20 Burst results for "Body Of Research"

"body research" Discussed on Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

03:09 min | Last month

"body research" Discussed on Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

"Congresses passing an infrastructure bill that spends tens of billions of dollars promoting electric vehicles. It's high time to ask a basic question or electric cars. Relieve the way to go. Hello i'm steve forbes. And this is what's ahead where you get the insights you need it better navigate. These turbulent times these days it is considered a basic fact that electric vehicles of the wave of the future that the traditional internal combustion engine is headed for the museum. Why enthusiasts say ev admit less carbon dioxide. And that's crucial for battling climate change so far though most motorists here and elsewhere not been persuaded. Despite enormous subsidies electric cars and trucks make up only three percent of the market worldwide. A big drawback is still the time. It takes a recharge vehicle hours versus few minutes at the gas pump. As for being big reduces of carbon dioxide emissions a number of studies and evaluations. Are making it clear that the situation is not as clear cut as once thought in an article for tech crunch dot com energy expert. Mark mills sums it up this way and i quote a growing body research points to the likelihood that widespread replacement of conventional cars with e vs would likely have a relatively small impact on global emissions. And it's even possible that the outcome would increase emissions and of quote. The problem comes when taking into account the carbon dioxide created when mining or making the materials that go into building an e- especially the battery that is what is dubbed embodied emissions for example what amount of carbon dioxide is emitted when mining the minerals to make the battery or omitted when manufacturing the aluminum or carbon fiber to make the car as mills puts it. And i quote. The issue is what we know and don't know about what happens before an evs delivered to a customer namely the embodied emissions arising from the labyrinth things supply chains to obtain and process. All the materials needed to fabricate batteries and to quote a typical. Ev battery for instance has sixty pounds cobalt to get that amount of cobalt means mining sixty thousand pounds of war. Then there's the mount of earth that has to be removed to actually mine these minerals. A single battery can require digging up over one hundred tons of dirt. These factors are why francis high climate council last year issued a study that found that actual emissions were some seventy percent higher than originally reported when taking into account embodied emissions in the country's imports. So where should we go from here. Very simple readjust the focus to developing more efficient combustion. Engines impossible no to that end. Impressive progress already is being made by several companies with engines that can cut fuel use by fifty percent. I'm steve forbes. Thanks for listening. Do send in your comments and suggestions look to being with you soon again..

Mark mills steve forbes francis high climate council mills
"body research" Discussed on Discover Music Channel (Discover Music Channel)

Discover Music Channel (Discover Music Channel)

05:50 min | 11 months ago

"body research" Discussed on Discover Music Channel (Discover Music Channel)

"Dumfries. Gee does dot com enough to come home but never maas bring all the time off. Twenty nevada my more. You're been waiting to pins things by not the next one. Why make your weekend. Gary learn about treatment monica. Good no one me. I go for i. Don enami bliley. Pipe this this. I just say good metal filing filing good good filing gosh manicure boy and foskit imprisonment in just wanting to tell you. Are you good. Good morning filing nigga donating of the good. Don't but mia go calm feeling like i done in ohio new. I used to be happy body research by bug easter new laws out. I want. i'll be watching them. Were no motif for young nuke. Thick fit into me. I guess voted like about. I'm yellow body find finding jobs. The homeboy back title team de sumati and chop tan to national. Or gosh and to all my folks family hustle assange. Yeah him up brain-dead over them of buckeye stop and shop on nov. Mind on meets me here. We love three of the major for not going crazy card dawn wanna on his to give him shen..

"body research" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth of 3 to 4 times the rate of whites that holds true regardless of wealth or education, black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality out weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Cartman's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that She studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016. And two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis and we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes, nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died at route, she says. It's about stress. Ah, lifetime of struggles over housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stuff across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth, in particular that in the start of life, it's so important because if we can't get that, right You know, we're setting someone up for a lifetime of pain and a struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles. Hardin and says, might help doctors better understand.

Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevin Cartman Philando Castille North Minneapolis obesity Minneapolis underweight Hardin
"body research" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Police violence leaves marks across a community of survivors, their families and neighbors. Hardiman studies racial disparities in health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth at 3 to 4 times the rate of whites that holds true regardless of wealth or education, black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality out weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Cartman's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that She studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016. And two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis and we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes. Nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died. Route, she says. It's about stress a lifetime of struggles of her housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stuff across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth in particular, that in the start of life is so important, because if we can't get that, right, you know we're setting someone up for a A lifetime of pain and struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles. Hardin and says might help doctors better understand challenges for women like Raven Cane. I meet Cane and her three week old daughter, Remmy. Okay, fire to Remmy Kane had five miscarriages.

Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevin Raven Cane Cartman Hardiman Remmy Kane North Minneapolis obesity Philando Castille underweight Minneapolis Hardin Remmy
"body research" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on KCRW

"Floyd's killing in Minneapolis placed police violence again in the national limelight, with protests erupting. But black and Brown communities say the effective police violence is felt long after demonstrations died down. In fact, research shows trauma from racism and violence can leave imprints on a community's health, including on pregnant women. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi. Outside the corner store where George Floyd died. Murals, stuffed animals and origami cranes filled the street. So I'm Rachel Heart of men. I am on the faculty. Rachel Hardman grew up nearby and it's a public health professor at the University of Minnesota. We walk in a field where there's a memorial for victims of police violence. It looks like a replica of a cemetery with about 200 grave markers like Ralph Bell, right? Hard del Cheryl over here. Many of these people were local and died at the hands of police. Travis Jordan in Minneapolis. He's actually it was a friend of one of my dear friends, Hardman surveys to makeshift cemetery. My first thought, is it This isn't even all of the names. And that breaks my heart. This scene, she says, doesn't capture the whole of the problem that police violence leaves marks across a community of survivors, their families and neighbors. Hardiman studies racial disparities in health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth of 3 to 4 Times The rate of whites That holds true regardless of wealth or education. Black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality. Weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Hartmann's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that. She studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016, and two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis. And we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes, nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died at route, she says. It's about stress. Ah, lifetime of struggles of her housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stress across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth in particular. Then in the start of life is so important, because if we can't get that, right, you know we're setting someone up for a lifetime of pain and a struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles, Hardman says, might help doctors better understand challenges for women like Raven Cane. I meet cane and her three week old daughter, Remmy. Okay. Prior to Remmy Kane had five miscarriages with no medical explanation about what caused them. I had gotten an ultrasound and had seen a baby in a strong heartbeat. Literally had come back the next day, and there was nothing there. So I just had this really high anxiety anxiety about losing her pregnancy with Remmy, too. She was about four months pregnant when the pandemic hit. Then George Floyd died blocks from her parent's home. You know, During that time, it was constant sirens when they were saying that the KKK was supposedly in town, and it's just stressful. It's like and then you're trying to Carry life and then you're thinking about them being a black person in this world and the things that they might encounter, Kane tried to distract herself by hosting a family party to reveal she was having a girl. My dad was jumping open down like he was so heavy, he said. He was in the garage and cried a little bit, cried partly out of relief. He told her the world wasn't safe for black boys. Midwife Rebecca Polston. Here's that often. Holsten started roots community birth center five years ago to offer women more support than a traditional hospital. Clinic defied the odds in five years on Lee. One client has had a preterm birth, she says. That's because the clinic addresses trauma. Some of the things that we explore is not finding out the sex. Of their baby because the stress that it brings when you find out that you're having a black sun. That kind of stress, she says, is palpable all around her. After George Floyd's death, Colston says she confronted a group of white men flying Confederate flags three blocks away. She closed the birthing center for a week. But the threat, she says, isn't just from outsiders. Once an elderly neighbor fainted nearby, Polston and her staff rushed to help and the police came up with their hands on their guns saying, What are you doing to us while we're taking blood pressure clearly healthcare providers those Interactions where those who you call for help. May not come to help you but come to harm you shadows every aspect of one's life and it becomes especially acute when you're in your birthing phase of your life. That rings true for coming Love Valenzuela. I don't know how to explain it, but I feel like that trauma is just in my body balance way Low is a doula. Originally from Chile Four years ago, she went into early labor. On her way to the hospital. Police pulled her over for driving with high beams on she told him. him. I I have have an an emergency. emergency. I'm I'm pregnant pregnant and and he he stops stops me. me. I I need need to to see see your your driver's driver's license license and and registration. registration. So So I'm I'm scrambling, scrambling, shaking. shaking. Just remembering makes like my heart beagle so fast. She was scared and her contractions intensified. She says he'd be raided her ticketed her and insisted she keep the windows rolled down its frigid cold. I'm crying my tears or freezing as they're coming down because it's so cold. Her baby survived. But this spring, Valenzuela nearly died giving birth to her second child. She blames her earlier encounter with police because my uterus had worked so hard, potentially from this previous Drama. I actually had an acute hemorrhage. Two months later, George Floyd died about a mile away. She's still haunted that he called out for his mother as he died. So, too, is researcher Rachel Hardiman. You know, when George plaids yelled for his mama and summon all mothers, Hardman stands just a few feet from where he was killed. It's just so painful. You know, this'd why do the work that I do is so that every mom gets to have a healthy baby and Have a good life. She's expanding her research nationally to keep digging into the connections between police violence and its impact on mothers and their babies.

George Floyd Rachel Hardman Yuki Noguchi Rachel Heart David Greene Minneapolis NPR University of Minnesota professor
How Police Violence Could Impact The Health Of Black Infants

Travis Holcombe

06:58 min | 1 year ago

How Police Violence Could Impact The Health Of Black Infants

"Floyd's killing in Minneapolis placed police violence again in the national limelight, with protests erupting. But black and Brown communities say the effective police violence is felt long after demonstrations died down. In fact, research shows trauma from racism and violence can leave imprints on a community's health, including on pregnant women. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi. Outside the corner store where George Floyd died. Murals, stuffed animals and origami cranes filled the street. So I'm Rachel Heart of men. I am on the faculty. Rachel Hardman grew up nearby and it's a public health professor at the University of Minnesota. We walk in a field where there's a memorial for victims of police violence. It looks like a replica of a cemetery with about 200 grave markers like Ralph Bell, right? Hard del Cheryl over here. Many of these people were local and died at the hands of police. Travis Jordan in Minneapolis. He's actually it was a friend of one of my dear friends, Hardman surveys to makeshift cemetery. My first thought, is it This isn't even all of the names. And that breaks my heart. This scene, she says, doesn't capture the whole of the problem that police violence leaves marks across a community of survivors, their families and neighbors. Hardiman studies racial disparities in health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth of 3 to 4 Times The rate of whites That holds true regardless of wealth or education. Black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality. Weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Hartmann's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that. She studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016, and two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis. And we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes, nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died at route, she says. It's about stress. Ah, lifetime of struggles of her housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stress across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth in particular. Then in the start of life is so important, because if we can't get that, right, you know we're setting someone up for a lifetime of pain and a struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles, Hardman says, might help doctors better understand challenges for women like Raven Cane. I meet cane and her three week old daughter, Remmy. Okay. Prior to Remmy Kane had five miscarriages with no medical explanation about what caused them. I had gotten an ultrasound and had seen a baby in a strong heartbeat. Literally had come back the next day, and there was nothing there. So I just had this really high anxiety anxiety about losing her pregnancy with Remmy, too. She was about four months pregnant when the pandemic hit. Then George Floyd died blocks from her parent's home. You know, During that time, it was constant sirens when they were saying that the KKK was supposedly in town, and it's just stressful. It's like and then you're trying to Carry life and then you're thinking about them being a black person in this world and the things that they might encounter, Kane tried to distract herself by hosting a family party to reveal she was having a girl. My dad was jumping open down like he was so heavy, he said. He was in the garage and cried a little bit, cried partly out of relief. He told her the world wasn't safe for black boys. Midwife Rebecca Polston. Here's that often. Holsten started roots community birth center five years ago to offer women more support than a traditional hospital. Clinic defied the odds in five years on Lee. One client has had a preterm birth, she says. That's because the clinic addresses trauma. Some of the things that we explore is not finding out the sex. Of their baby because the stress that it brings when you find out that you're having a black sun. That kind of stress, she says, is palpable all around her. After George Floyd's death, Colston says she confronted a group of white men flying Confederate flags three blocks away. She closed the birthing center for a week. But the threat, she says, isn't just from outsiders. Once an elderly neighbor fainted nearby, Polston and her staff rushed to help and the police came up with their hands on their guns saying, What are you doing to us while we're taking blood pressure clearly healthcare providers those Interactions where those who you call for help. May not come to help you but come to harm you shadows every aspect of one's life and it becomes especially acute when you're in your birthing phase of your life. That rings true for coming Love Valenzuela. I don't know how to explain it, but I feel like that trauma is just in my body balance way Low is a doula. Originally from Chile Four years ago, she went into early labor. On her way to the hospital. Police pulled her over for driving with high beams on she told him. him. I I have have an an emergency. emergency. I'm I'm pregnant pregnant and and he he stops stops me. me. I I need need to to see see your your driver's driver's license license and and registration. registration. So So I'm I'm scrambling, scrambling, shaking. shaking. Just remembering makes like my heart beagle so fast. She was scared and her contractions intensified. She says he'd be raided her ticketed her and insisted she keep the windows rolled down its frigid cold. I'm crying my tears or freezing as they're coming down because it's so cold. Her baby survived. But this spring, Valenzuela nearly died giving birth to her second child. She blames her earlier encounter with police because my uterus had worked so hard, potentially from this previous Drama. I actually had an acute hemorrhage. Two months later, George Floyd died about a mile away. She's still haunted that he called out for his mother as he died. So, too, is researcher Rachel Hardiman. You know, when George plaids yelled for his mama and summon all mothers, Hardman stands just a few feet from where he was killed. It's just so painful. You know, this'd why do the work that I do is so that every mom gets to have a healthy baby and Have a good life. She's expanding her research nationally to keep digging into the connections between police violence and its impact on mothers and their babies.

George Floyd Thurman Blevins Minneapolis Yuki Noguchi Rachel Heart Rachel Hardman Ralph Bell Del Cheryl Hardman Travis Jordan Philando Castille North Minneapolis Raven Cane Remmy Kane Hardiman University Of Minnesota Floyd Rebecca Polston
"body research" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The corner store where George Floyd died. Murals, stuffed animals and origami cranes filled the street. So I'm Rachel Hardiman. I am on the faculty. Rachel Hardman grew up nearby, and it's a public health professor at the University of Minnesota. We walk in a field where there's a memorial for victims of police violence. It looks like a replica of a cemetery with about 200 grave markers like Ralph Bell, right, Hard del Cheryl over here. Many of these people were local and died at the hands of police promised Jordan in Minneapolis. Is actually it was a friend of one of my dear friends, Hardman surveys the makeshift cemetery. My first thought, is it This isn't even all of the names and that breaks my heart. This scene, she says, doesn't capture the whole of the problem. Police violence leaves marks across the community of survivors, their families and neighbors. Hardiman studies racial disparities in health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth at 3 to 4 times the rate of whites that holds true regardless of wealth or education. Black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality, weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Hartmann's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that she studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016. And two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis and we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes. Nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died. Route, she says. It's about stress a lifetime of struggles of her housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stuff across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth in particular, betting the start of life is so important, because if we can't get that, right, you know we're setting someone up for a A lifetime of pain and struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles, Hardiman says, might help doctors better understand challenges for women like Raven Cane. I meet Cane and her three week old daughter, Remmy Social. Prior to Remmy Kane had five miscarriages.

Rachel Hardiman Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevin Rachel Hardman Minneapolis Raven Cane George Floyd Ralph Bell Hartmann Remmy Kane North Minneapolis obesity underweight Remmy Social Jordan Philando Castille Cheryl professor University of Minnesota
"body research" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"If you like to call in to ask question you could do so now. 1 808 for eight W A. B c 108 for 89222 Let's go next to Andrea in Sparta. How are you? Doctor Town? Good morning. I would like to. I'd like to say something here. I hope your audience appreciates your brilliant. I've been thinking about it before. But you are right up there. You referred to Schachter before I've been up there now. I don't clearly when I'm down in Missouri, he invented depends. Unit He's written 36 books. Radio talk show 13 different electric. Devices, etcetera, But you are just really amazing. And I hope your listeners really appreciate it. Thank you. It's very kind of you. We get a lot of notes in the office. People who go on the website and send me a note. Wait. We have a lot of calls in the office. You know, patient thanking me for being so thorough in trying to make things easy to understand and not use confusing medical jargon. I mean, that's really what my goal my crusade has been to teach people and make things easy to understand. So they have They have choices, you know. My great only are you brilliant, but you're also very humble man. I've been listening to you for a while now they're too strong question Number one. Um, I know someone, someone here in town here, and he has a son who has autism. So obviously his concern is not only his son now who needs care, but additionally, his son later when he passes on Will and can stem cell therapy. He has more than afford to bring him into you. But the problem is people don't even some people don't know that you took me until I'm 72. I learned about you three years ago. And you know, there's a big gap there where I could have been coming to you, but it can stem cell therapy helping with autism. I think there's research that shows that there's benefit from using your own stem cells for autism spectrum disorder. Individuals. There are even looking at scholar Google. What I typically say that on stem cell therapy You have 2.6 or seven million studies. Uh, they're studying stem cells for everything Known to men, every degenerate disorder. So they're they're looking at stem cells for autism there 40,800 results roughly at this moment. On scholar dot Google when you look at this, so I think that there's benefit because you're in everyone that we describes themselves. You're able to put brand new cells into the circulation to take over for some sort of damaged degenerating. So with that, just just that in mind. I love the idea of teaching people that if you have damaged cells in your knee or your pan, Chris, your liver, your kidneys, your heart your brain. Every part of your body research describes Benefits in these areas, so I think that the numbers of studies on all of these disorders is just skyrocketing because there's evidence there's proof there. Okay. Now the second point second question. Retired Teacher. I'm 72 years old. Don't look like a 72 year old like a 72 year old. I think like I want during vitamins diet, etcetera. Might counters are loaded with Hundreds of bottles of vitamins anyway, point is, I would like to come in in the spring. Right now. I'm busy with my conduct business, and I like women in the spring and get a tune up number one before the dementia or Alzheimer's or whatever, then inspect brain and then secondly, an organ tune up. Can they both be done at the same time? Of course you always Initial blood test ends up being as I say about 25 pages. So you're looking at everything you're looking at heavy metals, vitamins, organ everything and then find no, that certainly. And for a lot of people that can get here can't get to the office. We can set up a telemedicine counsel. Where we can chat over the phone. You go online on the website fill out our registration forms. Then we try to get a lab. Get your prescriptions to have a lab with the testing. And if it's easier for you to do it, you know from home that we can set that up. You do the 25 page blood test If you find right here, someone who has had the blood test and they want to hit stem cell therapy. Do you do anything prior to if their blood work shows difficulty to basically Build the stem cells within their body because there's no need and there's nothing that makes Superman You know any stronger, you know, for example, so a lot of people will ask. Well, my vitamins are a little bit low. I know you recommend values today, you know. Do I have to get my vitamins into the perfect range for stem? No. And when you recommend vitamins when we do that, It's days that you know it takes a couple of days and then your vitamin levels were dramatically higher. So And that doesn't make your stem cells spike. Those cells are, you know, super duper cells that will do their job. Think of it when people used themselves for cancer. They'll put you in the hospital take out some bone marrow, which is a stem cell separation. Stem cell procedure. Bone marrow transplant. They'll radiating chemo person. And then put the stem cells back in. So if using that radiation chemo does not interfere with the stem cells doing their job, then nothing really will interfere with that. So The beauty is yourselves will do their job because that's their only drop soul to go to areas of damage in degeneration make brand new cells. Trying to be practical. I look at coming in to see you and having the stem cells. They're in both regions as an investment in me and you know, to prevent things from happening. That can't be cured. Perhaps etcetera. Anyway, I appreciate your listening and I appreciate the information and I definitely planning coming in great. Look forward to seeing you have a wonderful day. Taking you to find out. As we've said before on the program, we have probably 30% of people come in. For stem cells without any major medical abnormality. And they just want their body to function and feel like it did when they were younger or tow. Regain some of what they believe they've lost, whether it's vision or focus. Strength in a variety of ways, so There's no downside to taking your best cells that are sitting your body waiting to work. Take them in large number. Put him back in. And create repair. Your own stem cells of the greatest repair mechanism. Known to science. A lot of people will tell their doctor, their doctor is not really versed in it and then say there's not enough research. But as I've described again, if you go on, you know scholar dot Google and you're looking at articles on stem cell and I'm not even saying that. You want to go on? On look at articles for one disease compared to another disease. You know, the studies are there in mass. And you could research every disease that should like to sew. The ideas you want to be able to understand what the literature has been saying. And in a read or watch, you know, Look at that. So 3.2 1,000,000 studies. The numbers of studies keep jumping and jumping and jumping because researchers all over the world are doing this. So, of course, you'll see some stem cell research on bone marrow, which is obviously the best and the most approved sum on fat sum for cancer, some for all the different diseases. But as of today, 3.2 1,000,000 articles. Trillion to 180,000 articles..

Google chemo Doctor Town Missouri Schachter Sparta Andrea Alzheimer Chris
"body research" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Grammy awards on TVM Mander in chief impeached this spring be John legend and his wife Chrissy Teigen outspoken president trump critics she went on to say it's just too many so much so much it's possible for you rapper YG performed his song titled F. Donald Trump backstage at the Grammys Michelle Pelino fox news creative it's not a six twenty six it think a player in Houston with apologized by now for the sign stealing scandal that cost AJ hitch the manager's job and while we got our first apology didn't come out of Houston it came out of Chicago by way of Dallas all right let's put all these pieces together that's because Chicago White Sox pitcher newly signed Dallas Crichel who was a member of the Houston Astros in two thousand seventeen he actually apologized for his role in Houston's sign stealing scandal Kagel apologized on Friday but we're sure to add to the Astros didn't use the sign stealing operation in every game that they played saying quote it was not like every game we had this going on yeah I'm guessing it was just the games they found themselves trailing right in any case the last thing that he needed to do is that an Asterix to an apology for the team now known as the Houston Asterix so X. Astros pitcher Dallas Crichel apologizes for his role or any role the cheating scandal I guess if you really hate getting shots will I got some good news for you might soon be able to get your flu shot via a pill a new study from VAX art and Stanford University shows that backs arts oral tablet vaccine is just as effective at preventing the flu from a particular strain as the standard injection the bill uses a non spreading virus to carry the flu protein into the body research researcher David McClelland he says this study is a significant step towards an oral flu vaccine market and making it marketable to the entire world the availability of an oral flu vaccine would be a major breakthrough not only because of the obvious comfort avoiding the needle **** but because an oral tablet would be easier and faster to distribute and administer then the and check the bulls vaccine which could have a major impact on global vaccination rates it's really easy for an adult to order an uber or lift but right now minors under the age of eighteen are not allowed to ride without a guardian some choose to break this rule but there might soon be a solution for those who have have safety concerns or otherwise just don't want to break the rule start ups like tango they're offering scheduled rides with trains care givers currently can go operates in California and Arizona but they have plans to expand in the future which is a pretty good news you like scary movies group of researchers from Finland they found evidence that horror movies really are expertly designed to make us feel excitement they looked at the top part of movies of the last one hundred years and they looked at how people's brains reacted to them and they found during a horror film the brain is continuously anticipating and preparing us for action in response to threats and horror movies exploit this to ramp up excitement another find was psychological horror movies and those based on true events were considered the scariest and people reported being a lot more frightened of things that were unseen or implied rather than things that they could actually see and would you want to vote in elections from a smartphone which touched on this last week recently Washington state announced that the king conservation district voters would be able to take a cast their ballots for an upcoming local election over the internet including via smartphones and web browsers and experts say that's not a great plan university of Pennsylvania's mac police said this extremely risky decision runs counter to the findings of the national academic securing the vote study which represents the consensus of experts last week Washington secretary of state Kim Wyman also issued a press release cautioning against online voting noting that quote anytime you connect the system online it becomes vulnerable to attack also this district in Washington is not governed under the same election laws as the rest of us are which lets them have smartphone voting so they can test it out bottom line is this this will be a thing happening in a county near you very soon unless you live in Washington it's six thirty the to the roadways into the traffic center once again get a.

TVM Mander Grammy John Chrissy Teigen
Flu vaccine in pill form on horizon

Joel Riley

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Flu vaccine in pill form on horizon

"Don't know if you had your flu shot lot of people don't like shots at all so if you're kind of in both of those boats you may want to think about a new flu pill yeah a new study from VAX arts in Stanford shows that backs search oral tablet vaccine is just as effective at preventing the flu from a particular strain as the standard injection of the pill uses a non spreading virus to carry the flu protein into the body research says the study significant step toward oral flu vaccines making it to the market the availability of an oral flu vaccine it be a major breakthrough not only because of the obvious comfort of avoiding needle but because oral tablets would be easier and faster to distribute and administer than an injectable vaccine show the flu peel soon with this how about

FLU Stanford Flu Vaccine
"body research" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Men were back we are back what about a man who is forty six so pretty young man he's say go it just stop smoking a year ago yet back pain and shoulder pain you have lots of symptoms he was seen by a chiropractor and well he got worse and worse and worse and worse I chiropractor is not a medical doctors not in M. vis so a lot of people are confused I said that to set the record straight medical doctors are not chiropractors most commonly in chiropractors are not medical doctors anyway the man with back pay to start losing weight he's lost sixty pounds he went from one eighty five to one twenty five he was treated by a chiropractor for back pain and weight loss and run for quieter paying and his food was getting stock when he swallowed which is always a worrisome sign if he came to me and the back pain he was losing sixty pounds of this food was getting caught in the Sava guys I would not be do and back when the fillet should be getting tests to diagnose why he was losing weight and why the food was stuck in this esophagus well it took a year one year to finally get out of the hands of the chiropractor and to get medical care in the head of the DA's Skippy that means and though means in size and scope the men's locker room and so he had and das could be which is looking down into the esophagus and into mass where the esophagus esophagus is the food too so if you think about food going in your mouth and your throat and going down the esophagus to your stomach the esophagus is that to the connection from your throat down to your stomach with a mass in the she he John can status for gastro the stomach and the eat the gastric Zapatero junction there's of masses biopsy pas of having carcinoma he had a cat scan of the chest CT scan news frowned liver and lung metastases or probably in that year that he was seeing the chiropractor most probably the cancer was traveling to the long and the liver that's why it's so important if you have symptoms to see your doctor or come in here you're welcome here at thirteen eighty four Broadway if if a suspected cancer he was scheduled to get a cat scan the day after he saw me he had some problems with his stools he said taking Percocet is on narcotics is doctors occurring Percocet and morphine for the pain but he's had no treatment I examined abuse of very slender man you can imagine being a six foot man is a hundred and twenty six pounds he is he suffered your cancer the G. junction Alan of carcinomas planning to get chemotherapy and he came to me why because he didn't really want to came I went to the chemo doctors that's the only thing they offered him but no one offered him treatment to get that is soft because opened up and that's what he wants he wants to be able to eat and I can tell you of all the treatments out there ours is probably the most rapid method of killing the cancer in opening up the esophagus we see so many patients with me suffered your cancers and gastric cancers you'd need to get their Asafa's opened up and be able to eat and that's why he came to us and that's what you wish to that's what we're doing we're treating his esophagus to open it up and multiple studies including our hours show a few treatments our pinpoint treatment not weeks and weeks of treatment like usual radiation not months and months of endless chemotherapy but a few focused treatments on the esophagus to open up the esophagus this is the work that we do every day it's a work we pioneered first to New York first in America first in the western hemisphere when every other doctors medical facility in the hospital including all the big famous ones you can think of five standard treatment was okay one doctor stood up and said there's a better way better ways to focus the treatment on the cancer minimize the harm to healthy tissues increase the dose the intensity of the treatment to get a better quicker more durable response and that's with body radiosurgery is about were first in America first in the western hemisphere of course first to New York with body radiosurgery the most experienced doctor in the western hemisphere you're just welcome to call to make an appointment at two one two choices two one two two four six forty two thirty seven that's what this man once that's what he's getting to open up the esophagus noninvasively with no cutting no bleeding no chemo no anesthesia all non invasive treatment entrance of usually last about ten minutes my name's like two liter min cancer doctor we have a caller on the line how are you today what's I had a question on which will be C. do you do in a five or nine if that one and the same no not at all cyberknife was developed in recent years we are the originators of stereotactic body radiosurgery our treatment allows us to focus in on a particular area where the cancers in the body without excessive radiation to the body the people and I know the people who develop cyberknife actually the first name for was accurate which went belly up bankrupt the change of name to make it sound more sexy it's the same machine and cyber night for accu raised sends in multiple teams to try to find the cancer so there's lots of radiation to a healthy body there's an uncertainty because they try to find the cancer each time that they set up the patient so there's some uncertainty is lots of radiation with each treatment it's less proven in our treatment it's a different technology than our treatment of trying to copy us of the man who did that I believe did it because he'd rather sell machines and take care of patients he's a doctor and so you have less proof more radiation more uncertainty compared to our technique which is more proven over more time with many more patients treated if that answers your question I ask you that I have a colleague that has a sub mediastinal tumor itself quite often very close to the heart and they said you got a candidate because of damage to the heart I just didn't know if you might be an option for we treat some crying metastasis of nodes all the time if we get our body booklet you'll see examples of that so we're able to focus in on the sub crying to without hurting the heart to the longer the chase and tissues in general Iraq I've been doing it for more than two decades occurred about forty thousand patients with stereotactic body research so close to the heart though but you can calculate it so it it stops cancer in the heart I feel cancers in the heart cancers of traveled to the heart so for me the carina compared to that as a mile away we just do not have any problems in fact you're talking to the first doctor that's me who discovered adverse effects of radiation on the hard light did that more than thirty years ago so I'm very sensitive about the heart I wrote the first articles you can look them up leader minister first author the journal of clinical oncology thirty years ago so I know all about radiation in the heart the first doctor in America to do that work why do you think I started body radiosurgery America because I was aware of the consequences of of large fields of radiation to the hard other structures the whole idea of radio surgeries to focus to treatment on the cancer and not hurt healthy tissues and when I was training other very famous medical school the doctors are you say all radiation can hurt the hard of little no that wasn't true in fact there's higher death rates so there's many reasons that I discovered it it's a long story it would take an hour to explain that whole story to you for the purpose of pinpoint treatments of try to avoid healthy tissues anywhere in the body the first radio certainly was in the brain and member before brain radiosurgery the healthy brain was getting radiated and we know that the healthy brain gets damaged so different string radio surgery in standard radiation for brain tumors is we can protect the healthy brain and then the same is true for the rest of the body so it would you say to me is very sensitive to me and very close to my heart because my track record over thirty years is working to discover the adverse effects of normal radiation on the heart and then developing radiosurgery I can tell you that I've taken a lot of heat from the doctor's thirty years ago who said all that's not true radiation can hurt the heart what can and that's why I developed radio certainly and then the first doctor in America to bring radio surgery to the body in the western hemisphere's will think about that the first doctor to describe adverse effects on the heart and the first doctor to bring radiosurgery people like you in the western hemisphere and there's a relationship because I understood that unnecessary radiation to the healthy body heard sit and by focusing on the cancer we can focus we can avoid unnecessary harm we get higher doses to the cancer last those are zero does to the healthy tissues so really I think it's what people with cancer one your colleague was a cancer in the sub crown a note obviously doesn't want his heart radiated obviously doesn't want his long Sir but I suspect that he wants his some crime mass effectively treated and that's what radiosurgery most commonly does in the success rates over ninety percent for the rest of his life all right down I know it's hard to say but that that type of procedure netiquette would it be months of therapy or how does that if you're thirty five treatments we have people from around the world people list of the show people is the so on the computer I've just had a man who flew in from Shanghai China because you couldn't get the treatment that he wanted to came in Connecticut he takes metro north on the Grand Central walks over to our office here visit you in patients from Connecticut that's like the silliest thing in this world to save his heart and his life versus a trip on metro north.

"body research" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"body research" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"From Bloomberg radio works in the magazine this week with the headline the problem with female CEOs isn't that they are female it's that they are CEOs this is one that everybody needs to stop and read and you're going to talk about it after you read it we've been talking we had a big time so now we're in talk about with the author Rebecca green field she runs all of our diversity coverage here at them with the managing diversity team recently promoted to run that congratulations I'm I'm living the truth that I write about women we have to run is through the ranks actually and you really put it out there in the store a lot of ways and capture a moment that's really important give us the thesis yes so I noticed something that was happening which was there are lots of companies that are run and founded by women but they also have these missions that are you know we are all for gender equality and our products are going to create this gender equality and that's great but then there would be these scandals where employees would say actually I'm a woman who works at this company and you are not practicing what you preach and we saw this happen for a few years we saw it happen at things which was a company that makes underwear for women to wear rather on their period we saw this happen at nasty gal which was a like a retailer for women and then more recently we've seen it I wrote about how it's kind of happening at the wing right now the co working space and there's a huge backlash to these companies because there's those kind of ironing I think happening or like you're not practicing what you're preaching so I'm exploring that phenomenon in this piece and saying yeah that's going to happen because women when they become CEOs acts a lot like men when they become CEOs well there's so much there's a lot of times you know I love it I love it and you know I do want a first let's start with some of these are younger companies startups and I think this is a valid point that when your start up like costly putting out fires that mean that's an element of it yeah definitely I think when you're a start up no matter who you are what you run what your mission is you are under a lot of constraints right you got a lot of money and you have to grow really quickly you're learning how to scale something and I think what they're learning is when you scale you it's hard to have you know feminism beer mission but doesn't square with current creating a big successful company and maybe it shouldn't have to worry like why would we expect rat one of the things that I really took away from that that I thought was such should eight in many ways profound point and you're dealing with this every day as we said running the diversity coverage is there is a distinct difference and keeping us here in the in the telling of this between the benefits of having women on a border women in management verses diversity that seems to be at the core of what you're arguing here right yeah so I think there's this fallacy that we want more women to lead companies because women are more compassionate than men they're more ethical they're more moral they create safer workplaces and that's just not true the research has found that's not true and in fact that's just another gender stereotypes I talked to researchers who just put it out there and tad women are different than men in the way that they lied and that's the reality and the benefits of diversity come not because women are different than men because they're not that different that man but because their diverse and that they are different than the ten men who are in the room and that's what we want from diverse they want a mixture of different types of people different point of views to kind of push back on the type of homogeneous thinking that leads to bad decisions well and that's exactly it that one of the things that we're all trying to fight as managers in many ways is group think right I know they have the same experience you have a great line in your piece that talks about you know ten white due to all went to the same three business schools there again I kind of think the same way and so what you need is this diversity of opinion and experience that doesn't necessarily just mean a different sort of group think and what exactly and I mean Sally crotch Iraq has said that in the notes this is one of her lines that she thinks that that kind of group think is exactly what led to the financial crisis and I should note that Wall Street still looks pretty much the same as the dead before a financial crisis and so I think we yeah that's that's the real benefits of diversity and that's a lot of these companies they start ups are also not diverse right they're just people that are like themselves other women yes they have and they are the people they know they hire the people in their networks they often talk about how they hire a lot of women which is great because you know most companies don't look like that so their company is going to be diverse in a group of other companies but it can lead to the same group thing I think this is so important you and I've had this conversation because I'm very anti like okay you have the women's group yeah the LGBTQ community like separating everybody into groups like unless we all work together and really you know everything is is together and really think about diversity with all of its different layers I mean that's what it's all about right that's the goal yeah I mean I think it can help when you are in a company where you're not part of the majority group to talk to other people about your experience as that can help you but I think when everyone silo road right you're not getting the benefits of someone else having a different perspective there was a study I talk about in here where talk look you know there's a body research going maxing boards with women on them act more ethically so people have kind of jump to the conclusion that women are more but this research I talked to said that's not actually what we think is happening we think is happening is that somebody is in the room who again as seen things from a different perspective and is pushing back against the group things that makes an ethical decisions or the group just by having an outside member in it isn't going to be so bold and doing things that are unethical they kind of check themselves and so that's the kind of benefits of diversity I think we want to see so one of the things that I think folks might react to when they read this story is this and we've seen this with me to to some extent for the backlash to the backlash right and this idea that alright well we're just giving up on women running companies now so that didn't work so let's go back to where we were before do you worry about that sort of happening in the world I hope that's not the message of the story is getting us man come designed by men act like this all the time I can name so many I mean there's Hoover there's we were there's lots of companies run by men that have similar problems so I don't think women are any worse than that and I just think it's a setback for us to set them to this higher standard yeah because when they don't mean at them the you know they're penalized even more than that for Becca greenfield who drives our diversity coverage in the magazine remarks provocative remarks in the magazine this week yeah I really like this because it's a nuanced argument in many ways obviously gender in the workplace yeah different genders in the leadership is much more complicated than just like Hey let's have more women CEOs and I think the message here is it's really about good great leadership if you well not whether you're a man or woman running a company you're listening to Bloomberg business week coming up a deep dive into lululemon that is a company that has gone through quite a journey but the money behind it well they've done pretty.

"body research" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"body research" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Pain and their suffering and their cancer where we aim to be so it should come to us rather than going to a super duper big hospital she probably would have had surgery on her right hip in her left hip and rods placed on her right leg in real life like she probably would have had a few pinpoint treatments come in we focus the beams on the cancer area and then most likely we can eradicate this cancer where we are the beam and the pain the suffering and avoid those big operations which she's had which actually overall haven't helped very much because right now she's got more pain and more suffering and they have that's why she's here because she's had systemic therapy and start working she's suffering and pain and we see plenty of people with cancer who were left in pay and no one wants to be in pain nobody nobody nobody wants to be in pain so this is the work that we do every day we're able to focus in find the cancer and then the packet and make the pain go away and I can tell you are treated thousands of people with cancer the bones user it's metastatic cancer sometimes the primary cancer the bone like this myeloma is a cancer of the bone marrow but there are other cancers the bone like us still sarcomas and Sir com is our particular kind of cancer which are very very sensitive to focused non invasive radiosurgery our treatment so again it depends who works at a big door to big surgical place shows up with multiple operations right hip left hip right leg left leg where is with us a few non invasive treatments pinpoint precision treatments to the bone and the cancer will most likely solve the problem and she would have avoided the surgery a couple lessons and risk of infection and pain of the surgery and the rehabilitation of the down time the time away from her family and friends and loved ones which no one wants to be away from family and friends and loved ones don't want to be away from their own bed and that's why so many people come here to avoid unnecessary the surgery chemo or learn about all the options and sad to say not too many surgeons to operate on the bones tell people well you can have the surgery with me and be laid up and out of rehab and convalesce for a month or go see doctor liederman in ten minutes have a treatment and go out the door and go us across the street to Macy's or of lunch or go to the movies or go to work or go home or do what you want which is such a big difference a huge difference this is the work that we do every day at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway thirty eight street in the heart of New York City we have lots of information to send to you you can call even now and get a book the D. V. D. about our work there's no charge no obligation we're not going to bug you all even now it's two one two choices the number is two one two choices to Sir remember because two into stands for New York City and choices because you have choices like this woman she didn't know she had a choice you thought you had to have that surgery on her right hip and left to right like a left like with the sword and told her what was big operations but she could of most likely come here had treatment outpatient invisible beams and done very very very well and speaking about women who come from far away I want to talk about this woman who's come from Detroit she flew in from Detroit she seventy three years old she's marriage you came with her husband and her cousins and well she had darkness of the urine inner skin turned yellow that's called jaundice she went to the big hot one of the big hospitals in Michigan trip to birds it ruptures from ever pancreas cancer and well once again she walked in the door and goes to the emergency room they found a tumor they call the surgeon the surgeon comes and says well Mrs acts you've got to have surgery you gotta have a whip pole procedure well that's what they did Whipple procedure which is a big radical surgery on the pancreas and that's what she had and the surgeon told her well all the cancer well they did get all the cancer out okay number one number two we know that number three there were lymph nodes involved and then the surgeon recommended chemo or you know who he should do something else because he left the cancer behind and so they started chemotherapy they sort of Salada gemcitabine and she became very toxic should colitis from the chemotherapy and she couldn't tolerate further chemo inches hospitalized for nearly a month without toxicity and it should scans of the scans show despite the surgery despite the chemo cancer growing in her liver and she had new scans of there was more cancer growing in the liver number she had the surgery shed the chemo and it didn't work in a word by definition because the purpose of the surgery was to try to cure her and to do that the purpose of the chemo was to cure her and didn't do that the cancer progressed she lost weight she went from a hundred thirty five pounds two hundred fourteen pounds lost twenty pounds she has no headaches she says she's a mental rack because of the cancer and she seems like she's a mental rack he's an ex smoker should just quit smoking a few months ago her brows are fine she has this report procedure I examined her and despite having cancer in the abdomen the doctor could not feel something and I can't feel anything either when examined her but we got a pet scan she flew in from Detroit the same day within minutes we arrange for a pet scan we arrange for cancer markers and she came back with actually two masses of the liver and the recurrence right where the surgeon operative so all that will quote all the chemo was sad to say for naught it didn't help months after the web for months after the chemo the cancer came right back at the same site and in the liver submitted stage four and she came to us why because she wants a better treatment a different treatment she couldn't tolerate chemo didn't work number one number two wasn't tolerant showed up for the hospital surgery didn't help and that's why she's here flying in from Detroit and we have people from around the world who come here for treatment why because we were the innovators were the first with body radiosurgery in the western hemisphere first with body radiosurgery in America first with body research United States first of body radiosurgery and unite in New York this is the work we do every day we have a team of experts of physicians and physicists bill some interesting technicians and nurses and staff all devoted to you and this patient comes in with her family loving husband and her cousins who are caring for her and she's fully functional amble towards just feel so nervous she feels like a mental rack well we hope to get the cancer under control we have a high success rate in treating pancreas cancer both of the pancreas area where it relapsed right where the surgeon operated and deliver so it's very likely cells were left behind maybe even spread by the surgeon and got in the bloodstream went to lever this is the work we do if you look in our body booklet you can call our office even.

Pain two hundred fourteen pounds hundred thirty five pounds seventy three years twenty pounds ten minutes
"body research" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"body research" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Our Radio New York, also vailab on the iheart radio podcast. And now on, I tunes as well. Well, let's get into it. Let's begin as we have for the past couple of weeks, with facts underscoring, the most important part of what we're doing here defining the discipline viability of marijuana and CBD. We all know, now, I hope the cannabis in the US is available medicinally in thirty three states. More and more research is available virtually every day on the improvement in health outcomes, health outcomes, nice medical term associated with cannabis yet. I'm still getting some negative emails, telling me, quote, I am supporting illegal drugs love that one close quote or the second, by the way, for my dad, but that was six months ago. He's finally softened up now that he's user, this people in the audience, laughing and not for the radio channels to mazing the second, most popular one is quote, you are supporting a gateway drug close, quote, my mom used that same phrase fifty years ago, and she's moved off at as well. How can you possibly do this question, Mark. Well, mike. Typical restore. Ponce's to encourage some reading and listening to the show, the science of healthcare keeps moving forward and we need to stay up if we want to help ourselves and more important we wanna help our families lead the healthiest lives possible. So here's an overview of the indications that research says are positively impacted by cannabis. All right. We're going to do this quick, and punchy because everybody said Jeff, this could be boring. I'm telling you, it's going to be interesting. All right. So let's start with multiple sclerosis or MS. If a disease that affects the brain, spinal cord symptoms vary both in type and severity. But typically include pain, spasms, balance issues, tingling vision problems, and more. Research published in the multiple sclerosis journal, that's easy for me to say multiple sclerosis journal found that cannabis based medicinal, extracts can do what they can significantly reduce the pestis, ity and pain, societas with MS, while having very few adverse side effects on patients. Bring it closer to home. My sister-in-law has MS. She's about my age you thought it was thirty five but you wrong because my kids are that age and experiencing quite a bit of pain and trauma as she ages. She found medical cannabis some years ago and has worked with cannabis caregivers to get some much needed relief from this challenging Z's moving onto spinal cord. This is caused by trauma to the spine. They're known to affect motor skills, and can potentially lead to total loss function. And some parts of the body research suggest cannabis can help patients treat the pain and muscle spasms that are often symptomatic of spinal cord injury. Where does that come from the Oxford centre for naval meant that deals with spinal cord surgeries? Let's move onto cancer responsible for about thirty percent of all deaths cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada. According to figures reported by Canadian Cancer Society, well, cannibus can't cure cancer. Nobody's suggesting that for a moment, but it can drastically reduce the severity of the symptoms and. And improve quality of life for patients. How research shows that both THC, which is the psycho active molecule, and the plant and CBD, which is the non psychoactive molecule in the plant guys raw becoming chemistry majors. Congratulations, can stimulate appetite which may help with the weight loss anorexia that many cancer patients experience. Let me give you a quick story. The other day, I got a phone call from a gentleman that I've known for twenty years. He says, Jeff, my mother-in-law is going through the last two months of her life, because her body is wracked with what with cancer. She doesn't have a medical marijuana license, and she's an unbelievable pain. Can you help us I said, no, why would I be level because he knows so much about the space. Well, that's fine. But we live in New York. The York is a medicinal state. You must have a medical marijuana license, and go to Psychopharmacologists to get a prescribed like any other. Medication prescribed by a doctor. So I strongly suggested to him that he goes, and does that on her behalf because it's not a single doctor in New York today. That's a Psychopharmacologists with the brain me underscore that with the brain that wouldn't prescribe to her cannabis for the last two months of her life. Let's move on. HIV and aids treatments come a long way over the last decade or so while Morton therapy allows those with HIV and aids to live a long and mostly healthy life side effects of the treatment can be challenging the deal with the last one is arthritis. Why arthritis while I have arthritis flips you notice as you don't let me tell you? Why flips doesn't have arthritis because young strapping, man, he's a young strapping? He's under thirty years old chance of him effing arthritis or roughly zero. Everybody on the other side of the glass, is myself barely over thirty times to of course. That's a coefficient of two back to my calculus. Instructor Jack in the back jacks over thirty barely his kids know that he's just barely over thirty. All right. So what happens with right is to kinds of arthritis rheumatoid arthritis? That's the bad stuff and as osteoarthritis. That's what we all have you got older. You gotta steal their more one hundred different types of arthritis. But those are the two biggies symptoms. Typically. Include swelling redness around the joint, reduced range of motion, stiffness weakness, and severe ongoing pain. It's the latter symptom cannabis's most effective in treating in one study into the efficacy of cannabis as the form of pain relief for arthritis. Researchers noted that quote a significant analgesic effect was observed and disease activity was significantly suppressed. All right, that's the science. Now back to the dad meter for those of you who are listening, the dad meters, an important part of my world. Right, dad. My dad has this. What is he doing? He's getting out of the bath every morning we talked about this before. I know I'm boring, right? He goes into the bath to put heat on the muscles and loosen the muscles up. Dad do me favor. Take more CBD every morning, you're going to feel better. And guess what he did? And guess what? He feels better will be on the show someday. Only flips. Give me the high sign. Absolutely. All right. One hundred percent the baby. All right. So let's move on, epilepsy a neurological condition that affects almost one hundred and forty thousand Canadians one million Japanese and three million Americans that Thors characterized by seizures, which ranged from relatively mild like a moment of impaired concentration, by the way, flips doesn't have epilepsy, but he has quite a bit of impaired concentration through. Gotta love the efficiency of words. Don't you one word responses? Cannabis based medicines and CBD dominant. All are one of the most important FDA approved solutions. Now when I say, cannabis, I'm talking about CBD's specifically, we talked about the dialects brand, which has GW farmers brand that is approved by the FDA and specifically has shown to address epilepsy. I also took through Charlotte recall, the thirteen year old Charlotte Fiji who met the Stanley brothers and through their wonderful foundation called the realm of caring went from three hundred grand mal seizures of day, which the most powerful kind of seizures in epilepsy to virtually no, seizures a number of years later, so epilepsy without any question is addressable in a CBD context. When we come back, we will listen to our guest, and Davidson, who is a leader in the space and the only person, I believe this is an I believe, of course, I can cover myself that successfully grown. Six hundred thousand square feet of Monday marijuana under canopy. We're also gonna talk a little bit about Oprah Winfrey. So if I were you wouldn't miss the next.

cannabis arthritis marijuana medical cannabis New York Jeff MS. She Canadian Cancer Society US FDA mike Mark Oprah Winfrey Oxford centre muscle spasms Canada Ponce
"body research" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"body research" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Self-mastery personal optimization. Our virtues celebrated by the Silicon Valley world and their executives. Many look back to a Greek philosophy stoicism engaging in cold showers. Austere diets and meditation are all tenets of this modern, ancient expression. Our guest, Donald Robertson, looks at how the Roman history offers us lessons for the ethical, and psychological challenges. We face today, new book makes the case that how we think like a Roman emperor, the stoic philosophy Marcus, Aurelius examines this read this Roman leaders success and why his reign lasted so long Marcus kept personal journals his meditations of getting through difficult situations practice of stoicism meant calmly accepting that some things were outside of one's own control. And that this guided his battles against other military commanders, he believed in preparing for success or failure down. Robertson is the author of the book and is a cognitive behavioral psychotherapist. He's also a founding member, the nonprofit organization modern stoicism, and he joins us right now. Donald welcome to the show. Thank you for your time today. Then we speak here. Thank you. I will get to Marcus Aurelius just a second. But in terms of today, how does stoicism really play out in the business community? Do you think? Oh, well, I mean, it's a strange thing. You know, I didn't anticipate this one of the biggest groups of people are interested seems to be millennials the work in the tech industry. So it's really taken written, Silicon Valley and where I live in Toronto as well. I seem to me, a lot of young people work in software development of tech industry in general, the pecu- liaisons us philosophy. So then tell us the story of Marcus Aurelius and how stoicism became really his tenant to living and to ruling back in the days back in his days of the Roman empire. Marcus is one of the good, I'm pros. And he lives in the second century D And rain was subject to many problems came after a peaceful period in history. And then as soon as he became emperor. There was a war with offense and then women in Parvez invaded again by Bob aliens from the north. There was a common the river Tiber flooded. And they had the plague Cogan summing plague thoughts of codes as many as five million people, he had a really hard time of and how to really on this philosophy that he studied from when he was a young mind coke with, and we're last to have his pass no record of how he coped with addresses, the psychological take strategies. He used derived from stoic philosophy. Yeah, it is interesting that these meditations as they are referred to. They will quite a significant importance or did to him. Him. But obviously, they I read that they still hold importance to people today when they read them. Oh, yeah. The medications must be one of the most popular hell hell of spiritual gay Volta. I mean, kind of self book, but really suspended cross, 'cause well, and philosophical classics, saw you could call it medal brower. Hi, Brian yourself help, if you like, and it's always been a popular book has gone through a resurgence of popularity today and impart. Michael, say coca therapist, that's because in the nineteen fifties with the coconut revolution psychotherapy when we behavioral therapy, beginning to drew heavily on Stuart says for inspiration as an alternative Freud and all that kind of stuff, the new motorcycle EFI was influenced by Stuart says, and that's so down through self help and psychological, literature January. So this is obviously part of the reason why he was able to rule for the length that he did. And have the impact that you just kind of alluded to on the room. Empire back in his day. Well, one of the historians cuts deal actually comments on not. He says that even for Marcus was in the Therese sweet frail man and had the number of health diesel might have a bunch of other people around in an incredibly tough time. People are dropping like flies because of the wars, they were involved in Clayton and my nearly reached sexy, which isn't exceptionally. But it's a fairly good going particular period in Roman history. So he was tougher than he looks you could see impart rethink that was because of the psychological strategies he developed to cope with his emotions and to cope with the physical pain, and they'll nece- have to endure. In terms of the, when you bring it forward to today's world, it is interesting that one of the things that you talk about in the book is this understanding that there are going to be times where they're going to be things beyond your control. And I think that's an incredibly important element to be able to have an understanding on, but also to be able to, to be able to enact in your life and in your business life today, because of all that we have going on around us these days. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I mean, some people think even more timely, because we are so bombarded with information constantly being told about the bigger picture in the world and things going on in other countries that we have very little control over, and the stakes realized a long time ago that the truck was landing to make a clear this thing on my between under control, and, and the only really under control as own. Well, are not Sion's, if you like the things that happen to happen to, but what we can really control of way, we respond to those things still wants to take responsibility greater ownership for things that we can actually do, both in terms of our thoughts and our actions in the spawns to the response to the situations that we face. I can imagine that, that if you're somebody that, that doesn't maybe necessarily have a handle on that concept and that understanding. It can be an incredibly stressful element that you have to deal with to, to not have an understanding that they're going to be times where whatever occurs around you. You can't do anything about it. Yeah. And, you know, probably most of the things in my clinical practice, you know, worked with many people suffer, for example, from generally things I this all guide, which is sometimes called the pathological worry the sort of people exhibit worry in lots of different is I solve depression as well. Right. God is really stuns. And most of the things people, what are what about tend to be things are, obviously say, direct control. The distant future things in politics and stuff like things that they can't really directly control, and they'll win doing neglect to do the things that could be doing under the control. We're talking with Donald Robertson, who is the author of the book. How to think like a Roman emperor, the stoic philosophy of Marcus Aurelius, your comments are welcome at eight four four Warton, eight four four nine four two seven eight six or if you'd like Senator comment on Twitter at biz radio one thirty two or my Twitter account, which is at Dan Loney ELO anyway, twenty one but I what I find interesting about the book Donald. How you put together is that obviously, you're telling the story of Marcus Aurelius from, you know, from hundreds of years ago, but as we mentioned, your correlating it with, with today's world and some of the elements that people really need to consider like one of the Amish you talk about is how to speak wisely. And I think there is a, a significant issue surrounding speech and how it is used in today's age. You know, I absolutely agree. And I'm so glad that you mentioned because one of the things that people often overlook with and what it can teach. You know, people use flowery motive language a lot of time in the Carson where faced with problems. If someone is anxious that a meeting, they'll say that guy shut me down in flames where they could just say, oh, he said something that, you know, they expressed us agreement with me. So when you say the same things, and this is very all these, when you're working clients therapy. And when you describe the same situation and more kind of value free more of. Checked Matra fact terms often seem as much less district saying, we unconsciously unintentionally because even more things. When we use rhetoric on ourselves in this week. And the students are very aware of this problem. It almost seems like and I would assume this is the case that, that you believe that there are so many different elements around stoicism that, that could improve our culture today. Oh, yeah. You know on many different levels. I mean, I, I want to so many people over the past twenty years, or so the industry has agreed community around and I hear over and over again the same things so people sable like academic Fossey, but it's more practical like Buddhism, but it's kind of a western alternative to take like Cristiana T, but it's more secular. Marash, no and philosophical. So it seems to fill as gap and our coach the moment of providing a philosophical into health and rational way of life. That can help people to find meaning also to become more emotionally resilient going off of speaking wisely. One of the other areas that you talk about in the book involves anger, and certainly that we have in various levels in various locations. It feels like at times more anger today than we've ever had other Vangere everywhere. And the stinks actually interested in the main emotion, the bottles them, we have an entire survives to the by Seneca, cold on einder about the stick, Serapio vying for the main emotion that Marcus realism interested in dealing with be knew he had problems that his feelings of eyeing at least isn't young mind because he mentioned by the beginning of the books when away the meditation, partly because have learning to deal with his anger, and become more empathic to other people. He describes so many techniques that would be relevant today. Some KOMO therapy techniques to one point gives a less of ten separate Stewart techniques. Stunned up today to be used to help with anger. Are there times where stoicism is misinterpreted as disinterest? Yeah. Absolutely. You know, there are many common connections. And if I n the line that we have, you know, they then list language has of control of many concepts in Greek philosophy. So what we mean by cynicism with smo-. See it's very different from senators, the Greek philosophy with a capital c. The same goes for epic VM skepticism and also stores. More case stores, a small as a cooking style a penalty tree, where we conceal repression emotions, no ancient stoic. We're talking about. They have a whole system philosophy. That's much more sophisticated psychology. Cleveland, not one of the other areas. You talk about you mentioned with Marcus Aurelius. He obviously had various bouts of illness, and obviously to degree when you have the numbers of issues that he had over the course of time you're. Talking about dealing with pain, so from that perspective and obviously his military conflicts, I understand where the correlation is. How do you correlate the, the issues around pain to today's society? Tells people coping with pain. I mean, there are many people today, all seems more and more people because of our cat sedan-chair lifestyle, I think, and also because people are living longer. You know, we have a law people struggling to cope with chronic pain, and discomfort back, pans kind of an epidemic almost, and the students give these strategies for lending to coat with pain, and interesting thing is the mainly except and space strategies to cut to the chase. And there's a large growing body research buttery today, that shows caned of emotional acceptance seems to be of powerful strategy in cognitive therapy for coping with upsetting or unpleasant, feelings, particularly as a way of coping with paying if we want to suffer less. We, we now we need to learn to embrace our pain and love west with struggling against as much, we're joined by Donald Robertson, who's the author of the book, how to think like a Roman emperor, the stoic philosophy of Marcus Aurelius, your comments, welcome at eight four, four Warton. Eight four four nine four two seven eight six six if you're not able to get your phone..

Marcus Aurelius Donald Robertson founding member Toronto Tiber flooded Cleveland Cogan Twitter depression Brian Clayton Parvez Stuart Sion Cristiana T Carson Marash Michael
"body research" Discussed on Fierce and Flawless: The Female Project

Fierce and Flawless: The Female Project

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"body research" Discussed on Fierce and Flawless: The Female Project

"Put you know, a label on it. You're fighting to solve world hunger. Yes. I mean, but also how we can actually impacts maybe over consumption of food is an issue to try to hear people's awards more sustainable more sustainable dies that are both good for the planet and good in goods the human bodies. And and it's quite exciting. Because I think it's it's really the time has come to kind of sea food and use food as and lens to view big issues that are affecting the world and so much attention on this issue right now. So I'm really really happy that I followed my intuition. And I I knew that I had to gather experiences from around the world in order to get here. So I didn't stay in Canada. But I I've been living working researching in Asia Africa Europe, Nelson North America. And that is being also part of my passion. Into to learn from other cultures to learn from other systems in order to understand the complexity associated with food food systems now, which is say that another cultures that you have seen people have a different attitude towards attrition that. We see North America are pretty similar across the planet. And how if you food. Oh, that's not always very shocking for me to come home to come back Canada. And And the relationships food is really dangerous in many ways that people get auction view who to energy and fuel, but it's so much more than that. And and I and I believe that the culture aspect and the enjoyment around food. There's a lot more attention on that. Now, of course. But still I think that people are rushing in the way they're eating eating poorly. They're getting the wrong kinds of foods. They're you know, impr- inappropriate for their bodies. All these kinds of things that I that I can see in in North America food was away. That people were connected. It was community it extended just beyond the, you know, the Neal dinnertime it was a way that people socialize in and told stories and connected with other human. Beings. That's something that I'm definitely on a mission to to mos- and have people kind of go back to to the days where we were actually able to enjoy food without pressure of time and stress and all these kinds of things the funny thing is that it's really a lot of the kind of the fitness industry in all of this kind of stuff that's pushing the, you know, food is just fueled food is just he'll because they're trying they're trying to break people's enjoyment from food to try to get out change their eating patterns, but it's so much more than that our personalities are in great to have so many experiences in our childhood and social interaction, certainly, you know, this from all of your traveling. But I think the biggest difference that I've noticed is actually in France. Anyway, you go the restaurant takes forever bring the food out. But it's meant to be like that there's lots of time between the courses free to have a chance to sit down and enjoy your meal, and it's you look around and people are shotting having time you little bites really. Bulging because a lot of French food. It's it's quite rich, but has enjoyed a nice nice good setting slowly. Instead of just kind of cramming down as you're running between business meetings. If you are the way to eat French people eat in North America. But with North American attitude you packing on the pounds. Pretty. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's that's one thing that I think were were now coming to realize the importance of the social social aspect around food, and there's a new body research that actually looking at that. And it's quite exciting to kind of understand that this is a parts of culture that we can't afford to lose. I think that we can learn a lot from other cultures end. I think why I I'm so excited with the work that I do is because I'm so naturally curious, and that, you know, you're constantly

Lauren North America Canada Dr Antonella Keller United Nations Asia Ted Europe scientist researcher
Can We Finally Solve World Hunger?

Fierce and Flawless: The Female Project

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Can We Finally Solve World Hunger?

"Put you know, a label on it. You're fighting to solve world hunger. Yes. I mean, but also how we can actually impacts maybe over consumption of food is an issue to try to hear people's awards more sustainable more sustainable dies that are both good for the planet and good in goods the human bodies. And and it's quite exciting. Because I think it's it's really the time has come to kind of sea food and use food as and lens to view big issues that are affecting the world and so much attention on this issue right now. So I'm really really happy that I followed my intuition. And I I knew that I had to gather experiences from around the world in order to get here. So I didn't stay in Canada. But I I've been living working researching in Asia Africa Europe, Nelson North America. And that is being also part of my passion. Into to learn from other cultures to learn from other systems in order to understand the complexity associated with food food systems now, which is say that another cultures that you have seen people have a different attitude towards attrition that. We see North America are pretty similar across the planet. And how if you food. Oh, that's not always very shocking for me to come home to come back Canada. And And the relationships food is really dangerous in many ways that people get auction view who to energy and fuel, but it's so much more than that. And and I and I believe that the culture aspect and the enjoyment around food. There's a lot more attention on that. Now, of course. But still I think that people are rushing in the way they're eating eating poorly. They're getting the wrong kinds of foods. They're you know, impr- inappropriate for their bodies. All these kinds of things that I that I can see in in North America food was away. That people were connected. It was community it extended just beyond the, you know, the Neal dinnertime it was a way that people socialize in and told stories and connected with other human. Beings. That's something that I'm definitely on a mission to to mos- and have people kind of go back to to the days where we were actually able to enjoy food without pressure of time and stress and all these kinds of things the funny thing is that it's really a lot of the kind of the fitness industry in all of this kind of stuff that's pushing the, you know, food is just fueled food is just he'll because they're trying they're trying to break people's enjoyment from food to try to get out change their eating patterns, but it's so much more than that our personalities are in great to have so many experiences in our childhood and social interaction, certainly, you know, this from all of your traveling. But I think the biggest difference that I've noticed is actually in France. Anyway, you go the restaurant takes forever bring the food out. But it's meant to be like that there's lots of time between the courses free to have a chance to sit down and enjoy your meal, and it's you look around and people are shotting having time you little bites really. Bulging because a lot of French food. It's it's quite rich, but has enjoyed a nice nice good setting slowly. Instead of just kind of cramming down as you're running between business meetings. If you are the way to eat French people eat in North America. But with North American attitude you packing on the pounds. Pretty. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's that's one thing that I think were were now coming to realize the importance of the social social aspect around food, and there's a new body research that actually looking at that. And it's quite exciting to kind of understand that this is a parts of culture that we can't afford to lose. I think that we can learn a lot from other cultures end. I think why I I'm so excited with the work that I do is because I'm so naturally curious, and that, you know, you're constantly

North America Canada Asia MOS Neal France Europe
"body research" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"body research" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Electricity before we had lights on that night. People used to sleep. I think it was night hours. I I read the study. All right. Let's go to matters of sexual health. Many women have urinary incontinence, they found that exercise improves urinary incontinence this from the journal of the American geriatrics society. This was a study of over fourteen hundred postmenopausal women who lowered their BMI by just five percent. That's about eight pounds for five foot five women who is one hundred sixty pounds and through exercise. They were half as likely to develop this stress, urinary incontinence. We think about it losing weight eases pressure the bladder that also exercising strengthens your bladder muscles to help prevent leaks. So if you exercise for no other reason, do it for that reason. Excuse me, I got to take a pause here to get a sip of Agua. Oh last set. All right. Oh, I have a backup bottle of water. Talk about hydration. All right. This is interesting. Viagra may reduce colon cancer risk. This was an animal study. But they found a small daily dose of the popular evidence. Struck Viagra reduce the formation of cancerous polyps by colored by fifty percents. That's huge because it raises a raises levels of the substance that helps intestinal cells form of physical barrier against bacteria and other Ford. It's more research is needed, of course, to determine if the same effect would be seated humans, but that sounds pretty promising growing body research shows that regular sex could add years to your life, and we're gonna talk about longevity and just few minutes with our guest, rob Martin. But here this is this is a research scientist at the university of Bristol England, they found that having let's see for every one hundred orgasms you have your mortality risk falls by over a third. So that's interesting. And then we go from Iranian continents to urinary. Tract infections are UTI's. I did adventure. This. I usually do or the holidays because cranberries. You know, it's interesting that the cranberry season if you were in the cranberry business. Six weeks over the six weeks of the holidays that's responsible for ninety five percent of all cranberry sales throughout the year. Ninety five percent take place in the six weeks, November December time period. But anyway. It's been used by native Americans. It's been used since for many centuries since ancient times for their antibacterial qualities, and they could actually prevent urinary tract infections. I remember I was with I was associated with company back in the eighties. They were solar Ray. It was the first natural food stars. And of course, all the competitors have milk come out with their own cranberry supplement, but they came out with Krant acted and it was the first researched cranberry. And then it was a special concentration of the canon condensed, Hannon's, anthocyanins, and cranberries that prevented what it does is. It keeps bacteria from the sticking to the urinary tract inner surface the walls of the urinary tract. But cranberries grateful for that purpose so both preventing and treating urinary tract infections. And of course pharmacy sell it and doctors prescribe. It now and everything, but but it wasn't that. Well, that wasn't that well are widely used before the nine hundred eighty s before celery Cabo. So just something to know if you if you are ever. Of suffering from urinary tract infections or a lot of people are prone to your retract infections for various reasons and women are much more proud than bid because they they're your ureter is your throws but shorter than that. All right. Let's go to the pharmacy for half laugh. Sorry. I don't have a.

urinary incontinence Viagra journal of the American geriat research scientist university of Bristol England Ford rob Martin colon cancer Krant Hannon six weeks one hundred sixty pounds Ninety five percent ninety five percent eight pounds five percent Six weeks five foot milk
"body research" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"body research" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Well he he managed a put it as this uh con of wild story about these uh maverick scientists in portugal who have fought this this wonderful property and they're building some kind of device that can frost you out of your body so that it it immediately made me think of x man and professor exotic via then i question nazi about this in the interview and she does indeed confirm quieter always they hit a roundabout way it's conferred awards isaac applicable by survey ira they are basically xmen how happy just held this amazing story about their out of body research and on nancy's husband wagner in a really they both pushing this field full of trying to do some hard science and figure out what is actually happening with these experiences that of course we've covered countless times on the show in that people experience from all walks of life from all around the world and when i looked into them it really impressed me how openminded they were yes and the the breadth of what though a researching but also how down to earth an honest they were with the research and how important the scientific method was to them i think you're absolutely right and i think they're they're up against it because they're talking about topics that for the most part if you just brought up at dinner potty wherever else i think most people would think that they're clack topics i mean you talking about consciousness you talking about energies astro projection the lusa dreaming experience in of most importantly one of the focuses is the out of body experience as well and i think that if for the most part as a lotta wu all at a quackery app day but they really have taken this healthy scientific sceptical approach to it and that trying to push what the boundaries of consciousness really are and i think they're making progress and i especially like it with nazi that she's trying to also address children and this something comes across initiative in the interview really well because i think.

professor nancy wagner portugal
"body research" Discussed on The Smart Passive Income

The Smart Passive Income

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"body research" Discussed on The Smart Passive Income

"Come world's ecology to come to that fact and there's been a very strong body research last twenty thirty years about how to do this and the practice of gratitude is the very top something else the second question your read on there is a global big today great and uh this is actually monitored question because the priming question and the concept of priming your brain pat let's say on you buy a new car whatever gem corrina idea okay it was a car it's a tesla axe fantastic okay so you definitely when you were driving around in the test lexus especially when he started i bet you noticed every other test lacks around yup absolutely i actually i just ask the question either name related to that in a has it has some sort of named tuna forget an the name but it's some amtrak look for it on on twitter here but anyway has it it it's a fronting rich ridicule activating says yeah there you go by yeah so what the reason that works is because when you're in that court you brain is primed to notice these things around you of those cars were likely all already there you distorted notice them very similar on it's been proven that when you look forward to a positive experience in your day a large part of the happiness is actually the anticipation yell actually even before i got the car knowing that it was a it was coming because with tassles you have to order them had a time ryan i wrote or that one like in june and i had to wait nine months for a during the nine months i would spot every single tesla owner so excited about doing in one of those eventually so you're you're absolutely right right instill the cool port is everybody who does the farmer journal does it every day.

twitter farmer journal ryan tesla nine months twenty thirty years