20 Burst results for "Bob Welcome"

"bob welcome" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

07:49 min | 6 months ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"More information, Please go to Minnesota Military radio. Com. So I said at the opening, we're gonna talk to the American Legion Department, Minnesota about some veteran related legislation. And joining me now to talk about that is Bob Hart, who was the department legislative chairman for the American Legion here in Minnesota. And he's and he's a Marine. So Bob Welcome to Minnesota Military radio. Thank you. I'm glad to be here. Have understand. You served back about my time. You're a Vietnam era marine, and you had some pretty good duties and rain car. Did I was in. I went that turned 21 in boot Camp and M C R D San Diego And they made the decision start withdrawing Marines from Vietnam. So I had an intelligence billet. But I ended up in Quantico, Virginia headquarters Battalion for a while and then was later transferred to a, um, helicopter squadron. Hmm. To six tree, which is Ta Dee from Cherry point because there simply wasn't enough room to bring everything home, So I had a mixed a mix of opportunities in the Two years and I was born And Bob. How many years after you got out of the Marine Corps, does it take for you to join the American Legion? You know, it's amazing. It took me many years. I didn't join the American Legion till I was 50 years old and just happened to get a mailing from national and my legion post points. 48. Still water was just a few blocks, actually from my home, and I thought some gun I've never even been there. So I stopped in and found a whole bunch of guys. My age, likable group said. I need to be part of this. Involved here in Minnesota. We've got a kind of a unique organization. All the veterans Nine Veterans Service organizations combined in what's called the Commander's Task force, and one of the big things they do every year is theirs. They come up with legislative priorities to take over to the Capitol. And in Dr elected officials about and and you've been involved in that for a while. I have. I've been involved in in the Legislative Committee Department for about 10 years and the chairman on and off for about, I guess, about seven. Well, it's a lot of good activity, and one of the things that happens there is you take the combined membership totals of all of those organizations, American Legion v. F W. De v, Amvets, Marine, Corley and so forth. And when you go over and talk to our elected officials, they know that you're representing a lot of folks and Bob this winner. There's been a bunch of special sessions and then every space special session, they said. The legislators said they were gonna work on something called the Veterans Restorative Justice Act. They just haven't had time with the pandemic to get it. Done that Z. Hi. I think on your list your to do list And could you quickly just tell us about that? Yes, Uh, the first place the Restorative Justice Act. There's some misunderstanding about how this uh how this works the it's officially called the Military Veterans Offenders. Restorative Justice Act sponsored currently buys on Senate file 116 by Chamberlain and House FILE BEISTE of House files. Where 78, but basically it's an extension of the veteran course. We already have veteran's courts now and they're very effective. But what what the sadness that actually allows us for any judge to use the same standards set of Veterans Court would use in? Um uh, looking at it and lower level offenders using up for serious crimes in lower level offenders. The way they have service connected issues that might have have have something to do with their with their With their crime that there's gold in the treatment instead of incarceration. So that's really a point of it, and they They believe that that the advocates believe the dense bill is in line with other states. Criminal justice statutes that empowered judges to make it make the best choices basically boils down to trust the judges. So it's what it's not. And this is important. It's not a get out of jail free card, then instead of going to correct correctional facilities is simply go into a treatment program. It's a win win. The state saves a ton of money with to do it this way, and the veteran gets Dalby needs, uh, deliver a fruitful life go back to normal. Actually hard to work for him to go this way, But then they can clean up the records and get back to work and get back in society. We're speaking to Bob Heart, the department legislative chairman for the Department of Minnesota American Legion on Minnesota Military radio. And Bob. I know that with the pandemic over the last year and the closings of Ah lot of the clubs and restaurants and bars and things a lot of are a lot of our American Legion posts are struggling. To stay alive and stay afloat. And I think you're working on some things to see if we can't give him some relief on the real estate taxes. Yes, we are. As a matter of fact, the the do the bill If you just had a hearing the other day, and I'm not everything's this point is preliminary. But the point of this is that currently right now you have The post, which is many cases, especially smaller communities. It's one of the backbones of that, that community it's used for a lot of purposes. Meeting halls of is more than just a bar day of wedding receptions there, they have social gatherings. But it's a meeting place and everybody in town typically knows where the American Legion Post is our V F W posts and what we're seeking here is simply they have to be property tax obligation eliminated. S so that the money used currently being used for those taxes now, this is only for post that open their building. So instead of spending their hard earned funds, her taxes that money could be used to improve their facilities or even to make a positive difference in the community itself, especially if we're talking about gambling fund's Bob, one of the other things I know you're working on is we have a lot of disabled veterans here in Minnesota, and some of them are so disabled. They need the assistance of a personal care attendant. And in hard to find those folks because they're hourly wages so low we're trying to get that boosted our way. Yes, we are. None of fact that the the depth of the problem is throughout the health industry finding capable people not just for personal care attendants. But even nurses are becoming a challenge, trying to find people to get into the work. But in many cases when you're talking about a disabled veteran, the Hub. The burden falls on the family itself, and you know to give him the care they need. Now. The the typical wage earlier was about his $11.34. And that's $2 in 18 cents above the poverty line, and it's $6 below the living livable wage of 16 34. Minnesota covert related package that we had 2020 gave a temporary hourly wage of $15. But that ended sunset it on January 31st. So the American Legion. The CTF would like to simply see that increase. You'll become permanent for personal care attendants because it's a tough job. Upton is very important. We've got to get a bush there so that they're there to help our veterans Bob, we have take a short break my comeback going to talk a little more about some legislative priorities from the American Legion and the commander's task force, Please. This is Minnesota military radio..

American Legion Minnesota American Legion Post Bob American Legion Department chairman Department of Minnesota Americ Bob Welcome Military Veterans Offenders Bob Hart Commander Legislative Committee Departme Veterans Court Quantico Bob Heart Marine Corps Vietnam Senate
"bob welcome" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:23 min | 6 months ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Bob. Welcome here, remember? He'll be happy to now alone. There's a stick. It must be You told me about me now I got a job. I didn't say anything that can help you. Nothing. Mom. Jay Z, one of my New Jersey Chan time. It's to 25.

Jay Z Bob.
What GOP Senate could mean for Biden's climate agenda

Climate Cast

04:05 min | 9 months ago

What GOP Senate could mean for Biden's climate agenda

"How fast will climate policy shift under a president biden. I'm npr teeth meteorologist. Paul hunter here with climate counts. President joe biden has laid out a dramatic shift in climate change policy. But the makeup of the senate is still uncertain. What could biden do and not do with a potentially divided congress. Former republican congressman. Bob inglis is executive director of the conservative climate action group republic. Espn dot org. Hi bob welcome to climate cast expo. It'd be with you in a recent inside. Climate news piece. I saw you said a divided. Government situation may give rise to the best opportunity for durable climate solution. What did you mean by that. If you run something on one side of the field only then when the pendulum swings you know it can be undone and so the thing that comes with divided government is the opportunity to do this in a bipartisan way. Therefore is durable biden frames a lot of climate change policy agenda in creating jobs a green jobs and infrastructure energy auto manufacturing. Do you think that that can get some buy in from senate republicans that's gonna be the the thing that Will have immediate bipartisan support. I should think which is basically incentives to make it possible to transition to clean energy. I mean if you look at the polling data if we trust anymore you know. I should probably about pulling if the pooling debt is right It shows broad support for the concept of clean energy. President-elect biden has of course a history in the senate do you think that gives them a better chance of cooperation. Really hope it's gonna be different. This time You've got one of the reasons. That is joe biden was in the senate for an awfully long time so he's got cheap understanding of the way the senate works. He's got deep relationships with senators. Yeah there is you know last time we did. This is barack obama and he's only been in the senate for four years before it became president. And you had sadly this racial overlay cola. Name names like secret. Muslim american socialists. There's no reason to call the man names. He's left of center. And i'm right of center but We we shouldn't have done that Indications joe biden like. He's an old white guy like me and show. It won't admit racial element to it. Let's talk about what a president biden could do on his own. What specifics could biden change regarding greenhouse gas emissions with executive actions. There's something that he can do for example issue Executive orders that undue president trump's executive orders if he tries the next step up from the order which is regulatory action could run into some trouble with a six three conservative majority in the court so really we need to go up to the next step which is legislation. And that's where it's so important to find bipartisan consensus. We've seen this huge boom in renewable energy production Some progress in electric vehicle growth. How much can a president accelerate that process. President can accelerate through some executive orders But the most powerful thing the president can do is set a very ambitious agenda for solving climate change and particularly making sure to see it as a worldwide problem. We've if we're just solving for climate change in the us where we're cleaning up local air which is nice but we're not solving for the challenge of climate change in order to do that. You really have to get the whole world. And that's that's what takes real presidential leadership former south carolina. Republican congressman. Bob inglis. thanks so much for sharing some of your perspective today. Hp with paul thank you.

Biden Senate President Joe Biden Bob Inglis Conservative Climate Action Gr Paul Hunter Elect Biden Joe Biden NPR Espn President Trump Congress BOB Cola Barack Obama United States South Carolina HP Paul
"bob welcome" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:57 min | 9 months ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Ah, Limited edition Dodgersthree Ball, Baseball, said all furnished by Nikos Sports. Start dialing right now. Good luck. Joining us now to talk about this is the man behind it. Mr. Bob, Bob. Bob. Welcome a John. Nice to be with you and congratulations to your wonderful city. You know you wait 32 years I've been a baseball my career for over 45 years I used to be with Chicago comes money years ago before that was a sportswriter. Covering a baseball back in the seventies with The Washington Post of Baltimore Sun, So I've seen a lot of great baseball season. But you know, to see the Dodgers finally get it done. They were knocking on the door step for someone of years. We wanted to do something very special and very limited. I know you were talking a moment ago about this special baseball set that Rawlings has produced. I get a chance to see a prototype this morning. It is really a sweet looking thing. For just $99. You could stagger these, but the good point about it is not everybody's going to be able only because only 2000 and 20 of the sets are going to be produced by Rawlings. They'll each come with a individually numbered certificate of authenticity. Again for just $99 to help us raise. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation, which does great work, They improve education, health care. They deal with homelessness, Social justice and they've been around since 1995 tip of the cap to them before I go ahead and remind everybody how they can purchase use again. Through the 800 number website Do want to point out on each of these three baseballs that come inside of a beautiful acrylic display case. You'll get that numbers are difficult of authenticity. All.

Dodgers Baseball Rawlings Mr. Bob Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation Nikos Sports sportswriter Baltimore The Washington Post Chicago
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Managing Research Needs Using Kubernetes with Bob Killen

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

11:34 min | 1 year ago

Managing Research Needs Using Kubernetes with Bob Killen

"I am here at q Kahn in San Diego. And I'm with Bob Dylan. Bob Is a research cloud administrator at the university. -versity of Michigan Bob. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you awesome so We met yesterday you were on the AM L. Media and analysts panel talking a little bit about your experiences using communities to support the researchers there At the University of Michigan Gin. And you're also one of the other rose plsy are co chair of the CNC FS research User Group So really interested in hearing a little bit about your experiences with. Sounds like you work with Kuban. Eddie's kind of to support a broad portfolio of applications not just MLA. I we run a wide variety of applications of both animal focused like keep blow but we have a whole slew of other supporting services that are researchers Consume Joey on in our larger. HPC Cluster. Tell us a little bit about your background. How did you get started working with communities? I moved over to artistes Microbe advanced research competing technology services about three years ago but before that I worked for the University of Michigan Hospital and in Twenty fifteen we we started going down the container out for a lot of our clinical workflows. This is sort of before docker was a thing So we are predominantly like Alexi containers. And we're first looking at communities to orchestrate that but raise wasn't mature enough of the time and we went For us from there we Dan Shift back and forth and also start supporting our research workload serve alongside our clinical workflows on there. They sort of saw you know some of the benefits of containerization and this WanNa take advantage of the broader service that we were offering From there I was hired by artists to sort of build out the same something but be completely. Research focused as well as like managing of virtualization system and communities has really exploded when it comes to the the broader management adoption of containers and We have things like that. Keep sputtering in super hub that just integrates directly with it in from. There's just inside the cube. spiner cube sponsor sponsor in reporter wanting to hub at. It can spend a notebook as a container itself itself. Can you maybe talk a little bit about the various use cases that you're supporting what researchers doing. Oh man it's a a pretty broad stroke spectrum on top of reneges. We support a bunch of social science stuff. Various databases that are consumed By in other applications and people running workloads in our large H. B. C. Cluster And we do support We have a significantly large a jupiter environment a lot for classes and other researchers that are spinning stuff up bioinformatics physics Think those are most most of the big ones okay. And so is the primary user experience among your researchers the Jupiter notebook and the ability to spun off containers from the notebook amendment. Yup over time. We've seen a gradual shift of people you know sort of moving away from the classic. HPC to style system. Where you would log into a sage along node? And you'd run your system you something up and running off now. They're sort of an expectation for art to have the Jupiter Notebook or have some other sort of science gateway for the user to consume. It's it's a lot friendlier than than having to dig in and right like a bash script it to automate some of the suffer you one of the things that's different between the classical. HPCC scale up systems and the more distributed environments that We see now and that are common With Kuban. Eddie's is that in order to take advantage of I've these distributed environments the users in your case researchers have to know about them and kind of know how to to to use them in a lot of cases right there you know code Oh to take advantage of distributed computing. Are you researchers doing that or are you. Are there things that you've put in place that provide abstractions so that they don't have to Think about that We do have some abstractions and play that Make it much easier argo workflows and things of that. Nature have simplify things greatly for people then of course empower users. That you know will will just want to dive in and do everything themselves. But in general we have a pretty good suite of tools and libraries to make it easy for them. The social scientists isn't kind of the target user for a cube flow yet they're using communities Q.. Flow in your case. It sounds like the ARGO. WORKFLOWS you know our lot. You didn't say that necessarily the social scientists Mantis were using the ARGO workflows in Q.. Flow but I'm I'm curious to hear a little bit about how cube flow in particular is used in this environment. Cute flow it. So we don't have any social science people using cube flow The cute flow stuff is mostly by a small subset of people. And Right. Now it's a more experimentation stage But the the aspects of it released sort of make a special like the model life cycle of things Significantly easier for people and we we sort of see much. More people shifting. Adopting it going forward maybe talk a little bit about that user experience. What do they have to do to get their apps up running into keep environment? They don't have to do too much they can do. Most of it from the Jupiter notebooks that Cupola spins up in manages for them and then there is I forget the the Argo are the flow Cli tool but that allows them to create some workflows pretty easy to. There's there's some other things being built that allows allows for better like designing and building better pipelines in More consumable workflows. Maybe talking generally. What from the your participation the patient in this panel? I got the impression that you're pretty excited about Kuban as as a platform generally for these types of research workloads. Maybe talk a little. What about you know why you're excited about it? Sure communities provides a lot of like proper abstractions for just managing a variety Heidi of workloads and those things that it cannot handle it offers the extension points to easily extend and augment so like grenades it self does not have any capability of running a like standard. MPI job or a gang scheduled job but because the extension points are there. It's easy enough to who sort of your own schedule or to handle that. And it's just like a little. You know one variable change than us that scheduler to spin up and manage that workload and and by using carbonates itself and the extension mechanism. You gain the accessibility of using everything else. That's being developed on top of whereas in the past you know again going back to the classic. HP system there wasn't any of these other this other tooling API's really do any of this stuff. So now we can get. You can do a lot more such as like eventing and triggering different workflows off. Different things happening within the system We're definitely seeing them. A much more broader adoption of things like data streaming an link in this stuff. You can really do well on a classic. HP system but it it works in fits quite well on top of communities and you can integrate it with a whole slew of other things that are being built on top of it. Are you supporting putting users. That are doing things like building out their own schedulers or are these things at the broader community is doing and they can just kind of take off the shelf and take advantage of right now. The it's mostly from the broader community and our users can then take that off the shelf cute flow itself has a NPR operator built into it. So that makes it easier for their the people consuming Q.. Flow to spin up in. MPI Job And then there's other things like a volcano which are trying to offer much more of the classic a batch computing things that we'd find. HPC for communities directly. Joe Down a little bit deeper into that. What is volcanoes? Specific volcano is a Open source project that is trying to be sort of the classic PC scheduler and workload managers thinking like slim but built for Kuban Eddie's so it is offering things like a fair share cues backfill as well as offering things like you know being able to support gang the jobs and things of that dream So the idea there Being that as a A research cloud administrator. You've got some pool of resources. You've got some pool of people that want to take advantage of these resources. How do you Fairly are consistently give them access to the resources and so oh my fair share of being one idea there gang scheduling is more. Like I've got these five things that need to go at the same time. Exactly how do I ensure that they're happening in concert with one another and then like if a worker happens to die you don't want to necessarily kill the entire job whereas you know if so the controller dies you want to then you know kill and Req- a Q. The entire job for us in for Sort of the larger sites that are still primarily a on prem focused on like bare metal you know we have a finite finite amount of resources. We aren't necessarily bursting up to the cloud So being able to backfill and set priorities on things is very useful for us as well as you know cues For us is like we want to backfill with jobs from students. They might be able to run those for for free but if we have a researcher that's doing something when we want to have those take priority sort of bump off those lower party jobs we think about in the context of machine learning Some of these. He's jobs Like network training deep learning Training they can take many days or weeks But that's not a new thing in the context of HVAC are the workloads that you're tending to support also kind of these long running Jobs but but not necessarily deep learning training we have we support again being a That handles researcher needs for the entire university. We have a little bit of everything and most of our jobs would probably fit into that category Where they might take a week to complete Or something of that nature I think are Maxwell time is twenty one days and what can you say what that is. I don't remember off the top of my head But we've had several that are dislike cranking through you know terabytes and terabytes of data And if they have something that just hits the wall time you know. It's it's unfortunate for the Kill it off. Also the this maxwell time isn't the biggest job that you've seen the limit that you yes yes all right the thing that runs logging in that we're going to give him the Nice Nice warm. Not Nice

Researcher Kuban Eddie Kuban Argo Michigan Bob Dylan Administrator Q Kahn BOB HP San Diego Am L. Media University Of Michigan Gin Joey Alexi Reporter Maxwell
"bob welcome" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Mexico Bob welcome to the show question recently moved from Orange County California you wanna and are my H. P. printer wireless character department and where I was but now it won't connect and are using the same old first off why the move how's how's that going it's going great the ramp to route nice place to live okay great so your your printer used to connect back at the old place are using the same wifi network are using the same equipment okay a what about the legend of our router and did you like your did you reset the settings on the printer to connect it to the new wifi network well I'll let today I deleted all of the the challenge of my laptop so there's nothing on there and no one my printers are unplugged show okay reply back in and and then do a reset on the sound yeah so that's what you need to do here so your your your printer your computer is you know how you did the right thing on your computer read deleted that printer offer there because it's still you know that had your old connection settings to your old network so what you need to do is that was great now on the printer itself there is a way to reset it to factory or just re go through the set system set up of connecting at your wifi network does this printer have any sort of display on it yeah okay so you're gonna go into that display going to the settings on that display and then just basically follow the settings to network connection and just connect it your new network once it's connected your new wifi network then you can go through and go on your computer and search for printers on your wifi network it will find the printer it will marry them up and you'll be able to print once again okay well thank you very much alright Bob thanks so much for calling in today appreciate it enjoy down there I've been to Tijuana gosh I've been there once a long time ago maybe actually no I've been there twice once a real long time ago and once just maybe a decade ago but it's been a while but it's great to hear that you can move there from southern California and enjoy a pretty nice life there Jerry is in Pennsylvania Jerry welcome to the show hello rich can you hear me OK.

"bob welcome" Discussed on Jeather's Random Stuff

Jeather's Random Stuff

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on Jeather's Random Stuff

"I I know what we're doing now. I don't know what the Fuck Heather doesn't know what the fuck is doing. Welcome Bob Welcome. This is jeff random stuff. I'm Jacoby. I'm heather and we make a gender ask but I also already. I'm sorry I missed so excited. We have a guest speaker today again. Jill and we're so excited because we have purchased just third microphone. Oh my God we have three and we have a fourth cord less hi-fi right okay yeah yeah that was impressive that as Erin everyone are celebrating errands boxing day birthday. That's right her birthday was yesterday. Tadeusz boxing. Day is a special holiday in Canada. That is the day after Christmas. If you didn't realize this and we love boxing day in America because I think he took it presents right it's mainly. It's like a it's kind of like black Friday. Visit your neighbors and shit and eat. You Go shopping do you. It's the best sales to even know. I don't think you know you're talking about. I grew up next Canada all my Canadian friends Marla Michelle. What's boxing day? Why did you guys Tony You guys can correct me but I grew up right next to Vancouver and we just went shopping on that day? You know I just realized I have a lot of Canadian friends and I don't know about boxing day. Well what the Hell's wrong with you so I will find that out uh-huh. I thought they ate like it's like Thanksgiving or something but I could be totally totally wrong about that. What is the point at boxing day? I don't know a Christmas box in Britain is a name for a Christmas present. Boxing Day was traditionally a day off or servants in the day when they received their Christmas box from the master. Oh Okay so you do get pretty Massa. Thank you these presents data. Give Christmas boxes to their families choice. Okay isn't that special. I feel so special. We'll have to celebrate boxing day this year. Well what who's WHO's. Who are we giving the day off my dogs <hes>? I don't know this is my servant. <hes> your dog is your servant patrolling. You get the day off off on the twenty sixth of December. Maybe we're the servants and we get the day off. I feel like I'm more of the Servant of the animals sure well then I'd get the day off. You can change your ticket so high that I will buy you a box of something. Okay there you go. What do I need to buy you a box or something yeah yeah because are the servants of your whole family I am so we each need a box dumping like a giant eagle joy by like a jolly joy box folks? I don't know if we talked about. We talked about Jolly jingles. Joy Bomb probably just think so well all of them. I don't think the Jelly Jingle joy box was named after the Fab that fun box. Oh maybe you guys have mentioned this. Yes okay yes so I I invented the jolly jingle joy box because Kobe die stalking every year I am the recipient of the jingle joy box and it's always full full of goodies like the it's better than any fat it totally is tailored to me yes by my best and it's jolly so jingly so isn't urine since it's her birthday boxing day presents presents to open so open them on the podcast you know she's going to describe all of the presence and then tell us much. She hates beats. Our love's okay here. We go so the first present is oh my but it's not as good as because we didn't put the fucking pitcher in there that's okay I still love it. It's a picture frame shaped like a bone and and it's really cute 'cause it has like Chevron <hes> Chevron print within its would it's very cute. It doesn't have Delilah but but it's still very very curious dirty dog in the free. There's a very cute dog in the frame. The model dog is very very cute. This is a picture a picture frame for Aaron Stock Doc for Delilah which he loves or Sampson I mean or could be with both of them and the next thing is a really fancy wine glass <music> off for two two. There's Joe that is for you in Jason so you get star partaking in your and it's the thin lipped sewing losses these as one of the elite wine glass. I am elite now now now. These ones are overtures. What that means is that they will go with any red wine so they're not specifically firmer low or a cab or a Sarah or anything like like that you can use any read once you get past these then we start breaking into the other ones don't have retail glosses losses pauses podcast? Go Buy yourself some fucking read on Yes. They make a big difference here this most who's from you so tight lists visor. 'cause I golf yes. I am a Golfer I. I don't know a little bit about golfing often. I don't know about the brand but my husband's brand. This is one of the best Gulping Bram very one of the very best and shades your face aw it's cute because she's worried about my son exposure. Thank you so much. I actually love visors over hat do you yes we believe or not I do in our own adviser helped. Put It on well because the hat. I must have a short head so my ears don't normally fit in a hat. That's my issue too because they like pull him out. Yes I have to but you can buy hats actually have the shorter I know a low profile and that's visors weren't opposed for a picture now. Yeah I love visors and I needed a white one two Yay and white from Kuwait end I okay and this is a wine saver so these are what's the milt winery uses and they just put it over there Bala. You're not gonNA yeah. GO AHEAD ASK FOR I. I'm assuming it's still done thing were marked as explicit explicit. We are explicit. That was funny any though very funny thank you. The next thing is a card game called loaded kings and I you were telling me about this game yeah but do you notice something else about the card. Game is have have a penis I mean I don't know for sure there could be a bonus you to ten adult players at a time. Oh Oh my gosh waterproof playing card for my boat. Oh you are oh. That's paying attention to.

boxing Canada Delilah Joy Bomb Bob Welcome Jacoby Jill America Vancouver Erin Chevron Massa golfing milt winery Marla Michelle Kuwait stalking
"bob welcome" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"He's a top journalistic authority on the N._B._A.. Having covered the league for decades he now co host the sports reporters podcast Bob Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. John also joining me from New York is the multitalented New York Times reporter so pen deb who covered Donald Trump's twenty sixteen presidential campaign then arts and culture and now the N._B._A.. He also does stand up comedy. No joke so pan welcome. Thanks so much for having me John Bob. I WanNa start with you as the senior most of the two of you <hes>. Do you think what happened in the N._B._A.. Since the finals is troublesome is it great for players. <hes> is it something that the ordinary fans should be worried about. It's too soon for a definitive answer about the long range effect of the process as it has now evolved. It's troublesome to the for ally people <hes> because it it <hes> it disrupts any it prevents continuity in every even taking root any possibility of continuity look at Toronto now they got what they want. They got got a championship and and <hes> they better savor it and enjoy it because they're now falling back a Downer wrong. They're no longer in my mind thought impossible to call them a contender so <hes> but they're going to have to enjoy I and of course what they did. It was a special wonderful story galvanizing entire nation literally. I talked to people up there up there and Canada. I mean everywhere from from New Brunswick to yellowknife. People were united in following. This team was wonderful story. I find but it the I think the potential that I worry about is that one of the things that has sustained the league. I thought reasonably well over the years and granted at different degrees different points of time was the fact that a a a smaller market could get put together a good team and keep it for a while. <hes> Portland has been on and off a good team going all the way back the seventy seven when they won and they've contended for the championship subsequently a couple of times <hes> who wants to go there you know <hes> if you have a choice and San Antonio let's see what happens now <hes> with San Antonio <hes> in this post Dunkin era <hes> and and <hes> whether there will be able to sustain what they've been able to accomplish I it seems to be it's tilted toward the predictable places although not the old predictable places with two was New York but you know at Miami L._A.. <hes> they're the teams that have benefited and Cleveland thing was an aberration because Lebron was from Akron could have been any city Eddie if the if it was have been from suburban Milwaukee than would have been milwaukee but he wasn't but I just don't think internal turns the fans are comfortable with this and yet <hes> there is nothing illegal. That's the thing that they're they're they're playing with the <music> system <hes> free agency and the singer of course begun because <hes> team the superstars have leverage and it all began with Lebron and Wade Getting Lebron joining forces were Wade and then someting bosh the come join us and we know what happened so pen in any business people who get a job offer from another employer <hes> of course a free to take it and good for them. <hes> I grew up at a time when teams in all sports <hes> <hes> had more control over players than <hes> professional sports does now that was good for fans because you had a team that you could watch over years and <hes> especially if they were getting getting better <hes> but not so good for the players <hes> because there wasn't a free market..

John Bob Lebron New York Bob Welcome Milwaukee San Antonio New York Times Eddie Donald Trump Wade New Brunswick Toronto Canada Portland Akron reporter Cleveland
"bob welcome" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on Science Friday

"I'm John Kasich you sitting in for IRA though, forty three years ago. Bob peck, started a new job at the academy of natural sciences in Philly. The oldest natural. History institution in the US just under a month into the job. He spotted some cool looking metal boxes sitting academies hallway destined for the trash thinking these boxes might make a cool entity for his apartment. Bob, of course, snag them only to find they weren't empty boxes inside was a strange kind of collection, a collection of hair inside, these boxes were human hair, animal hair hair for mummies and hair. From get ready from thirteen US presidents Bob had stumbled on the collection of Peter Brown. A citizen scientist whose collection of hair says much about nineteenth century sciences. Does about the diversity of the stuff. Topping our heads today. Bob is the curator of art and artifacts of the academy. And he's written a book about Brown's idiosyncratic collection. It's called specimens of hair and joins me now to talk about it. Bob, welcome to science Friday. Thank you. Glad to be with you. Maybe can describe what you saw when you open these metal boxes some forty three years ago. Well, of course, it I I thought they were just empty boxes since they were in the trash, but there to my surprise where some. Albums dozens and dozens of albums actually beautifully leather bound and each page were little tufts of hair first few albums, were sheep will. And and then we got into animal hair, and then finally human hair some of which was perfectly anonymous, but I began recognizing names on some of the other sheets that caught my attention. I can imagine. We'll get those names in a moment. Given what you've found in there. Why was the academy throwing this stuff away? Well, we were in a process of moving from one place to another. There were lots of things that were being reviewed, and I think the curator's at the time felt that this was not something that really deserved scientific attention. They were mostly looking at the wool and some of the animals for and they thought well, we've got full skins of animals elsewhere. Why would we keep these scrapbooks just taking up a lot of space? And they're probably wondering what exactly can we do with here? What does this have to do with our collection? Well, exactly, remember, this was all in a sort of pre DNA era DNA was only selected in the nineteenth century, but identified in the in the nineteen fifties, and then the complete human genome wasn't sequenced until night two thousand and three. So all of this back in the nineteen. Seventies was not recognized really for the value that it is today. So this is the collection of Peter Brown. And this is a big part of the story who was Peter Brown. Peter Brown was a lawyer and Philadelphia, but very patriotic and philanthropic man, and he was trying at first to help advance the agricultural world in in America. He he was collecting sheep wool from all over the world. So that he could instruct the growers of sheep here, which breeds would be best suited to which purposes. So this one might work. Well for a blanket or sweater, this one might be good for felt hat and people hadn't really paid much attention to that until he began to do. So. Go quite sort of from one step to another thought. Well, if we can do all this with sheep wool, and he was examining the will very carefully. He had invented a little mechanism to test is strength in its size called a trick. Commoner? He was looking at it with microscope. He said if I can study this much about sheep will maybe they're things in other animal, wool and hair that could be useful to us. But. But I have to ask you though. But that that's what's so interesting about this. Because it makes sense that you would find sheep wool interesting because you can make things out of it. But elephant tail hair or raccoon whiskers. Wh what possible use could this have to to human industry? Well, that's what we might say now..

Peter Brown Bob peck US academy of natural sciences John Kasich Philly scientist America forty three years
"bob welcome" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Bob, welcome to after hours. Are you doing Amy good? Yeah. Calling in. I I'm in a survivor pool. There's thirteen hundred people and and six hundred sixty took New Orleans. Yeah. No doubt. I mean there were so many games last week that were impossible to figure out and that seemed like one okay drew Brees Alvin Kamara plus the bucks. And we know that Ryan Fitzpatrick has the potential to start ripping that ball all over the place. It's just the Tampa Bay is had if nothing really quiet preseason. And most of the talk was about the quarterback, they didn't have. And so for them to go into New Orleans division opponent and score forty eight points Wilders. It was crazy. Who did you pick? I actually I'm from Cleveland, but I took Pittsburgh. So isn't it? No, no because you're still in. Well, not in our pool tie. You're out. You're out. I'm still in. Luckily, this one's four hundred dollars a person what you pay dollars per a survivor pool. And there are thirteen hundred people who shelled out four hundred bucks for that pool. Yes. Holy rat. You guys are degenerates. So I don't feel quite as bad about losing in week one. I was in another one that wasn't as costly. I took Arizona. So that one's done. We'll man I'm rooting for you how much do you pay out if you win? It's. Four hundred fifty thousand dollars. Owner who's organizing the survivor pool. Our care. I can't tell you that. Oh, it's illegal is it. I don't know. I bet it is. Let best to my knowledge sports gambling is not yet legal in Ohio or in Pennsylvania. We're in New Jersey. He he lives in New Jersey. So it's not even it's a private one. Ooh, man. You're with fire that guy can take off with your money. I don't think so he wouldn't be able to hide. Okay. Well, I'm glad you have that kind of dispensable income. I definitely do not. You don't get the big bucks. They're not big bucks that I'm spending on a survivor poll. Are you kidding me? No way. Well, it's the dream of winning though. You know, it's it's almost worth it. Okay. If you say so have you ever won before? One like one that was a smaller amount before is this your first time in this pool. No, I've been we've been doing this like twenty years, and how many times have you won the four hundred fifty grand. Zero. So how many times have you give out the four hundred and not one? Well, it's gone up through the years. It started at like fifty. So how much money have you put into this pool and was three hundred now so how much money have you put into this pool over twenty years and not one? Too much. I'm with you there. All right. So anyway, is there anything else? This is Bob. About it. Well, man, I hope for your sake you where do you don't get caught by the cops. The gambler my favorite trash talker would be Larry Bird. Yeah. He was fantastic for, sir. All right, Bob. Good luck. You have a good one. Thanks, hashtag faced.

Bob Larry Bird New Jersey New Orleans Ryan Fitzpatrick Alvin Kamara Tampa Bay Amy Cleveland Arizona Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Ohio twenty years Four hundred fifty thousand do four hundred dollars
"bob welcome" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Joanna Welcome back to KFI AM six forty more. Stimulating talk Bill Handel Saturday morning and welcome to handle on the, law marginal legal, advice When I. Tell you have absolutely no case after hey Bob welcome to handle, on the law Yes sir Bob Yeah. Yeah Having. A, safe I have three Family members children and I'm wondering if I bequeath behalf, half my passing Assets that they receive from me Subject to Lost to creditors two. Of them I sure Bob, the second they get the assets once the money or the property is transferred into. Their name now you have assets that can be attacked by either a judgement or it makes them worthwhile for whoever the credit your is to. Sue, them yes Surrey. Bob. Bob Yup so what you may, wanna do how much money we talking, about Bob when you said sizable We'll be something like. Three, million yes that. Is. Sizable my man and there are, three of them that are getting a, million dollars each approximately All right Title. I will here's my piece of advice and that is you go to an attorney that specializes in. Asset protection there are attorneys that do that and it's within. The law we're not talking. About fraud we're not talking about hiding. Assets illegally what we are talking about is setting up a system where it is either very difficult or almost impossible for the the creditors to go after. Those assets and I'm not an expert, in this although I certainly play one, on radio and I'm talking about some kind of a trust in which the amount of money they receive in the creditors are limited to that amount of money as opposed to these. Massive assets Trust. Yeah there's things you can do that, there are those or other kinds of, trust but the the basic one is a spendthrift trust but it has to be done absolutely perfectly and there are other avenues to do so it's definitely time go to the website That's reassuring that's. What I wanted to okay good for you Good for you your your kids probably don't deserve it and and here's the. Other thing that you're going to love their, deeply in debt and are you aware that when you die they are going to receive. The money. And probably piss through it. In. About three months He took you a lifetime. It took a lifetime to accumulate that and, if you were still alive somehow in handed to them it'd be gone in ninety days Enjoy your Yes. Thank. You appreciate and so. He should I cut him off which I shouldn't, have done but I do. Appreciate that Alex there you are hi Alex welcome, to handle on the law Hello, Alex yes hi. Yes, my, house burned down months ago congratulations I have been. In, this? House. I, was. Leasing this house more than ten. Years And I have absolutely nothing I. Could get absolutely. Nothing no support whatsoever? What do you mean Company landlords. Okay but hang on a second I. Don't understand what that means you got no support from your? Landlords insurance company and what. What did you. Want them to do Please allow me access to my property He's there but if there's no if there's no ability, to get in there or it's destroyed there, may be an issue as to safety but it's not the. Insurance company that doesn't allow you.

Bob Bob Yeah attorney Bob Yup Alex Bill Handel KFI Joanna Surrey fraud Sue million dollars three months ninety days
"bob welcome" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Can he do anything for like defamation of care now wait a sec can't well maybe the caregiver can do something because the caregivers under because the supervisor said the caregivers under investigation well if the caregiver is under investigation hey the truth that is one of those defenses so by the way are you yeah now why bad boy you shouldn't do that can be a wrist slap slap bob there you are bob welcome to handle on the law thank you my wife is a eighteen year employees of a local hospital last six says they unit manager two years ago at the advice of a former c you know she went back to school on her own to get her master's degrees and there's practitioner it's been on her resume the hospitals known about it her sympathizer of known about it for the last two years three months ago when she sat down with her immediate report director of nursing to inform her that the upcoming this summer would have to start taking some days off during the week to go and get her clinical hours for her studies she understood that it's a forty hour workweek as required and she said that she would make sure she got that time in we just lose you yes we did know there's something about cell phones that i just happen to love as in half the time they're garbled on the other half the time you just can't hear what's going on and the other half the time.

supervisor unit manager two years eighteen year three months forty hour
"bob welcome" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on WDRC

"That trend bob is on the line listening to the mighty k k o b radio albuquerque bob welcome thanks for taking my call i read an article in the economist it's says that they question the safety of vpn and the the reason they give is that they claim that etf have no market makers and therefore if you know they started going down that nobody would step in and buy them to protect them well i don't think you can count on market makers to bail you out in in in a situation where things go south i mean if you take a look at stocks that do have market makers they can disappear pretty quickly when bed when bad news comes out so i think that the notion that you need a market maker to stabilize the price of an exchange traded mutual fund is is is is a stretch to put it mildly in fact you do have buyers and sellers in exchange traded mutual funds they're called investors they're called individual investors and institutional investors and they are they are the true market for exchange traded mutual funds okay hey appreciate the call thank you for joining us yeah you'll see these pieces occasionally appear that'll be trashing exchange traded mutual funds or trach trashing mutual funds in general i've seen advertising trashing mutual funds it's ridiculous it's completely ridiculous when you see advertising trashing mutual funds it's usually going to be from a money manager who wants you to give your money.

"bob welcome" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Bob is calling from attleboro bob welcomed a wpro how are you good thanks for my car and uh they they they were i see a case on ninety five am i mistaken i believe they were coming in from cranston so don't again i'm not sure but i would assume that because they were coming in on the six ten okay and then wild up on the ramp going north you know if you know the area you could visualize it he's tried to get onto 95 north never quite made it or late last night about five thirty or so i was on route stakes going west and they came up with that white truck on a flat does take can i guess they're taking this state barracks instead of being taken away i mean i i took a call i i'm tanya it except for of a bullet holes i didn't see any dense were at the point i would by that are because there's no i don't see any body day your point is that there was no ramming forward ramming back i in that truck i didn't see any ramming damage only damage i saw was uh all i pounded the over twenty thousand bullets sal every time someone discharges a gun aren't they are like best duty a so what i can i started going to be taken off the uh uh probably a good thing can't let me tell you bob it's going to be one hell of a press conference qasir i mean i got a lot of he i gotta hours worth of answers questions right now so we'll see what they have to say later in the day thank you for your thing yes i don't i really don't think that baram a person that run the troopers is a big part of job because the way she she couldn't handle interview well did the on the old guy did they did better the one that required from the trooper's thanks bob that curl summer goal was to say public speaking is not her forte i'm not going to falter.

Bob cranston attleboro
"bob welcome" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on WCTC

"Two five five in talking about your home bob welcome hello yes ira guide my main line drain were carter added to have crummer come out hm uh i have to open up and you will recommend a product can i walk in i should do it keep it the open yeah what did he say was there like tree roots in there now you could to require character brock care error gree never put it found nearby could from the group of people that were here yeah so this isn't adr is this the drain line nuts outside while now or just all side taos i'll give you an idea how old house for our cut abroad beam down through powered by can abatement dyer said about who might pick two way to work my blog listen i doubt blerta gare work with we'll go along before that house goes there is a product it is a drain cleaner stay away from any kind of acids in you've probably heard that before e what the the the big buzzes now in really what works really good you said the perfect word ghankay is an enzyme during cleaner and an enzyme literally eats the gun could eats the bacteria uh big roc be i see makes a main drain cleaner an enzyme green clear i'd recommend.

dyer carter
"bob welcome" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Okay bob welcome to handle all we can do for you thank you uh my white wait four months ago and i had a policy to force earth not a big one seven thousand dollars in all the work done in check we around okay uh so wait a sect so yeah life insurance policy your wife dis you policy i'm assuming you've submitted the death certificate and said i'd like my money how much money we talking about where are we talking about seventy okay but it's still it's still something you probably paying it over a number of years and win did you submit the claim how long ago bill actually it was less than two years and eric they say they're investigating but they've had all of this stuff for quite a while okay hold iso way way the policy says within two years of the death uh they're not going to pay correct no no it they're gonna investigate okay so there are so how long it they've been investigating i four mind think she four mine i have two months so it's been a month and a half two months for their investigation right right yeah that's not very long okay that's not a month and a half two months to investigate a policy no that's not unreasonable at all they probably have a ton of them that they're trying to get out of and that's what they live for it's the were never going to pay you insurance company whenever you actually ensure with those people a seven thousand dollar policy i assume it's a burial policy i don't think comes from the big companies i think you see these on television all the time and i love it you pay only 25 cents per unit dealing tell you how much it costs in terms.

bob life insurance policy insurance company eric two months two years one seven thousand dollars seven thousand dollar four months
"bob welcome" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Okay bob welcome to handle on law because do for you a whole queue up come my wife passed away four months ago and uh i had a policy through force fears and got a fake when it seven five thousand dollars in all their dominant jack we around okay uh so i won't wait sex so yeah life insurance policy your wife dis uh you are policy i'm assuming you've submitted the death certificate and said i i'd like my money how much money we talked about where are we talking about seven times okay but it's still it's still some you probably paying it over a number of years and when did you submit the claim how long ago they'll actually it was less than two years and eric they say they're investigating but they've had all of this stuff for quite a while okay hold iso way weight the policy says within two years of the death of they're not going to pay correct no no it said they're gonna investigate okay so there i saw how long it they've been investigating uh i bet it's been four mind think he passed away i four mines on that i have two months yeah so it's been an month and a half two months four their investigation right right yeah that's not very long okay yeah that's not a month and a half two months to investigate a policy now that saw not unreasonable at all they probably have a ton of them that they're trying to get out of and that's what they live for it's the were never going to pay you insurance company whenever you actually ensure with those people a seven thousand dollar policy i assume it's a burial policy i don't think comes from the big companies i think you see these on television all the time and i love it you pay only 25 cents per unit they don't even tell you how much it costs in terms.

bob life insurance policy insurance company eric two months two years seven five thousand dollars seven thousand dollar four months
"bob welcome" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:17 min | 4 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Six five five mike they bob welcome how are you i'm foreign thanks i'm glad you're on the your spot on when amy who pointing out the fact that we have to accept even speak we don't wife uh it seems like a left wants to get the credit it it involved in ratifying their censorship of cliche oil a second point uh the klan people no matter how turk baggage they may same kilowatt of coq including myself had a permit to assemble in this regard to their statue being taken down the insofar people came in and they had truncheons helmet clubs rock and they didn't have a permit to show up and i'd like to thank you for bringing all this talk i mean though i mean it's it's my it's my pleasure because it's important you right those protesters in charlottesville they came ready to rumbled isn't that they were ready to they were ready to fight and they came out i wonder who gave him who tipped them off to come in such huge numbers yeah forehand and and for the fat and the idea that the president got condemned and has been blasted for daring to point out that he condemns hate and violence and bigotry from all sides i i love to go back to the critics and if you're one of them please call me because i want to ask you directly if you're criticising the president for co for calling out hate and bigotry and violence from all sides tell me does that mean you defend hate and bigotry and violence if it comes from a a particular shot up one particular side what side do you defend hate and bigotry and violence tell me tell me if you hate donald trump and you light to push back that he got over the weekend which led to him yesterday with great specificity condemning white supremacy nazis and the and the kkk if you're glad he got that pushback and you and you think it's deserve it tell me what that means because i wanna know what side you think it's okay to exhibit hate and violence and.

mike amy charlottesville president donald trump klan
"bob welcome" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"bob welcome" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Mike bob you're next bob welcome how are you are you though unlike other that i i actually i report art order he was a actually wicket bernie sanders order and napa that but when i in metric darkest you didn't hear about this year and increase year on the radio when i have bought it up the her first response all hopefully mitch mcconnell that got got wild what you said that your girlfriend showed that eckhard your girlfriend show that yeah while that's all that's awful you might wanna think about a new girlfriend well you know we we are we've come to an artist adding now our whenever she talk politics i will not listen door on because at your a shouting match that but that kind of reaction bob dunn the transcend politics that study even politics that's just that is the awful that's that's that's like yet vichy's like that with all anything politics i mean she hardcore democrat accurate you will not admit to a registered independent on enough i you know the democrats are not i'm not a democrat well you registered democrat or you're a democrat do you know how many tweets i got and text emails and messages i got from people who said things like i wished ted cruz played more baseball or i wish you was steve king who got shot i mean this kind of stuff is so awful and honestly bob i'm going to my business your personal life but i would i would i would push back and challenge your girlfriend on having that kind of reaction that i wish was mitch mcconnell he got shot that's a terrible awful thing to say and does sometimes it doesn't matter what your political your political stripes are you just got a call somebody out for be wrong brigitte the call the good luck sure good luck eight hundred six five five.

Mike bob ted cruz baseball steve king mitch mcconnell bob dunn