looked a little bit like alien curry Aachen. And you didn't like that. So if you want to tell my audience why you didn't like hearing that I think there are certain conventions and and, uh, the writing of plays and even books. And I think there are certain when you're writing a book on one particular in one particular style, or when you're doing something television program and that particular way that has certainly conventions and you don't cross From one convention into another convention, and I think the CIA's is they're wonderful. Semi documentary story about what the true and CIA agents do in order to keep the Marines and the others were with the Marines safe and Healthfully, and I would, you know, prosecute them when they commit crimes, And that's what the story is all about. The man from Uncle was a fictitious thing on NBC way back in the past. Friend had nothing to do with then CIA on nothing to do with reality for that matchup jump from one convention to another just for oil. It's a was sort of cheap joke. As far as I'm concerned, which people loved Until I was proved wrong in the end. Well, let me ask this and then I'll take my break. The movie that came out about four or five years ago. With Henry Cavil and Army actor. They brought back The title. The man from Uncle There were very few similarities and that movement and that team spoke to Robert or I or anybody else associated with the show. They just when did that movie and they did a very like job. She was beautiful and gorgeous and wonderful, knew how to wear all those clothes. But Apart from that, you know, there wasn't nothing extra special about it, and certainly no reference to what we did. And I didn't. I did not like That the character of Aleah Koury Aachen What super strong No one's going to the motorcycle over their head and throw it at somebody. Well, I mean, it was nothing to do. Uh, you know, it was just the name nothing else, right? And I.

Barbara Feldon Dan Watkins David McCallum David Morgan Joseph Bonanno Harvey Aleah Koury Aachen Gillum YouTube Jordan NBC Boston Robert Brighton Walser Gillam CIA Gibbs today tonight
"bonanno" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"bonanno" Discussed on Here & Now

"It is another ten stay in northern california near the near nevada. Border firefighters are battling kaldor fire now threatening the biggest city on the shore of lake. Tahoe they cut a break yesterday when winds relaxed a little bit but the fire has burned more than two hundred thousand acres and some fifty thousand people have evacuated. Npr's eric westervelt talked to some firefighters. Defending south lake tahoe. Fix smoke and ash. Enveloped the eerily empty resort area of south lake. Tahoe which is usually bustling. This time of year with summer tourists on the outskirts of the city exhausted fire crews in the christmas valley area. I really the last line of defense. Protecting south lake tahoe. Its number side over there. And then it's burning there that way towards the south talk behind us pretty close in a forested area adjacent to cabins and homes firefighter. Steve barnum and a wildfire strikeforce from southern california are scrambling to stamp out spot fires. These are the dreaded windblown embers that ignite many fires that can easily grow into new blazes. Bardem is working to contain one almost got out of control. It was bernie pretty Pie their thirteen fourteen foot claim lakes and get the ember cast off it it gets grasping the needle going and it goes over to the houses. And that's memorial. They're worried about sparks catching the drought-stricken brush dry pine needles surrounding the homes. Right across the road that can turn this forest fire into a battle to save homes and neighborhoods most of these forests and the tahoe basin have not burned since the nineteen forties. The spot fires they're tackling are not mere nuisances really the biggest threat to south lake. Tahoe right now says firefighter jesse alexander because they can overrun control lines and wreak havoc on any well-planned containment strategy and you have a spot fire basically planning might be go plan b. or plan c. depending on spotify jumped across so you can have every intention of trying to hold the road and if it jumps that road a spot fire now you have to kind of change your overall game plan. If you're not able to pick up that's

Dino bonanno katrina afghanistan jefferson kabul taliban Xinlong michael sullivan Southeast asia al qaeda Npr thailand singapore kamala harris lee us
pisode #35  Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

Conversations pour Elle, partages de sagesse féminine

05:02 min | 1 year ago

pisode #35 Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

"With us on the lobster savvas zone. The was pm almost young. Duncairn unix daniels on punk combined and his sons pissy ticket shows kush toll bagel Fox replays on. He added shushma There mickey soc nine now was super allows. this was so in motion. And i'm on the the kiss jan mumbo from the in toss financial concerns me yet put down stairs committee. All the polar dogs s become should body police secret dossiers even modern jeep indefensibly young put on the hostile metro area. Don't kill lou wop are highly. Listen you can lose moisture inch normal analysis To new to new number. don't care. Skiing mongrel geneticists tizzy komo privacy solutions. More lab senior key can you. He ended up. Don't do these emotion. Keith's manifests komo. Hover says it said burial laps yemen ad. Foam kiss turned ma on the. Da shows moldova's young till noon. We'll see a pattern allergy. Lucy bacall tunnels on a cd-rom metal set. Espy la pursue clash. Pf of wa. Who passer washington komo On a duty newly well spa style Example second level year until voc grew in neon new palette bent medlock A sorta p pallet fantasy. Not man and knock them up. You can see on this deserve. Speak here look trap. Kalani fungus kong secure. This is super sandy Tom put the point. Back by the copa habita- homes bhaskar bessemer dot. There are five are were doto the question and data sonate signed on as all put dorothy house. Ski faker bail you. Devolve year this town under file a cuisine and mia to new white house signed on it cuts the and bounce kotova. You're just took on paschi spouse wall septum farm. So michael community agreement signed docile cume of peer pundit poor pe- can you dr pair basketball dominate bonanno cast cylinder labus much. Craig glossy found league dick's p male fiscal sur. Five are tom of walk. It's just a kick acre cuisine. Could to serve democra- chris european malcolm dot com massacre And super attack my bhakta. The league belle pound. I love the minds found evil just wonderful spots if oh nouveau producer. Spirit said whenever say formats if calmly copeland apple dies on me the a mark. I'm so the fam- keep rooster while dope pass on liz off downscale. Vp conquer a nozzle bikes hotter yet. Dope person give the shows but panay ms similar p dishes the savasta savage Plant the kootenai against the for his social museum nesper. Pacifica defy fan cone factory the global and our cats in addition the performance. And the rest. Of the sixes. Not after the war. Just explain me them jobs. We have come up with a quantum abi of board. don't just get dot com. Donald took sa- salad come Less bengals facilitator. Some mr scuola. Paul son vie to see up. You don't don't the caribbean on the wii sipple. Total if die but access simba's school for dawn that built

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"bonanno" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"bonanno" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"I remember tuning in on that Saturday, seeing the images live, not believing what I was seeing yourself. It was just surreal. Here's the other thing about Nancy Pelosi morning 14,000 troops. You know to continue for six more months. That's just want really know it's ridiculous. Who the hell is she? Ridiculous. Who the hell is she requesting troops? She's not the commander in chief she wants. Where is the commander in chief on this good question. But she wants to keep the hate going and that that's what this is all about. This is not about safety. This is about continuing to fan the flames. But where is the commander in chief on this one? He hasn't said anything about this. As you know, he has something tells me he's gonna be very isolated. I don't want to yet. Well, he's of course he's having He's busy signing things to make him go away trump things to make him go away right now, Um I don't know how this you know. I don't know how I've never been in the military, so I don't have a good feel for how the deployment works. Since these Air National Guard from various states, Texas National Guard Oklahoma Bonanno turned on Is it up to each individual state to provide the infrastructure? I just assumed if you had a deployment This magnitude. It's a big deployment, especially for you know, non war situation. Really? I thought there'd be more infrastructure that came along with it. Tents, cots. They got hotel. But again, Todd, those help those hotel rooms and not across the street. I'm talking about available to them while they're doing there. Shift or whatever you wanna call it. Are you questioning the leadership of the guard? I'm not questioning. I just don't know. Sounds like you are. Sounds like you. Did they not have what they need. I don't have any suggestion. I mean, you have suggestions for our National guard, jesting. They they were not equipped to handle this The way I say I just I had I assumed that, along with the deployment would also come, uh, on infrastructure to support that, as far as sleeping quarter, you tense they can set tents up anywhere. S o. I was just thought that would be the deal that I think you're missing the forest for the trees. The real question is, why are they there? And why are they not back home with their families losing sight of that question, either, But they are they're so I'm asking. Why aren't they buy their own? Uh, you know, uh, support people. Why are they not being made more comfortable? Right. Well, they're not complaining about the comfort. Yeah. Right. I'll just drop that aspect of all right. Jump in here at 512836059. I don't know how that works. You could jump in as well. Any time you want. Yeah. Listen, some business news coming up next. You don't want to miss that at 512836059 Todd and don show Hey, I want to tell you about my friends it cleans owns. This company is starting to bring back employees into the office. I mean, you didn't think about the air in the office because it's shared by everyone, germs and bacteria and viral. This isn't all well, the engineers that claim zones. They have used decades of experience to create the world's on Li air filtration system and blocking system that captures and filters the air at the source. That's right in captures and filters it right where you call fix, you know, exhale or sneeze. Yeah, the clean zone panels. They create a 4 to 5. Different filtered air exchanges every single hour. So think about you know, if you got a restaurant, you got a lot of you guessed they come in. They're waiting in that waiting area for, you know, 10 2015 minutes waiting for the next table. And she would give them a peace of mind if they had. You know, we're able to see the clean zone panels right there in your face. Now, the claims on panels they feel to the air five times in a five stage filtration process. True happe and UBC attach is right to your desk. Very affordably right there to the front kiosk of Europe. Will your receptionist sets and you know we're very affordable to creating a barrier that would absorb the exhaled air And as she returned to work, let your employees know that you're concerned about what their breathing and your customers too. Claims owns and ensure that the air that they breathe is clean..

Air National Guard Todd National guard Nancy Pelosi Li air Texas National Guard Europe UBC Oklahoma Bonanno
Linda Bonanno And NPR discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:43 sec | 3 years ago

Linda Bonanno And NPR discussed on Morning Edition

"The placebo effect. It's when people who participate in clinical trials feel better after taking sugar pills, and it's pretty common. Researchers have asked whether doctors can use placebos as a tool to heal people. But there is an ethical hurdle. Most doctors believe placebos work only if patients think that they're getting actual medicine, if they're being deceived essentially, but there might be a fixed NPR's Shankar vay downtime has his story for a decade, Linda Bonanno organized her life around the inevitability of pain intestinal problems constantly interfered with daily routines. I couldn't even. Move. It was worse than labor pains. You better have a baby than what I

Linda Bonanno NPR