25 Burst results for "Boggs"

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

08:19 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"And if podcasting is one of the most trusted mediums, as a source of information, then people are probably less likely to give up their podcast too. So, but I guess the bigger question is, is it going to be pulled back off the pool of advertisers in the podcasting market? And all these estimates and forecasts about podcasting hitting 2 billion and ad sales by next year may get delayed again. Well, I don't know. Again, last time there was a recession. Podcast advertising spending went up. Well, it did, but it didn't go up as fast. I think you did not go up as fast. Yeah, I think we're safe. Yeah, I think overall, I agree with you. I think the podcasting media is overall safe. But I do think that there could be some advertisers that pull back on their marketing budgets is what I'm saying. So, and that could include podcasting with some of them. I'm not saying it'll happen with all of them. I'm just saying some of them may. This is a trade true pattern that I've seen, I spent many years in the marketing industry myself. And that's what I've seen during recessions. Is pull back in advertisement. Right. Obviously, there's prioritization that goes on there too. If podcasting have proven themselves to be driving the highest return on investment, they may not pull back on podcast advertising as much as long as the numbers are there. Because that may be the most efficient way for them to continue any kind of marketing spend. That's where podcasting really at the end of the day, Todd, the things we've been talking about for a long time around ROI. Is what keeps podcast advertising humming. So, yeah. Well, it's in here's the challenge too, if you've got a premium show in your charging for that premium show, you know, I was looking at my own budget. I was looking, you know, because I'm in the boat with the rest of you. And I started looking at my and said, well, I can get rid of that and get rid of that. Next thing I know, I've slashed about a hundred bucks, off my monthly, you know, I would call that. Well, just a little subscription stuff. And I can't cancel YouTube TV, canceled two or three other things. I'm just not using, so if I'm doing that, right. Other people are. How many hundreds of millions of others are doing the same? Yep. And you can still get some television. And if you have the right type of antenna, so it's not like you have to go without local TV, mostly but you know you have to invest in the right kind of intended to pick up that signal. That's true. So I guess John spurlock. I guess, had some data showing that the Spotify is free, podcast hosts, hosting the I guess made available at 25.8% of all podcasts, episodes in April. I don't know Todd, does that ring true with you? I'm not surprised. I haven't but I wouldn't be surprised. It was 25%. But yet 25% of the podcasting space was off for 9 hours yesterday. So yeah, I guess that could make up for it right there. Well, it'll knock a percent down for next month. Right. Potentially. That's true. But if you're going to run a service, you know, again, we're not we all have our time in the bucket. You just knock on wood. It's not your turn, you know? Right. So Todd, as you think about the two episodes that we did at the NAB, each one of those were 90 minute episodes. How are you thinking that you might push those out once you get them? I mean, I could go on and record the audio for both of them. If you would do that, that would be great. And then Dropbox and to me and I'll put them up in the drop in the feed in that way folks can get them. I mean, how do you think that you're going to publish those? You're going to put up maybe a couple in one week. Yeah, we'll just spread them out by two or three days and put them out. So put this one out as soon as possible. And then those are bonus episodes that follow. Okay. So get ready for a whole bunch of content, everybody. Of course, do you really want to listen to us for four and a half hours? I don't know. That's the question. Chew on them as you can. But there were some great conversations there. And the second, the second session we had, I was in the hallway, uh oh, this one's going to be lively. You know, but. That's pretty impressed with a certain young lady. She was very, very impressive. I think that she's got her nights thinking a lot like. Yeah, that's going to say. Now you know why I asked her to join. Yeah. Because I've seen her speak. Yeah, I didn't know because I didn't get a much time to feel her out at the end and then when the conversation was like, oh, yeah. Bonus. And quite the firecracker. I was very impressed. Yeah? So you'll have to listen to that episode. I'm being elusive here, trying to get all of you want to listen. Yeah, and then Larry Rosen. Yeah, Larry was great too. Was also on that episode. So talking about podcast advertising. A lot of complex topics and subjects that we talked about in that episode. About podcast advertising. It's a fascinating area in the medium right now. Let's evolving and changing and there's a lot of directions that it could ultimately go. And question. Well, we'll see over time, that's for sure. I don't really have a lot more to talk about today. How about you? Yeah, I think we can probably wrap it up. I think we've created enough content in the last two weeks, three weeks. Maybe Frank with you, rob. That night, we should disclose. You didn't completely hang with us, but Tuesday night. The little group that was in our little area, how should we say we end up on Fremont street? And at 1 o'clock in the morning, someone made the bold suggestion that we do shots of patron. The worst, worst, I was like, I'll do one and then two, three, three total later. I'm like, we need to go. And I think I ended up in bed at two 30 on that night. Wow. And so it did not know if my cohort would make.

Todd John spurlock NAB YouTube Dropbox Larry Rosen Larry rob Frank
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

07:55 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"Then. You could also, you could also tie an RSS feed to a property. So as people walked into a property, the podcast would start. Oh, that's cool. Yeah, but again, yeah, you had to be pretty nerdy. That's pretty deep down the rabbit hole. Yeah. But then you have like the album art on the walls on the virtual walls and stuff like that. I just wanted to say thanks so much for having me on. I apologize and I have to drop off, but I am very happy to receive the invitation and was really fun chatting with you. Yeah, thank you. When did you give everyone a plug and if there's a way they can reach out to you, if you're willing to share that, please do. Oh, yeah, please, you can check out spooler at spooler dot FM and the first show from insider is available on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. And as well as insider dot com slash refresh. And feel free to reach out to me or the team about interest in talking about our technology. I appreciate that. Yeah, thanks for coming on. We appreciate having you. Thank you. Take care. Thanks, James. Bye bye. Bye bye. Did we scare him off? No, no, he had a hard stop at four. Okay, so yeah, we get a little deep there on the metaverse thing. I don't know. But there's a lot of stuff that's been happening, rob. Yeah, the certainly has. And by the way, how you doing? You doing okay? I'm doing okay. Getting better all the time. Oh, good. So I tell you coming off NAB. And for those of you that didn't watch the two live events, we've got some really, really positive feedback from that. Available, I'll link to them today if we don't get them up as an episode right away. And on the YouTube side so you can watch them, but we got some good feedback on our guests have got some good feedback too. So there was some good, some good dialog. Yeah. So I think that, you know, if you want to get a piece of what we did, drop a drop in there and listen and we'll get it in the RSS feed as soon as I find some extra cycles. But I think that Tom Webster thing has got me really curious. Yeah, it's a little sad to see Tom Tom go. So it depends on where he's off to next. Curious. Yeah. We're definitely both curious about what he might do next. But yeah, it's definitely an end of an era, I'm curious who's going to come in behind him and fill in for what he did. At Edison, there's that leaves a big hole in Edison research right there. You know, and we did have his boss on. At NAB. So if you want to go here a little bit, I mean, obviously no discussion about this topic with Larry, but that he had to have known when we did that that that was coming. I did invite Tom to be on with us at NAB too, because I oftentimes Tom is at NAB. So that's why. So I guess. So, but the imitations open Tom, whenever you are ready to show your cards, what's next because he's definitely staying in the podcasting space. He's made it pretty clear it is his post that he was, so, and who knows he might be wanting to be independent? Yeah, maybe. So we shall see. If you're looking for a job, Thompson send me a resume, too. I love to love to see it. There you go. I've been pretty much head down since I got back trying to get caught up, but I actually fly out to outlier in Austin, I'm speaking tomorrow night, doing the opening keynote there. And we're going to be doing 30 minutes on the state of podcasting. So given my rendition of where I think the space is at, what people should be thinking about and doing. So I look forward to doing that. Then back here and then another turnaround and up to Orlando for one of two trips to Orlando. But we will be able to do a show next Wednesday. We'll be here. Yeah. Yeah, we're going to be here and then also we're doing a live show on the 27th of May in Orlando as well. At podcast. So which I need the book a couple of guests or if you know a couple of folks Todd that you want to invite to join us there. Yeah. If you're going to be a podcast and you think you want to be on, let us know you're going to be there too. We'd like to have a good mix of ladies and gentlemen that would join us. So great effort on the 27th. So let us know. We definitely want to hear and have a good diverse panel. If at all possible so, and that was going to be live stream too. Well, that's awesome as well. Yeah. I was actually watching a little bit of the news on what's been happening in the podcasting space. And it's not a lot of major announcements, per se. Just a lot of, I think we're heading towards summer, believe it or not. It's hard to believe, and it just seems like the news cycle. Maybe has slowed down just a little bit. Yeah. And I just had the first board of governors meeting with podcast academy today with all the new board members. How did that go? That went that went very well actually, everybody was there, and everybody was in good spirits and wanting the very positive and we already started talking about the ambies for next year. So it's all bubbling up really fast. So yeah. So it's interesting charitable put out a statement today because they're probably worried about people abandoning ship. And by the way, all of you that have started bringing your stats over to blueberry, we love you. We've had a huge uptick. A little pitch there, but it looks to me like they're pulling back a little bit on them saying they're going away completely. And it will only be available in megaphones. It seems like they're going to still allow people to use their tools. Interesting. It is interesting. And did you see the head of anchor podcast? Has decided to leave? Well, this is two years out. Yep. So he's done his two years of staying around in his office. Michael nano?.

NAB Tom Tom Webster Orlando Tom Tom rob Edison Apple James YouTube Larry Thompson Austin Todd Michael nano
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

07:38 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"Yeah. Yeah. I don't think they really ever got podcasting entirely off the ground. So if you want my honest feedback. You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink. And there was lots of advice given by multiple parties and it was largely ignored. So they had a they had their agenda. Number one, it should have been available on the desktop. That's number one. It should have been easily found in your news feed on the desktop. If they had done that, that alone is the whole picture would have changed. Instead, but what about what about they are focused on metaverse? So what's your perspective on what's the audio on demand experience, if any? In the metaverse. I know that they could have done podcasting differently, but what about what they are seemingly focused on, which is bringing this amazing new environment to life to more people. Do you think this is space for podcasts there? And if so, what do you see? Well, I don't know about the metaverse. I think if they truly are putting together a virtual reality, right? If podcasting is a big part of reality, then there needs to be some sort of avenue to participate in podcasting through that. Every time I hear the native verse and Facebook, I think about Second Life. To me, it's like, okay, how is the metaverse going to look like? How are we going to interact with it? I don't see a many of us wearing, you know, whatever. Yeah, I don't see us wearing those. The geeks will, but I don't know. He's got a vision, but so you're skeptical, it sounds like. A little bit. Okay. Because people consume Facebook here and on their desktop and. People are already suspicious of Facebook in many ways about what's being presented to them. So I don't know. Though I think it is a generational question, James, I do think if you think about I spent many years on the Xbox team and so they were clearly involved in that kind of virtual reality experience stuff very early in the process. And a lot of people get really enthralled in those worlds. It's almost like an escape. It's a different world. I think a lot of us think about it in that way and we don't really want to live our lives like that. But then you throw into the mix augmented reality as a layer on top of virtual reality and I believe that's really the first evolution of this that we're going to see is technology overlaid on reality. I do believe that there's probably something coming from Apple in this way and coming from Google. Definitely from other players that are trying to figure out a way to incorporate this stuff in our lives more and more. So I have a hard time thinking that podcasting isn't going to have a place. But it's just how long is it going to take before we get there? I don't know. To be fair, the wearable experiment that Apple did. You know, it was interesting. I still have my glass somewhere. That's not you mean Google. Google glass, yeah, sorry. Yeah, sorry. Okay. All right, yep. And I have a senior moment. So it's totally fine. So that was way ahead of its time, but it was just weird walking around. And I don't think people are going to wear a wearable in public. So if the metaverse includes wearing something that is going to show me something, I don't know. Todd is interesting. A perception that was built on what rubber Scoville did in the shower. Well, okay, most people don't know what you're talking about. So be careful. That's delivered on Twitter, I think. I was like, wow, Robert school will. There you are. Yeah, but you know, because of the perceived privacy invasion people felt by seeing that. Right here. Right. I don't know. Or is this going to be, like you said, is it? It's like some future space space science thing. Where everyone's got a headset on their head and they're sitting in a lazy boy. I God help us if that's the case. It seems like snap has done some interesting work when it comes to the hardware and bringing a kind of fashion forward approach to the industrial design of how do you gently, if the Google glass was the hard entry into AR snap, I think it's pretty cool, the way that they've done it, they don't talk about it as AR, I think it's, but it's a cool set of glasses that will layer on visuals and allow you to record and think. So it seems like an intriguing, maybe more consumer friendly entry point. I bought my first snap classes at outside of the big Ferris wheel in Las Vegas. They had a kiosk there. And you could buy those glasses right there at the little kiosk. And I bought them stupidest purchase I ever made. They're still in the right place. I don't know. You probably right, but I don't know. Here's the thing about where we are, we're podcasting is podcasts are can the best thing is they can be consumed anywhere. You don't have to you don't have these restrictions of being in the native earth or any listen to gym, driving to work. Wherever it may be, so I don't think it's going to affect the podcasting space per se. And I don't know, Facebook has got their own agenda, but they definitely blew with podcasting. And I lost a dollar. What was the bad? I had a bet with Mike Dell that Facebook would achieve 1% listenership within the first 12 months. Okay. They didn't get there. No. So Todd, how exactly did you know for sure that we're not already living in the metaverse? Well, red, blue pill. Who knows? Is it a simulation? Yeah, well. I think we're about, yeah. I won't go there because people think I'm a whack job. I think there's a 50 50 chance we are we're living in a simulation, but that's just me. I'm a geek. Whoever's in control of me dumps some money in my bank. Yeah, I think it is a, if it is, it's purely a virtual reality world. It's not an augmented reality world. So James, what's your thought? What do you think is happening? And I know, coming from Apple, I don't know if there's anything that you knew special about apple's plans, but just kind of your own personal observation on what you think is happening with those technologies. Do you think they're going to hit any kind of adoption.

Facebook Google Robert school apple Scoville Todd James Mike Dell Twitter Las Vegas
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

07:20 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"To be able to kind of be a final assembly step maybe after that content was just before it goes out for listening. And yeah, we think that could be potentially a way. But I don't know if a little drive short necessarily certainly eyes a listener like the ten minute news package format, there's a lot to be said about social sharing of shorter audio clips. And we're very excited to think about segment sharing. We have the story sharing, so you can take the interview with Ukrainian newlyweds in the refresh and I could send it to because I thought he might be interested in it as an extract and an invitation to then listen to the full experience in the rest of the show. And with the segments, of course, you can get into interesting things about could you play the rest of the show automatically after that was your entry point and things that were thinking about for ideal experiences. But I guess I don't anticipate that it'll drive short because by definition it's in inviting you to stack it up and stack short segments into a longer piece. That's interesting to take some one and send them a segment. Think about that for a second, rob. You send them a segment. So the segments are where you kick them into the beginning of the actual episode. Right. It's kind of a teaser. Yeah. Longer form content. It's cool. Does it scale? Do you get enough usage out of it? By the listeners, to really drive engagement, or is it just going to be more someone put something on Twitter or Facebook or which has value into itself? We still don't have as an industry our ultimate viral audio playback. Right. I mean, audiograms are fantastic and they got the visual aspect of it, but I don't think we've had yet the scaling solution for that to make it easy to share. Yeah, because now it's just like easy headliner when these other tools. And it's usually the host doing and it's not the not the listener and I know from our experience we've made the embedded available on our website players for years that we track how much those are grabbed and dropped somewhere and it's not that much because it's a task, whereas a tweet, you know, be honest with you if Twitter had something, hey, Elon. If Twitter had the ability for me to send a segment of audio to it, easily now that would be a good partnership for James. He's a listener of the show, right? Well, you never know who's listening. So we have found that out over the years. I feel like he's pretty switched on, so. Twitter started out as a podcasting platform. But audio, right? Yeah. And I just want to mention that you're kind of, I was thinking about streaming online radio too. I was like, you know, how different is what you're doing to streaming online radio as opposed to podcasting? Are you, it feels like you're kind of like in between. Right in between them. Right. Yes. And I just wonder if this technology has taken to its natural extension that somehow you guys be the ones that really do the most damage to radio. Well, I think it's a good observation because we, there are some strong parallels, for sure. And there's some great legacy radio production suites that have a very kind of the playlist metaphor is not a new one. This is our kind of fresh take on it and podcast first. I guess you could say. But for sure, some of the most interesting conversations we've had with potential clients have been the bigger radio outfits because they've already solved that problem of making a lot of stuff to put into it. So it's a great tool. Exactly. Yeah, the story format is very well known to them and they're already in some cases doing it. So yeah, but the big difference is if you're listening to radio, it's linear stream. You join in the middle. You're not joining at the beginning. Right. So right. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. And that's where we want to position ourselves as we in our pitch. We talk about being the best of both of those. And enabling both those creator bases too, right? We want to help people that are still primarily radio production live focused come to on demand and get the most value that they can out of that existing production workflow, hence our strategy for interoperability where you can do bulk upload in a spooler and you can output to other hosts if you want to. But then also from the kind of podcast author community where the creators there may be coming from long form and want more efficiency with rapid updates. And the thesis of the company basically is that there's opportunity space between those worlds that we could get a little bit of the best of both. Yeah. Yeah. I can really see it. And it's one of those things where if you're really set your mind to it and think about it, there's some possibilities here. You know, and again you got to have a team and some resources to make that happen. But I know what it is taught. It's live on demand radio. Well, here's a case in some ways, that's kind of what's being replicated here. It was kind of like a little bit of both. Well, I'll tell you what doesn't. I've got my tech show the last three episodes in a loop. It's streaming on a shout cast. It's just and people join it in the middle. And believe it or not, it gets quite a bit of usage, but the biggest complaint I get from is I join your show in the middle I had no idea what you were talking about. You're talking about right. Right, because they got in three quarters away through something. And of course, we switched topics, but they're like, you know, they have to start from the beginning. Well, and they can't if it's streamed because it's linear. So that's where they come back and listen to the podcast. Oh, okay, now I got the context. Well, on Facebook and YouTube, you can pull it back on a live stream. Yeah, that's true. If you've ever done that, but no, I guess you can while we're live. But that's not available if you're using live stream 65 or something like that. He can't pull it back. Well, the two of you, what's your perspective on audio and the metaverse speaking of Facebook? They've just shut down the podcast service. I think that's coming in June, right? So they're not in a podcast. Are my NDA still in place?.

Twitter Elon rob Facebook James YouTube
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

08:23 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"Know, those shows are if you have real, real long tail. That's just a money printing press to that thing because you've hit the golden lottery ticket. But even great episodes that are like, listen to the questlove supreme and the rebroadcast, how they pull from the archive and it's sort of like a greatest hits or a best of on a TV show and there's still so much or at least listener value and joy for me going back to even an interview from 2017 or 18 or something. So it's interesting to think about is there is there value that we as an industry are leaving on the table and that archive. Well, there is if you have that true long tail. But again, a lot of podcasters say they have long tail and I just wink at them. I see the hockey stick laid up there. I see, okay, yeah, you got long tail you got ten, 15 downloads, two months later. Very thin. Given that, given that, do you guys focus on trying to get any updates to an existing episode done within a certain number of hours or is there no entire limit on that? There's no technical limit. I think that, again, that's an editorial decision with the tools, as is kind of the day part because of the production requirement for what we set up. I should say what Andy set up for the refresh. They're starting at 7 a.m. eastern and going through 1 p.m. eastern. And during that time, I think you just said that they do something like 20 or 25 segments, really dictated by the news cycle. So yes, was it yesterday? I think it was yesterday. It was like a really big day for updating and it was like the perfect use case. News day. Every few minutes, there was a new Supreme Court story update. And that's where the versioning system really can be helpful where you're not having to recreate all the metadata and that's your asset for that story. And we're trying to make it sort of live beyond a single use to be a version 5 6 7 8 as new details emerge and you can update just that section. So we see that as part of the capability that we were certainly excited to bring forth. And it would be also interesting because you could stack it. You don't necessarily have to take the old stuff out. You can continue adding and building to the story. The segment would get longer, but it would be like, what do you do on a blog post? You do an update on the bottom of the page. It's the same type of thing. You do an update to the episode, which in that situation is pretty cool. But yeah, yeah. I just wonder about expectations with the audience too. How do you, I mean, almost feels like this might be on the verge of creating a new medium of sorts. Because what you're doing is you're creating, I would hope if it's being marketed correctly for what you're actually delivering, it's setting different expectations with the audience, right? This feed is basically live. It's basically being constantly updated. So if you listen to it, you know, a half an hour ago, when you go in and listen to it, you know, half an hour later, it could be different content, right? Definitely. So how do you set that expectation in a medium that's been pretty much locked into a download store and playback perception? That's a good question. I think that's a key marketing challenge as well. And the way that we've approached it with and the refresh team specifically is approached it with the first show is just reinforcing that message about the uptime of the show and the refresh cycle and how you can come back and listen to fresh stories. And I think it's a unique differentiator, but it's also not a perfectly easy story to tell. So I think that's a little bit of a slow build over time as people can recognize that the show is responding to the news cycle. Intraday, which is a new capability that we think is really cool. And hopefully there's an audience building around that. But it's a great observation. It's not a completely obvious statement from the jump. And I don't know if it's a new media. I mean, it's flattering to think about it as a new media. But from our perspective, it sort of pressing with some new tech on one weak point that we all recognize about podcasting, the space that we love so much. And could we solve it and give creators a new kind of a new tool in the toolbox to reach an audience with fresh content and it's exciting to try to try to figure out for sure. Totally. And I think you're going back to your comment about Andy and the idea that the idea was for sure, Andy's thinking about this for several years and within the framework of dynamic targeting of ad content, is there an application for that in the segmented approach of that to primary content. So bringing that idea over to the actual meat and bones of the show itself rather than just the commercial messaging. Which is kind of what we're starting to pay off with the platform now and that dovetailed nicely with Henry's idea about an always fresh news experience from the same kind of journalistic quality that insider brings to the table and the print side. What's the equivalent when he's when someone is out walking or exercising or doing something where they can't be reading on even on the mobile app or the website? Do you think it's going to drive shorter because if you think about it, if you want to build an audience that's going to refresh and repeat throughout the day, it's almost like the top of the hour news it hits on traditional radio and it's usually the segments are the same, maybe they've added something to it. But those are very short. Those are two, three minutes, max. So that and I think what's cool about this too is rob, they can put an ad in that bad boy every time. So you monetize that. I brought to you by kind of thing. Yeah, but you can still, that's some rinse and repeat that I get excited about from a dollars and cents wise, if you get the right sponsor in there. But again, going back, do you think it's going to drive real short segments? That's interesting. I love the idea of aggregating the short segments into a longer experience because I find, I mean, I guess we all love long form. That's why we're in podcasts, right? A news model that we have for spooler that we haven't piloted yet, but is the ad, excuse me, the news break as a unit inserted to an existing show where you can solve that problem. You were describing a second ago Todd where if you had a longer format interview program with a headline package in it that you wanted to keep fresh because the interview was evergreen, but the headline package. And we know some big, very popular news programs that do analysis with a headline package and then it's like, well, the headlines are stale an hour after it's out the door because that's the definition of kind of headlines and updates. So spooler could power that assembly by refreshing that specific package even without touching the rest of the long form show format. And we think that's a pretty interesting use case for spooler down the road..

Andy hockey Supreme Court Henry rob max Todd
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"Speakers in the future. Go ahead, rob. Yeah, I was just thinking, I've been thinking about for the last couple of years that we're going to see podcasts in general are some podcasts anyway. Migrate into other apps more as an additional content layer can be added to all sorts of different genre apps out there. I was thinking that your platform would be a perfect kind of companion for making that happen. A lot of the apps are looking for. I'm sure fairly short. Highly relevant content. Probably less looking for, you know, long, long content or content that's a little bit more generic. So I was just curious, are you seeing movement like that? Are you seeing people with content apps today that maybe just have written and video in them that are looking to add audio like this from a platform like yours? Well, it's pretty early days for us in terms of sales cycles, but yeah, we're talking to a variety of folks. So I think the furthest along is the frequency machine team as we mentioned with that epic ratio. But that's exactly what we were thinking trying to offer a one a single point for the best of both of those experiences, obviously we want as it was saying kind of wanted to be good citizens of RSS two and keep working with all these platforms that we know and use every day ourselves. But then also for the creators that wanted a more centralized experience and maybe already had a, say, a web property with significant traffic like the team at insider, what unique and new capability could we bring to a back end that they could plug in and have it feel very much a part of the UI the UX of their existing web presence, whether that's an app or a website. So the skinnable nature of the spooler player is kind of that same idea where we're using insider fonts and the play head is insider blue and it should look like the other media players elsewhere on the site that have kind of UI precedent rather than a plugin that looks like a spooler property. That's the idea anyway. But I can also deliver the skip ability of segments. If you don't want to listen to the whole show, you can go right to what you're most interested in. One of the things I was talking with Andy about was I think you've definitely developed a platform that has a unique user persona use case. It would be, as you said, sites would maybe diverge and gadget these high traffic websites that are trying to do updates during the day and have a big enough team to be able to manage something where they're dropping new segments in. They're hitting that three, four, 5 times a day, whatever it may be. So that there's a fresh experience and I was kind of Frank with Andy, I said, did you guys pigeon your pigeonhole yourself too tight to a limited group or do you think that there is enough of those available to make the revenue to basically to grow the platform and survive? Yeah, I think that's a fair question. It was a decision that we wanted to execute really well with this admittedly to your point, a very specific use case of this high tempo content, because it's also a big production lift to be able to pull off that kind of very different than long form like we're doing now where it's concentrated, it's specific, it's sort of high information density in a short format. And so yes, we were intentional about trying to execute around that idea. And then, and then trying to be good listeners of our existing and near term clients about how could we add capability and make sure that this is a tool that could be used for other use cases. And I think with my, you know, in my experience putting any creator tools out there, you end up getting a lot of unintended use cases that are always delightful and I think one of the key joys of my career is empowering creative folks with new tools and access to distribution and simplifying complex tasks that can be repetitive with efficiencies and that's where I really enjoy building tools in that space. And so we had this initial specific use case in mind and then our enjoying seeing how it's immediately big diverted into different use cases, which I love. It's awesome. And then it's a discipline exercise, of course, where you have different cohorts of people that want to take into these different directions. And how do you kind of establish the through line in terms of product road map, which a fun exercise? I think about my own tech show. It's like twice a week. And, you know, the contents burned in 48 hours because it's old news. And yet there's that static file. I only have enough cycles to do two shows a week. But maybe if I had a little more time and I wasn't running a podcast company, maybe I'd have enough time to maybe do three, four, 5, updates during the week prior to the next full episode. I could see a use case there. And with the ability to have because my site gets a huge amount of web traffic, so even from my little site that gets 20,000 hits a day or whatever it is, it's still there was a player there with updated content. It might be compelling. But then again, it's a big lift. It's like, okay, you get up in the morning and you got to do an hour's worth of production or whatever to get three four spots in and then rebuild this thing and hit publish. That's a lift. Well, and we're coming in is how simple can we make that lift so that all of your energy can be devoted to your content generation and doing great writing great reporting and not have to worry too much about the assembly step publications step and our thesis is that with great a fresh take on some workflow software to get you there, it can be efficient enough to do it. And easier than it might have been previously. Yeah, it's definitely interesting. If I was part of a news organization, some group, this would be the tool. For me, because it does everything that you basically get almost like broadcast capability on an audio scale that's not been possible up to this point without putting out three four 5 new episodes every day. So it's an interesting play, sure is that's why getting somebody on your team like Andy is a perfect fit coming out at NPR. So I think. It can credit Andy with, I'm sorry, go, rob. Go ahead. No, it follows along with, I'm sure how he did things in the past with his prior projects prior to podcasting is just to kind of also fall off of what Todd just said is that they'll podcasting has been consumed pretty much completely within the first what 48 hours Todd? 80% of podcasts deliver 90 percent of their lifetime downloads in the first 96 hours. Right. So I'm sure you had insights to that over at Apple too. Their shows that have long tail. You.

Andy rob Frank assembly NPR Todd Apple
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

08:15 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"Episodes each of the platforms and have a new pub date and all that stuff. How are you suppressing so if it's being delivered still kind of a traditional podcast? How are you suppressing the follow subscribe? Because you really want people to play, you don't really want this to be cached on their device. That's true. I guess in an ideal case we'd have that kind of authority, but we're also trying to be just good citizens of our SS two. I think all of us here that have posting products, so we are building to that spec and even as we are looking to what the podcast two organization is doing some very interesting suggestions about improvements to new tags and new capabilities. But being aware of the kind of state of the art with the platforms, of course, coming from working on Apple podcasts, had unique insight there and was very familiar with that spec. So we wanted to make sure that spooler was a good citizen of that world. Even as we were also launching a JSON parallel publishing pathway for our own web in bed, which we have rolled out to be a kind of white labeled skinnable web player for the show's produced on spooler. And the first use of that, of course, on insider dot com slash the refresh for the show that Andy launched. So we don't really aspire pretend to suppress the follow function of the people that follow the show, of course, and we want to make sure that it's a really good podcast experience. So you get Andy and the team on refresh publish a new full episode a new addition that will index to all the platforms and present as a fresh update with all the updated pub date and the indication this is new content, which is great. And we love that. And I think, you know, we all know that the number of people that are technically following subscribers is going down, so more people are actively hitting play. So I think it works to your advantage that trend of fewer people actually using that follower subscribe mentality and just listening on demand. So I think it placed your advantage that probably more than 50% of your shows are probably being delivered with its current version, I would think. Yeah, we actually should look at that as a metric, but it's interesting. Observation. I would like to know what you guys think too, but do we approach more typical streaming behavior and does that open up new technologies maybe that can help with some of the pain points of our assess being a pretty static spec. It hasn't really changed since 2005. As you guys definitely, we've made incremental decided as an industry there are a few incremental things. And as much as we added some namespaces in as much as we prodded some people like your prior employer, the RSS two initiatives, some of those are really out there that are probably for the geeks yet. If you're on, if you're watching this show on one of the podcast two point S, you can boost this episode and send us some satoshis. But the majority of folks are not. And they don't even the transcripts don't even follow through. So it is a, it is an uphill battle for some of that. But I'm glad you guys are supporting the initiatives. And I just hope that we get more people that to push that through. And I think that will help space a lot. Just not from just how you guys want your consumption to go, but just everything else. Yeah, so I would imagine a lot of go ahead. Good. No, I just was going to agree a lot of cool thinking, deep thinking on the podcast two. Work. Yeah, as I've told, we've had some discussions over there in their Mastodon chat channel. Is it a lot of it is still some of the podcast two stuff feels like 2004. From a complexity standpoint and we have to break it down and we've got to make it so that the podcasters can fully appreciate and understand what the potential is so that they can start pushing back on their hosting providers and other people say, why aren't you doing this? It's an uphill battle, but I think we'll get there over time. But yeah, I'd love to see the spec expanded a little wrapper to rate. Yeah. So your current feeds with multiple episodes or they primarily just one one episode that you guys massage and play with to keep up to date and then when it entirely or replaces is there a cadence to that? Is it a daily thing or is it just based on when news is coming out or what's your kind of cadence on updates? Yeah, that's a good question. We do have a kind of evergreen episode model for spooler, which you can see in the RSS version of the refresh where some of the content is going to be more longer shelf life and consumable more with a backwards compatibility or forwards compatibility. So it's kind of both. And the idea of spooler would be to empower the editor to choose, whether there's older content episodes for consumption from the archive in the feed or if it's just the latest stuff with a single episode. But typically, it'll be a single episode that's either published over and replaced or updated depending on the kind of editorial priorities I was describing. But I think ideally it would be flexible. I think that's a creator's choice and that kind of empowerment, just like we've taken a kind of an interoperable approach to creators choice for existing, hosting solutions too. We've got a program we call works with, where we're allowing folks if they have an existing provider, they can push to that provider and use ad integration or analytics or other aspects of that that they like. And then spooler just becomes part of their assembly or publishing workflow as a mid step. And that's a nice kind of plug and play approach to folks that already have shows that their existing they want to take advantage of this different UI. But don't want to move off from their relationship they have with their hosting provider now. Do you see this playing well with the smart speaker platforms better than kind of a traditional podcast catcher type environment? I think that's a great use case. We want to be able to deliver this capability for real-time news effectively. So yes, we definitely had smart speakers in mind. And informed in some part by my experience working on HomePod and helping that team with news providers and play the news that whole experience. And so yes, I think ideally, and we're set up for, of course, with RSS distribution, the podcasts, catalogs that are available through various channels to smart speakers. And then that's kind of our deal with the JSON parallel publishing as well. Well, for app integrations and we actually have our first integration client frequency machine who's working on a cool city guide app experience that will roll out later in the month and they like the setup of the being able to publish our assess for podcasts and then into their app for audio control with the JSON. So we think that's a nice way to maybe do things like skills for smart.

Andy Apple
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

12:58 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"You again. And thanks for having me on. Yeah. It's awesome. You know, we were doing a little pre talk before we started the show. And actually, he was an apple for 17 years. So, well, yeah, but how long were you working on the Apple podcast, James? That's the other question. I was running the team, you're right for about a decade. And before that, well, I joined Apple in 2004 as they had soon after they launched the music store at that time. I was just iTunes store. It was just music just in the U.S.. And I joined what was then a small team working on content and editorial marketing programs on the store. And it was a really fun time period. We're launched a bunch of great versions of the app and expanded it numerous countries and then with iTunes 4.9 added podcast support. As you guys well know in 2000 5, the summer of 2005. And that's when they started to add different media types to the jukebox and so in 2000 6, I had a chance to start the international service for podcasts in London. And built that sort of service, the localized editorial, the localized content provider relationships with big public networks and the broadcasters in Europe, and then came back to manage the team in 2010. Yeah. That's a long time to be working on that project you've seen a lot. Changes with Apple podcasts over the years. Its growth and its adoption and its success and Todd and I have been working with you and working with your colleagues over there for many, many years. So I just want to say thank you for all your work over the years. Working on podcasting, I know we were a little bit competitors when I was working at Microsoft on zune. I would say friendly. Hold on a second. Hold on. Let's please clarify. There was no competition. Come on. Come on now. I have that artifact back here on the walls. Come on now. It's true. I have to acquiesce to that point, yes. Microsoft got cold feet in the end. But anyway, go ahead and start off. If you have something that you want to do, you know, there's so much stuff going on that we've missed. So we definitely are going to have to take some time some time today to talk about this thing that Tom Webster is doing because he's off the new things at some point. So I saw that. What he's got something going. So I didn't see any details about what's new. I just saw that he was departing Edison, so do you have any Intel there? No, it's Tom. Are you watching we expect you to break the news here? So I guess he's Edison until the end of May. And then whatever is next, we'll see. I have a suspicion, he's already got something big lined up. So the question is, who is he going to go work for? Or is he starting his own thing? That's the key. But it's people move on. I've had some team members at my company move on because it's a long time to work on one thing. So I guess what we should talk to you about is what are you doing and what big decision to leave Apple and spin off and kind of do your own thing at this point, right? Oh, absolutely. Yeah, as I was saying earlier, it was a tremendous experience for me being an apple for 17 and a half years. And such a long run, obviously the vocal my career and extremely formative and having learned an incredible amount from the teammates I had there and leadership there. And then, yeah, starting to think about new challenges. And with the launch of Apple podcast subscriptions, the paid premium vehicle for content on Apple podcasts, it was a great moment to an inflection point to take a step back and move on to something new. And so I was up for some new challenge and kind of change of scene in terms of work life. So I've got a departed apple in July of last summer, so mid July. And had an amazing couple of conversations with mister Andy Bowers, who both of you, another OG podcaster from the very early days that even before, before iTunes had podcast support, and he was at slate making shows, of course, political gab fest, one of the early hits on those early days of iTunes store podcasts. And so after he had departed megaphone and that sale to Spotify, he was looking for a new project and so we got into conversation with his friend Henry blodgett and decided to, of course, CEO and founder of Business Insider insider. And the two of them were interested in this concept that I found really fascinating too, that modular approach to show creation segmented organization of shows and we decided to start a new audio publishing tools company that could facilitate show creation from a segment metaphor, which is a concept that's been around you can say in radio, programming, segments of content, one after another and TV as well. And we wanted to give a fresh look at that specifically for audio publication used sort of digital native first approach to that. And it opens up a lot of really interesting capabilities, including the low latency publishing, which is kind of our focus. I'd be interested in both your thoughts of course, but I see kind of latency as one of the structural traditional weak points in the podcast infrastructure where time between publication and consumption can be can be quite long with an indexing cycle that maybe takes longer than it should as we would all hope it should. So kind of conceived to lean into that historical weak part that time to time between an event being happening, being reported, the reporting being written, recorded for audio and then made available on demand. And could with a new company, we close the gap between all the benefit of live, like we're live now, things are being reported and happening, emerging stories being covered. But with the advantage of being on demand. So it's never a show experience that has already started when you tune in. It's always at the beginning. It's always when you press play. So we like to describe spooler as fresh like live radio, but on a van like podcast. And a new capability, hopefully, right in the valuable space between those two existing mediums. And modular in nature so that it's segmented and it's effectively a really sophisticated playlist maker. So that's our fresh take on this kind of idea and it's super exciting to have spent a few months building it up in partnership with our CTO and other OG podcast or mister Benjamin Dan Benjamin. And all of his experience from fireside and 5 by 5, it's amazing team to work with. And so yeah, we spend a few months building that out and then launched with the refresh from insider, a new real-time audio news program from Henry's team and insider and Andy has had audio there at insider that launched at the end of February. So it's been a great transition out of stealth for spooler into being able to tell our story publicly. And we get a chance to talk to Andy podcast movement evolutions and here's the question I've got about Andy. Have you ever seen Andy mad because he is the most laid back guy, you know, and he's pretty unflappable. You know, and I would not be wanting to be in the zone when he did get upset because he's always so laid back. Yeah. You guys probably don't. He was NPR correspondent for a long time, and he was in London and Moscow. And he's The White House correspondent for a while. So I think there's a component of been there done that that makes it pretty unflappable. That's true. That's true. I mean, it's just it's such a fascinating product from the standpoint of how traditionally and maybe you can explain this a little bit more, and I know Andy, I think, did a little bit as well. But kind of the use of dynamic content, right? It's something that most people in the industry think about for just advertising. Right. But it sounds like that could be what's going on here a little bit. I mean, you guys are creating you updating existing files that are hosted on the server, are you generating all new versions of episodes that are being targeted to specific types of users? I mean, I guess the tech on this is so flexible that it's hard to really pigeonhole it into a particular use case. So how are you kind of using that? Flexibility to your advantage. Yeah, thanks. I appreciate the comments. We've taken I mean, it's kind of interesting. Having worked in podcasts so long, we really were sensitive to the particulars of our SS two as you guys are being experts. And so the difference between a new episode with a fresh goo it and all of that implies in terms of indexing across all the consumption points and platforms was really a central question. And we kind of in thinking about the design of the tool really always reverted to our ideal first user envisioning a high tempo newsroom and how do we best empower an editor who's in that high tempos stressful high responsibility high expectation environment. So that we had that inform our design UX design, the ease and flow of the tools, the click and drag interface that we use, which is sort of one bucket of segment library content that you're dragging over in order to make on the other side. And so to your question, we reverted to what how can we best empower an editor with that choice. Not that they had to really think too hard about whether this is a new episode or not. With the idea that is it an editorial kind of scope and scale decision to be made there, where our solution was a versioning system that we've come up with around the segments themselves so you can with spooler, you can decide as an editor, is this change that I'm about to make worthy of an entire new episode or as we call it an addition of this podcast, or is it more like a correction where, say, in a newspaper online, you might have maybe a number was wrong or a name was misspelled or mistaken place. So it's an update and a correction that kind of magazine sense where you're going to do a reprint and correct for a factual emission. So we've been able to a new version system at the segment level. We can say, well, we're just making a correction to this. And that's putting a new MP3 out there, but it won't trigger a new guid and it won't give the whole read index cycle. But if you as a listener are coming to that content without having listened to it prior, you get the better version, the improved more clarified and more current version of that. Or as an editor, you can say like, yes, this is a new, you know, there's an editorially most important news story that we want to put right at the top. And then that can be, that would sort of trigger the full new episode experience and then push out new.

apple iTunes store mister Andy Bowers Andy Henry blodgett Business Insider Tom Webster Microsoft mister Benjamin Dan Benjamin Edison London Todd Spotify Intel James Europe U.S. Tom NPR Henry
"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

New Media Show

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on New Media Show

"Way. Well, I think to be fair to them to some degree, I believe that they were taking raw video and they were going to wrap it with overlays and do all sorts of fancy stuff with it and then post it to their own website at the NAB. So I think that's what we're waiting for. And I'm not sure they've done that with all their other videos that they have. So I think yeah, I think you're assessment is right that this is that it's not as quick.

NAB
"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

"That's step two of these JJ green and this just in The House passed a lend lease bill aimed at getting supplies to Ukraine more quickly The vote was four 17 to ten Meantime Democrats are vowing to provide Americans with relief from high gas prices Mitchell Miller has more today on the hill The president's latest request is more than double the cost of the package for Ukraine that Congress passed earlier though there's bipartisan support for keeping weapons flowing in the fight against Russia And on another topic House speaker Nancy Pelosi says Democrats are ready to help fight to lower gas prices We are loser focused on lowering cost at the pump Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer says oil companies haven't helped the situation We have the Ukraine tragedy We have the COVID tragedy And do they try to make things better No they come in and make record profits Democrats are proposing legislation to make pricing more transparent with tighter regulation On Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTO news in other news this afternoon the man accused of killing the mother of a missing D.C. infant has been ordered by a judge to stay behind bars That man is the boy's father and he's charged with second degree murder in the woman's death It was early Wednesday morning when prosecutors believe 44 year old Carl Jones killed his on and off again girlfriend 39 year old ladana Boggs prosecutors say security camera footage show him near boxes apartment around the time of the killing with a knife and discarding items from the crime scene before they say he attempted to flee According to court records Jones told investigators that he didn't kill Boggs but that they both did smoke PCP together argue before he handed her a knife and left only to return to find her stabbed he claimed Jones and Boggs had a son together Kay on Jones who Boggs admitted to accidentally killing last year The boy's body hasn't been found That's something Jones told investigators he is still angry about and that he wanted to do something to her but new police would always get the husband or boyfriend Mike Morello News Can a D.C. council member make the run for attorney general We have news on the councilman's fight next four 36 My Frankenstein with way castle market is appreciating Me thinking about renovating so Frankenstein called caps enter They said they offer cash out refinance and me could save thousands on closing costs compared to other lenders At first Frankenstein said who can believe that but Frankenstein took chance.

Mitchell Miller Ukraine JJ green Boggs Carl Jones ladana Boggs Chuck Schumer Jones Nancy Pelosi Russia Congress Senate House D.C. Mike Morello D.C. council Kay Frankenstein
"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:21 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

"Asking Congress for an additional $33 billion for Ukraine What he believes the country needs to fight the war against Russia I just signed a request to Congress for a critical security economic and humanitarian assistance To help Ukraine continue to counter Putin's aggression and at a very pivotal moment It includes over $20 billion for military and security assistance to keep weapons and ammunition flowing Additional funding for more humanitarian aid for Ukraine and other countries taking in refugees Plus money to keep the Ukrainian government running We need this bill to support Ukraine in this fight for freedom and our NATO allies our EU partners They're going to pay their fair share of the cost as well but we have to do this We have to do our part as well We'll leave you the lines Mister Biden also announced a comprehensive package to hold the Russian government and Russian oligarchs accountable CBS News special report I'm Stacy Lynn Knew this hour the Republican dominated Oklahoma House of Representatives today gave final approval to a bill prohibiting abortion after 6 weeks of pregnancy That's before many women even know they're pregnant That Bill goes to Republican governor Kevin stitt who's expected to sign it within days because the bill has an emergency provision It takes effect immediately after the governor signs it Abortion providers say it will immediately end most abortions in Oklahoma a similar bill approved in Texas last year led to a dramatic reduction in the number of abortions performed there many women went to Oklahoma and other surrounding states for abortions A mother who was once charged with killing her two month old son has been found dead at her apartment in northeast and now police have made an arrest When police got to the bending road department of 39 year old ladonia Boggs after receiving a 9-1-1 hangup call they found Boggs dead in her doorway she had been stabbed Now arrested for the killing 44 year old Carl Jones the father of Boggs son This comes after Boggs was originally charged with killing their infant son cion Jones last year the charges that were downgraded after she admitted to rolling over on top of the baby in bed and putting his body in a dumpster when she believed he was dead The boy's body was never found According to court documents before the baby's death Boggs and the boy's father Carl Jones exchanged heated texts over the child in which Boggs claimed she regretted having the boy Now Jones is charged with second degree murder in Boggs death Mike Morello WTO news.

Russia Ukrainian government Mister Biden Russian government Congress Stacy Lynn Oklahoma House of Representati Kevin stitt Boggs Putin CBS News NATO Oklahoma Carl Jones ladonia Boggs EU cion Jones Bill
"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:22 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

"Feds bipeds Double DOP at one O three Thursday morning welcome into WTO P April 28th 2022 clear very cold parts of the area by daybreak but although the 30s we're at 43 in our nation's capital right now We do a D thank you for taking us along for your morning rye topping the local stories This morning I dean lane welcome in at arrest has been made in the killing of a D.C. mom who almost a year ago was charged in the death of her two month old son She was found dead in northeast D.C. this week Police say the person responsible this morning is the child's father When police got to the bending road department of 39 year old ladonia Boggs after receiving a 9-1-1 hangup call they found Boggs dead in her doorway she had been stabbed Now arrested for the killing 44 year old Carl Jones the father of Boggs son This comes after Boggs was originally charged with killing their infant son kion Jones last year the charges that were downgraded after she admitted to rolling over on top of the baby in bed and putting his body in a dumpster when she believed he was dead The boy's body was never found According to court document before the baby's death Boggs and the boy's father Carl Jones exchanged heated texts over the child in which bob's claimed she regretted having the boy Now Jones is charged with second degree murder in Boggs death Mike Morello WTO P news A video circulating on social media this morning shows a wild turkey locally chasing and attacking the woman on a trail and at Acosta The man behind the camera DD folarin he is with the D.C. go go band rare essence Well there are often cycles he says the anacostia river walkway trail near that area near the D.C. aquatic gardens as well he tells our news partners at NBC four this week that before he caught that turkey attacking the woman the bird apparently attacked him The wild turkey jumped up toward his face almost clawing him then he says in his own words the giant bird chased him for about 5 minutes so he picked up a twig And I found like the biggest twig I could find And I started whacking this bird Like I whacked him like twice feathers flew everywhere He kind of like stepped off back into the brush Dad Ralph says that D.C. Department of Energy and environment says this morning there's a pretty active and healthy turkey population in the district in case we didn't know that between 102 hundred birds to be exact Roush says that multiple people have reported being attacked by a turkey he believes it's the same bird.

Boggs Carl Jones dean lane D.C. ladonia Boggs kion Jones Mike Morello WTO DD folarin D.C. aquatic gardens anacostia river Acosta bob Jones NBC Dad Ralph D.C. Department of Energy and turkey Roush
"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:08 min | 7 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on WTOP

"It's 1103 it's Wednesday the 27th day of April 2022 34° outside We're headed down to the freezing mark in some of the outer herbs It wins the evening I don't Walters the top local stories we're following for you with this hour Breaking news tonight and arrest has been made in the killing of a D.C. mother who almost a year ago was charged in connection with the death of her two year old son was found dead in northeast D.C. the mother was police say the person responsible is the child's father When police got to the bending road department of 39 year old ladonia Boggs after receiving a 9-1-1 hangup call they found Boggs dead in her doorway she had been stabbed Now arrested for the killing 44 year old Carl Jones the father of Boggs son This comes after Boggs was originally charged with killing their infant son kaian Jones last year the charges that were downgraded after she admitted to rolling over on top of the baby in bed and putting his body in a dumpster when she believed he was dead The boy's body was never found According to court document before the baby's death Boggs and the boy's father Carl Jones exchanged heated texts over the child in which Boggs claimed she regretted having the boy Now Jones is charged with second degree murder in Boggs death Mike Morello WTO P news The video showed a wild turkey chasing and attacking a man on a trail in anacostia Is with the D.C. go go band rare es He cycles the anacostia river rock trail near the D.C. aquatic gardens This time however was different He said that while turkey jumped up toward his face almost clawing him then he says in his own words the giant bird chased him for about 5 minutes so he picked up a twig And I found like the biggest twig I could find And I started whacking this bird Like I whacked him like twice feathers flew everywhere He kind of like stepped off back into the brush Says he's been asked over and over again why he didn't just run away Dan routh says there's a pretty active and healthy turkey population in D.C. says they're not friendly This is a mess So it's a pretty large tricky and when people see it it will drop its wings it will pop up to display With the D.C. Department of Energy and environment says they plan to catch the bird.

Boggs Carl Jones D.C. ladonia Boggs kaian Jones Walters Mike Morello anacostia river rock trail D.C. aquatic gardens anacostia Jones Dan routh D.C. Department of Energy and
"boggs" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:13 min | 9 months ago

"boggs" Discussed on This Week In Google

"These tested? Yes. That's important too. Yes, in fact, the images are hysterical. Here's pecan and pumpkin bread with a pocket computer. Associated with it. €35 from J, BE books, written by demetria glass. And some of these are some of these recipes I've read. I love the pictures. Celery in anything. Mom's the way. I think about it. I had this instant flashback to all the recipes I've shared with people via email. Yeah. So or slack. Discord. Thank you to dot org for discovering that one from Dmitri a glass of photographer, Emily baltz, the leaked recipe cookbook. Fascinating. Thing of the week? Or are we still yes? I just know we're going to do a thing of the week. I just want to mention in passing I had never heard this guy's name. He was co inventor of Ethernet passed away at the age of 71, he was an intern at the Xerox Parc research lab. In 1973, one afternoon in the basement of the lab, he noticed another researcher tinkering with a long strand of cable, the researcher, another new hire named bob Metcalfe, who we do know was exploring ways of sending information to and from the lab's new computer, the alto, mister Metcalf was trying to send electrical pulses down the cable. He was struggling to make it work, mister Boggs offered to help over the next two years they designed the first version of Ethernet. Surprisingly, even though bob Metcalfe mentions Ethernet every time you talk to him, he's never mentioned. No. This fellow. Well, that's the thing. I never heard this guy's name. Metcalfe did say in an interview with The New York Times, he was a perfect partner for me. I was more of a concept artist. He was a build the hardware in the back room engineer. Everybody who has the idea needs somebody who can make it. So Boggs was, I guess, mister.

demetria glass Emily baltz bob Metcalfe Xerox Parc Dmitri mister Metcalf mister Boggs Metcalfe The New York Times Boggs
Florida Gov. DeSantis Bars Schools From Mandating Masks

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Florida Gov. DeSantis Bars Schools From Mandating Masks

"The response has been mixed to president Biden's new push to get Americans backs and ate it there have been lotteries and prize drawings and the president says keep it up with incentives and mandates we can make a huge difference and save a lot of lives in New York City the incentive is one hundred dollars for any resident who gets a first dose of a corona virus vaccine at a city run site the one hundred dollars got J. Boggs knows attention wells waiting for it I knew they were going to do it so I just waited yeah I'm not worried about I don't worry that much the governor of South Dakota Kristi Noem says the vaccine message has reached a saturation level where people start to tune you out she doesn't plan to offer incentives Iowa governor Kim Reynolds said no was well less than half of people in both states are fully vaccinated I made Donahue

President Biden J. Boggs Kristi Noem New York City South Dakota Governor Kim Reynolds Iowa Donahue
"boggs" Discussed on Not Your Mother's Goose

Not Your Mother's Goose

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"boggs" Discussed on Not Your Mother's Goose

"How does that play into your analysis on new panel member and say it's all about showmanship. Ursula has definitely come to to to own the own the game. She's got the makeup she's got the costumes. She's got the attitude my friend. What can you. what can you say. And don't underestimate the importance of body language. Any money out there on the other side of this when anybody thinks cars even got a chance. Underwater absolutely does scar have to vote to stab with. I mean that's his only option really. Well that's a good point. And i guess that depends on what you know discard have time to do much scouting. Having been busy in that first round matchup one assumes that ursel has been in the war room getting ready. let's move on and take a look at a couple of our other. Matchups gaston moves on in a tight battle against randall boggs. That was one that was up and down the hallway through randall. Had the lead guest on surged late. I mean i think the big flaw here is that is that randall was just fundamentally redeemable where guest on is not and so the the evil was just not their deep down to his core. I don't think randall had enough friends to petition to vote for him. Gaston knows a lot of people. Bribe him with beer. They're going to come out to the polls a lot of these people..

Ursula ursel randall boggs randall gaston Gaston
"boggs" Discussed on Alright Mary: All Things RuPaul's Drag Race

Alright Mary: All Things RuPaul's Drag Race

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"boggs" Discussed on Alright Mary: All Things RuPaul's Drag Race

"That's the makeover challenge challenge. One is c. Take laney boggs and turner into. We'll take your glasses off and the last twenty minutes of. She's all that wash her. You wash your hair. Oh my god that runway which when they came out i was like no fucking way. Yeah no yeah. Oh my god i yeah and that came right after poopie and you're like oh it was. Yeah and like the fact that she made all of the like she didn't just bring one of those looks are both of those look. She made them both. She didn't cut any corners. They looked incredible. I mean like it was. This is a talented. this is talented. I just kept thinking that watching this week and looking back. It's like carmen. Ferrall is so fucking talented. Like is yeah drag. Excellence like she's so good queer queer. Yeah absolutely this is a gay guy literally killing it and this is the only place that he could shine an all of his talent because he's putting it on himself. He's modeling himself. You know it's not just the fashion designer. Oh he's going to do the makeup on all these different types of of little challenges or whatever are different Game shows right. No it's all in one and it's his and has been great reality tv..

laney boggs Ferrall turner carmen
"boggs" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"boggs" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Saying that to somebody else. You know what I mean? Yeah, I know. I know precisely who he's making his case in other words for himself. And I think that I don't know where it started. I have no idea where started living my life. But I think that I've worked. I've worked in that vein always all the way back with Tommy and before Tommy When I was a kid, just kind of, you know, working from one small joint to another. That's Frank Sinatra with the great Bill Boggs. And it was with great respect and a great appreciation and affection from my long time friend. Bill Buggs. Welcome to Sundays with Sinatra, my friend. Great to have you with us. Bill. How are you? What a wonderful shows you already played may with, like, Come dance with me. There's a very good year. You're rolling here. Take just a po. Thank you. Well, look, Bill. How many times did you see the old man? How many times come on, tell us From? Well, I first saw Sinatra as a young teenager, I snuck into the 500 Club in Atlantic City, New Jersey, through the back door. This is the bus boy that 1960 Up to his second the last show ever in Atlantic City. 1994. So friends 82 times. Why, Oh, man, it is time to get the prize. I never went with you took so many people. That was exactly the cruiser is down and show I took the whole staff. No, I remember. I remember distinctly that I told the story before the first time I saw Mr Sinatra life. Carnegie Hall had to be 80 81 my wardrobe a person. His name was Mark Klein. Just a great guy. Mark got me like Christmas present. And it was tickets to see Mr Sinatra at Carnegie Hall. So I'm in Carnegie Hall. Bill Buggs, and I'm there and I'm with Mark and we're a little small group of us. I'm so excited to see Mr Corner your whole New York City. And that the lights start to dim. And I've told you this before, Bill, But you elicited it's Joe Piscopo. Bill Boggs on 77. W A. B. C and s So all of a sudden, from the back of the stage at Carnegie Hall. I see Bill Boggs walking out what he was looking out like he was the last guy that was the last guy to see the old man before he went on state. Tell us what happened..

Bill Boggs Bill Frank Sinatra Carnegie Hall Bill Buggs Mark Klein Atlantic City Tommy Joe Piscopo New York City Atlantic City. New Jersey W A. B. C
War, country shows and getting personal

Photography Daily

03:51 min | 2 years ago

War, country shows and getting personal

"Just to clear this one out for now set. Your website is room. Twenty eight fifty dot com. Why why that harks back to the day of life magazine as very loudly youngster. I used to collect them and read them. And does my photography grew. It was life magazine on magazines of the type that quite a big influence on on the type of photography that that i liked view and now to like to try and do self room. Twenty at fifty was the room in the american office of life. Magazine where hall of the photographers were in town usa to sit on meet to discuss projects or we're going to do kick ideas around and that was the room this. Those ideas were were born of some of those. You know amazing stories. I'm sure we've all say in life magazine. And i watch some documentary as the mentioned the factoring twenty or fifty thought. Yeah that's quite a good good name for what was a blog for me then and then became a website because of that i wanted to room. Twenty eight fifty still exists. Somehow i wonder what it is now. Probably being changed into apartments province. They they'll have no idea how important that room while she studied to photograph career in the army photography unit. Didn't he was how it all started. Yet that's right. I was in the army twenty two years so sixteen of those years. I was The photo observe in the royal artillery. So we used to work alongside our and armored colleagues with them do what they did. When there was a requirement to bring down artillery fire. It was responsible earth cellophane colleagues like may to bring down not Throughout all this photography debating the increase in interest. Tonight i was taking pictures and i was joyous i was teaching me self black and white film development and all that good stuff document bedroom at all been boggs over the window is all businesses and then as i pull continued through. Miami korea became aware of the army photographic trade until which point didn't navy noted that existed to be but it's a very small tree it under the rmc logistic corker podge. Under the time that. I think there was about thirty. Six people total Who all transferred from whatever units. They were in On joined his or continue. Whatever clears the hudson arizona. Job is what i did for the last six years correa a string now contributed for getty images news which which means you're images generally go to who in terms of distribution and all of the editorial subscribers to get images globally Would pretend to how the site of any pictures that i filed down to. The picture desk is a string is a string of duoyin. Well i'm a. I'm a freelance photographer. A work cell. I'm responsible for your books. You know tax returns all that kind of self employed stuff. But what i do is i look around mike. Mike switches northeast england north yorkshire through the cost of the look through. And i'll look at and find out about all say are here all kinds of events which i then tick and think will listen. Event the top this weekend be of entrusted. Get the energy. If i think so that. I'll go back to the to the person that i deal with the picture desk and say look. I've got this coming over the weekend. What do you think if they say yes. We like that will take us that. Essentially that's the confirmation of me being a string at for them for that deer so essentially you become stuff for the jewish of job so you get a wage. You're going to shift shift fake. Get your mileage expenses. You're going shoot the job at caption file In in the in the normal way to get those pictures out of the picture desk and on the goal on that distribution network potential editorial clients to say so the next day i could go and do a completely different job for somebody else. I'm obligated by contract. Fecta getting outside of that

American Office Of Life Army Boggs USA Correa Korea Miami Navy Arizona North Yorkshire Mike England
Alaska's Saber Wolf

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:37 min | 2 years ago

Alaska's Saber Wolf

"Is Welcome to kids myths and Mysteries. I'm your host kid crumb today Mysteries of the Alaskan Wilderness when I began my research on the Alaskan triangle. I found there were so many months that I had to narrow it down to two categories vanishings and Monsters the monsters included the waheela were sabrewulf the Great Alaskan tiger the northern giant bear an acoustic on the vanishings were too numerous to track. So I went with the 1972 disappearance of then House Majority Leader Hale Boggs. Now a little history on Alaska wage. The largest state in the Union is twice the size of Texas 95% of which is uninhabited thousands of people vanish every year in Alaska since the state started keeping track in nineteen eighty-six over sixty thousand people of vanished all of the monsters in the vanishings have occurred in what is called the Alaskan triangle triangle goes from Anchorage to Juneau to Barrel wage. It makes a rather elongated triangle. I had my work cut out for me. So I started with the Hale Boggs who climbed into a twin engine Cessna 310 and flew out of Anchorage had it for June off. The plane was equipped with the latest tracking device in the pilot was considered one of the best and was known to be able to set a plane down in an emergency without injury to his passengers. At first. I am intrigued because twenty years later a plane on the same flight plan also vanished Without a Trace. However, I dismissed the bogs disappearance when I found out that he had made enemies with Richard Nixon and J Edgar Hoover and when the bogs case was reopened in the late nineties documents before and after he vanished were reviewed it became apparent that his disappearance may not have been an accident and this conclusion became even more suspect when it turned out that photos taken with infrared film from a special search plane had been removed from the case birth. So I dropped the vanishings to moved onto monsters at first. I scoffed at the idea of real monsters. I mean come on, but it was a town of Port walk and one of the monsters it made me a Believer. The town of portlock was essentially a fish processing Port conveniently-located fishing vessels brought in their catch, but the town was plagued with odd murders body of the missing were found dismembered in a manner that couldn't have been done by a bear our cat. There were also trackers and Hunters experienced from the town that ventured out and were never heard from again soon. People were leaving the town and The Cannery actually ran out of Manpower in the 1930s when incidents started to happen. Most of the Russian Elites actually moved out of the town for a year people running the Cannery basically begged their workers to come back and they set up armed guards for a short period of time tried to get their workers back in town. Monster or know people abandoned portlock in mass and it became a ghost town literally overnight. Well, one of the problems I ran into with my research is a few people I needed to hear from had computers. So there was no email and even less were interested in talking to me over the phone of the monsters one stood out the wahila of what the local call the sabrewulf. The reason for. This is a several years ago. I was researching Canada's nahanni Valley located in the Northwest Territories Deadman's Valley to be exact way. It was Untouched by the last ice age and was one of the last homes for the woolly mammoth and what the danai people called the wahila upon further research. I found that the native language of the danai is the same as the Navajo that live in the United States Southwest. I also discovered that their ancient oral history describes a gila the Navajo Nation actually home. An ancient charcoal sketch of the creature the last stop on that research was a complete skeleton of the wahila at a museum on the University of British Columbia Campus of the Alaskan triangle. There is certainly a lot of unexplored ground that could hide any number of unknown species and there is no end of local and Indigenous folklore about what I know without a doubt. It's just somewhere in that uninhabited ninety-five percent of the state of Alaska an animal lurks is science calls of a Gila and locals call a sabrewulf

Hale Boggs Alaska J Edgar Hoover Portlock Anchorage Gila Nahanni Valley Southwest Richard Nixon Port Walk United States Union Russian Elites University Of British Columbia Texas Juneau Canada
Divina de Campo

Coming Out Stories

03:44 min | 2 years ago

Divina de Campo

"Let's rewind a bit and go too little too. When you were growing up because I think it's fair to say, isn't it? When you growing up, you get all these stereotypes sort of enforced on. You don't you. You tend to remember my mother trying to get to wear a skirt wants to wait because she said, that's what girls. Whether it was a big row over that but it was a similar things going on in your household was trying to push the binary on you in some way or my my dad more than my moment, which is weird because when I came out and she did not react well. But when I was little like that was absolutely no an issue we had addressing boggs and like my favorite thing in the dressing boggs was elected. ABC's leopard-print should neely. The Laurie. Today. And it had a goat trim round the neck, and then I think, yeah. HOW SPLIT IN IT? You know I think I'd say go it was a sleeveless dress with gold trim I mean tacky as hell. So Takeda's. But that was my favorite. Yeah absolutely. Follow I. Loved it. I. Felt it was you know this is yes. I love my life I. Always Been Dressing Up Anyway Kate and hasn't been a big deal but then I remember Ed once we have play room I. Mean we're so big class cry you play. So. I remember putting all these dresses on and then going in and feel like look I got all these silly clothes on on my dad's face was he was just like incandescent and just went very nice and. It was like seething. That was that I think the first time that I remember. Thinking Oh there's something wrong doing this you know dot doesn't like it but I don't know why my experience my father is he's very much generation of men were they weren't taught how to talk about their feelings or talk or express emotion in any other way than anger. At how old would you have been? Then I think I was about four five hours really. And then the you go I, guess you getting any attitude, the playground for not conforming to agendas wineries. Yet not conforming with definitely for me it wasn't such a thing at junior school lower. The thing like junior school that just didn't didn't seem factor into people's hey. So, you know Judy School for me. Actually it was a really happy time. I felt well-supported where the no case. But somehow they didn't seem to have that much of an impact on me Oh my thinking or any of that stuff. So every time at school are is singing in the choir. I was in the you know the little school show I was leading. Violin. Bali class. So I was just on cut fruit loop. Any moment are get. That's why I was kind of confused was. She reacted really badly when I came out, but she'd never kind of held me back from doing any of those things. You know if ever there was a little quaint okayed it with me. You know I was like the absolute stereotype epitome of Funky Little A. The. loafing Barbra Streisand, get me that Bob predicts and on the radio I love a all of this like this song, my brothers and sisters used to sing to me all the time in the car was. So my show you've got it the. Match and I was like, okay why are they singing they? Sit Me Oh, it's because I'm not.

Judy School Boggs Barbra Streisand BOB Takeda ABC Laurie Neely Kate ED
Veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts dead at 75

Morning Edition

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Veteran broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts dead at 75

"Veteran NPR and ABC news political journalist Cokie Roberts has died Roberts died today in Washington DC from complications of breast cancer she was seventy five Roberts was known as one of N. P. R.'s founding mothers an imperious don Gonyea reports she was among the first women to rise to the top levels broadcast journalism Cokie Roberts started covering Congress for NPR in nineteen seventy eight she came from a political family her father was Louisiana congressman Hale Boggs he was democratic Majority Leader when he was killed in a plane crash in nineteen seventy two her mother Lindy Boggs then one that seat in Congress Roberts new politicians and future presidents as family friends this is from C. spanning twenty fifteen it has given me empathy for politicians I know that they go home at night too you know rowdy households and homework and all of that and and that they are regular people who deal with regular issues Cokie Roberts worked as a commentator for NPR from nineteen ninety two until her death she also hosted this week on ABC news from nineteen ninety six to two

NPR N. P. R. Don Gonyea Cokie Roberts Congress Lindy Boggs ABC Washington Louisiana Congressman Congress Roberts
Roblox leads cloud gaming revolution

FT News

11:42 min | 3 years ago

Roblox leads cloud gaming revolution

"This is a message to all the accountants out there. If you are worried that a robot is going to take your job become a certified management accountant, you see we are only programmed to mine data and crunch numbers. You'll have control over the strategy and the decision making so become a CNA and robots like me will help you not hurt you unless we short-circuit then all bets are off the certification. You've gotta earn it. Visit certification dot org for details. Hello. From the newsroom the financial times in London. I'm season blimp. Som Ray blocks a California-based online gaming started valued at t- point four billion dollars. In offend raising round lost year has taken the US by storm. And is now I in Europe's thriving market Malcolm more discusses the rise of cloud gaming with Alli ram and timber chew. So I can you tell us what is roadblocks? How's it evolved? And how come so many kids in the US playing it? Yes. Well, it's extrordinary. They claim to have half of all nine to twelve year olds in America's uses and they have said they have more than ninety million monthly users around the world. It's a gaming platform in which uses children mostly designed that own games and games, kind of become more or less prominent based on how many people are playing them and how much they're enjoying them. And based on that. It's become really big. So you can go onto it you can design a game. And then you can play the game that you've designed nor shall the game with your friends. You can play the game you've designed you can play your friends games. They can play your games you can make a business out of it. You can make money off it. Okay. So that makes it very different then from games like foot night and Minecraft. Yes. So the models different. Because instead of building your own features in an existing world, you actually build your wealth from scratch as a user, and you can do that either by dragging and dropping features that roadblocks has designed and office to you to choose from or you can actually code elements of the world and the game that you want to create in that world yourself does that sound about right? Tim a decent. There are some overlaps in a way with fortnight in the foot night in his current geysers. This battle royale game where there's one hundred people competing to get down to the last man standing at the it's sort of become a mole flu. Would space than just that. Because you have concerts being held there. You have people using it as effectively just kind of place to hang out with their friends in that respect that both kind of virtual worlds, the have given a new kind of place for people to make their own entertainment in a way, it's not quite as prescriptive as trying to complete a level the kind of traditional videogames of old. This is the phenomenon that is cold in the industry, social gaming, and is becoming increasingly popular, and it's a kind of gaming community in which playing games as one tiny part of what they do. And a lot else of what they do is communicate with friends with strangers and share experiences online. The ideas sort of originally goes back to Facebook pre mobile, so farmville throwing sheep and things like that which were sort of big on Facebook probably almost a decade ago now, but kind of dropped off when Facebook moved onto mobile because it wasn't the same abilities to create. Mini games. Insides the Facebook out as the was on the desktop and so companies like Zinger at pine it that area died away a little bit and a lot of social mechanics that they were using more about trying to recruit new users than genuine the spending time with your friends or playing case, your friends, and that started to change with titles like was with friends while you were playing scrabble against people online. But that's now starting to come back again come full circle. And so he still Snapchat has just launched its knees social gaming platform Myer actually in your chats with your friends playing a little game right in now. Which is an idea that was really popularized in China with we chat, and the we chat many games platform. So there's lots of different attempts in lots of different ways now to create this sort of social gaming idea. Do you guys think that the audience for social games is different from the audience for traditional console games? Or are we looking at situation where the audience migrates from one to the other? Oh, I think one of the things that's marked out the the sort of lost decade in the advent of mobile gaming is it has broadens the number of people who play games regularly, whether the you'd looking at things like angry birds or candy crush all those kinds of things and those by and large were still solo activities, but people who might not want to sit down and play cola juicy or even for that muscle full night for an intensive period of time of got more used to this more casual form of gaming, and so that's in a way, why when the smartphone I came out, and they are obstacle launched. There was a lot of concern in the industry that would cannibalize console gaming actually it just increase the size of the market overall. And so the console gaming market was more for the hardcore gamers and the PC gaming mauka, even more dedicated players. And then there's a large number of people playing less frequently or less intensively on the smallest green and phones and those lines now really starting to blur. Okay. But with things like the roadblocks platform and others. Sort of social games are the best enjoyed on a mobile or on a desktop, and if their best enjoyed on a desktop where does that leave mobile games where they go in the future? It's a Google is trying to square that circle with its new games Jimmy platform stadia which was unveiled a couple of weeks ago, and is designed so that you can play exactly the same game on any device whether that is your phone or a PC or the TV sets. And so because all of the processing is done in the clouds and the same way as Netflix extremes videos to your screen. Whatever size comes to be. It will stream a fully-fledged game with really rich graphics, and you're not constrained by the processing power that you have runny particular device. And so it's not yet clear what games are going to emerge from that have been very little titles announced fill stadia so far. But that promise that you can play the same game everywhere was kind of established with full night. And it was something that started off as a kind of PC phenomenon. The only really took office his huge cultural movements, especially among younger players when it go onto Android denial s early last year. I think all these different gaming platforms catering to slightly different audiences are one of the major things that roadblocks is targeting is the developer community, so one of the big pitches that they make is that as a user of roadblocks. You can monetize a game yourself by building something that becomes popular goes viral. You can sell features within that game to other uses and Tun into a business, and I spoke to some developers who have built games on roadblocks, and it seems possible to make tens or hundreds of thousands of pounds. They claim some people have made millions of pounds on the platform by doing this. So I think some of these platforms addressing slightly different communities of gamers. I mean I mean, in a in way. a way this was the promise of second life more than a decade ago. Right. This was supposed to be an infinitely flexible virtual world where people could spend their time. And I think the problem the second life had part from the fact that the graphics were fairly poor and the connection was fairly terrible. Was that people go there, and he didn't really know what to do. And so very books solves out and vote night solves that by saying a case of start with it's a game and you come here primarily to play a game. And then they give you the tools to create something different out of that. And that's where roadblocks is definitely pioneering this vastly more inventive and creative type of gaming platform. So for large in the United States, but they are now expanding elsewhere. Yes. So they say they've seen much faster growth in Europe than in the US, and that focusing on the French and German market, they've launched a platform in French and German. They've also launched it in Korean and simplified Chinese and traditional Chinese which suggests they've got that is also firmly fixed on the Chinese massive. Market of gamers, so yeah, I think the next phase of the growth as the head of international expansion explained is overseas. How does roadblocks make money out of all of this of all these users and developers coming onto its platform and making their own games? Well, develop has got to keep a quarter of the money that's spent in that games, and very blocks takes away the rest, so they make money that way primarily and they claim that that model has allowed the business to become cash. Flow positive in the games. You mean uses buying certain items all lives or other things? The treasure chest type stuff that you can buy inside of games. Yes. So uses spun real money to buy a virtual currency, and then they can spend that virtual currency on things like clothes for that avatar or new features as part of the game. Enough to pay to play. They don't have to pay to play. I think that's a very keen business model innovation. These games are having in fortnight night is another great example of it. If you're trying to create an online space that is a genuine community you need to be able to kind of attract as many people as possible. But if it is a place where you are being yourself and hanging out you will want to kiss out. So the theory goes your avatar with something that establishes your personality, or nor density in the virtual world is the same way as you buy clothes fashion in the real world. And so the two things kind of Fito feature. Okay. And then just one final full them as the audiences for these grams grow in these communities and lodge. You know, are we going to face situation where safety becomes a problem? How regulators going to address what happens in these virtual worlds blocks has a kind of amazing and horrifying story about a child's avatar character who was right on the platform. And that was last year they said that the platform was hacked, and that's how. How that happened and they claim to have addressed it. But of course, as with all of these tools when you have children playing socially online, probably without being monitored. By parents does going to be a lot of concern about what happens in that context. And whether people who want to abuse that can leverage that game to do that. And I think that's just the nature of the beast. So for instance, roadblocks does own that problem, and they very vocally say that they want children to play on blocks, and that therefore they're going to have to deal with really complicated safety issues and invested not to make sure it's safe for them, the verification point, an how parental consensus grunted, whether it really is parental Cassandra disgrunted or just a kid taking a Boggs is a big unsold problem. Right. The way across this industry at the moment. And I don't know if that's going to be regulated into a solution something that the industry comes up with themselves. But it feels like that's gonna keep being an issue until something more a bus. Is put into place the but stories up a whole other set of questions around how much of your identity you want to share in verify online. So it's a really tough problem. Okay. Thank you very much. Batch was Malcolm law talking into our tech with voices alley ram, and Tim Bradshaw. Thanks for listening. Remember, if you're not ready subscriber and would like to discover more not content. He can find our latest subscription of F T dot com slash.

United States Facebook Europe Tim Bradshaw Management Accountant London Som Ray Alli Netflix T- Point Google America Cassandra Disgrunted Snapchat China Zinger
Why Are Peat Bogs So Good at Preserving Human Remains?

BrainStuff

05:59 min | 4 years ago

Why Are Peat Bogs So Good at Preserving Human Remains?

"Are pretty awesome. As far as sweeping mud fields of dead buried plants go. They store the energy of generations of plants there mass which can be harvested as Pete they're also havens for mummies artifacts buried beneath bugs, including human bodies may be kept in astonishingly good condition for thousands and thousands of years. They've all got stories to tell and today. We'll look at the weird science that makes their preservation possible. Common in cool. Wet parts of the world bugs are waterlogged grounds. That formed when decaying plant matter known as peat accumulates in low lying areas bugs are usually found in cool climates and often in lake basins created by ice age glaciers that no longer. Get a steady flow of river or stream water overtime Mazas cover the heap, like a blanket, and in most cases. This mossy layer is primarily made of a mosque called sphagnum. Spackman moss has the power to transform an entire landscape water dirt trapped beneath sheets of it will be cut off from the normal supply of oxygen from the atmosphere. Also, spelled them soaks up calcium and magnesium, which makes the underlying soil and water mildly acidic since bacteria and fungi. Find those conditions in hospitable. The dead vegetation decomposes at phenomenally slow rate instead of breaking down right away. It lingers piling up over time masses of the botanical waste gradually turned into Pete a soggy, mud colored sub. Instance peat can be used as animal bedding, and as a fossil fuel which makes it an important commodity in places like the Irish Midlands and in Scotland where it's the traditional fuel for fires that dry out grain to make scotch whisky in parting smoke, and it's flavors along with that heat. But to archaeologists Pete is a lot less valuable than the human corpses. That sometimes come with it bogs have long fascinated humans not just for their fossil fuels the spongy soil has intrigued people as far back as the bronze age many people died in these bogs or replaced their after their deaths and these bog bodies as they're known have been found all over the world. The wetlands of north western Europe. For instance, is a bog body hub hundreds of these corpses have turned up in Germany England, the Netherlands and neighboring countries in twenty eleven Pete harvesters working in Ireland accidentally ran over. A bronze age corpse with a milling machine dubbed, the Cashel, man. The harvester found all that was left of an adult male who probably died in his twenties. His body was riddled. With injuries, including a broken arm and a nasty cut across the backside. Some of these may have been caused by the compressing weight of the bog moss above him or the blades of that milling device. Nevertheless, archaeologists have reason to suspect that the Cashel man was a ritualized sacrifice victim other European bog bodies have displayed stab wounds, slit throats and evidence of torture historians things that the local wetlands were once a hotbed for religious sacrifices carbon dating tells us the Cashel man perished about four thousand years ago, seven centuries before king Tutankhamun was born to date. He's the oldest Earp, Ian, bog body on record with intact skin. That's right. The corpse of somebody who's been dead for four millennia still has its skin attached. And this isn't a fluke. Lots of bog bodies, retain, some or all of their original skin, the talent man at twenty three hundred year old corpse recovered from Denmark peat bog in nineteen fifty has skeleton is tens but elsewhere his skin is so well preserved that little details like the wrinkles on his forehead. Are still visible, although the talent man skin didn't rot away. The medication process did change its appearance and texture like the Cashel man and lots of other bog bodies. He sports leathery dark Brown skin. Some of them also have preserved hair that was dyed red after death. This is most likely caused by a recently discovered polymer called Spackman, which seeps out of debt, Spag them moss. If you think of leather it's made through a process called tanning that strengthens the bonds between some of the natural fibers in animal hides as a tanning agent Spag man has the same effect on human skin rendering, tough and tea colored sphagnum also binds with nitrogen, which bacteria needs survive. So by removing nitrogen from the environment Spag, Dan helps prevent the spread of microorganisms that would normally be breaking down human and animal remains and Furthermore Spackman along with the acid that it turns into polls calcium right out of dead bodies bones. Get weakened in the process, although sphagnum. Does a fine job of preserving skin. It's calcium. Thievery isn't great for skeletons mummies have been found in certain Boggs with soft extra flimsy bones. That are about to studies cardboard and that have been distorted by heavy Pete. But that's assuming the decalcification process doesn't altogether eliminate bones. Lots of bog bodies have been found missing bones. And some of the monies are totally boneless. The latter are basically human shaped bags of leathery skin, wrapped around pickled organs. Not all Boggs are so hostile to bones, though, the waters acidity level varies from bogged bog, and this impacts corpse preservation archaeologists have discovered that in really acidic peat bogs. The resident mummies have lots of skin and soft tissue and weak or non-existent bones. But there are some boggy places with relatively alkaline water here the environment pretty much has the opposite effect on corpses. A take for example, the window ver- archaeological site Pete bottomed pond in Florida that became the final resting place for dozens of native Americans between. Seven and eight thousand years ago skeletal remains from one hundred sixty eight people have turned up in the Pete a large deposit of crushed up snail shells, lying under the pond supplies the water with magnesium and calcium carbonates that makes the water. More alkaline neutralizing the span into an extent instead of mummified skin bags. The bog is rife with naked bones and skeletons a bears they are on the outside the ancient bones had a big surprise in store for scientists brain tissue was found in more than ninety of the wind over pond skulls making them extra fascinating fines,

Pete Boggs Pete Bottomed Spackman Moss Irish Midlands Spackman Mazas Denmark Western Europe Spag Scotland Germany Ireland Florida DAN Earp IAN England
Google is taking on the iPhone X with new gesture navigation in Android P

Mac OS Ken

01:46 min | 4 years ago

Google is taking on the iPhone X with new gesture navigation in Android P

"Google giveth and some say google take it as well on the giving side i download boggs says a couple of new features of g mail for iphone and ipad according to the piece the version of the g mail client has gained a snooze feature as well as support for google pay the peace explains both features saying put off emails the adjust can't read reply to straight away top the new snooze button you'll be asked if g mail should remind you when it's time to act on an important email you can also request money as an attachment and g mail with google pay and anyone with an email address google pay works on mac os and i o s through chrome firefox and safari from something given to something stolen in the words of some as google's deb conference google logo gets underway a number of sites including crunch couldn't up noticing these similarities between the new navigation gestures and the next version of android and the old navigation gestures from my phone ten it works just like the iphone ten according to tech crunch the piece quotes will will vp of android engineering dave burke as saying as part of android p where introducing a new system navigation that we've been working on for more than a year now and the new design makes android multitasking more approachable and easier to understand the piece goes on to say while google has probably been working on a new multitasking screen for a year it's hard to believe that the company didn't copy apple the iphone ton was unveiled in september of twenty seventeen.

Google Boggs Dave Burke Apple VP