9 Burst results for "Bob Mcmillen"

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

"'cause like the emergent properties of every other chain change intact blend together and end up kind of compounding so if like tech changes n. changes per year and then you have 'em changes in different vertical emergent properties are either end times 'em or end to the however you want to deal with it so security. There's a lot going on and so the big vendors that have distribution. I'm not gonna name names but you know we're talking about no no like they have a sales force and they have a book of business that lasts a long time but they don't really know what to fill it with. And so they end up being incredibly acquisitive. And they'd by all these little like base hits of things that seem to catch on and it kinda just becomes like turn the crank shovel the security products into the security product boiler and just sort of hope that like the buyers are getting like a you know a portfolio of stuff but then the other really hateful thing that enterprise software dozen general is the tip of the spear and the organization is the sales team in the solutions architects and then the customer success is kind of an afterthought leftover from when we did perpetual software licensing. And you could just shelf. Ware was just as profitable as you know. Software that was being used so as a result people end up buying a lot of stuff and then are they getting the most out of it you know. Does anybody even care It's a crank that is turned. And then you don't even look at the sausage at the other end because like that's customer success successes job you know so i just feel bad frankly for much of the ecosystem because it's more important than ever You know like. I don't think cyber security is getting less important over time. It is ends up being kind of the lens through which you were even analyzing like the future of open societies at this point of the bob mcmillen had a story in the journal. Like as we record this today about like the russians are back like solar winds to son of solar winds like. It's here so there's a culture problem in cybersecurity industry. There's a market problem. We kind of need to fix both. Because it's all fun and games to whine about vendors and to try and evangelize your product by sending people like air pods in the mail to take like meeting with you but like these things. They do hurt the entire society that we live in this behavior in the market. So that sounds like sort of four problems here. There's just the market dynamics of securities industry are different we have adversaries involved and we have quality problems like a well beyond say a market for lemons. Really read that paper. It's an excellent paper market silver bullets. We have the emergent complexity of securing systems that we're not responsible for where those systems intersect in ways that are multiplicative in their complexity. We have the economics of acquisition that have emerged in our industry with dominant players snapping up and comers and then we have finally bad organizational design choices not prioritizing.

bob mcmillen Ware the journal
"bob mcmillen" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

09:10 min | 2 years ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on The Journal.

"BOB mcmillen covers cybersecurity. He says the skirmish between Barin apple is the latest in a struggle between tech and law enforcement. That first exploded into view seven years ago. If you wanted to pinpoint date that this all really took off. It would be the summer of twenty thirteen. Gene when Edward snowden started leaking classified documents from the Archives The Washington Post is reporting noting that the National Security Agency and the FBI are mining the servers of nine leading US Internet companies the federal government tracking. Our phone calls not to mention the information we've given to companies like facebook Google and Apple. Everyone kind of knew that these intelligence is agencies were in the business of collecting data largely from computers. What snowden showed was that the scope of the collection was much greater than people thought the techniques leaks were more sophisticated than people knew and that I think really kind of woke everyone up everyone including apple? Aw before this known. Revelations apples relationship with law enforcement had been relatively smooth in the olden days law enforcement if they were doing investigation they already knew that these phones were very important investigative tools. They would often simply send them to apple. An apple would be able to provide the data that was on the phone. During this period investigators could get a warrant send a phone to Cupertino an apple would be able to send back the motherload emails. Contact lists call records records photos video but slowly apple had been tightening. Its security so beginning. Around the the apple four timeframe mm-hmm they started adding these very strong security measures to the phones and the one that the law enforcement people really care about. Is this technology that not not only encrypt the data on your phone but also protects it with a pass code and post note in apple double down those security features it encrypted and more of its users data and it changed its passcode from a four digit number to a more secure six digit number so they basically locked it down and they did a number number of very clever technically sophisticated things and they were very much. The leader on mobile phone security at this time apple made insurance customers knew about it by touting the security moves in its marketing like when it released its IOS eight operating system apple posted a note to its website assuring during customers that with new encryption passcode security. Not even apple could extract data from a locked eight phone. They built the iphone with such a intense level of security that in this one circumstance. If you have your hands on a phone and you don't have the pass code and you WanNa read what's on it. Nobody nobody can do that. Apple couldn't do that themselves so they basically went from a situation where they could take phone. Download the data Senate to law enforcement to a situation where they take phone. Look at it. Go out it's a modern iphone. We can't do it. We can't do anything with this. Customers might have liked the extra security thirty enraged law enforcement and in two thousand fifteen. Something happened to bring this standoff between apple and law enforcement to a head welcome back everybody. We have breaking news coming to out of California San Bernardino where we have the sheriff's Office confirming that they've had an active shooter where they have to San Bernardino attack. In December December of two thousand fifteen was a terror attack by husband and wife team who opened fire on a county Christmas party. Two suspects have been identified Vita twenty-eight-year-old Saieed for Ruch and twenty-seven-year-old. Tush fien Melik authorities. Say they do not have a motive at this point and are not ruling out terrorism and again after the attack was over law enforcement. Had this phone they had An Apple iphone Five C and they couldn't get into it because it was is locked down and they wanted to know with our other leads that they should be link. There'd be another attack for example that was being planned but try as they might the FBI could not crack it and this was when the government very publicly put in name to the thing they wanted from apple the thing that would solve the frustration. They'd been having for years now. Federal investigators wanted a back door. They wanted apple to write software to crack. Its own phones so that that investigators could get a warrant and just walk through that door. So what was the government's philosophical argument for a back door. Well it was just I. It remains that there should be a way for us to get data. The idea that we can't get data off of this widely used digital device. That's crucial to investigations. This is simply unacceptable. So it's kind of like. Hey we can get a warrant and searched your house. So why can't we get a warrant and search your phone. Yeah or they'll say like for the longest time we've had a way of wire tapping telephones. People are okay with that because you know. There's a precedent for getting a Legitimate Authority to do that and not everybody's phone gets taft. And you know why. Can't we have something like that for the iphone. What kind of leads needs? Can you get out of a fun. Well the most obvious thing is seeing what people have been saying to the suspect. You can see text messages. You can see who they know their list of contacts. You can find a browser history. You can see evidence of where they've been there sort of ways of tracking where where where people actually been taking the phone you know this is basically the the home of your digital life nowadays so if you WanNa profile someone the the phone is really the best place to start to try to build that profile for the San Bernardino shooters. The Justice Department tried to force apple to create a back door by taking the company to court and Apple went to the mattresses to fight it. Apple was not having it. They decided to put all chips in on this issue and to me. That's it was a very interesting acting decision. What they want is they want us to develop a new operating system that takes out the security precautions? Tim Cook appeared on national television and made the argument that the privacy of their users was paramount to this company and the only way it could truly be maintained was by building systems without these back doors. Cook argued that if apple created a back door sure the good guys could get in the good the bad guy. One of the bad guys knew that that existed target that is this is Obama's justice department had gone gone after apple very publicly but if it expected a groundswell of support it was mistaken. Customers stuck with apple no one proposed a law mandating. The back door apple really was able to. I think control the narrative around this just by really pushing this idea that they were taking users observers and their privacy seriously and his the federal government with just years earlier has been largely criticized for widespread surveillance programs. You no saying Oh we need more surveillance you know they were. It was sort of set up for them to smash this one in and And they did. So what happened with the San Bernardino phones was the FBI able to get in at the end of the day. The sembene a phone is an iphone five C and the FBI FBI paid a third party to gain access to it. So yeah they got into it. Cost them a million dollars but they got into it. This was the situation for law enforcement trying to get into an iphone in two thousand sixteen. It was a black box apple. Wouldn't hack it for you and if you wanted in you'd have to pay a million dollars to an anonymous attacker but since then that has radically changed. What changes that business businessmen? The profit imperative changed at after the break. The rise of the iphone crackers. My name is Dr Alexandra socks. I'm a psychiatrist. And the host of the Gimblett Podcast Motherhood sessions which is back for a second season each episode. I sit down with women who've come in with a question or a problem and we work on it together her. When was the last time you tax? I think it was like two years ago. I just I feel like the sexual part of me is just doesn't exist anymore. You can listen to the new the season of motherhood sessions for free on spotify or wherever you get your podcast. Welcome welcome back..

apple FBI San Bernardino Edward snowden BOB mcmillen California San Bernardino Google US National Security Agency Cupertino Justice Department San Bernardino shooters Senate spotify
"bob mcmillen" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

09:10 min | 2 years ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on The Journal.

"BOB mcmillen covers cybersecurity. He says the skirmish between Barin apple is the latest in a struggle between tech and law enforcement. That first exploded into view seven years ago. If you wanted to pinpoint date that this all really took off. It would be the summer of twenty thirteen. Gene when Edward snowden started leaking classified documents from the Archives The Washington Post is reporting noting that the National Security Agency and the FBI are mining the servers of nine leading US Internet companies the federal government tracking. Our phone calls not to mention the information we've given to companies like facebook Google and Apple. Everyone kind of knew that these intelligence is agencies were in the business of collecting data largely from computers. What snowden showed was that the scope of the collection was much greater than people thought the techniques leaks were more sophisticated than people knew and that I think really kind of woke everyone up everyone including apple? Aw before this known. Revelations apples relationship with law enforcement had been relatively smooth in the olden days law enforcement if they were doing investigation they already knew that these phones were very important investigative tools. They would often simply send them to apple. An apple would be able to provide the data that was on the phone. During this period investigators could get a warrant send a phone to Cupertino an apple would be able to send back the motherload emails. Contact lists call records records photos video but slowly apple had been tightening. Its security so beginning. Around the the apple four timeframe mm-hmm they started adding these very strong security measures to the phones and the one that the law enforcement people really care about. Is this technology that not not only encrypt the data on your phone but also protects it with a pass code and post note in apple double down those security features it encrypted and more of its users data and it changed its passcode from a four digit number to a more secure six digit number so they basically locked it down and they did a number number of very clever technically sophisticated things and they were very much. The leader on mobile phone security at this time apple made insurance customers knew about it by touting the security moves in its marketing like when it released its IOS eight operating system apple posted a note to its website assuring during customers that with new encryption passcode security. Not even apple could extract data from a locked eight phone. They built the iphone with such a intense level of security that in this one circumstance. If you have your hands on a phone and you don't have the pass code and you WanNa read what's on it. Nobody nobody can do that. Apple couldn't do that themselves so they basically went from a situation where they could take phone. Download the data Senate to law enforcement to a situation where they take phone. Look at it. Go out it's a modern iphone. We can't do it. We can't do anything with this. Customers might have liked the extra security thirty enraged law enforcement and in two thousand fifteen. Something happened to bring this standoff between apple and law enforcement to a head welcome back everybody. We have breaking news coming to out of California San Bernardino where we have the sheriff's Office confirming that they've had an active shooter where they have to San Bernardino attack. In December December of two thousand fifteen was a terror attack by husband and wife team who opened fire on a county Christmas party. Two suspects have been identified Vita twenty-eight-year-old Saieed for Ruch and twenty-seven-year-old. Tush fien Melik authorities. Say they do not have a motive at this point and are not ruling out terrorism and again after the attack was over law enforcement. Had this phone they had An Apple iphone Five C and they couldn't get into it because it was is locked down and they wanted to know with our other leads that they should be link. There'd be another attack for example that was being planned but try as they might the FBI could not crack it and this was when the government very publicly put in name to the thing they wanted from apple the thing that would solve the frustration. They'd been having for years now. Federal investigators wanted a back door. They wanted apple to write software to crack. Its own phones so that that investigators could get a warrant and just walk through that door. So what was the government's philosophical argument for a back door. Well it was just I. It remains that there should be a way for us to get data. The idea that we can't get data off of this widely used digital device. That's crucial to investigations. This is simply unacceptable. So it's kind of like. Hey we can get a warrant and searched your house. So why can't we get a warrant and search your phone. Yeah or they'll say like for the longest time we've had a way of wire tapping telephones. People are okay with that because you know. There's a precedent for getting a Legitimate Authority to do that and not everybody's phone gets taft. And you know why. Can't we have something like that for the iphone. What kind of leads needs? Can you get out of a fun. Well the most obvious thing is seeing what people have been saying to the suspect. You can see text messages. You can see who they know their list of contacts. You can find a browser history. You can see evidence of where they've been there sort of ways of tracking where where where people actually been taking the phone you know this is basically the the home of your digital life nowadays so if you WanNa profile someone the the phone is really the best place to start to try to build that profile for the San Bernardino shooters. The Justice Department tried to force apple to create a back door by taking the company to court and Apple went to the mattresses to fight it. Apple was not having it. They decided to put all chips in on this issue and to me. That's it was a very interesting acting decision. What they want is they want us to develop a new operating system that takes out the security precautions? Tim Cook appeared on national television and made the argument that the privacy of their users was paramount to this company and the only way it could truly be maintained was by building systems without these back doors. Cook argued that if apple created a back door sure the good guys could get in the good the bad guy. One of the bad guys knew that that existed target that is this is Obama's justice department had gone gone after apple very publicly but if it expected a groundswell of support it was mistaken. Customers stuck with apple no one proposed a law mandating. The back door apple really was able to. I think control the narrative around this just by really pushing this idea that they were taking users observers and their privacy seriously and his the federal government with just years earlier has been largely criticized for widespread surveillance programs. You no saying Oh we need more surveillance you know they were. It was sort of set up for them to smash this one in and And they did. So what happened with the San Bernardino phones was the FBI able to get in at the end of the day. The sembene a phone is an iphone five C and the FBI FBI paid a third party to gain access to it. So yeah they got into it. Cost them a million dollars but they got into it. This was the situation for law enforcement trying to get into an iphone in two thousand sixteen. It was a black box apple. Wouldn't hack it for you and if you wanted in you'd have to pay a million dollars to an anonymous attacker but since then that has radically changed. What changes that business businessmen? The profit imperative changed at after the break. The rise of the iphone crackers. My name is Dr Alexandra socks. I'm a psychiatrist. And the host of the Gimblett Podcast Motherhood sessions which is back for a second season each episode. I sit down with women who've come in with a question or a problem and we work on it together her. When was the last time you tax? I think it was like two years ago. I just I feel like the sexual part of me is just doesn't exist anymore. You can listen to the new the season of motherhood sessions for free on spotify or wherever you get your podcast. Welcome welcome back..

apple FBI San Bernardino Edward snowden BOB mcmillen California San Bernardino Google US National Security Agency Cupertino Justice Department San Bernardino shooters Senate spotify
Microsoft Warns of a Monster Computer Bug

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:52 min | 2 years ago

Microsoft Warns of a Monster Computer Bug

"No lack of computer bugs this week. And apparently Microsoft is next in line with a new warning. The Wall Street Journal's Charlie Turner has more. A warning for Microsoft. If your computer has an older version of the windows operating system, you should know that your machine could be affected by a monster. Computer bug. Microsoft says the bug has been patched, but it could wind up being exploited by militias software or malware. The bug is one of several high profile computer security issues to emerge this week. Let's get more from Bob mcmillen of the Wall Street Journal. Who's in San Francisco, Bob, you write that this is similar to the wannacry worm, which spread globally two years ago. Well, okay. So the bug behind it is similar to the bug behind the wannacry, worm. So there's a problem within Microsoft's operating system that if you're on a like a local network, you know, network in your office, or something like that. You the there's a service that connects computer. On that network. And that has a bug in it now that, that would allow somebody who wrote some software that was militias like say, the wannacry warm to write software that would explode this new bug and go from computer to computer within your local area network within your within your office, and what we found out with one cry is that even though in theory, these kinds of worms should be stopped at the firewall, you know, and not leave office. They did that during the wannacry outbreak. And so people are concerned that, if this bug were exploited by somebody who wrote say, ransomware that travelled around, it could it could affect a lot of computers. Wannacry affected at least two hundred thousand computers and then it was stopped the creators of it put like a kill switch in it. Basically a way of stopping the worm from spreading, and somebody activated that which stopped it, it could have been much worse. What versions of windows does this? Effect. You know as I was talking just now I realize, it's the version that my parents have windows, seven, and I need to give them a call right after this interview, so windows, seven is getting long in the tooth. That's probably the main the main supported version of windows, that people are going to have an need to worry about windows, the newer versions windows, eight and windows ten or not affected by this. But if you have windows seven or older, so even if you're for some reason, still running windows, X P, then you're at risk now. This is interesting because windows, XP is what they call it unsupported operating system. They don't Microsoft doesn't release bugs fixes for windows, XP anymore. But in this case, they're doing it just because they think the bug that is that is that serious shouldn't people upgrade to the new versions, or the newest version of windows as soon as possible. Hey, come on, if you're running x p really hang your head down, and go over to best fi-, it's time time to upgrade

Microsoft The Wall Street Journal Bob Mcmillen Charlie Turner San Francisco Two Years
"bob mcmillen" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Basically a hack to the phone that allowed them to get the data. So that the case kind of went away, but around the world all governments still have the same problem, including the United States government. So in the meantime, we've seen some laws that in theory could give law enforcement the tools, they need to to make these kinds of demands these legal demands of the tech companies and that could lead to a showdown. So as you pointed out there laws on the books in United Kingdom and. In stralia. Now, just since December that in theory could give a judge a away of ordering a tech company to provide data that tech company say right now, they they can't provide. And that could you know, we don't have another showdown going on right now of the nature that we had in two thousand sixteen the United States, but privacy advocates the tech companies. Observers of this phenomenon are worried that that could happen. And that now their the the legal tools to force a showdown. So it's totally fascinating to me. What would happen if that if that occurred? I mean, right. Right, right. What will this richocheting? Does it reach the United States? And we've had we've I mean Facebook has already had an employee arrested in Brazil. A judge dare said look it. I want some some data and Facebook said we don't have access to the data. And the judge said all right. We're going to get the head of your Latin American division and throw them in jail. And they they put him in jail for a day. He was later released, but that dispute is ongoing. And so there, you know, so what could happen there variety of things. I mean, once the if they once once one of these laws gets tested, it could be that they're, you know, the law enforcement agency could compel one of the tech companies to provide a backdoor they might refuse. And then they might face, you know, sanctions in that country. They might not be able to continue to operate in the country or they might run the risk of having implies arrested, or they might just you know, it might just end up being a public relations war, which is a bit of what happened here in the United States where apple went to war against the FBI. And they said this is a really bad idea for user privacy. And I think the public pressure of that actually contributed to the. BI backing off back in two thousand sixteen and you know, fast forwarding to today. I imagine critics are still sticking to their guns. You know privacy advocates. And then there's the issue of data. And that's obviously emerged as a much more prominent issue these days right there. So the a lot of people feel that the the US has happy to let you know, this sort of be judicata in other worldwide. So they don't have to face the the public relations fight that happened in two thousand sixteen one thing that's kind of fascinating to me is you know, three years ago. The the the image of the technology industry was a lot rosier than it is today. You know, there's sort of there's been a real turn around and people are very concerned about the power of these companies. So. You know, and there's so many jurisdictions that want access to so many different types of data. I mean, we're talking about end encryption here are, you know, the the the the iphone you use getting access to that or getting access to an encrypted message on your phone, but there's also the the date on servers that that countries want access to and so it's becoming very very complicated. And there some countries that are that are make more demands of the tech companies than others. And you know, I think a lot of technology companies are asking themselves. Well, do I wanna do business in a country? That's going to force me to give a level of access that might make my my users uncomfortable. I mean, it was a really interesting piece in the journal that lends itself to an important conversation that I think is worth having. So encouraged listeners to check it out. Bob mcmillen. Thank you so much. Hey, my pleasure. John you that ends this edition of techniques briefing from the newsroom in New York. I'm Tanya boost does thanks for listening.

United States FBI Facebook United Kingdom stralia Bob mcmillen Brazil John apple New York three years
"bob mcmillen" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:00 min | 3 years ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. This is tech news briefing, im Tanya boosters reporting from the newsroom in New York. And we're checking in on an international encryption battle as heavily covered on the podcast nearly three years ago. The F B I abandoned indefinite to force apple to extract data from one encrypted iphone fast forward. Three years later. Tech companies around the world are facing several new efforts from governments fighting for access to digital secrets. It's big tech. Versus international encryption after these tech headlines. And checking in on the latest involving Elon Musk tesla Twitter, and the SEC the journal reports that tesla CEO Elon Musk has until the eleventh of March to answer federal regulators claims that tweets he issued last week violated and enforcement settlement. He reached last year. The Securities Exchange Commission argues, Mr. musk announced new information in February nineteenth tweet that being the number of cars. Tesla would build in twenty nineteen in said tweet, Mr. musk said Tessa will make around five hundred thousand vehicles this year, his clarification tweet explained he meant to say four hundred K in the hours after the SEC made its filing Mr. musk remained active on Twitter, noting that quote, something is broken with S E C oversight and quote and moving over to the FCC. It's chairman says the US has an early five G lead, America's top telecommunications. Regulator said US companies are the front runners in. The global race to build fifth generation wireless networks this is a week. After President Trump said those companies must step up their efforts or get left behind more, generally, Mr. Pye called America's wireless. Telecommunications market a very healthy ecosystem helped by new companies, including cable providers trying to expand into the mobile phone service. And now the story of one British grocer headed for Silicon Valley online supermarket Okada has a better shot at justifying its tech starvation after selling part of its retail business. That's according to the Wall Street Journal's Carol Ryan the company that will help Kroger compete with Amazon has been a tricky one for investors to classify however, a KADO said Wednesday that it will unload a fifty percent stake in its UK food delivery arm as part of a joint venture with brick and mortar rival marks and Spencer US shoppers. Bought just one point six percent of their groceries online in two thousand eighteen but that number should roughly double by twenty twenty three. And according to the journal coz latest deal gives it a better shot at delivering for investors coming up the resurgence of big tech versus encryption in a brewing. International battle are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. Recently, an Australia, and the UK laws have been passed to make it easier to compel tech companies to turn over data and of the impact of those measures have yet to be tested, the so-called going dark issue or the government's inability to access data as devices get more and coded is growing issue among law enforcement and apparently new global legislation is making four new inroads. Let's get the latest joining us from San Francisco via Skype is the Wall Street Journal's Bob mcmillen. Hey, Bob Tanya as discussed on the podcast. I guess it must have been three years ago at this point. There was that epic fight between the FBI and apple, you know, the topic is gaining new momentum. It's about encryption what the government should have access to should they have access to our personal smartphone globally. This is playing out again, Australia, the UK earlier in the month. There was a meeting in Brazil, can you catch us up? Up on the latest. What's happened since the sort of die down a little bit. Yeah. It seems to have died down in the United States. Although from time to time the department of Justice or the FBI will say we want to be able to get data off of phones up until around twenty fifteen or so it used to be the law enforcement, if they had an iphone they could just send it to apple and apple would be able to give them the date off the phone, but in the wake of the Edward Snowden incident where the tech companies found that there was access to their data. They were storing that that that was concerning to the public. They've locked down a lot of these devices. So now when a law enforcement sends an iphone ten to apple Abakhan legitimately say, look, there's no way we really can't get the data off of this phone. It's just to lock down for even us to recover. So that's the the background for all of this. Now here in the United States. As you pointed out there was this big legal challenge in thousand sixteen around the San Bernardino terrorist attack. There was a phone that the F B I wanted to get data to they apple said, they couldn't provide it the the FBI and the department of Justice where seeking a court order to basically I apple to do a software update that would allow them to to see the phones apple said, this would undermine the security of their devices, and then the FBI sort of backed off, and they found another way in basically

apple Elon Musk United States FBI Wall Street Journal UK Tesla Securities Exchange Commission Twitter New York America Australia San Bernardino Bob Tanya department of Justice Silicon Valley
"bob mcmillen" Discussed on Instant Message

Instant Message

12:32 min | 3 years ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on Instant Message

"Sam. Downright cheap. Seriously. What's the what is the use case? Just imagine imagine a world where it's five years from now on all phones fold. How are we going to use these things it's just gonna be folding? It's cool. Nobody is. No. I actually it's about question. I I think it's bigger than that. I think you think about the there's a certain subset of things that you do on your phone that involved your thumb, and for all of those things that smaller screen is going to make more sense. It's going to be easier to type it's going to be easier to scroll it's going to be easier to move stuff around. If that's going to be it's like, that's the the tool part of your phone is going to be closed screen, and then you're going to open it up, and that's going to be the thing you used to watch videos or mess around on Instagram or whatever, and it becomes like there is a consumption and creation device and they're both in one thing. Now, it's like no way that I think ultimately commuter device. Saw on you have you have it closed, and you're using it during the day. Like like, you everything you just said David like, you're responding quickly to emails texts you make phone calls on it. Because guess what the foldable phone makes phone calls. And then you get on the train to go home or you have a little bit more time to do some work, and you open up your screen, and you watch Netflix while you also look at Email and also do your to do list. I don't know because it can do three apps at the same time or you just use alone say I think it's just as valid for people who are mostly using their phones for like GPS. And you know, they're getting texts on the way home, and you shouldn't be looking at it. But maybe you are mostly you're trying to say off your device. But you are using it to navigate I would love a big ole screen that I can just click right into my air vent. Like, I do now with my phone. I love when I get into an Uber and you see like the Samsung galaxy tabs running their Google, maps and stuff. It's it's the most hilarious system. I this is what Tesla's have the biggest screen, it's legitimate. You don't have to squint and possibly get into an accident. But so okay. So really quick before we move on Joanna. I'm curious like the S tens to me felt like if your phone is broken you'll probably by this just because it's the new one. But there was nothing to sort of make you like run not walked to the store and get a new one was that your sense to is there anything about this sort of everyday phones that blew your mind. I think the fingerprint sensors really cool, and like was a little bit jealous of that. And you know, being on my iphone facial recognition or face ID works. Great for me. I love it. But there are those times where I'm just like I'd still would like a fingerprint sensor, I think that to me was like the coolest thing, I'm not sold on all these cameras. I'm looking for you to test them and be like, this is Dahmer smart on that we need. All these cameras on our phones. But yeah, people were upgrade on CNBC this morning talking about these phones in the one of the hosts asked you to do think this is enough for someone to switch from the iphone? And I basically just wanted to be like hell, no nothing is. I mean, there's nothing is. Nobody's I think the number was like ninety four percent of people plan to stick with their same operating system. And it's like you're not even wondering about other phones like not now. One of the big ongoing questions in the tech industry. Right now is what what role do these companies have in actually policing the content on their platforms, and what about not just the content, but the algorithms that recommend those things to people to read or like or watch or whatever. So the fact that you can click on a video on YouTube that is by itself pretty normal. And then three recommendations later, you're deep in a conspiracy theory rabbit hole. It feels like a problem, but how do you fix that problem? So lots of companies have been asking this question. But this week Pinterest actually has a solution. It's like a pretty dramatic one. It had been hosting all of this anti vaccine content. And so just shut down all searches for any kind of vaccine stuff on the platform, and it seems to have worked so Bob mcmillen on our team reported on what that has done to Pinterest and discovered a lot about what companies can do and are willing to do to avoid having this controversial or misleading content on their platforms. So I'm gonna go get Bob. To explain he's just outside a beer can I figure by that? You you have not heard of the twentieth anniversary MacIntosh which came out twenty two years ago because I do, but I didn't know that like it was like, that's what that thing. It's. This crazy thing. I just didn't molest of Seinfeld. I didn't know that. That's what this was called. Yeah. And it has the like CD drive right in the middle. And it has that beautiful old school. I wish they'd bring it back the the rainbow stripe logo, which I just, you know, breaks my heart every time. I look if these dull white logos. That are sort. I didn't know I don't think I knew that it came with the Bose speaker. I bet that Bose speakers still really good too took up a hipster imagine you're saying this is the foldable phone of the past is no the twentieth anniversary MAC, Bob. Thank you for being here. My pleasure must tell us. How did you come into this Pinterest story where where what was the sort of Genesis of reporting this? Well, we have been reporting on misinformation on these platforms Daniela, the other my other reporter on this. And I would Br thinking broadly, okay, what are the other areas where misinformation could be harmful and everybody's kind of with a hoax science on. On the social media platforms. And we just started digging and digging. I'll you know, there was this video that I saw in December. Now that I think about it that was that'd been viewed by two hundred million people and individual it was on Facebook. It it explained that if you put piece of coal in peanut butter. You could get a diamond if you, but if you put your China taped it up and soaked it in milk overnight. It would make the China whole it was all this total nonsense. And so that was really like that video when I saw that that had been seen two hundred million times. I thought what other you know, scientific misinformation out there, and Danielle, and I just started looking and we quickly, you know, people have been talking about the vaccine thing, but we sort of zeroed in on medical health, and it turned out that Pinterest had actually been thinking about this even. Prior to this amazing video that I saw on Facebook and had been making some changes that were pretty controversial within sort of the alternate of science community. I guess you'd call them. Yeah. So what what was Pinterest problem like as as as you understand it, and as they were working on it like, what was the thing. They were trying to solve. Well, it was it was it. They wanted to. They didn't want to cause harm to the users. And they had been looking they'd been working with story full this organization that helps you understand, you know, the the variety of of content, and they had identified that there were people on their platform that we're very passionately sharing information about wellness. And that some of that information was dangerous. That's what they felt. And so in September, they changed their terms of service. They us they had they had long been thinking about self harm. So if you do a search for suicide on Pinterest nothing will show up, but except for some some advice on how to get help. So they've been thinking about these kind of things even for the for the year before this. But in September, they said, okay, we're gonna look at at fake cancer cures. And we're going to look at anti vaccine information. And if we see it on the platform, we're going to remove it. Well, the problem they had was there was just so much of it that they couldn't remove it all for so at that time they had to start thinking about other ways of addressing it. And you know, the the the business what what what we reported in. Our story was that they just stopped making searches for vaccination for cancer cure for breast cancer cure for a bunch of terms. They just stopped producing results for them. Now, Pinterest says this is just a stopgap we want to we want to do a better job than just like not giving you any information. But that's what they're doing right now. Right. So, and that's what that gap is. What's so interesting to me? It seems like it makes sense that that is the only thing that anyone can figure out how to do because like to your point the the middle ground is so difficult where it's like, okay. We know we have this problem that content on our site. We've no idea how to stop people from posting it or figure out what's what and like the line between. Okay, and wrong is not obvious. And I don't know. And I feel like, you know, you've talked about this with YouTube and others to or it's like what is the option other than just sort of pretending it doesn't exist and removing all from search results. Well, so you said an interesting thing there, you said the middle ground is difficult. I think the real word is expensive. Right. So all of these tech companies are facing this question of what they need to moderate, and when they should moderate long ago, they they felt that they were neutral platforms, and they didn't have any business stepping in and moderating, and they have a bunch of legal protection that says so right? That's right. Yeah. That's right. That's right. But their users and the public have decided that that's not acceptable that they actually need to take a role. And so with Jihadist recruitment. You know, the the platforms really stepped in and started preventing, you know, YouTube and Facebook from being recruitment tools for Jehovah. So that was like the beginning of it. Then the election interference clearly that everybody felt that what was going on. There was unacceptable. So they're stepping in on that and health is kind of the new frontier. So when we were reporting this story one thing that was really interesting to me was Google has long thought about this with respect to their search platform. So if you do a Google search for vaccination information right now, he'll actually get pretty good results. You get a range of results. And I think that my sense is that Google is not trying to only give you, you know, like trying to exclude completely exclude the anti vaccine world from its results there, you can get there. If you if you want to, but the preponderance of what you get is scientifically legitimate, and they have other they have these things called cards, which you probably know if you Google they sort of are these short things that show up at the very. Of your search results that kind of quickly explain to you the topic you want to try to actually sort of answer your. Yeah. There's sort of like, and then you can kind of burrow into them in and click to get a little bit more information, so Google search does a very good job, curing. This kind of information YouTube is the wild west, right? There's none of that. Now that now Google is now saying YouTube is going to start doing these kind of things, but it's expensive to do this in it takes it takes a human hand to curate this kind of stuff I've been thinking about the this great story over the last day, or so, and it kind of just dawned on me, and I'm just interested to hear like in the reporting of this. It seems like Pinterest because of what Pinterest is right, and I just googled pinchers. And then I say discover recipes home, ideas style inspiration and other ideas to try like because of what Pinterest really wants to be or is like can accompany like Pinterest take a move like this. And it's okay, but like Google or YouTube or Facebook or Twitter, which really is like, you know, information sources at this point right play. Where a platform where people and other types of sources all congregate. Like does Pinterest have that ability. Because of what it is. Right. Oh, totally totally. I mean, if you think about think about it, like if Google stopped returning searches for vaccine, you know, that would actually that would be a maybe a bigger public health problem, then Pinterest. You know, actually having all this anti-vat stuff. They can't do that. Right, but Google degree. But like, you just sort of trying to spout off like the the social layers of the other services, right? Like where this misinformation typically finds more of a life, which is Lynn even like totally like Pinterest has always been fairly straightforward about. Like, we are a happy place for happy right to do happy things. And then you go to the other side, and it's like Twitter which has versions of this problem is like we are about free speech and YouTube has always said like we we host everything they gets. It's a wonder if you know after a decade of saying one thing it makes it a lot harder to do anything that appears the other way. Way right on Twitter with this did make into our story. But Twitter's response, we we we we asked what Twitter was doing to deal with this information of this nature on their platform. And their response was free speech is the answer. I mean boil down to that like the more we allow people to talk about things the more that

Pinterest Google YouTube Facebook Bob mcmillen Twitter China David Netflix CNBC breast cancer cancer Samsung Tesla Joanna Dahmer Uber Seinfeld
"bob mcmillen" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:06 min | 3 years ago

"bob mcmillen" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"The. This is tech news briefing im Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. And apple has an apology for you about that FaceTime bug. It also says a software fix is coming this week where does that leave us and our feelings of security? Let's find out after these Ted's. Scooter startup lime is raising four hundred million dollars at a two billion dollar valuation. In the latest funding round. The deal would value lime at two billion dollars. If all shares authorized in the round are issued the filing confirms in earlier Wall Street Journal report that line which is legally known as neutron holdings was raising at around valuation of between two billion and three billion dollars. Vice media is cutting ten percent of its workforce. Adding to mounting concerns about the future of new media companies that at one time seemed to hold the keys to the online publishing business. The move is part of a global restructuring that will impact two hundred fifty jobs, the companies weekly show on HBO called vice smoke high profile brand flagship will also be ending though. The daily new show will continue Facebook removed hundreds of accounts groups and pages linked to an online syndicate that has been accused of spreading fake news and hate speech in Indonesia. This comes less than three months before presidential election, the world's third largest democracy. It's head of cyber security policy said in a statement that the company had removed more than fifteen hundred Facebook accounts groups and pages as well as two hundred eight Instagram accounts, Facebook and Twitter said late last week that they had also removed hundreds of fake accounts from Iran and Venezuela spreading misinformation the journals Ben auto has more at wsJcom. Coming up Apple's apology and fix for that awkward group. Facetime chat thing. So whilst week before apple disabled the function late Monday users of group FaceTime were able to listen in on others through their smartphones. Apple has an apology for you. Let us get more from San Francisco joining us in the podcast booth over there is Bob mcmillen. Hey, bob. So last week we were all feeling a little insecure perhaps about ever using FaceTime. Again this week. We should be feeling a little bit better because I understand apple has a fix. What can we expect this week delays delays apple said last week that they were going to ship a patch for this bug on by week's end, and they failed to do that. So we're feeling like the problem is mitigated because although they're working on a patch for the issue that hasn't been released. They kinda turned off the whole group FaceTime feature that was the source of the issue within hours of finding out about it. So you're not really at risk of of the the bug being exploited. But apple is taking longer than expected to fix it. Now, what that means to me is that maybe this bug is a little more complicated than I than it first appeared, but a lot of the security people I spoke with on Friday said that they were glad that. Appa was taking its time. They didn't wanna rushed out patch. Maybe lead to other problems, you know, afterwards. So we can rest a little bit easier. But can apple though because this which was quite a high profile setback? And we actually talked about how you know. It's not people are still going to buy phones. But it opens up the whole conversation about security, and it makes it even more awkward for apples and Steve came out with this crusade to protect privacy. And yet here we are. Yeah. This is their big marketing message that they have the most private and secure phone out. There. Also apple has struggled to deliver features that really get people as excited as they used to. And it's concerning that even as that's happening that the very basics the building secure products that have been properly quality assured are also not happening, right? Like, so this this bug was something that if. You saw exploited. You say to yourself. How did they miss this? Right. Like a fourteen year old literally discovered play for night. It's interesting too. Because this is actually rare we should note. Apple does not usually apologize. They're not necessarily one of those companies that are quick to do that. And so I understand that this teenager and his mother was were indeed thanked for their efforts. Where are they standing right about? Now is I mean, do they get free iphone at least? Yeah. They thanked them in the message I've been talking. So the mom's name is Michelle Thompson, and I've been kind of texting with her to hear if if apple has reached out directly to them to to say, thank you and the last I heard of this that had not happened. But they did send out a statement to all the media thanking them personally for making their effort to to notify apple of the issue the week before it became public. Now. This was an effort that was largely in vain apple by by all rights didn't actually get the message that they had found this bug. But. They tried also making this awkward is the fact that apple has criticized other tech companies for collecting users personal data just what was it just last week because what had happened was it had punished Facebook and Google I understand for violating its developer policies. Can you actually get into a little bit of that last week? There were reports that Facebook and then shortly after that report Google as well had misused digital certificates that apple issues to companies in order to create house apps now, this is sort of a complicated problem. But basically if you if you want to run an app on the iphone apple has a bunch of tests. They put on it. They make sure that it's private and that it's up to their standards. But if you just wanna run, you know, some some if you're down Jones and you want to run your own corporate app. They give you a little bit more leeway. And they'll give you a a way of just running those those apps in a less, scrutinized fashion. So what? The problem was was that Facebook was creating these created an app to test the Facebook website and it distributed using using its it's private internal key. Those only supposed to use for corporate apps and this violated Apple's all Google did the same thing as well. So last week apple pulled these in-house digital certificates, which basically broke all of the house apps for both apple I'm sorry for both Facebook and Google and so their their security team was was kind of scrambling to understand what was going on with these apps, and then they revoked certificates, and it was just kind of like a big messy week probably gonna have you back soon. I would imagine. Yeah. It's not gonna stop is a never ending Bob mcmillen. Thanks. My pleasure being here that is it for the tech news briefing im Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. Thanks for listening.

apple Facebook FaceTime Google Bob mcmillen Tanya New York Wall Street Journal HBO Ted neutron holdings San Francisco Appa Indonesia
Apple apologises for FaceTime bug, says fix due this week

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:59 min | 3 years ago

Apple apologises for FaceTime bug, says fix due this week

"Whilst week before apple disabled the function late Monday users of group FaceTime were able to listen in on others through their smartphones. Apple has an apology for you. Let us get more from San Francisco joining us in the podcast booth over there is Bob mcmillen. Hey, bob. So last week we were all feeling a little insecure perhaps about ever using FaceTime. Again this week. We should be feeling a little bit better because I understand apple has a fix. What can we expect this week delays delays apple said last week that they were going to ship a patch for this bug on by week's end, and they failed to do that. So we're feeling like the problem is mitigated because although they're working on a patch for the issue that hasn't been released. They kinda turned off the whole group FaceTime feature that was the source of the issue within hours of finding out about it. So you're not really at risk of of the the bug being exploited. But apple is taking longer than expected to fix it. Now, what that means to me is that maybe this bug is a little more complicated than I than it first appeared, but a lot of the security people I spoke with on Friday said that they were glad that. Appa was taking its time. They didn't wanna rushed out patch. Maybe lead to other problems, you know, afterwards. So we can rest a little bit easier. But can apple though because this which was quite a high profile setback? And we actually talked about how you know. It's not people are still going to buy phones. But it opens up the whole conversation about security, and it makes it even more awkward for apples and Steve came out with this crusade to protect privacy. And yet here we are. Yeah. This is their big marketing message that they have the most private and secure phone out. There. Also apple has struggled to deliver features that really get people as excited as they used to. And it's concerning that even as that's happening that the very basics the building secure products that have been properly quality assured are also not happening, right? Like, so this this bug was something that if. You saw exploited. You say to yourself. How did they miss this? Right. Like a fourteen year old literally discovered play for night. It's interesting too. Because this is actually rare we should note. Apple does not usually apologize. They're not necessarily one of those companies that are quick to do that. And so I understand that this teenager and his mother was were indeed thanked for their efforts. Where are they standing right about? Now is I mean, do they get free iphone at least? Yeah. They thanked them in the message I've been talking. So the mom's name is Michelle Thompson, and I've been kind of texting with her to hear if if apple has reached out directly to them to to say, thank you and the last I heard of this that had not happened. But they did send out a statement to all the media thanking them personally for making their effort to to notify apple of the issue the week before it became public. Now. This was an effort that was largely in vain apple by by all rights didn't actually get the message that they had found this bug. But. They tried also making this awkward is the fact that apple has criticized other tech companies for collecting users personal data just what was it just last week because what had happened was it had punished Facebook and Google I understand for violating its developer policies. Can you actually get into a little bit of that last week? There were reports that Facebook and then shortly after that report Google as well had misused digital certificates that apple issues to companies in order to create house apps now, this is sort of a complicated problem. But basically if you if you want to run an app on the iphone apple has a bunch of tests. They put on it. They make sure that it's private and that it's up to their standards. But if you just wanna run, you know, some some if you're down Jones and you want to run your own corporate app. They give you a little bit more leeway. And they'll give you a a way of just running those those apps in a less, scrutinized fashion. So what? The problem was was that Facebook was creating these created an app to test the Facebook website and it distributed using using its it's private internal key. Those only supposed to use for corporate apps and this violated Apple's all Google did the same thing as well. So last week apple pulled these in-house digital certificates, which basically broke all of the house apps for both apple I'm sorry for both Facebook and Google and so their their security team was was kind of scrambling to understand what was going on with these apps, and then they revoked certificates, and it was just kind of like a big messy week probably gonna have you back soon. I would imagine. Yeah. It's not gonna stop is a

Apple Facebook Facetime Google Bob Mcmillen San Francisco Steve Appa Michelle Thompson Jones Developer Fourteen Year