35 Burst results for "Bola"

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

06:08 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"I'm going to meet a friend for coffee. And her phone was broken. So we had to do a real 90s style, like meet me here at this time, right? It's kind of refreshing. Nostalgic. Very nostalgic. What I also realized was with that nostalgia, come complications. It's like, oh man, technology has taken a lot of away from us, but it's given us a lot as well. That is not the point of this petty peeve. So I'm going to meet her for coffee. We had to do it 90s style, set it up. That's cool. But the challenge is that arose were where my petty peeve comes in. So a trip that should have taken me 18 minutes to get to in an Uber took me one hour and about 12 minutes. A trip that should have been maybe a 20 $6 Uber ride turned into a 90 dollar Uber ride. Excuse me, lift, because the Brooklyn marathon. So we're driving and for whatever reason it is so almost impossible to cross over empire. And so I'm like, what is happening right now? You can't go down Washington, you can't go down flatbush, and every trick that I'm thinking of to tell this man, I'm like, okay, well, we're going to go straight and then we're going to go around the park, and we're going to come up this way. Block. Everything was blocked. And or gridlocked. So we're like, what is happening? I had to drive all the way down to east New York, come up, you to go around, but it was come to find out it was because of the Brooklyn marathon. I learned that when I was one hour and 12 minutes late for meeting my homegirl, and I'm standing outside the coffee shop and I'm like, a phone's broken. I am one hour and 12 minutes late. I too would probably leave. Right. So I stuck around for a minute, like, tried to see if I could find her in some general locations. I couldn't. I pretty much figured it was what it was, but I had to at least give it a good effort because I'm the late one. And you know me, I know y'all joking caught me Lauryn Hill, but I'm never one hour and 12 minutes late to meet anybody. I think that's disgusting. And consider it nasty. It's so I would never ever do that or intentionally. It just made it worse that I couldn't. Because at least if a phone wasn't broken, which that's out of anybody's control, but if it was and I could have at least been like, I don't know what's going on, but I'm stuck. You have the option of going home or doing whatever you want to do. But because we couldn't, she's just literally waiting there for me with her child. And she ended up leaving 15 minutes before. I got there, which I could not blame her. For doing. But my petty peev is for the Brooklyn marathon. How I discovered that it even happened is because we're sitting here trying to figure out why traffic is the way that it is. And still didn't figure it out, even after he dropped me off. And then I'm standing outside the coffee shop and some people walk by with their medals. Around their neck. And I said, that's what the fuck? Did this? Well, I don't understand. You all could have done. Why wasn't there some sort of notice? I'm gonna say there was no form of notice for the residents of the borough of Brooklyn that this was. I'm like, what y'all want us to if you want us to all the Washington New York one? Like that's what you want us to do. That's what we have to do in order to find out that there's a marathon. Like please give me something modern nigga, you all put out Apple. You all do that shit for less, and then everybody's in the fucking target and their phones are going off. Yes. Those. Yes. But what I'm saying is there's got to be a lower grade version. Maybe a less traumatic sound, maybe a sound that doesn't alarm us as much, but lets us know there is something that's going to be quite impactful. You know what I'm just something just something nigga like, I can't just be traffic alert planning for a regular Saturday and then it cost me $90, which was a complete, I didn't even meet her. It was $90 in an hour and a half of my time. Wasted. It's pretty difficult. Oh God. Refresh trading. My petty P is much more petty. And a lot, I mean, it's just very straightforward. I don't have, I don't have a build up here. So it's been brought to my attention that pat Houston. I believe, because of Satan. Of Whitney Houston. I'm sorry, yes. I'm Whitney Houston. I'm sorry. 'cause pat Houston is an evil. But I mean, announced that there's they're making yet another Whitney Houston. Don't say a movie. Movie. Let the movie poster today. The movie is starring an actress by the name of Naomi ecki, Aki. And the title of the film is called I want to dance with somebody. Oh God. It says it says the poster says coming soon. Spell her last name? Who? Naomi? A, CIE. The posters on pat Houston Instagram page, and I saw it floating around Twitter earlier today. There's no caption and there's no other details around where this will be released. I just would like for y'all to let my.

Brooklyn Lauryn Hill Washington pat Houston New York Apple Houston Naomi ecki Whitney Houston Whitney Satan Aki Naomi Twitter
"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

06:26 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"Y'all, in the spirit of self care, mine is very straight to the point. And honestly, I feel like I might have already highlighted this particular activity or behavior as a self care. But just act like you've never heard me say it. And so, okay. I went to the doctor today. I had a 6 month checkup with my rheumatologist. And I talked a little bit more about that during the pre show if you're interested in checking that out. But I will say this upon arriving and getting checked in, went back with the nurse when it was time for me to see the doctor. And I was asked to jump on the scale and I said no. I said, you know what? I'm actually okay. No, thank you. I actually would not like to be weight today. And the nurse was like, you know what? We don't need that. No problem. She was like, don't even. Okay, no worries. You're absolutely free to call. That don't have nothing to do with these joints, but literally right now. Not a data point that we need today. So don't even stress yourself. And I was very proud of myself for setting a boundary, yes. That protected my piece today, and it was otherwise a good appointment, all is well. I'm very grateful to say that, and you know, I learned, this is just a tidbit. So, you know, the medication that I take for my RA also suppresses my immune system. So I have to be very cautious around COVID. And what the doctor told me today that actually was quite illuminating. Was that because of my immunosuppressant condition, I probably need to be more mindful of my antibody levels. And I can actually, I'm eligible to sort of get multiple boosters. And so the doctor was just sort of speculating and she was like, you know, it's not surprising that she got COVID when you did because honestly, you should have gotten another booster in March. He was like, your antibodies were really low. Just given the way that your immune system was set up. And so it really does make a difference given the fact that I'm already vaccinated just sort of keeping the antibodies going. And so since I got the multi clonal antibodies infusion as the treatment after testing positive for COVID, you know, I'm good right now until about July. And then I can I can get another another booster. So that's just a little extra for those of us in the immunocompromised gang. If you are worried or concerned, you know, they're saying that for immunocompromised persons, especially for people who take immunosuppressants, medication. In my case, antibody loads to tend to go down at 5 to 6 months post vaccination. So it may be worth asking your doctors if this is something that you should think about or be concerned about. And I mean, if you want to sort of check your level of antibodies, you can check to see if you still have them and how high you have, that's a very simple blood test too. But that's just, yeah, that's my self care. I protected my peace at the doctor and I got some useful information for keeping myself safe going forward. So I think that is, that is a pretty wonderful self care this week. And honesty, especially holding boundaries. It's like, you know what? No, I'm not going. Actually, I don't really need to know how much I weigh right now. Thank you. Thank you. You have a quit. You have a good hold on. Okay. Why don't you just take this blood pressure? Let's get that going. Because we definitely need that. The fluctuates with indeed. My self care this week is, you know, I'm not really in the purse gang like that. I got a couple bags I like and maybe one that I want, but that's not really my bag. But I bought myself a new purse. Treat yourself. What you get. And I got, okay, so it is a black owned brand. Okay, we'd love to hear it. And it is a leather purse. It was like a forest green. And it's a circle purse. Really, really cute. It has a bee on it, and the brand is Ho go away. Love it. A luxury brand which inspires individuality style and expression through innovative craftsmanship. We love to see it. Designs are rooted in her West African culture, and maintain a truly global outlook by providing her own perspective to create timeless designs, and I feel like that person is just a person I'll have for a long time. I can carry it at any point in my life when I want to. And I love it, it's so cute. It's so, so cute. I got the, it's sold out now. It's a saddle handbag. But they do have, I think, one color left available, the honey brown bee, leather saddle, I got the forest green bee leather saddle, and she is very cute. So I love that. I don't know hey, she does not know who I am. This is not sponsored. This is not any of that. I was looking up, you know, just a bunch of different black owned brands, 'cause I'd like to support. And you girls have made those tele far bags just like a fucking shit show to get. You know what I'm saying? It's very, very real world versus road rules challenge. A bitch has to wait on the line. I'm buying Jordans in 96. So I said, well, you know what I'm saying? I'm gonna get me, I'm gonna get me one of those two, but in the meantime, there's got to be other black people out here creating beautiful things, and that's how I came across Hague capacity. And HK. And so I love it. I love my back. And if you would like to look, it is HOG OE K, dot com. It is literally one of my new favorite pieces. So that was my self care. I just treated myself to a little leather bag. Perv mcgirth. I love it. Yes. Let's get onto these petty peas. Let's.

Jordans Perv mcgirth
"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"Any size soft drink deal, you can sip your favorites. That crispy Sprite, that delicious I see that they had to bring back the orange Fanta Coke or Dr Pepper. Get the perfect beverage pairing with your favorite McDonald's mill, and with McDonald's is a drink for every mood and everyone has got a favorite and Mickey D's famous drinks have a reputation for being more flavorful and more satisfying than anywhere else. I can attest. McDonald's Sprite is one of the most universal McDonald's loves. We can't talk about how crispy a crunchy that Sprite is. We can't talk enough about it. The first sip of Mickey D's Sprite makes it feel like your body took a screenshot. If you drink it too fast, your eyes may water. And McDonald's hi-c, making a comeback was like Michael Jordan coming out of retirement. It's not just a drink. It's a McDonald's drink. Order ahead on the app and get your favorite any size soft drink like Sprite for only a dollar. Price and participation may vary, can not be combined with any other offer. This podcast is sponsored by better help online therapy. Relationships take work, especially the most important one you can have in your life, your relationship with yourself. A lot of us will drop anything to go help someone we care about. We'll go out of our way to treat other people well. But how often do we give ourselves the same treatment? I had to take ask myself this very hard question. And really, really sit with the reality of my answer. And then think about what I was going to do about it. And so over the past few years, I've been working with therapists and group counselors all kinds of people to help me really cultivate a healthy relationship with myself. So this month, better help.

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

01:34 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"You can learn them the way you learn how to ride a bike. The way you learn how to swim. But if you do not believe in yourself and your power in your tenacity, then you drown, then you fall, right? So first get clear on your head and in your heart. And then embrace the steps and start to create your plans. And you may not be able to see the light at the end of the tunnel, but you can see the next few steps in front of you. And just focus on taking those steps and before you know it, you're going to achieve big, amazing, great things. And then you can show your haters. How amazing is that? You don't have to be anything with a rolled up magazine. Volumes. And what's great about your success speaking volumes is that you will secretly inspire those people to do better for themselves too. And stop being haters. I don't know. Thank you, bola. This has been a joy. Thank you for your work. Thank you for your gifts. Thank you for sharing time and space with Jade and I and our Friends at the kitchen table. You're welcome back anytime. And I appreciate you so much. Thank you for this awesome opportunity. We are so grateful to have you and we will see you all in the next segment. Make sure you check out all of bolus information and clever girl finance information in the description box. Drinks at McDonald's just hit differently and nobody knows quite how they do it. I mean, the Sprite is crispy. The hi-c orange is high. It's just amazing. But we do know that once you know about McDonald's drinks, you don't look back. And with the $1.

bola McDonald
"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"And for people like us that this isn't handed to us that every day, the statistics are against us, right? Debt incarceration, the systematic systematic issues, it's a choice. You have to intentionally make that choice that I'm going to choose two prosper every single day, right? And otherwise, you get bogged down. By not just your baggage, but the baggage that the whole world is putting on top of you. And the book, I spoke to one of my mentors about writing the book and for me, my biggest fear was like, am I writing a story that's premature? I still have so much in front of me from my journey. And she told me there's value in telling the story as it happens. And because as it unfolds, because you get to inspire another woman who is starting where you were in her career in her business with having kids in dating a relationship, trying to figure out how finances that you have already overcome. And there's value in that. So I allowed myself to be vulnerable and share stories that a lot of things you read in the book, a lot of my friends actually don't know that about me, right? I call myself a faux extrovert, which means that I can be honest. But once you get off this podcast, everybody don't talk to me. I know that's right. Speaking of my whole language. It took us everything that I need. And then I see you in about two weeks. I need to recover. I love you. I am not bad at it. I get it. I understand it. We're so grateful for you to come through and share your journey with us. And to learn a little bit more about who you are. And we're going to have all of the links attached in the description box so that aside, I'm glad that people got a chance to know a little bit about Ebola, but we do want them to definitely check into your website, all of your resources, because you've got awesome resources. But above anything else, we're gonna link, we're gonna link the book in the description box so that you all can get your content. Is it out now? Can folks can folks access it or is it launching soon? Tell us, tell us, give us the deets. Yeah, so it's called choosing to prosper, it's out this summer on July 6th, but folks can pre order it. Yes. It's getting ready to drop about 9 weeks to go from this recording. It's going to be an ebook physical book audiobook, so you hear me read it to you. Yes. With this beautiful voice, I'm sure everybody will be very excited for that. How do you feel? Is it different because this book four? Are you like, oh girl, we've been doing this. Or are you a little nervous? Because so my face is on the cover of this book. On the other three books are like, like I said, they were personal finance. So I talk about myself, but you don't have to think about me because they're worried about your finances. Whereas invisible. Okay. I'm vulnerable with you, so that you can be vulnerable with yourself. So it's a little scary. But it has good intentions and I have to share this. If I did not, I would be doing myself a disservice. It's very important representation matters, you know, we want to see more black women on the cover of books, we want to see more successful black women doing big things, inspiring others to achieve, because once you open the Gates, then the next woman is coming behind because she saw representation. So I'm excited. I'm nervous, but I'm excited. And I'm ready. Well, we're very excited for you. And sorry to you guys, we already have our copy. It's amazing. So we will have the link in the description box for you to pre order your own. Make sure you check out Clevver girl finance. Again, all of that will be the website is amazing. The Instagram is amazing. Loads of tips and tricks what I love about the website is that there's literally a database of all manner of articles..

Ebola Gates Instagram
"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

07:31 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"And so we like to cover all bases at the kitchen table on getting grown. So today we are very, very excited to welcome the brilliant bowler she'll come be. Is it your company? Yes. Show me. I'm so sorry. I just want to make sure I say it right, but the very brilliant bowl of show can be a clever girl finance to the kitchen table. So welcome Mola. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. Yes. We're so excited to have you. And I must start off before Kia gets us into more of the premise of what we'll talk about. With the meaning of your name? Yes. Yes. Ebola. I know what it means. You tell the listeners what it means. Yes, so my full name is moji bola and it means I was born into wealth. I'm originally Nigerian and the language is Yoruba. And wealth doesn't mean money instead means joy, happiness, peace of mind. That type of wealth, the true love. So my grandmother named me, so people called me bola for short. I love it. I love that so much. I said, this is very fitting. And as I started reading more into some of the themes of your new book, I said this is look at the alignment. So Kia, please. I know. Your parents were on to something. Your family had vision. They knew where you were headed, girl. And this is meaning. This is what we love. And y'all are out here naming your kids. What blue and no comment? I don't count because, you know, she's already making more money than the rest of us, but I'm talking about for those of us down here named tequila. I love that. And I mean, it's just a lesson for those of us who get children that we have a responsibility to name something. Okay, we are meaningful. Responsibility, be out here and name me your children. Air force ones. But either way. Okay. Deficit. It just sounded really pretty. When they were deficit, it's like no hands. No, no, no. No, no. We got to get out of what these sound like. We got to get into the intention of it. Yes. Please. Let's continue. Certified financial education instructor, a finance expert in a bestselling author, and a speaker. I would love to hear, so in your book, you have a brand new book coming out very, very soon. The book is called choosing to prosper, this is your fourth book, and I would love to know, you know, we'll get into some of the origins, because you talk, you talk very candidly in the book about how you started. But bring us up to date on how we got here. How, after your three prior books, did we get to choosing to prosper? That is a great question. And you know, this choosing to process was a book that my publisher initially wanted me to write, right? They wanted me to write a story so people could get to know who I was and where I was from and who is this black girl, that's attempting to change the financial narrative for women of color. But I was very hesitant. I was I had impostor syndrome about writing the book. I was afraid of what people will think. And so I was like, well, let's write about an easy topic, which is personal finance. People don't have to think about me. They have to have to think about it as their money, right? So I wrote those first three books. And I actually pitched a fourth book on my publisher as I go, listen. Get yourself together, it's time to write this book. And I was like, you know what, I know, I know. I was waiting for you to tell me that. So that's really where the book comes from. It's a love letter to women like me who look like me who had experiences that may not be the same, but are relatable to mine as an immigrant as a black woman in America as a black mom raising black children, a love letter to inspire women, especially black women and women of color to achieve financial success, even when people tell you that you're going to fail because that's what I was told and continue to be told. It's also a dedication to my haters. Do you hate it? This is what we call the episode, a dedication. Dedication to my haters. You saw our voice as you say it though. You're like, this is about my background. And I'm so well versed in finance. And I love black people in black things, and fuck y'all. By the way. Get into the why. But what about that dedication? It's a love letter. It's my experience, but I also challenge the reader to think about, what is your background? What has shaped you? What are your goals? What are the things that you want to pursue in your life? Who are the people telling you that you can not succeed and how are you going to counter that and prove to them that you truly can succeed? And why you have what it takes, I'm a big believer that representation matters. Seeing another woman who looks like you as a similar background, seeing her succeed, is so impactful because if you think about the women that you admire in your life, whether they're famous or not. Imagine if their stories never existed. And there was nothing to aspire to. Like, where would we be? So for me, it would have been a disservice if I did not write this book and share my candid stories. I talk about my family background. I talk about my multiple experiences with racism, even today I talk about the challenges, women of color face, raising capital, I talk about the impact of everything on black people in 2020. You know, so it's really, it's a love letter, basically. And a motivational inspirational book in how I feel, I can do it best to empower another woman to go out and succeed. Okay, I love that 'cause that's what we're all about it getting grown. To black women who come from a foundation of being black women, but and we can meet there even with our different backgrounds. So I think that's so beautiful. So let's talk, let's go back a little bit to what you were just talking about. I'd like to hear a little bit of the motivation because you are such a sweet spirited person. We can see. So I'd like to hear some of the motivation of some of the things behind why this is also partially a dedication to the haters. Oh yeah, so I don't take any opportunities I have for granted and for every opportunity that I have gone out and taken a hold of and made mine. It has not come without a cost, right? Especially because of what I look like, especially because of where I come from. And just so many instances in my life where people have reminded me that I can not succeed. I remember being in college in Europe in Austria and people wondering, how is this black girl here? Is your daddy the king of the jungle in Africa? They really said shit like that. So.

moji bola Kia Mola Ebola Air force America Austria Europe Africa
"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

01:41 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"And dive right on into this kitchen table talk. Show you right. Our friends at elta beauty shared a few product recommendations for keeping your beautiful curls, juicy, and joyful. Ulta Beauty recommends using the following products in your hair care routine to help him prolong in your protective styles by keeping your hair healthy and hydrated. First, cleanse with Sunday to Sunday root refresh my sly rent. This lightweight gentle cleanser is color safe, very important. Sulfate free and keeps your scalp and hair fresh between washes, Ulta Beauty's next recommendation is commit biologics burdock, root butter, cream, which provides rich lightweight moisture for fine thin Afro coily hair, delivering 24 plus hours of moisture without the build up. Perfect for dry, medium to low porosity hair. We'll finish up this list with Rizzo's curls, nourish oil, which is made of a 100% pure essential oils to provide a radiant shine, this lightweight oil quickly absorbs and penetrates providing moisture and minimizing frizz for visibly healthier looking hair and scalp. So girl, what are you waiting for? Head over to Ulta Beauty or Ulta dot com and shop all your hair care essentials right now. There's so much pressure to put off fun until we quote unquote deserve it. But we already do enough every day to earn joy when we want it. So you've already earned some fun. Have it. It's like giving yourself permission to eat.

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

02:36 min | 2 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"And so they're judged. The judge literally put Tokyo out of the courtroom. And so whatever advocate that blac Chyna had, even in her mama, they eliminated that. Wow. They wouldn't even let me. What's really sad about that is her and her mother were estranged for so it's what I'm saying. Recently got on good terms and now you all don't even let her have one bit of support in there. You're just gonna let them pile on like this. Yeah. It's a lot. That's really tasty. And I mean. Like I said, I don't know, and I'm not out here, you know, I know that black China probably has her faults. It has contributed to this in her own way, but I just don't. There's no way that something like this could be a fair fight. And it's just really one sided, and it don't sit well with me. And maybe it's because I don't really bang with the Kardashians like that. But I just think like just in the larger, I think it's a combo. I think I don't think it would sit well with me for anybody to be. Yeah, I just feel like giving what we know about the court system, given what we know about the inequitable ways in which business of this matter is conducted in our country. There's just no way that this can be a fair fight. And it just seems like it just seems like it's just like I said, don't sit well with my spirit. I just don't feel comfortable watching it. I don't like to hear about it. It makes me. It makes me actually quite sad. It makes me uncomfortable. Yeah, I don't like it. And I actually, I feel bad for her and essence, because I don't think anybody deserves deserves to be held accountable like that. That's not accountability that is accosting and y'all are stone in this girl. That ain't right. And this just lends to the larger conversation about the justice system and the flaws within it and how it is not really set up because if you guys really wanted to see her be a good mother, you would focus on some sort of form of rehabilitation to help her in her journey to become that. But instead you just want to kill every bit of her spirit and make sure that she has no relationship with her child. And that's the dangerous and the nasty part about it. But that is, that is what's going on with that. This will be very brief because I don't really have any opinions or thoughts or anything on this. Elon Musk bought Twitter. I.

blac Chyna Tokyo China ai Elon Musk Twitter
"bola" Discussed on Siniar Kamar Sebelah

Siniar Kamar Sebelah

03:52 min | 3 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Siniar Kamar Sebelah

"Fatty acid. Oh yeah. What?

ISIS Leader Dies During U.S. Special Forces Raid in Syria

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:00 min | 5 months ago

ISIS Leader Dies During U.S. Special Forces Raid in Syria

"Who you are breaking news until hours ago. Abu Ibrahim Al Hashemi Al karoshi was the head of ISIS. He's dead. You have special forces striking and Idlib Syria, a place that's about 300 miles from Jerusalem. So it's a lot closer to Michael Oren's land than to ours, although I think Michael Lawrence and the U.S. today, former ambassador from Israel to the United States, doctor Michael oran, good morning, doctor Aaron. What's this headline mean to you? It's always welcome news with a leader of ISIS or Al-Qaeda or Hamas or Hezbollah gets to pass out of this world. I just was never particularly due to the major threat by Israel. You should know Hugh. The ISIS from our perspective was several thousand men mostly with light arms and machine guns on the backs of trucks. Our biggest threat of his bola was a 150,000 rockets pointed at our city. That's a major threat. But that doesn't mean we're anyway not relieved to see one of the major commanders of ISIS eliminated.

Abu Ibrahim Al Hashemi Al Karo Michael Lawrence Isis Michael Oran Michael Oren U.S. Syria Israel Jerusalem Aaron Hezbollah Qaeda Hamas AL Hugh
"bola" Discussed on Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

02:38 min | 5 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

"Talk about a smart woman. I think my biggest takeaway from this episode was really getting clear on your goals. Your financial goals, your lifestyle goals, what you want, and then also, and I think I could take away this lesson from probably every one of my guests that my talented, successful guest that share all of their gems on my show. I feel like each of them use one word. Every single one of them uses this one word and it's the same word for everyone and it's consistency. So another thing I'm taking away from this episode is that bolo was talking about, you've got to be consistent. Know what you want, get clear on your goals, but be consistent with investing. And I think that's one of the biggest takeaways. Hobie and I started investing later than I would like to admit, it's been a while since we've been investing, but you know I've been in business for almost 13 years now and are actually 13 years this month. And so we probably, I don't know, probably started investing 8 years ago, but that's a lot of years that I didn't invest while my business was growing. So one of my biggest regrets is not getting started sooner. So now with K, we have him investing. He's 18 years old and slowly but surely he's using his own money to start investing in dabble in different areas. And we ask him to pay attention to different things he wants to invest in. And then we talk about it. This is something that my parents never did. We never talked about investing. We only talked about saving super old school, right? My mom and dad, blue collar to the bone. We just talked about saving money all the time. But we never talked about investing. So it's something that I really want to change so that cade starts doing it really early. Anyway, those are just some thoughts I had from the interview, but be sure to check out clever girl finance and look into investing today. If you've never invested, I hope you make it your goal this year to at least get started. Like she said, you don't need a lot of money to do so. But I think once you get started, once you set up the investing account, once you get the ball rolling, once you start learning a little bit more, you'll be more likely to want to dive in even more. I hope you love this episode as much as I did. Thanks so much for joining me today. As always, share with a friend, follow along on the podcast, leave a little love through a review. I am so grateful for all of it. See you next week, same time, same place by for now..

bolo Hobie cade
"bola" Discussed on Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

07:54 min | 5 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

"If you know me, then you know that the goal digger podcast hosted by my friend Jenna Kutcher, who is also part of the HubSpot network, is one of my favorite podcasts. What I love about jenni's podcast is that she shares life and business tips from productivity hacks and business strategies and mindset shifts to daily inspiration and so much more. Episode 5 28, it's called surprise. I wrote a book. It gave me all the feels because she shared the real raw story a what inspired her to write her very first book, and she shared her process. So good. Listen to the gold digger podcast wherever you get your podcast, and now back to the show. Well, hey there, welcome to another episode of online marketing made easy. Today, you are in for a very special treat. But before we get there, how's your year going? We survive the first month of 2022 at the time of this recording. So if you're listening to it right when it went live, we made it, my friend. January for me was fantastic. I was determined to stick with my goals that I set at the beginning of the year and not be a statistic. I know that usually by the middle of January, most people are forgetting about their goals, they've thrown them out the window. I've done it for countless years. I hate to admit it. And I thought, I'm not being another statistic. I have to do this different this year because I want to feel different in 2022. I want to show up differently. I want to be a better person for myself or my marriage for my business for my Friends. And so that means I can't throw those goals out the window. So all the goals that I set, I am still 100% on track, which I feel good about that. So anyway, I guess I'm just patting myself on the back. You don't need to hear me brag about myself. I'm just very, very happy that I'm sticking with it. Also, Mel Robbins has a text group that she brought some of her girlfriends together and we're doing this really cool thing where she's helping us stay accountable. And that has been mind-blowing to me, just the fact that I have somewhere to go every single day, there's certain things that we do every single day. I don't want to give it away until she talks about it. But she's testing out these really cool ideas of accountability and it has been a game changer. So if you're struggling right now and if you feel like you're not sticking to the goals you set or you're not starting out the year as you want or heck, if you're listening to this 6 months into the year it doesn't matter, get an accountability group. Find a few friends get together in a group chat, text messaging and just make some commitments to each other and check in daily. I know that doesn't sound like a huge leap, but little small steps move mountains if you're consistent and that it's really made a difference for me. So anyway, something to think about. Okay, so my team and I noticed that there are a lot of top podcasts out there about investing, especially women and investing, and we thought, you know what? I bet our audience would eat up this topic. Now I know I've got some gentlemen on the show, and even though we're gonna talk about investing for women, 90% of this episode can apply to you as well. So do not skip it. Do not move on to the next. Hopefully you're listening as well. But we are talking about investing. And when we started brainstorming who we wanted to bring on to talk about investing, investing, especially as women and as entrepreneurs, we immediately thought of bola so can be. She's the founder of the largest financial empowerment platform for women, clever girl finance. The go to expert for investing and whether you're an experienced investor, you're just starting out. And she's a mom of twins. So bola is a certified financial education instructor, a finance expert, bestselling author, speaker, writer, podcaster, social media influencer, and growth strategist. She's been featured by time, money magazine, fortune, and Good Morning America, just to name a few. So today we're diving into all things investing. She's going to break it down for those that are new to all of it. And she's sharing how to be a smarter investor. Personally, and professionally, and what to invest in as an entrepreneur. And if we really have to wait to work 65 to retire and we're getting into so much more. I love this conversation so very much because we really talked about not only the basics, but then some really tried and true battle tested strategies for saving and investing. I think it's a really great place to start. So you're going to gain a ton of insight from this interview, I just know it. So turn off all distractions, get ready to take some notes, at least some mental notes, let's get started. Bola, thanks so much for joining me on this episode. I have been looking forward to this all week. Thank you for having me. I am so excited to be here and to chat with you and me. Well, this is a hot topic for sure. And I have so many questions for you. So I'll dive right in and I kind of want to start at the beginning. Can you share with us a little bit about who you are and how you got interested in investing and specifically clever girl finance as well? Yeah, so my name is bulla show can be. I'm the founder and CEO of clever girl finance. We are a completely free empowerment and course platform for women where we help women achieve their financial goals so that they can live life on their own terms. And I'm also the author of the investing book I'll grow your money. And I got started with investing coming out of college and wanting to save money as a child of immigrants. I just really wanted to save money and make my parents proud. I had never earned that much money before. I was earning $54,000 before taxes. And I managed to save a substantial amount of money and I remember going to a financial adviser's office because I was like, okay, if I want to invest, I need to speak with a professional. And sitting in his office and just feeling so annoyed because all he was focused on was where did I get the money? Do I have a rich boyfriend? Are you married? He was asking all these inappropriate questions and it took me a while to catch on because initially I was like, okay, maybe he's asking to that he can determine my income, my spouse income, and I'm like, no, I'm single. I saved this money, but it was so patronizing. And so I left the office and I was like, I'm going to teach myself how to invest. And so that's pretty much how I got started. The story behind clever girl finance ties into my investing story and it's just really inspired by my mom. My mom get married at 19 years old, had four kids did not have a college degree had a high school diploma, and she married an older guy in his 30s, my dad, and she got to a point in her own 30s where she started to see things with her friends that she didn't like. She was seen friends trying to leave abusive relationships and they couldn't. She was seeing friends wanting to start businesses, but they didn't have any funding because they were not aware of the family finances. And she was unfortunately seeing a few friends who lost their spouses and the families who just come in and take over everything. My mom decided that she didn't ever want that to be her. So she took it upon herself to go back to college with four kids. I went to all of her college classes with her. And she eventually became the breadwinner of our family when my dad went through financial downturn. And so my mom's story and her journey very much inspired me to want to achieve financial wellness as soon as I started earning money. And wanting to invest my money and also build real well. Oh, I love that the story stem from watching your mom do really amazing things like.

Jenna Kutcher Mel Robbins bola jenni money magazine Bola America
"bola" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

03:47 min | 10 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Organised news idea. The last one as myers route allies in thrown. Ask ambien masters paul though a secular. Yeah they born here is how they require mental commentators. The case pets malignancy within our party. Inkwell kier momento. You can blow in their class. A neighbor ask guy in alabama in blueberries boy emerson concerto diarrhea. This that rally theon maverick. Accuser on siegler sending laterano beethoven though latin. Theon gambian say myth. Glenn coalesce corinthians cage axes dna the us anesthesia at last montagna. The thac naphtha. Guessing gwen interim already gone sass. Oklahoma damian thunell shrewdest the can was keep more own people they must be cooler. Kc game or beethoven. Through limiting cavallo negro limiting theta. I had into trouble do beginning in radio or dementia that position paddington. Tara circle gear malaysian cape would affect like returned his full glory. The artifacts secret. Gay lazarus lucas. Mata tova get in. Our unique person is faira the this and then throw the bala so much pins have mass panic who now all the request career or pseudomonas demento unisys and alauddin dark winter laterally theon de thick. It's ten years when the sec. Now poland lithium dune abadaka is that will they will have bush about ethic marotta. The almond roca. Trespasser essay lamented potapenko. Either theater the last year. Yes but they're still in gwendal montana's the artifact last month pilotes is more than thematic kentucky. Laterally theon sitcom okay. Well as they ru stealing gambian pillow the workout in the gavin animal. Porges a stick. Continue that. I mean the interstate more or less bush all now rupa together. The we arrested victim they stay elemental protector. More lethal go. unika is less demar. I store spread. Molly knows anything gwen. The they will affect that if the through victim three. Comedians or parliamentary superstar recalled this me that they meant by the patel near yeti that the case as level i shock glow is thought that ivy theon elementary in trail the auto annoy though that we up more income rattled by ministers. Yes as well as they do is third temple analysts pretty these more and more sima owner ceo and let the journal. It's as much as i. The food doodo as well less love american america. Don't get those tomasi. Makina was america in davos. Uva i get voice. The motorcade has the ball last they will get ready. Theon guilford glory was javed muthu in los angeles during said there's real bogo getting styler soto them. We present this then throw they said hannukah look while they must get this. See ya is seeded by san movie. You're at the still fasting empty. Nobody pay engrave lame. We're just going to yet. Governor the guidon Haven't they the key is russo. Delilah need out. I'm in taylor's the level innovia k..

Theon gambian damian thunell Tara circle Gay lazarus lucas Mata tova marotta siegler potapenko cavallo Porges myers diarrhea unika paddington unisys Glenn alabama dementia bush Oklahoma
"bola" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

04:12 min | 10 months ago

"bola" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Bluegrass medically i in the aquatic emails. Iowa is gilman betas now gabba float down the komo ski salisu wall. Eschaton retailers press calories rather introduce varicose. The was rea- is half. we would have a lifespan. is who puts them. The last supper cave is glucose flow tavern. And ella you will as discus gwynne. Alaska's host through well look at within into winter is only. This is getting winter and el siglo euthanasia c. Almost a million all civil. Oh the athena two they think as well as they will them illustre. Lucas forgave. indra will glow sahana elry. Look it at home. While had demi novelty yellow with staffy into the water the komo secrecy who not. I think we're gonna see martinez located killers column osuna already okay. They don't recall local defense donor. Push no lobby. Anything has hasbro largely an eyesore. Look at one are still more because from boca complicated. They it okay. This threat the the lawyer. The odia method theta put. This game is lucky. Mass main gotta yes like reaganism. Maria motorbikers litters. Because kim wound mile oil in was is as well as they would say you alma porchet. I'll dinosaurs colorless transparent. Reflect daddy the way to was nailed. Luther leo sickly. Get that. I wish the sashes all of course no. Dna elderly to stay people there. Malice sorted thought ambien. Roughly host is pandora's yellow. La la is in moutaa tambien. Elcock sal medicals portables. It's i'll go by details ticket. In through this o.'neil alimentos claros. The aca just spreads join us alaska. Separate india is alyssa. we dentist material. Heavy rian that concrete limit or tallow. And there's no they will not low lorena element. Those pretty mario bit okay. Ethnic when test. Representant seeming i don. T the like ese series. Monteria is this is in l. Propose though knowing then data getting no scholla's casino is deirnesa so yes then throw appropriate earth but but locally so this one is skin meals at interested in they think quality louis theater ill lamentable renault needle denigrate america personnel. Chauvinist is next in. Illegible is as much as they will get those numbers imagine initial cabramatta them. But i got sick with a freedom and just as well as the brookhurst dinning at scatters inventor superstitious elements does get better dennison. Alpine obama. alaska didn't understand number done in idea. Polka king narrowly that his latvian. Seeing the lessee guarany standards as well as they would us alas scattered or in las puertas healers because audience dallas perkins who pushed the last cussing gaza. If you kill liquids the iraqi got the which was boiler settler sentiment gianotti an essay in tampa mentors through the level. They were betas in that is when element of people get alaska and he in me. Neither woman through congress rocketeers western letters on is pool. Sal is as parliamentary lacerra sunday. Elementary apple larry. Las getting tear gas Still ended in knit took in hispania. Gabriela does the conrad rufus emetic in boston. Matzah but oh winona mccain roller. Rescue timers have run. Although i r s gay nelson danta restarting much individual siempre only while they show the grammar skip the dusty Able to those latter case lies free spot in like..

osuna Maria motorbikers Luther leo sickly moutaa neil alimentos claros gwynne indra scholla ella demi hasbro Iowa alaska martinez Lucas boca Alaska rian La la Alpine obama
CDC Team: 'War Has Changed' as Delta Variant Dangers Emerge

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 11 months ago

CDC Team: 'War Has Changed' as Delta Variant Dangers Emerge

"Internal documents show the CDC is laying out the risks from the highly infectious delta variant documents obtained by The Washington Post appear to be talking points for the CDC to use in explaining the variance dangerous including the line it knowledge of the war has changed they know the delta variant causes infections more contagious than the flu small pox lady bola and acid faxes as chicken pox the documents say since January people who were infected after vaccination had made up an increasing portion of hospitalizations and in hospital deaths among those with coded nineteen while emphasizing the vaccines are still highly effective and that breakthrough infections are uncommon Sager mag ani Washington

CDC The Washington Post FLU Ani Washington
"bola" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"bola" Discussed on BiggerPockets Money Podcast

"Wasn't financial freedom. Like for me i was. I was young when you're so young you don't think about like financial freedom. I mean you do but not to that extent. That was not something on my mind. I have a problem working but for me was just like the sacrifices my parents had made my dad had retired fifteen years earlier. The college to shine my parents had paid could have gone towards my mom. Not having to work as hard as she had to work My mom having to move with me or immigrate to the states you know so that she could create some sort of landing landing spot for me to come to when i came to that last year. College Just thinking about my aunts and thinking about you know other people my family who were not as fortunate as as me right who my cousins who were taking seven years to go to college Just many there are many circumstances in terms of my background. That i just wanted to do. I wanted to have my own skirt. And also i got to sit and listen to my mom and watch my mom console. Her friends and the fair broke. I think is one of my favorite being broke is is definitely a big mindset challenge for me just watching that like seeing a mother with her children and suitcases crying in your house because she cannot go back to a husband. Who's beating her. It's something that you don't as a child that stays with you. And i just never wanna find myself in that position. I never wanted to be in that position. I always wanted to to be able to my parents said you know what we need money for this. I want to say here. It is if i needed to exit bad relationship and be able to pack my bags and just go immediately so for me was just that fear of not having anything and wanting my parents to be proud and just wanting to just have better opportunities knowing where i come from knowing that my aunt did not have those opportunities and just doing well so financial wellness financial freedom. Yes but that was not necessarily the the why at the time. Okay before we move on..

seven years last year fifteen years earlier one
Chocpocalypse Now! Quarantine and the Future of Food

Gastropod

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Chocpocalypse Now! Quarantine and the Future of Food

"I've been hearing about this quarantine book for many years many many years because our publisher has been waiting for it for many many years. And certainly i never thought i'd have any personal experience with the topic but i did always wonder and i saved up the question just for this episode. Where did you both get the idea for a book about quarantine. Let's go back a long long long time ago. you know. we are married and We were on a trip together in australia our first time. They're together Staying in sydney and at one point a local friend invited us out to a picnic and that was out on a peninsula on the other side of the bay from sydney proper and it was right by what is now in a hotel. it's called q. Station and it was a quarantine station. That jeff said. Now it's a hotel that remote oceanfront location that made a great for quarantining passengers travelling to australia by boat in the eighteen hundreds turns out to be delightful for people looking to get away from it all today. And that's not uncommon for sites that were used for quarantine in the past when you hear about a quarantine station. They tend be ruins They tend to have been turned into something else The maybe they've been eliminated entirely. Torn down a raised as if quarantine was this obsolete. Strange thing that don't do anymore and so somewhat. Ironically given how the book turned out you know our initial question was really kind of asking what was quarantine. Why did we do it. Where did it go. And why has it gone away. You have to remember. This was many years break ovid but once we began looking we realized that actually corentin hadn't gone anywhere and so in fact as we kind of started pulling the strings of quarantine. We started seeing it everywhere. you know. it's all over the world that was happening at various scales. It was happening in agriculture. Happening with human diseases. Like bola and covid nineteen but it was also even happening in things like on an interplanetary scale with talking to people who worked at nasa and the european space agency and terms of how they quarantine how they help prevent contamination of earth. From off world microorganisms. Or how they help protect places like the moon and mars from bringing earthly microbes to them. And so yeah. It was a huge topic and it really just seemed like the kind of thing that a book would be a lot of fun to do. And so we sorta dived into this thing. I mean that trip to australia was in two thousand nine. That's a little while ago. Not only are we still married but the book is finally coming out. So

Sydney Australia Corentin Jeff Bola European Space Agency Nasa
Northeast Nigeria Violence Forces 65,000 to Flee, Humanitarians Targeted

UN News

01:17 min | 1 year ago

Northeast Nigeria Violence Forces 65,000 to Flee, Humanitarians Targeted

"A spate of clashes involving government security forces and insurgent groups in northeast. Nigeria has caused mass displacement and threatened humanitarian assistance armed. Groups have also gone from house to house in the search for aid workers. Un agencies said on friday in total sixty five thousand nigerians are on the move following attacks by armed groups on damasec town in northeast. nigeria's bola state which left eight people dead. According to u n refugee agency. Unhcr jens locker from the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs. Archer said that. There had been several reported incidents in the town since sunday. The eleventh of april where aid assistance is a lifeline or she also continues to receive very worrying reports of clashes between insurgent groups. And the nigerian opt forces in damasec in borno state and non-state armed groups are targeting humanitarian assets and facilities and reason the also conducting house to house searches reportedly looking for civilians identified as aid workers according to archer the attacks will affect support to nearly nine thousand internally displaced people and seventy six thousand in the host community he receiving humanitarian assistance and protection. If the attacks continue it will be impossible to deliver aid to people who desperately need it. Mr locker said

Nigeria Unhcr Jens Office For The Coordination Of Borno UN Archer Mr Locker
Messenger RNA technology might kick-start a new age of vaccines

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Messenger RNA technology might kick-start a new age of vaccines

"The covid nineteen vaccines from. Madeira and pfizer are in many ways. Modern miracles as you know by now they were developed using technology called 'em aren a which basically gives the body some instructions to create antibodies for the novel coronavirus. It's the first time a vaccine has been developed in this way and now that we have this technology we can start using it on all kinds of viruses like flu. Your days are numbered. Andrew hessel is a geneticist and microbiologist. Well because amarnath vaccines ultimately use our bodies as a pharmaceutical plant. We can target essentially any virus. We can make any type of an antibody to it and so it opens up the possibilities for making vaccines for for emerging viruses. Like like zeka. Even a bola. But i think the one that will get really targeted in the short term is simply flew We we have an annual flu season that for the last hundred years we haven't been able to get head of and i think this is the technology that finally puts the nail in the coffin. We think about viruses as part of life. But how big a deal is it to imagine that we could target this many viruses so precisely in the future. I think it's a total game changer. Not just because this is a disease that causes suffering and death but it's been the biggest economic push like we realize how important it is to have some sort of bio protection now in the world. Because we've never had a new multi trillion dollar effect knocking on from a an outbreak.

Andrew Hessel Madeira Zeka Pfizer FLU
Avoiding Weight Gain During Stressful Times

Dishing Up Nutrition

17:07 min | 1 year ago

Avoiding Weight Gain During Stressful Times

"If you're worried that you have gained or are gaining way during the stressful time. We're definitely so stressful brittany with this pandemic and the ongoing at home and working from home and you're not the only one i'm hearing it more and more in clinic in fact a survey of eight thousand. Us adults published in the journal of obesity. Found at least a third of adults in the us reported. The corona virus pandemic has led to dramatic changes in their good health habits. Today we want to talk about some of these behaviors and ways that you can avoid weight gain during the pandemic or during any other highly stressful time in your life. Now that you know what we're going to be discussing this morning. I want to myself and our co host. I'm melanie beasley and have been a registered dietitian for the past thirty years one of the joys of my life is sharing the benefits of eating real food with as many of you as possible. I can speak to the benefits of eating real food both professionally and of course personally as well if you read my bio on weight and wellness dot com. You'll see that. I've had some very serious health problems over the years myself. So i truly know the value of eating real food for my own health at nutritional weight and wellness. We all believe health is so much more than the number on the scale does so true. It's so much more we have to feel good. You have to feel good. Everywhere had shoulders knees and totally. It's sad to say but is true. That many people just focus on their weight and now their overall health. Well i know that for me for years and years. This was really important. So i was always looking at what was the scale. What was on the scale now. What was going on internally. Well joining me this morning as you can hear. A voice is brittany. Vincent who's also a registered dietitian britney. You also have had some health problems that went away when you switch eating real food. Yes very transformative. I understand so share with us. Some of your pass health struggles with the listeners and how you overcame them well good morning everybody. You know I was in my early twenties and after finishing while towards the tail end. Finishing school to become a dietitian started having insomnia migraines. I was really tired. i will never forget. I was at a bar with a group of friends. And i like conked out in the in the booth because i was so tired. Oh no and i. It was not from partying. It was just ringing so tired. Exactly as like oh i know. That's when there's something going on. And i always say i saw the light finally an eating real food. I was looking at what i was eating and it was really just processed low fat. I mean everything that i was taught in two and so i made an overhaul of eating more fats Real vegetables purchasing better quality foods and then all of a sudden. My energy got better. I was sleeping better Eliminated gluten as well. My magazines basically disappeared and hers. Feeling great feeling as you should as a young adult and i think that a huge huge Switch that. I made was really the fat really because i was not eating those healthy fats. So making sure and getting that tablespoon of butter or olive oil avocado oil. Some not some avocado. I think really made made a huge difference for me. Plus just tastes delicious. Oh right so much. Easier to eat your veggies with some delicious fat on it and you know i think that For everybody listening that you can definitely be touched in many different ways of just changing changing your diet. Some just curious did you have anxiety that is sort of resolved. I did not do not while the insomnia would be racing thoughts but other than that. No no no. But i'm happy. That's that's over. That is not fun So you know. Understanding the science of nutrition to help to solve a personal problem is so powerful. I think that Experiencing these things ourselves just allows us to better help. Our clients visits us mercy and compassion for everyone who's walking through door or through zoom. Yeah right so you know britney when you were talking about that. I got to thinking. Let's discuss getting back to our topic. We're discussing ways to avoid weight gain during stressful times and certainly living in the midst of the pandemic has its own unique and unpredictable. Stressors right but many of us have had other times in our lives that we have also had highly stressful times so when i was going through cancer and treatments and all surgeries. I was stressed and my family was stressed. In lots of scenarios we can have tremendous stress. I think the most important thing that we can learn during these stressful times is how we manage our stress so true that we have some. We can develop some tools today. We wanna focus not on the stress but on how how each of us can increase our stress management skills. I want us all to focus on the foods and behaviors that increase our stress management skills. The first step is to to see that we have the ability to improve our bodies ma- how it manages that stress. Think of it as adding some tools to your tool box that you can pull from that. You have some control in how your body manages stress. Yeah and i hear that from clients who really are dedicated to eating real food throughout a stressful time and they comment. I am handling this a lot better than i. otherwise would be. It really is about chemistry. And i know people's character. It is in our survey reported in the journal of obesity included peop- people from different counties but also from different states in the in the us in the study found that the corona virus pandemic for many adults has led to a major decrease in their healthy habits and that they had that they had practiced prior to the pandemic and the study found two thirds of people eight more junk food well only a third eight healthier meals cooked at home again about two-thirds exercise less because gyms were closed but many rescue dogs and consistently walked their new dock. Some have more anxiety slept less where others were able to sleep longer to to less commuting time some people viewed the pandemic as a time to cook more healthy meals at home sleep longer also to have time for a pet. The sussex study also broke down the results by the different bmi classification such as normal weight overweight and obese ir that study in the study i noted to the study found the stay at home. Order had the most negative impact on the individuals in the obese category actually found. They found the anxiety. Scores increased most dramatically in people with obesity. The people with obesity also gained the most weight during the stay at home order so from results of the study. There are many different questions we could ask now number one do people of normal weight. In general practice better healthy habits for number two d normal weight people have fewer cravings. Find it easier to maintain a healthier eating plan number three to overweight and obese. People have more stress in their lives. Very good questions. Yeah do you have the answers necessarily but we're gonna talk. We're gonna right so to answer some of those questions. We want to share some basic lifestyle and eating habits to help you avoid weight gain during stressful times. Because i am seeing in clinic. I do see clients who've gained weight who've had a weight problems stressful and if it's a chemical chemical process and perhaps another way to live at this time is to find ways you can increase your stress management skills those tools in your toolbox that may be a new thought for you and yes you can learn and practice certain tricks to manage your stress whether it's during the pandemic or taken high school or college exam whether you're going through health crisis and i think time to dig into a demystify these tricks and the first trick to come out of the magical hat is eat breakfast every day. Not a sundays days. Breakfast is in spat especially important if you have stressful meeting or Chemistry exam or presentation or you studied all night absolutely. We're going to get back to eating breakfast but we have to take a break. I you are listening to dishing up nutrition and we are discussing how you can avoid weight gain during stressful. Times will be right back. Welcome back for dishing other for many of our clients. Tell us they need healthy new snack ideas so we decided to share a couple with you today. Make an egg. Salad with celery and expel or pressed. Safflower may or avocado mail. Then place a scoop of the egg salad and a half of a red pepper love I love deviled eggs as well. So my favorite is our salmon patty recipe that's in the weight and wellness way. Cookbook and nutrition guide. It's also on our website weight and wellness dot com ad and variety of raw vegetables. The vegetables to and you can Dip in some mayo at that. And then you've got this nice balanced out snacks so stay tuned and we will give you additional snack. Ideas have to say i love that I never tried it until pre pandemic one of our front desk staff gals was eating it. And i thought oh. I want to try this and she goes. Oh get a fork. I tried it. I was like it so delicious but when looking at the ingredients. I thought me when i wanted to make now i make it. You just plop it. Cook it and then take those patties and freeze them. They freeze great. Yeah so easy. It's awesome so stay tuned because we're going to have more of these ideas we are and i think it's time to dig into and demystify these tricks that we have the first trick to come out of the magical hat was eat breakfast every day. So fringy have for breakfast. I had leftover hamburger patty at six thirty. This morning did in samantha's and For something quick. I had part of an apple. Yeah wonderful e you got a gun. It wasn't gone. My husband always makes a eggs for me. He always gets up. When i have the radio show and So a couple eggs. And i also do half of an apple with sunbutter easy. Yeah got it done early in the morning forest feeling good for the radio show feeling over the radio show and you don't take out your energy you know and i always tell my clients breakfast really Tone for the day. You are going to feel better having a balanced breakfast. And then you're naturally going to make healthier choices because you're starting the day with a balanced blood sugar. It really makes the world of difference. And i the key to that balanced blood sugars like i had the eggs the protein and you had the hamburger patty protein and that kind of anchors not only your blood sugar but also begins the process of making those rain chemicals. The neural transmitters us that helps us with our day. Yeah yeah. I have absolutely recognized. I need enough protein in the morning just to feel good the entire day so i need at least three ounces. Good to to get me started. And i think that you know. A lot of people aren't in the habit of taking the time to make breakfast Your after something easy so you might sit down. Pour your favorite dry cereal in a bowl until the bolas fall. Always you know not a cup of cereal. Several cups of syria but that may be inviting obesity earnings -iety to come visit. There's been many studies. Demonstrating that high carb. High sugar diets often lead to anxiety and obesity. So what could be happening when you eat a big bowl of breakfast cereal which could easily have eighty one grams of carbs. When you consider how high carb that is in how high sugar foods affect your brain chemistry. It's very likely this unhealthy breakfast is causing a reduction in your serotonin. Level and serotonin is one of our. Most important are transmitters. You can think of neurotransmitters feel brain chemicals and serotonin helps to make us happy calm. Less anxious more focused all things that we that we need right. If you could just have a cup of serotonin But the next step we can just buy a coupla. Serotonin is that protein xactly so importantly we know a diet. High in processed carbs raise blood sugar level above normal and then the pancreas produces excess. Insulin leading to people being overweight or obese So when we say process carbs pathetic of the foods that come from a factory versus a farm Cereal is one. there is no serial bush. No there's not another interesting fact. Is obesity associated with having more anxiety one study found at the obesity. People have a twenty five percent increased risk of suffering from mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally chronic stress can also increase the fat stored in the abdominal area. And around our organs it is also an increased risk for type two diabetes heart attacks. High blood pressure so many risk factors we want our clients to avoid absolutely. And that's often a question i ask A new client. If weight loss's one of their goals asking them whereas there where they have gained weight where they're storing it can indicate to us. Hormonally what could be going on. And i'm sure you can agree. But i'm hearing more and more. People are starring in their abdomen that stress. And then also you know. Eating more processed carbs increases insulin resistance so can really be twofold mentioned earlier. We talked about if you have that bullet cereal and maybe skim milk. Possibly sugar sprinkled on. Tom It raises that blood sugar. And when your blood sugar goes higher than the body once it to It really is a stressful event entirely. Yup and when we have that stressful event internally we're increasing our stress levels yep so that's a simple tool really it is and you know. Our body doesn't know the difference between that stressor of eating cereal or the stress from covid. No good point. We respond to it the same way So keeping that in mind and again we have control of everything. We're putting in her mouth. So if that can impact stress that much We really need to take control of that is that is to have control over few things and that is one of i

Obesity Melanie Beasley Insomnia Migraines Britney United States Vincent Insomnia Hamburger Patty Cancer Apple Samantha Diabetes Heart Attacks Syria Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Bush TOM
"bola" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"bola" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"I'm just asking that question. Anyway. Go ahead. Do you want some word of the day? Okay. Where does the day is a noun? It is Tom Bhola. T o m B o l. A tumble is a musical instrument that has bells and a wooden block on it, Tom Bola. Tell me that doesn't sound like a legit be true, but it could be like Hollywood squares where you make up something, and it's convincing. Well, let me ask PK PK. The word is Tom Bhola. I think it's obviously a musical instrument with bells and a block. Obviously, we think Is it have to do with a tomb? Something tomb related? No money. You pay to get a tomb to Mullah? Yes, Tomb Bulla. I hear the Mandy is a virtuoso on the Tom Bhola. Exactly. It's really my only talent is my talent to bowl of playing. What is it really? She's a Tom Boulis. That's what they call it. No actual definition is a game and you're gonna this is one of those. What do you call that thing? Well, this is it, a game in which people pick tickets out of revolving drum and certain tickets win. Immediate prizes typically played At a fair that big bingo kind of without you raffle. It's like a rapper. There's a young child was an expert at Tom Below, Always singing an expert get that one of price now because he was gaming. The system put his little ticket under his body also play the instrument. Yes, of course. I'm gonna be giving a tumble a concert and by the way, Sling Davor, known as Tom bows, Okay, so get with it. Okay, But those of us who play the Tom Bullock Sorry I offended you. What? Los Angeles High School has been used as a set for a variety of classic films, including Greece. Pretty in pink and a nightmare on Elm Street. Venice, Venice High, I think, or Santa Monica is one of those has got that round junior high. Idea why I knew it was John Marshall High School. And yet I did. I don't know. Marshall High School. No clue. But I knew that maybe just from eighties trivia. The first Supreme Court The chief justice, Okay?.

Tom Bhola Tom Boulis Tom Bola John Marshall High School Tom Bullock Tomb Bulla Tom bows Los Angeles High School Venice High Sling Davor Supreme Court Venice Hollywood Greece Santa Monica
TSA sees highest number of airport passengers screened since pandemic started

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:49 min | 1 year ago

TSA sees highest number of airport passengers screened since pandemic started

"Despite the drastic surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations already underway. Us air travel over the weekend reached its highest peak of the pandemic. The tsa says nearly one point. Three million passengers were screened yesterday. And that has dr found she again warning of a surge on top of a surge back with us tonight dr. He'd be delia an infectious disease physician and the medical director of special pathogens unit. At boston university school of medicine she worked with the world health organization back when we were a member nation during the o. Bola outbreak and is among one of our medical. Contributors dr julia. It's good to see you so the travel over the weekend was exceptional. All things considered a lot of americans deciding that they wanted to get away. I wanted to see family. What do you make of what that is going to mean for the spread across the country. And when will we start seeing that spike. Katya look back one month right. Look at california as an example. California is one of the epicenters right now in our country of this pandemic and the state lockdown order. But when you look at the cell phone mobility data people didn't stop moving as much as they did after the first lock down and you only have to look at the tsa data for lax the biggest day of travel during pandemic on november twentieth. The top forty four thousand people the second largest summer twenty third and so if what played out with the increased number of cases leading to the hospitalizations that you're seeing in december now because of the holiday travel in november. Were up on a hill. A really really rough hill for the next month as we see what's already happening in hospitals get doubled from the cases and hospitalizations that result from the december new year's travel. Let me redo this from the washington post. It's impossible to say. How many infections people have taken flights in part because those travelers may not have known they were sick. The cdc said in september that it had investigated sixteen hundred cases of people who flew while they were at risk of spreading the virus and identified. Almost eleven thousand people who could have been exposed on those flights. Now the airlines taking great pains to say that they have state of the art air filtration systems and the air within those plans are getting getting circulated so quickly that the spread of infection when you are flying is relatively low. They're also a lot of airlines. That are saying they're trying to spread people out but with that. Many people traveling on limited schedules. The planes are getting tighter. My question to you is. Where is the risk worse. Worst is on the planes or is it at these gatherings that folks are coming from. Yeah i think it depends on the plane or the gathering. I mean on the plane. The toughest part is when you're actually at the gate when all those hippo filters and not circulation is actually off. And you don't know the person in front of your or next us put their mascot right. this has been. There's been an ongoing discussion about getting travelers to wear masks. And so it is. It is during the plane ride. It is those periods of time. There is no circulation but that person as you said asymmetric what we know that asymptomatic carriers people who are infected could make up up to forty percent of the new cases the spread of new cases and so they may take whatever transmission they got on that plane to their gatherings and again indoors larger groups all of those elements as we've been talking about over the course of this pandemic are going to hurt one. One thing that i heard today that really struck me. Is that people who got infected at their christmas gathering that they now go to the new year parties they're actually going to be infectious and be able to transmit that.

Dr Julia TSA Boston University School Of Me Bola Delia Infectious Disease Katya World Health Organization Washington Post CDC California United States
Springtails: Nothing to be afraid of

On The Ledge

05:49 min | 1 year ago

Springtails: Nothing to be afraid of

"The first thing to say about spring tells is that probably not something. The yoga sports on the lease of your plants. They like moist places. And that means you most want you to see them on the surface of your soil particularly if you've just watered or perhaps if you lift up apart and look underneath inside a cashpoint possibly you will see lots of little creatures roaming about. They're about the size of a full stop and there are hundreds if not thousands of species. I think there's about two hundred and fifty different species of spring tail here in the uk so as well as into the in your house plant pots. You might also find them outside. You'll compost heap or in part of dump leaves on the characteristic that gives them their name is their ability to spring. But don't get them confused with fleas. They are different creatures. And do not have the capacity to blunt. You or your pets or indeed. You'll houseplants these are really agent creatures. Apparently there are fossil's of spring tales. Going back to four hundred million years ago the know insects they are heck supports which means they've got six legs. I've said that detroit officials while that means they feed on any kind of decaying matter in the soil. They also feed on fungi and algae and that sort of thing so they serve a wonderful purpose in breaking down organic matter. The thing that makes the spring tale jump is called for keeler earned it is of wishbone shaped appendage kind of detail that sits underneath the spring tales belly and when it's surprised for example by you lifting up the port where. It's been hiding this little spring flicks up and propels the spring tail into the air. And apparently this leap is the equivalent of me jumping over. The eiffel tower says pretty impressive. I'll link in the show notes to a wonderful video. Featuring sir david at bra or should i say our lord. God david attenborough talking about spring tales. The column bola class as they unknown and showing how they actually go about springing. It's really amazing to watch. They also have an amazing cheap on the head which they use to moisture is their body basically they have to stay moist in order to survive and most patches of ground on all seven continents of the world will contain about one hundred thousand spring tales per square meter wells' so they are everywhere and there isn't really any great reason for concern if you see and the old spring tail in your soil or under your parts. Because they're gonna go somewhere moist. They are breaking down organic matter. It may be a sign that you're a little bit to dump if maybe you're seeing spring tales in the soil of say cacti and succulents but if you seeing them in the soil of the plants in you've just watered or you're lifting up a part there some there it's really not something to worry yourself about. Just take a look at those tells on wonder at how amazing they are. The other thing to note is that they do mainly wonder about that. Jump everywhere so if you see some small creatures about the size of a full stopped moving around not necessarily jumping the could very well still be spring tails but if you disturb them you may find that one or two will jump and the color very say anything from very dark gray to white to brown. But as i say. The main indication is their location if they are in that soil and they're not doing anything with these. If your plot unusually the location of the creature gives you a really good indication of what it is if it's white and fluffy and in the crevices of your succulent than it's probably a mealy bug if it's a white and fluffy and it's in the roots of your plant while check it carefully. Because it could be micro rizal. Fungi strands but it could also be mealy bugs again. Your hand lenses really useful here. If it's something on the back of your leaves are white grainy stuff. That's probably the shed skins of your spider mites. If you've got really good vision or use a hand lens you should be able to see the brown crab like spider mites wandering around aphids. Well they usually tackle the new soft growth on plants often find them on. Flower stems or on new growth of leaves and thrifts well. They don't look that much different than spring tails but they are bigger and generally you'll find them wondering about your plant leaves as opposed to on the soil and if he wants to get a closer look at the spring tales in your life. Then dave wilson has written an excellent book called the garden jungle or gardening to save the planet which i highly recommend has a good technique to suggest for gathering some up. Dave suggests that you get some compost or leaf mold or indeed the material that's in your plant pots and put it into a funnel under warm lamp sick that funnel on top of some kind of container and the spring tails will head away from the heat and into the container and then you can take a closer look at them a fun activity if you have kids or grandkids to entertain this festive season

Keeler David Attenborough Sir David Detroit UK Dave Wilson Dave
Battling Pandemics With Dr. Anne Rimoin

Mom Brain

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Battling Pandemics With Dr. Anne Rimoin

"To us a little bit about the different pandemics that you've worked on. Were closely on that. You've studied so in terms of pandemic so the panned this is really the first pandemic in our lifetime so good. The last pandemic was the nineteen eighteen pandemic but in terms of epidemics. I've been working on. I've worked on bola for many many years. So basically after i finished my phd I ended up working for an i h for several years. I started setting up. these research. Programmes in african countries. And i started working in the democratic republic of congo in two thousand and two and so i started this huge research program. That's what started as a team. Research program became a huge research program. And we've been working on things like ebola. Monkey pox work on maxene preventable diseases. So trying to get people vaccinated and understanding how many people are vaccinated against regular diseases like measles in leo and tetanus and these things that we worry about here in the united states to so. I've been doing that. But then i've also been doing things like following hunters and people who are at the animal human interface in trying to see will what viruses are. They getting exposed to who gets infected. What are they so One of the themes of my of my work has been preventing pandemics before they start so in the whole idea that it's better to to avoid being in the situation that we are right now vent to spend the money to prevent it in. Its i always use the example. You know my my my late father in law always used to say it's better to stay out of trouble than it is to get out of trouble. How do you do that. What is that look like. What is preventing pandemic or epidemic. What is that look like. Well the the best way to do it is to is to invest in the research in the public health infrastructure to be able to detect these things beforehand because epidemics like wildfires. Or you want to stamp them out when they're just little sparks you don't wanna wait until they've started burning through lots of brush in becoming a huge wildfire the the. It's very hard to extinguish. And so you need trained public health professionals. You need to have good disease surveillance on the ground. You need to be able to have the lab infrastructure in place in the testing in place in all of the diagnostics in place. All the things that you're going to be able to detect what's going on. I you need your your. Your is near ears on the ground. And then the tools are detected and then the ability to go respond to it now is been spending the vast majority of my career doing this in places like the congo you know but here in the united states we're learning. It's the same problem. We didn't invest in our public health infrastructure. And so as a result we're really paying the price you know. It took us a long time to be able to to get Testing in running. It took a really long time to be able to contact tracing in all these people who are trying to figure out okay. This person is exposed to this person. This person gave a guy gave it to this person. All of that has taken a very very longtime time to give get in place. And so we're it's like having a house with a really poor foundation that you know it's sinking while you're trying to build on top of it and that's kind of unfortunately where we are.

Bola Democratic Republic Of Congo Ebola Tetanus Measles United States Congo
Where Did COVID Come From?

The Naked Scientists

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Where Did COVID Come From?

"The story that we've been told is that the coronavirus cancer bats and jumped in humans sometime late last year at seafood market in the city of Wuhan. China. It's a neat tail, but the problem is nobody actually knows whether it's true and the evidence is mixed, which is why the World Health Organization said over the past few months there has been a lot of discussion about the origins of Covid nineteen. Or preparations have been finalized and experts will be traveling to China this weekend to prepare scientific plans with their Chinese counterparts for identifying the. Sources of the disease the WHO's director. General Federal. Gabriel's speaking there back in. July. The two people that the WHO, which just the advanced party for a much bigger group of scientists leaving soon for hand to start asking hard questions from the WHO Micron, the answers to these questions are sometimes elusive, and it is quite a detective story to find the source and the intermediate pathways by which the virus can breach that barrier to humans. We spent decades trying to do that any bola we spent years trying to do that with Merce and Sarah's it takes time and it does take meticulous multi sectoral approach to this and. We don't know where that species barrier was actually breached. This is very important because unless we understand like anything if the walls of your castle breached, you need to know where the breaches because you can fix and repair that breach. You can make sure that that is strengthened for the future. So we need to understand was the the track of this virus from the wild animal kingdom directly into humans directly through farmed animals directly into a marcus. When Mark Two hundred, we have to keep an open mind science must stay open to all possibilities. In. This program were exploring the. The evidence and the gaps in the evidence will I hear how the virus might have got from animals and into people will talk to scientists who are questioning the time and place it actually emerged and address whether the virus could have actually come from lap. On the very last day of Twenty nineteen China reported an outbreak of a strange pneumonia in cluster of people with links to the local who on live animal and seafood market two weeks. Later, the cause of the onus was identified as a new corona virus. Now named Saws Covy to the causes the syndrome known as COVID. Nineteen. Since. Then thousands of scientific papers have been published on the outbreak including the genetic sequence of the virus which confirms its close relationship to Corona viruses carried by bats, and therefore also gives us a clue as to where this vars came from Dennis. Carroll heads the Global Viral and project the Coruna viruses first and foremost are a family of viruses. We estimate there between four and five thousand different corona viruses and virtually all of the ones that we've discovered to date about two hundred we found in bats in different parts of the World Asia Africa, and in the Americas. Bats well, we don't know why bat except that bats are able to host viruses like corona viruses without themselves, having any adverse effects, and they will periodically shed these viruses in their feces or in their saliva. So they represent sort of an ideal host because a virus when it doesn't affect another animal, the last thing want to do is to kill the animal off its speaks to its own demise as well. So they've developed a very sympathetic relationship with bats over the Millennia. Are you saying that bats of the origin and when you get corona viruses and other species, it represents a jump from a bat into that species at least at some point in time. Well, I. Let's be very clear. We don't have a definitive answer as to how the COVID nineteen virus entered the human population but we've seen enough examples of the virus moving either directly or indirectly from bats that it's the most reasonable explanation. There was some initial speculation to be confirmed that Pangolin. Another wildlife animal that is a food source in China may have acted as a spillover agent, but more work needs to be done to really clarify exactly what the transmission route might've been. One other avenue to pursue is you read genetic code off of a virus and then you go looking in the database to see what is most closely related to because that can sometimes point you in the right direction of West something came from. Walt story emerges when we do that sort of analysis, many of the different corona viruses circulating in these geographic areas do in fact, have a strong genetic relatedness to the covid nineteen genetic profile. So it speaks to a pedigree shared pedigree. So if that's the case, then you make a case of the fact that these viruses are actually pretty common. You can find the across the very diverse patch of China. Why would they emerge in Wuhan? Well. The source is largely bats that are proximal to Wuhan City, and one of the things we know about bats first and foremost is that they have the ability to adapt and share. Living. Space with human populations and so what we've seen in Wuhan as an example, love high interactive dynamics between bat populations possibly again, secondary intermediary hosts with human populations. If we don't bring a human in close proximity to these infected animals, you will not get a spillover.

China Wuhan City World Health Organization Covid Director Gabriel Saws Covy Merce Pneumonia Carroll Millennia Asia Africa Americas Walt Sarah
Lebanon tribunal names 4 suspects in Hariri killing

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:55 min | 2 years ago

Lebanon tribunal names 4 suspects in Hariri killing

"Is more than. Fifteen years since Lebanon's Prime Minister Rafic, Hariri was killed in a massive car bomb along with twenty one others. Later today an international caught near The Hague will hand down verdicts in the trial of four people accused of planning and carrying out the attack the four accused of of the Iran backed militia and political party. Hasballah. Hezbollah itself is not formally accused. Well, let's hear from the journalist and multiple twenty four regular contributor in Beirut Leyla Milana Allen Lali you're standing outside the very hotel in front of which Rafic Hariri was killed. What sense is in Beirut today that the justice will be done. There is very little sense. the families, all of the twenty one people other than because eighty who were killed as well as the nearly three hundred injured have waited as you say, over fifteen years justice taking a very long time this commission to come through with this, and the problems are a few of course many people here feel that the responsibility lies with the Syrian regime and through has through then has one. and. The five men on trial here all labeled as Hezbollah supporters because they found it very difficult to actually find evidence to show that they his bumbling members because, of course. Is So secretive I'm one of the biggest problems is that must have budgeted dean who was the main sort of ringleader debt these indictments who was accused of having set. The whole thing was known very well as the military imam to Hezbollah was killed in two thousand sixteen an attack on Damascus APP while his was helping Bashar Assad's regime with the wool there. So he was the one person who is very easy to link to Hezbollah and the only evidence they have all circumstantial evidence from these mobile phone networks. So as we expected, the indictment will come through the verdict will. Saying that before remaining men all guilty lane attempts about those who are accused of the murder of the prime minister. said a five men who stand accused have all been labeled Hezbollah supporters and that's because it's incredibly difficult to prove that they were in fact, Hezbollah members everyone in Lebanon believes that that. The majority of people believe that Kennedy was assassinated at because he was starting to pull away from supporting the Syrian regime who'd had troops stationed in Lebanon nearly thirty years all the way through the civil war and afterwards, and of course, we now know that Hezbollah very heavily H. Two zero. But this was all just sort of starting not link between Syria and Iran and Hezbollah but the main man was accused of being the ringleader. Organized the whole nation is most of that that the WHO was very well known as the head of the military wing of Hezbollah but he was killed in two, thousand sixteen and attacks Damascus Apple, which means he's no longer in the indictments and he was the only person. It was very easy to direct the link because there was evidence that he walls a top commander in. Bola. So I, the that means that it's very unlikely has itself will be named in the verdict today it will simply be. These men and then these men haven't been found the Lebanese government has been able to find. Her Bella is a big portion Lebanese government and the chief of Hezbollah nationalize long maintained that he absolutely does not see any of independence in this inquiry he says that it's funded by Israel and he says that there is no way that they will ever hand over these suspects old they will ever be found and historic has very good at hiding its top guys who've been involved in operations in. Lebanon in Syria and even Iran many think that these four worship over to Iran. So even if that comes through in the verdict is guilty as we expect, there's not really going to be any justice indeed has on Rolla said that Hezbollah isn't worried or isn't remotely concerned with today's verdicts but what will the repercussions be? The repercussions are unlikely to be much at this point, and that's for a few reasons I, Ne- as I said standing outside the. Hotel, which at the time in two, thousand and five win this thousand kilograms of TNT when pages devastating crater in the middle of the road and destroying all the buildings around loons lodge in the public consciousness here you there had been assassinations in the years off the list of this by the largest active. So many people because whoever was responsible really wasn't taking any chances and it was enormous copy. And other than the two thousand, six war with Israel, which was very different because it's a war in terms of an explosion going off in a very recognizable. Popular Ponte. out of nowhere that was the one that was remembered. Of course, until two weeks ago, two, thousand, seven, hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. In the port, just a few hundred meters down the road from this hotel. Injuring seven thousand people or more chilling up to two hundred, and still don't have a full body copy. What is still missing Susan now is far more would have. Done that assassination the other thing is that at the time, it was very shocking that people. Had Eighty was really associated with post for Lebanon. He was the symbol of course will Lebanon deeply loved by international leaders around the world as well as many Lebanese and so the idea that the Syrian regime would dad's kill him has would dare to kill him with. So shocking even though of course, assassinations were quite common but he was he was such. An important figure now firstly, since then of course, we've seen brushing Alaska wage a almost decade long bloody war against his own citizens in Syria we've seen very clearly now those strong legs between Hezbollah Syria and Iran Hezbollah work soldiers full bachelor says regime in the civil war in Syria. So nobody would be remote. You surprised now that that they all responsible. And the other issue of course is the fact that. Sad had eighty I think Kennedy some kind of stepped in his stead very much because he was the son and that's why he was given so much faith especially young age and has become such an important figure in politics here. But in the last year, we've seen a rudy seismic shift in Lebanese. Politics. People say that happens every fifteen years the lost round with two, thousand, five, thousand, and six before the civil war ended in one, thousand, nine, hundred before about. It started in nineteen, seventy five, and now of two, thousand, one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty weeks but newest protest movement Saudi the is very much seen as one of those political elites people out. So the younger generation at least don't have that same attachment to the family and time to seeing them as such an important force a good and for future movements, which is what that party is called Ford Movement in Lebanon So really this bird apartment, of course for the families. Of those killed and injured is not really going to have that much of an impact with so much else going on right now.

Hezbollah Lebanon Iran Syria Rafic Hariri Damascus Israel Beirut Lebanese Government Kennedy Prime Minister Bashar Assad Leyla Milana Allen Lali Dean Commander Murder Alaska
"bola" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"bola" Discussed on The Dictionary

"That's K N O ot nodding and a design of usually three rows of our. medallions. Maybe I can find an example of a Bokhara. Let's see this is from WHO's Becca Stan About all the information I get. Next is I. Think it's pronounced book mole or Bulk Mal Capital B. o. k. m. a. l. and the a has the little circle over it. This is a noun from nineteen thirty one, a literary form of Norwegian developed developed by the gradual reform of written Danish and then compare to the word that I do not know how to say which I'm going to try to say as Knin Norsk, N., Y. N. O. R. S., K. Norsk this is bulk mal is a Norwegian word that literally means book language. Interesting. Okay. Next and last word for this episode is Bola B. O. L. A. OR B. O. L. A. S.. which would also be the plural singular and plural guess noun from eighteen eighteen, a chord with weights attached to the ends for throwing at and entangling an animal. This is an American Spanish Bolas from Spanish Bola which means ball. Let's see. We had a boiler boilermaker boilerplate boiler room boilersuit boiling boiling point boil over blink. Mode. Dark Wa- Serie Boisterous Watt. Because Bucknell and Boola. I am going to pick Bukamal as the word of the episode because I don't know just kind of interesting book language I mean this. That's I. Don't know some probably related to the dictionary in some way alright that is it for the words. Thank you very much for listening and until next time this is spencer dispensing information goodbye..

K N O Knin Norsk Bokhara K. Norsk Becca Stan Bola B. O. L. A. Bukamal Bucknell Wa Boola Y. N. O. R. S. B. O. L. A. S..
"bola" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"bola" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Hello. Words welcome to the dictionary podcast. Yeah. Okay. Let's say these things that are called words. The first of these so-called words is boiler B. O. I L. E. R.. It is a noun from Circa fifteen forty one one that boils to a a vessel used for boy lean to be the part of a steam generator in which water is converted into steam, and which consists usually of metal shells and tubes. To See a tank in which water is heated or hot water is stored. Next is boilermaker. It is two words Noun from eighteen, sixty, five, one, a worker who makes assembles or repairs boilers. I was actually going to make the joke. It's the person or the thing that makes the thing that I just read about but I didn't actually expect it to be in here and then number two whiskey with a beer chaser. Beer chaser just means that you drink it afterwards. Next is boilerplate one word Noun from eighteen ninety, seven, one syndicated material supplied especially two weekly newspapers in Matrix or plate form to a standardized text. To be formulaic or hackneyed luggage as in bureaucratic boilerplate number three tightly packed icy snow. Why is that called boilerplate? I don't think. I've I. Don't think I'm familiar with that one. All right. Next is boiler room two words Noun from Nineteen Zero, three, one, a room in which a boiler is located number to a room equipped with telephones used for making high pressure usual usually fraudulent sales pitches. Y-, they probably call it a boiler room because they're high pressure and its high stress, and you know boilers are also full of high pressure. You know steamed stuff I'm thinking of the movie the shining they had to release the pressure in the boiler so they wouldn't explode. Next is boilersuit. One word suit is s you. Noun from Nineteen Twenty eight and we have the synonym coverall, which I assume would also just be overall, interesting, overall and cover all. They just took off the see what happened there. Are, right next is boiling I. Form Adjective from the fourteenth century one a heated to the boiling point one be. Synonym is Torrid T.. O.. R. I.. D. As in a oiling son. To intensely agitated as in a oiling see also is in boiling with anger. Now, we have the second form of boiling adverb from sixteen o seven to an extreme degree. Synonym is very as in boiling mad or boiling hot. Next Boiling point two words Noun from seventeen, seventy, three, one, the temperature at which a liquid boils to a the point at which a person becomes uncontrollably angry. To be the point of crisis and then we have the wo- seventeen be definition for the word head H. E. A. D.. So head has at least eighteen individual definitions or seventeen main definitions while okay and then we have an example matters that reached the boiling point. When I said to a before for some reason in my memory I feel like I said to be accidentally but I have no idea. So maybe I said to be or maybe I, said to A. I guess we'll find out later. Okay. Next is boil over two words. Verb from the Fifteenth Century looks like it's just in transitive one to overflow while boiling to to become. So incensed as to lose one's temper and then boil over is a noun. Next is the word Boeing B O n que it is a transitive verb. I'm surprised there's not more than one. But. It is from nineteen eighty-seven sometimes vulgar and it just means to copulate with. and then the etymology says Boeing or Boeing. Those are interjections of a reverberating sound. That's where they get the sound or the word from I thought that there would be other definitions for boing as well but I guess not. All right. Next we have this is a French. Couple of words that I am going to totally screw up I think it's pronounced bowed dark. Something like that be only s second word de Apostrophe a R C. this is a noun from eighteen. Oh, five and we have the synonym osage orange I think that would be it also, it's wicked. So it's a type of wood and this is American. French literally literally means. How would or Bo would? I never know how to pronounce that word because sometimes the context does not help me Bo would probably a bow like an era of era. That's what I think. They're talking about Bo would. Okay. NEXT IS MOSS ARE- B. O. I S. E. R. E. IT is a noun from eighteen thirty to a panel or paneling of carved. Wood. This is French again from. Assuming Wa -bio I ask which means would from old French of Germanic origin akin to the old high German busk. US. K which means forest. Now, why the the previous word is. It says Bo dark or something like that. But why wouldn't it be Wa dark? I. Don't know French is weird. All right. Next is boisterous. It is an adjective from the fourteenth century. One is obsolete, and then we have one a when be and one seat. So one, a synonym is course one be synonyms are durable and strong ONC- synonym is massive. To a noisily turbulent synonym is rowdy. To be marked by or expressive of exuberance and high spirits. Three synonyms are stormy and tumultuous, and then another synonym at the end is vociferous boisterously is an adverb and boisterous nece is a noun. And this is from Middle English boisterous, which means crude or clumsy. Next Rehab What B. O. T., and then there is the carrot accent over the I. This is a Noun from nineteen, twenty two and we have these synonym nightclub. What and it's French literally means box. I think a nightclub is a nightclub is a little bit more than just a box, but I'm sure there is some reason they chose that. Next. Is Bok. Choy be okay. Second Word C. H., O. Y. or C. H. I. Oh, you could. Also, it could also be Park Choi P. A. K. This is a noun from eighteen forty, seven a Chinese cabbage forming an open head with long white stocks and green leaves. The scientific name is BRASSICA RAPA geneticist. So this is Chinese word It says Guangdong, which I assume might be like the region in China that it's rum Bok Choy literally means White Vegetable. That's what that means. Next is Bokhara capital be okay. H.. A. R. A. It is a noun from nineteen hundred, an oriental rug characterized by fine nodding..

Bo dark Boeing Wa Bokhara Bok Choy BRASSICA RAPA Choy US Choi P. A. H. E. A. Guangdong S. E. R. B. O. T. China
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 2 years ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
Gilead’s remdesivir is a rare example of foresight in this pandemic

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

05:35 min | 2 years ago

Gilead’s remdesivir is a rare example of foresight in this pandemic

"Up let's go inside the magazine the cover story it's all about how Kelly adds wind does appear is an example of foresight in this pandemic we caught up with magazine editor Joe Webber and the writer of the piece Robert Langer from the beginning of this series character really clear that there weren't that many drugs that could do that and like lab data against corona viruses to go right into trials plane to human trials and this is one of a kind of handful found some from very early on you know if there's going to was going to early drugs qualifiers this is likely to be excised paying attention only on those talking to Billy you know early on trying to get interviews with some of their executives which was very hard to but what one thing we were able to get you know before this completely closed off or if you get a to talk to for you know into a one of A. R. the plants for the filling the file got in California this is why does everything was shutting down in mid March in U. appointment last days we could have done it we gotta talk over there a couple of great pictures and make videos suggesting that really helped make the story and then I just kept talking to them and you know get more detail at the earliest years of compounding then yeah finally is able to get me to deal with one of the top you know manufacture accurately tell me all the the seven different chemicals went into this and they get a twenty five different steps and you can compare the two making a very yeah yes the very specific or local of type of gratitude bakery if you don't if you don't already huge amount of your specially flower advance you have to wait for the new crop wheat to grow up to be a big delay that's right January all the specialty ingredients in the right order the flyers in China and Europe Wayans dance I was like the biggest smartest thing that they did yeah it's that's really such a key detail what to bring into Weber the editor of Bloomberg business week he joins us from Brooklyn and jolt you put this on the cover it makes a huge amount of sense because it's such a good read give us the contact from your perspective because you're looking across all of these stories not just as it relates to the crown of ours but across the world of business you know I think the story's significance is is huge and it's also the way that I I think is the best part of it but this is almost like the most hopeful news the only hopeful news basically to date in this coronavirus saga you either with like it it feels like it one bit of bad news after not act and it's almost like this cacophony of incompetence sometimes and so what I think Bob will be able to do in this Gilead story was actually shows like here's a good example of like one of the only ones really of a company that had incredible foresight and preparedness and you know how do you not actually ordered the raw materials that they needed to actually make this creep back in January even before it was you know before we knew how bad this was going to be having not done that back then we would not have the treatment that we certainly you know I like to be sure this is not a cure it's a treatment it takes corona virus from being fifteen gate operation down to maybe like eleven Coolidge down to like a linen suit you know if it's a modest improvement over nothing but at least it's something and you don't bother are you sort of you know reported around if you know if it's actually even more incredible than that because this is a drug that actually you know it's been around for like eleven years now and it never could find a purpose even right what what's the backstory you know the first thing that is you know looking for hepatitis C. drugs that was hard to administer the a better one for pills with conditional for that and then you know they tried it for a bola and they spend years on that you know because the first attempt to prolong a ball out quicker than the outbreak faded before they could get into even falls lake Catherine reasonable outbreak and then it didn't work that well so they are but in the end so they're trying to figure out what to do next and when the moment came along and they didn't have the thing that he definitely was I did not in January they didn't assume the best case scenario they didn't play has to wait a few weeks we'll see if this goes away because they're gay in case this is a pandemic worker or a whole bunch of stuff right now and it's just very different from what a lot of other folks did I have to say what's really cool in the story and if if people don't totally understand how significant this is it you're right Mr how Anthony Fauci has pointed out that he is like in the trial of ambassador to the first big trial of AZ T. the first drug for HIV right and so then you understand because that too was something we just couldn't figure out a treatment and so you understand Bob how room disappear is really a first very important step well yeah absolutely I mean the way to think of this is as a first step or first thing over again as the sea of going to self censor any a lot more drugs they're working on better drugs and better ways to administrative right now to confusion and we're definitely gonna need vaccines this doesn't solve the problem this is you know and as you said the first up from the second you know hospitalized patients in this reporter Robert Langer and of course Joe Webber the editor of Bloomberg business week and Carol what I really liked about this story from the pretty arresting cover image all the way through the pieces we talk so much about sort of botched response in on preparedness this was a case where a company anticipated some of this a lot still to be seen about whether this will be the drug that we need but I a company in the

Joe Webber Writer Kelly Editor
COVID-19 Question Answer Session with Dr. Amy Baxter

Outcomes Rocket

08:15 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 Question Answer Session with Dr. Amy Baxter

"So let's chat cove in nineteen. You know what what? What are some of the myths out there that you want to help us bus than you know? Guide us through that. Sure well I think the scariest myth was one. That was introduced to me by my bank teller. I put on a mask. She had on a mass. And we've known each other for years and she said confidentially. Is this really a thing? Because I've got a friend in Brooklyn says he drives by the hospitals in no one's there. Is this really happening? So the biggest myth is that coveted is not a serious disease that it's the same as flu. A study. This week showed that there actually are twenty one times more fatalities from Kobe in New York were from flu so the biggest Smith is is this going way and is is really a thing and the answer is no and yet Yeah no I. I definitely appreciate that. And it's real you know and a lot of us in the healthcare space Definitely feel it but there might be that out and so as we as we think about it. You know What what are some of the questions year getting and seeing that that you feel? The listeners could benefit from knowing around the around this virus. Sure I think that the interesting things are how this virus is different from other viruses and some of those attributes we could leverage for treatments and for care and some of them may get really scary because we don't have One of the papers I read yesterday said this virus is unlike any other and I think it's true. This pathogen is doing things that other viruses haven't so first of all the biggest difference is in infectivity by age. Usually we have what we call A. You're a where the very young ages we have a lot of infections in morbidity which means bad things happening and at the old ages we have a lot of corporate entity mortality. And we don't see that this one is very much a a along J. It's very very low. At young ages goes way at the top other than it. Strange about. This is how long it takes to become infected and how precipitous drop is when people have a problem so. I think that you probably know that. From the time of infection until you show symptoms can be five to seven days so that incubation is very long the scary part is that forty four percent of infections come during that a symptomatic face. So it's very easy to spread without knowing you have it. Which makes it harder to track. Hard to trace and hard to know who detest. Yeah it's It's different and and so how about the ideas of like where it came from and and you know why any thoughts around that sure well. It turns out that bats are natural reservoirs of grunted irises. So for example a Bola was initially in a bat in a cave. That a young boy outside the incident town was playing with. And that's where the virus team from as habitats change as the climate changes. Bats go out of their normal territories and they happen to have grown viruses as a very common infection. It doesn't kill them so it can be transmitted directly to humans now. The certainly the time that this virus started wasn't Wuhan an was from a back but it looking at the strains and the genetic typing of it it seems to be mutating fairly slowly and it makes it very easy to see when it started where it came from so the wet market in China is still the most likely it came from but no matter what. This is. The kind of virus that comes from that directly to humans. I'd heard that and I wasn't sure if it was true or not. I'm like is it. Is it really from Batson mean and then I also hear people saying it came from a lab somewhere? It's a chicken egg thing or a Atlantic yet. There was a there is a lab in Wuhan because of the risk of corona viruses. It had been studying. Bats heavily said SARS and Moore's so both stars and moons are Corona viruses and there had been increased studying bats in that lab. But it's because they're dangerous and because there are risks not because they're trying to create run irises or create infections. It's the fact that somebody was looking at it in researching yet because it was dangerous not that it became dangerous because someone was researching fascinating fascinating. I didn't know that connection. Thank you for that. So as we as we explore this J shaped curve. You know. I'm curious right. I mean I've got a three year old and I've got you know aging parents will tell me more about that and and particular things that you'd recommend for safety and and You know just things that we need to keep on our mind share it. Will I have a couple of theories about why the J shaped curve is typically the U shape curve has to do with mutagenicity so how well your immune system protects you and young? People don't have very weldon alter union systems so they tend to be more vulnerable to respiratory diseases and older people also have decreased immune systems so the the very heavy incidents on people who are over sixty five which seems to be where the cutoff is to have a dramatic increase in risk. That probably isn't due to decreased. Immunity one of the theories is that due to increased immunity. That there were the two grown viruses virus alpha and Beta cuddling named that were circulating in the late fifties and identified sixties. And so it may be that those people were alive in the fifties and sixties before it. Kinda petered out has some immunity that was developed that point which causes an excessive immune response in older patients. Now the other possibilities are this. Virus doesn't seem to enter the body and then get into the bloodstream and spread everywhere. It seems more like this virus comes into the body and marches a bit at a time. Almost as if the the troops come in and they set vacations and it's like World War Two and so the battalion's multiply and spread on a time. So with that being the case the interesting thing is that paper nature last week determined that tissues that this viruses attaching to before the lipid fatty layer of the virus. Fuses with the cell. Can the news in the nose? There's something called an ace two receptor. That is where the little spiky protein hops onto and holds on and their ace two receptors. All over the body but the ones that were interested in the nose and children don't have big noses they also don't have sinuses. You don't get a false at sinuses teenager interesting so because of that. Maybe that's why they they're less less at risk to to get this. Yeah absolutely if what we're talking about is something called viral load which is literally hell many virus particles. You have That is going to be difficult to accumulate in a small child. One of the interesting things I found out was that the nasal cavity size is dramatically. Increased over the age of seventy and it's Moammar nails. Oh is that right. Yeah certainly we've seen that males can be more at risk of catalyses more at risk of catching the virus than females. The ratio is about five to three some studies on about sixty percent of males. Were the ones who are affected by an only forty percent cements

Wuhan FLU Sars Kobe Brooklyn Batson China Smith New York Moore
Missed lessons from the Ebola Outbreak

Second Opinion

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Missed lessons from the Ebola Outbreak

"This is Dr Michael Wilks. With a second opinion history in general and the history of medicine in particular is greatly underappreciated. For the lessons it can teach US scholars. Tell us that those who cannot remember. The past are condemned to repeat it. Well it seems that valuable lessons learned in the recent past around epidemics have been ignored and disregarded for example although there are differences between the novel Corona Virus Cova Nineteen and the abol outbreak. There are valuable lessons that we missed. What's similar between the two diseases is the fear the distrust of government recommendations the role of the family and spreading the disease the importance of social distancing and the lack of a plan to attack the illness. Dr Brian Bird is a leading veterinarian. An infectious disease epidemiologist and the associate director of UC Davis one health institute. He's worked on the front lines of the Bulla epidemic and other epidemics round the world. He says the major lesson we might have learned was simply to have a plan being prepared or at least having a plan to be prepared is is the key doctor Bert. Also points out that. When Ebola was first recognized in west Africa the concept of a spreadable lethal virus was a totally new concept. That virus was a completely new disease to the people living in that region. They had no experience with the boulevard versus much like the job. Now for Cove it just like with Corona early in the Ebola outbreak. There was also fear no testing and a huge need for socialized relation that tore families apart. There were no treatments or vaccines for either a bowl or Cova and there was a fragmented healthcare system required to care for a large number of sick people and there was no trust in the public health response to prevent the healthy from getting sick West Africa. Bola was a warning to the world. Bit viruses will emerge from relatively distant and remote places. But what we've done no places remote and distant anymore because of the transportation networks whether it'd be roads airplanes in disease management it is essential that people trust their government and believe that they are telling them the truth you look in West Africa. There was a period of time when there was a lot of mistrust and disbelief that the disease was real so in the early months there were large campaigns that just to say a bola is real. There were many opportunities to learn from the Ebola outbreak. That were missed. A lot of those lessons learned have been laid by the wayside because it was appeared that that diseases the disease over there not here. Dr Bird explains the health of the people depends on a strong and coordinated government response during the Ebola outbreak governments in west Africa. Were eventually very heavy handed. But communities came to understand that self isolation was in their own self interest governments need NBC Straw and have a consistent and thoughtful approach to how they want to tackle the emergencies of the day. Today there are important lessons. That could be learned. Some countries and states and cities that could greatly benefit others it requires a willingness to learn and an openness to recognize that. We are all very much in this together. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second

West Africa Dr Brian Bird Ebola Dr Michael Wilks United States Cova Associate Director Bola Uc Davis Nbc Straw Cove
The Day They Closed Our Masjid  Ustadh Fahad Ansari

The Friday Circle Podcast

07:20 min | 2 years ago

The Day They Closed Our Masjid Ustadh Fahad Ansari

"Yesterday for the past six. The current virus rid nineteen and how sets US particularly with the closure from side to nothing did I can remember. Or markets can remember have had has been so impact from on the entire world as this pandemic if you think about it the previous issues of war terrorism other panicky Bola. They had an impact the shook the world they stopped. The word people have to do this differently. Nothing to schedule seeing at the moment is unprecedented that the entire world had to stop so functioning as it's used to functioning and it doesn't matter which party were you. How wealthier country poor countries is not a word of companies a secular country or the Muslim country or the Hindu cut. It doesn't matter it's affecting everybody. Schooling close pubs bars restaurants cafes cinemas theatres everything shut down sporting events primarily the NBA International to completely shut. Down or is international. Problem is installed. It's absolutely chilling to see what's happening is like a complete lockdown and obviously what affects us of believe with more than anything else you take that which is beloved to us away from below the thing to us a daily basis that we have in our minds as believers is also is a prayer at the place to do that is massage now if the controversial decision and the Austin some who assisting the stay open to discuss supposed writer room. I just want to focus on effective getting involved in the whether it's Roger all my opinion is has no consequence isn't bearing I nobody. I cannot influence the most staying open or being closed in this way. Never to the reality is we have to so. Let's think about this aren't delay. Says not even a leaf light tiny leaf fall off a tree in the middle? Of course loss hundred dollar witted for allow Zapped Leaf for. This doesn't draw full off Alah Willett. He wanted foldout. Whatever the reasons we say as to. Why most needs to have because of risk realities Alon wielded that is most close their doors winded that we cannot print these and therefore we need to reflect as A. Why isn't that position? That's the real question. Read you sit and you go fourteen days in suffice. It's a good time to sit and think about this question just over two weeks ago. I sent a picture of the governor and they had close it off completely so all you could see the white marble and you can see people in the off. Cnet would prey and is quite chilling. Side looking at the reassure us. The Authority said that the clean precautionary. It hoped to be running business as usual in a in a short period of time. And have you started wearing Madan? People Perplex go there for. He was thinking about Hutch. But you know there was a feeling that this is going to be okay. Then what happened last couple of weeks slowly restrictions start coming in non-saudi here in the UK into now local massage. What did it last week? The Friday Levin reduced ten minutes could find Saddam told. Don't come to the mess with children. He don't bring the humming. They sit at any level. This talk this could be dangerous. It's a risk to others who post this weekend. We're supposed to be on the retreat. Study Retreat Have to be constantly. He hoped by joining. You'll have a Mogadishu. He talked a video in paramount's Sanchez yourself. Before you come in wearing a must come in. All of these measures were happening. Guidance was coming out from the different organizations. And Councils about how we should deal with this and then yesterday almost like a domino effect one after the other press releases announcements this massive that losses to. It'll be no Jamak mortar. It'd be no Jeremiah. This Muslim he's Prato and the MOMS were crying. The Tears Trustees breaking down saying this is difficult decision. We've had to make. We didn't take it lightly. Believe believe if we did not take his likely and the reason that this is has taken such a hit. The most is not just a place where we pray. It's not just a place where we go. We worship flight time today through the congregation Salah. No it's much more than that. It's a hub of the community is when we have an education system we have found in. We've mothers for the children. We have classes for adults will ever On we A- circle the Mawlid relearn at the practice our faith. It's a place of its place of celebration. Someone has a newborn child legal to celebrate the most their party. Nick weddings morning. He was last rites leaves. Libya genus pre in a mass shooting. People COME TO SOCIALIZE. How feeding so down because after work softer network late night and then the run they come and they just see some of the brothers in this piece this school. This song This was missing the wellbeing discussed affairs of your mom. Local community problems how to resolve them the visual refund. Raise our brothers and sisters locally locally and get into states. A few days older All those lessons of a lot have been taken away from them.

Prato United States Zapped Leaf Saddam Alah Willett NBA Mogadishu Alon Jeremiah Madan Roger Libya Cnet Austin Writer Nick UK Levin Non-Saudi
Eyes on the Virus: The View from the CDC

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

15:00 min | 2 years ago

Eyes on the Virus: The View from the CDC

"Is working around the clock to produce and stand out more test. That's what the CDC has recommended you know how many CDC is administered these days the Centers for Disease Control and prevention also known as the CDC is probably the most recognized institution managing the Corona Virus Pandemic. They're the ones offering guidelines on symptoms travel and prevention. He might have already been to their website. Given the level of fear and confusion surrounding this pandemic I wanted to talk to one of the. Cdc's top leaders and get answers to some of your biggest questions. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. The American public really needs to steady ourselves for a long haul here. This may be more disruptive than other outbreaks. We've been through. Dr Ranch shook. It is the principal. Deputy Director of the. Cdc This is not her first Rodeo. She's been with the CDC FOR OVER THIRTY YEARS MANAGING RESPONSES TO H One n one SARS and Ebola. I've spent a lot of time with her out in the field. I know we've already talked about the movie contagion but remember Kate. Winslet's character the virus hunter. She was modeled after. Dr Shook it. I asked her if she knows anyone. Personally who has contracted the corona virus? No not yet. But you know the epidemiology that we're seeing suggests that all of us are GonNa know someone you are the principal deputy director of the CDC talk us through a typical day for you now. Typical Day doesn't exist to every day is a new adventure But you know we're taking this really seriously for the past several months and so my days start early and they go late and they involve many calls. After I do get home we have over fifteen hundred. Cdc staff involved in the response so my day is always interesting and always challenging and involves connecting with people around the country the states and local public health. Who are on the frontline. You have worked on lots of pandemics and outbreaks in the past. Have you ever seen a response of this magnitude? The National Guard now just deployed to new. Rochelle all that. We're seeing around the country. The extent of this outbreak in the United States and around the world is is serious I was in in Beijing in two thousand three during the SARS outbreak and I saw firsthand Society really stopped I think we all saw that on. Tv when we saw Wuhan China and then who bay province literally shut down. I think each community will be making some decisions about what's the best strategy for their environment. Cdc's working closely with the state and local public health authorities to provide guidance and advice. I have seen some pretty dramatic interventions in my experience I actually was also in West Africa during Bola but I think for Americans. This is quite surprising and stunning in some of the communities. There's been a lot of news about testing and I WANNA ask you some specific questions about that but I just give me your your taken. Hell has the United States done with regard to testing compared to other countries in the world. The rollout of the laboratory testing to the public health system didn't go as quickly and smoothly as we usually see. We had hoped to be able to skill up the testing at the public health. Labs states and cities earlier than we were able to so that was a bit delayed in most of the country the commercial sector really was slow to take this on and scale up and what we saw in a couple of other countries was rapid. Scale UP OF TESTING. I would say that the jury's out about exactly what's the best way to roll out testing? I've heard from colleagues and other countries about concern that there was so much testing going on of people with no symptoms and people who really were not at risk that it clogged up the healthcare system. So I think right now. We're seeing you know we've done more than eleven thousand tests. I believe between CDC in the state and local public health labs now and the commercial labs are just coming online right now. So I think it's going to be important to use them but I know what the American public to get the impression that the right thing is for every single person who wants a test to get tested that could have negative consequences both for the healthcare system in the testing ability for everyone who really needs it right now if somebody is concerned because they have symptoms. They don't seem to have the flu. Maybe they came in contact with somebody with the corona virus as things stand now dr shook. At how easy would it be for that person to get tested? Well I think an important thing is to be connected with the healthcare system to figure out if you need testing you know. It may not be the best thing to go into a clinic and ask about that. It may be better to call. I would say that based on what I've seen so far and learned about this virus. The average person who's young and healthy without underlying conditions like heart disease lung disease kidney disease diabetes who develops cough and fever can probably stay home and Essentially self isolate until they feel better and Doesn't really need a test. Over the course of the weeks or months ahead there may be so many people with these symptoms that testing individual ones may not be as efficient and we really need to shift into the community interventions. And not the one on one or the the man to man you know. We need to move to the zone approach. It sounds like what you're saying. At some point there is going to be this acknowledgement that the virus is spreading in the community and testing every individual given that. You're not gonNA do anything different. Based on the result that testing may not make much sense. But we're not there yet right. I mean we. We still need to get an of how widespread this is in the United States. And it seems like we don't really know the answer to that question right There are a couple approaches to get an understanding of how widespread this is. So you know. We have a number of systems that we use to track a seasonal influenza and those systems are being adapted to also track cove nineteen but another of the systems that we're using as our hospital surveillance that looks at Individuals who are hospitalized for infectious respiratory disease who get influenza testing or adding the coveted nineteen testing for those individuals. So I think we're GONNA have the broad perspective of where things are going and how bad this is with some of these systems so essentially outpatients in patients critical care and also fatalities will all be tracked the way that we track for flu. But we'll be adding in the Cova testing and we're just beginning to get. Those systems rolled out in different areas. One of the questions. I get a lot Dr shook it. I'm sure you do as well has to do with schools We do see that. There are school closings and the United States. And I wonder if you think that's warranted. If that's really going to be of benefit we know that children are very important in the transmission or spread of many respiratory viruses but for the covert nineteen disease. We don't know that children are an important part of the transmission dynamics. We haven't seen that yet. That said school dismissals or school. Closures may be warranted for certain situations for instance a case in a school may appropriately prompt dismissals for cleaning. That's you know dismissals. For just a day or two so sufficient cleaning of the environment can happen. There may be schools that serve a high risk population special needs kids who have many medical problems or have staff or faculty where there's a high percentage of people who are at risk for severe complications. Those types of facilities may need to want to alter their their procedures to be able to protect the vulnerable Schools May in the weeks or months ahead experienced high absentee rates where it's really not feasible to keep the school open but we know that closing a school has a lot of unintended consequences Many times it means parents have to stay home Because their kids are home and those workplaces the parents go to. We'll have unexpected high absenteeism. We know also that A high percentage of American children depend on schools for lunch and for meals. And so What we really want schools to be doing now and communities to be doing is to think through if we do end up needing to close a school for a shorter learn longtime or needing to dismiss students for shorter longtime. What can we get ready to go? That will help. Kids be able to learn while they're home. People who need to be fed be be able to be fed while the school was closed and You know making sure. There's good communication systems so that the community knows what to do when the school will reopen and so forth with Spring break next week. This is another question I get a lot. What is the guidance the? Cdc is giving on travel leaving aside international countries for. Why would you recommend people not travel this next week during spring break? We'll we think that People who are vulnerable those who are elderly with underlying conditions or those with series underlying conditions. Who aren't that elderly Should think twice about about travel. One of the issues is the uncertainty of where you're going and You know what the circumstances will be where you're going We also think that large gatherings you know these. These conferences that bring people together from all across the country. It's not necessarily that being at a conference itself is that Dangerous or being at a large event like in a one of the festival's but I think what we're concerned about. Is that individuals who come from across the country to a large event in then returned to you know fifty or a hundred different cities could bring that virus back into many communities and really speed up how this virus spreads across the country and a mass gathering is. How many people would you say you know? This is going to be variable. We've posted some recommendations on our website. They're called community mitigation strategies. Really what we call social distancing so there's not an absolute number for mass gathering you kind of know it when you see it. But if it's filled with high risk people or people like on a cruise ship where there's lots of high risk people and they're going to be going back to a million places and the shared environment is difficult to keep clean. Those are the kinds of settings that were concerned about. You know I've really been struck by the fact that most of the headlines make the point I think correctly that eighty percent or so of the people who are infected by this virus will recover and be okay but we have defined the vulnerable population as you've mentioned and I wonder for you know people who are in their seventies or eighties. Who are listening right now. People who may have an underlying condition the here this Dr shook it and for many of them. It feels like a death sentence. Just waiting to happen. How do you? How do you respond to them? Yeah every individual's different and there's not a a certain age cutoff or a certain disease that puts you at astronomically higher risk than someone else But there's things that everyone can do Higher Risk and lower risk certainly reducing the context that you have if you are in one of these high risk groups reducing the social exposures finding alternative ways to socialize whether it's by phone or online or video chats with loved ones making sure that you have you know supplies at home medicines at home So the most important things are to reduce those exposures and limit the chances that Joel contract the virus. Now if you do get the virus Most people Will Not have the severe outcomes is just the the risk for the elderly and those with underlying conditions is higher that you'll have those more complicated courses One of the reasons we're trying to slow the spread and really strengthen the healthcare system is so that if you do get infected and you do have a difficult pneumonia or a complicated course of the illness. We WanNa make sure that the healthcare system conserve you. Well one thing that people should know is that their clinical trials going on right now of new drugs that may be promising to reduce the seriousness of the infection. And I I hope that we'll have results of those in the next few months. We've all heard about vaccine studies. Those are going to take much longer but the therapy trials should have some results in the next few months. And that's the kind of thing that would be very helpful to know in the future and just finally stare into your crystal ball for a second. It's early March. How long do you think we're GONNA be talking about this? Well I think we need to be ready for this to be a problem for some time. Many respiratory viruses have a season -ality more disease in the winter and spring less in the summer But YOU. You will recall that with influenza in two thousand nine. When in very new influenza pandemic strain emerged we had disease during the summer to. It didn't go away completely. We had large outbreaks in summer camps and so forth. That was a virus where schoolchildren were really important and it may have been that the summer break from school reduced the circulation and then soon as kids went back to school. We saw a big increase again in the fall. I have to say. We're preparing for a response that lasts months and I think if this virus turns out to be one that sticks with us as a I in terms of humans until we have high levels of immunity either because so many people had mild infection and got protected or because we have a vaccine. We may need to be ready to deal with this virus for years and I think the systems that have led us down or been less robust than we had wanted are going to be critical for us to invest in and to make sure that we do better during this response and that we do even better for the next

CDC United States Influenza Dr Sanjay Gupta Sars CNN Dr Shook Dr Ranch Deputy Director Principal Principal Deputy Director Winslet Kate Beijing Rochelle National Guard Seasonal Influenza Wuhan China
Are we doing enough to prevent the spread of COVID-19?

All In with Chris Hayes

09:30 min | 2 years ago

Are we doing enough to prevent the spread of COVID-19?

"Joined by. Dr Ezekiel Emanuel former Obama. White House Health Policy Advisor. He's Vice Provost Global Initiatives University of Pennsylvania and Dr Peter Hotels Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine Doctor Manual. When we start with you. Where do you see us right now? Are we doing enough in terms of large scale social disruption and changes to slow the transmission of this epidemic? So first of all. I've been saying for several weeks now that it's going to get worse before it gets better. Parsley it's GonNa get worse because we have testing. That's just going to show us how prevalent the illness is. It's also getting worse because we know we have more community acquired infections as I mentioned to someone today. You know one week ago. We weren't even talking about new Rochelle and now new. Rochelle is a major topic in New York. And that's a lockdown and if we focus on new Rochelle without thinking about all the other places that this virus is maybe Washington. Dc maybe the suburbs of Baltimore. Who knows where the problem is? We need a more systematic less uneven response. That has to be pretty uniform. Because just 'cause we're seeing it new Rochelle doesn't mean Rochelle's the only place in New York that Scott and that response does have to include things like much more prevalent testing so we really have a handle on who's got it and who doesn't and a really good model is South Korea if you look at their trends you can see that. They're beginning to bend in South Korea. We also do need to inform people. We use the term social distancing like everyone knows what it means. It's not immediately obvious to people what that entails and how much you need to be separate from people explain to what should people know about but a large part of it. You people have come up with all these numbers no more than one hundred people to meet no more. The issue is density. How close are you to people? How easy is it for the droplets to spread? How much are you sort of packed in light sardines or not and that real? I mean that's a physical thing That is really important and I do think we probably need to educate people to minimize the. They're our contact and to stay home more. You can go out where there's no one else if you're going walking in the woods or something or going to a place where there are other people But I do think Restricting how we move around is going to be important I will note that not every but most of the Ivy League schools now for example colleges mine included. We're going online. The second half of the semester is all going to be online. Students aren't going to be in. Dormitories accepts students. That can go back to their home country and still complete the semester. So you are seeing a lot of action. But it's not concerted and that's what it's not systematic and that's what's bothering me Dr Hotels. We've been checking with you throughout the unfolding of the goal pandemic and I'm curious. Are we learning more about the virus itself about the basics about the transmission rate? Which seems to be maybe lower than at first. We thought the fatality rate the incubation period. Where is our knowledge right now about this so the transmission rate still seems to be? Pretty High Dr Fao. She mentioned. It's probably a significantly higher than the influenza as well as the mortality rate. But the you know just to echo and reinforce some of the things zeke Doctor Emmanuel was was saying we've learned a few things from a recent analysis. My colleague Mark Lipchitz sit at Harvard School of Public Health Chan School of Public Health together with a student a doctoral student. Ruan Lee didn't analysis of the Chinese cities in terms of how severe the epidemic is with the extreme example being Wuhan rare nine thousand people wound up in and severely ill with two thousand in the ICU versus city. Like Long Joe where there was only twenty a big difference right and it looked like it's primarily to do to how quickly you got on top of things after sustained community transmission started. So they let it go for six weeks. Before they implemented aggressive control and testing whereas in Guangzhou were the only at twenty cases one week. What's the lesson learned from the United States We're now about three weeks into this in terms of sustained community transmission. We had our first case of community transmission around the end of April so subtract a week before then. So we're getting to the point where because we're not doing adequate diagnostic testing and implementing those very important control measures. That seek pointed out. We're in a situation. Where we could risk being closer to Wuhan and Guangzhou and and we do we. We can't be there so now is a very critical period over the next couple of weeks where we have to be very aggressive about closing down major venues. We just this Houston. Today with the Rodeo was a tough decision but was the right decision that we're going to have to do this all over the country right now and the reason is this because if we miss that opportunity we then have. Our new problem becomes surge capacity hospitals. Where we're not gonNA have enough beds. We're not GONNA have enough into ventilators. We don't want to go in that direction. So now's now czar. Big Schnauzer going to be our last chance. We've already missed that in over the last few weeks. Can I reemphasize something? Peter says which is so in the entire United States. We have about eight hundred thousand hospital beds a little under eight hundred thousand hospital beds. In the entire United States we have under seventy thousand adult intensive care unit. Beds we have about sixty five thousand ventilators with the strategic supply. I've heard that it goes up slightly under one hundred thousand. That's our maximum capacity in the country at the moment if you imagine that even two percent of the population gets the corona virus and we have about six percent who are seriously. Ill GonNa need a respirator. We've exhausted all that supply. Just for those patients. Forget the heart attack patients. Forget the patients who need it for any other reason and I think what Peter said is exactly right we probably have missed two or three turns over the last few weeks where we could have gotten things down and just focusing on the hot spots. Seattle New Rochelle. I think is not. We need a much more systematic countrywide approach so that we don't overwhelm the healthcare system. Which already you know doesn't have that much search capacity in it. Dr Hotels Final Point to you for people that are watching this I. I've struggled with this for the last three weeks right. Communicating in a way that does not induce catastrophe or panic but also is clear eyed about the risks. And I do think it's worth just going back to the distinction between your individual risk you random American one of three hundred thirty million that you will get very sick and need to be hospitalized or may as life threatening illnesses that individual risk for any given random person is probably low in the grand scheme of things and this systemic risk to the society and to the healthcare system which is extremely high at this moment. Is that a fair way of phrasing. It yeah absolutely and also remember. It's it's all about communicating. What our top priorities are in. This is what I've been disappointed about. We've lost a lot of time because of a blanket statements that are not backed by data saying this is contained. This is this is the cold. This is the flu when in fact we know that there are specific groups that are at high risk including older older individuals those with underlying disabilities and our healthcare workers. And so what I've been looking for is at the White House. Press briefings to say. Look these are four. Bit Concerns Right. These are three or four populations That were concerned about This is a why we need to get on top of this very quickly. And here's what we're doing about it and and historically the American people have responded very well to this They understood this three. Bola Zeka as we say. This is not our first Rodeo so so we know how to respond and we just need that clear kind of concise messaging right now. All right. Just had one thing to Chris. Point which is we also do know the ass for any individual. The risk is low except we do know that there are certain people and Peter Emphasize of those who are over sixty or sixty five those who have chronic illness. They are at high risk and what we have done in. This country is aggregate them in nursing homes. Those are most vulnerable people people in nursing and we really have to social distance. There reduced the number of visitors. Probably two zero. Make sure that people are counting up and taking a donning protective equipment so that we don't have that Patriot play just explode with corona virus like it did in Seattle because almost every one of them is really on the verge just like the cruise ships. Good Point -portant point Zeki Manual. Dr Peter Hotels. Thank you

Rochelle Peter Emphasize Dr Peter Hotels United States Influenza Seattle Guangzhou Dr Ezekiel Emanuel Dr Peter Hotels Dean South Korea White House Vice Provost Global Initiative New York Baltimore University Of Pennsylvania Ivy League Dr Fao Policy Advisor Barack Obama