18 Burst results for "Bob Kendrick"

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

07:59 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Bob Kendrick, president of the Negro League Baseball Museum, joins me and Bob Why did you pick the site where the museum is today? And would you like more space? I mean, is the room where we thought that when we first opened this museum in 97 the Negro Leagues Museum itself is 30 years old this year, So we're celebrating a milestone anniversary, too. But we moved into our current home and in November Of 1997. And so when you go from a one room office, now 10,000 square feet of space, it seems like it was a lot of room at that time is not anymore And there's a a growing me for the museum to expand and we're in the process of doing just that. As a matter of fact, the building that the Negro leagues were formed in the castle Y M C. A Is just right around the corner from where we operate that is going to become the future home of the Buck O'Neil Education and Research Center. So we're going full circle right back to the very building at Gae Birth to the story that we're now charged with preserving and we're going to create his education and research center. In memory of the late Great John Buckle Meal, the founder of this Great museum, a legendary Negro leader himself and perhaps the game's greatest ambassador. Let's do that. Go back and do a little time line here. Ah, I did a little homework here. But Ah, 1920 was the Organization of the Negro League, and it was a Andrew Rube foster that created it. And everybody. Everybody has a nickname right? And you didn't have a good man. If he didn't have a good nickname. They're probably meant you could play. That's right. But he was a player manager and then created and you talked about. Ah You know, around the corner where this took place there was they got together. There was eight owners correct eight teams, But, hey, a fish that he initially were they all black owners. With the exception of one J. L. Wilkinson, where the only way owner of the original eight Negro League franchise Wilkie, as we believe, you know, is effectively know. Wilkie owned the Kansas City Monarchs. Ah, one of the greatest baseball franchises. They're not in. Like baseball history, but in baseball history and jail, Wilkinson Was a 2000 man in the 1900. He did not see color. Yeah. Wilkerson made his entire living in black baseball and see initially route Foster was against anyway. Ownership. But he can't hear these great things about jail. Wilkinson and buckle. Neil would describe Joo Wilkinson in this manner. He says he was the first white man he ever met, who had no president said When there weren't enough hotel rooms to go around. They slept in the same big get. Wilkerson treated his players with great respect and admiration, and they all loved her. And so Wilkinson had a team called the All Nations even before the monarchs, and they were homogenous group of athletes made up a black, white, native American, Asian Hispanic. So he really didn't see color on DSO Wilkerson route relented. But then Wilkinson also had what room needed there, and that was access to stadiums as the rule religion. And Wilkinson would become secretary of the Negro Leagues bring in his Kansas City Monarchs. As a charter member. The Monarchs would go on to become one of these great They wanted a great baseball franchises of all time. There are those who will say that the Kansas City Monarchs for the New York Yankees Literally. Today, and others will say that the New York Yankees where the kid is a city man, monarch had one losing season in there almost 40 year existence in the Negro League. Does that mean they got to get all the good and the best of the best players in just saying Wilkinson seem to have a neck? For finding the kind of talent that fit into the way he wanted his team to play. And it just seemed always have great guy playing on a team, you know, and like I said he sent more players to the major leagues and any other Negro League franchise. They were a model organization. And I say this and I said they have no disrespect. Should my beloved Kansas City Royals Kansas City Mama, They're still the greatest baseball franchise this city has ever seen. You talked about was the will person that had access to stadiums and doing my homework here. It seemed like there was a tough Time trying to get stadiums to have these guys played in, and then sometimes they would actually play after let's say the Chicago White Sox left town or something or did their game you guys would play and there'd be more fans there watching that, Then they did the major league team. Well, you don't Dan is interesting, because that's one of the reasons that it took so long integrated game because there were a number of major league teams that were making money off the legally. So when the devil leaves Rene Yankee Stadium they filling up. My understanding is they're getting a percentage of the gate. And likely all of the concession. The same thing is your Congress Comiskey Park. And so yeah, making league Baseball was making money off the table. It's because very few of the Negro League owners have their own state. And for me, that's the fundamental difference between The major leave and the Negro League. Was money. Jim, all the major league owners had their own ballpark, for the most part. Very few legally, teams at their own stadium. You know you had In Memphis. The modern brothers had their own stadium in Pittsburgh guts. Greely had his own stadium in ST Louis or ST Louis, far as faras part, But you know, outside of that there were very few. Negro League teams that had their own stadium, so they were beholding to the major leagues because they were reading to ball front and then they had to set their schedule based on that major league schedule. And so, yeah, That was part of the reason. But you're right. They were outdrawing. Many major league teams did the money that did the money Then that was coming in? Because you guys have an all Star game to over 50,000 fans did that money then I know you. You know, you still being held up by the I guess the white owners of Major League baseball because they own the stadiums and if you want to come play here You're gonna pay my price my front so and Is it similar today to still today that they're still paying the price? Ah! But did that money residual do? They didn't drip down to the owners into the players Get to the players. So did the players signed contracts. Contra. Okay, did it state what they would make Then they would negotiate deals even for those East West on Star Gazer Man. They were only getting a, you know, And you know, In retrospect, they were only getting a small pitons of those resources that were coming from those All Star games. But you know a gay the owners have full control Bandit in amazingly And they had it in an equally and so the players were making a decent living playing the game. They look but you know, nobody was really getting rich. Now. The superstar Negro leaders, the Satchel Paige is otherworld. Josh Gibsons of the world..

Negro League baseball J. L. Wilkinson Negro League Baseball Museum Negro Leagues Museum Kansas City Monarchs Buck O'Neil Education and Rese Monarchs Wilkerson Major League Great museum president Kansas City Bob Kendrick Chicago White Sox Rene Yankee Stadium New York Yankees founder Bob Why Wilkie
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:01 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"You know every day it's as we're motivated to keep the legacy of these legendary and courageous athletes alive and and and it's an honor to be able to do this work. Bob I'm sure that you wish you could be welcoming more people through your doors during the centennial of the Negro Leagues and that. More of the celebrations that you had planned in partnership with Major League Baseball could take place this year given given. The way that the pandemic has affected going to things including baseball games and museums although your museum is open. For visitors now in a relatively limited way. But I hope that some of those centennial. Activities can become centennial in one activities. Next year. Absolutely. We've already come up with the concept of Negro Leagues One oh one and those are stepped foot on a college cabinet one or one class where the only ones out that. So we're GONNA, use a create an educational initiative that will kind of carry and drive next year celebration. As we keep create a continuum of things that we weren't able to get done this year certainly doesn't diminish the fact that there's still a mouse year and the launching of our tip your cap. To the Negro Leagues. Campaign really gave a boost to this milestone celebration this year you know there's virtual campaign it just really took off and it was a crazy idea that I had that after we couldn't do our national day of recognition with Major League Baseball we're all thirty teams were going on the Negro Leagues and and essentially do an in stadium tip your cap with fans and players, and as you will know in our sport, there's nothing more honorable that a ballplayer can do. Simple tip of the cat, it is the ultimate show of respect and so I came up this nose into virtual tip of the CAP? Could we get fans pass a few players current and former to take a picture or video of themselves? Tipping, their, cap. And on the Negro Leagues. Well little did I know that it would go viral and when we lost his campaign on June twenty ninth of this year, we lost it with four US president tipping their Cap President Obama President. Bush President Clinton President Jimmy Carter and then we even Jesse went into outer space and God a literally how to worldly tip the cap from astronaut. Chris. Cathy. who was aboard the International Space shuttle when he tipped his cap I, think at that point we realize we have something pretty doggone special year and that effort is. Still continuing, and so we're keeping the tip, your cap campaign going certainly through at least August sixteen. But with the popularity of this will likely to keep it going through the end of the centennial year, and for those who might be interested in tipping their Cap, You can upload autograph of yourself or Short Video. You know to photos at tipping your Cap Dot Com, and then the website if you WanNa, go on and look at these amazing folks who have tip the cap in honor of the Negro Leagues. The website is at www dot tipping your cap.

Negro Leagues Major League Baseball Clinton President Jimmy Carter President Bob I Baseball president Cathy. US Obama Chris International Space Bush Jesse
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Am Buckle always believed because Sacha was such a big star. White folk knew who SATCHEL page was. That, he would not have gone through as much of the racial hatred that Jackie went through. But there's also to greater risk that a pitcher could fail and they, of course, satchels age and the showmanship and flamboyancy of Satchel page. Too closely adhere to that stereotypical depiction of those black athletes. And here comes Jackie Robinson who is polar opposite Did Jackie Robinson is you know has some cachet surrounding him because he had been an all American football player at UCLA. And so he's college educated. He had served in the military he's disciplined. He would become married to the beautiful Rachel. Robinson he is stable and so when Jackie Robinson walks into that dugout with the Brooklyn dodgers. Halley might have been the most intellectual being in the dugout and so many of these sudden born. Ballplayers were in the major leagues. Black man up close and personal for the first time and he's nothing like I heard they were. And so yeah, that was so important in this equation, it really was and so. You know admitted respect Satchel was the Negro Leagues. He was the Negro Leagues Biggest Star. But you couldn't take Satchel and that's why breaking very smoothly. Chose Jackie Robinson. It's Bullseye I'm Jesse Thorn. My guest is Bob. Kendrick Bob is the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum. I just wanted to give you a heads. That we aren't recording our guests in studios these days for obvious reasons, Bob recorded this interview himself from his home in Kansas City and at about this point in the interview Bob's recording equipment stopped working. Now Luckily, we had a backup recording of him talking to US via phone. So the rest of the interview will sound like him on the phone because that's what we have a recording of. Bob I think often the integration of major league. Baseball. Is told as a almost like a founding myth of Americana that it is a triumph of dispirit of America and. As often told it's a triumph of. All the young white people like my dad who were rooting for Jackie Robinson and branch rickey. Know an older guy who was looking for competitive financial advantage and maybe also. Fine with the social justice implications and and You know a and a player who was both an extraordinary player in extra by all accounts and extraordinary human being and fulfilled the role the singular role of that was asked of him to be a credit to his race in in quotes. But. There is also. The reality that when that happened. It's not like when they started adding A. Black Baseball players to major league baseball. They started adding white baseball players to the Negro Leagues or they started adding black owners to Major League Baseball So. What did we. Lose. When Major League Baseball Integrated and as the Negro Leagues Faded and eventually. Closed up shop in the late nineteen fifties well I. I'll be honest. I don't know if the African American community realize what it was losing when it lost or leaks because Jesse wherever you had successful black baseball, you thriving black economies and so what was good for the soul about country?.

Jackie Robinson Negro Leagues Baseball Negro Leagues Biggest Star Kendrick Bob Negro League Baseball Museum Jesse Thorn Bob I Sacha Brooklyn dodgers UCLA Halley America branch rickey president Kansas City
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:13 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"So he had star quality written all over him. And he was a better baseball player. Jackie. Robinson was at that time. Monty was a superstar for the Newark Eagles. Baseball was Jackie's Weakest Sport, which again tells you how talented Jackie Robinson was because he becomes a hall of fame caliber. Baseball player. So there were other guys in the Negro Leagues who a better baseball player. Jackie Robinson. But that that really good may Negro League I didn't get a chance and then there's other superstar guys were too old. You get Saturday when he was reportedly forty two years old. He was likely fifty two at that time because most new will believe is at least ten years older than what he claimed to be and only bill vague would have given. SATCHEL. But some of the other guys from the Negro Leagues. They just didn't get a fair shake. You know a guy like Ray Dandridge who was a tremendous player in the Negro Leagues well when he he gets up to the Minneapolis Millers. And the Minneapolis Millers were the New York giants triple eighteen. Well Dandridge his name MVP of the millers when he was almost thirty eight years old. You know as well as I do they were not going to take a thirty eight year old black man to take a young white kid job it wasn't going to happen out. Okay. How good he was and so yes, he was bitter about it because he would play out playing all these young kids and there was no realistic chance for him to get their. SATCHEL pages may be the single most legendary. Negro Leagues Baseball. Player. One of the most legendary baseball players in any league. and. He's an interesting case to me because. There's besides him. Simply having a record of extraordinary performance particularly when he was younger as a barnstorming player in the Negro. Leagues. There's these two really interesting facets to him as a guy one is he had extraordinary success in the major leagues as a middle aged man. But there's this other thing about him that I think is really interesting which is. As extraordinary as he is player, he's perhaps even more extraordinary as a story like he obviously understood his brand and. He was getting a cut of the game and he knew how to make his his life into a story and was one of the most you know, no pun intended colorful baseball players who who's ever played baby. Right. And that seems to me like it is reflective of a two sided coin, which is on the one hand. There is no doubt that in the Negro Leagues, they were playing a more entertaining form of baseball that was more fun and more exciting, right? On the other hand because. Disaster page. Could strike somebody out with his hat on his foot, throwing it backwards through his legs. Whatever like because these guys could do anything But. Those stories is amazing as they are I think in part became the story of the Negro Leagues and can run the risk of. Diminishing the quality of play in the the extraordinary qualities of the of the business and its significance in American history. And also, in some cases, reinforcing negative stereotypes that white people have propagated about people of Color through American history certainly, you know the like. All smoke no fire, whatever. Voting and so forth, and that's why Jackie had to be the first guy. And again, that doesn't mean that others couldn't have done it. But this was so much more than about baseball ability. And for everything that you just mentioned. Jackie defied the stereotypical depiction of African American athletes..

Negro Leagues Baseball Jackie Robinson Minneapolis Millers Ray Dandridge Jackie Newark Eagles Monty MVP
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:20 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Because they miss the adulation as well you have to remember they were stars they were stars in their own communities, but they were stars and as we say when they went to the restaurant, you'll get to find his table, the waitress give you the best service you just as it is today and so when you're transitioning away from the limelight, so to speak and into a realm of. Normalcy, you know you become one of us normal working class citizens because none of made enough money where they would just be institutional a wealthy after their playing careers. So they did transition now som- became scouts in our sport buckle Neil transitioned into the major leagues as a scout became the May, just first black coach but not a whole lot of them. So some became school teachers and educators others went into doing work. Cool. Papa. Bill you know in some guys were janitors you know later on in their lives just trying to. Take care of their families. I think in many people's imagination, the Negro Leagues ended with the Integration of Major League Baseball in nineteen forty seven. That's not the case they continued for more than a decade after that. What was it like for the players who were great players perhaps were for whatever reason not willie mays or Hank Aaron or Monte Irvin players who got the opportunity to play in the major leagues for Baseball Integrated but works still great players when. Major League Baseball started to block the Negro Leagues Shine and when the Negro Leagues I eventually folded. Yeah, yeah and you're right. See that transition took twelve years. You know before every Major League team headed one black baseball player Boston last integrate when they signed pumps agreed in nineteen, fifty nine. So with a very slow meticulous process as related to bringing black layers in now, the only exception really really was the Brooklyn dodgers branch rickey was very aggressive signing black talent the rest of the major leagues Kinda came along. You know kind of like Johnny come lately they were very slow, and so basically you bring a player up and then eventually you bring another player so that that player wouldn't be so terribly isolated but. It wasn't as if Jackie Breaks Color Berry and black folks just ran on enter the major league and there were a lot of Negro League players who did not get the opportunity they didn't have like a big tryout where all the African American national baseball players got to come and they they got drafted onto major league teams. They were major league teams that still had one or two black players in the early nineteen sixties. Oh. Absolutely and teams like Boston who was last could have had the pick of the litter of star black talent. And passed on them. because. They really didn't want a black player. You know they were the last because. They ultimately felt like, okay. Everybody else got one. I better. Get One now too and that was really the case with the American League by and large the National League was more aggressive signing black players, which is also one the reasons why the pendulum of power shifted to the National League but that really good Negro. League. Clear. Most of them know Jesse were passed at prime. You're the superstars. The need relief really were past their prime. Time to make, he's got some really good players who became great players, Maze Aaron and Ernie Banks Roy Campanella, guys like that. They get Monte Irvin Monte Irvy's thirty in when it comes over to joy the New York giants and he still has a really good career at thirty..

Major League Baseball National League Baseball Negro League Monte Irvin Monte Irvy American League Boston Hank Aaron Monte Irvin Bill Jesse rickey som Brooklyn dodgers willie mays Neil New York giants Ernie Banks Roy Campanella Johnny Jackie
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Back in the day, as Netflix began to gain popularity, its rival blockbuster was looking for an edge. We're one point the investors were asking blockbuster to sell genes in the store. You're. Older. Investors being what the kids want. They want gene. You get a Tom Cruise movie in some stone wash jeans the downfall of blockbuster and the rise of networks listened to it's been a minute from NPR. Welcome back to Bullseye I'm Jesse Thorn. My guest is Bob Kendrick. He's the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum one of the only institutions in the world devoted to telling the story of the Negro Leagues. Let's get back to our conversation. I've always found that the life of a professional athlete is inherently tragic. Because if we're lucky, we live to be seventy five or eighty, five years old. But there are who can maintain professional level athletic skills beyond their thirties. What was it like? For Negro League players who were dealing with the fact that they were re entering quote unquote normal life burden both by racism and its attendant lots and structures in the United States and the fact that many of didn't have skills event sports you know they hadn't gone to college some some had. And you know one of the wanted to interesting the facts about the Negro Leagues and I'm so glad you mentioned that. Is that some forty percent of the athletes who played in the Negro Leagues had some level of college education. Less. Than five percent of those who played in the major leagues had any college education for the simple reason that the major leagues Jesse didn't want you to go to college. Then they got you right out of high school if. They got you write a high school, put your farm system, and then you work your way too big leagues. Well, the Negro Leagues didn't have that kind of sophisticated farm systems so whether they do they trained on the campuses of historically black college and universities, and then they would play the Black College baseball teams, and then they recruited a great deal of their workforce from those Hbo. So. They actually had a disproportionate number of college educated athletes in comparison to the major leagues but you're right when you're talking about a Po- sports career and I think this is what any athlete that transition into normal life is never easy..

Negro Leagues Negro League Baseball Museum Jesse Thorn Bob Kendrick Netflix Black College NPR United States
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"There was there was a great legendary one of the most successful barnstorming professional baseball teams was called the House of David and they all pretended to be observant Jews. and. Some of them were involved in unusual religious organization. But they also had a lot of ringers who just wore fake four locks. There were all kinds of entertainments. If you went to see a a Negro League baseball game in nineteen, thirty or nineteen, thirty five, maybe you could describe both a a proper league game and a barnstorming game since they were both such big parts of how baseball players and teams made their money what would you see and and how might it be different from what you might see at a at a major league park? Totally Different Negro Leagues Baseball was the pace of the game was just different and just I think they understood really understood that baseball was entertainment and that means that you weren't going to see. Great. Fundamentally. Sound Baseball. Man You WanNa be thoroughly entertained or again as my friend Buckle Neil would say you couldn't go to the concession stand because you might miss something you ain't never seen before you know that's what they brought to the game. So the taste of the game was faster Major League Baseball was essentially a base to base kind of game. So a guy got on base you moved them over to second and then the big hitters came up and drove him in net brought with that. But again, the Negro Leagues would drop that button and then they were willing to steal second still third. Smart they still in home. That's the style Jackie took with him over to the major. League Jackie Robinson and so the pace of the game was just so fast and daring, and so the major leagues would oftentimes accuse the Negro League players of showboating. Yeah. So if a guy went into, Ho dove flipped behind his back started to double play the major leagues would say show boat they just showboating well as again my friend buckle was a number one if you got something to show show it. Again is homeless show boaty when you can do it and today is sportscenter top ten highlight every night of the week. When you see that happened that was commonplace in the Negro Leagues and so yeah, the styles were different. Fans flock to those gangs because it was so exciting, you mentioned the House of David. The House of David plays a great role in the story of black baseball because they would barnstorm all over the country. Playing with and Against Negro League teams most notably our Kansas City monarchs and Jesse one of my favorite stories associated with the House of David and ever those I know you mentioned them and kind of gave a little bit. But for those who might not know who the House today house of David was a religious sect based out of Benton. Harbor. Michigan who would typically characterized by the very long hair and very long whiskers..

Baseball Negro League Major League David Jackie Robinson Buckle Neil Benton Jesse Michigan Kansas City
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Of the reasons why took so long to integrate the game because the Yankees were in no hurry to see integration because the Negro Leagues were renting to Ballpark for them they were getting. A percentage of the gate and likely all of the concession. The same thing could be said in other cities across the country and so that had as much of an impact in wide took so long to integrate as anything because many of these mateen were making money off the Negro Leagues I mean it speaks to the legacy of systemic racism that one of the greatest differences between these two parallel sets of leagues was that the the white major leagues had access to capital, be it through inheritance businesses or loans to acquire real estate and develop it, and then you know use use that power to extract rant from the African American parallel. I can said it better myself. That whole aspect has always been a part of. The african-american plight in this country, and so while these African American businessmen were certainly shrewd enough to be able to generate capital to put these teams together. They still had to turn to Major League baseball in order to have the kinds of places that they needed to play these games and so when I hear people say, well, you know the Negro Leagues scheduled was so haphazard. No, not really they just had to wait until major league baseball set its schedule so that they could see where the open dates were because they were using so many of the of their stadiums. How many people were going to Negro Leagues. Man Filling out the ballpark's matter of fact, in many cities across this great country of ours they teams were outdrawing many major league teams and so here Kansas City, the Kansas City great city monarchs played at that time you'll backfield and then eventually municipal stadium. The stadium before they put on the epidemic for football held about seventeen thousand when the monarchs played their Jesse Seventeen thousand plus standing room only well when they go to Yankee Stadium, they're putting forty thousand in Yankee Stadium at Comiskey, on the South side of Chicago they've got fifty plus thousand in for the Negro League's version of the All Star game, the East West Classic. So they were filling up these ballparks in Washington DC home then the Washington senators. Clark Griffith was watching the homestead grades outdraw his Washington Senators, which again is one reason why he had tinkered with the notion of signing. Buck Leonard and John Gibson well before branch rickey made the move signed Jackie Robinson but again. He's watching Leonard Player dazzling space and he's watching Josh. Gibson hit balls where no mere motor had ever it them but he's also watching all of these black fans feel up his ballpark and if I put the Negro Leagues out of business..

Negro League Yankee Stadium Major League John Gibson Kansas City rickey Yankees Washington Buck Leonard Washington DC Jesse Seventeen Jackie Robinson Clark Griffith Comiskey Chicago Leonard Player East West Classic Josh
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:38 min | 2 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Dedicated to my favorite sport baseball usually try and put it out around opening day. Of, course, baseball is very different this year the season started late the stadiums are almost empty and by the time this airs. It's possible that the season. Will Not exist anymore. So, this year's Bullseye Baseball Week is going to be a little different to we're GonNa talk about baseball's history I up an interview with Bob Kendrick Bob is the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum. He's had that job for almost a decade. The MLB M is pretty much the only place in the world dedicated to telling the story of the Negro Leagues. The leagues that gave rise to players like Hank Aaron Jackie Robinson. Willie mays and Satchel page not to mention of course, the many players who were never allowed to play major league. Baseball. Bob and I had a really great conversation so I won't say much more than that because I want to get out of the way but. I'll just say that even if you aren't a fan of baseball I, really encourage you to hear what Bob has to say about this remarkable piece of America. Let's listen. I. Welcome to both I am so grateful to have you on the show. I certainly appreciate the opportunity to join you. Thanks for having me. So Bob, this is the one hundred th anniversary of the start of the Negro Leagues and I want to talk about the Negro Leagues in a minute but it occurred to me that I should ask. In what context were African Americans and other dark skinned people in the United States playing professional baseball before a hundred years ago before nineteen twenty. Professional baseball goes back decades before that. Oh absolutely and African Americans. Playing professional baseball goes well before the actual formation of the Negro Leagues here in Kansas City in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty. Jesse we've been playing baseball since the late eighteen hundreds and actually there was some evidence of African Americans playing even while being enslaved. So it was certainly not a new phenomenon for black folks to play baseball. Unfortunately, it was so haphazard and booking agents were taking all of the money..

baseball Bob Kendrick Bob Negro Leagues Negro League Baseball Museum Hank Aaron Jackie Robinson Willie mays MLB Kansas City president Jesse United States Satchel America
MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 3 months ago

MLB Marks The 100th Anniversary Of The Negro Leagues

"Baseball is marking the anniversary of the Negro leagues created 100 years ago. The league's showcased black baseball players players who couldn't play on the major teams because of the color of their skin. Only a few members of the leagues are alive to celebrate the centennial Michigan radios, Doug Tribute spoke to the only surviving team owner and others about the legacy of the legendary leagues. In 1920 owners of independent black baseball teams from the Midwest gathered in Kansas City, Missouri. At that meeting they created the Negro National Leagues had no idea they were making history. They didn't care about making history. Bob Kendrick heads the Negro Leagues Baseball museum there, he says. Faced with segregation, black owners and players kept pushing for organized baseball. These athletes never cried about the social injustice. They went out and did something about so you won't let me play with you and I create my own And they did today. Stars like Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard and Satchel Paige are enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but thousands of black and Latino players endured bigotry and racist taunts. It was Tear before the players at that time. Many Forbes owned the Detroit Stars from 1956 to 1958. She lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan, that players try of them. They had nowhere to stay because of the discrimination, so they slept in the buses. And they couldn't go in places to eat so one person would go to the back door. When get food for all the players. Pedro Sierra pitched in the Negro leagues for several seasons in the 19 fifties. He grew up in Cuba and says it was tough to adjust to segregation and racism he saw in the US It wasn't easy to see all the problem with the raise. I know all about it, herb artist. But I hadn't experienced today. Sierra lives in New Jersey In 1954 he signed with the Indianapolis clowns at the age of 16. His salary was less than 5% of what white players were earning dollars a month a month, $100 a month. And I look back and say, Oh my God. Jackie Robinson played briefly in the Negro leagues. Then, in 1947 he broke baseball's color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers in Cleveland, Larry Doby became the first black player in the American League. Coming seasons brought many more signings. But many Forbes sympathizes with the many athletes who were good enough to play in the major leagues, but never got a shot. Unfortunately, some of the good players by the time the time Came. They were too old to play. The last league folded in the early 19 sixties, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum estimates there are about 100 former players still alive. Forbes is 88 worries about being one of the last left to tell the story. And I just want a if I'm worthy of represent and speaking about the Negro League because When I got involved, things was easier for me. Then it wass father one before me. Many Forbes will keep sharing her stories with younger generations and others will to Major League Baseball has a day to honor the league's set for next month. The museum has pushed back its year long celebration of the centennial to next year and renamed it Negro Leagues. 101

Negro League Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Baseball Pedro Sierra Major League Baseball Forbes Baseball Hall Of Fame Bob Kendrick Michigan Midwest Kansas City Missouri Doug Tribute American League Grand Rapids Jackie Robinson Josh Gibson Satchel Paige Detroit
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"BoB Kendrick president of the Negro Leagues baseball Museum and Negro Leagues historian and baseball historian. I am so excited to have you on thank you so much for being a guest. It's an absolute pleasure to catch up with you again. Thanks so much for having me on I'm cannot express like to listeners and to you. I'm fangirling right now. This is such a such a treat to get to talk to you again, especially because you recently celebrated your nine year anniversary as president of the museum. Yes. Yes, you know time flies. It seems like it was just yesterday. I was sitting my boxes back down. I had left the museum in 2010 to take on another role with another not-for-profit organization and then thirteen months later. I am coming right back to the Negro Leagues baseball Museum or coming home to the Negro Leagues baseball Museum, and it seems like I just set my boxes down and literally hit the ground running. We've been running ever since but it's been a match. To call nine years as we've had, you know, a really significant turn around here at the Negro Leagues baseball Museum. And so I'm really proud of what we've been able to accomplish over those nine years. Now that being said we still have a lot of work to do we've just scratched the surface. But yeah, it's been nine amazing years for me as president. It's hard to believe it's been I ain't twenty-seven years of affiliation with this Museum. So I got involved with this place almost from its infancy going all the way back to 1963. So it's been a glorious ride for me working with an organization that I am just absolutely passionate about and never in my wildest dreams. You have your own what I thought that this would have turned into a career when I began volunteering with the museum way back in 1993, but it's done just that and it's been one of the most rewarding and gratifying things. I think could have ever met. They're so lucky to have you I was actually going to say you began as a volunteer when you were working with the Kansas City Star..

Negro Leagues baseball Museum Negro Leagues president BoB Kendrick Kansas City Star
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Girl At The Game

Girl At The Game

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Girl At The Game

"So it was like a bunch of years and also shout out to like the Eleven Hundred plus athletes and coaches and 300-plus front office Personnel across football basketball and MLB who signs that players Coalition thing I get Congress to pass the ending qualified immunity act just like really amazing to see all these athletes stepping up LeBron doing that voter thing to end like voter suppression and make sure people vote just so many amazing athlete activists out there doing stuff. It's great to see we just have to like keep going. I mean like last week we dedicated our episode to Brianna Taylor and the police report came out today and like dead. They honestly have the audacity to say that she had no injuries and that there was no forced entry when they broke into her home while she was sleeping and shot her eight times. Yeah, she was literally sleeping in bed. And also like the person they were looking for had already been arrested was in custody then it turns out one of the cops has been accused of sexual assault by multiple women and like nothing has come from that either and these guys still haven't been fired or suggested and the new Cycles moving on and like it can't move on like we have to fight for this woman. Absolutely this woman and her family deserve justice just it's inexcusable. There's so much wrong with the situation. But basically we need to email call sign petitions donate to important causes organ a link to setting a freaking rooftop. Yeah tweet about her just like took her memory alive and we're linking the same act blue racial Justice organization page in the podcast description. They split your donations between multiple very worthy causes that are working off. To dismantle systemic racism and just make this country a better place for everybody and get Justice for Brianna. Just like do everything you can don't let this stuff happen. I mean, this is Sade acceptable. It's so beyond unacceptable. So we are continuing with our initiative to pass the mic to black people and we have another awesome guests for you guys this week, I grew up playing this game called stratomatic which is like a baseball board game apparently now, they have an online version, but I played it the old-fashioned way with my dad on Saturday afternoons after synagogue. It's how I fell in love with baseball. You may have player cards. They're kind of like Advanced versions of baseball cards and my dad being like a collector of all things educational had literally 30 different debit cards, and one of the decks of cards was like different from all the rest. I remember asking my dad about it and he was like, well, this is the Negro League. So I learned about the Negro Leagues from playing strat-o-matic with my dad and he told me all these stories. Yep. Asked BoB Kendrick who is the president of the Negro Leagues Museum one of the most incredible people in the Baseball World. He's been the president for over a decade. He's been volunteering and working for the Negro Leagues Museum since the early nineties. He has the most incredible stories.

Brianna Taylor Negro Leagues Museum Justice baseball Negro League BoB Kendrick MLB president LeBron assault Congress
"bob kendrick" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:56 min | 5 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on WTVN

"The mark blazer show day man Atreus Stanley Josh sees yeah I gotta ask you this because this happened in this has nothing to I don't even know Bob Kendrick but you know he was he was off the air for a while and he will be back next week according to station again she actually said he was going to be back she talked about it yesterday just briefly toward the end of when she was on with us and there was a you know that he would he had done something I guess on his Facebook page you need today may I call upon the air it was actual an apology I need called people that we're kicking in doors breaking windows the looters not the looters necessarily but they were committing crimes a clearing or destruction of property they were being thugs unanimous easy call them animals and I guess there was a some backlash so what I want to know because I want to talk about the call from you yeah is is is supposedly that term animals you can't say that because it's racially sensitive here here's the here's the game my friend here's the game right hi Jack a word they do they do they will hijack it but here's the thing the people that went at Bob Kendrick for using the term and they're calling he called people is the first is the worst fog right trump says thugs black people or white people say oh my god he's call them black people thugs no he didn't because there were white people there were black people you're calling black people thugs stop stop putting how you feel on others and I feel like Bob Kendrick got caught in that very same moment it's that's what they do they take these things in a few calls from you say a word all you call the minimum I will you call black people and no I guarantee well they were getting it on his personal account I believe so and I believe so and it was it was it is it on the news broadcast he wasn't like they're acting like a bunch of animals it wasn't it was like a part but here's the thing D. that I have a problem with with that you can like just because somebody black says you can't say you can't call people animals that's a racially and sent that word means non human here's the thing doesn't mean black white liberal deliberate the white liberal did that the white liberal put it in the black people's minds to do that now that's a white liberal thing they think they're changing the world they think they're making the world a better place they're doing nothing but ruin fun and did a lot they don't envision right here's a here's another car our argument we got into it my family there's liberals or whatever here's the thing you'll tell me to treat you or treat them equal but you're telling me to treat them equal because they're gay black Asian or whatever you're the one that's causing the division that person is a normal person to me I see them they may be gay but I'm going to treat him like a human being that and then there's the other piece but then they say where the races and we're dividing but then they tell me to treat them equal or treat these people equal because they're gay no treating equal because there do you think it is right Helen before workday right right yeah and and I did I get into debates about this and that oh no you need to recognize they need representation what what represented Robert representation do I need to give them that they're human being is not gay like he is it that you think that they are self projecting their own so loosely onto you on to the other yes because no one else things like that but them so therefore it must be there some conscious thoughts they're having I don't know I don't get it yeah David should broke drew Brees have apologized oh boy where we're at that's great all right is to be continued on that we got a whole list of questions for Dimitrius today hi again.

Atreus Stanley Josh Bob Kendrick
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

09:23 min | 6 months ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Producing from his home studio in Connecticut. Taylor Schwenk buster only working from my home studio. He just north of New York City Taylor. I remember early on during the lockdown. That you were every Friday every Saturday. You're taking a long drive. You still doing that now. That we're more than a month into this. The drives have dried up in the last two weekends. We might go for one this coming up next weekend but I'll pull back the curtain a little bit. My wife and I are two consecutive weekends to different people We've done these like zoom murder mystery parties which are a lot of fun. Actually I know that people do them face to face in real life. But we've gotten a little creative here and if you guys are looking to do something like that I would highly recommend it. It's fun to dress up a little bit. You know we did a twenty s era one and a seventy era once we made some different cocktails for it and My first time I wasn't really sure what to expect and I enjoyed it quite a bit. So that's taken over the drives a little bit so that's your recommendation. Mine is digging up. Dandelions which has become an obsession for me. Because you know because I'm home I've made up my mind. I'm going to have the best lawn in my neighborhoods and so over the weekend. My fifteen year old son who certainly has moments. When he doesn't like me very much. This weekend I assign him digging up two hundred dandelions. I dug up that many myself. We are on a hunt for Dandelions at our place. Is that sound. Like Fun Taylor It sounds like a negative fund. But where do you think you are on your quest to have the best looking lawn in the neighborhood like are you like seventy five percent of the way there or where where do you stand? Doodo mobster good start like my lawn is looking really good like I cut around the edges. All the things in the past where I get back from Sunday night baseball and Monday and I'd be tired and I'd see some clipping that I need to do and I wouldn't do it now. Like up at five in the morning just dying for that. I like to get out and do it so trying to make the best of it so you got you know. Murder Mystery Zoom. I've got dandelions it's all what whatever you need to get through it. It's it's dragging on here so you gotta you gotTa take what you can get there. You go well this is contributors week. Folks who helped the sport of baseball not necessarily as players managers are front optics executives. And we'll start with Bob Kendrick. Who is the President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City? In Alaska who he thinks is the greatest player of all time. We'll hear from Sarah Lines as well. I The news and notes retired Los Angeles dodgers broadcaster. Been scully's back home. After falling and being hospitalized the team quoted scully in twitter Saturday saying home and resting comfortably with my wife and we are both eagerly awaiting the time for dodger baseball. I almost can't say without trying to imitate. I'm not GONNA do that. The Cape Cod Baseball League. Renounce Summer League for top college stars cancelled. Its Two thousand twenty season due to the corona virus pandemic. It announced on Friday. The Cleveland Indians will pay regular salaries to full-time employees through June thirtieth. But the club has had to furlough others due to the Kobe. Nineteen pandemic the teams that senior executives took voluntary salary reductions to ensure the team could continue to pay staffers. The Indians confirm they furloughed Many of their part time employees and interns those will take effect on. May first and there is sad. News Steve Del Hausky a while. Left-hander was said to have been dubbed the fastest pitcher in baseball history. By Ted Williams died this week in new Britain Connecticut. He was eight years old. Before we get to Sarah into Bob. Don't forget about Jalen and Jacoby. The after show the guys are recapping episodes. Three and four of the last dance. The shows went up right after the last dance aired. And they'll continue doing that throughout the run of this Docu series Jalen and Jacoby. The after show is brought to you by State Farm and at and T. You can find it wherever you get your podcasts numbers game. They're laying say reporter producer for MLB DOT COM. And Sarah in a moment. We're GONNA be talking about Kendrick head of the Negro Leagues Museum in Baseball Museum in Kansas City. And so Sarah what I sent you an email over the weekend saying you know what? I'm curious about your perspective on who or the Five Best Negro Leagues players of all time. How would you rank them? Starting with number five. Yeah so I love looking into this and I love thinking about this because you know this is an area of baseball history that we don't know quite as much about and I know I personally have learned a lot about maybe over the last ten years or so but I feel like I'm always learning more and more about these players in reading more of these legends so it was a great great opportunity to dig back into this and I love it so my number five is Oscar Charleston. And you know they're so many great comparisons when you read about these players. Everybody is compared to some absolute legend and the one that I have for Oscar Charleston. Buck O'Neil said. He was the greatest player that he ever saw. He was compared to tie Cobb interest speaker and he was considered the Negro National in Israel. I real- superstar back in nineteen twenty and he could hit close to four hundred played a great outfield. Iran. Base while and Satchel page side. You have to see him to believe him anyway. And so the hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy six and of course buck. O'neil was a longtime first baseman and a manager and he we scout. He's got it later in life. There's actually an award at the hall of fame given every year now That's name for Buck O'Neil. Whose NUMBER FOUR. So number four. I've got cool Papa. Bell you know legendary speed one story. I saw said that he went from home home. In twelve seconds which is really fun. You know we can actually contextualized that now whether or not it's true we don't know but you know the fact that people thought that was true. I mean that's right there with the fastest home-to-home times who see on home runs you know now a stack cast so and he taught. Lubar have a steel basis. I think that almost tells you all you need to know in humans. The Hall of fame in Nineteen Seventy four and cool papa. Bell of course. The great story about said tongue in cheek was that he was so fast when he turned off the lights which he'd be back under the covers before the late actually went out. Who's number three so number? Three is Buck Leonard. He was the homestead grays first base for seventeen years which made him the longest tenure player with one team in the entire history of the Negro Leagues. He Josh Gibson were outstanding. Duo led the team to nine Negro nationally pennants and five world series. Aaron says and he went to the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two number. Two number. Two is Josh Gibson so dizzy Dean called him. One of the best that he ever saw it for a ton of power. The legends are absolutely incredible. They talk about five hundred foot home runs and maybe he hit nine. Hundred home runs in his career. We don't know you know for sure. But he certainly was. You know an absolute outstanding catcher an outstanding a power hitter and he wins the hall of fame in Nineteen. Seventy two as well number one all time. So Am I number one. I have sexual page. I'm not sure that he was the absolute best player in the history of the Negro Leagues. But I think he is certainly the most famous on so I was sort of going back and forth between him Gibson whose number one number two I ended up with Satchel page number one. He was the first to go into the hall of fame. He's the most associated with the league. I think a lot of ways and you know a lot of people thought he was the greatest pitcher whoever left and I want to ask you about the greatest player of all time in any league for me. It's always been willie. Mays who to me? He did so many things well he was fast. He could play defense. He hit for power. He won the Most Valuable Player in the National League. A couple of times Led the League in a home runs multiple times. He won a batting title in One Thousand. Nine hundred fifty four. It's six hundred. Sixty homers had three thousand two hundred eighty three hits scored over two thousand runs in his career. That would be my pick for greatest player of all time. How about you? Yeah I mean I you. I have talked about many times on here. My mother grew up a huge giant. Stand a huge giant fan. Let's hear about Willie mays since I you know basically couldn't talk yet and I've always always default to him but I will say that you know as I learn more and more about these Negro Leagues players. I mean I do think that you know there are so many players who you hear that you know could have been the greatest of all time or would have been considered the greatest of all time in major league history. Had they gotten the chance to play their gotten a chance to play. They're in their prime. So I think that there certainly are You know other considerations to take but I always go slowly mace yes. Some people would argue Babe Ruth. Some people would argue Henry Aaron. I'm going to put that question of Bob in just a moment. Sarah thanks for doing this. Always great to talk with you. Basis for having me investor. Kendrick is President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City. Missouri and Bob. Thanks for joining us. Sit at time when everybody's looking for distraction and I know you've got a lot of stories always exciting for me because I'm looking forward to those same distracting about these baseball and baseball history because the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum like everybody else has been so greatly impacted by the health situation that we're currently.

baseball Negro Leagues Baseball Museum Sarah Lines Bob Kendrick Negro Leagues Josh Gibson Kansas City murder Cape Cod Baseball League Buck O'Neil Willie mays Oscar Charleston Negro Leagues Museum Henry Aaron League Taylor Schwenk President Summer League Connecticut New York
"bob kendrick" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Is inside cardinals nation on camera wax. My guest is Bob Kendrick who runs the negro leagues. Baseball museum NTN to city. Hey, Kramer nation. Meet cardinals nation at your nearest white castle. We continue my conversation with Bob Kendrick. Can I put you on the spot? Okay. So you're you got buck O'Neil. You got satchel. You've got Josh Gibson. You got all these great names. Cool Papa bell. When you hear all these stories. Let's talk best hitter. People say, Josh Gibson. I I'd have to go. Okay. I have to go Josh. Because when you look at what Josh did. And he was doing it as a catcher this incredible combination of power and average see sometimes you get lost in the power. Right. We forget that Gibson was a great hitter. Lifetime. Batting average of three fifty four Seattle to mess that up. I always think the power and in head to head competition against major leaguers and countless exhibition games. Over four twenty while to go with that big bat. So he wasn't just a big bet and he didn't strike out a lot. No Josh was that kind of hit who might strike out twenty twenty five times in a season. Buck O'Neil would describe him in this way. And if you can envision this. Josh Gibson had the eyes of Ted Williams and the power of Babe Ruth road into one dynamic packet his house where loud loud out. Yeah. As buck would say to third baseman and shortstop were damn near left. You could get killed. It basically said if you wanna to go round. The best pitcher satchel. There were a lot of great pitchers in the negro leagues. There's only one satchel Paige, right? And for me. Yeah. They're guys who stuff may have been just as good. Nobody was better though. But when you talk about the complete package when you talk about longevity, great, stuff charisma as only one satchel pay. Absolutely our just sharing here recently this week marks the anniversary of him playing in Saint Louis for the St Louis Browns, and he pitches a twelve inning one to nothing shutout over the Detroit. Tigers Dan, he was supposed to be forty six years old at that. Right. If you believe that he was born in nineteen zero six, which I absolutely do not believe, right? He was more closer to fifty to fifty six. He was forty six at that time twelve any one to nothing shutout. He struck out nine gave up seven hits. And the most remarkable surprising on this that like he walked to people sat rarely ever walked his likely were intentional walk right in that game at eight. Forty six. Just incredible. Well, he makes it to Austar games as a member of Saint Louis Brown. Right. Yeah. He he's named the two all star teams well into his forties with Saint Louis Browns. How old do you think he really was modest believe he was at least ten years old any claim? Yeah. At least here, and you can rest assured they released no less than five years older than what he claimed. But most believe us at least ten and of course, being the savvy businessman that he was he played that a up to the hill. He milked it for everything he could get out of it. And and it it added to the lore and legend of this great ball player, but I can tell you now. Nobody pissed that baseball any better than Saturn. That may have been some that. Whereas good nobody was better than south paid cool Papa bell. We, you know, so many of our fans and Saint Louis can be listening. So give me an idea of what this guy was like how good he was never wanted to tell me. They gotta street there in Saint Louis as name for him. And I believe the speed limit on that street. Probably thirty to thirty five miles per hour. That's too slow. Slow basically had a section of the freeway name. Beyond having the greatest nickname. I believe. Yeah. In baseball history coup Papa was outstanding. He's one of the stars of the negro leagues. And he's also one of those transcending stars that name went mainstream. You know, you knew that name cool and subtle and Josh. He was everything that they said he was and then some he came to Saint Louis as a pitcher. And as fate would have it. He hurt his off. And when he hurt his arm. They moved them to the outfield and the rest is history. He used that blazing speed to run down everything in the outfield. Didn't have a great throwing on because he had hurt his arm, but he had a very quick release. And because of the great speed he could play so shallow that you couldn't bloop it in front of him. And unless you hit it over on a rope. You couldn't get it over his head. Switch primarily about it off the left side. So he's running out of the box. Yeah. And so this the stories of his speed are just leading dairy. And this is the honest to God truth. Cool Papa bell twice scored from first base on a bunt in exhibition games against major league Allstars. Yeah. And one time it was satchel page who dropped the. But is that right? Well, cool just never stopped running. Yeah. So the major leaguers really hadn't seen this before. And so the pitcher didn't back up home plate intact could get there before before who got it by the time the catching the third baseman fit field converse to feel a ball third baseman. Guided threw the ball to first base cool was rounding third. He's incredible easily. It's incredible. And they're always been a lot of fast guys. Matter of fact, we have fast guys here. The other day from your ballclub Willie McGee. Yeah. Yeah. So at Vince Coleman, so the cardinals no speed absolutely history of guys who could run but buckle meals said the difference between cool Papa bell and the other fast guys was his uncanny and amazing ability to cut that bag on the inside. Where most guys gotta take that big round here. He says cool is only inside of the bag, and Dan buck said that cool would be so low to the ground that he could literally smack the bag with his hand and not fall. Incredible. It isn't it? Is physics define is what it is. Yes. But again, I think every now and then somebody comes along they born to do what they do Saturday was born to piss dot ball. Cool was given a little something that the rest of us. Just didn't have you know, what I mean? And so he was he was special. Yeah. All those guys that you just name were special. How many of the current major leaguers come by? We're getting more and more. We're giving. Delight to my absolute delight because it used to be that I would have to try to call two teams. Yes. And say God we in town. Why don't you come on? By one extent has invitation for you come back. But now more and more guys are calling me saying, hey, I got guys who wanna come by the museum. Can you be there to meet him? And the answer is. Yes, I will be there to me Mike Claiborne from your team. Of course, brought down some guys this week. And we had just a wonderful time. I don't know how much they knew about the negro leagues prior to the visit. They had heard about the negro leagues is hard to play ball there and Saint Louis and walk past that statue of cool Papa bell at least not have some recognition of the negro leagues. But I think yesterday when they delved and I said yesterday on Thursday of this week when they delve into this story at a much deeper meaningful fashion, they were blown away. Yeah. Yeah. They were blown away. They were blown away by the circumstances in which these men had to play this game young kids. Don't even know they can't fathom an America that was divided by color. Right. Yeah. They may. Racism in their life, but they won't experience. Segregation. And so yes, segregation through the eyes of young people are summarized quite simply that was dumb. And they're right. It was dumb. But that was the way that our country was and we've continuously and perpetually evolved from that. Even though we still got work to do. We still have a lot of work to do in this country as it relates to race relations. And if they're going to be asked to kind of carry that mantle than they have on at least have some understanding that life had always been as good as it is today for some of the citizens. So you can imagine a look on their faces when they come in and see segregate sections at ballpark, and you could go to jail for sitting in a row section of a ballpark or drinking from the wrong water fountain or using the wrong restroom, and as we both know going to jail with some of the good things that happen. A lot of people lost their lives for breaking those simple societal standards. And so what we attempt to do here to negro leagues. Baseball museum is take segregation complex subject matter. Difficult for us as an adult to understand no less our children and try to simplify it by telling it through the eyes of these enormously talented black baseball players who just wanted to play ball. And so we had a great time on Thursday just walking around telling lies. But they were fascinated by it, and and really intelligent young people. And so they were no really delving into this in a much deeper capacity. Then sometimes some of the athletes do when they come there. So amazed by some of the artifacts, and those kinds of things particularly old equipment. Yeah. There you see the evolution. Yeah. You know, you see these old wooden shin guys and they took him aback Woodson. Yeah. They were wooden bagging right back in the day. And then you see there's oh chest protected. I really wasn't much of it and protect a whole lot. No. It was there. But and so always fascinated by that. But I think they to enjoy the stories that we share and many of these stories there's stories that the lake right buck O'Neil shared with me first hand, and I get to share them with a new generation of baseball players, and it never gets old about. No, it doesn't..

Papa bell Josh Gibson Buck O'Neil Saint Louis cardinals baseball Dan buck Bob Kendrick Saint Louis Browns Saint Louis Brown St Louis Browns Kramer Austar Seattle Baseball museum Tigers white castle Willie McGee
"bob kendrick" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Wwl w dot com and from our friend Bob Kendrick hurt, us talking about this was a guy. That called earlier who said that. He had never used motor code but his dad has been badgering. Them about it and I've used this stuff for years and it's great and. You should use it to sun so he's one himself a code I. Think and we'll finally by the be. Able to buy his own motor coat use it for the first, time and he's gonna, find out that dance pretty smart as. Is the case as in most cases you find out the older you get the. Smarter dad seems to get in this is the case with Bob he said that As a teenager I didn't, think my dad knew anything boy isn't that typical. Yes you got all, the answers dad is a dope he don't know nothing but, then he says Bob says when he. Came home from the army at. Age twenty two He, put his, head on his dad's shoulder and told him dad I'm sorry You weren't the d I thought, you were That the, case man like I say dad get, smarter the, older you get as a. Teenager you know you're, just feeling your, oats you're feeling your independence you know it all you got, all the answers and daddy don't know crap. And you find out as. You grow, up the dad's pretty damn smart. Sixteen, past we'll get with your phone calls next. We get the brain dead Chevy day guy eskimo moms checked. In animal holy moly animals not on vacation Wow He's always posting photos of him and Gizmo on vacation somewhere got room for. You got..

Bob Kendrick army
"bob kendrick" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on WEEI

"And so you know so oftentimes did joe he brought joy out of despair and that day at the buck o'neil center when i walked over all that water in that building and the insurmountable damage that had been caused was one of the darkest days ever for me but there's light in the midst of darkness has so many again has rallied around his museum and his memory conclude with the real meaning of the national negro league museum and it's a special place because it is america at a worst joe it is also america at a triumphant best and that's what makes the story of the negro leagues so special in so rich and so compelling it's never crowded about the social injustice they went out and did something about it you won't let me play with you all create a league mile what you stop to think about that is the american way and so even though america tried to prevent them from sharing in the joys of her so called national palestine it was the american spirit that allowed them to persevere and prevail and that is what you gain when you come here you come here and you learn about the history of this country you leave here tearing the power of the human spirit congratulations on all the wonderful work you've done always great to visit with joe is so good to see you so great great to have the red sox in town and so i said this is the day that i look forward to every single you negro league hall of fame president bob kendrick with our own joke is dig leone i'm chris villani coming up next we'll hear from red sox manager alex cora it's the managers report straight ahead on the herb chambers ford pregame show and the w red sox radio network you know how some.

buck o'neil center negro league museum america joe bob kendrick chris villani alex cora president sox
"bob kendrick" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"bob kendrick" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Bob kendrick i remember the negro league museum president we had out a way cool willie was so amazing that when he found out that we were the kansas city monarchs he talked about hitting offer settle paging told a story that incredible story probably worth retailing right now if you haven't heard it so bob kendrick's the prison the negro league museum in kansas city if anybody has never been you've gotta go it's one of the greatest experiences ever and he came out to and shed at a second time i've done this in two weeks shut out to peter goldmark remote i literally who arranged to have him come speak to our kids to explain the monarch to explain the homestay grace and now i brought bob two jim davenport's funeral and willie mays was there and we were gatward the mario that bob wanted to meet willie and you know willie's willie man you've got to be careful with e they don't want people inundating him so so morris and let me get back to you and then he came up to he just take the elevator down to the second floor willie's waiting we go down there's willie in the gulf cart with his handler and he's is so happy to see by that voices so if i'd love cutter caves legally busy all there and and then he goes to what's going on here where we do it what it and he said well came out to speak to this young man he's coach coaching the kansas city monarchs and he looked at me willie squint again at the monarchs i said yeah he said i remember pull them on actual first time i've i've faced such a pace while i was sixteen years old komo first time of i got a good pitch to hit i had a double off i felt pretty good a vet next time i came up he threw three fastballs onetwothree right pass mainly said now go if that little bore that's a google i recall that story that lam cool what are you gonna say right there what do you do yeah uh little league baseball welldirected this has happened by the way so satchel was like kinda just screwing around the first day venus oh you want to play.

Bob kendrick president willie jim davenport willie mays kansas kansas city peter goldmark morris sixteen years two weeks