13 Burst results for "Bob Josephson"

"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Things considered from NPR news. I'm already Cornish Chang. One of the big drug companies at the center of the national opioid crisis. Reached a major settlement today with the state of Oklahoma under the deal announced this afternoon Purdue pharma, and it's owners the Sackler family will pay out two hundred seventy million dollars over several years. The bulk of the money will help create a new center for addiction treatment and research in Tulsa north country. Public radio's Brian man covers opioid litigation for NPR, and he joins me now. Hey, Brian hails. So at this point Purdue pharma faces something like more than a thousand lawsuits across the country. What makes today's settlement? And Oklahoma's so significant right? So Purdue pharma makes us really controversial painkiller Oxycontin. They're drowning in lawsuits. This isn't the first settlement. That company is reached during this big opioid crisis. That it comes in a crucial year at a time. When people are watching to see if this company will start. Cutting deals with states and local governments to limit its legal exposure. So this is a big settlement will be looked at as a potential template for future deals all over the country. So what does this was this deal? Look like, what did Purdue agree to do? The big piece here is Purdue and its owners the Sackler family will endow this new center at Oklahoma state university and the idea is to study opioid addiction and find new ways to treat people. Here's my counter, he's a glaucoma attorney general quite simply we are out of time to deal with this crisis. The money from the settlement will provide significant and substantial funding to the center for wellness and recovery here. Allowing us to focus our attention on what should be our highest priority. Americans struggling with addiction. But the Sackler family and Purdue have endowed other medical facilities and pain treatment centers around the country. Right. So are they doing the same thing? They're already doing as part of this legal settlement. Yeah. It will be interesting to see how people react to this part of the deal. There are some differences. Of course, the Sackler won't have their name above the door at this research facility, like they do at other places where they've donated a lot of cash pretty also has agreed to pay more than twelve million dollars directly to local governments that are struggling to respond to the opioid crisis. And one other thing, that's key. Here's the company has agreed to to really strict new limitations on how they market and sell drugs like their Oxycontin brand in Oklahoma. I understand that produce CO Craig Landau has been talking recently about the possibility of bankruptcy was that even a consideration. In today's settlement. I think it was a big deal. Mike hunter, Mahomes attorney general said point blank that talks with Purdue were very much spurred by these growing questions about the company's future. So. So Oklahoma effectively negotiated here to get to the front of the line to ensure that they'll see some compensation so what's producing about today's settlement. The produce spokesman Bob Josephson Centene PR statements saying this resolves all of Oklahoma's claims against the company. He also included a separate statement from the Sackler family that includes this, quote, we have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction. But this comes at a time when we've learned a lot of troubling details from internal memos and emails about how hard Sackler family members who were on produce board at the time pushed employees, urging the to sell more of these dangerous opioids to more people at higher doses. This was at a time when tens of thousands of people were dying each year from overdoses on painkillers like Oxycontin now. Just really quickly. There are still some other defendants remaining in this Oklahoma case right trials still set for may. That's right at my counter says he's negotiating with those companies. But if settlements aren't reached he says, he will go to trial. That's Brian man with north country public radio. Thanks so much. Thank you advisors to the US food and Drug administration have spent two days, focus. On the safety of breast implants, what's emerged is a lack of scientific certainty about the risks implants pose to the millions of women who have them NPR's Patty named reports. The panel heard from manufacturers, plastic surgeons researchers and women who got implants for reconstruction aftermath, Secta me, or for cosmetic reasons, Tara hub, co told the panel she was a healthy, mom and bodybuilder in her mid thirties. When she decided to get implants for aesthetic reasons problems started just weeks after surgery when she became extremely exhausted. And could no longer remember the names of colleagues at work. I had panic attacks that woke me in the night and anxiety that kept me shut in in my house, my hair, stop growing. My vision was blurry. I couldn't eat without pain and nausea every morning getting out of bed. My legs were non at my feet burned up. Co was one of dozens of women to address the panel about a range of auto immune related symptoms often called. Breast implant illness. She had her implants removed about a year ago. My symptoms are almost all gone. I am person that I used to be. And if I knew anything of what could have happened. I would have said no, thank you to my implants. Like most women who spoke go implored, the FDA to look more closely at safety concerns and move right away to take textured implants off the market. These implants have a bumpy surface to help them stay in place. But there's an increasing number of anecdotal reports suggesting they call us, autoimmune illness. They've also been linked to a very rare cancer of the immune system, even so most members of the panel say there's not enough evidence yet to rush textured implants off the market, and that larger longer term studies are needed Raina Doria with the implant manufacturer mentor says the company provides patient education, brochures, to doctors to help patients understand potential risks of implant. It's air may be a gap between what we are providing and what information is reaching the patients, we believe the best way to ensure patient understanding of risk is for them to have a conversation directly with their surgeon. The FDA panel is not expected to make specific recommendations about implants at this point. It is expected to call for more research into implants.

Oklahoma Purdue Purdue pharma Brian man NPR Sackler attorney Tulsa Cornish Chang Oklahoma state university Co FDA US painkillers Craig Landau Bob Josephson Raina Doria
Purdue Pharma agrees to $270 million settlement in Oklahoma opioid case

City Arts and Lectures

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Purdue Pharma agrees to $270 million settlement in Oklahoma opioid case

"One of the big drug companies at the center of the national opioid crisis. Reached a major settlement today with the state of Oklahoma under the deal announced this afternoon Purdue pharma, and it's owners the Sackler family will pay out two hundred seventy million dollars over several years. The bulk of the money will help create a new center for addiction treatment and research in Tulsa north country. Public radio's Brian man covers opioid litigation for NPR, and he joins me now. Hey, Brian hails. So at this point Purdue pharma faces something like more than a thousand lawsuits across the country. What makes today's settlement? And Oklahoma's so significant right? So Purdue pharma makes us really controversial painkiller Oxycontin. They're drowning in lawsuits. This isn't the first settlement. That company is reached during this big opioid crisis. That it comes in a crucial year at a time. When people are watching to see if this company will start. Cutting deals with states and local governments to limit its legal exposure. So this is a big settlement will be looked at as a potential template for future deals all over the country. So what does this was this deal? Look like, what did Purdue agree to do? The big piece here is Purdue and its owners the Sackler family will endow this new center at Oklahoma state university and the idea is to study opioid addiction and find new ways to treat people. Here's my counter, he's a glaucoma attorney general quite simply we are out of time to deal with this crisis. The money from the settlement will provide significant and substantial funding to the center for wellness and recovery here. Allowing us to focus our attention on what should be our highest priority. Americans struggling with addiction. But the Sackler family and Purdue have endowed other medical facilities and pain treatment centers around the country. Right. So are they doing the same thing? They're already doing as part of this legal settlement. Yeah. It will be interesting to see how people react to this part of the deal. There are some differences. Of course, the Sackler won't have their name above the door at this research facility, like they do at other places where they've donated a lot of cash pretty also has agreed to pay more than twelve million dollars directly to local governments that are struggling to respond to the opioid crisis. And one other thing, that's key. Here's the company has agreed to to really strict new limitations on how they market and sell drugs like their Oxycontin brand in Oklahoma. I understand that produce CO Craig Landau has been talking recently about the possibility of bankruptcy was that even a consideration. In today's settlement. I think it was a big deal. Mike hunter, Mahomes attorney general said point blank that talks with Purdue were very much spurred by these growing questions about the company's future. So. So Oklahoma effectively negotiated here to get to the front of the line to ensure that they'll see some compensation so what's producing about today's settlement. The produce spokesman Bob Josephson Centene PR statements saying this resolves all of Oklahoma's claims against the company. He also included a separate statement from the Sackler family that includes this, quote, we have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction. But this comes at a time when we've learned a lot of troubling details from internal memos and emails about how hard Sackler family members who were on produce board at the time pushed employees, urging the to sell more of these dangerous opioids to more people at higher doses. This was at a time when tens of thousands of people were dying each year from overdoses on painkillers like Oxycontin now. Just really quickly. There are still some other defendants remaining in this Oklahoma case right trials still set for may. That's right at my counter says he's negotiating with those companies. But if settlements aren't reached he says, he will go to

Purdue Pharma Oklahoma Purdue Brian Man Sackler Oklahoma State University Tulsa NPR Painkillers Craig Landau Bob Josephson Attorney Brian Mike Hunter Mahomes Two Hundred Seventy Million Do Twelve Million Dollars
"bob josephson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:49 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KCRW

"It's six oh six halting synthetic continues on KCRW, it's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Said Chang one of the big drug companies at the center of the national opioid crisis. Reached a major settlement today with the state of Oklahoma under the deal announced this afternoon, Purdue pharma and its owners the Sackler family will pay out two hundred seventy million dollars over several years. The bulk of the money will help create a new center for addiction treatment and research in Tulsa north country. Public radio's Brian man covers opioid litigation for NPR, and he joins me now. Hey, Brian hails. So at this point Purdue pharma faces something like more than a thousand lawsuits across the country. What makes today's settlement? And Oklahoma's so significant right? So. New pharma makes us really controversial painkiller Oxycontin. They're drowning in lawsuits. This isn't the first settlement. That company is reached during this big opioid crisis. That it comes in a crucial year at a time. When people are watching to see if this company will start cutting deals with states and local governments to limit its legal exposure. So this is a big settlement. It'll be looked at as a potential template for future deals all over the country. So what does this was this deal? Look, what did Purdue agree to do? The big piece here is Purdue and its owners the Sackler family will endow this new center at Oklahoma state university and the idea is to study opioid addiction and find new ways to treat people. Here's my hunter. He's Oklahoma's attorney general quite simply we are out of time to deal with this crisis. The money from the settlement will provide significant and substantial funding to the center for wellness and recovery here. Allowing us to focus our attention on what should be our highest priority Americans struggling. With addiction. But the Sackler family and Purdue have endowed other medical facilities in pain treatment centers around the country. Right. So are they doing the same thing? They're already doing as part of this legal settlement. Yeah. It will be interesting to see how people react to this part of the deal. There are some differences. Of course, the sacks I won't have their name above the door at this research facility, like they do at other places where they've donated a lot of cash pretty also has agreed to pay more than twelve million dollars directly to local governments that are struggling to respond to the opioid crisis. And one other thing, that's key. Here's the company has agreed to to really strict new limitations on how they market and sell drugs like their Oxycontin brand in Oklahoma. I understand that produce CO Craig Landau has been talking recently about the possibility of bankruptcy was that even a consideration. In today's settlement. I think it was a big deal, Mike hunter, Oklahoma's attorney general said point blank that talks with Purdue were very much spurred by these growing questions about the company's future, so Oklahoma effectively negotiated here to get to the front of the line to ensure that they'll see some compensation. So what's pretty saying about today's settlement? Produce spokesman Bob Josephson Centene PR statements saying this resolves all of Oklahoma's claims against the company. He also included a separate statement from the Sackler family that includes this, quote, we have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction. But this comes at a time when we've learned a lot of troubling details from internal memos and e mails about how hard Sackler family members who were on produce board at the time pushed employees, urging me to sell more of these dangerous opioids to more people at higher doses. This was at a time when tens of thousands of people were dying each year from overdoses on painkillers like Oxycontin now. Just really quickly. There are still some other defendants remaining in this Oklahoma case right trials still set for may. That's right, Mike hunter says he's negotiating with those companies. But if settlements aren't reached he says, he will go to trial. That's Brian man with north country public radio. Thanks so much. Thank you also advisors to the US food and Drug administration have spent two days, focus. On the safety of breast implants, what's emerged is a lack of scientific certainty about the risks implants pose to the millions of women who have them NPR's Patty named reports. The panel heard from manufacturers, plastic surgeons researchers and women who got implants for reconstruction aftermath sect me, or for cosmetic reasons, Tara Hubco told the panel, she was a healthy, mom and bodybuilder in her mid thirties. When she decided to get implants for aesthetic reasons problems started just weeks after surgery when she became extremely exhausted. And could no longer remember the names of colleagues at work. I had panic attacks that woke me in the night and anxiety that kept me shut in in my house, my hair, stop growing. My vision was blurry. I couldn't eat without pain and nausea every morning getting out of bed. My legs were non my feet burned up. Co was one of dozens of women to address the panel about a range of auto immune related symptoms often called. Breast implant illness. She had her implants removed about a year ago. My symptoms are almost all gone. I am the person that I used to be. And if I knew anything of what could have happened. I would have said no, thank you to my implants. Like most women who spoke up co implored the FDA to look more closely at safety concerns and move right away to take textured implants off the market. These implants have a bumpy surface to help them stay in place. But there's an increasing number of anecdotal reports suggesting they cause autoimmune illness. They've also been linked to a very rare cancer of the immune system, even so most members of the panel say there's not enough evidence yet to rush textured implants off the market, and that larger longer term studies are needed Raina Doria with the implant manufacturer mentor says the company provides patient education, brochures, to doctors to help patients understand potential risks of implant. It's air may be a gap between what we are providing and what information is reaching the patients, we believe the best way to ensure patient understanding of risk is for them to have a conversation directly with their surgeon. The FDA panel is not expected to make specific recommendations about implants at this point. It is expected to call for more research into implants safety NPR news. The Justice department says it will take weeks not months for attorney general William bar to make a version of special counsel, Robert Mueller's report public bars four page summary. Of course, noted Muller did not find that President Trump or his aides conspired or coordinated with Russia in the run-up to the twenty sixteen presidential election, but it did conclude that there were at least two main Russian efforts to influence the race one focused on spreading false information on social media. The other on hacking democratic operatives the special counsel indicted, a number of Russians in connection with those as we head toward the twenty twenty election. We wanted to know did those indictments curb Russian activity IS, Lena paalea Cova the Brookings Institution. She studies disinformation campaigns and political warfare tools. The indictments from the special counsel investigation against a thirteen Russian actors. I think were significant in helping us curb some of the activities the US cyber. Command the agency that is responsible for tracking cyber attacks against the United States reportedly sent very targeted messages to these specific individuals. And so we know who you are. We know all you're doing, and we're watching you they'll be consequences. If you try to do this again, and I think potentially as a result of that. We didn't see a lot of these similar activities emanating from these particular individuals during the two thousand eighteen congressional elections. And so some of these we have been able to close, but it doesn't mean that were in the safe zone because the Russian operations are, of course, if all being as we become better understanding that minute closing out those won't abilities. Do you have a sense of how the news about the Muller report has played out in Russia? Well, no surprise there. Really, the Russian reaction official Russian reaction has been ecstatic. You can say one Russian Senator by the name of Alexey push cov, quote said that it's a mountain the birth a dead mouse. So a whole lot of nothing out of a big mountain of something basically, and we've seen similar reaction from other major state controlled media outlets saying this confirms what we've been saying from the very beginning. There was no Russian involvement. Of course. Putin and other Russian officials have consistently denied any involvement in in election meddling in the United States, and I was gonna say the summary from the attorney general doesn't say that. There was no Russian interference in the election. Right. No, exactly. I read the summary closely confirms very clear that there was significant Russian interference the truth is the Russian government has pursued a foreign policy. In which these kinds of information warfare operations cyber-attacks what we generally call political warfare sort of below military conventional warfare, these kinds of grey zone operations is something that's been part and parcel of how the Russian government seeks to influence other countries. Everything that we saw happening I states in two thousand sixteen and then that we saw happen in the French presidential elections in the German, national elections and not really all over the democratic quest. We had seen before in places like Georgia, Moldova, Belarus and Ukraine. If you could see the full Muller report, what would you be looking for? Well, I would be very interested in seeing even more information about how the Russians really designed operated this entire campaign. The best research that we have so far on how the Russian government has sought to influ. The United States and really undermine trust in our democratic institutions we've seen from the Millar indictments that we've been talking about it really got into the mechanics and the nuts. And bolts of who did what when where and how it was really incredible to see that. I would like to have the report be public. So that at least those of us who are researching the can better understand what we might expect in the future. And I think.

Oklahoma United States NPR attorney Purdue Brian man Russian government Muller Purdue pharma Mike hunter Sackler Audie Cornish Tulsa FDA Oklahoma state university Chang KCRW special counsel
"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Meltsa chang. One of the big drug companies at the center of the national opioid crisis. Reached a major settlement today with the state of Oklahoma under the deal announced this afternoon, Purdue pharma and its owners the Sackler family will pay out two hundred seventy million dollars over several years. The bulk of the money will help create a new center for addiction treatment and research in Tulsa north country. Public radio's Brian man covers opioid litigation NPR and he joins me now. Hey, Brian hails. So at this point Purdue pharma faces something like more than a thousand lawsuits across the country. What makes today's settlement? And Oklahoma's so significant right? So Purdue pharma makes this really controversial painkiller Oxycontin. They're drowning in lawsuits. This isn't the first settlement. That company is reached during this big opioid crisis. That comes in. A crucial year at a time. When people are watching to see if this company will start cutting deals with states and local governments to limit its legal exposure. So this is a big settlement. It'll be looked at as a potential template for future deals all over the country. So what is this was this deal? Look like, what did Purdue agree to do? The big piece here is Purdue and its owners the Sackler family will endow this new center at Oklahoma state university and the idea is to study opioid addiction and find new ways to treat people. Here's my counter. He's Oklahoma attorney general quite simply we are out of time to deal with this crisis. The money from the settlement will provide significant and substantial funding to the center for wellness and recovery here. Allowing us to focus our attention on what should be our highest priority. Americans struggling with addiction. But the Sackler family and Purdue have endowed other medical facilities in pain treatment centers around the country. Right. So are they doing the same thing? They're already doing as part of this legal settlement. Yeah. It will be interesting to see how people react to this part of the deal. There are some differences. Of course, this actress won't have their name above the door at this research facility, like they do it other places where they've donated a lot of cash pretty also has agreed to pay more than twelve million dollars directly to local governments that are struggling to respond to the opioid crisis. And one other thing, that's key. Here's the company has agreed to really strict new limitations on how they market and sell drugs like their Oxycontin brand in Oklahoma. I understand that produce CEO Craig Landau has been talking recently about the possibility of bankruptcy was that even a consideration. In today's settlement. I think it was a big deal, Mike hunter, Oklahoma's attorney general said point blank that talks with Purdue were very much spurred by these growing questions about the company's future. So. So Oklahoma effectively negotiated here to get to the front of the line to ensure that they'll see some compensation so what's producing about today's settlement. Produce spokesman Bob Josephson Centene PR statements saying this resolves all of Oklahoma's claims against the company. He also included a separate statement from the Sackler family that includes this, quote, we have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction. But this comes at a time when we've learned a lot of troubling details from internal memos and e mails about how hard Sackler family members who were on produce board at the time pushed employee's urging the to sell more of these dangerous opioids to more people at higher doses. This was at a time when tens of thousands of people were dying each year from overdoses on painkillers like Oxycontin now. Just really quickly. There are still some other defendants remaining in this Oklahoma case right trials still set for may. That's right. And my counter says he's negotiating with those companies. But if settlements aren't reached he says, he will go to trial. That's Brian man with north country public radio. Thanks so much. Thank you also advisors to the US food and Drug administration spent two days, focus. On the safety of breast implants, what's emerged is a lack of scientific certainty about the risks implants pose to the millions of women who have them NPR's Patty named reports. The panel heard from manufacturers, plastic surgeons researchers and women who got implants for reconstruction aftermath sect me, or for cosmetic reasons, Tara Hubco told the panel, she was a healthy, mom and bodybuilder in her mid thirties. When she decided to get implants for aesthetic reasons problems started just weeks after surgery when she became extremely exhausted and could no longer remember the names of colleagues at work, I panic attacks that woke me in the night and anxiety that kept me shut in in my house, my hair stop growing. My vision was blurry. I couldn't eat without pain and nausea every morning getting out of bed. My legs were non and my feet burned up. Co was one of dozens of women to address the panel about a range of auto immune related symptoms often called. Breast implant illness. She had her implants removed about a year ago. My symptoms are almost all gone. I am a person that I used to be. And if I knew anything of what could have happened. I would have said no, thank you to my implants. Like most women who spoke up go implored, the FDA to look more closely at safety concerns and move right away to take textured implants off the market. These implants have a bumpy surface to help them stay in place. But there's an increasing number of anecdotal reports suggesting they cause autoimmune illness. They've also been linked to a very rare cancer of the immune system, even so most members of the panel say there's not enough evidence yet to rush textured implants off the market, and that larger longer term studies are needed Raina Doria with the implant manufacturer mentor says the company provides patient education, brochures, to doctors to help patients understand potential risks of implant. It's air may be a gap between what we are providing and what information is reaching the patients, we believe the best way to ensure a patient understanding of risk is for them to have a conversation directly with their surgeon. The FDA panel is not expected to make specific recommendations about implants at this point. It is expected to call for more research into.

Oklahoma Purdue Purdue pharma Brian man NPR Sackler Audie Cornish Oklahoma state university Tulsa Meltsa chang attorney FDA US painkillers Raina Doria Bob Josephson Tara Hubco
"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Deliver install it's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Elsa chang. One of the big drug companies at the center of the national opioid crisis. Reached a major settlement today with the state of Oklahoma under the deal announced this afternoon, Purdue pharma and its owners the Sackler family will pay out two hundred seventy million dollars over several years. The bulk of the money will help create a new center for addiction treatment and research in Tulsa north. Country. Public radio's Brian man covers opioid litigation for NPR. And he joins me now Brian Nelson. So at this point Purdue pharma faces something like more than a thousand lawsuits across the country. What makes today's settlement? And Oklahoma's so significant right? So Purdue pharma makes us really controversial painkiller Oxycontin. They're drowning in lawsuits. This isn't the first settlement. That company is reached during this big opioid crisis. That it comes in a crucial year at a time. When people are watching to see if this company will start cutting deals with states and local governments to limit its legal exposure. So this is a big settlement. It'll be looked at as a potential template for future deals all over the country. So what does this was this deal? Look klay. What did Purdue agree to do? The big piece here is at Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family will endow this new center at Oklahoma state university and the idea is to study opioid addiction and find new ways to treat people. Here's Mike hunter. He's Oklahoma's attorney general quite simply we are out of time to deal with this crisis the money from the cell. Will provide significant and substantial funding to the center for wellness and recovery here. Allowing us to focus our attention on what should be our highest priority Americans struggling with addiction, but the Sackler family and Purdue have endowed other medical facilities in pain treatment centers around the country. Right. So are they doing the same thing? They're already doing as part of this legal settlement. Yeah. It will be interesting to see how people reacted this part of the deal. There are some differences. Of course, the Sackler won't have their name above the door at this research facility, like they do at other places where they've donated a lot of cash pretty also has agreed to pay more than twelve million dollars directly to local governments that are struggling to respond to the opioid crisis. And one other thing, that's key. Here's the company has agreed to to really strict new limitations on how they market and sell drugs like their Oxycontin brand in Oklahoma. I understand that Purdue CEO Craig Landau has been talking recently about the possibility of bankruptcy was that even a consideration. In today's settlement. I think it was a big deal, Mike hunter, Oklahoma's attorney general said point blank that talks with Purdue were very much spurred by these growing questions about the company's future, so Oklahoma effectively negotiated here to get to the front of the line to ensure that they'll see some compensation so what's producing about today's settlement. The produce spokesman Bob Josephson Centene PR statements saying this resolves all of Oklahoma's claims against the company. He also included a separate statement from the Sackler family that includes this, quote, we have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction. But this comes at a time when we've learned a lot of troubling details from internal memos and e mails about how hard Sackler family members who were on produce board at the time pushed employees, urging the to sell more of these dangerous opioids to more people at higher doses. That this was at a time when tens of thousands of people were dying each year from overdoses on painkillers like Oxycontin now. Just really quickly. There are still some other defendants remaining in this Oklahoma case right trials still set for me. That's right at my counter says he's negotiating with those companies. But if settlements aren't reached he says, he will go to trial. That's Brian man with north country public radio. Thanks so much. Thank you also advisors to the US food and Drug administration have spent two days, focus. On the safety of breast implants, what's emerged is a lack of scientific certainty about the risks implants pose to the millions of women who have them NPR's Patty named reports. The panel heard from manufacturers, plastic surgeons researchers and women who got implants for reconstruction aftermath me or for cosmetic reasons, Tara Hubco told the panel, she was a healthy mom and Bonnie Bill during her mid thirties when she decided to get implants for aesthetic reasons problems started just weeks after surgery when she became extremely exhausted. And could no longer remember the names of colleagues at work. I had panic attacks that woke me in the night and anxiety that kept me shut in in my house, my hair, stop growing. My vision was blurry. I couldn't eat without pain and nausea every morning getting out of bed. My legs were non my feet burned up. Co was one of dozens of women to address the panel about a range of auto immune related symptoms often called. Breast implant illness. She had her implants removed about a year ago. My symptoms are almost all gone. I am the person that I used to be. And if I knew anything of what could have happened. I would have said no, thank you to my implants. Like most women who spoke up go implored, the FDA to look more closely at safety concerns and move right away to take textured implants off the market. These implants have a bumpy surface to help them stay in place. But there's an increasing number of anecdotal reports suggesting they cause autoimmune illness. They've also been linked to a very rare cancer of the immune system, even so most members of the panel say there's not enough evidence yet to rush textured implants off the market, and that larger longer term studies are needed Raina Doria with the implant manufacturer mentor says the company provides patient education, brochures, to doctors to help patients understand potential risks of implant. It's air may be a gap between what we are providing and what information is reaching the patients, we believe the best way to ensure patient understanding of risk is for them to have a conversation directly with their surgeon. The FDA panel is not expected to make specific recommendations about implants at this point. It is expected to call for more research into implants safety..

Oklahoma Purdue pharma Purdue Brian man Sackler NPR Mike hunter Audie Cornish Oklahoma state university Elsa chang Tulsa north attorney FDA Brian Nelson US painkillers
"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right. So are they doing the same thing? They're already doing as part of this legal settlement. Yeah. It will be interesting to see how people reacted this part of the deal. There are some differences. Of course, the Sackler won't have their name above the door at this research facility, like they do at other places where they donated a lot of cash, right? You also has agreed to pay more than twelve million dollars directly to local governments that are struggling to respond to the opioid crisis. And one other thing that's key here. Here's the company agreed to to really strict new limitations on how they market and sell drugs like their Oxycontin brand in Oklahoma. I understand that produce the Craig Landau has been talking recently about the possibility of bankruptcy was that even a consideration. In today's settlement. I think it was a big deal, Mike hunter, Oklahoma's attorney general said point blank that talks with Purdue were very much spurred by these growing questions about the company's future, so Oklahoma effectively negotiated here to get to the front of the line to ensure that they'll see some compensation so what's producing about today's settlement. Produce spokesman Bob Josephson Centene PR a statement saying this resolves all Oklahoma's claims against the company. He also included a separate statement from the Sackler family. That includes this, quote, we have profound compassion for those who are affected by addiction. But this comes at a time when we've learned a lot of troubling details from internal memos and e mails about how hard Sackler family members who were on produce board at the time pushed employee's urging the sell more of these dangerous opioids to more people at higher doses. This was at a time when tens of thousands of people were dying each year from overdoses on painkillers like Oxycontin now. Just really quickly. There are still some other defendants remaining in this Oklahoma case right trials still set for may. That's right and Mike hunter says he's negotiating with those companies. But if settlements aren't reached he says, he will go to trial. That's Brian man with north country public radio. Thanks so much. Thank you. Also. Advisors to the US food and Drug administration have spent two days focusing on the safety of breast implants, what's emerged is a lack of scientific certainty about the risks implants pose to the millions of women who have them NPR's Patty named reports. The panel heard from manufacturers, plastic surgeons researchers and women who got implants for reconstruction aftermath sect me, or for cosmetic reasons, Tara Hubco told the panel, she was a healthy, mom and bodybuilder in her mid thirties. When she decided to get implants for aesthetic reasons problems started just weeks after surgery when she became extremely exhausted and could no longer. Remember, the names of colleagues at work. I have panic attacks woke me in the night and anxiety that kept me shut in in my house, my hair, stop growing. My vision was blurry. I couldn't eat without pain and nausea every morning getting out of bed. My legs were non my feet burned up co was one of dozens. Of women to address the panel about a range of auto immune related symptoms often called breast implant illness. She had her implants removed about a year ago. My symptoms are almost all gone. I am the person that I used to be. And if I knew anything of what could have happened. I would have said no, thank you to my implants. Like most women who spoke up go implored, the FDA to look more closely at safety concerns and move right away to take textured implants off the market. These implants have a bumpy surface to help them stay in place. But there's an increasing number of anecdotal reports suggesting they cause autoimmune illness. They've also been linked to a very rare cancer of the immune system, even so most members of the panel say there's not enough evidence yet to rush textured implants off the market, and that larger longer term studies are needed.

Oklahoma Mike hunter Sackler Sackler family Tara Hubco Craig Landau FDA painkillers Brian man Bob Josephson Patty US Purdue NPR attorney Drug administration twelve million dollars two days
"bob josephson" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast lawsuits connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy Richard house. This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic. By aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy, starkly, drew nevi. One of the most powerful tools for the Bendon rum as best as companies the night nineties through today. PGA bankruptcy as a way who globally. Resolve large numbers of lawsuit. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those profits would be affected by produce. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go up there. The other party in order to clawback money that that wrongly taken away from a company that actually happened in in the main bankruptcy, though, that definitely could happen case. Like this to these opioid lawsuits target a wide range of companies, including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated in trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard house nicotine university of Kentucky says government swing big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Jonathan Johnson is really getting hammered by the AGA and Oklahoma, and they do have pickpockets and probably wouldn't be candidates for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week a judge rejected the request, and that's civil. Case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital One offering a variety of credit card options with features for a range of customers from foodies to travelers Capital One what's in your wallet credit approval required capital. One Bank USA NA.

Purdue Purdue pharma NPR Brian man Comcast Adams Zimmerman Richard house Capital One Oklahoma university of Kentucky Jonathan Johnson Bendon professor painkillers Bob Josephson PGA nicotine university of Kentuck
"bob josephson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options. And that includes bankruptcy Richard Alston's is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay in all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy, historically, proven to be one of the most powerful tool. Dependent. About this companies through today. PG at NEA bankruptcy as a way to globally. Resolve large numbers lawsuit. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those prophets would be affected. By purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to clawback money that bit wrongly taken away from a bad actually happened in bankruptcy that definitely could happen in a case. Like this to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection the whole interlocking web of. Cases becomes much more complicated than trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard alston? At the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean Oklahoma. And they do have pickpockets probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week. A judge rejected the request and that civil case will go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from Shotsie Harrison and her father, James Flavia Koi Brown. They sat down for story courts six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl..

Purdue Purdue pharma Purdue Johnson Richard Alston university of Kentucky Brian man NPR Adams Zimmerman Oklahoma Rachel Martin Shotsie Harrison David green Loyola University Bob Josephson painkillers James Flavia Sackler professor
"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy Richard house. This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you Claire bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs. Adam Zimmerman and opioid litigation expert. At Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy. Starkly through one of power. It's about this company through today. PG bankruptcy way through globally. Resolve large numbers. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those prophets would be affected. By purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler is private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to claw back money that bit wrong taken away from a that actually happened in in the made off bankruptcy. No that definitely could happen indicate to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated than trials could be delayed by months or years, Richard Alan is at the university of Kentucky says government swing big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean, Oklahoma. And they do have pockets of probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week, a judge rejected the request and that civil case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from shots Harrison and her father James Flavio Koi Brown. They sat down for story six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl. I'm.

Purdue Purdue pharma Adam Zimmerman Brian man university of Kentucky Johnson Johnson Rachel Martin Oklahoma David green Harrison Loyola University NPR professor Claire painkillers Bob Josephson PG James Flavio Koi Brown Richard Alan
"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman. It's five twenty two. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene. Rachel Martin lawsuits connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy, Richard Alston? This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. My guess is they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often used bankruptcy to limit. Their exposure, bankruptcy starkly grew to be one of them was how old bender. Companies ninety through today. PG at NEA bankruptcy as a way to globally recalled large numbers law. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months show, the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those profits would be affected by Purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go under other party in order to claw back money that bit wrongly taken away from a that actually happening in the made up bankruptcy. Definitely could happen to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated than trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard Alston is at the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than do Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean Oklahoma, and they do have pockets probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week a judge rejected the request, and that's civil case. We'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from shot see Harrison and her father, James Flavia Koi Brown. They sat down for story course, six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl nine.

Purdue Purdue pharma Richard Alston Brian man Johnson NPR Adams Zimmerman university of Kentucky Oklahoma Dave Freeman Rachel Martin Harrison David Greene professor Bob Josephson James Flavia Loyola University painkillers
"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options. And that includes bankruptcy Richard law. Professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. My guess is they're serious. If you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay and all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Allegation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit. Their exposure, bankruptcy starkly grew to be one of them looked how old tool Bendon it's about this ninety through today. PG and E bankruptcy as way to globally recalled large numbers loss. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those profits would be affected by Purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to claw back money that that wrong tweet taken away from a that actually happened in in the made up fake. That definitely could happen in a case. Like this to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name-brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated and trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard Alston is at the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean Oklahoma, and they do have pockets probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week, a judge rejected the request and that civil case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news..

Purdue Purdue pharma Purdue Johnson Brian man NPR university of Kentucky Adams Zimmerman Rachel Martin Oklahoma David green Richard Alston Loyola University Bob Josephson Professor painkillers CVS WalMart
"bob josephson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options. And that includes bankruptcy Richard houses, a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay and all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Allegation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy, historically, drew to be one of them. Most powerful tools for the Bendon. It's about this ninety through today. PG at need bankruptcy as a way to globally. Resolve large numbers lawsuit. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those prophets would be affected by produce. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to claw back money. That bet wrong take it away from a that actually happened in in the made off bankruptcy. No. That definitely could happen to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection the whole. Interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated in trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard alston? At the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the H in Oklahoma. And they do have pockets you probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week judge rejected the request and that civil case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from Shotsie Harrison and her father, James Flavia Koi Brown. They sat down for story court six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl.

Purdue Purdue pharma Purdue Johnson Brian man university of Kentucky Adams Zimmerman Oklahoma Rachel Martin Shotsie Harrison David green Bendon Loyola University Richard alston professor Bob Josephson NPR painkillers James Flavia
"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"bob josephson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Streaming service from the founder of Discovery Channel where people can watch history. Science and nature shows. More at curiosity. Stream dot com slash NPR C three C threes. AI software suite enables organizations to use art official intelligence at enterprise scale to sow previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at C three dot AI Dartmouth offering master of healthcare delivery, science and online program for physicians and healthcare executives teaching business leadership and health policy to transform healthcare at healthcare, delivery dot Dartmouth dot EDU. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country public radio. Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy, Richard Alston? This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay and all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit. Their exposure, bankruptcy, historically, grew to be one of the most powerful tools. Independent. Companies ninety through today..

Purdue Purdue pharma NPR Rachel Martin AI Discovery Channel founder Brian man David green Loyola University university of Kentucky Bob Josephson Richard Alston painkillers Adams Zimmerman professor official