17 Burst results for "Bob Wilkins"

"bob wilkins" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"And you know what? The best thing about that? Is there giving the award two guys Plus, let's say there's 40 50 people that help you. The people from the trenches, the people that are out doing this for the kids. It's not that you guys are a big donor, or you're doing this or doing that, or you are the people that are taking these kids and their parents who may not have experienced any of this and getting them outdoors. So they can enjoy. Yeah, Yeah. You know what? Once these people in the public learns that our slogans give him a tackle box, not an Xbox. They're here, Herc up. Ah, they're in. You know, everybody talks about the bad thing about college right now, Chauncey. Okay. No school, no sports. Everybody with the mask. Everybody's complaining about the cold thing, but I'm sure Bob can contest to this. We are seeing an influx. Of members will calling members all you gotta do it like our page on teach outdoors. We can go on Facebook. We consider you remember, but we've seen an influx of activity. It are Events we do Because now parents are saying Get outside. The kids are at home. They're in quarantine there. They're hiding from the world and we're opening our door. That these kids have never seen. Let's get on the outside with this. Wanna hook? Let's shoot a bow. Let's look of butterflies, but you know whatever it is. We're introducing the outside two kids, and, uh, if you can see a rainbow at the end of the tunnel is a light at the end of the tunnel. That's not a train. From Colin. We're getting kids outside, getting fresh air in their lungs were getting sunlight on your face. Ah, good fisherman. Sunburn is kind of a cool thing right now, and it's really on. What was that, Bob? We're giving people memory together the family in creating a bond. That's what we don't have any more. That's what we offer. Teach outdoors. Yeah. Oh, God, you know, and all these kids are going to say they're going to go. She was that was pretty cool. She was That was fun. I call it the gee whiz factor. She was I had a great time. Oh, let's do it again, right? Oh, and then we get done with our activities and the parents come. They work like we did in archery thing here at the Greenie County riding Gun Closet Wreck Club. We belong to that. They have opened up their gates to let us bring the kids and we did an archery thing here. We developed an archery range at the club. We did in house thing with the kids, and I had five parents. They left Artery seminar. They shot over the head over to the bone collector about their kids both. So that's a solid impact that way. Gotta form way. Got a four? You know exactly. Well, you know, everyone. We're talking Bob Wilkins and Jim Smitty. Two men are gonna be honored. Att tthe E. And when I conservation foundations, Outdoor Hall of Fame dinner next spring, so you'll have to mark your calendars were going to be talking about it, pushing it really hard. They're going to be honored there for their program that they started called Teach outdoors. I'm sure that there's going to be a lot more than one table of people from your organization there. Yeah, The buses are going to be coming from or his folks and it's going to be a great time. Congratulations to both of you. I am honored that you came on my show to talk about the program. And I am honored to welcome you into the Illinois Outdoor Hall of Fame. Thank you so much in honor to speak with you. You're listening too chancy on chances before I end. If somebody wants to get more information about teach outdoors, How did they do it? Jimmy Smitty, teach outdoors. Got orders? Not my business beauty at teach out north that ord. That sounds good. Alright. Thank you to our website, www dot out towards that orange Sounds good. Hey, everybody. You're listening. A chancy on chances. Great outdoors..

Bob Wilkins Gun Closet Wreck Club Sunburn archery Jimmy Smitty Facebook Bob Outdoor Hall of Fame Illinois Outdoor Hall of Fame Chauncey Colin Jim Smitty
"bob wilkins" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

13:19 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"In minutes on NewsRadio WFL a. There are certainly some films that can scare the living daylights out of you ever wondered, though, what goes on. And making those films I recently had the pleasure of welcoming back Mr Lobo to coast to coast, tell oh there, Mr Lobo. Logo agreeing your logo, what am I saying? I miss your lovo I think we're in another dimension. I don't even think we're in the same universe, Mr Lobo in the other dimension. It's bizarre. Isn't it? It's right. What would my life being another dimension? If I were Mr Lobo, I've never seen you and me in the same place at the same time we have to meet one day. My gosh. What state are you in? Well, now I'm intensity here all over the map, I have a lady. We went to Virginia for monster fest, and then we went up to oaks of for a retro Khan, and now we're, we're covering. And then, of course, they're tearing up my bathroom. So I can't even be homes and I'm you're out in a hotel to our houses ready to be. But what's going on in the movie world, these days all can only scary things. A lot of scary things a lot of good scifi to, you know. I mean, I'm I, I don't know if you saw the new blade runner, but I know I haven't seen it yet. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed it. I mean it's not doesn't have the soul of the original. But, you know, it's intelligent and takes its time, which is unusual for modern movie. I'd like it with these movies. Get to go online and you can watch him that way in the comfort of your home. It's really happening. A lot of people are doing that. That's why ticket sales have been plummeting and a lot of people are not going out to the cinema. You know, it's or when they do they all go out to see the same movie, everyone goes out to see, you know, whatever of injures or or Star Wars, but a lot of, you know, really movie lovers are spending a lot of time. Now, watching watching streaming, you know, the old time movies of the old time movies would not make it today. When I look at the John Wayne, westerns, and some of the movies Frank Sinatra's in any, and they were good quality scripts, but, you know, there was no high action, there was no digital effects. They didn't have those things, they wouldn't make it today. It's interesting because I feel like you know, I think we've been sold a bad Bill of goods, because I think that everybody thinks that everything needs to be faster and louder and have more effect s- and, you know, when it comes down to it, if you're not engaged by the story, if not engaged by the characters you just sorta tune out. No, you're right. So I I'm hoping that we know we have a return to I think, on television, we are having that because we are able to have been so many great. You know, there's so many great series now like stranger things, and things breaking bad was great breaking bad, where they really can take their time and develop characters that you, you know, you wanna know their stories, and you really engaged, and it's not it's not an action. It's things flying screen, and, you know, you know, a million digital effects, what's the demographics for movies these days? What what age group are they going after? Right now. I think they're trying to get women to be honest. If you like that, that they're that they've women spending all the money, and my wife spends all the money. So I, I don't know. But, you know, I think that I think that that is, I think that's a big demographic. I think the other thing is that I think a lot of the studios have given up on America markets. I think they're really focusing on the foreign market really, which is a shame because they're always thinking in terms of well as that joke, gotta translate. Or maybe we shouldn't have to, or maybe we should have something that's more, you know. Vague? And I think that that's kind of, you know, if you thinking in those sort of terms when you're when you're creating a story, I think that you can, you know, lose a lot of texture a lot of lot of feeling. What about the age demographic, age demographic? I think that, you know, I think that they're they've written off the younger people, I think the people who are going to the movies are probably, you know, thirty five and older, really I would have thought it was the other way around. Yeah. I feel like at least for for for feature films families. You know, that's another big demographic, where if you've got something like a Pixar movie or, or a new Disney film, Star Wars, where it's something where people bring their kids and I think that far as as far as like actual cinema ticket sales. I think that that's of, you know, that's a lot of who they're aiming at is parents in their kids, what happened in terms of the progression of television and movies, when, for example, we had been Crosby red Skelton Jack Benny, but we had all these older guys. Right. That would not make it Bob. Hope they would not make it today. If they if they went on television today for a new show, it wouldn't. They wouldn't make it nobody would watch them in the younger. John Reid younger hits wooden watch that at all yet. If they succeeded in a big way, then, but why didn't television in the movies go after the younger audience in those days? You know, I think that a lot of television in those days was relatively new. And I think a lot of the stars that were on television were carrying over from radio from radio and Phil earlier films. You know. And so they, they were they were already established commodities, and perhaps nostalgic too. I mean, you know, we go through periods of being very nostalgic. And you know, right now, I think we're having that period. Again, we're, we're kind of looking backwards and, and kind of, you know, we've got things old television series like twin peaks and things that are twenty five years old. They're, they're trying to continue and do a Star Wars where they're trying to continue and all the actors or you know, in the fifties and sixties now. So there's a lot of these franchises, and things that they're, they're going back to everything that worked, you know, before the digital revolution. You know, because really the, you know, the past ten years or so. So, you know it's it's anybody's game. Nobody knows what's coming next. And I think that it's just, you know, everyone's in a panic and they're really just it's like it's like back to the future where they can't fix it now. But if we go to the past, and we can, you know, something that broke through a while ago, we can still kinda grab onto those people who, who, who, who, who we reached when we could actually break through and reach people. But I think most everything now is some kind of existing franchise did a lot of a lot of big budget things, did you see the movie Noah from a couple years ago? I did not one of the worst I've ever seen. They, they, they went too far with animation. They had rocks that turned into talking creatures. Oh boy. And, you know, I wanted to see a good rendition of Noah and the story of Noah in and I wanted to see it in a well done fashion. This was horrible. A lot of times, especially if it's going to be on, I max or whatever they just feel like because it's going to be three D And everything. They just have to have a million silly, things happy, exactly. And I you know, I don't like movies like that. I want more reality would good storytelling in good acting, and, you know, these talking rocks and no other. Just it lost me in Las. If you do fan at fantasies difficult to do because, you know if you do it, right. The audience is doing most of the work for you, because, you know, the suspension of disbelief if you can, if you can get your audience if you, if you could win your audience over and get them to buy into that concept of whatever your whatever illusion, you're trying to create then, you know, you don't have to force it down their throat with too many affects people people will want to believe what you're what you're trying to put out there. So tell me a little bit about yourself again, and we've talked many times, Mr. mobile, but you're a horror whole time. What is a horror host do a horror host a horror host is the presenter of films. And the tradition goes back quite a ways, you know, even in radio, I think we had a horror hosts where, you know, the, the inner sanctum and the old witch in where they would be of stories, and they would be always this presenter and. When television came around, and we had, when the universal film for start coming to, to television themselves of the thirty started coming to TV. I think they felt they wanted to reach younger audiences by having presenter, something that was current sorta connected with an audience. And so in the fifties and sixties they had these wild and colorful, vampires mad scientists, you know, Dr mortgages, right of my buddy was your horror ho, that's right every market every market every city had their their own version. So it was a national phenomenon that happened locally, and as things progress in a lot of things follow that format it was so popular things like the twilight zone. It was always the presenter, so, you know, and I would even say, even William castle, you know, a lot of is kind of a large Alfred Hitchcock. They all kind of took that role as. The presenter, and I think in horror, it's always been, there's always been this thing where here's this. Here's this guy, who's gonna take us over the river, sticks or take us to the place where all the weird stuff happens, and he's going to bring us home safely again. And in my particular case, I worked at a TV station and at ABC TV station in early in late nineties early two thousands, and they had a overnight movie on Saturday that ran twenty minutes short and I mean being a big fan of Bob Wilkins and creature features which was my horror host growing up. I, I suggest the idea that I could build at twenty minutes with background on the movie and comedy and weird stuff and, and they didn't care which was the best thing ever. Loose, right? Yeah. They, they really didn't get that, that time slot was dead to them. So they didn't really care. And we brought that time slot up. We went from Pash marks to two in the ratings which was twenty two thousand home. That's a good bump at three in the morning, twenty two thousand homes. So we we went into syndication and then we were picked up by syndicator. And then at one point, we had a two thousand five, we probably had a forty five million forty five million homes footprint. You know with the state we were on and all the markets. And, and of course, broadcast has diminished much since then. And now we are on streaming and I have my own streaming channel for Roku called seventy four and I'm still hosting brand new episodes of cinema insomnia. And so they can find you on Roku. Yes, they can sl. Seventy four is the channel. And if you put it in your into this, what do you like? On it. What drives me into this? Is that what you said? Oh, I love it. It's fun. You know, I think it's a thrill, you know, I think it's e you know, at least a good horror movie. You know, you feel like a roller coaster, you know, you there's two kinds of roller coasters, one where you go, okay. I'm never getting that on that again. And the one we want to get right back on it, and write it again. You know. And so I, I do I love movies and I love being able to and this kind of, you know, I mean, again, this kind of thing is, is unique in the way that I get to I get to voice, my opinions on things I get right to perform get to produce, and I get to watch movies, so it's, it's you know, it's you know I'll just do it until they take my crayons away, and break him, would you? Call Alfred Hitchcock's psycho a horror film. I would I think it's I think it's the granddaddy of, of Friday, the thirteenth and Texas chainsaw massacre. I mean they're all doing the game story.

Mr Lobo horror host Noah Alfred Hitchcock Bob Wilkins Skelton Jack Benny Virginia John Wayne Frank Sinatra America Las Disney John Reid Khan Pixar Phil Texas William castle Mr. mobile Pash
"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Remember that one dang it. So dang old I'm older than the mountain tops. Bruce. Bruce paging, Bruce. Are you doing Bruce? Thank you. Indeed. That's awesome, man. Thank you. About the. Yeah. Disney. Saturday night. Right, right. I remember James. Yeah. Well, I'm I'm taking a day by day. I appreciate the your thoughts have good days and bad days hope for better days than than bad days and just got to get up and keep going keep going forward. So. Everybody together. Yes, sir. I appreciate that. Thank you very much. I appreciate the first time. This is. Features. Bob wilkins. That's right. Heating munchies. Attention, and they just. Well, that's what you're that's the older brothers supposed to scare the younger, brother or whatever. But yeah, Bob Wilkins was a great show. I look forward to it every week when a lucky guy could sit and smoke a cigar while he was working. Hey, bruce. Hey, bruce. It's great to have us a first time caller. I hope you'll call us again. Ending. Everybody on Facebook. And it wasn't that bad. Wasn't. It was easy. You gotta with ervices is no problem. Right. Yes. Sir. How you did it Sunday. So I could get over it. Yeah. Bros. Thank you, man. Dave's and Carmichael. Hi, david. Yeah. Doing good, David. Thank you. I don't think it's been mentioned yet. Guy was as low personality. I don't think he'd around anymore. He went by the name of captain sacked. Oh, sure. Yeah. Catton sankoh. Yeah. I I love captain back there. I and wasn't that Harry Martin cartoons and whatnot. I think it was Harry Martin was captain Sacco if.

Bruce Bob wilkins Harry Martin david captain Sacco Disney Facebook James Dave Carmichael
"bob wilkins" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"At for the opening of some of a animated feature called Jack in the bean stocked at Columbia Pictures, whoever had him promoting on creature features, and it had been a Japanese animated film. But anyway, so like there there must have been four hundred kids that showed up to meet him. And then the crowd got bigger that all wanted his autograph. Jeez. And it was really it was really really really crazy. So you've had horror who's all the country that were all as popular as Bob Wilkins just in their local market in their local market and people love them and remember them to this day and their websites devoted. There's a documentary. I recommend you checking even remotely interested in the phenomenon of the American horror host friend of mine worked on this documentary guy, friend of mine, Mike Monaghan who also wrote a book about the history of bay area or us, which is indispensable called shock to me. The golden ghouls of the Golden Gate. He also worked on a film pulled American scary. He conducted all the interviews with all the horror host of that for that. Film was leap. Sorry. I was gonna say was our asylum in Chicago was our horror hosts, Ben Guli. Yeah. So as he the same guy, you're talking about a horror host, right? Exactly. You know, they all do different different stick. Right. You know? But you know, your spend Guli used to be the son to spend Guli. Because there was another spin Guli before him, I okay in the seventies. And that was you know, a guy who was. Amazing. I mean, there's still videos of of his shows that are on YouTube of just his hosts segments, and they're crazy. They're really crazy. He was only on a couple years, but he left an indelible impact in in Chicago television history. He was on the says three years, Jerry g Bishop. Yeah. Mister bishop. Larry's I mean and spin Goulding's the decree spin Guli was a fan of Jerry g Bishop he was a devoted, Dan. It's it can I do it could you're gone. Can I take over the mantle? Will you give me permission to become the next span Gulick? Okay. And and that's the second instance of one fan becoming his following in the footsteps of his favorite horror host. There was a guy in Cleveland called glory in the sixties early sixties. And he created like I mean, this guy would blow up stuff on TV. He would blow up model kits. People would send a model kits just for him to put a firecracker in it blow it up on the air, which you can't do now. Now, you can't do that to blow something up in the studio, and he would just he had his whole beatnik rift and his name was Ernie Anderson. At eventually. He was calm. He was comedic partners in Cleveland with a guy named Tim Conway who became very famous a few years later Mikhail's navy and the Carol Burnett show, and they decided they got offer to move to Los Angeles to do a western comic. Western for network television. Tim Conway being sort of like a goofy like deputy, right? And Ernie Anderson mostly has kind of a straight, man. Well. They made the pilot, and they were you know, they're they're waiting to get approval for a series. And they've Lou from Cleveland said we're done with Cleveland, TV Guardia is going away. And then the network came in and said we liked the Conway kid, but we gotta get rid of you Anderson, your we don't know what to do with you. So they kept Conway like, they broke up the band, basically, you know. And Ernie Anderson went what the hell I'm not gonna go back to crawl back to Cleveland and do the same stuff. So he eventually became the voice of ABC the love boat, he merely announcer at ABC that tonight on the lobe. And he is the father of Paul Anderson. The director the famous booby direct. Oh, what the fuck? All comes out circle. Yeah. So I recommend checking out this documentary American scary. It's got a Jerry g Bishop of Chicago's spindle originally spin googly passed away, unfortunately, but he's interviewed documentary and Bob Wilkins's in this document reminder host, and they got us many guys that were still breathing.

Ben Guli Ernie Anderson horror host Jerry g Bishop Cleveland Tim Conway Chicago Bob Wilkins Paul Anderson Columbia Pictures Golden Gate Jack Guli YouTube Mike Monaghan director ABC Dan Carol Burnett Goulding
"bob wilkins" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"Even though she was only on a local station, the ABC affiliate New York, and it was a live show wasn't recorded and her name was vampire. And she was the archetype whorehouse should tell RAI bad jokes when they came back from commercial, and then go we're going back to the movie, she do little skits or whatever. And so this was the formation of what we call the horror host. And so with the shock movie package there were places like again, the different bozos. The different cartoon hosts all over the country, there became horror hosts everywhere all across the country that people in there, you know, they some of them started in the fifties. This whole phenomenon whorehouse horror host lasted well into the eighties. Even though cable starting to kill local stations being able to have big film, a libraries because guys like Ted Turner were buying up all these packages from the studios and throwing money for the exclusive at them for exclusivity. So all of a sudden, they all disappeared from local television getting onto cable all across the country. You know, you can watch the M G. There was Ted Turner to watch the MGM channel is nothing but MGM movies. That's it. You know? But so then a local station couldn't show them, you know. So anyway, so this Horose thing happened. So when I'm a kid, you know, we had a local horror host. We had several one of them before I was way before I was born. And then we had another one that I just caught a little bit of a guy called as Modena's who hosted his show out of castle. Nor was it Chateau. I think it was Chateau Noir. But then we got this guy named Bob Wilkins. Who didn't have a gimmick. A lot of these guys wore capes and dress like monsters or mad scientists and had you know, I'm mortgage the magnificent or whatever that's a real guy to and then we had Bob Wilkins who came on in his suit. It a pair of glasses and he smoked a cigar. And he was youngest guy, and he would go tonight's movie is so terrible. It was delivered to channel two in a Brown. Paper envelope. No return address. You know, he would do these. These these aims jab pan. He was at guy that Phil into hosting television. And he was our horror host and his show was sometimes locally San Francisco is a one of the bigger television markets and it used at the time the big three television markets. That's where they would test shows. They were worthy of being like, you know, national network shows would were San Francisco, Chicago, New York, and San Francisco is a big market and Bob show started before Saturday Night Live came on the air before it was, you know, launched and he became this big phenomenon. And then when Saturday night launched and became a huge hit. You know, it's a, you know, obviously Saturday in is still on. So the original one must have been head, right culture. Changing pop culture changing show. Our show the Bob will can show which was called creature features would routinely beat Saturday live in the San Francisco ratings. Really? Yeah. What the hell? Yeah. Locally produced. Joe we had a he would have a market of one million viewers. Every Saturday night. So his show what he first viewed nineteen seventy-one. He started out with one movie at nine o'clock and within six months, they went to a double feature. And then his show was on in one thousand nine hundred ninety started he decided to bail he'd been hosting award from sixty six and so he decided to quit nineteen Seventy-nine. But if he had decided to quit at that point. He would have kept going because he was actually at the same time. He was hosting a show in San Francisco. He was hosting a show in Sacramento eighty miles north he would drive up to Sacramento once a week the film that show them back down to the bay area. So he continued with the Sacramento show because of his contract with that station until about I think it was eighty four. So he was this huge phenomenon. I mean, we he did a public appearance..

horror host Bob Wilkins San Francisco Joe Saturday Night Live Ted Turner ABC MGM Chateau Noir New York Sacramento Brown Modena Bob Chicago six months
"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The new Bill called these sunshine Protection Act of two thousand nineteen also follow similar legislation enacted by the state in the state of Florida. Scott signed that Bill when he was the state's governor, the Florida legislation cannot go into effect until Washington passes a measure allowing it. Rubio and Buchanan also introducing bills to allow Florida's law to go into effect last year. The bills passed. The idea like daylight saving time we scrap it. I'm gonna get into some of the pros and cons of DSP daylight saving time. And if you have a comment I'd love to hear from you. I'm not exactly what sure what kitties Paulk asked. But I'm sure it said something like do you like daylight saving time? Should we keep daylight saving time? Keep doing it the way we're doing it or do you like the the sunshine Protection Act? I'd just like to see any sunshine at all. Or do you not care? Nine one six nine to one fifteen thirty locally nine to one fifty thirty a toll free one eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty. Here's our friend Vinnie driving tonight if any. Good evening. Thank you for taking my call. Sure. Alexander Graham, Bell data. Yes, you right back at ya. It was on this date in eighteen seventy search a patent was awarded to Alexander Graham Bell for device that would one day we call the telephone is kind of a vital part of your career at this point is really is. It certainly is. Yes. In regards to the daylight saving situation. Yeah. No profile, no preference. As to what you know what we do here. My main thing is can we just stick to what leave it at that? The only reason I am okay. With this is because I know that every every spring when we do this nonsense. I change the batteries in my smoke alarm stroke house. You change the batteries. Why does it just as a reminder or what am I missing their? Why why do you change the batteries because they're going there for a year? I see. Okay. So that's just kind of a reminder. Yes. So that's what I do is every every every year when it comes springtime to adjust the clocks. That's when I go out and. All the nine volt batteries and much imagine. If we don't have daylight saving time Vinny. How you gonna remember to change those Dan all just take another day? Maybe I don't know my per se. I don't know. You every year on your birthday has changed. The batteries smoke alarm, but whatever works for you. I mean, that's that's actually kind of a neat way to remember that you need to change the batteries and smoke alarm very important, by the way. Yes. It is. Have a great many. Thank you very much for your call for the reminder on Alexander Graham, Bell day. Hey, it's Paul and Yuba city a ball. Hello, Paul Charles. Oh is this Charles. Hello, charles. I'm sorry. Yeah. Hello, charles. Don't like it. I don't like the daylight saving. I wish it ended. Same time all year. And it should be like it's coming towards light later in the day. So you get rid of daylight saving time. Just keep it the way it is all year long. We're we're we're like we're when it's coming up here. What were life later today? Day more. Yeah. Right. And which of course, had something to do with the reason this all began in the first place, which will get into the history of that coming up. I'm gonna Mark you down as stay late longer. Get rid of daylight saving time, Charles. Yes, sir. I gotta confirmation mckinney's information earlier. Hawaiian early. Seventies. Tv was wacky. So you remember those days where we just cut away. There was a movie host. Cut away in the middle of his word did come back and he'd be asleep. Your child show checkers. Pogo kiddy show. You come back and pogo picking his nose. I'd be entertained. I'd have to see that television. I think it'd be thoroughly entertained. Way different. Bob Wilkins greeted creature feature. Ready to give you his. Seconded came back. I always liked him my face over there. I liked him on channel forty two when he was here, and he'd always be puffing on that big cigar? And it always be like some zombies from outer space movie, and he was so good. I missed Bob Wilkins, his take on things was just. Wart? Attempts. Over thought. Yeah, he really did. And he's like he's like the last guy that can host a local show and smoke a cigar at the same time. Great show. Pat, charles. Thank you, man. I wish thank you Charles. I wish I could do that candle. Just sitting here have a cigar during my show. Gosh, that'd be so great. Caroline. Hello. Carol. Yeah, I'm calling from north highlands. And I believe in keeping standard time all year get rid of daylight saving time. You don't want anything to do with daylight saving. Sure. Don't. And I never liked it. I always hated it. My mother hated it. I hate it. Everybody that I know's hate it. Tell me why you hate it. Because I have for one thing. I just I like sleeping in bed in the morning. That's one of the things be too. Yeah. And I just standard time is is sometime, and it's and it's just corresponds with the sun. And that's the way it should be. Yes. That's that's that's that's a good argument. I like, Kevin more sunshine myself. I said right now this point I'll take any sunshine, quite frankly. Caroline, I'm putting you down as you hate it. I'm putting that wasn't even a category. But I'm gonna put you down this the that you hate it. Thank you for calling. Appreciate that. All right. Well, we keep on taking some of these calls here. Curious to know what you think nine one six nine thousand two hundred fifteen thirty one eight hundred fifteen thirty. More your calls coming up Powell.

Paul Charles Alexander Graham Florida Alexander Graham Bell Caroline Bob Wilkins Paulk Washington Rubio Vinnie Scott Yuba city Vinny Bill Dan Buchanan Kevin Powell north highlands mckinney
"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Welcome back to coast to coast, Mr. logo with us. I'll tell ya Mr Lobo funny story about the Patrick Wilson who was an insidious the conjuring number of other films back in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine a television news director in Saint Louis, and my anchorperson was a fellow by the name of John Wilson. A little six year old boy who ended up being Patrick Wilson. A small world that is incredible in he moved off to Florida with his parents. His mother is a Boyce teacher Mary Kay, and the father was a television anchorman. It's cool. Incredible. You know, a lot of these these television personalities, the anchorman and stuff a lot of them ended up being or hosts Bob Wilkins was the weatherman in and he was my horror host. He was the weatherman on channel two when he was horror host, Richard writes me from canton, Ohio, he said I used to watch a fellow by the name of Guli. Artie, artie. Yes. In the Anderson. Yup. That's right. Exactly. Most famously known as the boys at ABC the love that was him. How 'bout that? He would green screen himself into some of these old black and white films in this guy. Here says he made it even funnier than the original movie. Yes. There's a there's a famous one. And I'm not sure if it was hammers Ackerley, but he's leaning on a building. And then the scene changes and he's leaning on the fifty foot woman by mistake. I love it. All right. Let's take some calls here. We've got calls this hour with Mr Lobo. Eugene Logan is with us in Eugene, Oregon. Here we go hide Logan what welcome to the program. Hi, there are you guys in tonight rates. So I wanted to bring up the influence on music and horror movies such as punk rock bands. Like, the misfits and music like segue. Sure the cramps. I love the cramps and the meteors and all that stuff. Absolutely. You know, definitely. And there's a whole off shoot where it's all horror. There's a horror punk offshoot of that kind of music. I worked on a movie called the ranger this year, which was a punk rock movie about a bunch of punk rockers getting killed by a park ranger. And you know, there's definitely always that connection between music and movies. And I I think they influence each other. I think return of the living dead is probably the ultimate punk rock horror movie. We didn't talk about slasher movie, just like chainsaw and things like that. We didn't talk about Texas chainsaw massacre. Which is interesting. If you watch that film because really there's there's there's hardly any blood in it. There's hardly any. I don't think there's been harsh language in that movie. But it's so disturbing that you think you see, and you think you hear a lot more than you actually do. Well, that's true. It makes you really once like psycho. Yes, psycho exactly psycho has a cycle. And it's time had the same heavy rep that chainsaw massacre. You never saw the knife stabbed into the woman in the shower never entered her what you thought you felt it exactly. Next up Nancy in Victoria, Texas. Welcome to the program. Hi nance. Right. Hey, good to have you with us. Go ahead. Thank you. I all I gotta say this the last movie that I watched. I watch recently was the twenty eighteen a version of Halloween. Okay. Did you like it? Yes. I did too. I joined it. I have a question. What what rollo's? Take on the new the newer movies that are out right now. But just get out and other scary. So scary movies. That are bloom. Noli are a little bit poetical in a way. Yes. Well, there's that's been going on for a little while. Now, I think there's I think the purge films. There's an interest get out. And then I understand like what you're saying with with those films in particular. I think the guy from Qian t o which I always forget with these key or if he's peo-, but he's rebooting the twilight zone as as the host. You know? I mean, I think that I think that horror films always sort of do reflect the times and always do kind of have underlying political all the fifties horror movies. We thought that reds were hiding under our basements, or whatever. So I think it's just an ongoing thing of whatever people are afraid of and right now people are afraid of politics. I'll tell you that what about the Walking Dead series. They seem to have a life of its own. Yeah. It does. I mean, it's interesting because it is kind of still following the night of the living dead kind of template. I think it's because we're interested in the characters in the stories, and to be honest, you're talking about where the western went. I think that a lot of western stories have all been converted into samba stories, you know, instead of shooting at Indians a shooting at zombies what made the horror genre. So popular in its day. Well, you know, there's there's definitely a lot of cycles. I think the first cycle was the thirties with Dracula, and Frankenstein, and that's because universal had a very young president. You know, so university he he wanted to see more horror content, and they made it and then things got conservative for awhile in the cycle. Didn't come back into the later forties with the Wolfman, and then it got kind of conservative again for a while. And then and then in the sixties when trying to compete with television, the movies got rougher and scarier leading up into the seventy s with films like the exorcist and so on where you're not going to see that on TV at least not uncut. So, you know, I think that there's there's definitely cycles with horror films, and I think we're in another horror cycle, what are the demographics for movie attendance? You know, I think that they probably skew older, you know. But it's it's weird. Because I think it's it's probably younger and older people who are still going to the movies who used to be a cheap date. Yeah. It's not a cheap date anymore. No. It's not I I like to go on Tuesdays when it's half price. What is what does a movie cost these years since we're ten bucks? Sometimes really. Yeah. Yeah. Five bucks on Tuesdays when it's six bucks. But that's what six bucks is still high. So six bucks is still high. Yeah. I mean, what happened to you'll laugh you'll cry you'll kiss sick three bucks? Goodbye is really what it should be. I think it's interesting. They're talking about people not going to the movies. I think if it was cheaper. Honestly, I feel like a lot of people would go I feel like it. You know, it's just to get away from everything, you know. I I always give it a speech before we show movie. It's like you don't have to turn off your cell phones. You get to turn off your cell phones. You get to be away from the internet for two hours and have a vacation or just put it away stuff. Go. Lot of people still send text messages from movies. I don't get it. You know, I'm I'm I feel way. I'm sorry. I didn't couldn't answer your call. I was watching a movie. Next up victor's with a sulphur springs, Texas, east of the Rockies. Hi, victor. All right. Well, my up in the north west when I was a kid channel seven CBS. It was the Cairo count. The Cairo count. Tell me all about who is the host. I remember. Well, I don't remember his name. But he was like the she e o of that CBS affiliate. He was the CEO. And then he put on. The Dracula Cape hosted the movies. I love it. Yeah. But I got another question. I have a relative, and I'm sure you'll probably figure out. He was in the beam quarter movies, and I count numbers game. But he starred as the sheriff, and where the Redfern groves was that the name of the movie. But he was in several hundreds. But that was the name of the movie where the word for fern grows. I can't remember who the sheriff was in that right now. Interrupt the kid from trying to steal that kid dogs. Yeah. Yeah. I'm vaguely. I remember watching Lonnie Lonny Chapman was name of the sheriff. Thank you for that. Thank you. Thank your staff for that. Hey, I did it on my own. Oh, you did. All right. Well, then I thank you, George. You're always on top. But Victor, that's the name of your relatives. All right. Well, thank you, guys Chapman. Are you gone Chapman, the great Lonny Chapman as the sheriff in where the Redfern grow? I do have a great staff, by the way, Mr. mobile, and they have on occasion that talk to me quickly in my ear. But in this case, I got that on my best whenever I'm talking with his Tom or Stephanie or lease. I feel like I'm in excellent hands. Your staff is the best. Speaking of Tom Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Hi thomas. George. Thank you for taking my call. I remember here in California there was science fiction theater. And I'm not sure who the host was but heading towards can answer that that was his favorite show. Yeah. I was always very creepy. I mean, there was a host. So there was a different science fiction theater. Then. Yes question. I had for you, Mr Lobo. Yes. Sarah, say director in Canada who has a cult following. David Kranenburg movies like video Drome? Deborah, Harry, and James woods fly with Jeff Goldblum. Absolutely. And. Creeps up on you. It's like, yeah. That'll the movie realize oh my goodness. You know, this is getting serious all of his movies, again seem to fall into what what's called body horror where it's things that are happening to us physically. And it's a little scary with that. And I think especially in the eighties with with aids and everything that was happening with that. I think it really played on our fears of getting sick or something happening to somebody doing something to us in all of his films seem to have this kind of underlying creepy -ness of it something happening to your body. Scanners has that shiver which is another one of his has that the fly? Of course, he completely mutates into the fly. And it's very graphic. But Kronen Burke is definitely an artist. Certainly I mean, either nobody makes a movie like that guy. And you know, even though they're they're disturbing. They're always very well acted and well well-made, so I'm here's a little trivia question for you Thomas. What was the name? Of the fly in the movie. Oh my goodness. That that's a good question. Yeah. I think I got that one. Give it a shot, Mr Lobo the Brundle fly. Yeah. Try to fly Seth Brundle. He became Brundle fly. Exactly. Thanks, tom. Appreciate it. Then of course, in the original fly movie wasn't that a black and white? The return of the fly was black and white which doesn't make any sense because the original fly was in color. The first one was in color in the second which movie did the guy he was a little fly. But you could hear him go. Help me help me. No. Yeah. That was the fly original fly the original one. I'll always remember that lonnie's with us Long Beach, California. Hey, Lonnie taken away. Hey, what's up high? Georgia's good to hear getting again. Real fun..

Mr Lobo Lonnie Lonny Chapman Texas Tom Thomas horror host Brundle fly victor California Patrick Wilson CBS cramps director Bob Wilkins Artie Eugene Logan ABC Mary Kay Ackerley Anderson Florida
"bob wilkins" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on KGO 810

"Coast AM on cagey. Oh eighteen. And welcome back to coast to coast, Mr Lobo with us. I'll tell ya, Mr Lobo. A funny story about the Patrick Wilson who was in insidious the conjuring and a number of other films back in nineteen seventy nine. I'm a television news director in Saint Louis, and my anchorperson was a fellow by the name of John Wilson. Yeah. A little six year old boy who ended up being Patrick Wilson. Small world. That is incredible. He moved off to Florida with his parents. His mother is a voice teacher. Mary Kay, and the father was television anchorman. It's cool. Incredible. You know, a lot of these these television personalities, the anchorman stuff a lot of them ended up being horror hosts Bob Wilkins was the weatherman in and he was my horror host. He was the weatherman on channel two when he was horror host, Richard writes me from canton, Ohio, he said I used to watch a fellow by the name of Guli. Artie, Google, Artie. Yes. In the Anderson. Yup. That's right. Exactly. Most famously known as the voice of ABC the love boat that was him. How 'bout that? He would green screen himself into some of these old black and white films in this guy. Here says he made it even funnier than the original movie. Yeah. Yes. There's a there's a famous one. And I'm not sure if it was hammers Ackerley, but he's leaning on a building. And then the scene changes and he's leaning on the fifty foot woman by mistake. I love it. All right. Let's take some calls here. We've got calls this hour with Mr Lobo. Eugene Logan is with us in Eugene, Oregon. Here we go hide Logan what welcome to the program. Hi there. How are you guys in tonight? So I wanted to bring up the influence on music and horror movies, such as I'm Greg misfits and music like really sure the cramps. Love the cramps and the meteors and all that stuff. Absolutely. You know, definitely. And there's a whole offshoot where it's all horror where there's a horror punk offshoot of of that kind of music. I worked actually on a movie called the ranger this year, which was a punk rock movie about a bunch of punk rockers getting killed by a park ranger. And you know, there's definitely always a connection between music and movies. And I think they influence each other. I think return of the living dead is probably the ultimate punk rock horror movie. We didn't talk about slasher movies like chainsaw and things like that. We've talked about Texas chainsaw massacre. Which is interesting if you watch that film because really there's there's there's hardly any blood in it. There's hardly any. I don't think there's any bit harsh language in that movie. But it's so disturbing that you think you see, and you think you hear a lot more than you actually do. Well, that's true. It makes you really once like psycho psycho exactly psycho has a cycle. And it's time had the same heavy rep that chainsaw massacre. You never saw the knife stabbed into the woman in the shower never entered her what you thought you felt it exactly. Next up Nancy in Victoria, Texas. Welcome to the program. Hi nance. Hey, good to have you with us. Go ahead. Thank you. I all I gotta say this the last movie that I watched. I watch recently was the twenty eighteen version of Halloween. Yes. I did too. I enjoyed it. I have a question. What what's low take on the new the newer movies that are out right now. Just get out. And other scary scary movies. That are bloom Noli are a little bit political in a way. Yes. Well, there's that's been going on for a little while. Now, I think there's a I think the purge films. There's an inner get out. And then I understand like what you're saying with with those films in particular. I think the guy from key and peo- which I always forget if he's key or if he's peo-, but he's rebooting the twilight zone as as the host. You know? I mean, I think that I think. Horror films, always sort of do reflect the times and always do kind of have underlying political all the fifties horror movies. We thought that reds were hiding under our basements, or whatever. So I think it's just an ongoing thing of whatever people are afraid of and right now people are afraid of politics. I'll tell you that what about the Walking Dead series. They seem to have a life of its own. Does it? I mean, it's interesting because it is kind of a still following the night of the living dead kind of template. I think it's because we're interested in the characters in the stories, and to be honest, you're talking about where the western win. I think that a lot of western stories have all been converted into sob stories, you know, instead of shooting at Indians a shooting at zombies what made the horror genre so popular in its day. Well, you know, there's other there's definitely a lot of cycles. I think the first cycle was the thirties with Dracula, and Frankenstein, and that's because universal had a very young. President, you know, so university he he wanted to see more horror content, and they made it, and you know, then things got conservative for awhile in the cycle. Didn't come back into the later forties with the Wolfman, and then it got kind of conservative again for a while. And then and then in the sixties when trying to compete with television, the movies got rougher and scarier leading up into the seventies with films like the exorcist and so on where you're not gonna see that on TV at least not uncut. So, you know, I think that there's there's there's definitely cycles with horror films, and I think we're in another or cycle. What are the demographics for movie attendance? You know, I think that they probably skew older, you know. But it's weird because I think it's it's probably younger and older. Right. People who are still going to the movies who used to be a cheap date. Yeah. It's not a cheap date anymore. No. It's not I I like to go on Tuesdays when it's half price. What is what is the movie cost years since fourteen bucks? Sometimes really. Yeah. Yeah. Five. Tuesday's when it's six bucks. But. What six bucks is still high six bucks is still high. Yeah. I mean, what happened to you'll laugh you'll cry you'll kiss three bucks? Goodbye is really what it should be. I think it's interesting. They're talking about people going to the movies. I think if it was cheaper. Honestly, I feel like a lot of people would go I feel like it. You know, it's just to get away from everything, you know. I I was giving a speech at the before we show a movie, it's like you don't have to turn off your cell phones. You get to turn off your cell phones. You get to be away from the internet for two hours and have a vacation or just put it away. That stuff. Go. People still send text messages for movies. I don't get it. You know? I'm I'm I feel but in a way it's like, I I'm sorry. I didn't it couldn't answer your call. I was watching a movie excuse next up victor's with a selfish springs, Texas, east of the Rockies. Hi, victor. Your Joel Mr. we'll my up in the north west when I was a kid channel seven CBS. It was the Cairo count. Cairo count. Tell me all about who's the host. I remember. Well, I don't remember his name, but he was like the CEO of that CBS affiliate there. He was the CEO. And then he put on. The Dracula Cape and hosted the movies. I love it. Yeah. But I got another question. I have a relative, and I'm sure you'll probably sicker about. He was in the beam quarter movies, and I can't remember came. But he starred as the sheriff and where the Redfern gross. Was that the name of the movie? You know, he was in several hundred either that was the name of the movie where the web for fern grows. I can't remember who the sheriff was in that right now. Yeah. Up the kids from trying to steal that kid your dogs. Yeah. Yeah. I I'm bigly. I re I remember watching Lonnie Lonny Chapman was name of the sheriff. Thank you for that. Thank you. Thank your staff for that. Hey, I did it on my own. Oh, you did. All right. Then I thank you, George. You're always on top. But Victor, that's the name of your relatives. All right. Well, thank you guys. Chapman, gone Chapman, the great Lonny Chapman as the sheriff in where the Redfern grow. I do have a great staff, by the way, Mr. Mobutu, and they have on many occasions bat talk to me quickly in my ear. But in this case, I got that on my best whenever I'm talking with his Tom or Stephanie, or at least I was still like I'm in excellent hands. Your staff is the best. Speaking of TOMS, here's Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Hi thomas. George. Thank you for taking my call. I remember here in California there was science fiction theater. And I'm not sure who the host was George can answer that that was his favorite show. Yeah. He was always very creepy. I mean, it was a stuff was a host. So there was a different science fiction theater. Then right. Yes question. I have for you, Mr Lobo. Yes. Sarah, say director in Canada who has a cult following. David Cronenberg movies like scanners. Video drum with Deborah, Harry, and James woods fly. What Jeff Goldblum? Absolutely. And. Reaps up on you. You know? It's like, yeah. Of the movie, you realize oh my goodness. This is getting serious all of his movies, again seem to fall into what what what's called body for where it stinks that are happening to us physically. And it's a little scary with that. And I think especially in the eighties with with aids and everything that was happening without I think it really played on our fears of getting sick or something happening to us to somebody doing something to us in all his films seem to have this kind of underlying creepy -ness of it something happening to your body. Scanners has that shiver which is another one of his has that the fly? Of course, he completely mutates into the fly. It's very graphic. But Kronen Burke is definitely an artist certainly either. Nobody makes a movie like that guy. And you know, even though they're they're disturbing. They're always very well acted and well well made so I'm here's a little trivia question for you Thomas. What was the name? Of the fly in the movie. Oh my goodness. That's a good question. Yeah. I think I got that one. You give it a shot, Mr Lobo Brundle the Brundle flight. Yeah. Try to fly Seth Brundle. He became Brundle fly. Exactly. Thanks, tom. Appreciate it. And then, of course, in the original fly movie wasn't that a black and white? The return of the fly was black and white which doesn't make any sense because the original fly was in color. The first one was in color in the second which movie did the guy he was a little fly. But you could hear him go. Help me help me. No. Yeah. That was the fly original fly the original one. I'll always remember that. Yes. Totally lonnie's with us Long Beach, California. Hey, Lonnie taken away. Hey, what's up high? Georgia's good to hear. Hey, real fun..

Mr Lobo Lonnie Lonny Chapman horror host Texas victor Brundle fly Mr Lobo Brundle Thomas Patrick Wilson California director Artie Tom ABC cramps CBS Eugene Logan George Bob Wilkins Saint Louis
"bob wilkins" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on KTRH

"And we're back with Mr Lobo. What did you think of the twilight zone series, Mr Lobo the originals the original twilight zone? I mean, it's amazing. I mean, I think that they never get old and rewatch ability is incredible. I watched those episodes over and over and over again, and they just never be never get old. And rod Serling his stuff was so sharp said he was just such a keen observer of human nature and a great host. I mean, rod sterling is kind of a horror host, really. Yeah. He was the way he'd come out and everything else. Indeed it, but it wasn't all horror flex. No, all it was all imagination. That was really what the toilets. They had messages behind every show. Absolutely. Absolutely. I think it was it was a great way to use fantasy as a metaphor for the human condition. What about the Alfred Hitchcock mystery the're remember got presents was good too? Outer limits was good to twilight zone was better. But I think Alfred Hitchcock was great too. And he was like his presentation was very horror host like I love when he was talking about his headache remedy, and it could be taken in a tiny capsule. And then he just starts putting bullets on the desk in front of them. I mean, what about science fiction theatre remember that of course, science fiction, which did not have a host. No, it did not it just started. And they just started. But a great Boise an anthology, a wonderful anthology show. How come those shows don't work anymore? Anthologies are tough. Because again, it's every every week. The different show. And I think that you know, I think now all the shows are soap operas because that's the way they keep they continue from one to the next breaking bad and all that. Yeah. So I think it's this new twilight zone it will be a whole and they're doing a new tales from the crypt at a new twilight zone. So hopefully, you know, we're coming back to to being able to do that. But you have to have an audience. Oh, black near is a good modern. I'm good. How do you think of that show? You like, yeah. I like it. I don't not always in the mood for it. Because it's so dark. It's like, yeah. I get it technologies. Terrible. And it's making us horrible. But you know, I don't know if I want to hear that story every week, but it's the they had a choose your own adventure one. That was really kind of interesting called Bander snatch. There was one where there was a guy who was putting himself into a Star Trek type show using technology to kind of live out his fantasies, and and a lot of kinds of things that's really strike home with with. Today's generation, and I and I think a lot of the stories like the twilight zone have something important to say about where we're at socially and everywhere and as just as as human as humans. We're packed with calls. Let's go to Greg in Tampa, Florida. Hey, greg. Go ahead, sir. All right. Yes. I have a couple of movies that I remember child. Irresistible thirteen ghosts thirty also William castle thirteen goes who'd have the ghost viewer. If you looked into their I believe if you look in the red one it meant you believed in ghosts. And we're looking at the blue lens meant that you didn't believe in ghosts something like that. But you didn't see it was like a three d saying they had the lion tamer that the lion. And finally business had often. And then they had at the end of the movie the child a little boy was being predicated upon and the way that he got rid of his is dealt adversary close. There was like a bet that came down and suffocated him. Right. Right. To watch that. Bad like, they want to see the goes. That's what I wanna know. I was just I wonder who would wanna watch the movie with the lens. The tides all the ghosts. I would think that everyone would want to watch it with the lens that allows you to see the ghost. Well, yeah, I know but back then I just had a black and white TV. Oh, sure. And. One. I liked the, of course, was the house of lax, you know, where the heroine vegan, the young girl, you know. She was finally supposedly being you know, have have hot wax boiling. How wax poured over her? You know? For young young man was also a big three D movie. Also. Which one was that the Mr Lobo house of wax was was the first three D movie as far as I know. Do they still do? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I max has a lot of major blockbusters are all simultaneously created in three d it's not the red blue three d it's not the Antic with three D. It's the whole rice three. Let's go to Cleveland, Ohio Sandra's with us east of the Rockies. Hello, sandra. How many times I've tried to call this wonderful? You got through this time. I'm glad you're here. Wondered if you knew at all in your radio travels a man named Bill Cargill from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Oh, chilly. Billy card. Jelly, absolutely. Was one of the great horror hosts in Pittsburgh. He of course, did radio for years after his television days, and he's also forever immortalized in night of the living dead as as television, one of the one of the guys going around with the posse at the very end of the movie he is involved with that as as a television reporter. So he actually has a role in one of the most famous or movies of all time. But the reason they put him in that movie is because he was there horror host. And he they grew up watching him. Did you know him, Sandra? I well only through the TV that I felt like knowing you grew up with him. Didn't you? You grew up watching him. Yeah. It was like thank goodness. My sister-in-law. I had a one bedroom asleep found. I'd love it was he was he was he was one of the normal guys. He did not dress up like a vampire, Google or anything like that. He was usually like in a tuxedo or turtleneck, and and, but he did show the horror movies, and he was very quick on his feet. Very very very funny naturally funny in my pal. Of course, more guests who originated in the world liens they ended up hiring him in Detroit. And I'd come running home from school every day. Mr Lobo just to watch him. 'cause he would do these Zanny little weather bits around some kind of science project. Everything always went wrong. Everything went wrong with his science thing. I feel so bad for Borges. When is he going to get an experiment that actually I know it he came in the studio here a couple of years ago. My staff flew him here for the hall of wonderful. And he wanted me to gonna fly, Mr Lobo. They might do that the mortgage. Wanted to do an experiment with him. And he said that he had developed a force field that he could put around. So he told me to smack him in the mouth, and I said, I am not gonna hit you in the mouth mortgages. And he said, George, it'll work it'll work Georgian work. So he put this force field around him. Of course, you can't see it. Yes. He said now hit me hit me right here right here in the mouth, and I knocked out his tooth. Oh, wow. That guy is amazing. Is absolutely amazing. What a treasure one of the all-time. Great hor Tracy's with us truck. Driving in Mississippi high trace go ahead. George. Thank you for taking my call, actually, your previous caller me to chilly Billy that was that. I. He was huge people loved him. He was I I have an autographed picture of him. Every time. I do monster bash and picks, Pittsburgh, which is the big convention there in in Butler, or sometimes it's in Mars, Pennsylvania. But in that area near Pittsburgh. Every single person comes up to me and says, oh, okay. You're doing a chilly. Billy cart daily. Is he still alive or is he gone? He's passed. But you know, he used to do those all those conventions up until up until the year. He passed he was at all those shows signing autographs shaking hands, you know, really very very good to his fans had a smile and a joke for every single fan, and and kept his energy up well into his later years in most of those days, they didn't have the capability of videotaping. No, what they used to do as they used to do something Kyle Kennedy scope, which they take a picture of a picture, right? It would be a video camera shooting a film camera shooting video image, and then recording it onto film. It's too bad. We lost some great things videotape was too expensive. So a lot of a lot of those. In those days, you not exist. I think there's maybe just a few minutes of a vampire a few minutes of of Google arty. A lot of those even Bob Wilkins who was in the seventies. It was my horror host, you know, they only have like a handful of complete shows most of that stuff got your Boca raced. You remember soupy sales. Now, he wasn't a horror host. But he he started in Detroit. Did a show. There got picked up by a BBC went to Los Angeles. And then became a superstar was very influential to horror hosts, though, I think the kids show hosts were were very influential to horror hosts, I think is very similar line of work in Spain Guli who's really popular right now out of Chicago. He does a lot of bits that are right out of soupy sales. Where you've got like he's talking to like to just stick your leading hand of a person that you don't see that's very soupy sales. And you know, he used to host after between, Jack and Johnny Carson. He do the tonight show once in a while. Oh, relate philan-. I never knew that rate to see. I would love to see him. Do. He's a funny guy. He had great characters and fast, fast, fast, and funny. Very very quick. Good improv Mark in Lincoln Nebraska's with us now. Go ahead, Mark. Oh, your drinks. Mark. Yeah. Trying to longtime ago I gave up for a while finally got through. Yeah. Yeah. One of the guys beaming to it that I met him. And I got his autograph in Lincoln doctors sanguinary. Nebraska, Dr sanguinary. Absolutely. And there is another generation of doctors sanguinary, not the same person. But some that character still continues today. Got his autograph in a picture and stuff when I was a little kid. And then I remember macabre. And there was there was a couple of other ones. I can't remember their names longtime ago after that. But yeah. And in a couple of the movies. I remember that a classic. Let's see one of them were called that blood relations. You remember that? I don't blood relations. Tell me more. I have to VHS. Well, I've seen it one time. And then I I took me a long time to find a VHS. But it's I can't think of the guy's name. But he's I think he's gone by now, but he was he was in the same era is price. He was the guy had a mustache kinda he's on a lot of the old creepy classic horror movies. I think he was on the house of wax to maybe or something he was an older guy. Okay. And and but he was the dad and there was there. His son brought home his fiancee, a real real pretty girl. And his dad was jealous and are being in his wife. Ways dying of something to think brain cancer. So and it was kinda weird because and this was his son who brought home look the girl. Right. Right. And so so so after I mean, basically yet the in the movie, then you find out what what was the plan, but they had a plan. I guess and later on you found out the sun was sort of in on the plan to and I guess during the movie and his dad sort of had like, a, you know, a thing with his girlfriend, and then at the end of the movie.

horror host Mr Lobo Pittsburgh Alfred Hitchcock Billy card Google Detroit rod Serling Pennsylvania George Sandra brain cancer Greg sharp William castle Cleveland Boise Bob Wilkins Tampa
"bob wilkins" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And we're back with Mr Lobo. What did you think of the twilight zone series, Mr Lobo the originals the original twilight zone? I mean, it's amazing. I mean, I think that they never get old and rewatch ability is incredible. I I watch those episodes over and over and over again, and they just never be never get old. And rod sterling his stuff was so sharp as he was just such a keen observer of human nature and a great host rod Serling is kind of a horror host, really. Yeah. He was the way he'd come out and everything else. Indeed it, but it wasn't a horror flicks. No, all of it was all magic nation. That was really what the twilights they had messages behind every show. Absolutely. Absolutely. I think it was it was a great way to use fantasy as a metaphor for the human condition. What about the Alfred Hitchcock mystery the're remember got presents was good too? Outer limits was good to twilight zone was better. But I think Alfred Hitchcock was great too. And he was like. His presentation was very horror host like I love when he was talking about his headache remedy, and it could be taken in a tiny capsule. And then he just starts putting bullets on the desk in front of them. I mean, what about science fiction theatre remember that science course, science fiction, which did not have a host. No, it did not it just started. And they just started. But a great news an anthology, a wonderful anthology show. How come those shows don't work anymore? Anthologies are tough. Because again, it's every every week. It's a different show. And I think that you know, I think now all the shows are so Papua's because that's the way they keep they continue from one to the next breaking bad and all that. Yeah. So I think it's this new twilight zone. It would be a whole they're doing a new tales from the crypt at a new twilight zone. So hopefully, you know, we're cutting back to to be able to do that. But you have to have an audience. Oh, black near is a good modern. I'm good. What do you think of that show? Yeah. I like it. I don't not always in the mood for it. Because it's so dark. It's like, yeah. I get it technologies. Terrible. And it's making us horrible. But you know, I don't know if I want to hear that story every week. But it's you know, the the they had to choose your own adventure one. That was really kind of interesting called Bander snatch. There was one where there was a guy who was putting himself into a Star Trek type show using technology to kind of live out his fantasies, and and a lot of kind of things that's really strike home with with. Today's generation, and I think a lot of the stories like the twilight zone have something important to say about where we're at as socially and everywhere and as just as as human as humans, we're packed with call. So let's go to Greg in Tampa, Florida. Hey, greg. Go ahead, sir. All right. Yes. I have a couple of movies that I remember as a child. The original thirteen ghosts thirty also William Catholic thirteen ghosts who'd have the ghost viewer. If you looked into their I believe if you looked at the red one at meant you believe believe in ghosts. And we're looking at the blue lens, it meant that you didn't believe in go something like that. But you didn't see it was like a three d thing. They had the lion tamer that the lion and finally business head off. And then they had at the end of the movie the child a little boy, you know, is was being predicated upon and the way that he got rid of his is a dull adversary close. There was like a bet that came down and suffocated him at the movie. Right, right. You don't want. To watch that man. Bad like, they want to see the goes. That's what I wanna know. Pardon me. I would I would wonder who would wanna watch the movie with the lens? The tides all the ghosts. I would think that everyone would want to watch it with the lens that allows you to see the ghosts. Well, yeah, I know, but, you know, back then I just had a black and white TV. Oh, sure. Then the other one I liked the, of course, was house of lax, you know, where the heroine Veon, the young girl, you know, she was finally supposedly being you know, we have have hot wax, boiling, hot wax sport over her. You know, for young young man big was also a big movie, also which one was at the Mr. level house of wax was was the first three D movie as far as I know. Do they still do three d? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. You know, I max has a lot of major blockbusters are all simultaneously created in three d it's not the red blue three d it's not the three D. It's the polarized three. D let's go to Cleveland, Ohio Sandra's with us east of the Rockies. Hello, sandra. Hello. How many times I tried to call this one you got through this time? I'm glad you're here. I wondered if you knew at all in your radio travels a man named milk Cargill from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Oh, chilly. Billy car deli. Absolutely. Yeah. He was one of the great horror hosts in Pittsburgh. He of course, did radio for years after his television days, and he's also forever immortalized in night of the living dead as as a television, one of the one of the guys going around with the posse at the very end of the movie he is involved with that as a as a tour television reporter. So he actually has a role in one of the most famous or movies of all time. But the reason they put him in that movie is because he was there horror host. And he they grew up watching him. Did you know him, Sandra? I well only through the TV that I felt like you grew up with him. Didn't you? You grew up watching him again. It was like thank goodness my sister. And I had a one bedroom asleep. I'd love it was he was one of the he was he was one of the normal guys. He did not dress up like a vampire or Google or anything like that. He was usually like in a tuxedo or turtleneck, and and, but he did show the horror movies, and he was very quick on his feet. Very very very funny naturally funny. My pal, of course, more guests who originated in New Orleans. They ended up hiring him in Detroit. And I'd come running home from school every day. Mr Lobo just to watch him because he would do these Zanny little weather bits around some kind of science project. Everything always wondering on everything went wrong with his science thing. I feel so bad for Borges. When is he going to get an experiment that actually I know it he came in the studio here a couple years ago. My staff flew him here for the hall of wonderful. And he wanted me to gonna fly Mr Lobo mortgage wanted me to do an experiment with him. And he said that he had developed a force field that he could put around himself. So he told me to smack him in the mouth. And I said I am not going to hit you in the mouth mortgages in. He said, George, it'll work it'll work Georgian work. So so he put this force field around him. Of course, you can't see it. Yes. And he said now hit me hit me right here right here in the mouth, and I knocked out his tooth. Oh, wow. That guy is amazing. Is absolutely amazing. What a treasure one of the all time. Great hor Tracy's with us truck. Driving in Mississippi high trace go ahead. George. Thank you for taking my call actually, your previous caller baby to chilly. Billy. That was that. I. He was huge people loved. He was I I have an autographed picture of him. Every time. I do monster bash picks, Pittsburgh, which is a big convention there in in Butler, or sometimes it's in Mars, Pennsylvania. But in that area near Pittsburgh. Every single person comes up to me and says, oh, okay. You're doing a chilly. Billy cart daily. He's he's still alive. Or is. He gonna know he's passed. But you know, he used to do those all those conventions up until up until the year. He passed he was at all those shows signing autographs shaking hands, you know, really very very good to his fans had a smile and a joke for every single fan and kept his energy up well into his later years in most of those days, they didn't have the capability of videotaping. No, what they used to do as they used to do something Kenneth scope, which they take a picture of a picture, right? It would be a video camera shooting a film camera shooting video image and then records. It onto film. It's too bad. We lost some great things videotape was too expensive. So a lot of a lot of those in those days, you're not exist. I think there's maybe just a few minutes of vampire a few minutes of of Google arty. A lot of those even Bob Wilkins who was in the seventies. It was my horror host, you know, they only have like a handful of complete shows. Most of that stuff. Got your bulk erased, you remember soupy sales. Now, he wasn't a horror host. But he he started in Detroit. Did a show. There got picked up by a BBC went to Los Angeles. And then became a superstar was very influential to horror hosts, though, I think the kids show hosts were were very influential to hor hosts, I think is very similar line of work in Spain Guli who's really popular right now out of Chicago. He does a lot of bits that are right out of sales. Where you've got like he's talking to like just just sticky relating hand of a person that you don't see that's very soupy sales. And you know, he used to host after between Jack Bauer and Johnny Carson. He do the tonight show once in a while. Oh, relate philan-. I never knew that rate to see. I would love to see him do the he's a funny guy. He had great characters fast fast, fast and funny. Very very quick. Could improv Mark in Lincoln Nebraska's with us now. Go ahead, Mark. Hey, your drinks. Mark. Yeah. Trying a long time ago. I gave up for a while finally got through. Yeah. Yeah. One of the guys beaming that I I met him. And I got his autograph in Lincoln doctors sanguinary. Nebraska, Dr sanguinary. Absolutely. And there is another generation of doctors sanguinary, not the same person. But some of that character still continues today. Yeah. I got his autograph and picture and stuff when I was a little kid. And then I remember macabre. And there was there was a couple of other ones. I can't remember their names longtime ago after that. But yeah. And then a couple of the movies. I remember that are classics. Let's see one of them was called blood relations. You remember that? I don't blood relations. Tell me more. I have the VHS. Well, I've seen it one time. And then I I took me a long time to find a VHS. But it's got I can't think of the guy's name. But he's I think he's gone by now, but he was he was in the same era is Vincent Price. He was the guy had a mustache. And he's kinda he's on a lot of the old creepy. Classic. Harmless. He's I think he was on the house of wax to maybe or something he was an older guy. Okay. And and but he was the dad, and there was a there was a his son bought home his fiancee, a real real pretty girl and his dad with jealous and are being in his wife ways, dying of something too. I think brain cancer. So and it was kind of weird because this was his son who brought home look the girl. Right. Right. And so so so after I mean, basically, yet the end of the movie, then you found out what what was the plan, but they had a plan. I guess and later on you found out the sun was sort of in on the plan to and I guess during the movie and his dad sort of had like a, you know with his girlfriend and then. At the end of the movie,.

horror host Mr Lobo Pittsburgh Alfred Hitchcock Billy Google Detroit Sandra Pennsylvania rod Serling George Mark Greg brain cancer Papua Vincent Price Cleveland Bob Wilkins Tampa
"bob wilkins" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"AM is on KOA, NewsRadio eight fifty AM and ninety four one FM. And we're back with Mr Lobo. What did you think of the twilight zone series, Mr Lobo the originals the original twilight zone? I mean, it's amazing. I mean, I think that they never get old and rewatch ability is incredible. I I watch those episodes over and over and over again, and they just never be never get old. And rod sterling his stuff was so sharp, and he was just such a keen observer of human nature and a great host. I mean, rod sterling is kind of a horror host, really. Yeah. He was the way he'd come out and everything else. Indeed it, but it wasn't a horror flicks. No, all it was all imagination. That was really what the toilet. They had messages behind every show. Absolutely. Absolutely. I think it was it was a great way to use fantasy as a metaphor for the human condition. What about the Alfred Hitchcock mystery the're remember that got presents was good to outer limits was good to twilight zone was better. But I think Alfred Hitchcock was great too. And he was like his presentation was very horror host like I love when he was talking about his headache remedy and that could be taken in a tiny capsule. And then he just starts putting bullets on the desk in front of them. I mean, what about science fiction theatre remember that signs, of course, science fiction, which did not have a host. No, it did not it just started. They just started. But a great who's an anthology wonderful anthology show. How come those shows don't work anymore? Anthologies are tough. Because again, it's every every week. It's a different show. And I think that you know, I now all the shows are soap operas because that's the way they keep they continue from one to the next breaking bad and all that. Yeah. So I think it's this new twilight zone. It would be a whole other doing a new tales from the crypt at a new twilight zone. So hopefully, you know, we're cutting back to to be able to do that. But you have to have an audience. Oh, black nearer. Is a good a modern. What do you think of that show? You like it a great. Yeah. I like it. I don't not always in the mood for it. Because it's so dark. It's like, yeah. I get it technologies. Terrible. And it's making us horrible. But you know, I don't know if I want to hear that story every week. But it's you know, the they had to choose your own adventure one that was really kind of. Interesting called Bander snatch. There was one where there was a guy who was putting himself into a Star Trek type show using technology to kind of live out his fantasies, and and a lot of kind of things it's really strike home with with today's generation. And I and I think a lot of the stories like the twilight zone have something important to say about where we're at as socially and everywhere and as just as human as humans, we're packed with calls. So let's go to Greg in Tampa, Florida. Hey, greg. Go ahead, sir. All right. Yes. Have a couple of movies that I remember trials. The original thirteen ghosts thirty also William castle thirteen ghosts have the ghost viewer. If you look into their I believe if you look in the red one at meant you belie believed in ghosts. And we're looking at the blue lens meant that you didn't believe in ghosts something like that. But you didn't see it was like a three d thing. They had the lion tamer that the lion. And finally business had often. And then they had at the end of the movie the child a little boy, you know, is was being predicated upon and the way that he got rid of his is a dull adversary. I there was like a bet that came down and suffocated him. Right, right. You don't want to know is who. Don't watch that the land in like they want to see the goes. That's what I wanna know. Me. I was just I wonder who would wanna watch the movie with the lens. The tides all the goes, I would think that everyone would want to watch it with the lens. It allows you to see the ghost. Well. Yeah. But, you know, back then I just had a black and white TV. Oh, sure. Then we'd other one I liked the, of course, was the house of wax. You know, where the heroine vegan, the young girl, you know, she was finally supposedly being you know, we have have hot wax, boiling, hot wax, or it over her. You know? For young young, man. Big was also a big three D movie. Also. Which one was at the Mr Lobo house of wax was was the first three D movie as far as I know. Do they still do three d? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. You know, I max has a lot of major walk busters are all simultaneously created it in three d it's not the red blue three d it's not the with three D. It's the polarized three. D let's go to Cleveland, Ohio Sandra's with us east of the Rockies. Hello, sandra. Hello. Oh, how many times I tried to call me? Well, you got through this time. Glad you're here. I wondered if you knew at all in your radio travels a man named Bill Cargill from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Oh, chilly. Billy cart deli. Absolute. He was one of the great horror hosts in Pittsburgh. He of course, did radio for years after his television days, and he's also at forever immortalized in night of the living dead as as a television, one of the one of the guys going around with the posse at the very end of the movie he is involved with that as a as a television reporter. So he actually has a role in one of the most famous or movies of all time. But the reason they put him in that movie is because he was there horror host. And he they grew up watching him. Did you know him, Sandra? I well only through the TV that I yeah, you felt like you knowing you grew up with him. Didn't you? You grew up watching him Dakhil. Yeah. It was like thank goodness my sister. And I had a one bedroom asleep found. I'd love it was he was one of the he was he was one of the normal guys. He did not dress up like a vampire or Google or anything like that. He was usually like in a tuxedo or turtleneck, and and, but he did show the horror movies, and he was very quick on his feet. Very very very funny naturally funny. In my pal. Of course, more guests who originated in New Orleans. They ended up hiring him in Detroit. And I'd come running home from school every day. Mr Lobo just to watch him because he would do these Zanny little weather bits around some kind of science project. Everything always went wrong. Everything went wrong with his science things. I feel so bad for Borges. When is he going to get an experiment that actually I know it he came in the studio here a couple years ago. My staff flew him here for the holiday wonderful. And he wanted me to gonna fly Mr Lobo, they might do that. But the mortgage wanted me to do an experiment with him. And he said that he had developed a force field that he could put around him. So he told me to smack him in the mouth. And I said, I am not going to hit you in the mouth mortgages any said, George it'll work it'll work George, so he put this. Feel around him. Of course, you can't see it. Yes. He said now hit me hit me right here right here in the mouth, and I knocked out his tooth. Oh, wow. That guy is amazing. Is absolutely amazing. What a treasure one of the all-time great horror Tracy's with us truck. Driving in Mississippi high trace go ahead. George. Thank you for taking my call. Actually, your previous caller beat me to chilly Billy that was that. I. Man, he knew he was huge people loved. He was I have an autographed picture of him. Every time. I do monster bash and picks, Pittsburgh, which is the big convention there in in Butler, or sometimes it's in Mars, Pennsylvania. But in in that area near Pittsburgh. Every single person comes up to me and says, oh, okay. You're doing a chilly. Billy cart daily. He's he's still alive. Or is. He gonna know he's passed. But you know, he used to do those all those conventions up until up until the year. He passed he was at all those shows signing autographs shaking hands, you know, really very very good to his fans had a smile and a joke for every single fan, and and kept his energy up well into his later years in most of those days, they didn't have the capability of videotaping. No, what they used to do as they used to do something Kyle Kennedy scope, which they take a picture of a picture, right? It would be a video camera shooting a film camera shooting a video image, and then recording it onto film. Yeah. It's too bad. We lost some great things videotape was too expensive. So a lot a lot of those. In those days, you not exist. I think there's maybe just a few minutes of L vampire a few minutes of of Google arty. A lot of those even Bob Wilkins who was in the seventies. It was my horror host, you know, they only have like a handful of complete shows. Most of that stuff. Got your bulk erased, you remember soupy sales. Now, he wasn't a horror host. But he he started in Detroit. Did a show. There got picked up by the Los Angeles. And then became a superstar was very influential to horror hosts, though, I think the kids show hosts were were very influential to horror host. I think is very similar line of work spend Guli who's really popular right now out of Chicago. He does a lot of bits that are right out of soupy sales. Where you've got like he's talking to like just sticky -lating hand of a person that you don't see that's very soupy sales. And you know, he used to host after between Jack Parr Johnny Carson. He do the tonight show once in a while. Oh, relate philan-. I never knew that right to see. I would love to see him. Do the funny guy. He had great characters fast fast, fast and funny. Very very quick. Could improv Mark in Lincoln Nebraska's with us now. Go ahead, Mark. Hey ratings Mark. Yeah. Trying a long time ago. I gave up for a while finally got through. Yeah. Yeah. One of the guys beaming. But I I met him. And I got his autograph in Lincoln doctors sanguinary. Nebraska, Dr sanguinary. Absolutely. And there's another generation of doctors sanguinary, not the same person. But some characters still continues today. Yeah. I got his autograph in a picture and stuff when I was a little kid. And then I remember macabre, and there was a couple of other ones. I can't remember their names longtime ago after that. But yeah. And then a couple of the movies. I remember that are classics. Let's see one of them was called blood relations. You remember that? I don't blood relations. Tell me more. I have.

horror host Mr Lobo Pittsburgh Alfred Hitchcock Google Billy Detroit Sandra Pennsylvania George Greg Nebraska William castle Cleveland Bob Wilkins Tampa Florida Mark Ohio Los Angeles
"bob wilkins" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:05 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on WTVN

"Hey, Lonnie taken away. Hey, what's up high? Georgia's good to hear you again. Oh, real fun. Fact, my name is Lonnie, and my parents actually got the name from Lonny Chapman. So there's that. Better than better than Lonnie Anderson. Yeah. Yeah. But I heard nothing. No, no, no, no, nothing's better than Lonnie Anderson. Well, if that was his name. True. That's true. But I wanted to bring up the the old horror hosts I grew up in the mid west. And I remember in the seventies. We had a gentleman named Dr sanguinary oh easily come out in a in a bloody Omaha. Nebraska omaha. Nebraska. Dr sanguinary then after he retired in the eighties. We gotta lady called macabre macabre wonderful. There's very a lot lot. Lot of ladies in the eighties after Elvira. I feel like every every there were a lot of it was another push for for lady horror hosts, including misty brew and a whole bunch of others. But they I spent many teenage nights up late watching macabre, and I'm sure good bad horror movies wonderful. Thank you for sharing macabre with us. I don't I'm not sure if I've heard of macabre before I like that name. Yeah. It's great. Vincent price. He was a great horror type actor wasn't. He. Absolutely one of the best room Saint Louis. And he was just that. He was great and Edward Scissorhands as the scientists. Professor, absolutely. He he hosted mystery that show on PBS for years. And of course, so many movies hundreds of mask of the red death fall. The house of usher return of the invisible man, which he carried that movie with his spectacular voice. So many so many so many so many, you know, a last man on earth. I mean, really Vincent Price was just. Just one of the best horror actors, and what's interesting like a lot of these guys is he thought he was coming to the end of end of his career as an older gentleman. But really that was the beginning of his career, and he gave us he was much more effective as an older actor, then he was as a younger thriller with Michael Jackson. No money for that. That was a cashless deal there. He did. He did the voice for Vincent pry for for the Vincent Price. Did the break down in the middle of the song where he darkness falls across the land. The midnight hour is close at hand creatures crawl in search of blood terror is your neighborhood. He did that whole break down in the middle. And they used it in the Michael Jackson song. And then as as his payment. He got a giant life sized painting of Michael Jackson in his you know, regale you didn't they give him a choice to see if he wanted a little commission of the total take. Elected not to take it. When I heard from David Delvalle is he did it as a favor, and and he got a painting as a as a as a bonus. And and then his his wife is like we got to get rid of this painting. And and and Winston prices like, oh, no, no. So he they just had a giant painting Vincent Price in their house somewhere. And he he worked right up until he died. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I think Edward Scissorhands was his last, and I I think he worked right up until he died he loved to work. And I think that you know, if you can spend your whole life doing something that you love, and and people appreciate why not wasn't he in the original house on the haunted hill. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. He was he was the mastermind and. Invited everyone to the house on haunted hill and promptly got them all drunk and gave them guns because that's what you do. When you got ghosts. Next up. Let's go to Johnny in Augusta Georgia before the break. Welcome to the show, Johnny go ahead. Yes. Hey, this is Johnny in Augusta. Good to talk to you, George. You too, sir. Right. I was gonna tell you this you probably could've told the story better in your own words, but we had a count just insane. That was our local. Justin sane. That's not. Yes. I like it. Yeah. Yeah. It was always the horror host, right? They're always have the punny names. He had the name. But in the in the somewhat, you know, hey, Dan on this Michael Jackson note. But you know, he had demise years later about ten years ago matter of fact. Convicted for. You're breaking up a little bit at the you're saying that he was a pedophilia. Is that is that what we're going with this? I would not going there. Okay. Good. San Francisco and San Diego, they had a show called disaster piece theater. Do you remember that? Yes. I do. Remember that vaguely skits and everything. Yeah. Absolutely. Of course, I always watch creature features with Bob Wilkins. But yeah, there were a lot of other ones going on. There was I forgot the one with as Modi. Yes. But he was another bay area or host, and there was Whitey Gleason who hosted frightened night theater. There's just a ton of them. I love these names. They came up with. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. All lot of them. Have a great great Honey names like Mt. Graves and stuff like that is not a bad name either. Bob fast is the best twentieth anniversary. And of course, the meteorite fell to earth in nineteen fifty eight and the came out, and of course, well at the end of the movie they freeze it, right? They send it to the Antar tick. And I love the line at the end of the movie, which always gets a laugh today, which is you know, we'll be safe as long as the Arctic stays call. Exactly. We're going to be back with final calls with Mr. logo on coast-to-coast..

Michael Jackson Lonnie Anderson Vincent price Vincent Price Johnny Edward Scissorhands Bob Wilkins Nebraska Dr sanguinary Omaha Lonny Chapman horror host Georgia Vincent Justin sane Elvira Arctic Saint Louis Professor
"bob wilkins" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on KTRH

"We had a gentleman named Dr sanguinary oh, easily come out in a in a bloody. Brassica Omaha Nebraska Docker sanguinary and then after he retired in the eighties. We gotta lady called macabre macabre wonderful very a lot of ladies in the eighties after Elvira. I feel like every every there were a lot of it was another push for for lady horror hosts, including misty brew and a whole bunch of others. But they spent many teenage nights up late watching macabre. And so I'm sure good bad horror movies wonderful. Thank you for sharing macabre with us. I don't I'm not sure if I've heard of macabre before I like that name. Yeah. It's great. Vincent price. He was a great horror type actor wasn't. He. Absolutely one of the best from Saint Louis. And he was just that. He was great and Edward Scissorhands as the scientists. Professor, absolutely. He he hosted mystery that show on TV s for years, and of course, so many movies hundreds of mask of the red death fall. The house of usher return of the invisible man, which he carried that movie with his spectacular voice. So many so many so many so many, you know, a a last man on earth. I mean, really Vincent Price was just. Just one of the best horror actors, and what's interesting like a lot of these guys is he thought he was coming to the end of end of his career as an older gentleman. But really that was the beginning of his career, and he gave us he was much more effective as an older actor than he was a younger thriller with Michael Jackson. Video no money for that. That was a cashless deal there. He did he did the voice for Vincent pry for for the Vincent Price. Did the break down in the middle of the song where he darkness falls across the land. The midnight hour is close at hand reaches crawl in search of blood the terror is your neighborhood. He did that whole spray down in the middle. And they used it in the Michael Jackson song. And then as his as his payment. He got a giant life sized painting. Michael Jackson in his, you know, regalia didn't they give him a choice to see if he wanted a little commission of the total take. Elected not to take it. What I heard from David Delvalle is he did it as a favor, and and he got a painting as a as a as a bonus. And and then his his wife is like we had to get rid of this painting and wins the price prices. Like, oh, no know. So he they just had a giant painting of Vincent Price in their house somewhere in. He he worked right up until he died, didn't he? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I think Edward Scissorhands was his last, and I think he worked right up until he died he loved to work. And I think that you know, if you can spend your whole life doing something that you love, and and people appreciate why not wasn't he in the original house on the haunted hill. Oh, yep. -solutely? He was he was the mastermind, and you know, he invited everyone to the house on haunted hill and promptly got them all drunk and gave them guns because that's what you do. When you've got ghosts. Let's go to Johnny in Augusta Georgia before the break. Welcome to the show, Johnny go ahead. Yes. Hey, this is Johnny and Augusta. Good to talk to you, George. You too, sir. Yeah. I was gonna tell you this you probably could've told the story veteran. Your own words that we had count just insane. That was our local just insane. That's nice. I like it. Yeah. Yeah. Always the ponds with the horror host rate. They're always had the punny names. He had the name but in the in the somewhat. Yeah. Hey end on this Michael Jackson note. But you know, he had demise years later about ten years ago. Matter of fact. Convicted for. Yeah. Exactly, you're breaking up a little bit at the you're saying that he was a pedophilia. Is that is that what we're going with this? I would not going there. Okay. Good. San Francisco and San Diego, they had a show called disaster piece theater. Do you remember that? Yes. I do. Remember that vaguely diskettes and everything. Yeah. Absolutely. Of course, I always watch creature features with Bob Wilkins. But yeah, there were a lot of other ones going on. There was I forgot the one with as Modi. Yes. But he was another bay area or host, and there was Whitey Gleason who hosted frightened night theater. There's just a ton of them. I love these names. They came up with further. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. They're all a lot of them. Have a great great Honey names like Mt. Graves and stuff like that is not a bad name either. Bob fast is the best twentieth anniversary. And of course, the meteorite fell to earth in nineteen fifty eight and came out. And of course, well at the end of the movie they freeze it, right? They send it to the anti Arctic. And I love the line at the end of the movie, which always gets a laugh today, which is you know, we'll be safe as long as the Arctic stays cold. Exactly. We're going to be back with final calls with Mr Lobo on coast.

Vincent price Michael Jackson Edward Scissorhands Bob Wilkins Johnny Dr sanguinary Elvira horror host Mr Lobo Arctic Saint Louis Professor Graves Mt David Delvalle Augusta Georgia George Augusta Whitey Gleason
"bob wilkins" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on KTRH

"To coast to coast, Mr. logo with us. I'll tell ya, Mr Lobo. A funny story about the Patrick Wilson who was an insidious the conjuring and a number of other films back in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine a television news director in Saint Louis, and my anchorperson was a fellow by the name of John Wilson. Yeah. A little six year old boy who ended up being Patrick will. Small world. That is incredible. He moved off to Florida with his parents. His mother is a Boyce teacher Mary Kay, and the father was a television anchorman. It's cool. Incredible. You know, a lot of these these television personalities, the anchorman and stuff a lot of them ended up being or hosts Bob Wilkins was the weatherman in and he was my horror host. He was the weatherman on channel two, and he was horror host, Richard writes me from canton, Ohio, he said I used to watch a fellow by the name of Guli. Artie. I Google Lardy. Yes. In the Anderson. Yup. That's right. Exactly. Most famously known as the voice of ABC the love that was him. How 'bout that? He would green screen himself into some of these old black and white films in this guy. Here says he made it even funnier than the original movie. Yeah. Yes. There's a there's a famous one. I'm not sure if it was hammers accurately, but he's leaning on a building. And then the scene changes and he's leaning on the fifty foot woman by mistake. I love it. All right. Let's take some calls here. We've got calls this hour with Mr Lobo. Eugene Logan is with us in Eugene, Oregon. Here we go hide Logan what welcome to the program. Hi there. How are you guys in tonight? So I wanted to bring up the influence on music and horror movies such as punk rock bands. Like, the misfits and music like psych really the cramps. I love the cramps and the meteors and all that stuff. Absolutely. You know, definitely. And there's a whole off shoot where it's all horrid where there's a horror punk offshoot of that kind of music. I worked actually on a movie called the ranger this year, which was a punk r- a movie about a bunch of punk rockers getting killed by a park ranger. And you know, there's definitely always a connection between music and movies. And I think they influence each other. I think return of the living dead is probably the ultimate punk rock horror movie. We didn't talk about slasher movie, just like chainsaw and things like that. You've talked about Texas chainsaw massacre. Which is interesting if you watch that film because really there's there's there's hardly any blood in it. There's hardly any. I don't think there's any bit harsh language in that movie. But it's so disturbing it you think you see, and you think you hear a lot more than you actually do. Well, that's true. It makes you really once like psycho psycho, exactly psycho has a psycho. And it's time had the same heavy rep that chainsaw massacre. You never saw the knife stabbed into the woman in the shower never entered her what you thought you felt it exactly. Next up Nancy in Victoria, Texas. Welcome to the program. Hi nance. Right. Hey, good to have you with us. Go ahead. Thank you. First of all, I gotta say this the last movie that I watched. I watch recently was the twenty eighteen a version of Halloween. Okay. Yes. I did too. I enjoyed it. I have a question. What what sister logos? Take on the new the newer movies that are out right now. But just get out and other scary, Phil scary movies that are. Subliminal? We are a little bit poetical and Elaine. Yes. Well, there's that's been going on for a little while. Now, I think there's a I think the purge films. There's an enters get out. And then I understand like what you're saying with with those films in particular. I think the guy from key and peo- which I always forget if he's key or if he's peo-, but he's rebooting the twilight zone as as the host. You know? I mean, I think that I think that horror films always sort of do reflect the times and always do kind of have underlying political. I mean, all the fifties horror movies. We thought that reds were hiding under our basements, or whatever. So I think it's just an ongoing thing of of whatever people are afraid of and right now people are afraid of politics. I'll tell you that what about the Walking Dead series. They seem to have a life of its own. Does it? I mean, it's interesting because it is kind of a still following the night of the living dead kind of template. I think it's because we're interested in the characters in the stories, and to be honest, you're talking about where the western went. I. Think that a lot of western stories have all been converted into samba stories, you know, instead of shooting at Indians a shooting at zombies what made the horror genre. So popular in its day. Well, you know, there's other. There's definitely a lot of cycles. I think the first cycle was the thirties with Dracula, and Frankenstein, and that's because universal had a very young president. You know, so university he he wanted to see more horror content, and they made it, and you know, then things got conservative for a while. And the cycle didn't come back into the late forties with the Wolfman. And then it got kind of conservative again for a while. And then and then in the sixties when trying to compete with television, the the movies got rougher and scarier leading up into the seventy s with films like the exorcist and so on where you're not gonna see that on TV at least not uncut. So, you know, I think that there's there's definitely cycles with horror films, and I think we're in another or cycle. What are the demographics for movie attendance? You know, I think that they probably skew older, you know. But it's weird because I think it's it's probably younger and older. Right. People who are still going to movies who used to be a cheap date. Yeah. It's not a cheap date anymore. No. It's not I like to go on Tuesdays when it's half price. What is what is the movie cost these years since bucks? Sometimes really. Yeah. Yes. Five. Tuesday's when it's six bucks. But why what six bucks is still high six bucks is still high. Yeah. I mean, what happened to you'll laugh you'll cry you'll kiss sick three bucks? Goodbye is really what it should be. I think it's interesting. We're talking about people not going to the movies. I think if it was cheaper. Honestly, I feel like a lot of people would go I feel like it's you know, it's just to get away from everything, you know. I I was giving a speech before we show a movie, it's like you don't have to turn off your cell phones. You get to turn off your cell phones. You get to be away from the internet for two hours and have a vacation or just put it away stuff. Go a lot of people still send text messages for movies. I don't get it. You know? I'm I'm I feel like I I'm sorry. I didn't couldn't answer your call. I was watching a movie skews next up victor's with a sulphur springs, Texas, east of the Rockies. Hi, victor. Your you're Mr. we'll my up in the north west when I was a kid channel seven CBS. It was the Cairo count. The Cairo count. Tell me all about who's the host. I remember I don't remember his name. But he was like the she e o of that CBS affiliate. He was the CEO. And then he put on. The Dracula Cape and hosted the movies. I love it. Yeah. Another question. I have a relative. I'm sure you'll probably figure about. He was in the beam horror movies, and I can't remember, but he starred as the sheriff, and the Redfern grows was that the name of the movie. Know he was in several hundreds, but that was the name of the movie where the red fern grows. I can't remember who the sheriff was in that right now. Up the kids from trying to steal that kid dogs. Yeah. Yeah. I'm vaguely. I I remember watching Lonnie Lonny Chapman was the sheriff. Thank you for that. Thank your staff for that. Hey, I did it on my own. You did. All right. Then I thank you, George. You're always on top Victor. That's the name of your relatives. All right. Thank you, guys Chapman. There. You gone Chapman, the great Lonny Chapman as the sheriff in where the Redfern grow. I do have a great staff, by the way, Mr. LeBow, and they have on many occasions that talk to me quickly in my ear. But in this case, I got that on my best whenever I'm talking when his Tom or Stephanie, or at least I was still like I'm in excellent hands. Your staff is the best speaking Thompsons Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Hi thomas. George. Thank you for taking my call. I remember here in California there was science fiction theater. And I'm not sure who the host was. But nothing George can answer that that was his favorite show. Yeah. I was always very creepy. I mean, it was a staff host. So there was a different science fiction theater. Then right. Yes question. I had for you. Mr Lobo Sarah, say director in Canada who has a cult following. David Kranenburg, O F movies like scanners. Video drome. Deborah, Harry, and James woods. Fly with Jeff Goldblum. Absolutely. Creeps up on you. It's like the movie you realize oh my goodness. You know, this is getting serious all of his movies, again seem to fall into what what what's called body horror where it's things that are happening to us physically. And it's a little scary with that. And I think especially in the eighties with with aids and everything that was happening with that. I think it really played on our fears of getting sick or something happening to us to somebody doing something to west in all his films seem to have this kind of underlying creepy -ness of something happening to your body. Scanners has that shiver which is another one of his has that fly. Of course, he completely you Tate's into the flying. It's very graphic. But Kronen Burke is definitely an artist. Certainly I mean, either nobody makes a movie like that guy. And you know, even though they're they're disturbing. They're always very well acted and well well-made, here's a little trivia question for you Thomas. What was the name? Of the fly in the movie. Oh my goodness. That that's a good question. Yeah. I think I got that one give it a shot, Mr Lobo the Brundle flight. Yeah. That's right. Fly Seth Brundle, he became Brundle fly. Exactly. Thanks, tom. Appreciate it. And then, of course, in the original fly movie wasn't that a black and white? The return of the fly was black and white which doesn't make any sense because the original fly was in color. The first one was in color in the second which movie did the guy he was a little fly. But you could hear him go. Help me help me. Yeah. That was the fly original fly the original one. I'll always remember that. Yes. No lonnie's with us, Long Beach, California. Hey, Lonnie taken away. Hey, what's up high? Georgia's good to hear you again. Oh, real fun. Fact, my name is Lonnie, and my parents actually got the name from London Chapman. So there's that long world at better than better than Lonnie Anderson. Yeah. Oh, no, no, nothing's better than Lonnie Anderson. Well, it would be if that was his name. True. That's true. But I wanted to bring up the the old horror hosts I grew up in the midwest. And I remember in the seventies..

Mr Lobo Lonnie Lonny Chapman Lonnie Anderson horror host Texas lonnie Thompsons Thomas California Patrick Wilson Mr. LeBow director cramps CBS George Tom Eugene Logan Bob Wilkins Artie Mary Kay Cairo
"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Welcome back to coast to coast, Mr Lobo with us. I'll tell ya, Mr Lobo. A funny story about the Patrick Wilson who was an insidious the conjuring and a number of other films back in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine television, news director in Saint Louis, and my anchorperson was a fellow by the name of John Wilson. A little six year old boy who ended up being Patrick Wilson. Is that a small world that is incredible in he moved off to Florida with his parents. His mother is a Boyce teacher Mary Kay, and the father was television anchorman. It's cool. Incredible. You know, a lot of these these television personalities be anchorman and stuff a lot of them ended up being or hosts Bob Wilkins was the weather man in and he was my horror host. He was the weatherman on channel two, and he was horror host, Richard writes me from canton, Ohio, he said I used to watch a fellow by the name of Guli. Artie, artie. Yes. In the Anderson. Yup. That's right. Exactly. Most famously known as the voice of ABC the love that was him. How 'bout that? He would green screen himself into some of these old black and white films. In this guy. Here says he made it even funnier than the original movie. Yes, there's a there's a famous one. And I'm not sure if it was him Zachary, but he's leaning on a building. And then the scene changes and he's leaning on the fifty foot woman by mistake. I love it. All right. Let's take some calls here. We've got calls this hour with Mr Lobo. Eugene Logan is with us in Eugene, Oregon. Here we go hide Logan what welcome to the program. Hi there guys in tonight. So I wanted to bring up the influence on music and horror movies such as punk rock bands. Like, the misfits and as music like psych, really sure the cramps. I love the cramps and the meteors and all that stuff. Absolutely. You know, definitely. And there's a whole offshoot where it's all horrid where there's a horror punk offshoot of that kind of music. I worked actually on a movie called the ranger this year, which was a punk movie about a bunch of punk rockers getting killed by a park ranger. And you know, there's definitely always that connection between music and movies. And I think they influence each other. I think return of the living dead is probably the ultimate punk rock horror movie. We didn't talk about slasher movies like chainsaw and things like that. We didn't talk about Texas chainsaw massacre. Which is interesting. If you watch that film because really there's there's there's hardly any blood in it. There's hardly any. I don't think there's any bit harsh language in that movie. But it's so disturbing it you think you see, and you think you hear a lot more than you actually do. Well, that's true. It makes you really once like psycho. Yes, psycho exactly psycho has a cycle. And it's time had the same heavy rep that chainsaw massacre. You never saw the knife stabbed into the woman in the shower never entered her what you thought you felt it exactly. Next up Nancy in Victoria, Texas. Welcome to the program. Hi nance. Right. Hey, good to have you with us. Go ahead. First of all, I gotta say this is the last movie that I watched. I watch recently was the twenty eighteen of version of Halloween. Do you like it? Yes. I did too. I enjoyed it. I have a question. What what's sister Lobos? Take on the new the newer movies that are out right now. But just get out and other scary, Phil scary movies. That are bloom. Noli are a little bit poetical in a way. Yes. Well, there's that's been going on for a little while. Now, I think there's a I think the purge films. There's an inner get out. And then I understand like what you're saying with with those films in particular. I think the guy from key NPR, which I always forget if he's key or if he's peo-, but he's rebooting the twilight zone as as the host. You know? I mean, I think that I think that horror films always sort of do reflect the times and always do kind of have underlying political all the fifties horror movies. We thought that reds were hiding under our basements, or whatever. So I think it's just an ongoing thing of whatever people are afraid of and right now people are afraid of politics. I'll tell you what about the Walking Dead series. They seem to have a life of its own. Does it? I mean, it's interesting because it is kind of a still following the night of the living dead kind of template. I think it's because we're interested in the characters in the stories, and to be honest, you're talking about where the western went. I think that a lot of western stories have all been converted into samba stories, you know, instead of shooting at Indians a shooting at zombies what made the horror genre so popular in its day. Well, you know, there's other there's definitely a lot of cycles. I think the first cycle was the thirties with Dracula, and Frankenstein, and that's because universal had a very young president. You know, so university he he wanted to see more horror content, and they made it and then things got conservative for awhile in the cycle. Didn't come back into the later forties with the Wolfman, and then it got kind of conservative again for a while. And then and then in the sixties when trying to compete with television, the the movies got rougher and scarier leading up into the seventies. With phil. Like the exorcist. And so on where you're not gonna see that on TV at least not uncut. So, you know, I think that there's there's there's definitely cycles with horror films, and I think we're in another horse cycle. What are the demographics for movie attendance? You know, I think that they probably skew older, you know. But it's it's weird because I think it's it's probably younger and older. Right. People who are still going to the movies who well it used to be a cheap date. Yeah. It's not a cheap date anymore. No. It's not I I like to go on Tuesdays when it's half price. What is what does a movie cost these days a year since box? Sometimes really. Yeah. Yes. It used to be like five bucks on Tuesdays when it's six bucks. But that's still what six bucks is still high. So six bucks is still high. Yeah. I mean, what happened to you'll laugh you'll cry you'll kissing three bucks? Goodbye is really what it should be. I think it's interesting. They're talking about people not going to the movies. I think if it was cheaper. Honestly, I feel like a lot of people would go I feel like it's you know, it's just to get away from everything, you know. I I always give this speech before we show a movie, it's like, you don't have to turn off your cell phones. You get to turn off your cell phones. You get to be away from the internet for two hours and have a vacation or just put it away stuff. Go lot of people still send text messages for movies. I don't get it. You know? I'm I'm I feel way. It's like, I I'm sorry. I didn't couldn't answer your call. I was watching a movie. Next up victor's with a sulphur springs, Texas, east of the Rockies. Hi, victor. All right. Well, my. Up in the north west when I was a kid channel seven CBS. It was the Cairo count. The Cairo count. Tell me all about who's the host. I remember. Well, I don't remember his name. But he was like the she e o of that CBS affiliate. He was the CEO. And then he put on. The Dracula Cape and hosted the movies. I love it. Yeah. But I got another question. I have a relative, and I'm sure you'll probably figure out. He was in the beam horror movies and I count in numbers game. But each starred as the sheriff, and where the Redfern gross was that the name of the movie, but he was in several hundreds, but that was the name of the movie where the red fern grows. I can't remember who the sheriff was in that right now. Interrupt the kids from trying to steal that kid dogs. Yeah. Yeah. I'm vaguely. I remember watching Lonnie Lonny Chapman was the sheriff. Thank you for that. Thank you. Thank your staff for that. Hey, I did it on my own. Oh, you did. All right. Well, then I thank you, George. You're always on top. But Victor, that's the name of your relatives. All right. Well, thank you, guys Chapman. There you go Chapman the great Lonny Chapman as the sheriff in where the Redfern grow. I do have a great staff, by the way, Mr. LeBow, and they have on many occasions bat talk to me quickly in my ear. But in this case, I got that on my best whenever I'm talking with his Tom or Stephanie, or at least I was still like I'm in excellent hands. Your staff is the best. Speaking of Tom. There's Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Hi thomas. George. Thank you for taking my call. I remember here in California there was science fiction theater. And I'm not sure who the host was George can answer that that was his favorite show. Yeah. I was always very creepy. I mean, it was just a host. So there was a different science fiction theater. Then right. Yes question. I had for you, Mr Lobo. Yes. Sarah, say director in Canada who has a cult following. David Kranenburg o f movies like. Video Drome with Deborah, Harry, and James woods fly. What Jeff Goldblum? Absolutely. And. New, you know, it's like the movie you realize oh my goodness. This is getting serious all of his movies, again seem to fall into what what what's called body horror where things that are happening to us physically. And it's a little scary with that. And I think especially in the eighties with with aids and everything that was happening with that. I think it really played on our fears of getting sick or something happening to somebody doing something to us in all of his films seem to have this kind of underlying creepy -ness of it something happening to your body. Scanners has that shiver which is another one of his has that fly. Of course, he completely mutates into the fly. And it's very graphic. But Kronen Burke is definitely an artist. Certainly I mean, either nobody makes a movie like that guy. And you know, even though they're they're disturbing. They're always very well acted and well well-made, here's a little trivia question for you Thomas. What was the name? Of the fly in the movie. Oh my goodness. That that's a good question. Yeah. I think I got that one. Give it a shot, Mr Lobo the Brundle flight. Yeah. Fly Seth Brundle. He became Brundle fly. Exactly. Thanks, Tom appreciated. Then of course, in the original fly movie wasn't that a black and white? The return of the fly was black and white which doesn't make any sense because the original fly was in color. The first one was in color in the second which movie did did the guy he was a little fly. But you could hear him go. Help me help me. No. Yeah. That was the fly original fly the original one. I'll always remember that one is with us Long Beach, California L. Hey, Lonnie taken away. Hey, what's up high Georgia's good here? You're getting hey. Real fun. Fact, my name is Lonnie, and my parents actually got the name from Lonny Chapman. So there's that. Wow. All world at better than better than Lonnie Anderson. Yeah. Yeah. But I hear nothing. No, no, no, no, nothing's better than Lonnie Anderson. Well, it would be that was his name. True. That's true. But I wanted to bring up the the old horror hosts I grew up in the mid west. And I remember in the seventies. We had a gentleman named Dr sanguinary oh easily come out in a in a bloody Omaha..

Mr Lobo Lonnie Lonny Chapman Lonnie Anderson Texas horror host victor George Thomas Tom California phil Patrick Wilson director cramps Bob Wilkins Artie Brundle fly Eugene Logan Lonnie Mary Kay
"bob wilkins" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"To coast to coast, Mr Lobo with us. I'll tell ya, Mr Lobo. A funny story about the Patrick Wilson who was an insidious the conjuring and a number of other films back in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine television, news director in Saint Louis, and my anchorperson was a fellow by the name of John Wilson. A little six year old boy who ended up being Patrick Wilson. That a small world that is incredible in he moved off to Florida with his parents. His mother is a Boyce teacher Mary Kay, and the father was a television anchorman. It's cool. Incredible. You know, a lot of these these television personalities, the anchorman and stuff a lot of them ended up being or hosts Bob Wilkins was the weatherman in and he was my horror host. He was the weatherman on channel two. He was horror host Richard writes me from canton, Ohio, he said I used to watch a fellow by the name of Guli. Artie, artie. Yes. In the Anderson. Yup. That's right. Exactly. Most famously known as the voice of ABC the love boat that was him. How about that? He would green screen himself into some of these old black and white films. In this guy. Here says he made it even funnier than the original movie. Yes, there's a there's a famous one. And I'm not sure if it was hammers Ackerley, but he's leaning on a building. And then the scene changes and he's leaning on the fifty foot woman by mistake. I love it. All right. Let's take some calls here. We've got calls this hour with Mr Lobo. Eugene Logan is with us in Eugene, Oregon. Here we go hide Logan what welcome to the program. Hi, there are you guys in tonight. So I wanted to bring up the influence on music and horror movies such as punk rock bands. Like, the misfits and music like really sure the cramps. Love the cramps and the meteors and all that stuff. Absolutely. You know, definitely. And there's a whole offshoot where it's all horrid where there's a horror punk offshoot of of that kind of music. I worked actually on a movie called the ranger this year, which was a punk movie about a bunch of punk rockers getting killed by a park ranger. And you know, there's definitely always a connection between music and movies. And I think they influence each other. I think return of the living dead is probably the ultimate punk rock horror movie. We didn't talk about slasher movie, just like chainsaw and things like that. We've talked about Texas chainsaw massacre. Which is interesting if you watch that film because really there's there's there's hardly any blood in it. There's hardly any. I don't think there's any bit harsh language in that movie. But it's so disturbing that you think you see, and you think you hear a lot more than you actually do. Well, that's true. It makes you really once like psycho. Yes, psycho exactly psycho has a cycle. And it's time had the same heavy rep that chainsaw massacre. You never saw the knife stabbed into the woman in the shower never entered her what you thought you felt it exactly. Next up Nancy in Victoria, Texas. Welcome to the program. Hi nance. Hey, good to have you with us. Go ahead. I all I gotta say this the last movie that I watched. I watch recently was the twenty eighteen of version of Halloween. Did you like it? Yes. I did too. I enjoyed it. I have a question. What what's Mr. logos? Take on the new the newer movies that are out right now. But just get out and other scary. So scary movies that are. Noli are a little bit poetical a way. Yes. Well, there's that's been going on for a little while. Now, I think there's a I think the purge films. There's an inner is get out. And then I understand like what you're saying with with those films in particular. I think the guy from key. And which I always forget with he's key. Or if he's peo-, but he's rebooting twilight zone as as the host. You know? I mean, I think that I think that horror films always sort of do reflect the times and always do kind of have underlying political all the fifties horror movies. We thought that reds were hiding under our basements, or whatever. So I think it's just an ongoing thing of whatever people are afraid of and right now people are afraid of politics. I'll tell you that what about the Walking Dead series. They seem to have a life of its own. I mean, it's interesting because it is kind of a still following the night of the living dead kind of template. I think it's because. We're interested in the characters in the stories, and to be honest, you're talking about where the western went. I think that a lot of western stories have all been converted into these stories, you know, instead of shooting at Indians a shooting at zombies what made the horror genre. So popular in its day. Well, you know, there's other. There's definitely a lot of cycles. I think the first cycle was the thirties with Dracula, and Frankenstein, and that's because universal had a very young president. You know, so university he he wanted to see more horror content, and they made it, and, you know, then things got conservative for awhile in the cycle. Didn't come back into the later forties with the Wolfman, and then it got kind of conservative again for a while. And then and then in the sixties when trying to compete with television, the the movies got rougher and scarier at leading up into the seventy s with films like the exorcist, and so on where you're not gonna see that on TV at least not uncut, so, you know, I think that there's definitely cycles with horror films, and I think we're in another horror cycle, what are the demographics for movie attendance? You know, I think that they probably skew older, you know. But it's it's weird because I think it's it's probably younger and older. Right. People who are still going to the movies who used to be a cheap date. Yeah. It's not a cheap date anymore. No. It's not I like to go on Tuesdays when it's half price. What is what is the movie cost these days a year since fourteen bucks? Sometimes really. Yeah. Yeah. Five. Tuesday's when it's six bucks. But that's what six bucks is still high six bucks is still high. Yeah. I mean, what happened to you'll laugh you'll cry you'll kiss six three bucks? Goodbye is really what it should be. I think it's interesting. They're talking about people not going to the movies. I think if it was cheaper. Honestly, I feel like a lot of people would go I feel like it. You know, it's just to get away from everything, you know. I I always give this speech before we show a movie, it's like, you don't have to turn off your cell phones. You get to turn off your cell phones. You get to be away from the internet for two hours and have a vacation or just put it away stuff. Go a lot of people still send text messages for movies. I don't get it. You know? I'm I'm I feel it's like I I'm sorry. I didn't couldn't answer your call. I was watching a movie excuse next up victor's with a sulphur springs, Texas, east of the Rockies. Hi, victor. Your home. Sure, we'll my up in the north west when I was a kid channel seven CBS. It was the Cairo count. The Cairo count. Tell me all about the host remember, well, I don't remember his name. But he was like the CEO of that. CBS affiliate. He was the CEO. And then he put on. The Dracula Cape and hosted the movies. I love it. Yeah. But I got another question. I have a relative, and I'm sure you'll probably figure about. He was in the beam horror movies, and I count the numbers game. But he starred as the. The sheriff. And where the Redfern groves was that the name of the movie? But he was in several hundred either was the name of the movie where the red fern grows. I can't remember who the sheriff was in that right now. Yeah. Interrupt the kid from trying to steal that kid dogs. Yeah. Yeah. I'm vaguely. I remember watching Lonnie Lonny Chapman was the sheriff. Thank you for that. Thank you. Thank your staff for that. Hey, I did on my own. Oh, you did. All right. Then I thank you, George. You're always on top. But Victor, that's the name of your relative. All right. Well, thank you, guys Chapman. There you go Chapman the great Lonny Chapman as the sheriff in where the Redfern grow. I do have a great staff, by the way, Mr. LeBow, and they have on many occasion that talk to me quickly in my ear. But in this case, I got that on my best whenever I'm talking with his Tom or Stephanie, or at least I always feel like I'm in excellent hands. Your staff is the best. Speaking of TOMS, there's Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Hi, george. Thank you for taking my call. I remember here in California science fiction theater. And I'm not sure who the host was George can answer that that was established show. Yeah. I was always very creepy. I mean. There was a host. So there was a different science fiction theater. Then right. Yes question. I had for you, Mr Lobo. Yes. Sarah, say director in Canada. Who has a cult following David Kranenburg movie? Scanners video Drome with Deborah, Harry, and James woods fly. What Jeff Goldblum? Absolutely. Reaps up on you. You know? It's like, yeah. Title the movie, you realize oh my goodness. You know, this is getting serious all of his movies, again seem to fall into what what what's called body horror where it's things that are happening to us physically. And it's a little scary with that. And I think especially in the eighties with with aids and everything that was happening with that. I think it really played on our fears of getting sick or something happening to us to somebody doing something to us in all of his films seem to have this kind of underlying creeping of something happening to your body. Scanners has that shiver which is another one of his has that the fly? Of course, he completely mutates into the fly in it's very graphic. But Kronen Burke is definitely an artist. Certainly I mean, nobody makes a movie like that guy. And you know, even though they're they're disturbing. They're always very well acted and well well-made, here's a little. Trivia question for you Thomas. What was the name of the fly in the movie? Oh my goodness. That's a good question. Yeah. I think I got that one. Give it a shot, Mr Lobo the Brundle flight. Yeah. That's right. Fly Seth Brundle became frontal flies. Exactly. Thanks, tom. Appreciate it. And then, of course, in the original fly movie wasn't that a black and white? The the return of the fly was black and white which doesn't make any sense because the original fly was in color. The first one was in color in the second witch movie did the guy he was a little fly. But you could hear him go. Help me help me. No, no..

Mr Lobo Lonnie Lonny Chapman Texas horror host victor Patrick Wilson CBS cramps director Thomas Tom Bob Wilkins ABC Artie Eugene Logan George Mary Kay Saint Louis Anderson Florida
"bob wilkins" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"bob wilkins" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"All these all these comic books reading all the monster magazines seen the movies in a watching the the saturday night horror shows they're on tv for your creature features guide to kirk bob wilkins was bob wilkins right local horror hosts yep san francisco on the east side we had zach zach early well you know absolutely we lost recently yeah if act xactly pretty much had the best description for the type of music i play and he called it that plugged in music that plugged in to this day that description it's close to my heart you know very accurate it's apt i remember i grew up reading famous monsters film wind yes and i had two things that i bought from the magazine one frankenstein poster is that the poster that you still have yeah house yeah he's got an living room and in the magazine they make it like they're sending frankenstein to your home and then you go it's a poster by dow it's it's in a frame and all the ving room now i kept it for years the other thing i have also complete ripoff was herman the asiatics insect now they in the picture you see a little kid open a box and under normal monster with fang laws and tentacles leap out and people are screaming terrorists so i sent away for that and it's a little tiny box about an inch long with a tiny stick in it like got like an ice cream steak that has some fuss glued on it and a rubber band for antennas and and that herman a the attic is that ring a bell with you cook.

bob wilkins san francisco zach zach dow