25 Burst results for "Bob Pittman"

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Tech support, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Henry driver. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> People are increasingly <Speech_Male> turning to socially <Speech_Male> responsible <Speech_Male> ESG funds, <Speech_Male> but don't always <Speech_Music_Male> understand what companies <Speech_Music_Male> make up these investments. <Speech_Male> I'm chase Henderson, <Speech_Male> host of the <Speech_Music_Male> wise investor show, <Speech_Male> every week we discuss <Speech_Male> the latest financial <Speech_Male> trends and what <Speech_Male> investors need to know <Speech_Male> about them. To learn <Speech_Male> the truth behind ESG <Speech_Male> funds <Speech_Male> and to become a better informed <Speech_Male> wise <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> investor, listen to <Speech_Male> the wise investor show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at the wise <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> investor group dot com <Speech_Music_Male> or find us on <Speech_Music_Male> your favorite podcast <Silence> app. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Spring <Speech_Female> is around the corner <Speech_Female> and we're thinking about <Speech_Female> our health and wellness. <Speech_Female> What do fiber <Speech_Female> magnesium and niacin <Speech_Female> have in common? <Speech_Female> They're found in peanuts. <Speech_Female> When it comes to <Speech_Female> eating peanuts, peanut <Speech_Female> butter and peanut products. <Speech_Female> The research <Speech_Female> is clear. Peanuts <Speech_Female> improve your health. <Speech_Female> Celebrate <Speech_Female> march, national <Speech_Female> peanut month by making <Speech_Female> healthy choices <Speech_Female> and choose peanuts as <Speech_Female> your next snack. <Speech_Female> Visit about peanuts <Speech_Female> dot com to <Speech_Female> learn more and to order <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> your next peanut snack <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> today. That's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> right, visit <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> about peanuts <Silence> <Advertisement> dot com. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> From the creator of <Speech_Female> the bright Sessions comes a <Speech_Female> new fiction podcast <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for all ages. <Speech_Female> When a fellow student <Speech_Music_Female> vanishes, <Speech_Music_Female> max starts to look into <Speech_Music_Female> the disappearance. <Speech_Music_Female> Her investigation <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> draws her deep <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> into the dark Woods <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> around Hastings and even <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> deeper into the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> secrets and lies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the course through the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> veins of the sleepy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> town. This new <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> YA mystery from <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> writer director Lauren <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is an audio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> drama with heart and <Speech_Female> wit that involves the <Speech_Female> audience in a way no fiction <Speech_Female> podcast ever <Speech_Female> has. Listen <Speech_Female> to maxim miles on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts.

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

06:44 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Was like my whole childhood. Well, you know, in my childhood, my parents said, turn off that TV, turn off the radio. Oh, which is funny because you then went and put the radio on television with MTV. So there's always something that kids would occupy themselves with or people will rather than just enjoy ourselves and our space. And it's hard sometimes to feel comfortable with yourself in that space because you really have to confront your space. And you have to live with you. There's nothing to distract you. There's nothing to keep you busy. There's nothing to drive your ambition. But I think it's wildly helpful. And when I can have those moments to recharge my batteries, I'm so much better at all this other stuff that I think is better if I keep working. Yeah. But I discover again and again, it's actually better when I recharge myself a little bit and then come back to the task. And I find that if I'm working on a problem or trying to come up with a creative solution, even looking for a line in an advertising campaign, that the best thing I can do is sort of, okay, load myself up, understand all, and then forget about it. Yeah. And at that moment where I'm in my most send moment, down in my alpha state, which for me is about a 15 minute hot shower in the morning where I just zone out. Suddenly the answer just pop in my head. And I have run out of the shower so many times with a pen and a wet piece of paper, writing a speech, writing down something because it comes to me. And I think there's a great lesson in that, which is it's not going to come when you try too hard. It's going to come in your most relaxed moment in which you're just letting things drift over you. That's an enormous amount of trust that is required to let go of I think being in control. Probably. It's interesting when I was a young man. I would give speeches and I would write the speeches and slavishly read them. And at a certain point, I realized I could do a much better talk if I just got up and talked. So I would have maybe three point scribbled down a little note and get up and start talking. The scary thing when you do that is you have to your point about trust, trust yourself, because suddenly I'm standing around all these people that I really thought of nothing, except a couple of things. I want to talk about. And I just go with the flow. And I find when I do that, it's much better. It's much more what I really want to say. I think people enjoy it more. It's more relevant to them. And even sometimes we're doing a, you know, I'm doing a speech for the company or something. And I've got to do that inspirational closing. I don't have any idea what I'm going to say. And I just step out there and start talking. And that's one of the ones where you really have to just trust that it will come to you, but boy is it scary at that moment. Now, as I've been doing it long enough that I probably am not scared enough, but it's just the sort of relaxed go out there and whatever is in your mind your heart let it start coming out. And just trust that it will be the right thing as opposed to all I said the wrong word. I stumbled on a word or I said, no one cares about any of that. They care about your message. Wow, I wholeheartedly agree. I really do. I think that so much is about letting go and trusting, and we don't do that. We don't, because I think it goes back to planning. We think you have to have a plan. You have to have a script. You have to have a preordained idea of what you're doing. When like you said, it's a random walk, life. It's not prescribed, and yet I honestly think it's fair of death. I really do. I really think that the distraction and the planning and this idea of control is because we know, like you said, where this ends. This is where it's going. But if we actually lived with that idea, there is a clock ticking. Don't waste a single moment. Worrying about the moment not looking like you think it should. I think it is the mortality I agree with you. I think that is a big consideration for people. And it drives us more than we recognize. I didn't realize until my mom died that it was a huge consideration. It's actually incredible. It's actually an extraordinary moment because you can use it like rocket fuel to just be like, I'm no longer available to judge whether this looks like how it should. In fact, the word should. I've said this before and this podcast. My mother used to say the word should be buried in a big hole in the backyard. Your mother was very enlightened. Bad things look loss of our parents does something to us all. My mom died in her sleep. And so I didn't get a chance to be with her as she died. My dad was dying and died slowly and my brother and I sat with him today he died and held his hand as he died. In a weird way, it was such a beautiful experience to be able to share that moment with him because I think we're so afraid of it. We want to avoid it. But I went on the journey with my dad. I'm still here, but it was a lot of talking to my dad. It's okay, you know, you can let go. We love you, and I'll sort of all the reasons why he had a wonderful life, and why we love him so much. And with my mother, I sort of missed that moment, although I had a great relationship with her and felt very close to her. And even after her death, I still feel her presence. But I think you're exactly right. We're sort of fearful that we want to run it away. I had a house in Mexico for about 20 years. And I got to know day of the dead there, which is turned out to be one of my favorite holidays because it is so contrary to what we do in America. And in this little town, San Miguel de. There was a expats cemetery, and there was this cemetery for the locals. And on day of the dead, it's so sad because there's no activity in the cemetery for the expats. It's dark. And in the other, they're celebrating the life of those people, and they have their food out their favorite songs. They're acting as if they're still alive and still a part of them. And I just thought it's a beautiful experience to accept death and to sort of put it into your life as opposed to as you point out. Spend your whole life trying to avoid the existence of it. Bob is not only a wonderful podcast guest, but he is also a wonderful podcast host. You can listen to his own podcast, math and magic, wherever you listen to your podcasts, and while you're at it, check out the iHeartRadio app for radio station's music and more podcasts. Many questions is hosted and written by me, Minnie Driver. Supervising producer, Aaron Kaufman, producer, Morgan lavoy, research assistant, Marissa Brown. Original music, Surrey baby, by many driver. Additional music by Aaron Kaufman. Executive produced by me, Minnie Driver. Special thanks to Jim nikolay. Will Pearson, Addison O'Day, Lisa costella, and a unique oppenheim at WK PR. De la pescado Kate driver and Jason Weinberg and for constantly solicited.

MTV San Miguel Aaron Kaufman Mexico Minnie Driver America Morgan lavoy Marissa Brown Bob Jim nikolay Surrey Lisa costella Pearson Addison Kate driver Jason Weinberg
"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:33 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? I think it has to be a mother child relationship, which is one of the most beautiful pure relationships I've ever seen. I mean, I'd love to say it's dad child because I love my kids and I hope they love me as much as I love them but I actually think there's something about the mother and child childbirth with a child. I mean that experience that just sort of indescribable Bond. I think is pretty powerful. And sure, hard imagine love could be any deeper and pure than that. Was that observable? Because you were there at the birth of your children or because you've observed their relationship with their mother. I think both and also the relationship. How would my mother? And watching other people with their mother, I have a close friend who was the victim of just an awful abuses a child. And I said, how do you cope with it? She said, I think about that abuser as once was just a baby, and their mother loved that person. And I try and take it back to love, as opposed to what they became. And I go, wow, that is like so advanced because I'm not sure I could ever bring myself to do that. But I do think this idea and it was one of the ones that sort of keyed me in and sort of focused me again on that mother child love. It being so pure that it's what we sort of all aspire to in some form or another. That's so interesting. I mean, I think you're right. Like, there is. It's unadulterated, you know? It is the version of unconditional. Yeah, completely unconditional. And it may turn into something that gets distorted over time. But at that moment, it's this sort of truly unconditional love. I hope what we all can achieve and strive for. Yeah. The show looks like some people don't want to strive for that. Or they don't know the power of it. You see unconditionally except for, and you go, no, no, there's not no except for us. Yeah. Look, it's easier for me to talk about it because I had that for my mother. And I know people that didn't have it from the parents. It's a much more difficult experience for them. It's the regret of parenting issues. But if you've got it, you can always call upon it. And it's that sense that it's always there. Omnipresent gives you this insecurity to go through your life with sort of a base. And I think people who have not been given that gift have a lot of work. They've got to do that fortunately. I don't have to do, so I'm not judgmental about the issues. They deal with because I understand that they're going through something that I can't totally relate to. It's funny, I think about a lot. Maybe since mom died. The love for a mother and the love for my child. It's like a what's it called? Is it a double helix the shape of the DNA? Keeps going? Yeah. Midterm election years, like 2022, tend to bring more unstable markets as politicians pursue policies to motivate their base, we often see more volatility. But the time following a midterm election year can serve as a great buying opportunity. I'm Simon Hamilton, host of the wise investor show. Every week we discuss the latest economic trends and what investors need to know about them. For ideas on how to prepare your portfolio for 2022 and beyond and to become a better informed, wise investor, listen to the wise investor show. At the wise investor group dot com or find us on your favorite podcast app. This summer I want to go to Mel which camp accomplish. My Friends say we can swim, play sports, Kraft, ride horses, and have new adventures every day. Mel would camp accomplish is for kids ages 5 to 18 with and without disabilities, with ten weeks of day camp and overnight camp options to choose from. It's all located in southern Maryland with paddle boats, ropes courses, and outdoor stage, and tons of space to run around and have fun. Sign me up at Mel would dot org slash camp. Spring is around the corner, and we're thinking about our health and wellness. What do fiber magnesium and niacin have in common? They're found in peanuts. When it comes to eating peanuts, peanut butter and peanut products. The research is clear. Peanuts improve your health. Celebrate march, national peanut month by making healthy choices and choose peanuts as your next snack. Visit about peanuts dot com to learn more and to order your next peanut snack today. That's right, visit about peanuts dot com. So what quality do you like least about yourself? Lack of patience. Ah. I run things too quickly. I want to move too quickly through things. I don't sometimes take the time. We've just talked about active listening, et cetera. I keep wanting to jump to a conclusion and jump to an action and jump to the next step. And not sort of savor the moment, take the time to sort of let it all unfold and blossom. So patience is not a virtue of mine, but I work hard at trying to compensate. When you're impatient, what do you impatient to get to? That's exactly the point. Nothing. There's no reason to have that impatience. I can take a beat. I can listen a little longer. You think a beat between the last thing someone says and what I say, I can think about it a second. I tend to move too quickly to action and again, I try and modulate it. I have some degree of self awareness that may have self control. And I do work on that. Going back to the point about happiness, it does interfere with my happiness and others happiness if they feel like I'm not listening to them enough and I haven't taken the time to truly consider everything they have a sense like I'm moving too quickly to a conclusion. It's harder for them to be happy and it's harder for me to be happy. Do you think there's anything other than catching oneself in the moment of doing these things that we would like to change about ourselves, that when you're doing it and having an awareness of it is how it evolves. I can have some self awareness and begin to control it to a certain degree. I stopped working in 2002 completely and I've been working full time since I was 15 years old. Probably never taken more than a two week vacation ever in that period of time. And my vacation was like long weekends or something. It always thinking about work. And when I stopped working, it took me about two or three months to come off the adrenaline addiction. And then I discovered that it's actually possible to be bored. And I began to enjoy boredom and go, wow, I'm bored right now. I'm just gonna wallow in this boredom. And I think that my patients got a lot better because I just sort of wallowed in the moment and accepted whatever it was as interesting. Boredom was suddenly interesting. Wow, this is a great sensation. Boredom. And get excited about whatever life threw me at that moment. And not feel like I had to quickly do something. You know, when I first stopped working, if I went to the beach, if I was lying on the beach, I'd go, what am I going to do now? What I'm lying on the beach. And then at a certain point, I begin to go, wow, this is great. I'm just lying here. And it was a real transformation. And gave me an insight that I can still use even though I've gone back to my adrenaline addiction. And I did go back to work. And my impatience is still a problem for me. I can call upon this time I had to go boredom is good. And I should look for a little more of that in a little bit of that ah time where I don't have to process anything. I don't have to have an opinion. I can just let life tripped over me a little bit. And that's sort of the opposite of impatience. Yeah. It's interesting. We were spent a lot of time being bored when we were kids because I was, you know, obviously they weren't cell phones and computers. And my son sometimes I say, put the phone down and stare out the window and see what happens. And he does, and he's like, it's so weird. You kind of go into a trance and I was like, yeah, that.

Mel Simon Hamilton Kraft Maryland
"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

08:44 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"All human beings have emotions, and we need to learn how to understand and control them, but not avoid them. Better help is customized online therapy that offers video, phone, and even live chat sessions with your therapist. So you don't have to see anyone on camera if you don't want to. It's much more affordable than in person therapy and you can be matched with a therapist in under 48 hours. Give it a try and see where over 2 million people have used better help online therapy. Many questions listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com slash mini. That's better, HELP dot com slash mini. Feeling exhausted, between the pandemic, work burnout endless social media scrolling and then never ending to do list. It seems we all are. So welcome to sleep awareness month. Embrace the restorative power of rest all month long with Casper. Whether you're tossing and turning in need of more support or waking up too hot, Kasper has a mattress for you. Rest assured the adaptive Casper wave snow mattress provides support where you need it with 86 gel pods and comes with snow technology for over 12 hours of cooler sleep. Also, the Casper original mattress is available in both foam and hybrid. Every Casper mattress is made with 4D sleep technology. Count on Casper to get you your best night's sleep and your best day tomorrow. As always, Kasparov has free shipping and free returns. Get the rest you need. This sleep awareness month and every month shop all Casper products, mattresses sheets, pillows, and more at Casper dot com. Use code iHeart 100 for $100 off select mattresses. That's code iHeart 100 for a $100 off select mattresses. Exclusion supplies, the Casper dot com for more details. It is John a rather you know I'm all about making things as quick as possible. That's why I love the Safeway app all the new deals, all the rewards and the perks. You can use it to view the weekly ad clip digital coupons and shop any way you want in store, delivery drive of and go, open the Safeway app, clip your deals, and then order your items online and experience Safeway associate, then is going to carefully select your groceries, bag your order and bring it right to your car or deliver right to your door. Download the app or visit Safeway dot com for details. What person place or experience most ought to do your life? My mom and dad. I couldn't have asked for a better childhood if there's a parental lottery. I certainly want it. And you know, I lived in a house where the word you couldn't say was hate. We don't hate anything, honey. And it really set me on a course. I'm not saying I've looked up to all those expectations, but I have them at my core. And I am very grateful for them. And I think that certainly shaped me also think I have to say I was shaped by I grew up in Mississippi in the 50s and 60s, which was segregated when I started school. There were black and white schools that were colored only bathrooms and white only bathrooms. When I graduated from high school, our school was about 50 50 white black. So everything happened in that period I was going to school in the civil rights movement. So, you know, everybody's influenced, I think, by whatever that big thing that's overhangs them and their childhood. And that probably for me was the one that hit me the most. And so as a result, I sort of still see that in society and look for it and notice it. Did she talk about the civil rights movement with your parents like did they address it with you or was it more experiential? Oh yeah. And my family, it was a big issue and everybody there was working on it, at least the people I knew working and trying to work for change. My dad was a methodist minister and in Mississippi, they had a black they have conferences in the Methodist Church, and they had a black conference and a white conference in the same geographic area. And my dad made it his mission to integrate the two and to combine them, which meant the Ku Klux Klan came after my dad a few times I was a little young to sort of understand the impact of that. That was going on. And then after they merged it, my dad was in the by that time in the executive branch of the church and worked on trying on what he called reconciliation is trying to get people to join together and sort of move past it. And mentored some of the black ministers as they went into some predominantly white churches and really tried to change the tenor of things. But there are, you know, awful stories that go with it too. My mother's first cousin who she was very close to is like a brother was the school superintendent of Philadelphia Mississippi. And he had thrown some clansman kid out of school for harassing a black child and they came one Friday night shot up his daughter's bedroom and my mother's cousin won that committing suicide and just sort of couldn't see a way out felt torn between doing the right thing and protecting his family. And their awful stories like that and certainly, you know, that pales in comparison to the stories that the black community suffered through. And the horrors that they dealt with and the degradation. I think for all of us who were there, my mom and I were watching a NPR special on the civil rights movement in the 90s, we were in New York, watching it together. And my mother turned to me with tears and just got it, she said, for the life of me, I can't imagine how we let that go on. And I think there's something in that. When you grow up and things a certain way at what point do you look around and say, hey, this isn't right. And the lesson I've tried to take out of it that goes beyond this is what am I seeing today that's not right, but I'm just not noticing because it's quote unquote normal. And I think they're probably a lot of I'm not even saying right now, but I at least try to look for those and as we look in the world is what is happening that's not right. What moment do you notice it? And then when you notice it, what do you do about it? But I think as human beings, we all have that obligation. And unfortunately, fortunately, I have something in my past that was so horrible. And the fact that my mother looking at me at that time, I'm going to still remember that and saying, yeah, my mother grew up at it and sort of didn't see it. Didn't sort of see what was possible. And then take an action. And they could have a few people had seen it earlier. Do you look today and do you feel whether it's a similar or maybe it's akin to the groundswell of change that is hopefully happening in some of the systemic shit that exists in our world, like having seen things really shift in the 60s. Do you think that that's playing out now? Do you know present world collapse? I think we're finding there are things that are falling apart and there are things that are growing and blossoming. My dad used to talk about when I talk about somebody did something terrible. He said, well, I believe in the redemptive power of love. He was talking about forgiveness, that we should all have an open heart to forget people. If somebody says something wrong to someone, say, hey, here's what's wrong with that and give them the chance to say, wow, you're right, I'm sorry. And sorry means something. Apologies do mean something. I mean, I love the old things slow to blame quick to forgive. I think there's always a room for them. And always room for love in our hearts to accept that people basically, I think most people want to do good, I think most people want to do the right thing, there was time at which I'm sure we've all had it, which I've been in a meeting someone says something. And it's off, and after the meeting, I'll say, you know, I know you maybe didn't realize it, but you said this. And almost always. They're horrified. They're mortified. They go, oh, I didn't even realize that I didn't see it that way. I feel so badly. And so I think that's actually most people's feelings. And it worked at try and push upon our people that don't be afraid of the mistake because we learn from it. Forget who it was. I ate a win or I learned something. And I preached to my kids that, you know, a failure and success are the same thing. They're just a stepping stone. They're not the end. And what we call a failure is I step on that stone and I go in the other direction. On what we call a success I step on that stomach, keep going in the same direction. But those aren't the ends. They're just merely a step on the journey. And I think if we can wrap our heads around the fact that we're constantly moving with constantly growing, we're constantly changing, then it allows us to be a little more gracious with our forgiveness and our understanding. Being a preacher's kid always remember vengeance as mine say at the lord. Wait, what does that mean, vengeance mind that God was like only I can have vengeance? Yeah, don't have vengeance. That's not for humans to have. That's not for you people. Yeah. Yeah. God, I wish I wish he'd given us a proper list. This is really not your cast out because you ate from the tree of knowledge. I want a really specific list. It's why I do this podcast because I like very specific questions so I can have very specific answers.

Safeway Casper Mississippi Kasper clansman Kasparov Methodist Church John NPR Philadelphia New York
"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

10:27 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Trailblazers across all these different disciplines. So I adapted Proust questionnaire and I wrote my own 7 questions that I personally think are pertinent to a person's story. They are. When and where were you happiest? What is the quality you like least about yourself? What relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? What question would you most like answered? What person place or experience has shaped you the most? What would be your last meal? And can you tell me something in your life that's grown out of a personal disaster? And I've gathered a group of really remarkable people, ones that I am honored and humbled to have had the chance to engage with. You may not hear their answers to all 7 of these questions. We've whittled it down to which questions felt closest to their experience or the most surprising or created the most fertile ground to connect. My guest today on mini questions is the cofounder of MTV and iHeartMedia where he is the current chairman, bob Pittman. Bob is a media entrepreneur who feels to me like he's sort of in a league of his own. He's had so many interesting and creative incarnations in a ton of consumer focused industries just to give you an idea. Bob has been CEO of AOL networks. 6 flags theme parks, century 21 real estate and AOL Time Warner, as well as being CEO of clear channel, which was what evolved and expanded into the current iHeartMedia. So it's extraordinarily varied. He's one of the most interested people I've ever met. And when you're having a conversation with him, ideas sort of spark off each other, creating this brilliant feeling of forward momentum and given the scope of his success, it feels like, you know, he could probably sit back and enjoy the extraordinarily diverse fruits of his labor. But whenever we speak, I always get to see the perspective of a person who is constantly looking forward and is interested in the exploration and unfolding of life, not just business. Feels like a weird time to be asking this first question, but it's always pertinent within peacetime or war, but when and where were you happiest? I hope that I'm happiest right now. Someone told me when I was a young man said, you know, most people never live because they're in the past with their regrets in the future with their worries. And they never get right here right now. And so I've tried as a human, not always successful, to sort of understand that and try and be happy wherever I am, whatever I'm doing, and at the moment I'm alive. I've had a lot of happy moments, but I want this to be the happiest moment, and I want to appreciate this moment the most of any moment I could have. Is that part of the contingency of happiness for you is presence and appreciation? It's a good way to say it. I think so, but it's also, I just don't want to think, well, I was happy then. Why am I not happy now? I know. I mean, to me, happiness is one of those things that I can either choose to be happy or I can choose to be unhappy. And how do I get myself in a frame where I just look at things and go, I'm happy. I'm feeling good. I appreciate it. Yeah. I mean, sometimes just saying it. It's tricky with circumstance not lining up with one's expectations and even though I think that expectation might be the deadliest psychological weapon that we have against ourselves of expecting reality to conform to what it is we want as opposed to being in the isness of what it is. I agree with you. I think one of the worst things we do this can sound very weird and I don't mean it this extreme, but I'm going to say it this extreme. The worst thing we do is plan. Plans don't come true. Something wonderful can happen, but we sort of develop, I think, to reduce our fear of the future and our anxiety about the future. But to me, you know, I do I have a plan. Of course, in business, I've got a game plan. We lay out the year, but it's interesting. Even at work, we have a weekly meeting what we call our stratcom and is the senior leaders of the company and the goal is to adjust the plan. Because we know no plan. And even in a week the plan has changed, that this plan is not going to come true. And the plan is to hope it's a dream. It's an, as you say, an expectation. But I think sometimes we get ourselves off track by saying I plan something and I'm unhappy because it didn't come out as planned. Wait a minute, you made the plan. Why don't you make another plan? Make a plan where it came out exactly as you want. Bevels a lot of people and leads people astray from their own enjoyment of this journey we have called life. You know, and at the end of the day, this thing it ends the same way, no matter what we do, you know, most business they go, you know, the means is not important, it's just the end. What are you going to do? Well, in life, it's the opposite. The ends the same no matter what you do. So it's all about the journey. And I think if we can begin to get an appreciation of that journey, it not only makes it better for us, spiritually, mentally, et cetera, but also even in business it makes it better because which is realistic about that so many variables you can't control, stop trying to control. But if we know these things, why do we persist then with the expectation of circumstance either conforming to the idea that we have about what a good version of that is? When everything does as we've just seen in the last two years, how things come apart in an instant. Why are we still so attached as humans to this idea of it working out as we envision it as opposed to going, let me stay incredibly loose and fluid with the vessel that the things I want is going to come to me and because maybe it's going to be different. I think the ambiguity and the randomness makes people very anxious and uncomfortable. And I think if they can do a plan and say, I've got my 5 year plan. I've got my one year plan. I have my weak plant. I know what I'm going to do. I know what's coming for me. It goes, ah, I've reduced the anxiety. But I'm not sure that's healthy, but I will tell you some people criticize me because a year so ambiguous. You know, you're not being cleared. I go, I'm trying to be realistic that there's only so much that's knowable and life I think is more of a random walk than it is a planned experience. I look back at, you know, even talking about business, I look back on my business career and go, gosh, it's been a series of meteors flying out of the sky and hitting me on the head. It's that kind of randomness that my career has been about. And when I was a young man, I thought I had a plan. That plan fell apart really quickly. And thank goodness I sort of opened my mind to say, oh, well, maybe I'll do that then. If that's popping up in my personal life as well, is you think, gosh, I know it's going to be great for my kids. I know what my kids should do. I know what school they should get to. Wow, it's like, that's not at all what happens. And if I try and force my kids into my plan for them, I'm not doing them a favor, and I'm not doing anything for my relationship with them. It's the idea of how do I do active listening and really trying to understand the moment and where they are and how I can support them as opposed to try and get them to conform to my plan. Yeah, I think it's actually the secret of happiness. In fact, that's what I think happiness is is being able to let go of what you think happiness should be and allow it to be what is and fit yourself. There's a great quote, I can't remember who's William James or something about our experience is what we attend to. Genuinely, if you look at something, it can only look like this and my happiness in my everything my business, my relationship, my everything is hung on it looking this way. Well, it's also one that was saying as reality is what you perceive it to be. And you know, this whole discussion now about is does the universe create consciousness or does consciousness create the universe? I mean, you get the very fundamental levels of existence and so, you know, when you get down the happiness is, I think the challenge is to be happy with what we have when we have it, how we have it. And to accept happiness as opposed to reject happiness. I agree. So Eleanor Roosevelt, people are as happy as they make up their mind to be. I like that. I always say that. Yeah, that's a very good line. She was cool. I liked her. Yes, she was very cool. In your life, can you tell me about something that has grown out of a personal disaster? Sure. When I was 6 years old, I was at a family reunion at Thanksgiving and a little farm outside of Holly springs, Mississippi. And one of my uncles put me on a horse to give me all the kids to ride in the horse, reared up threw me off, stepped in my face, and I lost an eye. By the way, lucky the worst didn't kill me, so I'm lucky that all I did was lose an eye. But having a artificial eye growing up made me a bit of an outsider. I was the kid with the glass eye and kids are not young kids, especially can be extraordinarily cruel, not accepting. But I think that experience gave me the feeling of what it feels like to be on the outside. What it feels like to be an outsider gave me a little bit of detachment from being on the inside and allowed me to sort of grow into being myself. Probably helped with my empathy and developing that. And I think I probably wouldn't be anywhere near the human being I am without having had that what you would consider to be a personal disaster. But ultimately, I think if I look back on my life and say, why am I here at this point instead of somewhere else? I have to attribute a lot of it to what I got out of being the kid with one eye. Wow, were there any other children that you grew up with who had either a disability or had some other challenge that they were dealing with? Or were you really isolated in that experience? I was probably the kid with the problem. I mean, I think today we would probably identify some of the kids as having dyslexia. Dyslexia was undiagnosed back then and you had these kids that were thought to be dumb. Right. That were not at all dumb. They were brilliant, but they had dyslexia. And so the ratios like that that look back on now and go, gosh, it's very clear what was going on, but at the time it was more physical. Do you have an arm or leg, and I or something missing? It was isolated, but it was also it allowed me to build who I.

bob Pittman AOL networks AOL Time Warner Bob clear channel MTV William James Eleanor Roosevelt Holly springs Mississippi Dyslexia
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"Is pretty unlikely. Talk a little bit about quick. Take on bio investing texans super hot. The bios looking pretty hot too. How do you think about it. Yeah so bio is gone through this tremendous breakthrough in a change in the way we model biology. When you and i were kids we have this chemistry model of the human body. And you know that took you to certain place. But now we've got an information bottle kind of based on the genome the microbiome therapy genome. And so if you have an information model of the human body then you can apply computer science techniques to it and you can apply to and that opens up a world that is absolutely completely different. The example that everybody is so grateful for on that is the vaccine so right in the old days to make a vaccine we would try and conjure up like some small amount of the disease. We would manufacturer by like growing it in a chicken egg. And then we inject you with it and hope you didn't get too sick. The vaccine like we print a message. We manufacture it by printing a message that we send to yourself that says hey buildup this protein to defend against this virus and then that message has gone in two weeks and all you have is what your body produced an. They're amazingly effective that difference in precision like we call it drug discovery like imagine you did bridge discovery to figure out how to build a bridge right. You build a thousand bridges one. That didn't collapse that's it. That's how we do drug discovery. Now we can do drug engineering. We can do so much more. It's just tremendously exciting. One of the things that that we think about a lot is back when you and i grew up like we used to get lost right like you would have to call somebody. Hey i'm up this phone booth. i don't know how to get to your house and stark. Where am i. Then he'd never do that anymore have. Gps you know where you are at all times ten years from now like. We're not going to wonder why we're sick. We're going to know why we're sick every single time. Because we're going to be able to sequence our blood or microbiome we're going to have so many signals and then we're going to have a which can look at thousands of dimensions and inputs very easily match us against everybody who's ever been sick and say okay. This is what you've got as opposed to like human being. You know listening to your heart taking your blood pressure and trying to figure it out who can only think in three dimensions. It's really just an amazing time in biology right now. If you could go back in time it gives some advice to your twenty one year old. Self what would that advice be. it would probably be. Don't worry so much because it's gonna turn out okay. Because i worry about everything but then i wonder if i told myself not to worry what it turned out. Okay maybe the worry is what got me. They're always loved that line. If i've known i was going to be successful i wouldn't have worked so hard. Yeah exactly exactly so. We always end each math magic episode with shoutout to the greatest on the two sides of marketing and business. It's what the podcast is about math magic the analytical view the math and the creativity those people just just burst out of them. The magic as you think about and boy you know a lot of who would you give the shout out to on the math side. And who would you give it to on the magic side on the creative side. I'm gonna give it to a friend of mine's shock ascend gore. Who's got a new book coming idea. Heat he spent nineteen years in prison and seven and solitary confinement for a murder that he did commit when he was nineteen years old and he transformed his life let. I still can't understand how he did it. But you know he's come out and he's just become this roy amazingly successful writer and so forth but he's got this new book called letters to the sons of society about his two sons one which he had at right as he went into prison. And who cut really raised because he was behind bars and then another yet when he came out and they've completely different. Pass as you would expect in him trying to reconcile that. I always think of the hardest thing about being a creative is getting all the way to the truth Particularly when the truth is filled with pain and he's gone through so much pain to get to. The truth is just amazing. And on the on the mayor i am going to give it to jeff bezos. Because where would we be without amazon. During the pandemic i mean. How miserable would that be without like the greatest logistics company ever bill right in our own country giving us every single thing we delivered to our house through everything that went wrong all the time and by the way keeping our entire computing infrastructure. Up running me this. Like what an amazing feat of accomplishment there been you have made a huge impact on business and society. You've seen things. no one else has seen. I'm sure you've got a lot more to see And you're giving us good lessons as you go. Thanks for sharing with us today. yeah absolutely. It's great catch. This is been a tremendous amount of fun things. I picked up my conversation with one when you lead an innovative company. You aren't just leading the company but the industry itself. When ben was at netscape he and his team would run into challenges where the only way to building was to invent a new tool. Don't wait for problems to be solved by others instead. The solution to the founder of the company is often the best person that chart the path fall. Traditional venture capitalists often replace a company's founder with a season ceo who appears more prepared to scale company. Ben believes it's better to support the founder develop their skills and provide them with a network of support three. The best entrepreneurs are driven by more than just the bottom line. Ben said that. Most of the founders. He knows passionate about identifying problems and building innovative fixes for them. According to ben that kind of thinking is one of the ways business in helped make the world better four company. Culture doesn't need to be rigid instead. You should identify and then hold onto the elements of your company culture that add your competitive advantage beyond that. It's okay of different departments different offices or perhaps even different coast to things slightly differently. I'm bob pittman. Thanks for listening. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to math and magic a production of iheartradio. The show is hosted by bob. Pippen special thanks to sue schillinger for booking and wrangling are wonderful. Talent is no small feat mercer brown pulling research our editor. Derek clements our producer. Morgan lavoie our executive producer. Nikki tour and of course gail rahul eric. angel noel. Everyone who helped bring this show areas until next.

jeff bezos gore roy ben amazon Ben netscape bob pittman sue schillinger mercer brown Pippen Derek clements Morgan lavoie bob gail rahul eric angel noel Nikki
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"I actually think our era was probably better because there was something about and you remember it that that feeling that you're out there without net wave home like it was like okay. You're going to get it done or you're just gonna be hungry. There was no. I'm moving back in with mom. She definitely the room in the house for me in the in in my case my whole like wife and kids so i think that feeling of there's only one way out up and out and you've got to get it done is very powerful. 'cause there's so many things in life that make you wanna stop or make you wanna quit or make you wanna kinda not press forward and i think that you know kind of the lack of that you know that kind of nest that ever encompassing nest is tough to deal with for today's kids in that one like there's just that feeling that you can return home like your kids my kids you they. It's almost like they have too many choices. Like you hit whatever it was gonna make us money. That's what we were fucking doing. Like there was no okay. Should i do this or that. Or i'm not sure what i wanna do with my career like. We didn't have those thoughts a lot of what you get out of. Those early experiences is that you just went hard and the things you learn by going hard at something and giving it everything you have because you have to survive like there is just tremendous value in that. Let's continue a little bit on the idea of kids. And let's go back in time to you as a kid. You were product of life and berkeley california in the sixties seventies and eighties. Can you paint a picture of that time and place that you grew up in that influenced you i in a very weird childhood because you know my father. Was you probably remember ramparts magazine Which was kind of the magazine. The new left in the early seventies. He was the editor in chief. And so he was super left. You know basically a marxist and you know in one of the things early you know when i was four or five six seven eight years old is. He was very involved in the oakland chapter and the black panthers and so a lot of the people. I met the adults that i've met when i was a kid. Where panthers and that had a big influence on that politically at all but just stylistically. You know all the things that i end up you know be music or hurt people. Ask me like ben. why do you drink cognac. Nobody drinks out. I was like that was the pinpoint drunk they would always talk about. They're going to have a yak. I was like that. Sounds like the greatest thing ever so. That's kind of just where i ended up. But then you know. My father's politics changed all the way. As i got to be a teenager and that just kind of caused me to go. Okay should stay away from politics because nobody knows what's on but berkeley was a you know very integrated place which was a great benefit to me in that i learned so many cultures growing up. It was just such a different place than every other place. That wasn't my life that it kind of forced me to learn how to adapt culturally. I like the business world. Because i had no no concept of what like a corporate culture would would be like when i was a kid. We were all yelling at each other because we were more politics culture and so you know all those things get ended up being really valuable. You were this smart math kid. I know that. But i didn't know this. You also played football. How did having a foot. In both of those worlds help you. I mean those seem like pretty diametrically opposed. It's funny you know like might. My ability was mad. But i love football. And then you know because berkeley was such a hippie town and communist hate football. I have no idea why like what it is about. Football that doesn't go with communism like they're fine with basketball and gymnastics. You know other things but they really hate football and you know coming from like a communist heritage. You know being a teenager communist. I'm for so what. Football was great in that sense and so i just tried out for the team and I made the team and anybody who's played high school football at such amazing bonding experience. You get so much of that. Really tight camaraderie. So you got football. Let's move to the other thing. That was an influence hip hop clearly. Had a huge impact on you. It developed popular on the scene about the time you were growing up. Why and how hip hop. And why you and hip hop in. Felt like a breakthrough like okay. Here's something brand new. My parents don't know about this. Nobody knows what this is. I could imagine be like you know if you grew up when rock and roll hit it. Was that kind of feeling where. Oh my god this. Is you know such a different feeling. And then the other thing about it you know for me was it was so aspirational you head. These kids who like literally. They had so much nothing they would. They would make songs about their sneakers. And their sweats like aspiration is the thing independent of what you have and for me. It was such a great kind of motivation attitude. You know like you can make something from nothing. The whole culture of it had just tremendous appeal. And i got very into it now. You know along the way that there is this crazy incident where a friend that i grew up with who you know very very close family friend. Got shot then became blind and he didn't speak for three months. He was so depressed from being only thirteen year old kid and nothing could kind of bring him out of it. And i was in new york at the time you know in college and i recorded. Here's how like if i was i would record. Dj red alert and chuck chill-out shows. Because i thought like they were so exciting and they were so aspirational that. If i sent him these tapes from these shows that he would snap out of it and sure enough like all he wanted to talk about was dj. Red alert and check out. And so you know here. We started a band called blind and deaf crew so that forever.

football berkeley panthers oakland Football california ben gymnastics basketball new york
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"To math and magic production iheartradio. When you're a leader of an industry you gotta make the industry. It's just enough to make the company you've got to make the industry work. I am bob pittman and welcome to map the match stories from the frontiers of marketing. Today we have a guest who brings us insights from decades of being at the forefront of change technology and all the products and services that raido change. He's a mainstay of the silicon valley world. Ben horowitz the co founder and general partner of venture capital. Firm andriessen horowitz. Ben grew up in berkeley so he actually started out on the west coast. He's described his young self as incredibly shy but he was also incredibly smart but the strong math mind he was computer. Science guy in both the undergrad and grad world and not surprisingly spent his early career tech firms like silicon graphics. Lotus and netscape when netscape changed the world. He's always loved hip hop he's written brilliant books. The most recent is the hard thing about hard things. He's a coach and has helped countless entrepreneurs in best of all. He's a really nice guy. Welcome ben thanks bob. It's exciting to be here then. Exciting to be working with you again. Exactly it's we're like going back in time before we jump into that and the other good stuff i wanna start off with exploring you in sixty seconds sound good. Okay here we go. Do you prefer early. Rising earned night out at this stage of my life early rising. There was a time when i tried to keep jazz hours but no longer berkeley or silicon valley. Silicon valley cool. Dj red alert or chuck. Chill out called the red alert beach or mountains beat colombia or ucla ucla call or texts coffee or tea. Coffee raiders or forty niners raiders. Cats dogs dogs. It's about to get harder smartest person you know. I'll say mutasa harris childhood hero. George clinton favored rapper secret. Talent make them grits collard greens super. Good that's a hell of a talent favorite city florence guilty pleasure madden football. Let's jump into the real stuff right. Netscape change the world. It was the first commercially. Viable browser opened up the internet to mere mortals. And of course has been the foundation of what we have today. You were there at that moment contrast for us where we are today versus where you thought netscape was going to take us. You know so many of the things that we thought were going to happen did happen on the good the bad side so you know the world came on line. People have the library of congress in their pocket. People have better access to information now. The average person with a with a phone than the other present in the united states had in nineteen ninety. So it's like that has been amazing video audio worked All the industry's kind of moved onto the internet. We definitely thought all that would happen. And on the bad side. We did think there was going to be a lot of crime although we did. We thought we'd have a better chance at stopping it. There was a period where the entire industry just decided not to take security on. The internet seriously started with a technology that microsoft build called activex which everybody knew was going to be problematic but goes competitive and they did anyway and whatnot and then after that think we were really really kind of just went away from the idea that we had to build things super safely online. And that's what it has definitely didn't anticipate all the implications of social media in particular. You know what it meant for humanity so because we had kind of version of it we had newsgroups we The chat we had things on the internet in the early days and didn't quite happen the way it happened with facebook and twitter and instagram. These kinds of things. But i think that humanity is not really able to process everybody's opinion simultaneously at the same level in a way. That's quite spectacular. Did you anticipate that really was probably social than more than anything else would replace. News experts of that we would sort of. He's looking to anyone who had a point of view as opposed to these anointed experts. That we trusted we really thought news was going to change so mark and jim clark went to see all the big media guys and say hey. You need to invest in netscape because the internet's can be a problem for you guys to get in front of it and they all basically laughed at like. None of them wanted to put by there. Were like you guys are idiots like nobody's gonna read news off a computer. What are you talking about. All that kind of thing. And i remember just a sitting. There just been completely shocked that they would think that because we thought news was never gonna be the same you know it had changed forever and in fact it would be more like and mark used to talk about the origination of newspapers in the united states which was literally the founding fathers suit. Anonymously writing what we would call a blog post. Today's they all had their own newspapers where they would write sometimes under their own name and sometimes under a pseudonym and they would attack each other and right like very aggressive stuff and so forth but everything was an opinion. There was no what we would call journalism. And in that sense you know while it was very opinionated. I would just say a and we thought that's what was going to happen and a lot of ways you know. In particularly the blogging era was a lot of that i think social media put it on steroids and that kind of idea that there would be no set of facts that people agreed on also by the way i think we do enough to know that kinda centrally controlled facts. You know had been historically very wrong very many times so we didn't think that was such a problem although you got other problems so let me sort of continue on society impact before we jump into some other issues you know. When i was growing up. I left home at eighteen thousand miles away. My parents had no idea what was going on in the town. I moved to because there was no way to get that information. Long distance phone calls were very expensive back then. They didn't work on mother's day exactly nba. Exactly i forget about that and and by the way i call them about once a week once every two weeks i was able to afford a trip home about every six months or so and today my college age kids can't escape me. It's like they're still living with me. I know where they are. No all the info about where they are living their friends. What's been going on some would argue. And i'm gonna give you two contrasting views. Here's some would argue that. We're denying our kids the chance to become their own independent adults others say no. This is what life was like one hundred and fifty years ago and families live together and created this tight community. It was more about family and common goals. So where do you come.

netscape bob pittman Ben horowitz andriessen horowitz ben thanks bob silicon valley red alert beach niners raiders mutasa harris berkeley ucla George clinton venture capital west coast Lotus raiders colombia Ben chuck united states
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"I think i grew up in an era where one of the many things i loved about. music was. it's social commentary and it is about the times we live in. And it's about all the things that affect you in a very deep way. And i thought. I think there's a way to do this where it will be engaging. This was not about telling people you need to vote. That's the way i looked at all. It was saying to people who make big decisions. In this country this is a generation disengaged from you and you need to address them on their turf their way and will invite you to do that. That's your shot. It wasn't about trying to be parental or any of that kind of stuff to them or give them boring facts or anything like that and so we gotta smartest we could get in. I think i didn't tell anybody. That's another thing. I sent tab at. The soaring tabitha went to new hampshire and she called me at like midnight. She said you know. I got up. Appear in lake. Bunch of candidates are like what mtv and she said and then a couple them like. Got back off. The bus primarily bill clinton and said. I'll talk to you. And then we were sort of often running and you know that partnered with incredible creative work on those rock the vote spots. I mean madonna wrapped in a flag. Whatever their disagreement. Tom preston quickly embraced. The idea we knew is important to our audience. I also knew extremely important to the employee base. Employees would feel better about working there if they knew we had some kind of social purpose associated with what we would do. We had one hundred sixty eight hours a week. We certainly squeeze it in. It also turned out. It legitimizes us in the eyes of advertisers. Who formerly wouldn't come nearest like american express but most importantly the audience liked it and then fast forward to you know. We're gonna throw an inaugural ball. That's not official and see if anybody comes to the party. Rem's gonna play and and vogues gonna play. Tried to make a spirited spiritism mtv but add a little bit of gravitas. If you will in meaning you know like you do matter. You are young but you matter and you deserve to be heard and listened to and we're going to help you. Mtv was a wonderful ride from the very beginning co-founders. And i knew we were doing something that was important to culture but we had no idea we were going to change. Culture mtv changed. Tv it changed music. It changed graphic design and it certainly changed my life. No matter how old i get. Whatever else i've done em tv is still an important chapter my life and all of us has cofounders are still very much very tight fem but the truth is looking back. I think we all feel the same way tom. I felt when he joined the team. I was happy to have a job. I couldn't believe anyone who's going to hire me and lucky for all of us. We all kept getting higher again and again. I'm bob pittman. Thanks for listening. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to math and magic. A production of i heart radio. The show is hosted by bob. Pittman special thanks to sue schillinger for booking and wrangling are wonderful talent. Which is no small feat. Nikki tour for pulling research bill plaques and michael as our recording help our editor ryan murdoch and of course gail raoul. Eric angel mango and everyone. Who helped bring this show to your ears until next time. Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. is that shakespeare. no it's geico. Yeah that shakespeare from one of his unpublished works which

Tom preston mtv tabitha bill clinton new hampshire madonna Rem bob pittman sue schillinger bill plaques ryan murdoch tom Pittman gail raoul Eric angel bob Nikki michael shakespeare
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"We have story. We have record store. Selling music only played on mtv and he said great. Get a name get the information. We need an article and so we thank the phone. I turned to tally with tom. We get to go home and we took that and we wrote it as a case and we ran and billboard and music magazines to influence the record company. Keep going. I have the of course you. Do you have everything we ever did. You are the pack rat that one sheet. Mtv sells records. Joey smith and boy. That joey smith wherever you are in tulsa oklahoma. Thank you if you're wondering why we picked those places syracuse houston tulsa. It's because those were the view markets where we have enough cable density that we could make a point. These cities ended up being little laboratories where we could peak in at take measurements and show the world. Just how effective. Mtv was going to be so. It proved our worth to the record companies. But you have to remember. We still had to convince. Cable operators to carry tv. They want to be paid the carry our channel and frankly we didn't have the money so we had become with a breakthrough idea and genius campaign. That could do all the heavy lifting around here. Tom preston cyber telling that story. The start talk when we launched. Mtv you're the head of marketing. The cable operator wooden would mtv on. They wanted us to pay them one. We didn't have the money and two. That was probably a slippery slope and so we decided we would use a pool strategy to get distribution. I want my mtv. What was sort of a hail mary pass. 'cause known in the organization knew about wonder..

Joey smith joey smith Mtv tulsa mtv tom Tom preston oklahoma houston
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"You're listening to math and magic. A production of iheartradio for me. My humanity came out more than ever through the pandemic and maybe it was the combination of cova. But also what was happening with george floyd and and kind of the awakening that the world was having to racism. I think i was more myself than i had ever been and bringing my full self to work by. I'm bob welcome to math and magic stories from the frontiers marketing marketing business from the analytical side. Math and the creative side. Imagine today we have someone who stepped into the cmo job justice. Kobe was beginning to and had to reimagine marketing in the pandemic of the math. And the magic. He's the cmo of three m ramey kept ramey was born in the seventies grew up in atlanta influenced by right brain and left brain parents giving her that special blend of analytics and creativity. That makes strong marketers. She is an alum of png where she had her. First big successes. She has much to share about growing up in environments where she was minority and also where she was the majority and what we can do. In american business to help achieve racial justice and address. Racial opportunity gaps. She also can share her lessons about marketing through the pandemic and the permanent changes to our craft as a result she was named one of forty under forty marketers by age and savoy magazine named her one of the most influential women in corporate america. Ramey welcome thank you so much for having me bob. I'm truly well. We are delighted to have you and we're going to dig into some meaty stuff but before we do that i'd like to do you in sixty seconds. Are you ready. Yeah do you prefer early mornings or late nights late night. Introvert extrovert introvert scotch. Tape or scotch liquor. God's taped meeting or email meeting cats or dogs salty or sweet sweet. It's about to get harder. Smartest person you know sundar raman secret. Talent are pretty good writer favorite city. Atlanta georgia your first job. I was a library page favored up. Probably the posted apt favorite book. I haven't been reading much lately. But i would have to say the bible childhood. He wrote my mom she could do everything. Let's jump in. I read that when you stepped into the three. M cmo job. Which was i think january. Twenty twenty you're all set to get out hit the road go see the markets worldwide. When did you realize that wasn't going to happen. And how bad did you think this we're going gonna be. Where in january. I think it was just kind of a a caution that was thrown out in in terms of the pandemic so is still had plans to visit my global counterparts across the world. And then i would say by february. I knew that. I was not going anywhere and i knew that life was dramatically about the change so i would say by. The end of february was very clear that we were in this for longer than a couple of weeks. So talk to me a minute about how your job changed as a result of the pandemic what became your key metrics. Well bob are key. Metrics actually did not change vastly. We still focused on brand awareness sales growth conversion and traffic and engagement and overall are is to make sure that our dollars were being spent effectively and we were driving the right outcomes but what i think we really did is focused even more deeply on keen understanding of consumers and getting that voice of consumer into our marketers hands really understanding the sentiment and how needs changing post covid was really really important and it became our focus area so that consumer understanding just elevated itself during this time three. Am has five. Respirators pandemic hits. Tell me that story. Yeah so. I kinda breathe in as you asked the question because there is nothing more critical than working at a company that is responsible four in ninety five math and we are the number one producer. And there's a pandemic and mask. Mpp e are things that are keeping people safe. It is a tremendous responsibility. I couldn't have been prouder of the company. Ns mike romans leadership in saying we have a responsibility here. This is not about making money. This is not about anything beyond keeping people safe and he took the creativity and the innovation and the know how of reimers and he focused it towards production of those mass and we delivered about two billion math and twenty twenty. Well we all thank you because you you really did step up. So how did you role as leader change during the pandemic all of us were handling work and home and everything was melting together and people were scared. I think people were going through dramatic changes depending upon what their home lives were. A lot of people have young kids that they had to manage and so my leadership style. I would say i consider myself. A human centered leader. I had to really really make sure that. I showed up that way and that was making myself more accessible. I tried to be as clear as possible. I tried to remove busy. Were excess work. That was not focused. I tried to just have real conversations with people in check in and let them know that it was okay not to be okay and be relatable. That was really important. And so. I think that's how my leadership shifted. I think people started to know more about me..

february george floyd sixty seconds january Atlanta georgia Kobe Ramey today atlanta america First five first job seventies Twenty twenty iheartradio age and savoy magazine bible three one
Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

podnews

03:06 min | 1 year ago

Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

"A constant patron of just announced a collaboration enabling creators to publish subscriber only content across different podcast platforms and make it easier for fans to financially support patriot creators. who works on almost all podcast. Players is profitable. Fuck i heart media. Podcasting revenue grew seventy four percent year on year for the company. Downloads are up. Seventy one percent new advertiser also spending with the company and other places to bob pittman. Ceo committed in a revenue colder fifty percent of the new. Podcasts launched on the podcast network be from female and verse creators and we now know that iheart paid fifty million dollars to buy. Vox nurse last month. I heart media has also signed sales and production partnership with pushkin industries. It'll make iheartmedia. The company's exclusive sales partner. And pushkin will also co produce new original. Podcasts iheartmedia over the next few years quite enough iheartmedia. It's focused on somebody else. Stitcher has rolled out a new website in the process. The url for podcast has changed old addresses. Though will read rx by you might as well update you website. It's probably a good idea. A are ends iheart podcast network trailer that they are again. They've signed up with pod sites to enable podcast attribution for every campaign triton. Digital's omni studio has partnered with ghana india's largest music streaming app to bring omni studio podcasts into the garner platform. Keep listening for how well garner is working for. Us and podcasts was a category in. Us quiz show jeopardy on monday. Podcasts highlighted stitches. Science rules with bill. Nye luminaries fiasco wonder is we crashed an audible. Original weirdly called it burns us neither and it will conan. O'brien needs a friend taped earlier. It was the first podcast since the death of the host. Alex trebek surprise. It's time for some more tech stuff. Garner the indian podcast app appears really high impart news podcast downloads. Statistics which are linked to today are numbers are produced using both rss us agent and player user agents but the garner app itself doesn't set any obvious user agents so this traffic might not be visible in your own podcast host anyway willing to all of our workings today in our show notes nine newsletter phase one is about to close editions and suggestions for the new podcast. Namespace willing to that today. Buzz sprout now supports visual. Soundbites away to mark sharable portions of podcasting apps and social media attack from podcast index. New podcast namespace willing to a bite from the podcasting two point. Oh show on pont verse and we all sending a little more about the lightning network and podcast monetization and another piece of news that to just in case you understand it more than we do.

Bob Pittman Pushkin Industries Omni Studio Pushkin Omni Ghana Alex Trebek Brien Garner United States Conan India Mark Sharable
Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

podnews

02:59 min | 2 years ago

Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

"Iheartmedia the owner of Heart Radio says that it's podcast revenue grew one hundred and three percents here on Aaron. Quarter to the total digital revenue is ninety three million dollars unique podcast listeners group I thirty percent here on downloads grew by sixty two percent revenue for the quarter across the company however was down by forty-six percents complain the pandemic for that. You can read a full quite from Bob Pittman talking about exclusive whether they're a good idea or not in podcasting our show notes and our newsletter today. On track has published its top US publishers list for July Two Thousand Twenty Iheart is now number one for unique monthly audience in the US as well as global downloads beating NPR in both rankings. ABC is now measured alongside ESPN. The rancor only measures participating publishers. An SEC filing states that lip since former CEO Christopher Spencer who resigned on July thirty first will continue to be paid until the end of this year, he ends four hundred thousand dollars. He'll get a bonus of one, hundred, seventy seven, thousand dollars in early January he'll van to hundred and fifteen thousand dollars a year for his role is senior adviser until the end of February twenty, twenty three for which he'll have to work a maximum of eight hours a month. Lipson will also pay spencer four million dollars to buy back shares that he holds. The Board of lips includes those who last year criticized the company for outsized executive pay I'd like to say something sarcastic here. Row Quarter highlights a surge in tippety around sports podcasts. What's happening in House sports? PODCASTERS can take advantage the pre events for the fest global. Summits Twenty Twenty have been happening all week we linked to a bunch of recordings today. Dearest is a new exclusive podcast on spotify in Indonesian. It focuses on letters written and read by writers, musicians and actors, and it's made by Journalism podcast company K B our prime and a number of additional podcast hosts. Now, allowing you to submit your podcasts to the yet to be launched Amazon music and audible podcasts service some people are giving you a backstage link it works for anyone on any Host by the way. Welcome to a special episode of our humble indie music podcast made an India India Center seventy, three years of independence next week. But India's Music Indie podcast made in India. Wants to remind us that I, love for music isn't defined by geographic boundaries it'll produce three shows focusing on music from India's neighbors and the cat returns to audio with a new weekly podcast from the Vox media podcast network avery truthful man is host leading an ensemble voices engaged in the conversations that matter most to women and those who loved them. It returns on August nineteen

Ceo Christopher Spencer Summits Twenty Twenty India India India Center United States Heart Radio Bob Pittman ABC Aaron SEC Vox Media NPR Spotify Senior Adviser Espn Executive Lipson Amazon K B
Apple Podcasts reaches over 900,000 shows

podnews

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Apple Podcasts reaches over 900,000 shows

"The latest from USA Pot News Donnette nine hundred thousand. That's the number of podcasts. In the world in Apple podcasts. At least that's according to the my podcast reviews service by Daniel. J Lewis Fifty thousand added in the last thirty days. Google podcasts appears to have added auto downloads for us. At least the setting appears when subscribing or re subscribing to new show. What is Apple Building next in podcasting mark? Asquith has written along post with some thoughts about what they are an aunt planning to do in the future and suggests that they should work together with the industry to move forward in an earnings summary. The New York Times says the daily has achieved one billion downloads. Podcast revenues have increased by twenty six percents to seventy one million dollars though. This account side also includes revenue from the New York. Times is branded content studio and from wire cutter anyway. It's thirteen percent of the company's Ad Revenue. Iheart MEDIA'S PODCASTS. Are going to be on telly use. Epa signed a first look deal with heart media to have first rights at adapting iheartradio original podcasts. For TV only last week. Iheartmedia announced book adaptations from. Its podcast as well. The companies also asking the FCC for approval to waive a rule that prohibits foreign investors from owning more than a minority of the company. Clinton is to start her own podcast with iheartmedia she credits. Conan O'Brien getting her interested in the media and in the earnings call it was revealed that Iheart media's digital revenue which includes a podcasting was up thirty three point six percent year on year broadcast revenue fell by one point four percent. Bob Pittman claimed that the company will double their podcast. Revenues in two thousand twenty enrich Bressler said that the way to value podcast companies is about six dollars a download all about millionaires and spotify is to launch new podcasts in Australia leading podcast in the country though the ABC still remains unavailable on the platform and it focused news. Today's the five hundred episode of Gary Lennon's four minute crypto and Bitcoin Daily News. Bitcoin conference that he's running. Bit Block. Boom will be held in Dallas in Texas at the end of August. What matters most everyday Americans into America's new show about politics policy and power both have over the lives of the American people? It's a new podcast from news and MSNBC also from NBC News Bias Markets Hosted. By Dylan. Byers I see what you did. There looks at the world of Technology and media the current episode features and interview with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Hello New York New York. We're at the rain podcasts. Business Summit next Wednesday march fourth. In fact I'm hosting it and from five thirty on Wednesday night I'll be inside the their authority on three hundred West Fortieth Street. I will personally swap you a cheap laptop sticker for a pint foaming beer if of course you can find me. And there's plenty more and all the links in our newsletter subscribe at Pod News Dot

New York The New York Times Apple Iheart Media Iheartmedia Sheryl Sandberg USA Pod News Dot Conan O'brien Google Daniel FCC Asquith Bob Pittman Msnbc Gary Lennon EPA NBC Bitcoin Dallas
Podcast Movement Evolutions is under way in L.A.

podnews

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Podcast Movement Evolutions is under way in L.A.

"Focused movement. He pollution's has kicked off in Los Angeles in California. The first of three keynotes featured on World Radio Day. Bob Pittman CEO of IHEARTMEDIA CONAL burn president of IHEARTMEDIA PODCASTS and add weeks 2019 producer of the year. Mischer Yussef phobia number of announcements during the show will report on many of them in. Monday's Pod

Bob Pittman Iheartmedia Conal Los Angeles CEO President Trump California Producer
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:01 min | 2 years ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"Plans for and navigate through retirement this is aging options with receive a guy welcome everyone to aging options under servers that we got Bob Pittman in studio because receive is currently hosting a live event down in liquid now Bob you are an estate planning attorney that's true but you pretty much have heard it all in here many years you know it's there there's an argument for that someone so all my god you must be sold you for everything thanks I guess that's a compliment hi Jeff the cold with the called me the why is something a friend I think they said wise old guy but I'm not sure who was why is something that I couldn't I can't remember what it was we'll just go with that that's good we're talking about board members and that the retirement model is it relevant and you product charitable because as you know are all the things that go on when you think about a week in your life think of all the interactions or the things you've seen that have to do with volunteers and charities and maybe a goal past the food back maybe use of food that may be going to the senior center may be you go to the hospital in their volunteers that I mean if you strip the volunteers from our life we are are like our country would collapse were built I thank on volunteer ship volunteerism and what a great way to get involved when you have a little more time meaning that may be of retired from your old job and you don't necessarily want a new job but you want there's so many new things to volunteer for and why don't you why are we doing now and I think we are a lot of us are but don't forget that and maybe as you're planning for retirement think about how that might fit into your to your scheme and then I challenge you once you start doing it if you're a volunteer now a lot of you are have you found your replacement for when you're gone wow how have you thought about that who's going to replace you so you're one of your jobs as a volunteer if you really like this organization and I'm assuming you do if you've hunter for his start finding someone to replace you when you're gone you've got some great ideas we're gonna talk about your special binder the minute but only with the phone numbers because here's your chance to talk to an estate planning attorney Bob Pittman he's been around and he knows quite a bit SO two oh six four two one one thousand two six four two one one thousand or eight seven seven three nine seven como what I want to see you Bob is with my mother in law does something really cool she has retired for a number of years she goes impacts food at a local food bank on the side and she brings the grand kids with and then they go out to lunch afterwards and they discuss their experience and they love it absolutely love it now take that and just expanded by a little bit and say okay when they do that that's great and keep doing that and do more and then maybe once a year they all get together and talk about maybe how they'll do a pickup number how they're going to donate a hundred dollars this year maybe each of the kids to twenty Bucks apiece or something grandma's right in the track but who would they give twenty dollars to put the number I love that in all **** you'll learn about some interesting little charitable groups because the kids will seek them out your business goes hand in hand with Reggie fils talk about the events coming up in Bothell leave got one on that Tuesday this coming Tuesday the eleventh from seventy nine at the Hilton garden inn one in federal way on Wednesday at the aging options campus and then one in Michael teal on Thursday from seven nine PM at the St bridge suites and that is from seven to nine PM in Michael teal and now our next Saturday is two one two one two yeah that's right interment Bremerton permitting such a fun place the shipyard and all and you know I love the fountains there right now the waterfront if you've never seen it's pretty cute your Venta next Saturday these two to four PM and after the kids up conference center at Bremerton harbor side so you know if you get a chance to go to his federal way that's that's the office there and he it really is a campus it's almost like a mini community college campus he's got this great events that are there right near the I mean that that that's a fun one to go to if you if you can get the federal way and all of your other tickets are complementary so just using options dot com you can get to complimentary tickets for a live event coming up there it looks like we've got a phone call will take the phone call and I know we're bumping up against break but let's see how did Jimmy's from Seattle how you doing Jim hi Jim I'm doing good how are you guys doing great you have a question for Bob I do have a question for Bob Bob so first reasons we do on that there are particular here but I want to transfer about a year my wife bought a house years ago for a hundred thousand dollars in it's over the years improvement center our basis in that if we sold it today is four hundred thousand dollars okay you have done a lot of work to that's great well with all that for thirty years old now if a making fair market value so we kind of fill in all the better maybe let's say fair market value is seven hundred thousand okay all right now now I want to be my home go on every ball double crossed where my three children or the ten this year conditionally essentially become the owners but through an eerie vocal trust I can't take it back I think you understand the significance I call those and I really mean it trust no let me ask you to hold on just a second because I want to make sure we get a good shot at your question a lot of people are saying all I might want to do something.

Bob Pittman attorney
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"The full three sixty that's what you get an aging options are common of course they have an award winning long with great articles at aging options dot com today in studio we've got Bob Pittman filling in these nifty planning attorney it's fun to be here are always happy to sit in with for Russian eve or with Roger and now with Darryl it's so great well you can ask him the questions I think given the phone here's your chance you know I would really encourage people to stop by aging options dot com yeah I mean the articles are great there's also a spot where you can find out about future live events because it's fun it's fun to go see you you listened arise you have all the time it's fun to go see him and he is every bit as nice in person as he is on the air and although he can be very intense because he's very passionate about this topic he's really funny he likes to have a good time aging options dot com Bob we were talking about one of these articles about procrastination us her favorite pastime we love to procrastinate don't we we do but once you lose someone then it can it kicks you in the you know it really does and it just gets in I I find a lot of people will call unfortunately after somebody else your loved one is passed away in the sea and all it just reminds us that we need to get things in order and part of it is the legal part getting things in order part of it though was addressing all the other issues and that's the neat thing about life planning with Asian options is it covers so many different areas and we're gonna die and I were laughing I've I volunteer for a group and they did this little mugs and with our kind of a caricature a message you know Diana so this is really strange they they show my here is being Graham my mustache progress hi I have brown hair what is this you know often where I got my her Kelly said the other day and said well what what color her idea of all this will brown says that on my driver's license so as we age and get that gray hair we really need to think about all these things and when you think of retirement I love the the aging options format that way retirement actually can be exciting and it can really be fulfilling if you're approaching up right well okay let let's bring that up last week I was talking about about how much I like this one segment on this website where it says take you and your partner for a week you each write down a list of the things that you're concerned about or that you dream about or that you want in your life for what you imagine retirement being right does suffer with separately wrote sharing your for weeks we give some of you that homework assignments and I would be curious to see what people discovers right call if if you don't call today than call a different day until right she what you think Phil I I know he agrees with me on this it's just you know the and the the idea behind that homework assignment is to say you know don't I mean just keep that piece of paper in your pocket for the week don't don't think about anything over to yourself one of my really concerned about what I'm what's really of interest to me what what's driving me and what what what might keep me awake sometimes or do I worry about right on down on the paper no matter what they are no matter how trivial they might seem and then if you do have a partner it's interesting to compare but then bring them in to Raji far to an attorney to to talk about your concerns and make sure those concerns are addressed in your planning even if it's that you want to be able to watch Colombo on TV well that's a good point Colombo and not it you know volume fifty eight or six year or something like that Diane's going because you that's what she does not watch Colombo that's important to know too so don't put Columbo on Diane's in the chances wife by the way sorry we've only been married forty six years we met a little over fifty years ago at stadium high school and congratulations on that thank you I know Scott I'm gonna hit twenty three and I just can't believe it it's just blown by being together can be great can be difficult but you've got to take care of each other you gotta consider what other people want wanderings absolutely we do through their needs their wants and by writing it down on a list like that it isn't just your partner can say help Bob that doesn't matter you don't need to worry about that if you take it to a third party someone like receive Sturluson hole and it'll be in your it'll be in your planning can guarantee a alright we'll talk about planning planning for your retirement and life planning that's the whole goal of this show aging options will be right back on common stay connected stay informed the home of the Huskies komo news no motive yet for a deadly shooting during a church service this morning in white settlement taxes a small town near fort worth one person is dead another in critical condition after the gunman opened fire that gunman was and shot and killed by prisoners Rolex braziers he stopped short the just anything that you could even imagine and save countless lives Jeff Williams with the Texas department of public safety Georgia congressman John Lewis says he's undergoing treatment for stage for pancreatic cancer a suspect pleads not guilty to five counts of attempted murder an account of burglary Grafton Thomas is accused in a stabbing attack at a Hanukkah celebration a rabbi's home in Muncie New York an orthodox Jewish community north of New York City one person is dead after a small plane crashes into a home in new Carrollton Maryland wintry weather conditions are slowing travel for people who are trying to make their way across the nation's midsection Terry Alden or ABC news news one thousand have been ninety seven seven good afternoon it is three thirty one I'm Kelly Blair with the top local stories from the como twenty four seven news center Seattle police are investigating a shooting in the twelve.

Bob Pittman attorney
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"In for him is Bob Pittman hi Bob thanks for inviting me by thanks for coming back I'm glad I didn't she sat on the first hour all my goodness of course this is great bombs in the feet planning attorney and I would urge you that if you have any questions about estate planning call now here's your chance you can ask him anything two oh six four two one one thousand two oh six forty one one thousand or eight seven seven three nine seven K. one well I would venture bomb and I'm there also was a good thing out having fun yeah he will probably have heard every single question possible there's not a lot but you know I learned all the time I think that's why not well know that I'm Headin down the last street if you well as when I stop learning I hope that never happens I read somewhere that everyone just wants to learn grow and contribute I believe that's true I think so yeah so what is the most what's the most challenging question you had this week without revealing anyone's information if you possibly can you know probably the saddest was he dealing with the the death of a of a of a young person and without going into any detail it says that's hard to imagine yeah unless you are and I I discovered this a long time ago that and I you know two white ball but I said you know Bob you have no way of knowing what anybody's going through when that whether they lose a spouse a child a parent you don't know because you're not I'm not living through it and all I can do is is try to help the best I can to sort of sue the the belt and put up some little guide posts and help get someone down the right road but it's a tough tough road and it's different for everybody there some things I think must be the same it's just awful but it's just different and and I know that someone who's sales lost a spouse I'm not a surviving spouse and so I really don't know truly what it's like except that it's hard I think it's true that every day when you run into someone you don't know the path that they're on the road that they're on or what their story is too that's true the story so important I you know one of reasons why I started doing what I call guide book style plan in its guide book planning is so I wanna know as high as I sit and think and I ponder all these things all the time and I say okay a fight to find that surviving spouse I want this guide book I want to be able to open up a call to big red book I want to be able to open up the big red book and be operational in in a safe zone right away and that's what the guide what what I call guide book planning is all about is it gets you right away in the event of a number what when the merchants here are tough time comes you're right in to the guide book and you say okay I know what to do I've written it down in advance talk about prevention and preventing problems in the future and getting that road map out and we put it on per in purple on purpose and a big red book because we wanted to stand out and inside in the key information section that says okay you know Bob is incapacitated here's what I do Bob has passed Bob is diet here's what I need to do first and second and third and by the time you're doing that you're on the right road and you're not likely to be taken advantage of by the sharks and the vultures and it's so complete that it goes all the way down to what was your client the queue for a client you showed me this week hello John well I'm going to mention Joe Joe on the air Jo Jo came to visit us Joe Joe was the nicest little dog you'd want to me so it's every you know from Bob is capacity needed to who's gonna feed Jo Jo's right yes exactly right yeah now you take these the estate planning based on say a guide book can you wrap it in Rashi's life planning at all my goodness are you there or what well I would venture to say Bob we we've just met last couple days and I can tell how thoughtful you are and how much you think about your clients I know how much re she thinks about his clients to and how it's the full three sixty it's not just the legal part.

Bob Pittman attorney
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"Aging options with receiving a guy H. an aging options is brought to my life flight lan preserving your hard earned money preserving your quality of life yes absolutely sinus up that's we're talking about here summers I get to hang out here Bob Pittman filling in today for receive you guys have known each other for years a long time I was there when Ranjeet started so far back I was there were a lot of people start told you a mentor of sorts that's a real compliment for **** that Bob Dylan is an estate planning attorney here's your chance rush to the phone with your question to six forty one one thousand two oh six four two one one thousand or toll free eight seven seven three nine seven K. O. M. O. Bob you brought it up and now I'm here yes Scooby yeah you know issues in fact Harper really big and if you think about it all the people you know think of the people who have pets and how much they care for their pets sometimes they they like their pets more than their kids I have fourteen pound for key a little fur ball at home that I call my kid very important and yet how many of us have planned for our pets how many of us have really sat down said okay if I'm not there who's gonna take care of fluffy your take care of Scooby where are they gonna go what kind of life for they're gonna have and think about it and sometimes it's simple sometimes it's complex if you've got a parent for example those guys live for a long long time yeah press one and recently the horse that just passed away in their forties and then during the break you also mention the people need to plan for things like their firearms only goodness your your your if you have five been I'd say what awful lot of the people that come through the door to see me have firearms you know how dean whatever type of weapons and stuff so think about where they're going to go then if you're sending them to a relative here in the city of New York I'm guessing that the rules are a little different in New York than they are here in Washington state thought about it have you thought any other actually our trust for firearms well there's sometimes they're appropriate worth a lot of money in a lot of cases absolutely well we're so glad that we're to your phone calls and let's go to the phones right now Bob sounds good we've got gene from sea tac what is your question today hi Jane hi hi my question is at what the side of the state would it be appropriate to start thinking about having a trust good because what are the pros and cons of having to try good question Kate planning thank you for some of the pros are getting the planning kind of done up front rather than planning later through and going through a probate so you can avoid a probate even though probate is not a nightmare in Washington state I'm for the first one to say that but it's nice to avoid hassles and I I sometimes think of a hassle factor meter is from an old tape recorder I had years ago and the little needle would go from black to the rad and you don't want to be in the red zone because that means such a hassle so probate Sir kind of in the red zone trust can be and back on the block so that you're not having so many house also number one is hassle factor you're reducing hassles by using a trust typically you can avoid the probate maintain privacy a lot of us are very private and we don't like the idea of our whole plan or will become in a matter of public record if you're bored one day and get out of the courthouse and look through people's anybody's died with a will have a probate you can photocopy the contents of the file and take it home with if you want to sell privacy hassle free nature and then what I like to suggest is when we're planning for our loved ones put Saran wrap around their inheritance whether it's children or role other relatives in other words leave it to them in a trust so they have some degree of protection against losing their inheritance to a lawsuit or a divorce had a great run as women come to visit me many years ago seventy years old she had she was retired a nice person should driven through a crosswalk plowed two people down didn't have enough car insurance she lost everything most of our assets including the inheritance from her parents the for parents had left it in a special kind of a trust she probably would have had to start over fond at the age of seventy and not have to go back to work thirteen how much are we talking about if you want to share a little well I guess when you talk about you're talking about all complete like and all that it's pretty much everything even the clothes that the if you get it into a taxable state you actually have to value your clothes for the department of revenue well there's no okay very couple or single or okay so one of the board and things as for America poll is you might end up over two million when those for the first when the second spouse dies in that case you must have a special kind of a trust for the survivor is called a bypass for exemption trust her credit shelter trust then you can double your exemption from two to four million by using a trust format although it could be on a will but you end up with the trust I'll be right back to the at metro the best deal in wireless is on switch to metro and give one full Amazon prime membership included every.

eight seven seven three nine s fourteen pound seventy years one day
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"Good afternoon thanks so much for taking this long we're so glad you're here Somers Bob Pittman sitting in for receive regime is working hard at his events at federal way impeaching options campus I just want to say as a disclaimer we're not financial advisors in any way shape or form we think Theresa for her patients see this is why you know really put it all together he does and then this is the this is this wraparound of life plan now I'm in a state plan an attorney I do a lot of stuff but it's all legal estate planning park and oftentimes all say no you guys need to do the wraparound even if I'm doing your estate planning the life planning wraparound you get the financial you get the I mean someone goes out to your house now that be awful Diana it's only got so much going on we got to pick up but actually go and you want to be ready to age in place if that's important to you so someone's got to take a look at your house because just slapping up a bar here and there maybe in the totally the wrong place anyway then it may not be what you need so you want to have someone come and look and you want to plan it out in advance you don't want to be doing last minute stuff if you're late on their out of commission it's it's almost too late I mean we can do things but do the planning up front and do the wraparound of the financial the housing the the fish the the medical part it's all there through life planning and that's unique with rush even my opinion he has events coming up this week if you've been postponing it this is probably the last of the year two I yeah I think self so here you go here's your power coming up even maybe you've got relatives in town maybe it's on your mind I know at the end of the year I always start thinking about okay I want to do a refresh on my life but we're hitting twenty twenty Bob I think it's kind of snuck up on us in a way so here's your power week this week if you want to go check out the events.

Bob Pittman Theresa attorney Diana
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"Be here Bob Pittman actually city noon for standing for rush evening gosh my friend of many years life planning wife planning on a state plan an attorney I help people with all kinds of legal documents in a state tax issues and all kinds of fun stuff Reggie really wraps all of it everything we do with his life planning I discovered that quite a few years ago he does a great job and he's a wealth of information he'll be back next week meantime you're stuck with me a lot of talk about a couple things that maybe Roger you might not talk about one of them there was a question earlier about a state taxes and if I could just mention a couple more items on it a lot of people think we don't have to worry about a state tax anymore and it's just not true yes on a federal level we have a massive exemption of eleven point four million dollars now when I say massive I guess though those of you who are above eleven for several Bob that's not so massive but for most of us Silverman point four million that means that the first eleven point four million dollars are not have your state are not subject to federal estate tax if you're a married couple each of the spouses has eleven four you've got twenty two point eight million of federal exemption but don't go to sleep if you're living in Washington if you're a resident of Washington you have an exemption of just under two point two million dollars which is awfully easy to get to if you're a married couple you do not get both of those exemptions automatically that I think is one of the biggest a state tax traps out there for for married couples is they say well there's two of us that's like almost four point four million dollars you're wrong you've got to take action you have to be proactive you have to get a trust in place a certain kind of a trust in place generally to make sure that you're going to use both of your exemptions you know if you have questions about life planning with Russia even all the other issues if you've got questions about a state taxes it's probably a really good day to talk about that stuff give us a call at two OO six four two one one thousand two oh six four two one one thousand I spent many years doing a program called legal line and now I'm Sittin on aging option that's a lot of fun to be back on the air today and sitting in for such a great guy is Reggie by the way Rajiv hails from workshops that are unlike any you'll ever attend and it's no obligation he will not strong hurting you at the door really worth while to think about learning about life planning and your different options and I would rate highly recommend you go to aging options dot com and take a look at the summit our listings you've got on this coming month in Tacoma Michael teal federal way WA Connor Camillus numbers on the counter or Bellavia I got a look at the map and the five was born in Washington you think I know exactly where it is I sort of know where it is but I have to use my my map from her for it in the car to get there but the life planning some workshops and seminars are tremendous they're great assets you know we have a we don't have much of an option about aging but we do have an option about how we age and how we address all these different issues and so it's really important that we that we sit down and do the planning one of the one of the big tips that that I've come across from Russia even I've been trying to adopt in my own practice and that is when you get your planning up and running make sure maybe it's even before we make sure to fall for the family a simple thing like a family meeting so let's say that the Diane and I have our trust plan set up and we've got all kinds of different things documents durable powers of attorney and all that stuff but have we had a meeting with her two sons and and then all the whole family have we done that have we sat down and said okay here's our thinking here is the type of documentation we have here you know Jeff and Greg here's what we're going to be expecting of the two of you if if one of us becomes incapacitated you got to keep an eye on the other person make sure they're okay because it's pretty high stress stuff when one of us dies here's what we want to have happen I tend to write what's called a guide book when it comes to the plan and we put together our plans in the big red book we sometimes call it but it's really it's the guide book for your estate and it's all got all the elements further it's the documents and stopped but it also helps instructions and commentary and maybe even some fun stuff in there maybe a story or two about one of the personal items so give us a call with your legal questions concerning the aging process.

Bob Pittman attorney four million dollars two million dollars
Introducing: Math & Magic

BrainStuff

02:01 min | 3 years ago

Introducing: Math & Magic

"Hey, brain stuff. Lauren vogel. Bam. Here today. I wanted to share with you. The trailer for a show on the iheart media podcast network. That's brand new by which, I mean, it's new, and it's about brand building marketing strategies, and all of the math and or magic that go into making creative and business successes. The podcast is called math. And magic stories from the frontiers of marketing on it. Our own iheartmedia CEO, Bob Pittman digs into his past experience to talk about the future of marketing, along with some of today's most gifted industry, disruptors, here's the trailer. To me data isn't just numbers. Data is also words, we struck a relationship with Twitter to be, actually, the first one to anonymously, connect tweets purchasers. What I learned is that there are words that people use in social media, that can tell you, whether they're going to go to film, six months for that film comes out. It is astonishing. Every cultural phenomenon comes down to two things. Math and magic. I'm Bob Pittman chairman and CEO of iheartmedia. I'm one of the things I've always loved his trying to decode how big ideas find their way into the world. My new show, math and magic is about those stories. It's about the stories from the frontiers of marketing each show. I sit down with visionaries here how they view data and creativity bringing credible ideas to life. It was just pure desperation. Sorry. I come in to the programming meeting and I said, got an idea, I was fearful that creative executives would see me, walk down the hall, and run and hide is like a there's the data nerd every label was saying, no to really scooter. You're great at marketing, but like it's YouTube kit, unless it guys there's a sleeping giant over here. You're not paying attention. I discovered Justin Bieber on YouTube. Listen, it subscribed to math and magical apple podcasts, the iheartradio app, or wherever you get your podcast.

Bob Pittman Youtube Lauren Vogel Chairman And Ceo Justin Bieber CEO Twitter Apple Six Months
Could Transplanted Organs Be Reused?

BrainStuff

05:48 min | 3 years ago

Could Transplanted Organs Be Reused?

"Today's episode of brain stuff is brought to you by AT and T. And it can wait. Eighty two percent of people admit to using their smartphone, while they're driving were all used to seeing it. But ninety three percent of people don't approve of distracted driving. We feel awkward speaking up about it, and it's time that changed because it's not worth the risk a text alike selfie. Whatever it is, when you're driving, it can wait. So the next time you see a friend, family member or other human using their phone while they're driving. No that it's okay to say something. Distracted driving's reckless take a pledge to end. Distracted driving at it can wait dot com. A message from AT and T. Welcome to brain stuff a production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here battle Melton auto new the trials of kidney disease, and dialysis better than most in two thousand fifteen after spending most of his life limited by disease. He received healthy kidney by way of transplant tragically only two years later. Mel DeNardo, died in a motor vehicle accident normally has death would have been the end of the road for the healthy donor kidney. But instead that kidney was re gifted to another patient in need. This was done, of course, with the permission of maldonado's family. His sister Linda said in a press release. We just thought they gave him that gift. Why not help another family? If we can the recipient was a seventy year old woman who had been on dialysis, for ten years and pronounced, the kidney, a blessing. Organ regifter is a pretty rare procedure. But the team that transplanted this kidney doctor, Jeffrey veal director of the UCLA can the exchange program and his team every transplanted three kidneys in less than a year when we spoke with him. Dr veal said that he sees potential for many more centers to jump on board with the practice. He said, it's a shame that we're discarding these kidneys. So why aren't more kidneys? We gifted Dr veal explained. The knee-jerk response is that once a kidney is transplanted. You don't Retransplant transplant it an added that some concerns arise over the damage that might happen to a kidney over two separate death events. But he points out some of these kidneys, endured multiple blood transfusions and other treatments. When the original donor died, he said, regifter is less of a shock than these terribly traumatic motor vehicle accidents. He notes the twenty to twenty five percent of people who get a kidney transplant die with a functioning kidney. That's a lot of potential donors and healthy organs, that save lives are in short supply. Although some patients might bulk it, receiving a secondhand kidney waiting for a new one can take on average three to five years, sometimes longer in April of two thousand eighteen more than ninety five thousand Americans were on a waiting list for a kidney, according to the United network for organ sharing the nonprofit that manages, the nation's organ transplant system, some twenty people die every day, waiting for an organ transplant and indefinite life on dialysis is far from ideal for people with diabetes, in particular, every year on dialysis sees a drop in life, expectancy and quality of life. Although the re gifting program is still in early stages. Veal reports that his recipients are all off of dialysis, with well-functioning kidneys. He said, we don't know the long term results. But it looks great initially. Not all donor kidneys can be successfully re gifted the same donation rules apply. As those of normal transplants, for example, a recipient who later dies of a disease like cancer would not be able to pass along the Oregon. However, a patient who experiences a fatal stroke accident could still be in possession of a re giftable kidney to allow for redistribution of previously, transplanted organs, some major changes would have to happen both within the transplant centers and likely the aforementioned United network for organ sharing currently programs. Assess the original donor to determine compatibility and viability of the Oregon in regifter cases. However, Dr veal says that they would instead need to review. The first transplant tease details by using records to virtually cross-match blood types and other details like medical history. This is no small feat in an industry Laden with important protocols to protect patients nonetheless, it's possible that regifter may be done to organs besides kidneys in the future. For example, the liver. Dr veal said these are often high quality organs from young donors who have tragically died in are often going to sicker patients on the wait list, who are often older and might have multiple medical issues. And so our risk of dying a few weeks or months later of a stroke or heart attack. Why not take that high quality, Oregon and help someone else out? One organ donor can save up to eight lives. But too often, this potential goes on realized, if you want to be an organ donor make your wishes known to your family and take time to register online. The site, DNV dot ORG has easy registration for him. Stays. Episode was written by Aaliyah, white and produced by Tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other topics that keep on giving visit our home. Planet has works dot com and for more podcasts heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Have you ever wondered how do the smartest marketers cut through the noise, I'm Bob Pittman chairman and CEO of iheartmedia and all my new show? Math and magic. I'm sitting down with the day's most gifted disrupters. But when I did this people thought I was crazy. They're really no other rules, aside from, you know, no full frontal nudity go out there and do it. Don't like to follow the trend of listen. It subscribed to math and magic on apple podcast, iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Dr Veal Kidney Disease AT Oregon Jeffrey Veal Apple Mel Denardo Regifter Dnv Dot Org United Network Lauren Vogel Maldonado Melton Chairman And Ceo Linda Diabetes Bob Pittman Aaliyah Iheartradio
Tenderfoot TV's new investigative podcast

podnews

02:10 min | 3 years ago

Tenderfoot TV's new investigative podcast

"Pod track have released January twenty nine thousand nine figures for the top ten US podcast publishes and top twenty US podcasts using their service NPR remains at number one with a yearly increase in US unique audience from sixteen point three million to seventeen point nine million heart media has seen significant increases year on year as well. But their figures now include the stuff media purchase they made last year. So they're not quite compatible now portrait only measures podcast publishes who opt in to their measurement service. And so these numbers are incomplete. And additionally track have removed all global figures from these reports this month in December NPR achieved one hundred and forty seven million global downloads. Bob Pittman, the CEO of iheartmedia is interviewed in a recent addition of ad age ad lib, the podcast when cereal returns, it's focusing on the US public school system. It'll be hosted by someone new not by Sarah Kane. And for some reason, the producers are keen to highlight. This will be a limited series rather than your actual season. For chargeable think we're entering the global age of podcasts. They've published a lot of stats and data as to changing habits. We'd recommend you read it. It's in the show notes and in our newsletter today following her promotion, THEO bowel, come from the N Y tease interviewed in WW de about expansion plans for the daily and apple podcasts appears to have a branded imbedded player. It's called the mezzanine player prototype, and it's designed to be embedded in a web page. We saw a copy of it sent to us as part of a press release. Now of notice the audio is hosted by apple and it's available in both MP3. and Albright is a Google. Search reveals it's been used for beats one video clip as well in our newsletter. And in our show notes, we mentioned three new podcasts, including to live and die in LA. It's a brand new investigative Paul. Cast into the death of an aspiring actress hosted by Neil Strauss. The podcast is set to launch next Thursday. February twenty eighth from ten to foot TV cadence thirteen and megaphone by panoply,

United States NPR Apple Sarah Kane Neil Strauss Theo Bowel Bob Pittman LA CEO Paul Google Iheartmedia Albright
When life gives you Parkinson's

podnews

02:01 min | 4 years ago

When life gives you Parkinson's

"In the latest pod news. I happen to be forty six year old. Happily married proud dad of a nine year old with a great career and Parkinson's. I shake yet. I can't shake this. So what do you do with life? Gives you Parkinson's. You tell your story while you still can ten million people have been diagnosed with it, but few people know much about it when life gives you Parkinson's launches tomorrow co hosted by Larry Gifford a thirty year broadcast veteran who was diagnosed in August twenty seventeen. It's with curious, cost, Parkinson, Canada, and Omni studio. Paul squad is a new app designed to help small independent podcasters build that audience, his more efficiently on social media that hoping together feedback from as many podcasters as possible. And you can sign up to be part of the beater on their website. Podcast addict is now adding support. This podcast links, the author announces that the start the app is looking for patriot tippy and anchor link. WCHS rather than the rally quos payments standard, but who knows what the future might be at the end of the AB podcast up front last week was a chat with Bob Pittman who is CEO and chairman of media, and y'all Mon who CEO of National Public Radio willing to it in print form his a question from the moderator, how do you ensure the podcasts don't cannibalize terrestrial live radio? You'll guests are an opportunity feel podcast growth, say, radio public, a two part series, and in a survey, adobe analytics claims that forty eight percent of US consumers. We'll have a smart speaker by the end of the year. Apparently thirty two percent of US consumers have one. Now, the Lincoln tech crunch article to the full research is no longer working. If you'd like to dig a little deeper into those surprising numbers. Oh, and the US military have develops a microphone and earpiece that clamps to your teeth. You will find more details on this at pulled news dot net.

Parkinson United States CEO Larry Gifford Bob Pittman Omni Canada Paul Adobe Chairman Forty Eight Percent Thirty Two Percent Forty Six Year Thirty Year Nine Year