12 Burst results for "Bolt Beranek"

"bolt beranek" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right <hes>. So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays <hes>. And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain <hes>. He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here <hes>. So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay <noise> so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway <hes>. He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in <hes>. that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

mike explorer steve lauren julia wilson library Julia microsoft syracuse liverpool gene white house Steve vint cerf
The History of the Internet

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:06 min | 8 months ago

The History of the Internet

"To begin with we as a species. We've been trying to categorize an attain all the knowledge. We haven't to a database of sorts for a very long time right so for example in seventeen twenty. Eight ephraim champions globe maker publishes the cyclopes or a universal dictionary of arts and sciences. It is the earliest attempt to link by association all the articles in an encyclopedia or more generally all the components of human knowledge. He wrote in his preface quote this. We endeavored to attain by considering the several matters. E topics not only absolutely and independently as to what they are in themselves but also relatively or as they respect each other. So we've been thinking about like how to how to access knowledge how to obtain information and organize it in in a in a way so that more people can access it quicker classic enlightenment. Classic enlightenment am my right So in one thousand. Nine hundred belgian lawyers and bibliographer paul outlet and on revilla contain proposed a central repository for the world's knowledge organized by the universal decimal classification. It was called the mondays And it would eventually house. More than fifteen million index cards one hundred thousand files and millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas oh. I don't know maybe it was being at least that s something. Yeah or what. Does it come here. I need you. That's the one for the telephone log in. Yeah right fine. at least it's easy to remember. Yeah i message sent over. The internet is the message lock-in so sent over arpanet between the network node at ucla and a second one at sri. So leonard kline rock of ucla said at the ucla and they typed in the l. and asked sri by phone if they received it got the l. Came the voice reply. Ucla typed in the. Oh asked if they got it and received got the oh. ucla then typed in the g. And the darn system crashed boy the beginning on the second attempt. It worked fine so by the end of that year. Four host computers connected together in the initial arpanet so this was like the beginning of of the end. Basically

Paul Outlet Revilla Christopher Stray Wells Newman Inc Paul Baran Established Information Proces Donald Davies Oxford University Information Processing Techniq Unesco Derek Paris Baron Davies Bolt Beranek Defense Department Darpa Charlie Stanford Research Institute
"bolt beranek" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"And millions of images and in nineteen thirty four outlet further advanced his vision for the radiated library in which people worldwide will place telephone calls to his quote mechanical collective brain. And we'll get back information as tv signals. So this was a theory. This is something that they thought could get off the ground then in nineteen thirty six h. g. wells first predicts what's called the world brain He wrote the whole human memory can be and probably short time. We'll be made accessible to every individual time is close at hand when any student in any part of the world will be able to sit with his projector in his own study at his or her convenience to examine any book. any document in an exact replica. Study accurate it's pretty accurate so the world brain was to be a central repository of the world's knowledge organized by complex taxonomy invented by wells. So clearly there has been a precedent for desiring this kind of thing. So the concept of data communication or transmitting data between two different places through an electromagnetic medium such as radio or an electric wire predates the introduction of the first computers right. Such communication systems were typically limited to point to point communication between two end devices. Like semaphore lines are telegraph systems and telex machines so these can be considered early precursors to this kind of communication and the telegraph in the late. Nineteenth century was the first fully digital communication system. So that's just cool trivia fact it been a deeply so up until about nineteen sixty computers were huge unwieldy and self contained. You could use them as a tool. But you couldn't necessarily make them talk to each other or transmit information across any distances using them but there were a bunch of people working towards making that happen so a man named christopher stray cheesy who became the oxford university is first professor of computation filed a patent application for time sharing in february of nineteen fifty nine in june that year. He gave a paper called time sharing enlarge fast computers at the unesco information processing conference in paris where he passed the concept onto to lick lighter of mit like lighter vice president at both derek and newman inc and they discuss a computer network in his january. Nineteen sixty paper called man computer symbiosis so a quote from that is a network of computers connected to one another by wideband communication lines which provide the functions of present day libraries together with anticipated advances in information storage. And retrieval and other symbiotic functions. So super like great reading. You know just like pull it up right. Now read it. Yeah take it to the beach. You know something really exciting. So paul baran then publishes reliable digital communications systems using unreliable network repeater nodes the first of a series of papers that proposed the designed for distributed networks using packet switching. And we'll talk about that for a second. Method used to this day to transmit information over the internet and then a little later. Donald davies the. Uk's national physical laboratory or n. P. l. independently developed the same idea. So there's a little bit of like linear here So while baron used the term message blocks for his units of communication davies. Use the term packets so i was like what the hell is packet. Switching so packet switching is essentially and i. I used the the metaphor of of charlie and the chocolate factory. Ok you know mike. Tv how said the tv you're broken up into little pieces gets reassembled on the other side. That's basically what packet switching is with. Data the pieces get sent over in smaller pieces because they can travel over greater distances being smaller and then they get reassembled on the other side so that's packet switching s perfect. I'm gonna get a lot of emails. Okay so. Jc are lick lighter so jc are lick lighter. He was known as either. Jc are like friends. Call them lick several shame. I guess it's shorter than say j. C. r. guess so or just like yourself jim anyway He became the director of the newly-established information processing techniques office. Or the ipo within the us. Defense department's advanced research projects agency or darpa. So then robert. Taylor becomes the director of the information processing techniques office. Pto in nineteen sixty six and he intended to realize lighters idea of an interconnected networking system so he proposes to his boss the arpanet so the advanced research projects agency net which is a network that would connect the different projects that arpaio was sponsoring so a way to like keep everything together and at the time each project has its own specialized terminal and unique set of user commands so in order to talk to each terminal you had to physically go to the computer terminal that only spoke to that individual one so he was like what if we just had one computer that connected to everything and that was arpanet basically bam bam so there were like great. I love this. So they awarded. Arba awarded the contract to build this network to bolt beranek and newman or bbn technologies. And they're involved in the early stages of the internet in a major way and so all mentioned them like a bunch of times so the first arpanet link was established between the university of california los angeles and the stanford research institute at twenty to thirty hours on october. Twenty ninth nineteen. Sixty-nine the first message was the word log in that's boring. I know it's super boring computer guys. I was necessary to jump. It wasn't the first text message. Merry christmas.

wells christopher stray cheesy newman inc paul baran oxford university Donald davies national physical laboratory unesco mit derek paris baron davies charlie Defense department darpa Uk mike Pto arpaio
"bolt beranek" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

07:40 min | 10 months ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on American Innovations

"Your miles go further with the capital one venture card. The travelcard lets you earn unlimited double miles for more than just air travel right now earn one, hundred, thousand bonus miles. You can actually use redeemable for vacation rentals, car rentals, and more when you spend twenty thousand dollars in your first year what's in your Wallet Limited time offer terms apply see capital one dot com for details. A vast is a global leader in cybersecurity trusted by over four hundred and thirty, five, million users. AVAST premium security protects against all online threats, including viruses, spoofed websites, and ransomware. avast secure line VPN in crypts, your Internet connection no matter what Wifi. To giving you true online privacy, they've also got a vast breach guard which provides twenty four seven monitoring to protect your sensitive information from hackers plus removes your private data from databases of companies who sell it. Learn more about ass privacy security and performance products at. A. S T dot Com. From wondering I'm Steven Johnson and this is American in. This is the fifth episode in our series on the history of artificial intelligence passing for. Human. It's a special episode because it draws on many themes that I explore in my new book farsighted. The decisions that matter the most. As. We've seen over the previous four episodes. There's a long connection between a and gameplay most famously in the epic battles between Garry Kasparov and a series of digital challengers in the eighties and nineties even today is being advanced by gaming challenges. There's a new project supported by Elon Musk, that is training a is to compete at complex video games. But in the past few years, a decidedly last playful side of AI has entered the popular conversation, a set of real fears about what will happen if machines developed something resembling general intelligence. The ability to think reason communicate even create in genuinely open ended way instead of excelling at specialized tasks like playing chess or identifying faces in photographs. Like many important ideas in ai the notion of a machine capable of general intelligence has its roots back in the nineteen fifties in this case, with the writings of Alan Turing. The brilliant British mathematician who helped break the German enigma code during World War, two? In the first years after the war ended. Was One of the first pioneers to think about how a computer could be taught to play chess but he's even more famous for a test that he dreamed up for future artificially intelligent machines I formulated in nineteen fifty essay. Interns words a computer would deserve to be called intelligent if it could deceive a human into believing that it was a human. The deception of the turing test as it came to be called had nothing to do with physical appearances. The Classic Turing Test Scenario involves a human sitting at a keyboard engaged a text based conversation with an unknown entity. If human engaging in an open ended conversation couldn't tell whether they were talking to a human or machine than the I would pass the turing test. You might say that Elisa, the program that's so infuriated the VP trying to do a software demo passed a basic version of the turing test that day. It's an idea that is obsessed science fiction writers since touring I proposed it think of the contests in blade. For the AI replicates are so advanced that it requires careful inquisition to distinguish them from humans. You look down and you see a tortoise Leeann crawling. Know what a turtle is course. Same thing. The turing test has been an inspiration for generations of programmers in AI researchers, but it has also been a source of concern anxiety about our future about a world where computers developed truly lifelike qualities or where machines gets so smart that we began to Hanover decisions to them that previously belonged to experts and the highly educated doctors, judges, executives. That's what this episode will explore the danger that AI might someday pose a danger that we can already see the beginnings of in current technologies however playful, they might seem now. It's the same danger that was also alive in the minds of science fiction creators in the nineteen sixties in the nineteen seventies like skynet becoming self aware in the first Terminator movie or the Murderous Hal nine, thousand in two, thousand and one. Open the pod Bay doors. I'm sorry to. I'm afraid I can't do that. The program that's so confused VP at Bolt Beranek and Newman had been created a few years earlier by a computer scientist at the MIT artificial intelligence lab named Joseph Watson. Bomb. Emigrated from Nazi Germany and bomb had arrived in the United States. And played a role in inventing some of the first digital computers in the nineteen fifties. In, nineteen sixty four, he'd taken a job at Mit and shortly thereafter began designing clever and playful software program named after Eliza doolittle from pygmalion. My Fair Lady Elisa used some surprisingly simple software algorithms to create the illusion of conversing with an intelligent human one modeled after psychotherapist who only asked somewhat cryptic questions. You type A statement into Elisa and based loosely on what you'd said, the computer would answer back with a question. It's raining today. How does it make you feel that it's raining today The program had an uncanny impact on the first users who experienced it. This was the mid nineteen sixties after all Siri and Alexa where almost half a century away the fact that a machine could seemingly engaged in a tolerable text conversation at all was impressive. But what makes Elisa. Different is the way Weissenbach actually designed the program to play psychotherapist when a patient talks to Elisa, it uses pattern matching and substitution to give the person a belief that they are being heard and most importantly understood like this exchange between Elisa and a young woman experiencing depression. Men are all like. In what way always bugging us about something specific or other? Can you think of a specific example? Well, my boyfriend made me come here. Your boyfriend made you come here. He says, I'm depressed much of the time. I'm sorry to hear that you are depressed. It's true. I'm unhappy. Elisa simulates empathy listening by reiterating what is said, this provides the illusion of being heard when someone feels that they've been heard they feel connection even if they know the entity conversing with is a rudimentary piece of software. You can still look up Elisa computer therapist online today and have a conversation with. The, lies didn't have any real world value in terms of providing psychotherapy, but another specialized AI program attempted to bridge the gap..

Lady Elisa AI VP Elon Musk Garry Kasparov Eliza doolittle Steven Johnson pod Bay Alexa MIT United States pygmalion Siri Germany
"bolt beranek" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

03:51 min | 10 months ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on American Innovations

"Am on Saturday morning mid nineteen, sixty s at the offices of Bolt Beranek and Newman and early computer company in the Boston area. One of the company Vice President arrived early to do a demonstration of some new software running on a PCP won a state of the art microcomputer. When the VP sits down at the terminal, he finds a note taped to the monitor type all messages into this teletype and them with a period. The VP assumes that the computer has been connected to the home computer of a programmer named Daniel. Bobo who often log onto the DP one from his Home Office he thinks typing into the machine will be effectively starting what we would now call a text chat with his colleague Bob. How Do, you think I can use the computer this morning. Sure. Enough Bo brow answers. Why do you ask? I might be able to make some additional Telkom sales. Why aren't you? So sure my perspective customers have never seen a demonstration of the system. Does this mean very much to you. Of course it does. Seem very positive about that. Barbara's answers seem odd and the VP is losing patience fast how dare Bobo play these games with him when he has an important software demonstration to do This is ridiculous. What do you mean? This is ridiculous except it's not ridiculous. It's actually quite brilliant. The person VP is talking to isn't a real person at all. It's not bow brow who right now is asleep in bed it's a computer program called Elisa that's designed to simulate a real human conversation mostly by responding to everything with another question. Is there any reason why I can't use the computer now? Tell me more about your perspective customers his blood boiling the VP decides to take the conversation offline. He types please dial up on four, nine, one, one, eight, five. In typing the words, he doesn't leave a period at the end of the statement Elisa has been programmed not to answer until it sees that period and so the computer screen goes quiet just a blinking cursor the phone doesn't ring because of course, there's no human to dial it. The VP waits for Bo browse call drumming his fingers on the Desk Bobo is going to have hell to pay for this prank. Still, the phone and the screen are dead. Infuriated. The VP picks up the phone and calls Bobo home number instead. The. Young programmer is still asleep, and of course, knows nothing about the conversation that is just transpired between the VP and the software. But. He picks up the phone and before he can say anything the VP is shouting down the line. Why are you being so snotty to me Half Asleep lowbrow says exactly the wrong thing or maybe it's exactly the right thing. Or do you mean I'm being snobby to? Elisa was not much as software programs go a simple script. But it was a hint of future developments in ai developments that are now becoming increasingly part of our daily lives as our virtual assistance grow and conversational fluid. Human beings are easily fooled into perceiving ascension being behind the screen even if the being we were talking to an elementary software program like allies. The question is what will happen when we start trusting them enough to think of them as collaborators in some of our biggest.

VP Elisa Bobo Bo brow Bolt Beranek programmer company Vice President Boston Telkom Home Office Newman Daniel Barbara Bob
"bolt beranek" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Fact check with my soul mate. Monica Pad Man. I wish I could sign your yearbook. Would you've written pages? I pages people's yearbooks we would mark pages for people name Yup mine says saved for Aaron APP. Yeah really broke my heart. The seventh grade page that will save was a full-page so beautiful and then eighth grade the eighth grade. We were starting to break up. Aaron I it was not as yeah. It's was kind of heartbreaking of it all sad you probably don't go back and look at it very often so it's OK being funny. Yes it'd be joke about Aaron. I especially when we drank six nights a week. That yearbook was out. You read those we would get drunk and those yearbooks out and just read all the things from all the different people and look at kids from our class. We are obsessed with junior high. We love to relive it. That Yearbook Cowan I would do rough drafts. Yeah Oh wow I wanna read it. I think I have some of them here. I have been slowly trying to bring them over for my parents house. But there's so heavy those highschool ones are like. Oh fuck high school yeah. Those are two big. I never even got one. I don't own a single high school one like those. But that's where you're most popular most popular in junior high. You probably have your junior high. I love those are those are thin yellow one fifth. This is now the listener. I know that I like to have a mental image in my head when I'm listening to people talk and you're wearing this. Wonderful Palette of soft grey today top and bottom wearing a mickey mouse. Sure SURE NOT MINIATURE MOUSE BUT MICKEY MOUSE MINNIE mouse shirt. That's of my liking In the right Palette. Yeah in a good Pallet Palette. This one's nice light gray as you said in the Pants Mad. Yes incredible incredible. Well done thank you. Yeah now. I'm inclined to get out my yearbook. Oh what is the worst school pitcher you've ever had probably my eighth grade year one bad shaved head. Oh in acne in my nose. Starting to get back it was not. It really went downhill from seven hundred eighth grade from my cotton a nine to six now. I know I wasn't a nine eight to six. What's your worst year pitcher abuse a baby in the white dress? She looked pretty. Ugly accused three so cute. That's why I can make that joke. There's one year that I had a mushroom cut My mom made. Oh my God. My mom is cutting hair now. The quarantine is she cut my dad's hair and she was bragging about it. Oh and then. She cut her sister's hair and she is bragging about it so much. She uses watching youtube videos to learn layering. Layering Unquote normal. I have something more to bond about. Because we're both beauticians both love to cut hair. We both have the cut here by the way. Did you get any feedback from the today? Show that aired today today. Yes I did a very small thing on the today show and aired this morning so proud of you I said how excited are your parents that you're going to be on the today show and you said why didn't tell them. I said what is wrong with him too so I text your mother. Your baby daughter's going to be on the Today. And she's a jerk and your mom was appreciative. Yeah then she got mad at me. Good no not good. Look tell me you make me sound like a bra on here and now I'm self conscious about. I'm sorry that's a brassiness. I think that's insecurity. Yeah it is so it shouldn't be pinned as this thing. I did to them like I didn't do anything to them. It was a three minute thing on the today show on the today show. You're on television the today show being asked your opinion on stuff. That's so wonderful it is. I'm grateful for it. It's very nice but I didn't think I did a great job and I didn't really want to see it. Yeah I relate. I never invited anyone. I knew when I did stand up. People would come and I'd be mad right so relate okay. Yeah I'm with you. I'm on both sides on your mom's side in your side. I wasn't nervous and then as soon as we started. I got kind of nervous and then I felt surprised that I was Alva. Satcher that can take you by surprise. Yeah and then that I think that maybe a little more in my head or something so that I I was like Oh. This is knowing while 'cause I must be visibly nervous. Were you shook by the technical limitations of the experience? No it wasn't that like a delay thing like Oh fuck I can't just talk. No it wasn't that I think it was. Oh this is going to be more skill than I was expecting because it was short very short and I knew it was going to even get cut down even more and you know he was a pro crag crag was my interviewer crag was really charming and cool but but like he was moving really quick because he knew move queer. Yeah and I was like fuck like there's no time to like be cute. And chatty like I kinda have to get to the point but I still wanna be q yes so that you don't WanNa feel like a motoring through it exactly. It'll just telling 'cause I was giving my opinion of podcasts at listening to And there were different categories so I felt like yeah I don't want to just like be listing them and then saying one thing about why liked it like I wanted to give it all? Dan Layer. Yeah feels a little Improv. Exactly and so I got little my head that was happening and Anne Hill but a few people text this they had caught it. Oh Yeah do you remember. Last summer hosted the today show with Jenna Bush. There in that studio as the person getting asked the question several times. What a fucking experience. It is to be the other so I bet because I only had to worry about my segment but you had that experience. Twelve Times over the course of an hour where it's so accelerated. I've felt like real time. It took eleven minutes to record that our. Yeah so that was this morning. But in a saver for that or you're giving haircuts. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah and you love to give haircuts job given. I gave Erica Haircut. Yes Nice one. I'd say yeah you give Nice Haircut. This was very hard to cook so curly. I've never heard that curly. Oh and it's hard to pull it up to see the length because all the top pieces just curl over your fingers. It's really hard to get a sense. A man yeah. I bet on a woman. That's less of a problem because the hair's longer still as you're moving your hands down to pull it out. You want to see if there's any you want to be straight ish but it's just all folded or this pieces this long you'd have the right time with mine. Then no I can pull yourself really lazy. I know wave. He's fine. It's when it actually curls over sixty your fingertip I see you got to basically pulled each hair up. It's impossible. I bet my mom thinks she'd be able to handle it. She's very arrogant about hair. Cutting skills another I think about it. I guess the move would have been pull all the way up in the cut from the bottom which never done. But that actually is how I prob- anyways fuck now. I'm realizing how okay watch videos like. I am a skilled petition. Melissa Melissa so well this part is confusing. Because she wasn't recording at the very very buried top because we were just bantering but then she mentions pine Sol okay and just wanted people to know we were talking about her cleaning her bathroom with Pine Sol before we started. Okay that's the she brings up the bathroom cleaning pine Sol. It was in reference to something. We'd spoken about a call but earlier. It was a callback. Okay and then. She said when her dad her dad would wake up at five. And then tell Ron it was nine. Oh and then I just made me wonder like if you had your druthers. What time did you wake up the left to my own I would. I would go to sleep at one. Am and wake up at nine. That would be the perfect schedule for me. Well that's where like at one actually WanNa falsely and at nine. I WANNA get up like I'm ready to get up. Yeah like any other hours. I'm forcing myself to go to sleep. And I'm forcing myself to wake up. Yeah I see that. Oh we should say I'm not GonNa have to do that as much. Bless this mess got canceled today. So sorry feel sad for everyone. That's worked so hard on it over the last couple of years lake and Liz and the cast and it's a great show. It's a great show. It's really funny. I love watching the girls but I talked everyone. Everyone seemed pretty good about it. That's Garret. Yeah no one seems suicidal or anything. That's good I'm sad because it was funded. Go there and do fact checking off those kind of fun. It was fun. I'd always grab your cookie from those occur to. I'm sorry when in can build and all the time you're Georgia buddy that maybe he'll do another project with her home. Never know She she said email was kinda relatively new and she was up groundlings. So I'm going to give you a time line about email K. organ away okay. Nineteen seventy-one oh Jesus Okay Ray. Tomlinson computer engineer working for Bolt Beranek and Newman in Cambridge Massachusetts developed system for sending messages between computers that use the at symbol to identify addresses. He now can't remember the first message. He said or the exact date he sent it. Tomlin system gained popularity by linking up users on arpanet the US Department of Defense System that became the basis for the Internet. Okay so that's nineteen seventy-one who would mean Barnea now nineteen seventy-two Larry Roberts. Also at work on arpanet writes the first email management program that develops the ability to list.

Aaron Pine Sol youtube Anne Hill Alva Erica Haircut Georgia Melissa Melissa Jenna Bush Dan Layer Ray Tomlin US Department of Defense Syste Barnea Tomlinson
"bolt beranek" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on Security Now

"They also said similarly in two thousand eight a Pakistani ISP attempted to use a BGP route to block package deliberately attempted to use a BGP route to block Pakistani users from visiting Youtube the ISP then accidentally advertised these routes with its neighboring autonomous systems and the route quickly spread across the Internet's BGP NETWORK. This route send users trying to access youtube to a dead end which resulted in Youtube being inaccessible for several hours so the idea there was. Pakistan was trying to do and do internal BGP so that to be essentially no route the network which was actually owned by Youtube sending it to some dead. I P when that escaped. They know routed youtube for not just for Pakistan but for the Internet whoops so that needed to get fixed then then they said there are examples of a practice called this. I'm still quoting from cloudflare. There are examples of a practice called. Bgp hijacking and it isn't always accidental. In April Twenty. Eighteen attackers deliberately created bad. Bgp routes to redirect traffic that was meant for Amazon's DNS service. The attackers were able to steal over one hundred thousand dollars worth of cryptocurrency by redirecting this traffic to themselves. They said they finish incidents. Like these can happen because the route sharing function of BGP relies on trust and autonomous systems implicitly. Trust the routes that are shared with them while there have been a number of ambitious proposals intended to make. Bgp More secure. These are hard to implement because they would require every autonomous system to simultaneously update their behavior since this would require the coordination of hundreds of thousands of organizations and potentially result in a temporary take down of the entire Internet. It seems unlikely that any of these major proposals we put in place anytime soon. Well the company known as bbn technologies. Leo You'll remember. Bbn INVENTED THE INTERNET. Oprah's original exactly. They were originally. Bolt Beranek and Newman one of the earliest and key participants in the creation of the Internet All major players on the Internet. Who obtain their own permanent allocation of IP addresses? As I'd mentioned like all of the early Internet originators had autonomous system numbers. Bbn's number one number. One oh I like it. Who'd they came up with a Thomas? Better was the guys that gave himself the first one and bb 'em Abebe an employee by the name of Ray. Tomlinson is credited with the invention of Internet email. He's the guy who chose the at Sei As the separator between an account and they mail domain name so my point is we old-timers all no bolt Beranek and Newman which has now changed his name to bbn technology eight years ago in February of Twenty twelve R F C sixty four eighty was published by two guys at bbn technologies that RFC is titled An infrastructure to Support Secure Internet routing the RFC's abstract reads. This document describes an architecture for an infrastructure to support improved security of Internet routing. The foundation of this architecture is a resource public key infrastructure are PKI that represents the allocation hierarchy of Ip address space an autonomous system numbers and the distributed repository system for storing and disseminating the data objects that comprise the our PK. I as well as other signed objects necessary for improved routing security as an initial application of this architecture the document describes how a legitimate holder of IP address space can explicitly and verifiably authorize one or more a S.'s. Autonomous Systems to originate routes.

bbn technologies Youtube Bolt Beranek Pakistan bbn technology Tomlinson Newman cloudflare Thomas RFC Amazon Oprah Leo Abebe Ray
"bolt beranek" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

14:23 min | 1 year ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"To stay. Stay healthy we love you. Ooh Well if I die. It's I died in a good cause. Are you making money for twit? Because you Diphu. Let's see what else. What else do you WanNa Talk? Please don't say air pods late campaign. Steve. Jobs would have been sixty five yesterday. Retirement age for him now. It doesn't feel like Steve would've ever retire exactly. Yeah I wonder I wonder though if he if he just had that really. Excuse me as an outside observer whose only met him once like if it's interesting to think what he would have done if he was if he had remained in perfect health if he were restless enough that he would have retired from apple but moved onto something else. That's interesting to think of what he coulda done. Even privately in philanthropy It's it's I interested by what you would apple. But what he would do the rest of the marine his wife is actually doing a lot of philanthropy. Yeah with his estate. So yeah that's an interesting question but I think you know he's huge guy though right. I don't know if he could have like Bill Gates Bill Gates who is power software. He's done amazing things but just to walk away from Microsoft some founders never leave no I know doug I read it to bill's wife Melinda who Early on convinced him to create the Gates Foundation and I think he's helped guide him in a very positive way absolutely and so I think we would have done the same thing for Steve to be honest. She's always been very politically aware. That that that loops back to what? We're talking about earlier that I think that a lot of people myself included. If if if we had the kind of wealth a we fantasize about that kind of wealth. The fantasy is not on. Okay you go nuts for maybe about a year And you have you you you have silvester stallone singing singing your birthday party all that sort of stuff but but the ability to simply say oh. Here's a here's a here's an organization that says we could radically eight. This disease for eighty million dollars. Okay right you check done. Put your money where your mouth is or all the way down to there. There's there's a under the under funding for school lunch program. So we'll guess what congratulations for the next ten years. At least all school lunches at your school are free and don't put my name on anything. That's that's what impresses me about certain when people achieve a certain area of wealth where it's not like Gee I can essentially by this by this golf and the small town next to it and turnage private estate like it's that's that's one of the things that's so admirable about what Bill Gates and others do with their money because that was literally with the Gates Foundation. Literally it's like. Hey what really. You're saying that we could absolutely a radical a radical polio and certain kinds of blindness blindness by just writing a check. I have a check but I do wonder if like in the back of their mind like bill still doing everything that he did for charity but in the back of his mind going well if it had. If I hadn't let Steve Take over maybe we wouldn't have lost mobile or a Steve. Jobs did the same thing you would have said. Oh my home. Pod would've sold a billion units in the first year just those sorts of for separating pots. The Guy who was on the XEROX PARC team that showed Steve Jobs. The Xerox graphical interface the menus. The mouse and inspired jobs to create the Macintosh has passed away. Larry Tessler He joined apple shortly after that. In nineteen eighty worked through a nineteen ninety seven as an apple of vice president passed away Monday at the age of seventy four. A couple of things Tessler was well known for one. His license plate said no modes in the early days of apple this part of the user interface guidelines. And of course Larry was a US. You I guy And one of the things apple really didn't want was modes In computing you know with with a command line computing. It's all mode. You're doing what you're doing and then you do something else But once you got windows there was kind of a debate And other a lot of what we call modal dialogs were boxes of popped up in. Wouldn't let you do anything else till you click the link. Larry said no no. No there shouldn't be any modes you should be able to. You know move around inbetween windows at your will and do whatever you want. You should never be locked into something By the way I th while he won that battle. I don't know if he won the war. Because the IPAD is famously modal. Remember those Itunes pop-ups yeah and there are some things that have to be mobile but I I was always impressed and I talked a lot about That in the early days of the Macintosh she idea of no modes. He also created something that we use every single day. Probably every hour cut copy and paste. He invented the idea and thank goodness he. He converted the idea from print. Because what print did was. You'd see it wasn't cut copy and paste but it was cut and paste. You would cut something actually out and pasted over some. I remember You know really on learning about writing and I can't remember if I think it might have been strunk and white or Carson probably remembers. That was the advice you know to. As after you've written something cut out aircrafts and move them around and pays them in different places literally cutting and pasting with the wheat paste He of course did it was command. C Command V. and necks. But just think about how. It's it's very easy for us to understand that concept because it's part of our vocabulary now but imagine when you have the physical thing of physically cutting things from one to another thinking that we want that that would be an interesting thing to implement somehow digitally at a time when graphic user interfaces are wow look how look how accomplish we what we are getting back to having a mouse move cursor ben pulling a drop down menu It's a IT'S A. It was a mind busting thing when the when it first appeared on a mainstream computer. And it's amazing to think about someone who can create something from zero to just imagine this thing existing without something else to refer to in the tech world because of it that's it I will never downplay that and because That a special kind of brain as a special kind of imagination. It was probably zero. I'm thinking it was his your star That they were shown which was very early It was considered office productivity tool. I think cut copy paste really misses the real point. It's the clipboard. That's the brilliant invention the notion that you have the storage the you don't see that you can put something onto and retrieve it from later is really the the kind of seminal event. Like he was so good at making technology. Human relatable where it's come from the fact that I mean every day now I go. I can copy something on my computer. And then pasted on. My iphone is my all my devices on just kind of like. Isn't that amazing amaz virtual? I still have not gotten over it. Where every time I is between devices. I'm like this is yeah. I use it all day every day. Yep So thank you Larry. Tessler really one of the great minds At apple a guy who was very influential and and what happened with the Macintosh He worked on the Lisa as well. Yeah Yeah Also as long as we're talking past things I mentioned this on a Sunday What's is it Evans. Sutherland passed away. And He's another He was an internet. Pioneer Probably less connected with Apple. He worked at Bolt Beranek. And Newman when the Original Internet was reopened net I'm going to pull up his obituary. 'cause I'm doing a terrible but looking that up this is this is what I'm on about about wishing that apple the document itself. It's history a lot or because We need all of these pioneers to tell their stories and get those stories down because it will history can forget that there was a person who saw cut copy and paste as the Fulcrum of pretty much everything that was going to be coming in the next ten years. It wasn't just something that someone noticed. someone scientists noticed a bird cut copying and pasting in nature and decided to duplicate that and without without that sort of history being recorded with that first person testimony being saved we forget how to innovate. We forget how to develop products and we create wrong expectations for exactly how hard it is to. Really push the needle When it comes to developing a products one advantage. I have been around a long time now and I remember these guys. Remember these names and I remember those stages and I remember you know going from a Z. Eighty running Running CPM TO MS. Toss and I remember when they added layers. Photoshop and I was like what to do with this. Think about it for a little while I was like layers and David Edney. Who's Early trainers and Bert Monroy. They had A. They had a class in South San Francisco on the new Photoshop and how to take advantage of layers and berms showing we talked about that and But but it was. It was what was passing. I had to go to a class to make sure I understood how to take advantage of it because I was when I saw it. I was like I don't know what I would do. It was a brilliant insight. Actually yeah so it's Bert Sutherland. Ivan Sutherland's brother Ivan said very well known for graphics. Burt was American computer scientist. He passed away on the eighteenth he was at Sun. He was at park and he was at. Bbn and helped develop the Internet he also was participating in the creation of the personal computer. Microprocessors Small Talk Java and the Internet little bit little. Eat it a little bit of stuff so I also worth pointing I if you go to the Computer History Museum They they have a bunch of Texas. They've also been putting up videos and they have long multiparty interviews with Scott forrestal and a lot of the old apple engineers just talking about all of this stuff and everything. That apple has been preserved. They've been doing an amazing job of getting those people in there and recording them and and just hand folklore dot org Andy Hertzfeld money Keep four dot Org Current CASSATT was a great repository and still up of Very useful original Macintosh stuff. I don't know if there's been anything recently posted there but if you want to read the Lore of the original Macintosh Andy Hertzfeld one of the original MAC teams But you can hear like for example Scott forstall saying well the secret origin. The iphone is that Lorraine had this friend who worked at Microsoft and he came over to dinner and he's like we have this tablets going. Just destroy you. Steve got so angry member that yes working yeah anyway so a couple of legends Very important people in the computer industry also If you saw the movie. The Great Movie Hidden Figures. Kathy Johnson was the mathematician who helped Apollo get to the Moon Passed away this week at the age of one hundred and one. What a great lead. They said they asked her for the moon and she gave it to them. Yep Wow wow very impressive. The calculator Interesting study we talked about this earlier on IOS. Today of smart speakers. These SMART SPEAKERS. Study from northeast you Northeastern University Imperial College of London They took all the smart speakers. Including Apple's home pod the Google devices the echo devices the CORTANA devices and made them watch. Tv One hundred twenty five hours of net flicks content with cameras pointed at them to see when they activated accidentally. There's the there's the tests up they did. They did a similar study recently. I think the same led to the similar study on asking the same question about smartphones By isolating them from all other distractions and seeing if if they were collecting information. Strictly the microphones and they and they came to the same conclusions that it's just not happening That the the the here the findings so I I the the question. Everyone's worried about There is no evidence. There were constantly recording. They do wake up frequently but short enter for short intervals. How often do they activate the average rate of activation is between one and a half and nineteen times a day during our experiments home pods and Cortana 's activate the most followed by ECHO DOTS? Google home mini dot series. Three the majority. This is the weird one and I think though anybody who has one of these devices in their living room knows this they don't occur consistently so they did this twelve times and only eight percent of the activation happened every time at least seventy five percent of it's so maddening yeah They do sometimes they activate for the strangers wake words sometimes they don't activate for their own wake words. Yup Are there any? Tv shows that do not cause activation. No all shows 'cause at least one device to wake up at least once. Some races are really smart though than they were just behaving test. The Gilmore Girls in the office are were the worst. They're responsible for the majority of activation because they have a lot of dialogue. There's one eight they say anything to a lot In most cases the activation aren't long enough to save sensitive audio echo dot to and.

apple Steve Bill Gates Larry Tessler XEROX Gates Foundation Bert Sutherland Microsoft Steve Jobs silvester stallone polio Computer History Museum Andy Hertzfeld Steve Take Tessler Bert Monroy US Google
"bolt beranek" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

10:07 min | 1 year ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Is not affect your GonNa Break Right Audie news reports we the Tech News? So you don't have to. Thanks so much to Mica Sergeant for filling in for me on the Windows Weekly and to Jason Hal for hosting this week in Google. I was gone on Wednesday and I appreciate it guys. I promise not to get corona virus. I'll be back next week. It's a promise you can't guarantee their buddy I've excellent immune system and I'm going to wear I'm telling you full body armor so Sad story but I wanted to make sure you all knew that Larry Tessler who you may not recognize his name but was a very important person in the computers that we use today he was at Xerox Parc. The Palo Alto Research Center. When Steve Jobs and apple employees very famously came to visit and find out about parks windowed Menu Guru we computing Tessler was actually offered later a job at apple where his dodge valiant bore customized license plate saying no modes. He was very famous in a really very influential apple for eliminating modes modes the idea of a mode. If you've ever used the I for instance is that he you know you're in VI you're either in the edit mode or the or the command mode you can't do both The idea of modes is built into DOS computing command line based computing. Do One thing in time. But with these new gooey computing. He was really interested in eliminating modes and apple was early on very much about motiveless computers. Kind of funny. Because we're going back to modes a little bit the way the IPAD works for instance. You're full screen. You're doing what you're doing And you have to switch to another screen if you want to do anything else he was. Vp of Apple Net and apple's advanced technology group at he played a role in the development of products ranging from the Lisa to the Newton. And maybe his most important invention was cut copy and paste without Larry Tessler. We'd have to call him something else. I think we would have come up with that some time eventually. He he's the guy who is credited with cut copy and paste. Larry Tessler passed away this week. At the age of Seventy Four. Another big name in In computing but the name. You may not recognize Bert Sutherland. Also passed away this week. He was computer. Scientist longtime manager of the Sun Microsystem Labs System Science Laboratory at Xerox Parc and the Computer Science Division of Bolt Beranek and Newman wear. He helped develop what was eventually to become the Internet. He participated in creation of the personal computer. Microprocessors Small Talk Java and the Internet. It's kind of amazing. These guys who were at the in the early days of this stuff how much they could influence His brother Ivan Sabbath Sutherland car. Ra- mead and Lynn Conway Developed V. L sl very large scale Integrated Circuits at the California Institute of Technology. Pretty cool so Another farewell to Bert Sutherland. Legend in computing. He was eighty-three passed away in his mountain view home. I don't like to end on a sad note. Let me think of something fun. How about forty years of Photoshop? Thirty years of Photoshop and In order to brought us the deep say the face shop. We wouldn't be where we are today with. Deep Aches new. I pay come into Photoshop. Photoshop one point Oh came out February. Nineteenth nineteen ninety on MAC system six. That'S A to even run on system. Six is an amazing achievement. I mean there was no memory management or barely any it was the first Mac. Os Iran really. Yeah you were eight years old at the time. Ten Ten close so I'm older than Photoshop. Barely happy anniversary thirty years of Photoshop. That's that's pretty cool. I just saw this. Hot Wheels are C. Cerebral. I thought you'd like this one. Do you want this? There is now a mini Tesla's even as the broken the one. It's four hundred dollars. Well yes it's a collector's item cheaper than an actual Tesla's I. I can preorder Tesla for one hundred dollars. I got a car. It's a remote control vehicle. One tenth assizes not made a metal. It's made of plastic. Yeah that's a little feels like. That's a little there. I mean to two hundred two fifty. Maybe four hundred like this well. There's one six four. That's twenty bucks though tiny we give her for twenty so hot. Wheels is still a thing. That's pretty cool. Hot Wheels this forever. A thing I always wanted to hot wheels when I was a kid there definitely in the collector's market. Now though lot of the things you say come out are. Sorta special exclusive to a certain brand. They do a lot of license of cars and stuff. So there's a lot of adults are my old ones worth anything then. My parents added especially at a toy store. Not that long toy store. That advantage defender some of those old hot wheels in terrible condition are worth fifty sixty seventy in good condition hundreds this rudy. I got it gives me Lori. What are you doing? Those hot wheels aren't worth anything and if you want to send them to pay shipping package. I I couldn't imagine you get in two to three cents for those things. I mean if you WANNA get rid of their clutter in the life hot whereas a lot. I'm GONNA do favor all set. I'll give you a buck arrogant. Laura you're killing me Oh. Jj Stone even though he looks like Papa smart is not gonNa miss a trick on this one. Thank you for joining us as always. It's a pleasure. I Q Z. Dot Com his raising injure podcast with his daughters. So good doing Kinsey textile. Bardo be live. It will be as good as this but I try my best sometimes to talk tech and I'm coming out there in April but now I'm scared I was gonNA come hang out. Do some shows live with the now. I'm thinking of saving cement tease for you know. See I GOTTA. I want to smell like Lysol than we could do. This is what if we're youtubers we could like Both have a mint tea and see you could talk. I think it'd be fun. We're GONNA be talking all week long. Challenge thank you always a pleasure to see you. Thanks to to Laura Gill. Who's doing double duty? She's going to be back on Tuesday for Mac break weekly. She sings for sick burn. She is managing editor at. I'm more DOT COM and on the renaissance significant of other has these softest hands using working retired liking sponsorship. Do we get did that. Make it into the show Carson on Tuesday. We're talking about no moisturizing. Some reason I don't but ever since I've been using helping hands. Can you tell how great you are using Nice right? Yeah Yeah thank you Laura Gill Dan more and I hope we didn't scare you. Come back soon be my pleasure I can. I can take up changed my book because I'm a I'm an author as well by Yes Oh my most. Recent book the Bayern Agenda which is a science fiction. Spy Novel came out last year at the sequel to it comes out in. May preorder open now on Amazon. All fine bookstores From around the world. So if you're interested and you also have the Caledonian gambit that was my first novel from two thousand seventeen so and they make a nice little gift package. The BEIRNE agenda is book one in Need Galactic Cold War Saga So they'll be more and more hopefully more to come number twos out in May so wait. How is it writing you liked you like write novels? I love write wanted to do for my entire life so I'm glad I get a chance to do it. It's hard work. I'll tell you that it's kind of a little bit of high caste. Yeah I work at home. You know in all my work as a little solitaire. I enjoyed the pike casting. Because it's like the only time I talk to people all day. Yeah I usually ill Also regular on the incomparable. Jason Smells podcast. He writes for the six color. Dot Com he and Mica do clockwise You also do the rebound unrelated. Fm and the NERDY game show inconceivable. I hope you say like that. Oh indeed thank you so much great to have you inconceivable. That word means what you think. It means we do this week in tech Sunday afternoons to Thirty Pacific Five Thirty Eastern Twenty to thirty. Ut See it's always a lot of fun you can watch us to it live. There's a few ways as I mentioned. We have a studio that's open to all. Our studio audience is always Very welcome if you WANNA be here on a Sunday afternoon..

apple Larry Tessler Bert Sutherland Jason Hal Palo Alto Research Center Tessler Xerox Parc Steve Jobs Tesla Windows Weekly Google Photoshop Iran Ivan Sabbath DOT COM
"bolt beranek" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on TechStuff

"Weren't natively designed to support multiple users, they were work, arounds, and MIT computer scientists found manufacturers were uninterested in changing that because there seemed to be very little call for it on July first nineteen sixty three MIT launched a project originally called mathematics and computation or MAC. But later, the acronym would be retroactively applied to the phrase multiple access computer funding for the project came courtesy of Arpaio, which would later, get its own acronym update to DARPA. And in case you are unfamiliar with that organization. It's a division within the United States Department of defense and its mission is to fund research and development into technologies that contribute to the defense of the. Country in some way. So why was the department of defense interested in this it largely had to do with Russia and Sputnik? Now talked about house, but Nick helped spur on a ton of innovation in the United States. It scared the daylights out of people in the US. It's adjusted that Russia was much further along technologically speaking than the US had suspected, and it lit a fire under the proverbial backside of the US military, and so there was a strong incentive to advance computer science and technology in the US to outpace, the Russians project, max primary purpose was to advance computer science, in several ways, including the development of new operating systems and computational theory, it largely grew out of a meeting between MIT professor Robert Fano and Joseph c r lick lighter who had previously established a psychology group in the electrical engineering department of MIT, then gone on to join a research firm called. Bolt Beranek and Newman better known as BBN and then was named the first director of Arcus information processing techniques office, or IP, t oh lick lighter. Convinced Vano to head up project MAC which would receive funding from the IP T O through Arba, but standing in the way of this goal where the limitations I've mentioned already it's hard to make real progress. If you're limited to just one person working.

United States Department of de United States MIT Russia DARPA Arpaio Bolt Beranek BBN Robert Fano Vano Arcus Nick director Newman professor Joseph c
"bolt beranek" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on Triangulation

"Sure sure to excite all those nerves among us. You could almost afford this. And I can hear my girlfriend now is I get excited. She goes next. Okay. Okay. More fascinating fine inside voice, again, the wiring and again hand wired. You know, this is this is before the days of printed circuits. Yeah. And you had to really get to know what you were doing the paints taking effort that went into this. Here's the control data CDC sixty six hundred that is a very nice choice on your part. I mean this. It's a human. Yes. That's exactly what I was. This is a great image. That's also behind that. Computer was Mr. Cray. He was a big part of that. He went on to bigger and better things young guy at the time Seymour Cray. Course later started the super now see that way of switches that's called a dead start board. And and you know, what I this is what I look like before caught the dead start. Yeah. I know what you do with this. Now, somebody look at that picture. I couldn't touch anything because it's. Can't change which is right. But somebody looked at it and pointed out, and I can't remember what he said he goes when he looked at the phone. He goes, that's which is wrong. Got a bug. Right. No. He actually knew the coordinator reason is you couldn't use these computers until you loaded in by hand, using switches, the loader loader program that had to be hand programmed in because ram didn't get saved. And then once the loader program was loaded. You could read the paper tape or the punch cards of the magnetic tape too low the operating system, but humans had to hand enter these and people did it so often they had it memorized. You your friend obviously knew and and just fake he memorized that probably forgot his kids birth. Hey. That should be down somebody's been messing with this. Yeah. Low any paper tape today. Could you imagine the kids coming in on the weekend? What's this for death? This is the latest hairstyle with all the kids today. Wow. Look at that. You would think that that's a bad job? Right. John. We we use. This is what the back of our rack you still look like. But in fact, you really isn't any choice. That's how it has to look I guess that's the top of my head with. Here's some of the actual lists, which is on the dead start. Wow. This is a CDC sixty six hundred. Here's a IMP now. This is an important, computer. Yes. And that was the star of the Arpanet, which was the predecessor to the internet. And I the first message set on the internet was low low because they were trying to type in log on in assistant crap. You know, what low is a little more biblical and right on I told Ye my works. I thought it should've said yo that. That was before that time low is nice low. But I just love the first thing they start off it crashed. And like nothing's changed the first the early internet. This was a connection between IMP processors designed by bolt Beranek and Newman you see the BBN logo there. This is something this this was really fairly important to see this computer, the first packet router for Arpanet the predecessor, and this is this is what J C R lick lighter. When you when you read the story of the early days of the internet. This is what they were talking about these improprieties in Boston and Stanford, and I just want to point out being the California. And I am it was on California's from SRI or so for research tease CLA so gay California. Wow. It this machine. Ten by the way, case, you're mapping out the early days of the internet collect the mall. Like ten we've actually we've seen and Steve has shown it the hand-drawn map of the first Arpanet and one of these in there and probably number ten look for number ten. We'll you could figure out where it was located. Wow. That is something. This is they called this a kitchen computer, really, really the Honeywell h three cents. Hype thing Neiman, Marcus. This is in the Neiman Marcus catalog. They would not one no marketing was beautiful wasn't a bad deal. It was only ten grand. You got four K memory. Yeah. You had to hand enter your.

CDC California Seymour Cray Neiman Marcus Neiman Honeywell Mr. Cray IMP coordinator Boston BBN ram John SRI Beranek Steve Stanford
"bolt beranek" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"bolt beranek" Discussed on American Innovations

"It's nine AM on a Saturday morning in the mid nineteen sixties at the offices of bolt Beranek and Newman, and early computer company in the Boston area. One of the company vice presidents has arrived early to do a demonstration of some new software running on a PD p. one a state of the art microcomputer when the VP sits down at the terminal, he finds a note taped to the monitor type all messages into this teletype and them with a period. The VP assumes that the computer has been connected to the home. Computer programmer named Daniel Bo brow who often log onto the PDP one from his home office. He thinks typing into the machine will be affectively starting what we would now call a text chat with his colleague Bobo. Do you think I can use the computer this morning? Sure. Enough bo- brow answers. Why do you ask I might be able to make some additional Telkom sales. Why aren't you so sure. My perspective customers have never seen a demonstration of the system. Does this mean very much to you? Of course it does seem very positive about that. Bogota's answers seem odd, and the VP is losing patience fast. How dare brow play these games with him when he has an important software demonstration to do? This is ridiculous. What do you mean? This is ridiculous except it's not ridiculous. It's actually quite brilliant. The person VP is talking to isn't a real person at all. It's not bo- bro- who right now is asleep in bed. It's a computer program called Elisa that's designed to simulate a real human conversation mostly by responding to everything with another question, is there any reason why I can't use the computer now, tell me more about your perspective customers, his blood, boiling the VP decides to take the conversation offline. He types Cleese dial me up on four, nine one one, eight, five in typing the words. He doesn't leave a period at the end of the statement. Elisa has been programmed not to answer until it sees that period. And so the computer screen goes quiet. Just a blinking cursor. The phone doesn't ring because of course there's no human to dial it. The VP. Waits for Bobrov call drumming. His fingers on the desk Bobo is going to have hell to pay for this prank. Still the phone and the screen are dead infuriated. The VP picks up the phone and calls home number. Instead, the young programmer is still asleep, and of course knows nothing about the conversation that is just transpired between the VP and the suffer. But he picks up the phone and before he can say anything, the VP is shouting down the line. Why are you being so snotty? To me half asleep Bobo says exactly the wrong thing, or maybe it's exactly the right thing. You mean I'm being snotty. Elisa was not much as software programs go a simple script really. But it was a hint of future developments in developments that are now becoming increasingly part of our daily lives as our virtual assistance grow and conversational fluid. Human beings are easily fooled into perceiving ascension being behind the screen. Even if the being we're talking to is an elementary software program like allies. The question is, what will happen where we start trusting them enough to think of them as collaborators in some of our biggest decisions or even begin to think of them as friends. American innovations is pleased to have soup recruiter as it's presenting, sponsor their job sites that send you tons of the wrong resumes to sort through. That's not smart. Neither is hiring without the help of artificial intelligence, but you know, what is smart going to ZipRecruiter dot com slash AI to hire the right person. ZipRecruiter doesn't depend on candidates finding you. It finds them for you, sip recruiter's, powerful matching technology scans, thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills, education and experience for your job and actively invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast. That's why ZipRecruiter is rated number one by employers in the US based on the hiring sites on trust pilot with over one thousand reviews right now, you can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address, supercrew dot com. Slash AI. That's ZipRecruiter, dot com. Slash AI,

VP Bobo Elisa Daniel Bo ZipRecruiter Newman Boston Beranek Telkom Bogota US programmer Bobrov Cleese