26 Burst results for "Bob Pittman"

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

07:12 min | Last month

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"Up bubbles up bubbles up. That's been my entire career in an internet fast world. Perfection is the enemy subjective. Perfection is the cancer when you think about the new forms based book tiktok etc. How do you think about risk in that world. And how do you think different from the risk and advertising prior. I think there is a stunning amount of risk with coming up with a brief having strategist come up with a strategy handing it to a creative team internally them coming up with subjective ideas than pitching it to a cmo brand manager and making a sixty seven figure creative output and then having no clean feedback loop of any say whatsoever and then all of your digital assets usually become matching luggage to this creative piece that you've made i think it's the highest risk most ludicrous process in a twenty twenty one world think about social and digital and even ott commercials. That could do so much more data. I think about driving down the cost of creative to allow you to have far more opportunities to be much more relevant to many different constituents. Instead of vanilla thirty second video there is nothing more risky on earth today and being a fortune five thousand company that spends money on making a commercial and putting out to the world in your world. Had you put that commercial out and cut all that out of the process so you go much more from idea to consumer the way we mitigated. If you're let's just use kick cats work with them. It's a candy company. We referenced it earlier. I believe kick cats needs to do is create a conversation around addressable customers. What i call cohorts. They need to create ten to fifteen to twenty of them. Because you can imagine. Bob you and with a couple of grey hairs if. We're still kind of fancying little kit kat bar once in a while they're going to need to talk to us in a very different manner than they're trying to achieve with an eighteen year old latino woman on the west coast right and what brand companies are not doing well is contextualising in multiple places to create a bigger brand instead. What they do is get very narrow. The thought that kit kat is gonna spend eighty percent of its money on its tv see and the digital banners that support that campaign in its brand positioning to me is not s- because first of all the distribution most people are not consuming actually with any of attention and intent. Tv see and that goes to be equally if not slightly more for banner ads on the internet to me. The way you do it. Is you take advantage of social media in its current form which is a media and creative place you create fifteen cohorts forty five to fifty five zero on the east coast from an astaldi place baseball enthusiasts latino males in texas black males into surfing in california with these courts allow you to do is have much more teeth around the creative and then you run them in a social media environment because the ads run in the feed are more native and feel less disruptive and feel more employees sub. What you're consuming in your feed and if you know you're targeting lack male surfing enthusiasts in california. You can imagine what that instagram post for kit. Kat looks like that's going to give people relevance and consideration. They're gonna consider kickouts because they're gonna see themselves in that video picture. If you're a brand is big as kit kat. It's about making cifti pieces of creative a week. Three to four per cohort and looking at the quantum quality feedback against depletion reports that seven eleven and bulk fails on box dot com or amazon or walmart. So us business feedback. Loops look at the qualitative feedback. The comments us opposed creative strategists. As i call it to read all those comments to inform better content. The next week. Everything i just said is the polar opposite of what's being done in measurability in distribution in where the money's being spent and i'm just much more common sense practical business oriented. This is not how the big six holding companies navigate or the fortune five hundred biggest brands navigate. I'm going to add to your story. Gary you know we're in the business at iheart. We happen to have eight hundred and fifty radio stations one hundred and fifty markets. It's always a surprise me that advertisers think we can have one voice one sound that there's somehow this national code words that people respond to oppose the understanding that actually every city every region in addition to the culture the diversity of people ideas and culture even within those cities and of course the biggest problem for so many years was the cost of producing advertising. But as you point out today with the cost going down the rules probably can change. Because i think everyone recognizes they should. We did something years and years ago with american express. Small business saturday. We did three hundred fifty different pieces of creative so we found the small business person in every city and they talked in their language with their accent with the slang they use for their city. What you just talked about with context at scale scale is gonna come now from five thousand jelly beans instead of one super jelly bean and most brands and definitely every agency is not built for that event deeply agencies. They're publicly traded companies and they need to drive margin and they are completely built upside down to be able to deliver on the amount of creative needed to be successful. Twenty twenty one brand. They have all their most people at the top and they bill against that and they need to have all the people at the bottom and make against that that is a transformation that is going to be very fascinating to watch the biggest advertising firms in the world go through. Will you know the content companies went through this many many years ago when we started. Mtv in the early eighties tv before that always tried to make every show looked like it was a middle america. So there's throw they quote unquote typical american family typical fashion. If you go back and look in the early eighties. Fashion just blew up because suddenly the mass. The people around the country saw something other than a tv programmers idea of what the typical american family should look like. And i think what you're arguing force that's accelerating and accelerating advertising even more what you were part of the revolution of going from thirteen to thirty six channels right sounded like a lot back. Then i remember there was thirty six channels exactly on my first nineteen eighty-four cable package that gave the freedom to show more so many more hours had been added to the ecosystem and led to the iconic executions of the eighties of mtv. Espn cnn some others. Of course on demand has made that even more possible. I don't have to join in progress. Cnn schedule. i can get exactly what i want when i want it but it was certainly the first step along that way and it all revolves round one thing with consumers convenience. They want control. They want what they want when they.

Gary amazon walmart california eighty percent ten thirteen saturday texas Three eighties eighteen year old next week instagram today first step one hundred and fifty markets eight hundred and fifty radio fifteen american express
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

07:17 min | Last month

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"Gary was born in the soviet union emigrated to the us. When he was young and watched his family build success in a new country. He went from queens to new jersey and made his as a successful child entrepreneur selling flowers back to his neighbor. Lemonade stands baseball cards shoveling snow and working at his dad's liquor and wine store throughout college and after college helped transform the family business for a two million dollar a year revenue business to a sixty million dollar a year revenue business in the process developing an online marketing chops which led to his current empire anchored by the media. He's the quickest guy and his feet and always has valuable insights. And he's a good guy. Gary welcome. I really appreciate that bob. Happy twenty twenty one. It's really with you before we dig into the meat. Gary i want to do you in sixty seconds ready to go ready to go early riser or night out new york new jersey mets or yankees yankees android or iphone. I call or text text coffee or tea coffee baseball or basketball basketball red wine or white wine. Her white words chocolate or vanilla vanilla cats or dogs cats. Gi joe or baseball cards baseball cards. It's about to get a little harder. Smartest person you know. My mom childhood hero. A mix between macho man randy savage don mattingly and patrick. Your favorite podcast. I'm gonna say. Tim is because it was the one that emerged in that early era as a real cultural impact and started creating the possibilities of how big john could be first job. You only job. I've really had was working. My dad's liquor store. But i always think of my first job is selling lemonade. Even though i was self employed favorite food english peas affect secret talent. I draw really well and nobody knows that last one what. You're guilty pleasure. Candy bars specifically watch him a call at though kit cats and butter fingers and snickers candy bars restore. Let's go and let's get into the meat of things you have had one of the most successful startups in the ad agency business and a world in which is hard. How did you manage to break through first of all. Thank you for saying that because it means a lot coming from you. And i think i broke through because i'm a good businessman. My thesis of consumer behavior was right. And i knew nothing about madison avenue and those are three incredibly intriguing ingredients that if i'm being self assessing breaking down quickly with the hope that somebody can use it as courage to jump into doing something that they feel like they want to do and the that they're capable of doing but maybe on paper it doesn't look like it was a good operator as you referenced. Earlier i built my dad's business was about a three point. Eight million dollar business went to sixty million about seven eight years. i thought it was a retailer. I thought it was a businessman. But when i really started self assess. I realized that was extremely good at marketing. And i was very strong and operating and ceo in the talent of just genuinely understanding where the attention is going and how culture works. And i thought starting agency would be a way to get paid to learn. Why the fortune five hundred's were not doing. What i saw was brewing on. Netflix facebook amazon and youtube. So a my timing was great. I started social media agency right as people were starting to consider. We needed this behavior. And they do not believe the creative agencies that they were working with understood. It did the grays or knee. Bdo's even care about it. It was an afterthought and to be very frank. Bob and you know this for the biggest creative agencies in the world today the great ones it's still an afterthought which is perplexing to me but understandable knowing the margins and the ecosystem so hey my timing was good be a good businessman a lot of times artists or people that see things can't operate so it was able to stay afloat. Those first three years was difficult to get clients and then see the beck ended up being ridiculously right. No different than the incredible things that have happened in your career. If you're good enough to get by in the first twenty four to thirty six months of innovation and stay alive if you end up being right you're in a position to catch all the opportunity and then i evolved. We bought from just doing community management on social to new york. The most super bowl spots in last year's super bowl is a creative agency. We have three spots. So we've evolved into a full service creative in media not continue to innovate whether it's podcasting or influencing influencers or being best in class on tiktok communications changing and i'm sure if we look in the history of the people that one television when we were transitioning from radio or which agencies razor fish a cake you a one the internet's Sanctioning into that world. You know this is a historic story of madison avenue. Who's the man woman that comes along. That understands the next communication change at sheen he capable of building an organization around it. And i think i'm gonna get a lot of credit one day historically about being that person for this media. Ot kind of like big shift in the maturity of the internet and how. It affected advertisers interesting. You say that because a math magic. We'll talk some about those moments in time. And i was there for some of them when the cable networks became a bible advertising medium in the late nineteen eighties and i was there when the internet sorta broke through and when i went to a well in nineteen ninety six. I think we had a couple of million dollars of advertising left. We had two or three billion of advertising so it all happened in the ninety s. And you're right. The established players don't really jump on the new very quickly and a huge opportunity. And you've been that so let's talk a second about that at the heart of that is really having an open mind and also thinking about creativity in a very new way when you look at creativity which clearly you did when you you built this. What most people get wrong about creativity. I think that most people get wrong in giving freedom to actually be creative. ultimately creativity is best. When it's free and allows the end-consumer could judge everything that happens in between it's debating politics. Subjective opinions treated as truth reporting and other math trying to be deployed against it to be a benchmarking system. Creativity is it's a process of finding right far more than a process of being right and they think modern advertising tries to be right and pushed down a friend of mine. Hit me up. The other day listened to jerry. Seinfeld talks about how he creates his set and he's like oh my god gary he does volume model goes around and does small clubs. Testing material gets a feel of what humans react to bubbles.

Gary two youtube sixty million Netflix Bob facebook iphone thirty six months new jersey three last year Tim sixty seconds late nineteen eighties first three years three billion soviet union first job new york
"bob pittman" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

02:18 min | 3 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Adlandia

"Took a ton of notes during that episode. One of the biggest takeaways for me is something that i think. A lot of marketers overlook we are simply filling or solving a need and that was the one of the best and most important things that bob said to me. Well he talks about following the consumer right like he when we asked. How do you place your next bet. It was very simply and very directly you have to follow the consumer. Follow the consumer and you have to fill a need. I'm solving a problem. Talked about being a sociologist. And i really think you know maybe more marketers actually need to think of themselves as sociologists so it's following the consumer but it's also being ahead of them an understanding. What is that need. What are those simple needs. And then how do we get to them. And bob bob goes against kind of what else say is modern marketing. Modern marketing kind of shuns reach and frequency. Shuns tv shuns. Grep's radio shuns. Radio shuns outdoor. Shuns all of these different types of media. That actually are extremely effective when you are filling a need when you are talking to a specific audience and i think the bob laid that out really really clearly and then talked about how he used word of mouth and how he created or at least entered into a community. All of those things are things that we talk about. But when you sit down and you look at a at a media flow chart usually you're going with whatever your media buyer tells you when i loved that he was talking about you know his. Drp happened he was a coup said. Who said that's the cap. Why yeah who said twelve was the magic number. Who said twelve is the magic number. Exactly and i think that more often you know taking it from bob's advice we have to question those things and really use media and laura. This is something that i think you and i have tried to do in. Our work together is used media to not just be a vehicle to tallah message but be a vehicle to really.

bob bob bob Drp laura
"bob pittman" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Adlandia

"When i got to the company this company was stalled at about seventeen million in attendance. Have been for twenty years and as we begin to look at it. We looked at the markets. And they'd say well we really get a hi desi buyers from the market and what they call the outer market. They said well. We don't advertise out there because it's hard to reach those people. I looked at it and it was like that was all the growth. In the growth potential of the company we already fully penetrated internally. So i figured out ways to do cheaper advertising's bashful advertising and things like that which reached this outer market which they said watson quote unquote efficient and we took the we do some other things too but we took the attendance from seventeen million to twenty five million and and it was unlocking these people that by marketing. Rules didn't work. I also did something there. Which i bought a ridiculous wait level. I bought fifteen hundred grips a week. Fifteen hundred a week almost impossible to get the number one advertiser in every market and we did this for about ten weeks in seven markets. And my agency said bob. You're wasting your money like a. They said you're twelve. Plus frequency is not increasing. And i go. What about my twenty plus frequency. What about my thirty plus freaks. Who said twelve magic number and what i wanted people to do with buying. The silly frequency was we were a tarnished dead product. I wanted people to think everybody was talking about six flags. So how did i. How was i going to accomplish that. If i bought enough frequency. I knew that the consumer would get confused and they would think every time i. I'm hearing about six flags. They think people are talking about it so they began talking about it then. I prime the pump of word of mouth and to me. That's the most effective advertising yet. A conversation going today marking still today. Think we win. Unless we're in the conversation labral product pass to get people to talk about the product. I gotta be at that dinner table conversation a have to have someone telling somebody and so the way i used that there was massive frequency and again i think a lot of these tricks get lost when people saying that. I've got precisely seven point three clicks. It's going to be the magic number. And i go. You're kidding yourself you are. It is not that precise and you you human brain and no computer can capture all the variables that are necessary for success. And when we try and do it. It's i promise you a fool's game and and so for us for me as a marketer yes. I want to know all that information. But i'm realistic about what it can do what it can't do one of the things you know you're just alluding to to scale and we know i heart reaches nine and ten americans but we're really enamored with. Is the audience relationship with the platform with the hosts with each other and thinking about. Bob how close you are at the community level locally eight hundred and fifty stations around the country talk to us about the magic in power of local radio at scale chore. Let let me let me spent one second. Because i think it's poorly understood. Although i think you guys understand it pretty well that you know radio is unlike any other media most media about a program a piece of information a piece of quote unquote content radio. Not radio is companionship. Be thinking about your music. I said well twenty five percent. Just don't play any music. How do you explain that And they and they say well. I'm hearing all my favorite songs i go. I swear to hear my favorite songs that you know. The we put a tape recorder available attack We didn't have to listen to commercials marquette mile mix tapes Radio well why is it needed to be big. It turns out of course what radio is as companionship. We're keeping people company. We're riding to work with them every day and that empty seat. That's ryan seacrest there. He's a really interesting person. He makes your drive to work pretty interesting if you had a great You know of a buddy riding work with you and so our job is to talk to the listener. As if we're their best friend and they should think they know us ryan seacrest says it's wonderful stories. He tells about how he knows he's working. He said if he's out with some stars tv movie stars and the fan sees them. He said they rush up to the movie star and they go. Wow can i get my picture taken away. And then they turned around and say. Hey what you take my picture. They treat ryan as their friend and the movie stars star and he said the minute that changes are dead he knows it and i think the wonderful thing about radio in what we do is that we are having a conversation constantly with consumer. They listen to the radio broadcast radio on an average of about seven times during the day. They're always checking in to see what's going on. Like they would with a pal and they're looking to us to give them that relevant information and for us. Advertising is the this is probably the most medium for advertising because what has advertising tell you to do when it's done well it tells you what's out there You know. I don't think we as as a as a concept. I don't think we ever sell anybody anything. I think what we do. Is we try and connect people connect people to a product. They made like by explaining the product in a way that they understand that. If someone's using radio advertising their goal ought to be either through the weight level through the creative they use where they use it. They wanna get the consumer.

bob watson ryan seacrest ryan
"bob pittman" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Adlandia

"The united states and indefinitely for all of us a household name. I think this episode was very grounding in terms of the practice in what we do it very clearly. Brings it back to the reason. I got into marketing in the first place. And that's to find ways to connect with people and deliver on a need through the power of communication. The constant push pull. I having going through this conversation was. We've gotten so hung up on the delivery mechanism that in some regards. I think we forget what we're delivering. And when bob breaks down to your point alexa the simplicity of putting a clear message in front of consumers that delivers on that need and doing it over and over and over again. And then you'll hear. He says the most effective tactic. We have is word of mouth. Nothing that relies on technology or platform or a channel the companionship in the communication. The connection and the interaction that people have that moves them to take action. It's what products today are built on. It is peer to peer. It is putting the product at the center of a community. And i could not agree more and one of the things. Everything you said agree with one of the things that i would punch out in. Addition is bob wasn't saying two hundred and fifty. Grep's is the way this is tried and true. He was actually saying question that break that. That's breakable. but you're talking about that's unbreakable. And that i believe is what bob was talking about. It solidified almost re verified the work that this industry and so many practitioners and listeners of the show are doing so before we give away the whole interview. Get out your notebooks. We're gonna class with bob pittman. But before we get to bob laura. We're joined here with our partners from yield komo.

bob alexa united states bob pittman bob laura yield komo
Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

podnews

03:06 min | 3 months ago

Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

"A constant patron of just announced a collaboration enabling creators to publish subscriber only content across different podcast platforms and make it easier for fans to financially support patriot creators. who works on almost all podcast. Players is profitable. Fuck i heart media. Podcasting revenue grew seventy four percent year on year for the company. Downloads are up. Seventy one percent new advertiser also spending with the company and other places to bob pittman. Ceo committed in a revenue colder fifty percent of the new. Podcasts launched on the podcast network be from female and verse creators and we now know that iheart paid fifty million dollars to buy. Vox nurse last month. I heart media has also signed sales and production partnership with pushkin industries. It'll make iheartmedia. The company's exclusive sales partner. And pushkin will also co produce new original. Podcasts iheartmedia over the next few years quite enough iheartmedia. It's focused on somebody else. Stitcher has rolled out a new website in the process. The url for podcast has changed old addresses. Though will read rx by you might as well update you website. It's probably a good idea. A are ends iheart podcast network trailer that they are again. They've signed up with pod sites to enable podcast attribution for every campaign triton. Digital's omni studio has partnered with ghana india's largest music streaming app to bring omni studio podcasts into the garner platform. Keep listening for how well garner is working for. Us and podcasts was a category in. Us quiz show jeopardy on monday. Podcasts highlighted stitches. Science rules with bill. Nye luminaries fiasco wonder is we crashed an audible. Original weirdly called it burns us neither and it will conan. O'brien needs a friend taped earlier. It was the first podcast since the death of the host. Alex trebek surprise. It's time for some more tech stuff. Garner the indian podcast app appears really high impart news podcast downloads. Statistics which are linked to today are numbers are produced using both rss us agent and player user agents but the garner app itself doesn't set any obvious user agents so this traffic might not be visible in your own podcast host anyway willing to all of our workings today in our show notes nine newsletter phase one is about to close editions and suggestions for the new podcast. Namespace willing to that today. Buzz sprout now supports visual. Soundbites away to mark sharable portions of podcasting apps and social media attack from podcast index. New podcast namespace willing to a bite from the podcasting two point. Oh show on pont verse and we all sending a little more about the lightning network and podcast monetization and another piece of news that to just in case you understand it more than we do.

Bob Pittman Pushkin Industries Omni Studio Pushkin Omni Ghana Alex Trebek Brien Garner United States Conan India Mark Sharable
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"West is sixty seventy percent of the ad revenues, Google facebook Amazon Com, all small medium sized businesses as be careful what you wish for I'm not wishing as. Generic you you'd be careful because these these companies are generating opportunities, businesses, which is Jack Ma says is the engine room of the economy and creates a load employment. So let's talk a little bit just a second before we finish up and obviously we're on a podcast so I'm going to ask about podcasting. was video for so long in search, it's been social and suddenly audio has its moment and podcasting I mean and our company although ad revenues down we announced and second quarter add revenue in podcasting was one hundred percent we're racing quickly bill. What do you think a podcast? Well, I think a good way of our clients developing then media programming if you like and another good way to engage with consumers now whether it becomes mainstream not is another question been like influence harketting in terms of content I see influences being a subset of content and development of creation content. So I think important but not mainstream necessarily. which is probably what you to hear but no, no no. No I look. I'm interested in your opinion and it is we're on the. It's probably the only thing right now we're on the front end of and reminds me back at the days I went to AOL in the Mid Ninety S and I was at century twenty one real estate briefly and I remember someone who who's very smart said I I know once you but I can't imagine why you'd WanNa leave century twenty one for AOL and that's what. People Thought of the future of the Internet fortunately things turned out differently hey, we end each episode by focusing on a math and magic the analytics, the creative sides of marketing, and you have this unique perspective. Usually ask people about people who are analytical or creative and your case I wanna ask you about past or present if you had to pick an agency that you thought was the best math agency all about analytics, which one would you give that to. I have to say mighty highs. Okay. Thoughtless Four. Okay. Say That just. Say I would say s swoop be the one that I. Came back on the mass side of it. I would say essence a mighty house. Okay. So let's flip to the other side. What's the greatest creative agency the Magic Is In his early days obviously media amongst today, which is the other passive, the content part of as four. But if I went back in history adding Saatchi's from when I was there from seventy seven I'm before I was there it was probably better. But when I was there when I knew it, well, some seventy, seven through eighty five outstanding. Sir Martin this has been fantastic. You have wonderful stories and you're continuing to build your legacy and continuing to stay at the forefront of what's going on. Thanks for joining us and thanks for. Great Harm and good good to catch up with you get where we could over the years but we go back to nineteen eighty, seven, seven, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven that seems like yesterday to me but I guess it was. Still see you stimpson Sheinberg and telling me I wasn't elected Very funny. Good luck by.

AOL Sir Martin Jack Ma Google Sheinberg Saatchi
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"He's not been with us for over 15 years now just took a gentle giant and inspired me. I think every day and I don't know so much in terms of if I thought back then about it from a corporate career or a big company career page. That was not what was inspiring any time. I was with my father at work Gatherings of any sort that we the family were invited to what stood out for me more often was that he managed to know every person's name in the room and knew them personally and related to them in that way and I think for me that was more what was that? The role model in terms of just how we carried himself the relationships that he built and then his belief that he would always talk to me about as you know Elizabeth, please just walk walk in someone else's shoes for a bit when you're meeting someone new when you're in a situation that you're nervous or uncomfortable just put yourself in the other person's shoes for a second. Imagine what they're thinking what they're doing what they did just before this meeting who they are what they're about what they care about what they're passionate about. It's those kinds of things Bob that I remember more than any of his corporate life or lessons that I might have learned that way. Yeah. It's interesting. It sounds like he's gave you some great a great role model and some great advice about navigating a corporation through empathy. Absolutely that you've captured my dad in one word. So you were clearly in the smart kid category you went to Princeton graduated with a ba in English. Focus on pre-med what happened? Why aren't you a doctor? Oh boy. Some days. I still ask myself that question Bob. Here's what happened, I first got out of college..

Bob Elizabeth Princeton
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

05:10 min | 5 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"A point of view home and ferociously defended when needed I've learned that that's important to me personally as well as as I'm leading a large team through transformation through great times and difficult times. It's been something that I've worked on very hard over time. And so have you been able to because I know you've talked to some about using it as a skill which helps you in your job and in your profession, how do you use that part of your existence to help be a better manager and better exec in a couple of ways and I'll start first with having to think long and hard get prepared for meetings ahead of time. So that's one thing that I think is come from just being an introvert a dog. Why do that because it then gives me the time the space to think ahead of time for my point of view and then be able to really defend it or or stated in a meeting. The second thing that I think because of my own introverted nature. I'm cognizant of other people in the room and try to draw them out particularly when they haven't said anything they haven't articulated what they feel. They need to draw them out. As you know to have the conversation build the relationship build the trust and when you build that trust and you form that sort of two-way relationship, it ends up creating great collaboration kind of at the end day, so I think I've worked hard on it myself as we've been talking about but also recognizing it in others and that should be my role now to help others along so that they can express their opinions and we can work well together you have made your mark as someone who builds your marketing around the consumer in an obsessive way, but I want to start with an Insight you got from your research that seems to be off. In the center in this covid-19 world that data showed that Americans are no longer dividing their work and Leisure Time as neatly as they once did. In fact, I think it was 60% off and their personal and professional lives are intertwined. It reminds me of a cartoon. I recently saw there was a guy had asked someone was at the door frame and he was asking them. I can't remember do I work at home or do I live at work? Which struck me as a truth were all experiencing whatever you uncovered seems to have accelerated in the last six months. Can you tell us how that Insight changed your marketing and just as important how Covetous changed that even more what a great question bobbing as I reflect back, you know, it was three or four years ago when we refreshed and relaunched our brand in our brand platform, you know, the powerful backing of American Express. Don't do business don't live life without it..

American Express
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

02:16 min | 7 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"<Music> Thank. You. <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Curfew <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> things have picked up my <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conversation with JEB <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be willing to make mistakes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as. Jan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> says if he don't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> make mistakes, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you're not gonNA get <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> anywhere big <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> keep it simple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when introducing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a new product like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all consumers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> values simplicity <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and ease of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> use over <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just about anything <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> else. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Three cost <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is relative <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as Jan often <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> had to explain <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> her marketing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> efforts cost the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> company, a lot of money, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but her results <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> were spectacular <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and worth <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> four <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to stay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> focused. You <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sometimes have to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> say no <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and the early days <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of AOL Jan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> harnessed the tremendous <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> energy of the company <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and kept <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everyone focused on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> achieving the core mission <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> allowing her team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to work on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> things that <SpeakerChange> didn't move <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them all in the same <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> direction. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening I'm Bob <Music> <Advertisement> Pittman. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's it for today's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so much for listening to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> math and magic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a production of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> radio. The <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show is hosted by Bob <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pittman special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to sue <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Schillinger for booking and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wrangling are wonderful <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> town, which is no <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> small feat Nikki <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tour for Pulling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Research Bill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Plaques and Michael <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as czar for their recording <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> help our editor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ryan Murdoch <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and of Course Gale <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Raoul Eric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Angel Noel <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mango and everyone <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who helped bring <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this show <SpeakerChange> to your years <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> until next <Music>

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

05:24 min | 7 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"You're not making mistakes tells me not try anything new and that's our lifeblood. I never fired anyone making mistake make the same mistake in two or three times, and you you. You know you're going to be on an ice you need to hire people smarter than you and be confident. My feeling has always been. You want job, come get it come earn it. I have only benefited throughout my life in hiring the smartest people that I could convince to. Working with me. So this jump a little bit I wanna jump the big crisis. We have the actually the day. I. Joined in management off the board in Nineteen ninety-six to run the AOL Service Steve Case and the company announced unlimited pricing and almost immediately had a crisis too much demand not enough supply consumers getting busy signals couldn't get online. We were called America off line. It was certainly the biggest business crisis of my career other than maybe covert right now can you take us back to that time and what did you learn from it? My feeling was they love us. They've really love us and that faded of course, we dealt with the crisis I think that we expected some blips. There was no presidents or we just all been wanting as fast as we could. which really the best example from the over the last twenty years of the walls garden despite lots of pressure we did not interact with other services deliberately and strategically if you wanted to communicate with someone aol you had to join well therefore. All more people joined it was sort of the perfect example and you were a great defender of it. You could smell people trying to sneak around the wall or breached the wall after my time at AOL and yours someone opened up the walled garden facebook is probably the best example of new wildcard. You think they appreciate that lesson of audio well. I thinking, go to great lengths to keep them on their service. When I look at Facebook, I see AOL over, we had a lot of the services that they have. We were probably early in introducing some of them. We did have these pages where you can collect your friends family. It was really. facebook point five, not even facebook one plano. Derailed what the AOL Time Warner merger, and probably if they allow had stated, independent company would have been the future of AOL issue point out many service help actually being worked on at the time. There are many many services that are send a text or an email to say we did that but we were early and it was a different time. So let me jump a little bit as we began to come toward the end. If you could give your twenty one year old self some advice what would it be? Wow. Someone gave me. Advice. When I was about twenty one years old was marketer. Here's my boss my first company when I moved over to the marketing department. And he said to me the problem with you is the you want to be something you need to want to do something. I didn't quite get what he was saying at that point but I did a few years later and realize the really my passion was marketing. My passion was connecting with people in that way and it was what led me frankly to end up at AOL as opposed to I. was interviewing at other companies at the time and companies that people that actually heard of back. Then it was American Airlines Sore I was interviewing a time at the time. I went to a well because I felt that it was the best chance for me to spread my wings and to do what I was really passionate or bell, and I was passionate about marketing and so I think that while I couldn't have given myself that advice someone else did give it to me. Let's wind up today we always end math and magic by looking at those two sides marketing the analytics math and the creative the magic. When you look back on all, you've seen who would you give the shout out to the greatest math person in the marketing equation In the brand of marketing that I was most involved in, you couldn't really separate the two, but you really couldn't have been a drug market without being able to do both of those things. One of the reasons I think I was so successful is because I actually am very good at both size. Yes she were. Let me jump to the other side. Then tell me who's the best magician ever yeah. Bill Jamie who was copywriter of great renowned anyone from my era or before or even a little bit of to would've known him. He was prolific did a lot of work in publishing end. He brought Magic to paper you very expensive to use and getting him to work on projects. You have a campaign for it. So Jan This has been great. All had to be the big success of my career and certainly one of the most exciting rides doing it was inspiring. I loved being in the Foxhole with you. I loved all the stories we have together. I have to thank you for all those Great Times Great Memories, and thanks for sharing some just a little bit of your brilliance with us today. Thanks..

aol America Facebook Steve Case plano Bill Jamie Warner
Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

podnews

02:59 min | 7 months ago

Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

"Iheartmedia the owner of Heart Radio says that it's podcast revenue grew one hundred and three percents here on Aaron. Quarter to the total digital revenue is ninety three million dollars unique podcast listeners group I thirty percent here on downloads grew by sixty two percent revenue for the quarter across the company however was down by forty-six percents complain the pandemic for that. You can read a full quite from Bob Pittman talking about exclusive whether they're a good idea or not in podcasting our show notes and our newsletter today. On track has published its top US publishers list for July Two Thousand Twenty Iheart is now number one for unique monthly audience in the US as well as global downloads beating NPR in both rankings. ABC is now measured alongside ESPN. The rancor only measures participating publishers. An SEC filing states that lip since former CEO Christopher Spencer who resigned on July thirty first will continue to be paid until the end of this year, he ends four hundred thousand dollars. He'll get a bonus of one, hundred, seventy seven, thousand dollars in early January he'll van to hundred and fifteen thousand dollars a year for his role is senior adviser until the end of February twenty, twenty three for which he'll have to work a maximum of eight hours a month. Lipson will also pay spencer four million dollars to buy back shares that he holds. The Board of lips includes those who last year criticized the company for outsized executive pay I'd like to say something sarcastic here. Row Quarter highlights a surge in tippety around sports podcasts. What's happening in House sports? PODCASTERS can take advantage the pre events for the fest global. Summits Twenty Twenty have been happening all week we linked to a bunch of recordings today. Dearest is a new exclusive podcast on spotify in Indonesian. It focuses on letters written and read by writers, musicians and actors, and it's made by Journalism podcast company K B our prime and a number of additional podcast hosts. Now, allowing you to submit your podcasts to the yet to be launched Amazon music and audible podcasts service some people are giving you a backstage link it works for anyone on any Host by the way. Welcome to a special episode of our humble indie music podcast made an India India Center seventy, three years of independence next week. But India's Music Indie podcast made in India. Wants to remind us that I, love for music isn't defined by geographic boundaries it'll produce three shows focusing on music from India's neighbors and the cat returns to audio with a new weekly podcast from the Vox media podcast network avery truthful man is host leading an ensemble voices engaged in the conversations that matter most to women and those who loved them. It returns on August nineteen

Ceo Christopher Spencer Summits Twenty Twenty India India India Center United States Heart Radio Bob Pittman ABC Aaron SEC Vox Media NPR Spotify Senior Adviser Espn Executive Lipson Amazon K B
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

08:18 min | 8 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"Is that we had no money to spend on this at I remember going into our bosses office, saying HBO spending ten million dollars. A year in advertising goes. You're lucky you have to somehow or other. The people in the media business didn't actually believe in advertising as the weirdest thing. And so I went to jail. I said look. We only have two million dollars. And he did an incredible data dump of where could MTV be put on against how much media cost in that particular market? And he did three or four five cross tabs to figure out the most likely places that we put on these spots. We'd have an impact that we would get people calling and making the cable operators, insane and God knows I think we made customer representatives from all over America crazy within four weeks next thing you know every cable operator of their eleven market, which would not be unusual time. They'd all call up in. In surrender, so we would move market by market for a couple of years across the country on from like what was seven million subscribers, ended up, being eighty or ninety million I. had a guy stopped me at a cable operator and said I hate you and I, go. Why do you hate me? And he goes because my phone rings all day with those people saying I want, you can't get any work done. Chats with co-founders. There's a lot of fondness for this deviant culture. We add MTV was. It was definitely anti establishment and the truth is even the promotions dripped with the brand sensibility. In some ways they define the brand sensibility. There's some crazy stories to. It was fun reminiscing with John Sykes about them. You were the guy who did the promotions. You came up with these great ideas and. Fortunately, or unfortunately with that also executed them, did the paint the house paint promotion with John Mellencamp the lost weekend with Van Halen. What formula were you using goes back to that Schenectady. York thing of being a dreamer, 'cause I was the kid I was the viewer who thought Oh my God. If only I could dot dot dot. So when you said we've got to put together some promotions, we gotta go bigger than life we got. What are we? GonNa, do I, said myself okay. What would anybody give their eye teeth to what would be the fantasy of all fantasies I? Remember? Just John had done a song called pink houses, so let's give away a house in. We're in a painful mother pink. Tell us about the first house you bought. When you had executed I mean you had to go find a house? It go buy a house. You had to go actually get a team to paint it pink. You gotta go fly people in, so we went and had no money, so we had to buy the. House, you could find so bob goes. Take a cashier's check and just go buy a house and I okay so I flew in Indiana and John Mellencamp. Who loved the idea since his ex wife to meet me to show me around by some house? She's a realtor, so we go when I go. Okay. I got about two hours for the flight back to New York. Show me for house first. First House we by the woman is just cookies for me. The kids are out front. They've cleaned it up. This was a shack so bad for her. She was a single mom. This House and I said do so. We can paint this pink, so I wrote a check. Thirty two thousand dollars bought the house her jaw dropping no realtor just handed the check and got in the car drove back. We roll stone three weeks later. MTV BUYS HOUSE ON TOXIC WASTE DUMP. Like all you go. POB had no idea John Malcolm writes me, let it I have today. Dear John, I'm sure you've read rolling stone by now and sure you wouldn't want to give a house on a toxic waste dump and I'm going Oh my God. We're stuck with the house, so I had to fly back and get another house. But that's not the double budget. Though the budget, the good story was the last weekend with Van Halen that one really really defined. MTV is a serious dangerous rock and roll brand to consumers. There was a movie called the lost weekend. Raimo land within their guy loses his my whatever, and so we just said. Let's do a loss the band. WHO's the craziest band out there right now Dan Halen? Wouldn't do any promotion because they were worried about their image. We call them the idea that we're in war, and by the way will fulfill the contest you've to do is just drop off the field with us. We'll deliver back on. Sunday So we did that to the kid arrives, and they take him about four o'clock afternoon right into the backstage and everything. You're gonNA match what have with van? Halen happened so by the time the band on stage at nine o'clock at night. This guy is fried. There's been things that we're not a wondering mix. The donor noticed activity, so he's standing on stage completely out of his mind and David Lee Roth because we have the winner tonight of the MTV lost weekend. Joe's Ned. You Know Joe Congratulations. They bring out a giant sheet cake. He's got his hands up there and the band's around a take the sheet cake, and they push it into a space in the guy is stunned, and he starts curling around swinging punches at the ban. The PAN freaks out. They take him off and be bringing backstage. We say to his friend. What's wrong with him? He said. We forgot to tell you. He has a metal plate in his head. He was in an accident. He's not supposed to drink a fundamental room with a security guard all night, but that kind of made the legend MTV I wish we could take credit for that, but that was it so the contest. Maybe we're lucky. We can't take credit for what those contests did. That creates the fantasy in the aspiration that makes someone want to be attracted to a product. MTV could have been a flash in the PAN, but the market needs spirit, captured and attitude that young America responded to people tuned in just to see what was going on MTV was a place to hang out, and as the word spread, the channel made money, although MTV was the most radical of the cable channels, it was also the first cable network to actually make a profit, and we had the highest revenue of any of the cable networks and remember. This was a time when people didn't believe cable networks could be profitable. Did that feel good, but part of keeping the channels successful was continuing to think outside the mainstream and continue to come up with new ideas. Here's spread again. We had these creative promo departments once people came in and started saying well. I worked on Promos over here. I didn't want to hire them. One of the earliest people I hired just come out of film school in his first job was cutting film negatives at a porno place I'm like okay fine. You will remember this, but one day you call me into your office. And you said Hey I need you to be you know the head of production? I said Bob, you! Know I've never seen even the red light on top of a camera. Go on, and you went. Oh, don't worry. You'll figure it out. And that was that and all of a sudden I was in television. and. You did a really great job. Thank you. But it wasn't just people like Fred who got an opportunity, MTV, here Judy and Tom Talking about how he kept an eye out for new talent, and groomed them up and the culture that the two of them kept going and kept building at the company even after I left. You think about it. In the days of MTV, probably looking back and extrordinary number of women very important roles, today would be crowing about it. Probably you know whether you like it or not. You have been mentoring people. You've been setting an example. How do you handle that responsible? And what do you do consciously that they began to see I was sort of a better editor coach than I was player. I can remember some things that just felt like personal milestones to be. You know one of the great fun things I got to do would be hang out in the rehearsals for the video music ords, and I was sitting there and I was thinking wow. We've got a female director. We have female unstaged managing the crew. We have a young woman who's the head writer. We have young woman in charge of seating in events, but we've got women in roles that were not traditionally women's roles. They were just really good, and I do think it's incumbent on somebody who gets an opportunity like? I got to look out for underrepresented.

MTV first house Van Halen John Mellencamp Dan Halen John America HBO Bob John Sykes Schenectady York New York John Malcolm David Lee Roth Indiana
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"Needed to convince a record business, so it was like we need a story Tom. John Connor on. Don't come back to you. Have a story in Tulsa didn't happen till he went to Syracuse Houston, we went to the cable markets so Tom and I. Driving through Tulsa and a rental car, literally with a matter of record stores going into places, so you sold any lease records sewing Duran Duran any tulips. To nope, nope. Nope, so we kept driving driving I. still remember there was registering enrolled house. Russian and we say solely this only. That's only to enter a brand ran. I sold two boxes of durant records last week. What you sold to. You sold fifty records twenty-five records in a box. Can we have your name? And can we use your phone? Call the? Story, we have story. We have record store. Selling Music only played on MTV and he said Great. Get a name. Get the information. We need an article, and so we think the phone I turned to tyler Tom. We get to go home. And we took that and we wrote it as a case study, and we ran and billboard and music magazines to Louis. The record company. Keep going I. Have the of course you. Do you have everything we ever did it? MTV, you are the pack rat. That one sheet MTV sells records, Joey, Smith and boy that Joy Smith wherever you are in. Tulsa Oklahoma, thank you. If you're wondering why we pick those license. Syracuse Houston Tulsa. It's because those were the view markets where we have enough cable density that we'd can make a point. These cities ended up being little laboratories where we peak in and take measurements and show the world just how effective MTV was going to be. So it proved our worth to the record companies, but chapter remember. We still had to convince cable operators to carry TV. They wanted to be paid. The carry our channel, and frankly we didn't have the money, so we had to come up with a breakthrough idea and genius campaign that could do all the heavy lifting. Here Tom Preston. Cyber telling that story start top. When we launched MTV, you're the head of marketing the cable operator wooden. WOULD MTV on? They wanted us to pay them one. We didn't have the money and two that was probably a slippery slope, and so we decided we would use a whole strategy to get distribution. I want my MTV. What was sort of a hail? Mary Pass? 'cause you know we're about to go. Under known in the organization knew about wonder. So how are we going to get these cable operators at us when we knew in fact, the? The people who actually had it in the few towns where it exists that they loved it, they were fanatical about it, so we actually had to go over their heads, and the idea was that campaign I want my maple, which I remembered as a baby boomer in the fifties, some obnoxious. I want my maple, but I want my MTV. The actual spot said they grew up with rock and roll. They grew up with television now. They want their MTV. George Lois who never saw something that he couldn't copy. Had already copied. A famous TV commercial from the fifties called I. Want my maypole for a really horrendous tasting oatmeal wheels. -actly and he redid it with Mick Jagger and David Bowie and on the beginning of the spot. He had Pete Townsend doing it. America demand your MTV. And people go I want my MTV I. Want My MTV and Pete Townsend again with a telephone. Call Your cable operator and say I, want. And they showed us this spot. If we could get major rock stars in a commercial to kind of hold, our logo validated, hold it in command people to call their cable company and demand their MTV. Make it look cool. Put some animation around it, and then put it in these markets at very high frequency. We go into a market and it'd be like blockbuster movie was opening. Most people in the market had never heard of MTV so we. We went and we pitched to you I. Think you saw the feeling of it right away? There's a lesson in this to that. You've always done very well. which is harnessing the power of partners, and in the case of I won't MTV movie stars who are willing to be in the commercial for free to help us accomplish our goals, but you also have music companies and others Dale was this brilliant hybrid of a strategist and a creative guy. And as a strategist, what he understood.

MTV Tulsa Tom Preston Syracuse Duran Duran John Connor tyler Tom Houston durant George Lois Oklahoma Pete Townsend Louis Mick Jagger Mary Pass David Bowie head of marketing Joy Smith
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

06:50 min | 8 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"It's the beginning of the eighties cable. TV was still a crazy idea. Most business executives, the most of America didn't understand or believe and how TV was about the change, and here comes this packet twenty year old with an attitude. None of us had ever done the jobs before all we knew, is we grow up with rock and roll, and we've grown up with TV and the two had never successfully together. We thought it had always failed because TV, people always wanted to try and make music that the TV foreign a story. We intended to make TV but the music form mood and emotion MTV was going to be about attitude and something. People wanted to join we. A mission. So an IHEART own John Sykes at the time a twenty four year, old record executive at CBS records in Chicago heard, but we were up to. Well, he wanted and. So. Let's talk about MTV. It's nineteen. Eighty word gets out that we're working on this. Do Music Channel. How did you hear about it? What does it mean to you? And how on earth did you really get connected to us to get on that original team? I grew up with three things in my life. Radio television music. That's all I cared about when I wasn't listening to radio station I was watching TV or listening to music. Those things to me shaped our culture, so I'm at school cable TV just starting up and I saw the cable channels are empty. The music is all over. The radio was on television, so we used to shoot the concerts. And, we tape and send them to new channels. We played a concert and people like Oh my God. I can see the band and all they wanted to do at that point was put music on television when I graduated. I went to CBS that. Let's put music on us one concert these three Martini lunch guys in New York looked at me like crazy. Crazy I got a job in the record business promoting radio stations I wanted to run the radio station I didn't want to promote them on the road, but that's the job I had so then I, heard from my friend. Steve Casey was wls in Chicago that his great friend Bob Pittman was in New York and he was going to start a video channel. And I lost my mind. It's still gives me goosebumps. I was like his. To, this is what I wanted to to to me. I was like music belonged on television so I started calling you. And I called you I called you and I called you and thanks to your assistant and Plunkett grows annoying so much. She said all right, bobby, please talk to this guy. And we met that day with a borrowed sport jacket. I didn't own it. Connected that moment because we have the same vision, music and television with the two biggest forces in pop culture, and they're about to be you know you look back on any successful product and it seems easy. You were there when we didn't even have approval from the board, do it? We just had some money to develop it. So give us a little color for people think things are easy and the always go exactly the way you plan what that early development was like. It is funny. People's like Oh. My God you're the Teen Start MTV that must have been a magical great ago I don't know. I was working to heart. We were so in the trenches all the time. It only looks glamorous today looking back, but when you're in it, it's a slug fest. There was this idea but to make it happen. We had no money and we all quit jobs. Jobs you NBC CBS, that was the promotion man of the year in Chicago and I. Just said I'm quitting people like us. We weren't gonNA. Fail I. Never Thought we were going to fail. I got scared when you'd come in and say you know we're going to cut the budgets. We've got a few more months. We've gotta make our numbers. That just made me say well. We don't have to work hard to make our numbers I can still remember one conversation. We have where I said okay. We're going to the board and we're. We're GONNA. Pitch this for approval and you go what we don't have. Approval I quit my job. We don't have approval. John This was development. All the blood ran out of your face at that bummer I do remember. I had to look up because there was no internet. I had to go in the dictionary. Look Up. The real definition of development is that we're developing something development means it's not going to happen yet, but you know something. Like who cares if it doesn't work August, leave my sister's couch and get another job. We were young. John Sykes was so hungry. He pounded on our door. Let him in. He believed to music television from the start, but my good pal Fred Seibert the one who came of radio and helped create the graphic look of MTV, his reason for getting into TV was very different. One of your great supporters who I'd worked with and who I loved dearly Dale. Pond recommended you to me pre MTV. It was in the early days of pay. You came over to join us in the Cable Revolution Yeah. Why did you make that jump well? You know this is going to sound flattering. I did it completely because of you. Dale had left the country music radio station and left me alone, and the guy was working for at that time in radio. I had no respect for whatsoever. So you called me one day said you want to be intimidated. Oh, you said okay. Come have coffee with me. I went to Dale's files and he had files on everyone in the business, and there was one article about you and I thought to myself. You know this guy is younger than me and I've heard of him. So. That's you know one check. So we go. We have the coffee and I walk out. And I called my best friend. And I said this guy that I talked to so much smarter than my boss Radio. He goes. What do you think about that? I said well. Here's what they'll taught me. Doesn't matter what the job his work. For the smartest person you can find and at the time you the smartest person I could find. That's what happens. You told you that's flattering. Truth. Be told when you first told me about it. I thought it was the dumbest idea in the world because I was a music guy. And I had seen a few crummy music videos. I hadn't really thought about it too much. And then. Luckily, somebody played a music video. That made you know the little white. Go Off I. Don't know whether it was blind. Faith or I was too naive to know that you had to have faith like you told me it was going to happen. I believe you with a youth. Totally, I was just talking with Alan Goodman my soon to be partner at that point, and he said you know we didn't really know it was going to happen. But you looked at all. The other people that were around you and it just had to happen. I think that's really true I. Don't know if you remember, but we went to the head of Warner Communications and American. Express and we've got a meeting with Steve Ross. Who is the CEO of Warner with his deputies David Horowitz etc, and we got Jim Robinson and his deputy Lugar Schnur for American, express. We were worried that when we showed these videos through for American Express what. To said. Let's find the TAMEST. Livia Newton John. Of your remember, but in the meeting they said do have to play that kind of stuff implying Olivia Newton John was to. Write to their credit. Jim Robinson's the first one to say okay. I'm in for my half..

MTV Chicago John Sykes Dale CBS New York Olivia Newton John Jim Robinson IHEART America American Express Steve Ross Alan Goodman John This Fred Seibert Livia Newton Plunkett
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"You're listening to math and magic production iheartradio. You actually where the guy who inspired us to do animated logos. You remember this I said well. What are we going to do in between the videos and the VJ's are we're GONNA? Do jingles went? Oh, no, we can't do jingles and I said what do we do? You said how about this imagine. It's a picture of a cow to yeah. He said an all of a sudden an X. comes down and cuts the cow's head off, and it falls to the ground, and you'd see the veins coming out in the blood, spurting out, and the cow vomits, and in the it is the logo and went. Oh, my God I can do anything I want. I am Bob Tippin welcomed the math and magic stories from the frontiers of market, and we're doing something special on today's episode. One of the pivotal moments in my life was leading a team that created MTV. I've had the good fortune of having all the co founders of MTV on this podcast with me and each of the interviews letter was chatting with Judy Grath Fred? Cyber John Sykes Y'all Moan and of course Tom Preston. Spent a little time talking about MTV so we wanted to do for you. Today was pulled together. Those stories for the first time ever tell the story at the beginning of MTV through the eyes of people who are actually in the room when it happened because all of us are really in the room, often laugh about how far of other people's accounts can be, so let me set the state..

MTV Tom Preston Bob Tippin John Sykes Judy Grath Fred
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

"Savage dance moves. Thanks for sharing your diy haircut fails. Thanks for sharing your inner lip sync star. Now it's our turn to share with the GEIKO. Give back the fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies for current and new customers, because we're committed for the long haul, the fifteen percent credit lasser, full policy term visit GEICO DOT com slash, give back for more INFO and eligibility. Guys it's bobby. Bones host the bobby bones show and pretty much always sleepy, because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio show. Wisher allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world. If he possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stop by the hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W. M Q in Washington DC or wherever the takes you on the iheartradio APP. Welcome back to math and magic a tear more from my conversation with Richland. Tell us about this. Iteration of a diamond is forever campaigning. We talked earlier about the parade. The fireworks you've got Herald Square. You can either be afraid to touch them. Or you use them, and it sounds like you touched. Diamond is forever campaign. Talk about it and talk about how you manage to persuade people. Let you do that and what? The impact was the busy really amazing organization in very unusual organization, because essentially it was a group of miners. Group of marketers so they were digging out of the ground and enable persuading people that they needed it, and all of that was done in a jv venture with South Africa and Botswana Namibia, so the company that was really quite ahead of its time in terms of benefits and working to make sure that a natural resource was benefiting both the country and being commercially successful. When they asked me to come to America, the US market had stalled, it was essentially growing. I think about two percent a year at the time fifty percent of the world's words, Don's being sold out of America. So that was pretty scary I can remember being briefed by the worldwide Sierra de Beers guy called Stephen Lee sir. He's mentally talented is brief literally was we don't think the US market is gonNA. Grow much more, but don't screw it up. Your job is not a blood up, but when I got that, we started to go look. Domin forever is an amazing campaign. But what if we built big product stories that went underneath it. What would those products stories be? We started to engineer products rather than campaigns. The best example of that was the past present future. We did a lot of in depth research with consumers. We actually hypnotized man. I kid you not. We kept asking people in quant. Do you agree it's a good idea that give your wife at diamond anniversary gift? Yes, I do. Eighty percent of men agreed with that, but I only temps in a actioning on it, so there's obviously quite a big gap, so we go really fed up with this between what they were saying. They rashly doing, and so what we did is we arranged hypnotize a group of men and literally one of the exercises. We have been diet. We had them say you're looking out over a valley. Imagine that valley is a vision of your marriage drawer paycheck, so all the people who had given domin jewelry you had green pastures snowcapped mountains plowed DHS and the literally. Some of the guys who hadn't we have volcanoes rivers with sharks in them. It was absolutely fascinating, but what that led us to do. Say Look you call fix marriages, but what you can do a very good articulation of what men want to say, because men really on that particular and what we found women wanted to hear. Was I love where we've been a love where we are an committed to a future that translated into the full your posture President your future, which then translated into three stone diamond ring, which by the way was fantastic as rather than selling one time and you're selling. I'm was even more fantastic. It was easy to manufacturer, so we essentially went on a road show with the trade, and basically said look. We think we gotta get idea, and they said No. We've been trying to sell three stained rings forever. They didn't work. We said well. What if we could it? Hospitals and future and ran this advertising campaign behind it and they went. That's interesting, so we did it. The trade aligned and it became a billion dollar success literally within three months of launch. It was unbelievable. To me was a good example of how we stopped being marketers, and what we became as sort of like cultural engineers and product tension is to basically go. Okay, there's a need here. We can build a solution then we can market the hell out of so let's talk about another solution. I love market expansion ideas, right hand diamond ring. That turned out to be about a three billion dollar business. Yeah, every time. Yeah, who came up with that idea I? mean it sounds like a risky idea. That was a really interesting one. Because essentially minds are unpredictable things. One month they'll be producing lots of large rushton's that cut to one carrots, and then they can suddenly start producing a whole Lotta little diamonds. The bears basically, we're producing too many small diamonds, and we needed to find a way to create some market velocity underneath them. Someone had the Brealey Revolutionary break-through observation. The women have to Hans the left hand could be about commitment marriage. The right hand could be an expression of individual taste, and who I am. When we initially went to the bears, and said we got this idea. We're GONNA. Make the right hand about self expression. You can buy yourself. It's very design intensive, which is great because that will use lots of little stains. A lot of people thought it was heresy. They will hang on a minute. A diamond is forever. It's all about love women buying rings. This sounds ridiculous now, but. We're dealing in fifteen years ago. And there was a lot of nervousness around the idea, so of course we the sensible thing we went and spoke to women and women went debbie ridiculous I can absolutely reconcile in my mind that there dunst apart from other dominance, the water self expression. That's a great idea. Let's do it so on the simple premise of torture customer, Dane, go in with preconceived ideas. That was a really good example, and then the creative team came out with his really really good idea of women in the world razor right hand. It was a beautifully crafted campaign with great product that really was sort of pushing an open door. That's a great case study for market extension. Let's go to case study for transformation turnaround two thousand nine. You make a jump. But this time Mr Client your first CMO Job Zales. You had fourteen consecutive quarters of positive comparable same store sales growth until sales actually was acquired in two thousand fourteen. How did you do it? Mean this is your first time in the lane. Now it. You're the client you're making the calls. What did you do well firstly? I was high by really really. Talented Sia Theo Killian just an enormously talented, generous, smart leader that makes all the difference in the world and second. If you're going to get involved in turnarounds, you have to be good in a firefight. You have to be the type of person who actually runs towards fires robin away from them, and you've got to have that sort of combination of arrogance and naievty arrogance that you can succeed where others fell and Naievety that you can succeed where others failed. Is a very talented group of people. who were brought in to help? Fix it very be not company, but at the end of the day, the sort of the core of the Brown was still left. We started to do things really simple things, and I took a lot of the lesson from De Beers and that made the transition easier because I understood the category when I arrive sales were running a very promotional approach to making jewelry, and it was a simple treatment Amana ever go down on his knee push. Hansa had here look Darling I got you a deal. Stop doing that doesn't mean that value is an important, but the brand has to mean.

US America bears bobby GEIKO De Beers Washington Herald Square Richland Sia Theo Killian Sierra de Beers South Africa DHS engineer Hansa CMO Job Zales Naievety Don President
Apple Podcasts reaches over 900,000 shows

podnews

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Apple Podcasts reaches over 900,000 shows

"The latest from USA Pot News Donnette nine hundred thousand. That's the number of podcasts. In the world in Apple podcasts. At least that's according to the my podcast reviews service by Daniel. J Lewis Fifty thousand added in the last thirty days. Google podcasts appears to have added auto downloads for us. At least the setting appears when subscribing or re subscribing to new show. What is Apple Building next in podcasting mark? Asquith has written along post with some thoughts about what they are an aunt planning to do in the future and suggests that they should work together with the industry to move forward in an earnings summary. The New York Times says the daily has achieved one billion downloads. Podcast revenues have increased by twenty six percents to seventy one million dollars though. This account side also includes revenue from the New York. Times is branded content studio and from wire cutter anyway. It's thirteen percent of the company's Ad Revenue. Iheart MEDIA'S PODCASTS. Are going to be on telly use. Epa signed a first look deal with heart media to have first rights at adapting iheartradio original podcasts. For TV only last week. Iheartmedia announced book adaptations from. Its podcast as well. The companies also asking the FCC for approval to waive a rule that prohibits foreign investors from owning more than a minority of the company. Clinton is to start her own podcast with iheartmedia she credits. Conan O'Brien getting her interested in the media and in the earnings call it was revealed that Iheart media's digital revenue which includes a podcasting was up thirty three point six percent year on year broadcast revenue fell by one point four percent. Bob Pittman claimed that the company will double their podcast. Revenues in two thousand twenty enrich Bressler said that the way to value podcast companies is about six dollars a download all about millionaires and spotify is to launch new podcasts in Australia leading podcast in the country though the ABC still remains unavailable on the platform and it focused news. Today's the five hundred episode of Gary Lennon's four minute crypto and Bitcoin Daily News. Bitcoin conference that he's running. Bit Block. Boom will be held in Dallas in Texas at the end of August. What matters most everyday Americans into America's new show about politics policy and power both have over the lives of the American people? It's a new podcast from news and MSNBC also from NBC News Bias Markets Hosted. By Dylan. Byers I see what you did. There looks at the world of Technology and media the current episode features and interview with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg and Hello New York New York. We're at the rain podcasts. Business Summit next Wednesday march fourth. In fact I'm hosting it and from five thirty on Wednesday night I'll be inside the their authority on three hundred West Fortieth Street. I will personally swap you a cheap laptop sticker for a pint foaming beer if of course you can find me. And there's plenty more and all the links in our newsletter subscribe at Pod News Dot

New York The New York Times Apple Iheart Media Iheartmedia Sheryl Sandberg USA Pod News Dot Conan O'brien Google Daniel FCC Asquith Bob Pittman Msnbc Gary Lennon EPA NBC Bitcoin Dallas
Podcast Movement Evolutions is under way in L.A.

podnews

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Podcast Movement Evolutions is under way in L.A.

"Focused movement. He pollution's has kicked off in Los Angeles in California. The first of three keynotes featured on World Radio Day. Bob Pittman CEO of IHEARTMEDIA CONAL burn president of IHEARTMEDIA PODCASTS and add weeks 2019 producer of the year. Mischer Yussef phobia number of announcements during the show will report on many of them in. Monday's Pod

Bob Pittman Iheartmedia Conal Los Angeles CEO President Trump California Producer
"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on KOMO

"In for him is Bob Pittman hi Bob thanks for inviting me by thanks for coming back I'm glad I didn't she sat on the first hour all my goodness of course this is great bombs in the feet planning attorney and I would urge you that if you have any questions about estate planning call now here's your chance you can ask him anything two oh six four two one one thousand two oh six forty one one thousand or eight seven seven three nine seven K. one well I would venture bomb and I'm there also was a good thing out having fun yeah he will probably have heard every single question possible there's not a lot but you know I learned all the time I think that's why not well know that I'm Headin down the last street if you well as when I stop learning I hope that never happens I read somewhere that everyone just wants to learn grow and contribute I believe that's true I think so yeah so what is the most what's the most challenging question you had this week without revealing anyone's information if you possibly can you know probably the saddest was he dealing with the the death of a of a of a young person and without going into any detail it says that's hard to imagine yeah unless you are and I I discovered this a long time ago that and I you know two white ball but I said you know Bob you have no way of knowing what anybody's going through when that whether they lose a spouse a child a parent you don't know because you're not I'm not living through it and all I can do is is try to help the best I can to sort of sue the the belt and put up some little guide posts and help get someone down the right road but it's a tough tough road and it's different for everybody there some things I think must be the same it's just awful but it's just different and and I know that someone who's sales lost a spouse I'm not a surviving spouse and so I really don't know truly what it's like except that it's hard I think it's true that every day when you run into someone you don't know the path that they're on the road that they're on or what their story is too that's true the story so important I you know one of reasons why I started doing what I call guide book style plan in its guide book planning is so I wanna know as high as I sit and think and I ponder all these things all the time and I say okay a fight to find that surviving spouse I want this guide book I want to be able to open up a call to big red book I want to be able to open up the big red book and be operational in in a safe zone right away and that's what the guide what what I call guide book planning is all about is it gets you right away in the event of a number what when the merchants here are tough time comes you're right in to the guide book and you say okay I know what to do I've written it down in advance talk about prevention and preventing problems in the future and getting that road map out and we put it on per in purple on purpose and a big red book because we wanted to stand out and inside in the key information section that says okay you know Bob is incapacitated here's what I do Bob has passed Bob is diet here's what I need to do first and second and third and by the time you're doing that you're on the right road and you're not likely to be taken advantage of by the sharks and the vultures and it's so complete that it goes all the way down to what was your client the queue for a client you showed me this week hello John well I'm going to mention Joe Joe on the air Jo Jo came to visit us Joe Joe was the nicest little dog you'd want to me so it's every you know from Bob is capacity needed to who's gonna feed Jo Jo's right yes exactly right yeah now you take these the estate planning based on say a guide book can you wrap it in Rashi's life planning at all my goodness are you there or what well I would venture to say Bob we we've just met last couple days and I can tell how thoughtful you are and how much you think about your clients I know how much re she thinks about his clients to and how it's the full three sixty it's not just the legal part.

Bob Pittman attorney
"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

16:37 min | 1 year ago

"bob pittman" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

"I am Bob Pittman and this is mathematics stories from the frontiers of marketing where we explore the insights side of marketing the creative side and how they come together to create the truly remarkable ideas and successes today on this episode. We have someone who is a true iconoclast somebody somebody Alamo Frankie Genius Fred Seibert welcome.

Frankie Genius Fred Seibert Bob Pittman
Mandy Moore completes trek to Mount Everest base camp amid deadly climbing season

Scott Shannon in the Morning

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Mandy Moore completes trek to Mount Everest base camp amid deadly climbing season

"Mandy Moore climbed this season. Just reached the base camp at seventeen thousand feet. She said, there's so much magic in these mountains, but not enough to make twelve thousand there's so many bodies on this liberty of attempted Everest, but more climb mount Kilimanjaro NAR NAR. Martina Navratilova, Jessica Biel among those who attempted that nineteen thousand foot men about Bob Pittman wife at the time. Sure. She's a massive climber. She's in many

Jessica Biel Mandy Moore Martina Navratilova Bob Pittman Everest Seventeen Thousand Feet Nineteen Thousand Foot
Introducing: Math & Magic

BrainStuff

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Introducing: Math & Magic

"Hey, brain stuff. Lauren vogel. Bam. Here today. I wanted to share with you. The trailer for a show on the iheart media podcast network. That's brand new by which, I mean, it's new, and it's about brand building marketing strategies, and all of the math and or magic that go into making creative and business successes. The podcast is called math. And magic stories from the frontiers of marketing on it. Our own iheartmedia CEO, Bob Pittman digs into his past experience to talk about the future of marketing, along with some of today's most gifted industry, disruptors, here's the trailer. To me data isn't just numbers. Data is also words, we struck a relationship with Twitter to be, actually, the first one to anonymously, connect tweets purchasers. What I learned is that there are words that people use in social media, that can tell you, whether they're going to go to film, six months for that film comes out. It is astonishing. Every cultural phenomenon comes down to two things. Math and magic. I'm Bob Pittman chairman and CEO of iheartmedia. I'm one of the things I've always loved his trying to decode how big ideas find their way into the world. My new show, math and magic is about those stories. It's about the stories from the frontiers of marketing each show. I sit down with visionaries here how they view data and creativity bringing credible ideas to life. It was just pure desperation. Sorry. I come in to the programming meeting and I said, got an idea, I was fearful that creative executives would see me, walk down the hall, and run and hide is like a there's the data nerd every label was saying, no to really scooter. You're great at marketing, but like it's YouTube kit, unless it guys there's a sleeping giant over here. You're not paying attention. I discovered Justin Bieber on YouTube. Listen, it subscribed to math and magical apple podcasts, the iheartradio app, or wherever you get your podcast.

Bob Pittman Youtube Lauren Vogel Chairman And Ceo Justin Bieber CEO Twitter Apple Six Months
Could Transplanted Organs Be Reused?

BrainStuff

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Could Transplanted Organs Be Reused?

"Today's episode of brain stuff is brought to you by AT and T. And it can wait. Eighty two percent of people admit to using their smartphone, while they're driving were all used to seeing it. But ninety three percent of people don't approve of distracted driving. We feel awkward speaking up about it, and it's time that changed because it's not worth the risk a text alike selfie. Whatever it is, when you're driving, it can wait. So the next time you see a friend, family member or other human using their phone while they're driving. No that it's okay to say something. Distracted driving's reckless take a pledge to end. Distracted driving at it can wait dot com. A message from AT and T. Welcome to brain stuff a production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here battle Melton auto new the trials of kidney disease, and dialysis better than most in two thousand fifteen after spending most of his life limited by disease. He received healthy kidney by way of transplant tragically only two years later. Mel DeNardo, died in a motor vehicle accident normally has death would have been the end of the road for the healthy donor kidney. But instead that kidney was re gifted to another patient in need. This was done, of course, with the permission of maldonado's family. His sister Linda said in a press release. We just thought they gave him that gift. Why not help another family? If we can the recipient was a seventy year old woman who had been on dialysis, for ten years and pronounced, the kidney, a blessing. Organ regifter is a pretty rare procedure. But the team that transplanted this kidney doctor, Jeffrey veal director of the UCLA can the exchange program and his team every transplanted three kidneys in less than a year when we spoke with him. Dr veal said that he sees potential for many more centers to jump on board with the practice. He said, it's a shame that we're discarding these kidneys. So why aren't more kidneys? We gifted Dr veal explained. The knee-jerk response is that once a kidney is transplanted. You don't Retransplant transplant it an added that some concerns arise over the damage that might happen to a kidney over two separate death events. But he points out some of these kidneys, endured multiple blood transfusions and other treatments. When the original donor died, he said, regifter is less of a shock than these terribly traumatic motor vehicle accidents. He notes the twenty to twenty five percent of people who get a kidney transplant die with a functioning kidney. That's a lot of potential donors and healthy organs, that save lives are in short supply. Although some patients might bulk it, receiving a secondhand kidney waiting for a new one can take on average three to five years, sometimes longer in April of two thousand eighteen more than ninety five thousand Americans were on a waiting list for a kidney, according to the United network for organ sharing the nonprofit that manages, the nation's organ transplant system, some twenty people die every day, waiting for an organ transplant and indefinite life on dialysis is far from ideal for people with diabetes, in particular, every year on dialysis sees a drop in life, expectancy and quality of life. Although the re gifting program is still in early stages. Veal reports that his recipients are all off of dialysis, with well-functioning kidneys. He said, we don't know the long term results. But it looks great initially. Not all donor kidneys can be successfully re gifted the same donation rules apply. As those of normal transplants, for example, a recipient who later dies of a disease like cancer would not be able to pass along the Oregon. However, a patient who experiences a fatal stroke accident could still be in possession of a re giftable kidney to allow for redistribution of previously, transplanted organs, some major changes would have to happen both within the transplant centers and likely the aforementioned United network for organ sharing currently programs. Assess the original donor to determine compatibility and viability of the Oregon in regifter cases. However, Dr veal says that they would instead need to review. The first transplant tease details by using records to virtually cross-match blood types and other details like medical history. This is no small feat in an industry Laden with important protocols to protect patients nonetheless, it's possible that regifter may be done to organs besides kidneys in the future. For example, the liver. Dr veal said these are often high quality organs from young donors who have tragically died in are often going to sicker patients on the wait list, who are often older and might have multiple medical issues. And so our risk of dying a few weeks or months later of a stroke or heart attack. Why not take that high quality, Oregon and help someone else out? One organ donor can save up to eight lives. But too often, this potential goes on realized, if you want to be an organ donor make your wishes known to your family and take time to register online. The site, DNV dot ORG has easy registration for him. Stays. Episode was written by Aaliyah, white and produced by Tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other topics that keep on giving visit our home. Planet has works dot com and for more podcasts heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Have you ever wondered how do the smartest marketers cut through the noise, I'm Bob Pittman chairman and CEO of iheartmedia and all my new show? Math and magic. I'm sitting down with the day's most gifted disrupters. But when I did this people thought I was crazy. They're really no other rules, aside from, you know, no full frontal nudity go out there and do it. Don't like to follow the trend of listen. It subscribed to math and magic on apple podcast, iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Dr Veal Kidney Disease AT Oregon Jeffrey Veal Apple Mel Denardo Regifter Dnv Dot Org United Network Lauren Vogel Maldonado Melton Chairman And Ceo Linda Diabetes Bob Pittman Aaliyah Iheartradio
Tenderfoot TV's new investigative podcast

podnews

02:10 min | 2 years ago

Tenderfoot TV's new investigative podcast

"Pod track have released January twenty nine thousand nine figures for the top ten US podcast publishes and top twenty US podcasts using their service NPR remains at number one with a yearly increase in US unique audience from sixteen point three million to seventeen point nine million heart media has seen significant increases year on year as well. But their figures now include the stuff media purchase they made last year. So they're not quite compatible now portrait only measures podcast publishes who opt in to their measurement service. And so these numbers are incomplete. And additionally track have removed all global figures from these reports this month in December NPR achieved one hundred and forty seven million global downloads. Bob Pittman, the CEO of iheartmedia is interviewed in a recent addition of ad age ad lib, the podcast when cereal returns, it's focusing on the US public school system. It'll be hosted by someone new not by Sarah Kane. And for some reason, the producers are keen to highlight. This will be a limited series rather than your actual season. For chargeable think we're entering the global age of podcasts. They've published a lot of stats and data as to changing habits. We'd recommend you read it. It's in the show notes and in our newsletter today following her promotion, THEO bowel, come from the N Y tease interviewed in WW de about expansion plans for the daily and apple podcasts appears to have a branded imbedded player. It's called the mezzanine player prototype, and it's designed to be embedded in a web page. We saw a copy of it sent to us as part of a press release. Now of notice the audio is hosted by apple and it's available in both MP3. and Albright is a Google. Search reveals it's been used for beats one video clip as well in our newsletter. And in our show notes, we mentioned three new podcasts, including to live and die in LA. It's a brand new investigative Paul. Cast into the death of an aspiring actress hosted by Neil Strauss. The podcast is set to launch next Thursday. February twenty eighth from ten to foot TV cadence thirteen and megaphone by panoply,

United States NPR Apple Sarah Kane Neil Strauss Theo Bowel Bob Pittman LA CEO Paul Google Iheartmedia Albright
When life gives you Parkinson's

podnews

02:01 min | 2 years ago

When life gives you Parkinson's

"In the latest pod news. I happen to be forty six year old. Happily married proud dad of a nine year old with a great career and Parkinson's. I shake yet. I can't shake this. So what do you do with life? Gives you Parkinson's. You tell your story while you still can ten million people have been diagnosed with it, but few people know much about it when life gives you Parkinson's launches tomorrow co hosted by Larry Gifford a thirty year broadcast veteran who was diagnosed in August twenty seventeen. It's with curious, cost, Parkinson, Canada, and Omni studio. Paul squad is a new app designed to help small independent podcasters build that audience, his more efficiently on social media that hoping together feedback from as many podcasters as possible. And you can sign up to be part of the beater on their website. Podcast addict is now adding support. This podcast links, the author announces that the start the app is looking for patriot tippy and anchor link. WCHS rather than the rally quos payments standard, but who knows what the future might be at the end of the AB podcast up front last week was a chat with Bob Pittman who is CEO and chairman of media, and y'all Mon who CEO of National Public Radio willing to it in print form his a question from the moderator, how do you ensure the podcasts don't cannibalize terrestrial live radio? You'll guests are an opportunity feel podcast growth, say, radio public, a two part series, and in a survey, adobe analytics claims that forty eight percent of US consumers. We'll have a smart speaker by the end of the year. Apparently thirty two percent of US consumers have one. Now, the Lincoln tech crunch article to the full research is no longer working. If you'd like to dig a little deeper into those surprising numbers. Oh, and the US military have develops a microphone and earpiece that clamps to your teeth. You will find more details on this at pulled news dot net.

Parkinson United States CEO Larry Gifford Bob Pittman Omni Canada Paul Adobe Chairman Forty Eight Percent Thirty Two Percent Forty Six Year Thirty Year Nine Year