35 Burst results for "Bob Dylan"

Country music star Charlie Daniels, best known for 'The Devil Went Down to Georgia,' has died at 83

The Ralph Report

00:37 sec | Last week

Country music star Charlie Daniels, best known for 'The Devil Went Down to Georgia,' has died at 83

"Nashville studios before he ever became a star in his own right, he he played for Bob. Dylan and Leonard Cohen all different kinds of music our, he broke. In the world of country music, some of big hits,

Leonard Cohen BOB Nashville Dylan
Milton Glaser | Make Things That Move People

Good Life Project

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Milton Glaser | Make Things That Move People

"So over the history of this show spending eight years more than five hundred guests. Two years filming on location and crew, and now more than six years is a podcast. I have been asked one question over and over and over. So who's your favorite guest so when you do what I do, you learn quickly to dodge the answer to that question for one. You can't win for any name. He dare to offer your simultaneously snubbing hundreds, and if I'm blessed to keep doing this long enough thousands of other people, but more importantly. If you're really paying attention, truthfully, there is no such thing as a favorite guest. Guest I don't do this to be entertained or to fall in love or to make new friends or to have favorites I do because I love doing it, and because it's a bit like my living laboratory, it's it's not about who I liked best, but rather who I have learned from WHO has left changed and on that level would have come to believe as you learn something if you allow yourself to remain open from every single person. As it is on screen. Has It is in front of a Mike in Studio on the? So it is in life. But as I sit here today. Having just learned of the passing of a man who has become as our producer, Lindsay often reminds me. The single most referenced guest by me. In the history of the show Milton Glaser. I can admit to one truth over the same span of time much as I have been profoundly inspired and humbled and awakened, and learn more than any book or school or course of study has taught me. There have been very few guests. Who when they walked out. The door left me thinking to myself. I live their life. Milton glaser was at the top of this very short list born and raised in the Bronx. He discovered what would become his life's work, and never in his eighty five or so years of. Building on that veered from it to make things that move people those are the words he shared with me. As soon as These words were offered in that classic Glazer Rasp. I can feel every cell in my body. Come alive with resonance me, too. I felt me to. My whole body just saying with recognition and resonance. Me To Milton me to. Glazer's list of accomplishments in the world of design and media and education, the stuff of legends launching a design agency push pin studios in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four with a bunch of friends who he graduated, Cooper Union with he would change the face of commercial illustration of art and design that famed Iheart. Logo Did that a tribute to the city. He loved so fiercely at a time when it was on the verge of bankruptcy of crumbling underneath him, Glazer wanted to do his part to help people. Re Imagine it to see the way he knew it to be the way it was in his heart, which probably explains why he was also a founder of York magazine that iconic Bob Dylan Rainbow Hair poster with more than six million copies in print glazer again. Thousands of other works of art posters, brands product packaging restaurants. You name it. Glazer was behind so much of it and Milton's work he it's been seen everywhere from the halls of global industry to local pub to. The Museum of modern. Art in New York City the George Pompidou Centre. In Paris in two thousand four. He received the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum Lifetime Achievement Award. He received the National Medal of Arts Award from President Obama in two, thousand, nine, the first graphic designer ever to be given dishonor. The man had his own typeface Glaser Stencil. That, brilliant mind and the artful hand, and the impact that they would have didn't stop at making, though he also taught for more than five decades, he shared his wisdom his lens on everything from life to art to beauty to work to love with thousands of students, many of whom have now gone out into the world to make their own lasting marks, and it wasn't just this diversion to craft to making meaning to the creation of an noticing of beauty to his commitment to teaching and giving back to the work. It was the choices that he made about who and what matter to him. The deep sustained commitment to living life on his terms, and never allowing himself to be boxed into anyone else's expectations in any domain of life to working and playing and spending time with his wife Shirley who he wed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, seven, and to whom he remained married until the day he died at age ninety one.

Milton Glaser Glazer Rasp Founder Cooper Hewitt National Design Glaser Stencil Museum Of Modern Lifetime Achievement Award New York City Barack Obama Cooper Union Paris National Medal Of Arts Shirley Producer Bob Dylan George Pompidou Centre Lindsay President Trump York Magazine Iheart
Milton Glaser, Designer of ‘I ❤ NY’ Logo and New York Magazine Co-Founder, Dies at 91

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Milton Glaser, Designer of ‘I ❤ NY’ Logo and New York Magazine Co-Founder, Dies at 91

"Cell Milton Glaser he was the guy who designed the I love New York logo beautiful in its simplicity literally militarized heart and it N. Y. woman Glazer died yesterday was his ninety first birthday Glazer along with others founded New York magazine in the late sixties he designed posters logos advertisements book covers for ever associated with that generation among them the nineteen sixty six plastic picture Bob Dylan with multi colored hair seem to be blown in the wind fun fact to blazer designed the I love New York logo completely

Milton Glaser Glazer Bob Dylan New York New York Magazine
Milton Glaser, designer of iconic 'I Love NY' logo and Bob Dylan silhouette poster, dies on 91st birthday

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Milton Glaser, designer of iconic 'I Love NY' logo and Bob Dylan silhouette poster, dies on 91st birthday

"Milton Glaser the designer who created the I heart New York logo and the famous Bob Dylan poster with psychedelic hair has died he died earlier today on his ninety first birthday his wife Shirley Glaser tells The New York Times that the cause was a stroke and that he had renal failure in posters locals add some book covers Glazer captured the spirit of the nineteen sixties with a few simple colors and

Shirley Glaser The New York Times Glazer Milton Glaser New York Bob Dylan
"bob dylan" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Reed from Bob Dylan's thirty night album, rough and rowdy ways all right, Greg. I almost feel like we have two separate conversations to have here. We have to talk about murder most foul, and interestingly enough on the physical release of this it has its own disk while the rest of rough rowdy ways is on a different disk, so it's almost as if Dylan in releasing that before. We knew there was going to be an album. It's almost as if he's saying. It stands apart, and it really does in some ways because to popular readings of it number one death of. Of American innocence. You know all that Oliver Stone stuff. America's never recovered from JFK. The more cynical reading some people contend that Dylan is saying that the baby boom generation failed in that they were easily distracted by all of this pop culture. Joy Everything from the Beatles to you know. He name drops Queen and Fleetwood, Mac. Those are not names that should come out of Dylan's mouth easily. Yeah, Okay Jimmy Reed, and Carl Wilson, but still in doing talking about the eagles. It's a mystery that track. It's rather inscrutable. There's no melody. There's a long drone. There's lot of Bob. and. Then there's the rest of this record man. We just played goodbye Jimmy read that's Parini Great? Even better crossing the Rubicon. Filed the Roosevelt! To. Other be John. birt..

Bob Dylan Jimmy Reed Oliver Stone murder eagles Beatles Greg JFK Carl Wilson America Queen Bob.
"bob dylan" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:41 min | 2 weeks ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Shot and Ilan from Toronto. Welcome back to sound opinions I'm great cat, he's Jim. Dear Goddess, and that's a little bit of murder, most foul, the first single released from Bob Dylan's new album, rough and rowdy ways. The thirty ninth studio album from the ours, too, is now seventy nine years old. Bob Dylan needs little introduction I would imagine his first album of original songs since two thousand twelve album tempests. tempests it was a kind of a major event for Dylan allergists. We've gotten a series of great American songbook albums in recent years from Dylan, and now he is shifting back to originals for the first time in eight years, which is bring joy to the hearts of many fans of this artist. Kia debuted the album out of nowhere this seventeen minutes single murder most foul appears. Appears. Some people are short handing. It is the JFK song at extensively begins with the murder of John. F. Kennedy in nineteen sixty three memorialize that event, but then spirals off into new territory that Jim and I are going to talk about here in a second, this new album was recorded with Dylan's touring band and self produced by Dylan, as has been his pattern throughout his. His, twenty first century recordings, he's got a couple of guests on here including Fiona. Apple they are credited, but we don't exactly know what instruments they're playing or vocals are singing. It's a Bob. Dylan album in any case, here's a track from the new album. We're going to talk about it in the second Bob Dylan with rough and rowdy ways. Here's Goodbye Jimmy Reed Unsound Opinions. GE's. Name. Live in Chechnya's. Didn't use. His. Tell them. From A. ME. At all time. Just. That is. Our. Talent and Though? Stating while. In Canada! Good! Godspeed. Battle. Claim. Goodbye Jimmy.

Bob Dylan murder Jimmy Reed Jim Ilan Toronto Chechnya Kia GE Apple F. Kennedy Fiona John Canada
"bob dylan" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"That he wrote that Song in twenty four hours. It feels like it. There is an urgency to it. It certainly doesn't sound like it sounds like a song incredibly well crafted, but what a piece of instant commentary! There's not a better example of it today than that song. speaking of fight. Songs Jim I've got another one for Rick Wilson another Chicago artist whom we reviewed on the show just a few weeks ago with his new EP which. which we loved has a new single out. fight like IDA. B and Marsha up referring to Marsha p Johnson the the famed gay activists self identified drag. Queen one of the most prominent figures in the stonewall uprising of nineteen nine, and as a referring to WWL's the famed American investigative journalist, educator and civil rights activist, one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People the N. Double A. C. P. Wilson. Named checking these two artists as inspirations for his own activism, Rick has been extremely politically oriented in terms of not just his music, but in his appearances at rallies around the world for just causes and this song particular cuts close to home because the Chicago Pride Parade for the Lgbtq community was just cancelled because of the covid nineteen crisis, he wanted to honor that in some way, and he also wanted to draw connection between gay rights fight with Black lives matter movement. You know this is an important connection. These are black women fighting for their rights and sort of tying together. These.

Marsha p Johnson N. Double A. C. P. Wilson Rick Chicago Pride Parade Chicago WWL Jim Advancement of Colored People Black National Association
Little Richard, rock'n'roll pioneer, dies aged 87

Foxhole

00:14 sec | 2 months ago

Little Richard, rock'n'roll pioneer, dies aged 87

"And roll legend Little Richard has died according to his Facebook site he was eighty seven the singer was a pioneer in an energetic and flamboyant performer who influenced the Beatles Bob Dylan Jimi Hendrix and other greats

Richard Bob Dylan Jimi Hendrix Facebook Beatles
Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 3 months ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
Dylan's 'Times They Are A-Changin'' lyrics for sale for $2.2 million

Rush Limbaugh

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Dylan's 'Times They Are A-Changin'' lyrics for sale for $2.2 million

"A set of hand written Bob Dylan lyrics is on sale for more than two million Bucks moments in time said a private collector is selling the one page sheet of lyrics to the times they are A. Changin for two point two million dollars previously the hand written lyrics to like a Rolling Stone fetched a then world record of two million dollars in two thousand fourteen that's met

Bob Dylan
Dylan's 'Times They Are A-Changin'' lyrics for sale for $2.2 million

Red Eye Radio

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

Dylan's 'Times They Are A-Changin'' lyrics for sale for $2.2 million

"Bob Dylan's hand written lyrics to his nineteen sixties classic the times they are A. Changin are going up for sale with a two point two million dollar asking price in what could mark a world record for rock lyrics it's being sold in a private sale not an option Dylan's hand written lyrics to like a Rolling Stone fetched a world record two million dollars when they were sold at auction by Sotheby's in New York in twenty

Bob Dylan Sotheby New York
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:20 min | 3 months ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

"And so going back to think twice you were talking about about more about the writing. Yeah and it's something that I didn't know enough about until I was invited onto your program. But what are the things that interest me about? Shakespeare is the fact that you know. He wrote thirty six so plays that we know of and almost none of them may be. The tempest may be midsummer. Night's dream are his original story but for the most part Shakespeare was not interested in creating a new story. He looked around at the stories others had told whether they were Italian. Novellas or English plays or history's any thought I understand what's slightly off for not really fulfilled in this version older version and he did what architects call a gut renovation. He kept the frame and he just cleared out the inside and made it is. Oh so when Dylan writes. Don't think twice. He knows Paul Clayton Song. Who's going to buy you ribbons? When I'm gone? He worked with Klay knew who sadly killed himself in in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. Eight toward together collaborated a little bit and I'm sure that there is kind of cross pollination if you will between Clayton Song. And and don't think twice and dillon with a little techy from what. I've learned about that you know he said I steal the word a or the word so whether we're done you know Ed is a good question. Although he was a little defensive even steal those words but he is reaching into a tradition a tradition that goes further back than Clayton to. What I learned was an African American Song that circulated in Virginia. Who's GonNa Bring you chickens? So what we're talking about. Our traditions and Shakespeare comes out of traditions. Really in very similar ways. To how Dylan does and plagiarism is. A useless category the only useful category. Can you take something old and make it speak to the moment? In a way that makes people feel connected to that song ways. Nobody has ever felt connected to it in dealing did that for me. I think I'm right in saying and correct me. If I'm not the Sean Wilentz I think wrote a book called Bob Dylan and America. And he I believe explored this notion and said you know what it's Alchemy. What he's doing is he's taking base matters and is creating something new out of it that shines and I thought that was really damage. It is in trouble. Lens is A friend and a very smart guy and I think he wrote brilliantly about about Dylan. Christopher ricks did as well They're just a people recognize. That is work rises to the level of seriousness. And it is how chemical it is a transformation but for me. It's really the lack of thoughtfulness beyond the magic of the transformation and the thoughtfulness I suppose has to do with. I see what's not there. That's a hard thing to to grasp and Shakespeare was really good at it. Didn't create the story of Hamlet. He didn't create the story King. Lear those were all plays bouncing around in the stage. You probably acted in a spear holder when he was young. He's onstage they could. God I can write this great Soliloquy at this point or I could tweak it in this way. And maybe it's not occurring Bob Dylan in a cerebral way. But it's occurring to him in a way that lets them know. Yeah I. I know the folk he sang exists but that song is dead on arrival. Something has to be done to reanimated and I suppose it's as much Raising the data's alchemy. And where do you think Dylan? Shakespeare intersect particularly? I think oddly even though four hundred years or so separates their birth. They both products of a similar education system. You know it's it's remarkable if you listened to to Dylan's account of education in his Nobel lecture in two thousand Seventeen. He talks a lot of doubt grammar. School you know. He learned things in Grammar School. The devices techniques secret mysteries whatever. He's talking about. He talks about gullivers travel. Dickins Don Quixote all these stories and of course we know he had a great teacher in school. Who taught him the poetry John Donovan? The poetry plays of Shakespeare so shakespeare learn what he learned in Grammar School. I mean this is a Western tradition that span than in now and both of them sat there probably frustrated probably demise racing as they were exposed to this stuff and taking it all in and a decade later or or ten years later figuring out how to turn this into into gold if you will and I mean that both literally and figuratively because you have to make money as an artist or like pulled claim you can end up desperate and suicidal and both of them figured out how to do that. And if you think you know as a thought experiment Dylan or Shakespeare Been Born twenty years earlier or twenty years later whatever genius they had could not have been fully rely so yes. They were both remarkable artists but they had great luck in being born at what they recognize. Both of them were pivotal moments in in their culture in the arts in the possibilities that were now available to young

Bob Dylan Shakespeare Clayton Song Grammar School Christopher Ricks Sean Wilentz John Donovan Don Quixote ED Virginia Dillon Klay Lear America
Bob Dylan's 'Tangled Up in Blue' reaches number 31 on the US charts

Sean Hannity

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

Bob Dylan's 'Tangled Up in Blue' reaches number 31 on the US charts

"Bob Dylan is a number one album with blood on the tracks single tangled up in blue does the number thirty one in the state

Bob Dylan
Remembering John Prine

Q

03:40 min | 3 months ago

Remembering John Prine

"For more than fifty years ago John wrote songs that were sad and funny and overall just human songs about regular work in life songs about quiet ordinary days rolling by the songs that were incredibly profound he wrote songs you could grab your guitar and sing along with songs about simple honest truths songs you could use a sort of a road map to life songs that use the language that you spoke with your friends at the bar and songs that you could spend three or four weeks parsing and trying to figure out John died on Tuesday at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville he died from complications of COPD nineteen he was seventy three years old that road map to live John sang about so often he was singing to one person in particular take a listen to this I want to say this is when whenever I've read naming this sounds like advice S. as in I'm talking to myself and you know I was trying to convince myself for that at the time that time don't get wrapped up in your anger you know because people don't realize it but there you can be your own best friend your own best your own worst enemy yeah it's hard to say if you don't know yourself for for some reason you're the hardest person to get up for your case you know it's it's how it's difficult to forgive yourself but within three years of these that's kind of where I was staying there and it works for me is that I'm say this John Prine and Mariposa folk festival in a really Ontario over his seventy three years John's songwriting genius caught the attention of pretty much the biggest names in music Bob Dylan called him a midwestern mind trips to the nth degree who writes beautiful songs Kris Kristofferson hated him after he discovered him because his songs were so good and so easy Bonnie Raitt famously did a cover of his song angel from Montgomery which launched her career John this paper trail for tons of younger folk and country singers people like Jason Isbell and Margo price and Kacey Musgrave if you ever saw John do a live show he tell these hilarious stories and then sing the most devastating songs which is the combination that you really need in twenty eighteen John released his album tree of forgiveness at that time it was first new record in thirteen years and now well I guess it's in honor of John Prine I want to revisit this really special interview I did with him around the time that album came out I got to talk about a line of his that I repeat myself at least once a week even now as we go through this whole thing here's my conversation with the late John Prine when I get to heaven MACA guides in thank you for more blessings than one man can stand then I'm gonna get a guitar and started writing little band check in do swell down any day after live grand and then I'm going to give it back and is that this is there is god is my witness the judge John you can you

John
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: Nish Kumar

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:23 min | 4 months ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: Nish Kumar

"What I was about. Fifteen years old. We went on a Fourteen is just before I turned fifteen. We went on this field trip to we went to Sheffield for a history field trip because we were studying something about the industrial revolution in the Arkwright Orlando Carmel Stuff. And we stopped as a treat at a now defunct building called the Sheffield History of popular music and I was just listening to it was forums. It was not great but I was listening to like a weird. There's like a listening post and you could just listen to some albums that they deemed classic albums and actually I my cousins were big Jimi Hendrix fans and so I started listening to Electric Lady Land and I remember listening to the first three songs and I just wrote the going. Great Well Mine Tie. World was just changed on so I ball. Electorally land go really into Hendricks and then viral electric lady land. Obviously through all along the watchtower read the liner notes. In its Britain by Dylan and niece of I guess if you're I'm thirty four and when we were school used to sing blowing it was a him so I guess there's just a moment of either has a sort of David. Your mind of who Bob Dylan is roughly and I. I was a into the Beatles at the time. So I sort of knew roughly a would big dylan fans and you know blowing the wind and he sort of saying you have some vague idea and then so my friend. Andy gave me the nineteen sixty seven greatest hits the he had which is his dad had which is just a best of everything op too blonde on. Blunt. I say it doesn't include anything for the debut album but it's just a great hits a of the of the pre John Wesley Harding nineteen sixties out on. Its I mean. That's a pretty place to star. Need because you sort of realized that this is by the time that period ends. He's probably about twenty five. I think. Yeah he yeah. He's about twenty five twenty six when the motorcycle accident happens. And so that's the if you think about the style changes the happen just did not show period of time. It's a pretty exciting thing to get like a quick precede history of and so from then on I was just you know I was just I was I was getting everything and I do think there is something really interesting. Did you go see blinded by the light? I know you on the show. There's a really amazing pit in that movie. Which is a beautiful film about. Safra's monsters obsession with Bruce springsteen this amazing bitten where it's kind of in the eighties and him and his friend who both of british-asian ethnic heritage and one of them is trying to get Bruce springsteen to be played on the School Radio Tannoy system and the guy says Bruce Springsteen isn't he got going on dodger into And the two Asian kids look at me. Go No ought not only definitely think. That's a work because when I was a kid my friends he's like. Oh that's the music DODD LISTENS TO A. My parents liked the bills in the light of the music. That was big when they moved to Britain like things like yellow and stuff but they they had no specific relationship with Dylan so I didn't have association with that. It was like a dragon something that your parents enforced you to endear. When you were growing up so to me I just couldn't. I just couldn't believe it. It just absolutely blew my mind. I had no full context for it and so I just bought as much as I can possibly buy that. There's a period where pretty much all I spend my birthday money. Christmas money on was Bob Dylan CDs and also quite good period to get into Bob Dylan because it was before they released the audio remastered CDs. So they were just so. I just I got. I bought time out of mind for one pound CD copy of time out of mind for a quid. From W H Smith's in Croydon and so it was really easy and cheap for me just to buy almost

Bob Dylan John Wesley Harding Bruce Springsteen Sheffield Britain Arkwright Orlando Carmel Jimi Hendrix Electric Lady Land Beatles W H Smith Hendricks Andy Dodd Safra David Croydon British-Asian
Basic Folk: Dave Godowsky

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:08 min | 5 months ago

Basic Folk: Dave Godowsky

"You are from Maine. Yes whereabouts are you from in. What is your hometown like? I'm from the town of Yarmouth Maine about seven thousand people. It's a great little suburban town. It's right outside of Portland which is a great small city great place to the classic kind of place that like when you're sixteen years old seventeen years old. You're like get me out of here. This is so boring. This sucks and then it doesn't take that long to be like. Oh you know what it's pretty cool like is a pretty place It spread on the coast. Means just a cool place you know. I think there's other small suburban towns in America that actually are probably the Really Boring this isn't one of them. It's actually a cold place. Let's the accent like the accent I can't there really isn't much of one. You have to get up into Maine to get into accent territory. I can't really I can't really do. I didn't really grow up with it. Disappointing Yeah Inter. Southern southern is It's really no different than vermonter. New Hampshire Rhode Island or Massachusetts. Although I guess sometimes there is A. It doesn't really have the Boston accent. I find the main accent. Would I know of it to be very similar to the western Massachusetts accent? Where there's like you can't get the From the The air it's like a dip down and then backup Yup Yup Yup. There's that thing which might be some form of Mandarin actually interesting moving on one thing that you aren't intentionally taught or a lot of people aren't intentionally taught to do is to listen to music You are basically a professional music fan. You've managed musicians. Signed musicians. Worked very talented songwriters throughout your career. What was it like for you to start discovering music at a young age? That's really interesting. I've never thought of it that that's a good. I'm going to steal that from now on you May Young Age. You mean like really young like when I was a kid merger you mean like when I first got into professional. Yeah I have another question about like about like your identity when it came to listening and discovering and then when you started to develop a fine taste but for this question I just wanted to know like when you first started listening to music. What was it like? Was there like an immediate connection or were you just like whatever this music and were in Louis stuff. Oh Yeah because a kid. There was definitely a huge connection. It's like the only thing I was really passionate about. Since I was like a little kid you know like eight seven or eight or something like I mean I remember just being so obsessed with records My parents had crates of old records from the sixties. Everything from the beach. Boys to Neil Young Bob Dylan to like the monkey is and you know. Funny stuff like that And I just remember like sitting there listening to records in studying the packaging and you know that was a time where the act the Physical Act of listening to music was as compelling as the music itself you know like you could get lost in the process of putting the needle on a record and listening to it and and reading who these people were and you didn't know it was just this big mystery. All you knew was what you were hearing. And whatever text and photos were in the sleeve so it was just this you know at this mysterious element to it that I became obsessed with it was like almost sounds like an adventure. Yeah exactly it was an adventurous. It was like it was exploring the unknown. Every time you found some new record And then you also wouldn't know anything about it or you wouldn't have any sense if anyone else knew anything about it like I remember talking to people at school and being like you ever heard of this artist or that artist and it was equal chances that someone would say like Yeah I've heard of Leonard Cohen. He's a big deal. Everyone knows him. And I'm like Oh okay or like does everyone know about this other person you know like I have no. You have no sense of things. It isn't like today when you just. You can see how many like instagram followers they have. Or whatever and you know within like a few clicks or whatever you can tell like more than you would ever possibly a million years want or need to know about any any. Wasn't that so hilarious when you discover so on you're like what a great discovery and you instagram. And they have like a million yes. Yeah Yeah that used to not happen. I know it's fun when it happens the other way. You assume someone say huge. He looked them up. And you're like what was this person not like for me. Sometimes when I do look at someone's numbers there is like either that like extreme. You know on the scale of extremes either. There's like a million followers. There's like one hundred in when I find that somebody has like a hundred instagram followers. I feel this like great despair. It's like Oh this is terrible right. What can I do probably nothing? Probably nothing unless you have millions of dollars yet. The correlation between quality and exposure is non-existent. Really which can be fun sometimes for fans not so fun for the artist but it kind of seems like for you. It's been a career long struggle of choosing performance over business. Yeah more so at different points. But Yeah Yeah. Why do you think that exists? I think a lot of it has to do with It's not even so much of -gistically thing as it is a perception thing like I'm not allowed to be feeling like I'm not allowed to be a musician if I'm working in music and that was something. I learned early on that. Really kind of bummed me out because I it never occurred to me before I was just like. I have car payments and student loan debt and bills and rent and all these things like you know I. I need to get a job. I can't just be a musician like you know. I need to get a fulltime job immediately. So thinking what did I just find job and music like it's the one thing I wanna do and I didn't even know what the music industry was. It was like there must be jobs in music right there. I know that there's some I don't know what it is but there's some music industry So I found a job at this record. Label mistake sure. Yeah we'll just do anything and the next thing I knew it was like I was playing gigs and there was immediately like this sense of like. Oh wait so you work at record label. Oh so but I don't get it like which one which one are you are you? One of us are one of them. It was like being a cop at a party or something you know like are you the are you a label guy or are you. One of the band was that it was seen in a negative way it may have inadvertently negative. I don't think there was much like. Oh we don't care about this guy. He's in with the label or something at least not overtly but it was definitely there like under like in between the lines. Kind of you know like it was I think for some reason. A lot of people have a hard time imagining that one person could be both.

Maine Instagram Massachusetts Portland Bob Dylan Boston Leonard Cohen Hampshire Rhode Island America Louis
Managing Research Needs Using Kubernetes with Bob Killen

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

11:34 min | 5 months ago

Managing Research Needs Using Kubernetes with Bob Killen

"I am here at q Kahn in San Diego. And I'm with Bob Dylan. Bob Is a research cloud administrator at the university. -versity of Michigan Bob. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you awesome so We met yesterday you were on the AM L. Media and analysts panel talking a little bit about your experiences using communities to support the researchers there At the University of Michigan Gin. And you're also one of the other rose plsy are co chair of the CNC FS research User Group So really interested in hearing a little bit about your experiences with. Sounds like you work with Kuban. Eddie's kind of to support a broad portfolio of applications not just MLA. I we run a wide variety of applications of both animal focused like keep blow but we have a whole slew of other supporting services that are researchers Consume Joey on in our larger. HPC Cluster. Tell us a little bit about your background. How did you get started working with communities? I moved over to artistes Microbe advanced research competing technology services about three years ago but before that I worked for the University of Michigan Hospital and in Twenty fifteen we we started going down the container out for a lot of our clinical workflows. This is sort of before docker was a thing So we are predominantly like Alexi containers. And we're first looking at communities to orchestrate that but raise wasn't mature enough of the time and we went For us from there we Dan Shift back and forth and also start supporting our research workload serve alongside our clinical workflows on there. They sort of saw you know some of the benefits of containerization and this WanNa take advantage of the broader service that we were offering From there I was hired by artists to sort of build out the same something but be completely. Research focused as well as like managing of virtualization system and communities has really exploded when it comes to the the broader management adoption of containers and We have things like that. Keep sputtering in super hub that just integrates directly with it in from. There's just inside the cube. spiner cube sponsor sponsor in reporter wanting to hub at. It can spend a notebook as a container itself itself. Can you maybe talk a little bit about the various use cases that you're supporting what researchers doing. Oh man it's a a pretty broad stroke spectrum on top of reneges. We support a bunch of social science stuff. Various databases that are consumed By in other applications and people running workloads in our large H. B. C. Cluster And we do support We have a significantly large a jupiter environment a lot for classes and other researchers that are spinning stuff up bioinformatics physics Think those are most most of the big ones okay. And so is the primary user experience among your researchers the Jupiter notebook and the ability to spun off containers from the notebook amendment. Yup over time. We've seen a gradual shift of people you know sort of moving away from the classic. HPC to style system. Where you would log into a sage along node? And you'd run your system you something up and running off now. They're sort of an expectation for art to have the Jupiter Notebook or have some other sort of science gateway for the user to consume. It's it's a lot friendlier than than having to dig in and right like a bash script it to automate some of the suffer you one of the things that's different between the classical. HPCC scale up systems and the more distributed environments that We see now and that are common With Kuban. Eddie's is that in order to take advantage of I've these distributed environments the users in your case researchers have to know about them and kind of know how to to to use them in a lot of cases right there you know code Oh to take advantage of distributed computing. Are you researchers doing that or are you. Are there things that you've put in place that provide abstractions so that they don't have to Think about that We do have some abstractions and play that Make it much easier argo workflows and things of that. Nature have simplify things greatly for people then of course empower users. That you know will will just want to dive in and do everything themselves. But in general we have a pretty good suite of tools and libraries to make it easy for them. The social scientists isn't kind of the target user for a cube flow yet they're using communities Q.. Flow in your case. It sounds like the ARGO. WORKFLOWS you know our lot. You didn't say that necessarily the social scientists Mantis were using the ARGO workflows in Q.. Flow but I'm I'm curious to hear a little bit about how cube flow in particular is used in this environment. Cute flow it. So we don't have any social science people using cube flow The cute flow stuff is mostly by a small subset of people. And Right. Now it's a more experimentation stage But the the aspects of it released sort of make a special like the model life cycle of things Significantly easier for people and we we sort of see much. More people shifting. Adopting it going forward maybe talk a little bit about that user experience. What do they have to do to get their apps up running into keep environment? They don't have to do too much they can do. Most of it from the Jupiter notebooks that Cupola spins up in manages for them and then there is I forget the the Argo are the flow Cli tool but that allows them to create some workflows pretty easy to. There's there's some other things being built that allows allows for better like designing and building better pipelines in More consumable workflows. Maybe talking generally. What from the your participation the patient in this panel? I got the impression that you're pretty excited about Kuban as as a platform generally for these types of research workloads. Maybe talk a little. What about you know why you're excited about it? Sure communities provides a lot of like proper abstractions for just managing a variety Heidi of workloads and those things that it cannot handle it offers the extension points to easily extend and augment so like grenades it self does not have any capability of running a like standard. MPI job or a gang scheduled job but because the extension points are there. It's easy enough to who sort of your own schedule or to handle that. And it's just like a little. You know one variable change than us that scheduler to spin up and manage that workload and and by using carbonates itself and the extension mechanism. You gain the accessibility of using everything else. That's being developed on top of whereas in the past you know again going back to the classic. HP system there wasn't any of these other this other tooling API's really do any of this stuff. So now we can get. You can do a lot more such as like eventing and triggering different workflows off. Different things happening within the system We're definitely seeing them. A much more broader adoption of things like data streaming an link in this stuff. You can really do well on a classic. HP system but it it works in fits quite well on top of communities and you can integrate it with a whole slew of other things that are being built on top of it. Are you supporting putting users. That are doing things like building out their own schedulers or are these things at the broader community is doing and they can just kind of take off the shelf and take advantage of right now. The it's mostly from the broader community and our users can then take that off the shelf cute flow itself has a NPR operator built into it. So that makes it easier for their the people consuming Q.. Flow to spin up in. MPI Job And then there's other things like a volcano which are trying to offer much more of the classic a batch computing things that we'd find. HPC for communities directly. Joe Down a little bit deeper into that. What is volcanoes? Specific volcano is a Open source project that is trying to be sort of the classic PC scheduler and workload managers thinking like slim but built for Kuban Eddie's so it is offering things like a fair share cues backfill as well as offering things like you know being able to support gang the jobs and things of that dream So the idea there Being that as a A research cloud administrator. You've got some pool of resources. You've got some pool of people that want to take advantage of these resources. How do you Fairly are consistently give them access to the resources and so oh my fair share of being one idea there gang scheduling is more. Like I've got these five things that need to go at the same time. Exactly how do I ensure that they're happening in concert with one another and then like if a worker happens to die you don't want to necessarily kill the entire job whereas you know if so the controller dies you want to then you know kill and Req- a Q. The entire job for us in for Sort of the larger sites that are still primarily a on prem focused on like bare metal you know we have a finite finite amount of resources. We aren't necessarily bursting up to the cloud So being able to backfill and set priorities on things is very useful for us as well as you know cues For us is like we want to backfill with jobs from students. They might be able to run those for for free but if we have a researcher that's doing something when we want to have those take priority sort of bump off those lower party jobs we think about in the context of machine learning Some of these. He's jobs Like network training deep learning Training they can take many days or weeks But that's not a new thing in the context of HVAC are the workloads that you're tending to support also kind of these long running Jobs but but not necessarily deep learning training we have we support again being a That handles researcher needs for the entire university. We have a little bit of everything and most of our jobs would probably fit into that category Where they might take a week to complete Or something of that nature I think are Maxwell time is twenty one days and what can you say what that is. I don't remember off the top of my head But we've had several that are dislike cranking through you know terabytes and terabytes of data And if they have something that just hits the wall time you know. It's it's unfortunate for the Kill it off. Also the this maxwell time isn't the biggest job that you've seen the limit that you yes yes all right the thing that runs logging in that we're going to give him the Nice Nice warm. Not Nice

Researcher Kuban Eddie Kuban Argo Michigan Bob Dylan Administrator Q Kahn BOB HP San Diego Am L. Media University Of Michigan Gin Joey Alexi Reporter Maxwell
Singer-songwriter David Olney dies on stage at age 71

Overnight America with Ryan Wrecker

04:21 min | 6 months ago

Singer-songwriter David Olney dies on stage at age 71

"Was the song writer David only dies onstage during a performance at Florida festival from what I understand is part of this thirty a for a festival show I think the idea of thirty eight I don't know that road but the you can travel up and down thirty A. there's all these different destinations different radio stations different groups clubs or whatever would bring in singer song writers to perform their songs in David only was one of them age seventy one it was in Santa Rosa beach Florida Saturday night some news reports say he collapsed onstage but the eye witnesses there say wasn't much of a collapse want you to imagine this and I've seen a lot of singer song writers on a stool and a microphone hooking up their acoustic guitar give a few words and then play a song there's normally not a lot of people in attendance now I don't know how much publicity this event would get it doesn't exactly say how many people were in attendance for all I know is when you get to some of the smaller towns in you know Santa Rosa beach Florida is not a Miami or Orlando or Tampa Bay or one of the other big ones that are inside of Florida but you know if if IT gas if there was fifty people there that would be a good turn out so he was performing in some news reports say he claps but again and this is what they say happened only was in the middle of his third song when he stopped apologized shut his eyes he was very still sitting upright with this guitar wearing a hat beautiful rust suede jacket they laughed at him earlier about it because it was raining outside where they were plain and you know swayed in rain they want a picture that the city was graceful dignified because at first it looked like he was just taking a moment next scene other yelling is there a doctor in the house one was in attendance ran up there they did everything they could to try to revive them could you imagine something like that just plain a song posting saying you know I'm sorry taking a break this channel down to his chest you never dropped his guitar never fell off the stool if you're a guitar player if your guitar man I think a lot of people wonder how they're going to go in life what's going to be their moment is it going to be peaceful as a going to be in your sleep is gonna be out somewhere you know in Saint Louis you may even have other wonders you now is it gonna be because a crime or whatever but sitting on a stool doing what you love that you made a career out of than some people know who he was apparently was pretty well known one person said in this article is from NBC news was quoting some of the witnesses there the late Townes Van Zandt famously said of only says anytime anyone asks who my favorite music writers are I say Mozart lightning Hopkins Bob Dylan in Dave only Dave only is one of the best song writers are song writers I've ever heard in that's true I mean it from the heart there's a radio station that brought him in in they had him perform a couple of songs in front of a group and I don't think there are too many people there but they were recording this and this is one of his stops in this had to abandon right before his final stop I mean the way that the line this up I don't think it was too far in between the two get a big bushy beard on look much much different than some of his photographs that are out there much different in one of the songs he played in this was the last song he played for that station right before like that they have like the branding so it's probably just sponsored by them but whatever then you he was at at this point that brought a man I gotta say I wanted to get an idea of what he sounded like because it made it sound as if he was a pretty big deal in a lot of people revered him in one of the chilling things is the song they decided to playing this is one of his very last songs asked to talk about his own mortality

Writer David Florida Festival
Timothee Chalamet to Play Bob Dylan in Film Directed by James Mangold

Donna and Steve

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Timothee Chalamet to Play Bob Dylan in Film Directed by James Mangold

"Timothy shell Amazin talks to portray Bob Dylan in a forthcoming film directed by James Mangold fox searchlight confirms in reports the biopic reportedly titled going electric will chronicle Dylan's rice from Greenwich Village folk singer to rockstar particularly particularly focusing on his controversial embrace of the electric guitar in nineteen sixty five Mandel directed two thousand five to walk the line about Johnny Cash was login for versus Ferrari and more accord reports Dylan is working actively with man golden searchlight pictures on the film which has no release date as

Bob Dylan Rockstar Mandel Johnny Cash Ferrari Timothy Shell James Mangold Greenwich Village
New Yorkers 'salt' roads after heavy snowfall

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 8 months ago

New Yorkers 'salt' roads after heavy snowfall

"Win the city has declared a snow alert starting at ten o'clock this morning our John Montone checks out the sanitation salt depot in lower Manhattan the sanitation sold spreading truck assigned to the west side highway in the forties and fifties was quite generous it looks like the Bonneville salt flats but this sanitation sold spreading guy tells me with the deep freeze coming the roads have to be covered a lot said so full it's full blast at full blast after after the last couple years they're not taking any chances which is what his boss sanitation commissioner Catherine Garcia is also say I think that we are taking a very conservative approach to make sure we are at the ready should this change on us as Bob Dylan one saying a change in the weather is known to be extreme and that's what we've got com John Montone and and wins at the sanitation soul

John Montone Manhattan Catherine Garcia Bob Dylan Commissioner
Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash's demo of 'Wanted Man' is released

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash's demo of 'Wanted Man' is released

"There is a Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash are rejoicing and the song is called wanted man up till now an unreleased Bob Dylan Johnny Cash to wet from the nineteen sixty nine recording session it's on the latest installment of Dylan's bootleg series that will be released on November first Dylan wrote wanted man with castles voice in mind it was the first song on cash's iconic nineteen sixty nine live album Johnny Cash at San Quentin this is the only known recording with Dylan singing as

Bob Dylan Johnny Cash San Quentin
"bob dylan" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Wouldn't you just think thinks that he's a Dick in <hes> in don't look back right. He is terrible intellect back. He's mean to reporters reporters. He's been to Donovan Donovan dressed as a reporter wearing a hat with a label says press in it. I think it's easy to be hard on dylan because he's so lionised he everyone that should have been hard on him. Wasn't your punching up basically yeah. That's right when you punch Bob Dylan my my friend David Reese who food is a world famous anti skeptic who truly believes he's a true believer. He wrote the comic. Get your war on correct but he is of the opinion that the death of Bob Dylan will more than any other popstar be the one that that that the irritates gen-x up no it will it will it will demarcate the change when Dylan dies. Everything thing goes with him generation. That's right so every single publication will have it on the front page. It will be like Lady Diana there except there will be seven million times more critical reappraisal of his catalog and his significant. We've already lost to Beatles. I mean we we have the experience and so that's the argument against this idea of Dylan is well. No Paul McCartney really is the bigger but he says no no no no. We've already already lost you. Beatles McCartney will get you know he'll get a good send off. He will probably outlive ringo at least hard to know though Ringo. Just you know plan just pieces his way through everything we can look younger every time I said what's he doing wrinkle could be I mean Ringo has never exerted himself gleason all playing the drums shitting Edel. If you want to live a long time she played a little tennis or something I mean he's still gets out but I guess Paul. McCartney does too Paul still does three and a half hour shows polls vegetarian balls Mitch and I'm Paul did fewer drugs. Oh well Paul would argue that no he was right there doing the drugs. That's one of the one of the things about Paul is that he he he has very little sense of how it looks when someone praises John Lennon and he has to step in and say well you know we knew due to others that to what does that so who's the last I it depends on who the last Beatles will be like Ringo is the last beadle then you know nobody's GonNa be beating their breasts and putting on sackcloth and ashes. He'll be on the cover of time probably but yeah it's not time will not there's a hostelry concept of time but Paul Circle. I think that's right. That's right time time. We'll be a MOEBIUS. A Strip club Newsweek will be a flat circle. <hes> the the thing about Paul. Is We already know we've already evaluated Paul all away but dylan remains a mystery. He's an enigma he really is. Did you read the story. It wasn't that long ago that he got picked up by the cops in some <hes> in some like New Jersey Beach town like blue collar beach down just because he was walking around late at night in a Hoodie just keeping in windows and the somebody called the cops on this Weirdo and begin grab picked him up and he was like Oh. It's Bob Dylan if he I was just like Oh yeah. I liked to do well on the one hand. I like an old white white person getting arrested just for wearing a Hoodie. It seems only fair sure but also windows wants material music might have been just one of those small towns where the houses are close to the street so you can't help but look in the window of his next album is all like songs from New Jersey living rooms and they watch in American idol but they're watching it on devaux. Although those New Jersey beach towns are like it's like a their blue-collar places springsteen territories called the cops she was like hey bob come over and he's like hey there's going to be this Weirdo on the Kreiner..

Bob Dylan Paul Paul McCartney Ringo Paul Circle Donovan Donovan Beatles McCartney New Jersey David Reese Lady Diana reporter Beatles New Jersey Beach Edel Kreiner Newsweek John Lennon springsteen Mitch
"bob dylan" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Got said, no. Apes have what God said you can do what you wanted. But. Bob Dylan in honor of his seventy eighth birthday today. Yes. Both day this is like my favorite song that bought doing ever did because it's me and it's funny sort, Donna. Bob. Bob doing is I love. Dylan is the story you told us off believe off the air about Bob Dylan. And a friend of yours on limits or no we're not talking about that. Shoe stores. A great sword. Yeah. A friend of mine said you wanna take a picture and Bob. Don't also Nobel prize winner couldn't be bothered to go. Pick up. Maybe my favorite story of all time. Bob dylan. Right. He's like guess. He's got toilet paper holders. Bob Dylan of by the way that the truck off the highway, sixty one revisited album, I didn't realize that highway sixty one runs from Duluth Minnesota, where he knows it. Yeah. Those, the hallway it goes all the way down to highway foot in Mississippi and not the famous crossroads where they say Robert Johnson in as legend has it solar. So the devil, yes. To become a great blues, that's all incorporated and still playing. And by the way, apparently, plus shoe place, golf. Dillard's three Nelson. He's not. Sallis couldn't tour three. Yeah. But no, he's not. Kenny G is. What we wanna point was like a scratch, jeez better than Alison. I think Kevin's correct. And really was two or three. Yeah. I think within skill better than all of them. Kathleen skill scratch player big hitter. Good player big hitter. The Lamma not as Kevin. I don't think Dylan can hit as far as Kevin's sets off the did you wanna talk about your kid, so? So last night, I went with my son three handicap for Alice Cooper bye. Okay. But it may be now but I think when he was younger, he was even back on that last night, we went Tony to see American football, the band at. They have contributed to this at the black cat, and I- Corbin is a massive fan of American football. You know, a little bit about them 'cause you played them this show, and they are a huge, huge cultish, sort of following in this area. We know everywhere. Oh, yeah. This is a band out of Chicago in the late nineties, and they broke up there, originally LP basically became a huge hit and Mike Concetta is the lead singer. Well during the show at one point, he says, what do you wanna talk about people? You wanna talk about sports, you wouldn't talk about politics. Two people yell out, let cheeser and I'm sitting there going. Why would this be connected to Tony's show? So I went up to one of the guys and I said, I'm just curious. Why did you yell out let Sheree and he said a big fan of the Tony Kornheiser show podcast. I don't know if you're familiar with it, and I said, no, I am. I am familiar with it. But why did you yell it out in this setting for this band? And he said the lead singer. Mike can sell it is a huge fan of Tony's podcast. Right. So as I was talking the guy goes, hold on. Wait a minute are, are you kit? So I'm Kip. But after the show corbin's stood around he grabbed the setting plays in a band band publicize your work club. It's my son and great drummer Brett who's part of the right now. Influx two to three piece. Right. They they're looking for new basis, I think, but he sat around Martinez. I wanted to go. I wanted to get home to watch the fourth quarter, the game whichever's recording. And that's why I had an opinion on it earlier, I watched it. But anyway, Corbin grab the set list in this guy, Mike, walks out the lead singer, and he introduces himself my son does. And he said, dad come over here, and I said, hey, nice to meet you, Mike..

Bob Dylan Bob Tony Kornheiser Mike Concetta Corbin Kevin Got Nobel prize Sallis Alice Cooper Kenny G Donna Mississippi golf Robert Johnson Dillard Duluth Brett Martinez Alison
"bob dylan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Bob Dylan is leftist, or you know, somehow associated with the hippie movement of the nineteen sixties or something like that. And the voice of the generation the nineteen sixties which was a label that he detested would look at him as perhaps a great leader of the antiwar movement. He never went to an antiwar March. And in fact, Bob Dylan is certainly not partisan. You can't stick him in Democrats or Republicans, and I would also say that you really can't say that he's exactly left or right. There are certain themes that come through throughout Bob Dylan's life about his politics and those subjects are social Justice support for the underdog suspicion of institutions and thority and concern about abuse of power. But those things aren't necessarily the domain of the right or the left. And so I think most people have. Have a misconception about what? Bob Dylan is Bob Dylan grew up in northern Minnesota in a town called hitting. And that is in a Porsche Minnesota known as the iron range, and that's kind of a special place in Minnesota. If a person would have gone to the iron range and the Taylor late night. Eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds it would have been a hotbed of radicalism. You would have run into socialists communists? These are folks working deep underground and iron minds. And so this is part of the labor movement that existed in America at this time. And so Dylan himself at one point said that, you know, more suspicious of bankers growing up than communists, and then of course, Bob Dylan grew up in a Jewish household. And so that made him a minority on the iron range as well. And so obviously that's going to have an impact to on his support for the underdog, and that sort of thing..

Bob Dylan Minnesota Democrats Taylor America
"bob dylan" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Pints around remember to listen and subscribe to archived episodes of the Tony Kornheiser show where every listen to podcasts including apple podcasts Spotify and Google play. And if you listen to the show through I tunes, please leave us a review. So he'd only copied like the first two versus of it. And I said, you know, if you go get the song last, I it says you wind up at a keys gotta keyhole on your knees. Look at the killing just really, yeah. It's a song by Bob Dylan. Yeah. Man today brought to you by the polar vortex. Because despite the fact that the heaters in the studio set to eighty two degrees three it's in the fifties. To and from Ryan Restivo. And komax Long Island Suffolk County. I've no skills in the art world. But I have some in Photoshop so I put together this. It's got everything the mural chatter needs trots Hopi the game to save in Lovie. It is the top of the Sistine Chapel where Barry. Oh, yeah. It's just been testing. Eric Hanson, a TV guy into Moines Iowa's, he signs it. Then right sock left sock. Wool right sock left sock. Dress right sock left suck right? Boot left. Boot. We're all the way to twelve below zero this morning all layers into Moines, Iowa, Steve the sycophant, your description of your physical exam reminded me the story about the doctor asking the examinee. Do you want? The good news or bad news first. Let's have the good news fine. A newly discovered fatal disease will be named after you terribly. Oh, sure. Chris almond can whistle out of his mouth. But the body has a number of other orifices. What would you bring on some real from Dennis Ryan and traverse city Michigan? Sorry, Dr Tony, but you've lost touch with the Long Island routes on PTI. You told wilbon the islanders no longer have a following Nassau and Suffolk because they don't play there anymore. Actually, they will the played more more than half their home games at a renovated Nassau Coliseum this season. I didn't know that. Yeah. In Brooklyn, the whole time. Here's the baby. The mother. My own. Tony took me two aisles games at the Nassau Coliseum. Which at that time was located Nassau County. It is in Nassau County in Uniondale. I can still recall how great the New York's pizza was across the street at the rally show in Boise, Idaho. Every woman in America has an ex-boyfriend just like loose. Russet. I am sure that Mike from Burke Virginia us pretty chill. Dude, Kellyanne John job because she's good at her job. I was expecting. She was nice to me once interesting question can somebody be completely despicable and good at a job? Come on set. You work at the four letter leader, and you work for razz. You, you know, the answer from Don hammock in Biloxi, Mississippi and her against positively the people would never would have guessed it's stupid where it's not. It's a non word, Jim Flynn and Cobra Connecticut, I was up for jury duty. Once I was interviewed to be on the jury for a complex way lawsuit with hundreds of potential witnesses as I was questioned by the three lawyers. I tried to be as much of a jerk as possible was afraid. They would still pick me. So Finally, I told them that if I was chosen I would show up every day in a Star Trek uniform was dismissed Mike Freeman to save the Star Trek paraphernalia. Just in case Jake in Manhattan. Dear Gary, clutch, Anthony Perkins reference. Dude nailed it boom goes the dynamite..

Nassau Coliseum Mike Freeman islanders Nassau County Dr Tony Tony Kornheiser Long Island Suffolk County Bob Dylan Ryan Restivo Sistine Chapel Nassau Jim Flynn Long Island Moines apple Dennis Ryan Moines Iowa Google Eric Hanson Chris almond
"bob dylan" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"And feed your curiosity with Aspen ideas to go here is Evan back with Malcolm. Glad well. Do you feel you mentioned you've got upcoming episodes that have sort of big big stars? And I think people that are very famous have made appearances in various ways in your work. But you've not been a person who's written about celebrity or sort of gravitated towards that over the years has that felt different you'd trying to conduct those interview. I mean, obviously, wrangling them as one thing, but conducting those interviews or being in the rooms with those people the garden or the difference in sort of trying to get that story out of them as same or different. Well, first of all like, I I am forever. Thirteen year old. So nobody loves slavery me. I mean, I I spent tastic I I have a complicated relationship with this. I'm like, well, you know, I don't go up to celebrities if I see them somewhere. But I like if I was walking down the street and I saw Bob Dylan walking towards me. I well. Make and I would immediately techs. Everyone knows there and saw Bob Dylan. Already one. So that's I get super excited. But does it change? Well, it's you know, they someone who has been in the public spotlight for a long time. It's just a little harder. They've just you know, the most loveliest thing in the world is to interview someone who's never been interviewed before to sort of watch them. So the totally novel experience, particularly when you're in about things that they never thought they might not have thought were worthy of an interview. That's a really lovely experience to kind of. It's like watching a anyone can have to go through something for the first time a kid on a roller coaster for the first whatever the version is. But a celebrity is a very different kind of experience because the bar for them is really quite high. They've been interviewed a million times. So you have to be kind of on your game. And you have to take them somewhere. That's a little unfamiliar because that's maybe that's what will get them to perk up. Otherwise, it's just another. Of a long line of interviews. So it's a lot more demanding. And also a lot of times. They don't need the interview. I don't mean that a nasty way. But there's just we mentioned Bob Dylan before Bob Dylan doesn't need to talk to me. Like nothing. It doesn't make better in any way. Right. He's still saw lots of records. So that's the complication and sometimes with these shows you wanna have a kind of good mix where you mix in some people who who maybe are not as well known. But for whom doing interview is kind of a useful exercise, but a novel and engaging exercise they can sometimes be expected to light full. We were talking about this episode before we started in where you go to Nashville, and you're talking to these songwriters one of whom has been on business history before actually wanna talk about that. Well, yeah, I'm probably Radic. But how do you? I'm interested in..

Bob Dylan Nashville Evan Malcolm Thirteen year
"bob dylan" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"So this is fourth time around and by Bob Dylan. And now, let's your Norwegian would by the Beatles. This is like rap beef in nineteen sixty six his what this was. But but when I wanted to go back to you what else stands out in your your memory from these sessions can't say enough about the fact that Dylan chose to give everybody album credit, which formerly was never done national up to that point. And so ever since then if you wanna who played on something he sort of shamed national into given credit, but prior to well known blonde, I didn't matter if you play your Pretty Woman or what they wouldn't tell you. Did it, you know, which by the white wine did play guitar on Oprah walkman? Well, me a couple of other pump chess. That's that's not too shabby, man. That's pretty solid. But yeah, I mean, right. So the and there's one other quick note blind just before we moved to four away from it. Wayne was playing that exquisite who's to ATar picking part on four time around something like that. That was just you doing strumming his way through the cords and you start in that or did he possibly even reference? Norwegian would to try to get a similar or how did that work out? Don't recall who brought it up just sort of played whatever felt like the song needed, and, you know, stealing lex from cheddar actions or whoever just McCoy's playing the counter melody also on acoustic guitar on that as well he in way. And of course, there are musical brothers. And they're they're so intuitive with each other it was, but the interesting thing about that. That's another thing. We're doing was still tweaking the lyrics and trying to find the right tempo, you know, for him to comfortably sing the song. They had the arrangement together. Like from the first or second take it was basically. There. Yeah. What did you make of Dylan sort of as a person and an artist? Like did he come across as a genius or just a mystery or as a weirdo or what little boat when the Michelin one, Charlie McCoy, cold and said cutting Bob Bennett, not said who's Bob Dylan? And he said, I don't know he wrote blowing in the wind show up now since then I've come to come a big fan. We recorded just like women on the area code six one five albums, and you know, he's he's done great things and Pulitzer prize then to to have either no-go. Yeah. But at the time, what do you make them? That's the time. I wasn't impressed by that much. Because I didn't know who he was right. And he didn't freeze up on the session or anything 'cause we weren't necessarily an all of him, but became big fans later on now, Daryl you listen to pretty much all the sessions for the Alba m- did some moments with other moments with Wayne standout since we happen having with us listening to leopard skin pillbox hat one thing I liked about that is that, you know, Robbie takes. The lead on the master take of that on the final night of recording Nashville, but Wayne and Joe south or both playing some really very cool risen stop that lays foundation for wabi plays in particularly way, in has just this sick, bogey grew going on, you know, I think it's like what Wayne said. And I mentioned earlier I think these guys were looking always to play something the best thing they could. But that set the song, you know. And but there are Wayne had some some moments on he and Robbie had a moment. I think it was on absolutely sweet marine, maybe where I've described it as a dual offenders because Wayne play a jazz master and Robbie played a tally jump in here wine. Well, you know, it's been a while. So I don't remember everything. But I do remember some things that maybe don't show up other pledges for instance, Kris Kristofferson was emptying ashtrays during the session. I don't know if. People aware of that. Right..

Bob Dylan Wayne Charlie McCoy Robbie Beatles Kris Kristofferson Pulitzer prize Oprah Michelin Nashville Bob Bennett Daryl bogey Joe south
"bob dylan" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"He said. You had Bob Dylan as a house guest. Wow. Yeah, that is some good research. Impressed. See Franks Fresca's usually I'm. And and and Frankel yell out, Andrea, you know, people within a in their name. I'm so impressed. I'm not even going to point out the fact that she wasn't there when he was a house. Yeah, she wasn't there yourself into the story. Well, I worship Bob Dylan documentary Martin Scorsese. Did we screened it because he's directing the SETV doc? So she had a seat it. It was. For somebody who idolize is Bob Dylan. It was so insightful and profound and saw different side of Bob Dylan. But yes, he rented my home in Toronto when when he was there, I don't know what he maybe you shooting a film, but when I got back to the house, the only Elba GMs that were out were his. I thought that was. Yeah. And didn't you say there were burn marks, earn holds your furniture on a hole on my comforter and light up a joint. Good for him. Meet Dylan and you travels. No, you, you care to give Andrey a little bit of your Dylan Embiid. Oh, jeez. Okay. This is my. Bob Dylan talking to Floyd the barber on the old show. Yeah..

Bob Dylan Dylan Embiid Franks Fresca Martin Scorsese Andrea Frankel SETV Andrey Toronto Floyd
"bob dylan" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Bob dylan just people that have seen me perform and don't these three bitches that's a good thing the black sits i will download the streets yeah who's pay check no they are people that have seen me been outperforming and people have come up to you and said i you remind me of a young mom say it that way but yeah you're very dylan esque about dillon or were they drunk he's still johnny cash johnny cash diet listrik more than style we'll hold on johnny cash and bob dylan are very different they don't they talk a lot in her songs they don't necessarily sing it out so much as sort of almost speak or sing very slowly speak seeing is is what you're talking i've done that before when i was in a punk band years ago i was that's kind of the way i was doing right well i can hear i mean you your baritone is similar to johnny cash i don't hear any bob dylan in your voice i don't like the compliment i didn't take it that way because i don't like bob dylan i don't like bob dylan i don't think he's that talent i don't think he's hitting or anything wait these young kids one video we're talking about okay i yeah listen to me bob dylan bob dylan tom petty bob dylan gets into the rock and roll hall of fame off of like a rolling stone alone with bob dylan is probably want to listen he had a ubs unique voice it's not it's not for everyone i am i going to tell you that bob dylan is one of the greatest singers ever know but neither was frank sinatra frank sinatra was a vocal stylist i thought more than a singer okay you know and he kind of spoke saying a lot of his songs as well bob dylan just just lyrically and what he did he wrote knocking on heaven's door man that's the greatest eulogy ever knocking on heaven you you right not not only have you written a rolling stone but you right knocking on heaven's door here's a good writer absolutely didn't he white what what is it is it the times they are changing he wrote that as well correct or am i mistaking sal yeah yeah yeah yoga bob dylan's hits for me you have a phone over there don't you so i can school this young kid you can't say the bob dylan does not talented well i was saying i didn't like him i didn't say he wasn't talent in singing voice and he's another one too like if you were to move into this era would he do anything but i don't i don't understand that question what do you mean if you were to move into i just feel like sometimes is he knocking on heaven's door a great song if it's released now absolutely that's why guns and roses that's why it's been covered ad nauseam right i understand that too but i might my theory if my theory holds the same thing with led zeppelin and black sabbath it's like the first to do something is obviously going to be well the first that gets recognized or hugely known to do something is usually going to get the most recognized all there's great or whatever listen the landscape of music has changed right now you can't say any banned from the seventies necessarily maybe even the eighties would have the impact that they did have released now because it's just a different landscape how people consume music but you can't you can't take away the brilliance of a ban like led zeppelin by saying if they were released today they wouldn't be as popular i mean that that catalog speaks warts ob just asking the question i'm not saying that that's the case but i mean even like a modern band if they went back to that era would they be i mean you know twenty one pilots i i understand what you're saying but i don't know that i don't know that the point of it would hold any relevance i gotcha something that i've thought about is like well is it because they were i is that the reason no by not worth it bob dylan was the voice of a generation that's why he's bob dylan he he he put into song what a lot of what the nation would a majority of the nation was feeling at the time that he was releasing those song that's why bob with timely that's no but other people did too.

Bob dylan
"bob dylan" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on World Cafe

"Benny lovitz take on bob dylan song emotionally yours it appears on her new album called things have changed so you haven't met bob dylan officially i guess but i heard the story that that you have kissed him or that he kissed you would you tell us the story we were in italy and when i tried to come out of my jessica neum security told me i couldn't because mr mr dylan was about to go on stage and i was like well i don't care i'm finished that i'm leaving so when i came fast them and came out very annoyed he was right across maybe twenty feet walking toward the stage and i said hey robert dillon bass player was walking with him and i saw him mouth to bob of that's betty so he came across to my face in both his hands kiss me square on the mouth and walked onstage oh my goodness so we're calling it prelude to words as opposed to a kiss us praying to the words well he certainly he's less said lots of words in his life i guess sometimes you can say better say better with the kiss i guess oh that's so good what year would that have been oh gosh it's only maybe three oh wow wow have you have you gotten any feedback from him or from his people on this album just from his manager who has endured and gave me license to do whatever i wish we're taking his an assumption that about maybe like sewers manager assumes he would like we don't know well i guess we'll find out if you're ever at a festival with him again he kisses on the lips right there you go find out so get another kid has will good to go okay well you let you let us know we'll follow up feddie levette is my guest here on the road cafe her new album is called things have changed she's interpreting the songs of bob dylan sometimes betty when i studied songs and leyritz especially that have been written by people that i'm going to interview i come away thinking that i know something about them or they at least have have ideas or questions about the way that they see the world based on the lyrics that they right and you've gotten so up close and personal with the lyrics of bob dylan that you've covered at least for the for the songs that are on this album is there something that you've learned about him as a person or that you would ask him about as a person after having such a close relationship with his words although a lot of things had asked him as why said this has opposed to that but in terms of knowing him i've i'm seventy two years old i've known a lot of men it's hard for them to fool me now in any kind of way and i think i know i don't think he would i would be surprised at all i don't think he would do say anything that would surprise me i been telling the audience that trying to find something in common with him he loses about everything and so do oh so we had that in can you tell me what you mean like is there an example of a of a song earlier that you're thinking about when you say that 'cause that's really funny survey shen we'll know just the songs if they say we it's what kind of job we are in what kinda trouble we the world then he says unless it's something you've done to win made him feel particular way a real ee soft made me made my hands sweat made my knee shake maybe run down the street will barrels oh my goodness yet that really comes to light in in your versions because i think what you said about his emotionality i think that his sort of public image can be sort of like prickly or standoffish as the way that some people see him but when you hear these words sung on their own i'm believe that if you were in love with you he would be in love with you just the way i see emotionally us i think it's just what he feels inside but that's kind of a raw emotion to sit out.

Benny lovitz bob dylan seventy two years twenty feet
"bob dylan" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on World Cafe

"That's emotionally yours a bit of a dylan be side if you will and one of the songs that betty labatt tackles on her new album called things have changed it was the first song i asked her about when we sat down his version has some group singing on it it's sort of like gets into this uptempo rock ballad sort of a song i can't even remember how it sounds i listen to it i'm briefly really we've we listen to mount a lot listen to briefly and then i never revisited well that's interesting because i i would think you know the thing with dylan songs is that that especially for fans of dylan the way that he sings them are so stuck in people's heads so i would think that you'd probably have to get away from that original pretty quickly in order to feel creatively free to put your stamp that wasn't hard for me to do i'd only heard three of these songs before in my life wow what intrigued you about doing dylan songs if you'd only ever heard a few of them before well the ideal was the brainchild of the executive producer kill friedman who is very good friend and a renowned photographer she grew of dylan fan i didn't hear it loud above dylan on black radio and she none of his song that appeal to me other than the ones that you've heard court it over and over blowing in the wind and knocking on heaven's door and i you know just didn't wanna get into that roope but i told her that if she could find someone else to believe in the idea of i would learn the songs and do them they it's mysterious to me oh bob dylan church because they're just they're just songs granted some of them are a little weird but i think after you listen to them and say them over to yourself they tend to make more more sensible they to me anyway and when they did start to make sense to me they were easier for me to sing because understood them emotionally yours surprised me more than any of them because i didn't know that bob was capable of feeling that that open and that wall and he is incapable of singing that because he doesn't want you to know that he feels but i seen happy with us so wow that's so interesting because it does i mean i one of the hallmarks of bob dylan singing is sort of this this cadence and almost like a deadpan delivery and what you bring to the the version of this song i mean it it really it it hits you doesn't express any motion that's why i say that he's not a poet say proce he thinks that are practical matter of fact take it's not poetic at all than that have a lot of times it rhymes wow what an interesting i haven't heard bob dylan's work described in that way and what a wonderful canvas i guess for taking and making pros your own or creating your own story or narrative around them so that you can sing them yeah let's listen to what you did with emotionally yours here we go come fun baby ramon where once become come no shell young.

dylan betty labatt
"bob dylan" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from newman's own foundation working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from newman's own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place more information is available at newman's own foundation dot org there's been no shortage of musicians who've covered bob dylan songs over the years jimi hendrix old crow medicine show emmylou harris tracy chapman list could probably go on for a year a new take on mr dylan's music is from rhythm and blues powerhouse betty leveque at all breaking news people crazy this is betty lebed's first album on a major label in thirty years it's all dylan and it's called things have changed betty lavalle joins me now from the studios of wb geo and newark new jersey is levette welcome to the program thank you and i'm glad to be with you so i should actually begin with full disclosure here i am a bit of a bob dylan obsessive and i'm quite certain that most of these songs that you've chosen won't be familiar at all to people who aren't dylan geeks like me they're not the old icon ick dylan anthems or chestnuts for the most part at least why go in that direction well i didn't choose direction i didn't have any relationship with songs before which is a very good thing because they weren't being changed at all to me they the way that i heard them and as i've been telling people when they say that word cover well kind of insulting to me because that were on them so hard and all you have to do to cover a tunas listen to the record and just repeat it but when you interpret song you have to find your own way into it and find your own meaning and with bob dylan at was quite a chore understand what he met before i could say what i'm at i've seen you described dylan's words as not being pretty you say they're more practical or they're more logical explain what you're saying there well i said that because he's often called the poet oppo it is to be dense to speak in beautiful terms in heats it ends to speak practice.

newman betty lebed bob dylan jimi hendrix tracy chapman betty leveque betty lavalle newark thirty years
"bob dylan" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Is well artists band that i cannot stand that change the channel just as much as if i get tom sawyer on the radio anything for bruce springsteen or bob dylan and it i cannot and the poetry i can't stand the i just i know they're talented it's just not my thing yeah man i know i'm probably going to anger a lot of people and you know what's tough for me i do a lot of social media and i'm i'm beginning to notice that with all the social media platforms more and more artists like kinda aggravated me with the anti political you know i don't know just i don't like the i know free speech i love it and where we are in debt we whatever but sometimes when they post stuff it's just like man i just wanted to listen to you like like music i don't wanna i don't wanna think this this way it's just it's just i don't know something something eric's me about that kademi awards not only do i not want to hear them talk about politics i don't want to even hear them talk at all because i don't know i don't wanna know you the person i don't want to bury the person i only wanna know her characters in reference to actually nikki six of motley crue what is all his anti trump fan but all all you see on his face facebook instagram post trump's a pig and blah blah blah and this is a guy that died what six times from heroin has had songs about strippers and drugs i mean come on man like i i can't i can't the social media is what the celebrities now is a craziness before it was like an artist would make a point on stage and you know it's over and done with and they do do their thing at the time but now it's a social media's and it's just like man i just wanted to listen to you like seeing you live a couple of times and now i'm just like i don't know about this guy anymore so back to travis barker i looked him up while you were talking and wanted to.

tom sawyer bruce springsteen bob dylan eric motley trump heroin nikki six facebook travis barker
"bob dylan" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"His devilish week reviewed of me as long and lag as and as hong an ankle gravel tussle night as young as that zone wide them was it with the day i would have resort mrs must be santa and it must not jimmy star no with you're listening to the voice of the land along and how is it what is who bob dylan no nothing now witnessed wait a minute fill that bob dylan dying in and bob dylan lissette what would you be step no jimmy stirs debbie what you wait when he pitted resolving yet then i ever heard frankly gerard bob known soon other the standard sometimes on the radio you yeah that is not as good but it's issues this is terrific friends of mine so dillon a couple of years ago around thanksgiving said it was an amazing show yeah dan you how old is he nice it'd be seventy summary dowhill has got to be the seventy i thank you sir number two neguev buster devin has report seventy sixty seventy cessi you've got us the necessary parker try smoke weed accepted i'd already done it listed he's dilatot he could do he was the guy that that we didn't i mean allowed it is that right these old i read the cannibus wa eddie let's around but it's what he was influenced by gybe start you could you can't tell me that dili righty all the great song very real i play julie jeremy cobra jabeen in look patti right e del he jimmy stirred polka king were with a big influence on bob dylan is what you learn play jimmy stir from my show this weekend at what am i said the vast them as i gotta jimmy and county lethem kidman i want to go to new york i did that wrong friends so i sit back and he's got his killer banned the band that did all they did all the standards that i did and i said are in any cg is great on stage you really great us ty defy you'd to not be in.

jimmy gerard bob dowhill parker bob dylan thanksgiving new york
"bob dylan" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"bob dylan" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"Oh and we'll be back with more of the best of renegade radio this is renegade radio so while i was in the sound like dillon bob dylan that is so why need we just like bob dylan the great bob dylan s you're doing green really from six to ten am one 15 to him wsb fanalert while law or waded center johny the two take all the way nor excite in the uk and had died mm who i.

bob dylan uk