17 Burst results for "Bloomberg School Of Public Health"

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:29 min | Last week

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Here on Bloomberg Radio. I'm John Tucker. That is your Bloomberg business Flash. John Tucker. Thank you so much. We appreciate that, Matt. I'm not sure if you know, but Johns Hopkins is not just world renowned for its lacrosse. They also have some pretty smart doctors and scientists down there were fortunate That they take the time every week to chat with us and bring us the latest news that we need to know about this pandemic in these vaccines that are rolling out. Lawrence, our associate professor of emergency medicine joins us using the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. We should know that the Bloomberg school Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg. Founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg Philanthropies. And this radio and TV operation Doctor Sour Again. Thanks so much for joining us. We really appreciate your time. I want to talk about Texas. I just don't get it. They drop their mask mandate for five weeks ago. They seem to be kind of going crazy the there at the end of the tunnel, yet their numbers are staying very low. What's going on down there? I took a question. I mean, I think we're always happy to see low numbers. I think a big piece of what's happening. It's likely their ability to stay outdoors on bear. Probably having better weather TOC sort of facilitate that, But I think Texas is definitely a week. Be situation to see what happens. I haven't seen the latest on their vaccine coverage data, but hopefully Um we'll start to see data soon. That shows that maybe the vaccine is what's driving that and the coverage is good. Texans are very strong people all stay, maybe naturally immune that maybe that you know, if you're from the Lone Star State, you just can't get it is easily. I am being sarcastic, of course, but we did see Lauren, a similar A similar situation in Florida, right because they let their guard down big time on day have been for so long, And yet they just aren't seeing the kind of spreads that we're seeing in. Other states that have locked down more. Strictly, um I guess it's still a mystery, isn't it? Why it spreads in some places that locked down and not in other places that are more open? Yeah, I mean, it is it and I think like, like I said, I think it is a little bit of this waiting because I think we're all hoping it's not. But there is the potential that it could be a leg. This could be some of the effects of seasonality that we don't will understand yet. So like with food, for example, We have seasonality in the virus and it it sort of aligns with the weather. And so if the weather is Making changes to this sort of prevalence of the virus, but also of people's ability to be more outside doing activities. Things like that where they're not indoors. It could all be additive. I think there is a concern among a lot of us, but it's not. And we're just what we're seeing is actually a delay. But I think the hope is that it's not a delay and that actually, they're not having another uptick. Lauren. I'd love to get your thoughts about AstraZeneca. And what the good folks at Johns Hopkins. We're thinking about that because it's obviously a lot of controversy about the efficacy of this vaccine and And it's stop and start. But, boy, you just look at what the such positive data coming out of the UK They have so much data there yet there's still a lot of uncertainty about it. What's Where do you folks at Johns Hopkins think about this AstraZeneca vaccine. Yeah, I think the AstraZeneca vaccine I think we all sort of feel that this is just another tool in our tool kit. And, um part of it is about the potential risk of these rare events. But We do know that it is over all safe and quite effective, especially in our older population. So if you still have ah region or a country or a place where there is ongoing community spread, especially in that elderly population. Should absolutely be a tool in your tool kit on not the focus shouldn't be on those rare clock. I think a big piece of this is actually more of a communication problem than a science problem. Where we really need to be consistent in what information we used from. The company's what information The companies provide us on what timetable they provide it and how we communicate about these risks because I think You know, we've been doing a lot of science by press release, and that is not the way sort of. We traditionally think about sharing results. We wait for the pure reviewed results, which gives up that sort of second check, but because everything is happening so quickly. Even though that process is still happening. We start to think about things earlier and see them in the media earlier and that can create an environment where there is a distinction between something that is released by a company Presser versus something that has put into the peer reviewed literature. And so even though the the validity of the science and the pure of you piece is happening at the regulatory level information gets out to the to the media or to the you know, average person before it would in normal circumstances, So we just have to sort of think about how we actually communicate with these companies and with the general public. As we see these results come in, and how we make decisions around them. Lauren When I was a kid, I spent my summers on Fire Island got Lyme disease all the time, and it wasn't that big of a deal. We just took our doxycycline and moved on. Later. Years later, we found out there were some serious long term effects for a lot of People. Are you concerned? We get that same kind of problem with Covad suffers. I think there's a lot of focus on looking at the long term effects of Corbett. I think people are very worried about it because we've seen some concerning Things in the medium term from concerning symptoms in the medium term, and this the not full recovery in some circumstances of symptoms, and so that's always something that we're going to continue to watch. And there's many Places across the globe. They're building Longitudinal Colbert's people that we study over the course of months or years or even decades to really better understand the impact and that will drive. Some of the treatment some of the therapeutic some of the way we manage these patients, even in the short term as we move we've learned more about the long term. But yes, I definitely think it's something that we're all very concerned about watching very carefully. Lauren, thanks very much for joining us, Lauren Sour there. She's an associate professor of emergency medicine that Johns Hopkins University famed for its lacrosse team, but also for the medical school. This is Bloomberg..

John Tucker Lauren Sour Florida Matt Johns Hopkins School of Medici Bloomberg UK Johns Hopkins University Lawrence Bloomberg LP Michael R. Bloomberg Baltimore Bloomberg Philanthropies Lauren Johns Hopkins Texas Bloomberg school Public Health second check Fire Island five weeks ago
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:55 min | Last month

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Scott Death Row, a record 2.9 million Americans got covert 19 shots in their arms on Saturday alone. That is 20% more than the previous daily record, according to White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt on this trend means Maura and more people are asking unimportant question. If I've been fully vaccinated, what activities are safe to do? The CDC is working on guidelines to answer this important question. Meanwhile, an increasing number of Americans expect a return to something like normal within the next six months. But for now, public health officials say it's important to stay the course and remain vigilant. NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us to sort through all of this good morning. Good morning, Scott. So this decline in new cases hit a plateau last week. What does that tell us about the current situation? You know, doctor values suggested. We're kind of in a holding pattern, he pointed out. There are still about 60,000 new cases a day. There are contagious variants. But there's also good news, he said on CBS's face the Nation that more than two million vaccine shots are being given every day about 23% of adults have received their first dose. But he said, now is not the time to return to life is normal. Every day that goes by that we keep the lid on, things will get better and better. Because you have more and more protection not only of individuals but of the community, So we're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer. There's even more research now to show that when people stay masked new cases continue to decline. Doctor felt, he says. This is not forever, but it's the best strategy for now. Yeah, and we should just emphasize that this guidance to stay vigilant applies to everyone equally shot or no shot because there are so many people who are just tired of being away from their families and friends. They're getting pretty anxious now that they've had their shots. Yeah, well, people who are fully vaccinated can feel more comfortable knowing they have immunity to ease up some as you mentioned, the CDC is in the process of finalizing some guidance on what exactly a safe vaccinated people. We are expecting that this week. I've talked to a lot of infectious disease experts about how they're navigating this in their own lives. Dr Josh Sharfstein of Johns Hopkins. Bloomberg School Public Health says. If you're fully vaccinated mean you've gotten both doses of the Mo Dan or Fizer vaccines or the single dose of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine two weeks after this, you should feel some new freedom, he says. Both of his parents are now vaccinated. My parents really, really have wanted to see their young grandkids in person, and they've sort of waved at them outside, But now they're going indoors and they're you know, they gave him a hug. For the first time in a long time, they were still wearing masks, but it really meant a lot to the kids into them. And it gave my parents a sense that You know, we're on the right track here. You know. On the other hand, he says their activities that are still off limits His dad loves going to baseball games. For now, Big crowds are not a good option, And I know Scott. Many people are asking. Why should I get the shot? If I can't go back to normal? I mean, the reason they can't go back to normal yet is that there's still lots of people who have not been vaccinated. And though the a risk appears to be very low, it's possible that vaccinate people could get the virus and spread it. Scientists are still evaluating this. That's why it's going to take some time for things to feel normal ish again. So just like so many other things in this pandemic, it's not about you specifically, it's about the people around you. That's exactly right. Okay, so let's let's talk about something else. There's been so much of a focus on inequities and who is being vaccinated. Why are there lower vaccination rates in some communities of color, especially given the increased supply of shots? And so many policies in place trying to address this very disparity, you know, probably multiple reasons for this. Joshua Sharfstein analyzed the inequities and state of Maryland by looking at vaccination rates and different counties, and he says it's reflective of the national problem. African American residents of Maryland are about half assed likely as white residents to be vaccinated so far, and it certainly reflects a pretty serious inequity, considering that African Americans are actually more likely to get sick and more likely to die from Covina. He says several factors may explain it the chaotic rollout that was very fragmented. Some people just don't have the time to spend hours online, finding an appointment, especially people working multiple jobs. So he says more could be done to support communities where there may be more hesitancy and less access. So let's let's move to yet another big hurdle here. You have pointed out, the CDC says about 23% of adults have been received at least one or more doses. But public health experts say we need 75 to 85% of the entire population vaccinated for herd immunity, and there is still no vaccine authorized for Children. What is the latest thinking on when this could be available for kids? You know, just yesterday, Dr Fauci said. Hopefully, high school kids could be vaccinated in the fall. Fizer is already approved. The Pfizer vaccine is already approved for 16 year Olds and up but for younger Children, vaccine makers still need to assess efficacy. Safety. What doses sufficient. So the data still Needed. It looks like 2022 would be the earliest perhaps next winter. In the meantime, schools have other strategies to keep kids safe, including having fewer kids in the classroom, staggering arrivals and departures and masking We're talking about a lot of positive trends here. But there's still a lot of headlines about more contagious variants, and they're still freaking a lot of people out. How concerned are public health officials about all these variants? You know, there are a lot of arians out there. And the old vaccine makers are looking at how they would retool the vaccines to be effective against multiple emerging strains. At the moment, the one that seems to be most prevalent here in the U. S. Is the strain from the UK Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS's yesterday that the strain accounts for about 40% of infections in Florida, 30% in California, and he says it could crowd out other variants from South Africa from Brazil, but it is more contagious. That's going to probably cause infections to take back up. I don't think we're going to see another surgery infection this spring, but we might see a plateau ng before we see continued declines again. So you know another reason to remain cautious. I mean, even in states that have lifted mask mandate, Scott Many places will still require people wear them. A spokesperson for the retail chain chain Target told me that they will continue to require mass for old guests and employees, including vaccinated people. Per the CDC. Guidance. Allison Aubrey, Thanks so much. Thank you, Scott. Support for NPR health coverage comes from Dana Farber Cancer Institute, where research showed how the immune system can be enabled to attack cancer cells. This lead to treatments for Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma and other cancers..

Joshua Sharfstein Rachel Martin Allison Aubrey South Africa Florida California 75 Andy Slavitt White House 2.9 million Brazil Maura Scott Scott Gottlieb Fauci 19 shots yesterday 2022 NPR 30%
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:44 min | Last month

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Scott Tetro. A record 2.9 million Americans got covert 19 shots in their arms on Saturday alone. That is 20% more than the previous daily record, according to White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt on this trend means Maura and more people are asking unimportant question. If I've been fully vaccinated, what activities are safe to do? The CDC is working on guidelines to answer this important question. Meanwhile, an increasing number of Americans expect a return to something like normal within the next six months. But for now, public health officials say it's important to stay the course and remain vigilant. NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us to sort through all of this good morning. Good morning, Scott. So this decline a new cases hit a plateau last week. What does that tell us about the current situation? You know, Dr Fauci is suggested. We're kind of in a holding pattern, he pointed out. There are still about 60,000 new cases a day. There are contagious variants, but there's also good news, he said on CBS's Face the Nation. More than two million vaccine shots are being given every day about 23% of adults have received their first dose. But he said, now is not the time to return to life is normal. Every day that goes by that we keep the lid on. Things will get better and better because you have more and more protection not only of individuals but of the community, so we're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer. There's even more research now to show that when people stay masked new cases continue to decline. Doctor felt, he says. This is not forever, but it's the best strategy for now. Yeah, and we should just emphasize that this guidance to stay vigilant applies to everyone equally shot or no shot because there are so many people who are just tired of being away from their families and friends. They're getting pretty anxious now that they've had their shots. Yeah, well, people who are fully vaccinated can feel more comfortable knowing they have immunity to ease up some as you mentioned, the CDC is in the process of finalizing some guidance on what exactly a safer vaccinated people. We are expecting that this week. I've talked to a lot of infectious disease experts about how they're navigating this in their own lives. Dr Josh Sharfstein of Johns Hopkins. Bloomberg School Public Health says. If you're fully vaccinated mean you've gotten both doses of the Mo Dan or Fizer vaccines or the single dose of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine two weeks after this, you should feel some new freedom, he says. Both of his parents are not vaccinated. My parents really, really have wanted to see their young grandkids in person, and they've sort of waved at them outside, But now they're going indoors and they're you know, they gave him a hug. For the first time in a long time, they were still wearing masks, but it really meant a lot to the kids into them. And it gave my parents a sense that You know, we're on the right track here. You know. On the other hand, he says their activities that are still off limits His dad loves going to baseball games. For now, Big crowds are not a good option, And I know Scott. Many people are asking. Why should I get the shot if I can't go back to normal? I mean, the reason he can't go back to normal yet is that there's still lots of people who have not been vaccinated. And though the a risk appears to be very low, it's possible that vaccinate people could get the virus and spread it. Scientists are still evaluating this. That's why it's going to take some time for things to feel normal ish again. So just like so many other things in this pandemic, it's not about you specifically, it's about the people around you. That's exactly right. Okay, so let's let's talk about something else. There's been so much of a focus on inequities and who is being vaccinated. Why are there lower vaccination rates in some communities of color, especially given the increased supply of shots? And so many policies in place trying to address this very disparity, you know, probably multiple reasons for this. Joshua Sharfstein analyzed the inequities in state of Maryland by looking at vaccination rates and different counties, and he says it's reflective of the national problem. African American residents of Maryland are about half assed likely as white residents to be vaccinated so far, and it certainly reflects a pretty serious inequity, considering that African Americans are actually more likely to get sick and more likely to die from Covina. He says several factors may explain it. The chaotic rollout that was very fragmented. Some people just don't have the time to spend hours online, finding an appointment, especially people working multiple jobs. So, he says more could be done to support communities where there may be more hesitancy and less access. So let's let's move to yet another big hurdle here. You have pointed out, the CDC says about 23% of adults haven't received at least one or more doses. But public health experts say we need 75 to 85% of the entire population vaccinated for herd immunity, and there is still no vaccine authorized for Children. What is the latest thinking on when this could be available for kids, you know, just yesterday, Dr Fauci said. Hopefully, high school kids could be vaccinated in the fall. Fizer is already approved. The Pfizer vaccine is already approved for 16 year Olds and up, but for younger Children, vaccine makers still need to assess efficacy safety. What dose is sufficient? So the data still needed it looks like 2022 would be the earliest perhaps next winter. In the meantime, schools have other strategies to keep kids safe, including having fewer kids in the classroom, staggering arrivals and departures and masking We're talking about a lot of positive trends here. But there's still a lot of headlines about more contagious variants, and they're still freaking a lot of people out. How concerned are public health officials about all these variants? You know, there are a lot of variants out there. And the old vaccine makers are looking at how they would retool the vaccines to be effective against multiple emerging strains. At the moment, the one that seems to be most prevalent here in the U. S. Is the strain from the UK. Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS's yesterday that the strain accounts for about 40% of infections in Florida, 30% in California, and he says it could crowd out other variants from South Africa from Brazil, but it is more contagious. That's going to probably cause infections to take back up. I don't think we're going to see another surgery. Infection is spring, but we might see a plateau ng before we see continued decline together. So you know, another reason to remain cautious. I mean, even in states that have lifted mask a mandate Scott many places will still require people wear them. A spokesperson for the retail chain chain Target told me that they will continue to require mass for old guests and employees, including vaccinated people. Per the CDC guidance. Allison Aubrey, Thanks so much. Thank you, Scott. Support for NPR health coverage comes from Dana Farber Cancer Institute, where research showed how the.

Joshua Sharfstein Rachel Martin Allison Aubrey Florida 75 South Africa Maura Andy Slavitt White House California Brazil 2.9 million Scott Tetro Scott Maryland yesterday Scott Gottlieb 30% Josh Sharfstein Johns Hopkins
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:40 min | Last month

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You can see the fanny pack or any other of the gifts you'd like to get. I love it, even just for its name. The W N Y C resilience pack. Call us right now. Take advantage of that. Very nice. Thank you Gift and the main reason to call, of course, is to support all of the news and information that you rely on here on W when my C thank you so much for your support. We're asking for your call right now. 28883769692 again. The website W n y c dot work. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Scott Death Row, a record 2.9 million Americans got covert 19 shots in their arms on Saturday alone. That is 20% more than the previous daily record, according to White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt on this trend means Maura and more people are asking unimportant question. If I've been fully vaccinated, what activities are safe to do? CDC is working on guidelines to answer this important question. Meanwhile, an increasing number of Americans expect a return to something like normal within the next six months. But for now, public health officials say it's important to stay the course and remain vigilant. NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us to sort through all of this good morning. Good morning, Scott. So this decline a new cases hit a plateau last week. What does that tell us about the current situation? You know, Dr Fauci is suggested. We're kind of in a holding pattern, he pointed out. There are still about 60,000 new cases a day. There are contagious variants, but there's also good news, he said on CBS's Face the Nation. More than two million vaccine shots are being given every day about 23% of adults have received their first dose. But he said, now is not the time to return to life is normal. Every day that goes by that we keep the lid on. Things will get better and better because you have more and more protection not only of individuals but of the community, so we're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer. There's even more research now to show that when people stay masked new cases continue to decline. Doctor felt, he says. This is not forever, but it's the best strategy for now. Yeah, and we should just emphasize that this guidance to stay vigilant applies to everyone equally shot or no shot because there are so many people who are just tired of being away from their families and friends, and they're getting pretty anxious now that they've had their shots. Yeah, well, people who are fully vaccinated can feel more comfortable knowing they have immunity to ease up some as you mentioned. The CDC is in the process of finalizing some guidance on what exactly a safe vaccinated people. We are expecting that this week. I've talked to a lot of infectious disease experts about how they're navigating this in their own lives. Dr Josh Sharfstein of Johns Hopkins. Bloomberg School Public Health says. If you're fully vaccinated mean you've gotten both doses of the Mo Dan or Fizer vaccines or the single dose of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine two weeks after this, you should feel some new freedom, he says. Both of his parents are not vaccinated. My parents really, really have wanted to see their young grandkids in person, and they've sort of waved at them outside, But now they're going indoors and they're you know, they gave him a hug. For the first time in a long time, they were still wearing masks, but it really meant a lot to the kids into them. And Gave my parents a sense that you know we're on the right track here, you know. On the other hand, he says their activities that are still off limits is to have loved going to baseball games. For now, Big crowds are not a good option, and I know Scott. Many people are asking. Why should I get the shot? If I can't go back to normal?.

Rachel Martin Allison Aubrey Scott Josh Sharfstein Johns Hopkins Andy Slavitt White House Bloomberg School Public Health Maura 2.9 million Fauci CDC 19 shots NPR first dose Face the Nation 28883769692 last week Saturday both doses
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:22 min | Last month

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KCRW

"Be cloudy today with a chance of showers and definitely on the cool side looking for highs primarily in the fifties and sixties. It's 507 on KCRW. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Scott Tetro. A record 2.9 million Americans got covert 19 shots in their arms on Saturday alone. That is 20% more than the previous daily record, according to White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt. And this trend means Maura and more people are asking unimportant question. If I've been fully vaccinated, what activities are safe to do? The CDC is working on guidelines to answer this important question. Meanwhile, an increasing number of Americans expect a return to something like normal within the next six months. But for now, public health officials say it's important to stay the course and remain vigilant. NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us to sort through all of this good morning. Good morning, Scott. So this decline a new cases hit a plateau last week. What does that tell us about the current situation? You know, Dr Fauci is suggested. We're kind of in a holding pattern, he pointed out. There are still about 60,000 new cases a day. There are contagious variants, but there's also good news, he said on CBS's Face the Nation. More than two million vaccine shots are being given every day about 23% adults have received their first dose. But he said, now is not the time to return to life is normal. Every day that goes by that we keep the lid on. Things will get better and better because you have more and more protection not only of individuals but of the community, so we're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer. There's even more research now to show that when people stay masked new cases continue to decline. Doctor felt, he says. This is not forever, but it's the best strategy for now. Yeah, and we should just emphasize that this guidance to stay vigilant applies to everyone equally shot or no shot because there are so many people who are just tired of being away from their families and friends. They're getting pretty anxious now that they've had their shots. Yeah, well, people who are fully vaccinated can feel more comfortable knowing they have immunity to ease up some as you mentioned, the CDC is in the process of finalizing some guidance on what exactly a safer vaccinated people. We are expecting that this week. I've talked to a lot of infectious disease experts about how they're navigating this in their own lives. Dr Josh Sharfstein of Johns Hopkins. Bloomberg School Public Health says. If you're fully vaccinated mean you've gotten both doses of the Mo Dan or Fizer vaccines or the single dose of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine two weeks after this, you should feel some new freedom, he says. Both of his parents are now vaccinated. My parents really, really have wanted to see their young grandkids in person, and they've sort of waved at them outside, But now they're going indoors and they're you know, they gave him a hug. For the first time in a long time, they were still wearing masks, but it really meant a lot to the kids into them. And it gave my parents a sense that You know, we're on the right track here, you know. On the other hand, he says their activities that are still off limits is to have loved going to baseball games. For now, Big crowds are not a good option, and I know Scott. Many people are asking. Why should I get the shot if I can't go back to normal? I mean, the reason they can't go back to normal yet is that there's still lots of people who have not been vaccinated. And though the a risk appears to be very low, it's possible that vaccinate people could get the virus and spread it. Scientists are still evaluating this. That's what it's gonna take some time for things to Feel normal ish again. So just like so many other things in this pandemic, it's not about you specifically, it's about the people around you. That's exactly right. Okay, so let's let's talk about something else. There's been so much of a focus on inequities and who is being vaccinated. Why are there lower vaccination rates in some communities of color, especially given the increased supply of shots and so many policies in place trying to address this very disparity? You know, probably multiple reasons for this. Joshua Sharfstein analyzed the inequities in state of Maryland by looking at vaccination rates in different counties, and, he says it's reflective of the national problem. African American residents of Maryland are about half assed likely as white residents to be vaccinated so far, and it certainly reflects a pretty serious inequity, considering that African Americans are actually more likely to get sick and more likely to die from Covina. He says several factors may explain it the chaotic rollout that was very fragmented. Some people just don't have the time to spend hours online, finding an appointment, especially people working multiple jobs. So he says more could be done to support communities where there may be more hesitancy and less access. So let's let's move to yet another big hurdle here. You have pointed out, the CDC says about 23% of adults have been received at least one or more doses. But public health experts say we need 75 to 85% of the entire population vaccinated for herd immunity, and there is still no vaccine authorized for Children. What is the latest thinking on when this could be available for kids, you know, just yesterday, Dr Fauci said. Hopefully, high school kids could be vaccinated in the fall. Fizer is already approved. The Pfizer vaccine is already approved for 16 year Olds and up, but for younger Children, vaccine makers still need to assess efficacy safety. What dose is sufficient? So the data still needed it looks like 2022 would be the earliest perhaps next winter. In the meantime, schools have other strategies to keep kids safe, including having fewer kids in the classroom, staggering arrivals and departures and masking We're talking about a lot of positive trends here. But there's still a lot of headlines about more contagious variants, and they're still freaking a lot of people out. How concerned are public health officials about all these variants? You know, there are a lot of variants out there, and all the vaccine makers are looking at how they would retool the vaccines to be effective against multiple emerging strains. At the moment, the one that seems to be most prevalent here in the U. S. Is the strain from the UK. Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS's yesterday that the strain accounts for about 40% of infections in Florida, 30% in California, and he says it could crowd out other variants from South Africa from Brazil, but it is more contagious. That's going to probably cause infections to take back up. I don't think we're going to see another surgery. Infection is spring, but we might see a plateau Ng before we see continued declines again. So you know, another reason to remain cautious. I mean, even in states that have lifted mask mandate Scott many places will still require people wear them. A spokesperson for the retail chain chain Target told me that they will continue to require mass for old guests and employees, including vaccinated people. Per the CDC guidance. Allison Aubrey, Thanks so much. Thank you, Scott. Support for NPR health coverage comes from Dana Farber Cancer Institute, where research showed how the immune system can be enabled to attack cancer cells. This lead to treatments for Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma and other cancers. Dana Farber dot org's slash everywhere. President Biden's massive covert relief bill is set to go to the House this week for final approval and then to the president's desk for his.

Rachel Martin Joshua Sharfstein Scott Allison Aubrey South Africa Scott Tetro California Andy Slavitt 75 Brazil Florida Bloomberg School Public Health Josh Sharfstein Maura Maryland 2.9 million White House 2022 Johns Hopkins yesterday
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:56 min | Last month

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Scott Dad throw a record 2.9 million Americans got covert 19 shots in their arms on Saturday alone. That is 20% more than the previous daily record, according to White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt on this trend means Maura and more people are asking unimportant question. If I've been fully vaccinated, what activities are safe to do? The CDC is working on guidelines to answer this important question. Meanwhile, an increasing number of Americans expect a return to something like normal within the next six months. But for now, public health officials say it's important to stay the course and remain vigilant. NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us to sort through all of this good morning. Good morning, Scott. So this decline a new cases hit a plateau last week. What does that tell us about the current situation? You know, Dr Fauci is suggested. We're kind of in a holding pattern, he pointed out. There are still about 60,000 new cases a day. There are contagious variants, but there's also good news, he said on CBS's Face the Nation. More than two million vaccine shots are being given every day about 23% adults have received their first dose. But he said, now is not the time to return to life is normal every day that goes by And we keep the lid on. Things will get better and better because you have more and more protection not only of individuals but of the community, so we're going in the right direction. We just need to hang in there a bit longer. There's even more research now to show that when people stay masked new cases continue to decline. Doctor felt, he says. This is not forever, but it's the best strategy for now. Yeah, and we should just emphasize that this guidance to stay vigilant applies to everyone equally shot or no shot because there are so many people who are just tired of being away from their families and friends. They're getting pretty anxious now that they've had their shots. Yeah, well, people who are fully vaccinated can feel more comfortable knowing they have immunity to ease up some as you mentioned, the CDC is in the process of finalizing some guidance on what exactly a safe vaccinated people. We are expecting that this week. I've talked to a lot of infectious disease experts about how they're navigating this in their own lives. Dr Josh Sharfstein of Johns Hopkins. Bloomberg School Public Health says. If you're fully vaccinated mean you've gotten both doses of the Mo Dan or Fizer vaccines or the single dose of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine two weeks after this, you should feel some new freedom, he says. Both of his parents are now vaccinated. My parents really, really have wanted to see their young grandkids in person, and they've sort of waved at them outside, But now they're going indoors and they're you know, they gave him a hug. For the first time in a long time, they were still wearing masks, but it really meant a lot to the kids into them. And it gave my parents a sense that You know, we're on the right track here, you know. On the other hand, he says their activities that are still off limits is to have loved going to baseball games. For now, Big crowds are not a good option, and I know Scott. Many people are asking. Why should I get the shot if I can't go back to normal? I mean, the reason he can't go back to normal yet is that there's still lots of people who have not been vaccinated. And though the a risk appears to be very low, it's possible that vaccinate people could get the virus and spread it. Scientists are still evaluating this. That's why it's going to take some time for things to Feel normal ish again. So just like so many other things in this pandemic, it's not about you specifically, it's about the people around you. That's exactly right. Okay, so let's let's talk about something else. There's been so much of a focus on inequities and who is being vaccinated. Why are there lower vaccination rates in some communities of color, especially given the increased supply of shots and so many policies in place trying to address this very disparity? You know, probably multiple reasons for this. Joshua Sharfstein analyzed the inequities and state of Maryland by looking at vaccination rates in different counties, and, he says it's reflective of the national problem. African American residents of Maryland are about half assed likely as white residents to be vaccinated so far, and it certainly reflects a pretty serious inequity, considering that African Americans are actually more likely to get sick and more likely to die from Covina. These air several factors may explain it the chaotic rollout that was very fragmented. Some people just don't have the time to spend hours online, finding an appointment, especially people working multiple jobs. So he says more could be done to support communities where there may be more hesitancy and less access. So let's let's move to yet another big hurdle here, you have pointed out, the CDC says about 23% of adults have a received at least one or more doses. By public health experts say. We need 75 to 85% of the entire population vaccinated for herd immunity, and there is still no vaccine authorized for Children. What is the latest thinking on when this could be available for kids, you know, just yesterday, Dr Fauci said. Hopefully, high school kids could be vaccinated in the fall. Fizer is already approved. The fighter vaccine is already approved for 16 year olds and up, but for younger Children, vaccine makers still need to assess efficacy Safety. What dose is sufficient? So the data still needed it looks like 2022 would be the earliest perhaps next winter. In the meantime, schools have other strategies to keep kids safe, including having fewer kids in the classroom, staggering arrivals and departures and masking We're talking about a lot of positive trends here. But there's still a lot of headlines about more contagious variants, and they're still freaking a lot of people out. How concerned are public health officials about all these variants, you know, there are a lot of variants out there, and older vaccine makers are looking at how they would retool the vaccines to be effective against multiple emerging strains. At the moment, the one that seems to be most prevalent here in the U. S. Is the strain from the UK Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS's yesterday that the strain accounts for about 40% of infections in Florida, 30% in California, and he says it could crowd out other variants from South Africa from Brazil, but it is more contagious. That's going to probably cause infections to take back up. I don't think we're going to see another surgery. Infection is spring, but we might see a plateau in before we see continued declines again. So you know another reason to remain cautious. I mean, even in states that have lifted mask a mandate Scott many places will still require people wear them. A spokesperson for the retail chain chain Target told me that they will continue to require mass for old guests and employees. Including vaccinated people. Per the CDC guidance. Allison Aubrey Thanks so much Thank you. Scott. Support for NPR health coverage comes from Dana Farber Cancer Institute, where research showed how the immune system can be enabled to attack cancer cells. This lead to treatments for Hodgkin, lymphoma, melanoma and other cancers. Dana Farber dot awards slash everywhere..

Joshua Sharfstein Rachel Martin Allison Aubrey South Africa Scott Florida 75 Maura California Brazil White House 2.9 million Andy Slavitt Scott Gottlieb yesterday Josh Sharfstein Cancer Institute Johns Hopkins 2022 30%
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:13 min | 5 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on WTOP

"You plan to attend to face a face holiday gathering to be T O P S Michelle Bash has more advice from experts with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health. How does Turkey Dinner on the patio? Sound epidemiologist carry, Althoff says Gathering outdoors will be safer than indoors. If you have to be endorsed, do open the windows turn on fans. Increased ventilation turned on your central A C or heating for that continuous circulation and remind us that they made you need to dress in layers as it might be drafting a mish adults. A senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security says. Think ahead about spacing people 6 FT. Apart at your gathering can families are households that air that are already mixed? Can I stay mostly together? And then you have other people wear face coverings masks face shields when they're interacting with other people. Michelle Bash w T o P News more Than a million people in the DC area. Our travel travel for Thanksgiving last year in their cars and on planes, But it won't be the same during this pandemic. There will likely be historic drops for Thanksgiving this year, with Tripoli expecting at least a 10% decrease in the number of people going somewhere for the holiday on the roads, those who decide to travel all likely to drive shorter distances. And reduce the number of days they are away. And for those flying triple A spokesman John Townsend says Eric Travel at the three major airports in the region will see the largest one you decrease on record. Overall, he says. Triple A expects the lightest Thanksgiving travel season since the Great recession in 2008. Nick I Nelly. W T O P. News. The National Park Service once again going to try and reduce the deer population in DC's Rock Creek Park operations, which will take place at night will begin next week. Running through the end of March, the government began taking action back into 2013 because the white tail deer population was growing and damaging the ecosystem. And for the first time this year, MPs will also take action to reduce populations of deer in places like Pinehurst Parkway, Battery, Campbell Park and Fort Totten Park, which are under rock creaks management. ADM. Fans have probably dance at Echo Stage in Sound Check in D. C. Now a major West Coast promoter, insomniac events has acquired both common be passed and shoulder shoulder and sing along all the things that covert doesn't want you to do, President Mahmoud says. Go Stages World class. It's a 3000 person Hybrid club. You have a huge dance floor, and then we have an upstairs with 40 tables. It's honestly an iconic venue. There's nothing like it in the world. Sound check is its underground little brother. Really cool room. It's underground, most ceilings and the name sound check. It's much soundproof foam foam ceilings, too poor public floors. It's the ultimate intimate experience. Read more on the acquisition of Deputy will be that calm, Jason friendly. It's the open is coming up in money news, a warning from the Fed chair that a covert vaccine will not be an immediate elixir for the economy. 9 24. Are you worried about your underlying health conditions? Did you know that if you have varicose veins, your chances of getting blood clots are five times higher than normal. Varicose and Spider veins are not only painful.

Michelle Bash Eric Travel Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Spider veins Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Rock Creek Park National Park Service Althoff senior scholar Fed John Townsend Campbell Park President Mahmoud Fort Totten Park Nick Tripoli Jason friendly Hybrid club
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:12 min | 7 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To speak with Dr Amos Adalja, infectious disease physician for Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. So, Doctor a Dahlia, widening the conversation a little bit and think about where we are as a country. You know, we're at this moment here in the New York area in New York City, where Alex Steel is where Public school students are our back to school. Now we have seen Children go back to school across the country and certainly more recently here up where we are, and I think probably where you are a cz. Well, what are we learning So far as Children do go back to school. We obviously saw a wave of college students go back and then subsequent cases. What are we taking from? Both the anecdotal evidence and some of the data that you're looking at. You have to separate them. They're not all the same. And we do know universities are special circumstance where they basically are minutes gathering. They're not going to be the same thing as a K through sixth grade. So far, we've seen kind of a standard approach. When you look at the K through six schools that some of them have done better than others and opening schools where the outbreak is uncontrolled is definitely challenging. And what you're seeing also is that schools need to have a plan in place to be able to deal with exposures and classes, explosions in classes as well as being able to Switch from hybrid to two in person very quickly and on a dime if necessary, So all of that's been challenging principles, but I do think that their overall we've not had any major concern from the school have not seen major outbreaks linked to them so far, So I do think that's encouraging. What we're seeing so far, especially now will know with New York City starting in person. Schooling being the biggest school district in the country. Well, and speaking of the word cluster is getting used quite a bit now whether it's in New York City. We've seen some clusters like 20 zip codes. They governor Cuomo highlighted. Also the top World Health Organization, officials said the outbreak at the White House constituted a cluster. What does that mean? What we can we contain clusters. We can came contain clusters, but it becomes more challenging because people will then have multiple contacts and you have multiple people with multiple contacts that becomes very hard for a contact or Eastern case. Investigator to get on top of The fact that it happened at the White House and people know who was at the White House on who they were in contact with so many cameras, and so many resources does make this cluster maybe a little bit easier than one that might happen at a rock concert. But but it is something that's going to be challenging because there are AH lot of variables. We have to figure out who was tested when when their exposure was who was a significant exposure who had been significant exposure? And clearly this cluster is going to be challenging, and I do suspect we will Seymour cases that emanate from that cluster because there's already the president. The first lady Ho picks Some journalists. I've been hearing about testing positive. Senator Lee, the president of Notre Dame, So they're like this likely was, you know, in retrospect, will be called a super spreading event. Right. So, Dr Adalja as we think about where we are, even in the seasons and the time of year, people have been very worried about, you know, sort of colder weather coming. People not being able to be outside as much we know that they're almost inevitably is going to be some sort of resurgence. How soon will we know? And what should we be looking for? To ascertain whether this is a very worrisome surge or whether it is manageable? What did the data and what sort of the inflection points that we should be thinking about? It's hard to know exactly when will no, I think we're already seeing some states having an uptick in cases and the percent positivity and increasing in hospital hospitalization. I do think that we're in that time period now where people are doing left things. Outdoor. So I do think that the next several weeks are going to be key understanding understanding. Does this virus accelerate in the winter? But what I would be looking at is percent positivity and hospitalization. Those numbers of the two most important ones understand where we are, and I suspect it will be heterogeneous across the country. It's not going to be all in one big wave. It will be many hot spots that flare And in the kind of alternating seesaw depending upon what's going on in those areas in the in the Sunday Sun Belt states just we round up the conversation here is we're waiting for President Trump looking at a live shot of the White House there, Marine one, So it looks like President Trump will be coming out of the White House to go on Marine one to Goto Walter Reed will have spent a few days Under care of doctors seems to be precautionary. We still hearing that he has mild symptoms than he's been working through the day. How do you treat a 74 year old man? That's been termed Ah, obese with Cove it How do you treat it? Well, you you do the basic stuff supplement. It's going to be kind of supportive care first, so that's going to the I V fluids. It's going to be Tylenol ibuprofen for the Fever's That's going. He's already gotten a Regeneron experimental. In a body cocktail you made If he needs oxygen, you may use drugs like Dexter met his own or Ramdev severe on him. It's you know, we're treating lots of 74 year olds with this, So there is a lot of Canada care types of things that are going to happen. He did get an experimental antibodies, so that's going to modulate his infection, and we don't quite know exactly how effective that will be, but hopefully it will blunt any of the severe complications. But it's going to be just a standard that we do for many of the patients. I get admitted all the time. All right, were really, really glad we got to catch up with you. Thank you so much. Dr Amos Adult Gia. He is infectious disease physician at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, each others on the on the phone from Pittsburgh and, of course Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health is supported by Mike Bloomberg. He is the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies, and Bloomberg LP, the owner of this radio station. The Johns Hopkins Folks have been Just absolutely critical to us and really the country understanding everything that's going on with this virus, Alex and so the latest headlines as you said, we are..

White House Bloomberg School of Public Hea New York City Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Dr Amos Adalja Alex Steel president Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Philanthropies Dr Amos Adult Gia World Health Organization President Trump governor Cuomo ibuprofen Senator Lee Ho Seymour
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:30 min | 7 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We're going to check in with our team down at Johns Hopkins to get the latest on that context that we need, but also the broader context of where we are in fighting this virus what we're seeing across the country, especially as we head into fall. So eager to do that in just a minute. But before we do that, let's get the latest headlines. There are a lot of them from Charlie. Thank you very much for listeners just joining us President Trump will be spending quote a few days at a military hospital after contracting covert 19 this from the White House as the virus that has killed more than 205,000. Americans spread to the highest reaches of the U. S government. His doctor says the president quote remains fatigue. Trump is to depart the White House by helicopter shortly for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The White House says the visit is precautionary and that he will work from the hospital's presidential suite, which is equipped to allow him to continue his official duties again. Developing story. But the president will be heading to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center stock slump today. Trading was volatiles investors weighed the implications of President Trump's positive test for the Corona virus, along with renewed efforts to forge agreement on fiscal stimulus. Thie SNP Down 32 A drop today off 1% the Dow Down 134 down 5/10 of 1% NASDAQ tumbled 251 down 2.2% It was a winning week for the U. S. Stock Market 10 Year Yield 100.70% Gold DOWN three tents 18 1990 ounce and West Texas Intermediate crude down 4.4% 37 01 a barrel THIE government's latest employment data show Female employment is falling is a percentage of the American labor force. And with that story, here's Bloomberg's Videl Jude Ice Women are dropping out of America's work force is the fastest space since the height of the pandemic. It's especially true of women with young Children now schooling at home and could erase years of economic progress. Their labor force participation rate dropped to 74.2% after nearly hitting a record. Based on government data and eat down Judy Spielberg radio and again, recapping stocks. Laura's MP Down 32 down 1%. I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, the headlines are coming at fast and furious. It has been quite a day. So let's understand what's going on from several different perspectives. And let's start with the virus because it's obviously at the core of everything here. The specific case of the President, United States obviously is catching a lot of the imagination. But it is representative of a global pandemic that we're still very much fighting. We have been so fortunate. To lean on our experts heavily at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, part of the Bloomberg School of Public Health. And, Of course, the Bloomberg school Public Health As you can probably tell by the name it's supported by Mike Bloomberg. Is the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. And Bloomberg LP, the parent of this radio station. Delighted to have back with us Dr Hamish Adult Gia. He is an infectious disease physician. And he told us on the phone from Pittsburgh. Dr. Adultery. Thank you so much for joining us. All right. Take a deep breath here. Tell me your reaction. When you saw the headlines this morning about the president having followed. This is closely as you have understanding so much the nuances here. What did you initially think? It's not surprising to me. The White House has not been impervious to the Corona virus. Even with the testing protocol we've seen the national Security advisor, for example, get infected, So this is something I think was bound to happen. This is a prolific virus that can spread very easily and When people socially interact. When people are traveling around the country. It's really ah matter of time before the virus finds them. So when you have President Trump going to Walter Reed, How do you read that? I do think it is unfortunate turn of events. We know that people when they get hospitalized. That's a signal that there's some severity of illness. We know that he was treated with an experimental monoclonal antibody cocktail that he's had a fever that he's fatigue. And he is in a high risk group or severe disease. So I do think that this is a no. Ah, setback for him. Even though this is said to be a precautionary and being done out of a quote, abundance of caution. It is something that you don't want to see people be hospitalized with Kovac. Now the political side of this, of course Dr Adalja is about, you know the big rallies and all of those things and candidly the inconsistent advice that many would say we've gotten from this administration around some of the basic health precautions around Fighting this virus, whether it is social distancing, or certainly around mask wearing in your estimation. Does this change the conversation? Does this embolden or empower medical professionals like yourself to essentially say, Look, let's let's just all get on the same page here and say, where a mask social distance Wash your hands. I do think that this is a turning point. This is something that now really concretize its For many people that this is a virus that is dangerous. That hospitalizes people is that There are simple measures that you can take to prevent yourself from getting infected. And I think now is really there really is no excuse for not taking this virus seriously and Doing the simple things that will decrease the rate of people being hospitalized and dying from this and No one is immune from this and we need to get get on with it. Conquering this virus so we can move on with our lives. And I think that this this is Going to be a point that people remember that Maybe this is what will galvanize people to actually started to take the correct action over the next few days as we try and understand what to look for. I think I even asked this question earlier. Today is what air the buzzwords we need to hear, like clearly difficulty breathing respiratory problems, obviously, but like the subtle words That we need to pay attention to Definitely shortness of breath. They might hear something about a pulse Oximeter and the pulse Ox. How much if there's a need for supplemental oxygen. Fever. Dehydration. All of those are going to be important buzzwords to look for when you're trying to monitor the president's condition..

president President Trump Bloomberg LP White House Charlie Pellet Walter Reed National Military Bloomberg School of Public Hea Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg school Public Health Bloomberg Johns Hopkins fever Bloomberg Philanthropies Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Pittsburgh Judy Spielberg United States
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:51 min | 7 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Begin with a headline from the Bloomberg Professional Service, France's daily Corona virus cases have jumped to a record 16,096 this after the U. K reported the Most new Corona virus cases since the pandemic started. Stocks were climbing on speculation that talks about a new round of economic stimulus will resume amid growing concern over a resurgence in Corona virus cases around the world. We're off session highs still green on the screen and update here with the S and P off 28. Now at 30 to 65 up 9/10 of 1%, the Dow is up 223 points of 8/10 of 1%. NASDAQ is up. 109 HARD by 1% 10 Years up one 32nd of the Yield of 10.66% gold up 4/10 of 1%, 18 70, Beyonce and West Texas intermediate crewed up 1% $40.30 a barrel Recapping stocks higher SNP, rebounding on a news report that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin plans to restart negotiations on government aid. I'm Charlie Pellet. That's a Bloomberg business Flash Right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, we've been giving you some updates about the virus. Clearly it is of concern to investors. It's of concern to the people who run colleges and companies and all of us just as human beings so Let's check in Get the latest with Dr Shelley Hearne, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Advocacy, part of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Of course, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health its support by Mike Bloomberg. Founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and founder Bloomberg LP, the owner of this radio station, She turns on the phone from Charleston, South Carolina. I love charged Charleston, South Carolina fortune. So I'm going to start there. Dr. Hearn tell us what life is like down there because any time we're talking to somebody outside of our little bubble as it were We want to know what's going on. Well, you know, we all have our bubbles all around the world. But Charleston, you know, you can always count on good food and lovely people. So it's it's It's not a bad bubble. It's not a bad bubble. But let's talk about a nice and family down in South Carolina just outside Charleston. And I know the numbers have been tough in terms of the virus. Well, the number is South Carolina is still struggling as you are tracking around the country who we're seeing different searches different improvements in places and it really kind of boils down to how seriously people are taking public health measures. And unfortunately, just like variations in food from the south to the north. We're also seeing variations in the acceptance of mask wearing the care with social distancing. And so that's what's going to keep this virus alive and well around the country is If we get complacent on and put our guard down if it will return. Well, you know, just a follow. I mean, you are so involved in time in terms of, you know, understanding, health and cities and communities. You know, Jason and I ke that there's you know, one thing you wear a mask. That's one thing we see. Repeat over and over. But there's also that idea of You know, taking care of your community? I mean, this is largely with this virus is about that's why you wear a mask. It is. I mean, you know, we're hoping for vaccines were looking for other kinds of therapeutics. But the really important element is even if those come on board The absolute best thing we could do for our families and for our neighbors, and our entire kind of economic tribe ability is to really practiced these basics in public health. It may not be sexy, but that's actually what's going to make the biggest biggest difference. And if we all did this together Oh, and did it. You know universally, we could probably really dampen this down, Get ready for a tough winter and do much better. I worry so much about our economy that if we if we focus in on just stemming and suppressing this virus by Community measures. It's what's really going to help open up our ability for strong, healthy commerce down the road. So Dr Hearn talked to us about the public health system because you know, Carol and I have talked on this program a lot about this notion that The virus has served to accelerate so many things for good and bad. It is forced us to deal with some things that maybe we didn't want to deal with And now we have to And especially when you parrot with what we've seen in terms of a really reckoning around systemic racism and some of the deep, deep inequalities of the great chasms that we've seen and Having spent a lot of time in South Carolina, having grown up in the south. I know that a lot of that is so apparent there in your state, even in Charleston. What do we need to do at this moment where we do have something of an opportunity to start to close that gap when it comes to public health? Well, it's a it's a brilliant question is the exact one that we need to focus on. So just like, you know, a healthy company needs good roads that needs good education system so that Workforce, eyes ready and prepared for the job. We actually need to have that same kind of capacity in our public health system. These are and the good thing of the pandemic its spring in alive. You need to have at the genealogist. You need to have labs. This is every day. It's not just when of virus is spreading. But we use those tools all the time to keep us healthy and well and actually..

Charleston South Carolina Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Bloomberg Professional Service Mike Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Center for Publi Bloomberg Philanthropies Dr. Hearn Charlie Pellet Beyonce Founder France Dr Shelley Hearne Steven Mnuchin U. K
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:17 min | 8 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A Bloomberg business. Much of the equity market is extending. That record breaking rally happened after Fetcher J. Paul unveiled its new approach to setting US monetary policy. The inclination appears to be to let inflation and the labor market both run hot now that risk of higher inflation is sending bond yields higher. 10 Year Treasury has gained five basis points right now. With a yield of 73 basis points. For the moment, Though the equity market is focused on this idea of low rates, the Dow is up 9/10 of 1% financials getting a boost from Mohr Slope to the U. S yield curve, and we have the SNP financials index up more than 1.9%. Right now, that's allowing the S and P To extend yesterday's all time high by 4/10 of 1%, the NASDAQ composite those struggling It's down about 1/10 of 1%, Oracle and Microsoft, each submitting bids to by the U. S operations of TIC Tac. And today we learned Microsoft's bid includes a partnership with Wal Mart WalMart trying to reach customers and grow its third party marketplace in advertising. Business. WALMART SHARES Right now up about 5% in terms of ICO data, US weekly jobless claims remaining above one million, although pending home sales at the highest level in nearly 15 years in the month of July, I'm dead prisoner. That's your Bloomberg business Flash. All right, duck. Thank you so much. You are listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek. Jason Kelly Carroll, Master here with you on a Thursday afternoon, a lot going on and a lot going on. When it relates to the virus. We have to keep track of this. We just talked about testing. There's so many issues around this that we need to explore. We're happy to have with us Doctor Tangela per now associate director of Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute, joining us on the phone from Baltimore. Of course, part of the Johns Hopkins family is The Bloomberg School Public Health and that is supported by Mike Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. And Bloomberg LP. The parent of this radio station. Dr Purnell Really nice to have you with us and listen, we talk about the virus every day. 19 different ways because we have to. It has invaded all of our lives, whether we've been directly touched by it or whether we've been fortunate enough to not be directly touched by It's affecting all of our worlds and one of the things that we have really come, TTO learn. Is that it does not affect everyone in the same way, And so much of it is determined by the disparities that already exists when it comes to health care, help us understand? The work that you and your team are doing. First I would like to thank both of you for having me here. It is, indeed an honor to be able to talk about. You know some of our work, and so as you correctly alluded to, this is a problem worldwide. But in particular, this is a problem for the exact saying disadvantaged populations that are typically the same population that you see, experiencing help disparities help. Inequities from a variety of different causes. So you know we at the junk. Hoskins ever been healthy, too, then also at the Center for Health Equity. We have a series of different approaches to try and tackle this problem, so obviously we do research that involves vulnerable populations. We do this work in conjunction with Our community in the patient's stakeholder partners who actually have a voice at the table and helping to really help US design, implement and also disseminate our finding. Another approach is really our education and training. Unfortunately, we know that all of these problems these disparities are truly does routed and generational inequities and it won't be all fixed. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear that it will all be fixed in one generation is still another thing that we really focus on is really training the next generation of help equity research chairs or public health practitioners so that we can make sure that this work continues so that the game that we, you know, we also baby keep those gang doctor Bruno. I think we wonder, too. It's interesting. One of the stories we're focusing on, Jason. I were just talking about that, you know, abot coming out and saying they've got you know, a 15 minute test for the virus and getting ready to ramp it up Great, and we've talked about how we need to have systems in place. That help us get control of the virus for everyone, And I do wonder we've had lots of conversations, certainly because of this pandemic about the inequalities in terms of access to health care in good health care. Among the different communities. So what things as you say, you talk with people in these communities. They've got a place at the table What needs to be done, And I do wonder there things coming out of this crisis, whether it's telemedicine or other things that will make a difference. Absolutely. So I think that you know the answers to so first of all in terms of access for testing. You're absolutely right. You know, and saying that we know that there is my equal access and in particular, even as we get these advances in technology, for example, Rafic testing. We also know that the dissemination of this is not equal among different communities, in particular the communities that we're already so I think that one of the things that we need to keep in mind is that as we are trying novel approach is really get this virus under control. We have to think about what one of the structural barriers People who are living, for example, and neighborhoods that don't have easy access to testing. We need to think about things like not necessarily requiring cars. It's about the beginning of this. Many people had to have a car to drive up to get tested. We need to think about things like our people able to get tested as they are asymptomatic are people able to get tested without a physician prescription, so all of these things could really be a barrier to people who are already this advantage by this system. And then you know, in terms of thinking about longer term, what we need to do within the community. I really need to take on love asses and realized that called it might seem, is not some Magical unicorn that just came out of nowhere. And then all of a sudden this proportionately impacted certain groups of people. What it did was really opened our eyes to the fact you know, more mainstream that there are packets of society who have not been properly taken care of by size. We need to be committed to the long term work of adjusting the structural barriers so that the next virus or the next whatever right continues to be the things that keep happening. You know enough is enough with this. Right, Right. Well, a lot has been laid there and we really appreciate the work that you are doing and you know, here's hoping that as it has been laid bare, and we All become more focused on it will be working towards a real solutions. Thank you so much. Dr Tangela per now associate director at Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute, joining us on the phone from Baltimore. Of course, she's also associated with members of the public health, supported by.

Bloomberg LP Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Urban Health Ins US Jason Kelly Carroll Doctor Tangela associate director Baltimore Mike Bloomberg WalMart Microsoft Bloomberg School Public Health Bloomberg Philanthropies Mohr Slope Center for Health Equity Fetcher J. Paul Treasury Johns Hopkins
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:44 min | 9 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Up the most since 1999 hard by 13%. Rival FedEx Up 2.4% Mood Media, which owns the music brand, has filed for bankruptcy. Also filing for bankruptcy today. California Pizza kitchen, it becomes The latest restaurant chain to try to cut debts as it grapples with a pandemic. I'm Charlie, that is a Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Charlie Muzak plus C. P. K. What is going on in the world. Scarlett, too. All right, let's head over to a conversation with our friends at Johns Hopkins. We're talking about Anita Cicero, deputy director at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and effective Remember at the Bloomberg school public Health as you can probably tell by the name Your school public health that is supported by Mike Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies. And Bloomberg LP, the parent of this radio station. Anita Really nice to have you back with us so much going on, and I want to go straight to the issue that I know is completely front of mind. As parents for both Scarlett and me, which is reopening schools. Where are we? What do we do? Thanks, Jason and I'm with you. I also have two high school age Children who would love to be back in school, and I would love to have him back. And so I think that the most important thing we can do to get our kids back in the classroom are really three things one. We need to get community transmission under control. It's hard to send kids back to school when there are still raging out breaks in our local communities on DH, then to one school open, open them very gradually with Tight mitigation measures that we know work like physical distance and mask used. And to get that physical space. We may need to prioritize some kids over others so it would make sense to bring younger kids back before older ones. And then also maybe those Most vulnerable or who need special attention in class and then three invest in research that we need to understand more about kids role in transmission of Corona virus. So we know in the future. How? How careful or how tight those mitigation measures need to be to keep everyone safe? Yeah, well that investment can't be at the expense of schools because they already have enough expenses to deal with me enough headaches. Jason and I are both in the suburbs of New York. And a lot of the public schools need to submit their proposals to the state Department of Education at the end of this month, So I've been hearing a lot of different proposals from schools on how they're going to make this work. One thing that strikes me though, and I'm always puzzled by this. It seems like we're reinventing the wheel. Other countries have done this. Canada reopened its schools in May. Taiwan never closed schools. Granted Taiwan situation never got to the point like China or the United States, but other countries have done it. There are best practices that we can employ. Why're we kind of fumbling in the dark here when there are examples to draw from? There are a lot of good examples. But for the the country that open schools successfully, they had much lower prevalence of disease rates. Then we now D'oh are outbreak is there you know cases are increasing in most of the states. Hospitalization rates for Cove. It are now matching your feeding numbers scene in New York and March and April from in many states. Hospitalizations were getting under pressure. So it's very difficulty to think about opening schools in areas where the epidemic is spiraling out of control for those that are able to reduce The prevalence of disease and communities. I think we can use a lot of the measures that have worked successfully in other countries, and they will work for us, too. So that's what we should be focusing on And tell us about some of those. I mean, what are some of those measures mean? You've talked a little bit about the social distancing and other things are there things that maybe aren't as well known that you've seen because you've looked into this much more in depth, and most of us have I think many of them people have heard of now certainly succeeded. Physical distance is important. Also requiring masks indoors can significantly decrease the chances of infection. Increasing the number of students per class. And as CDC put out its recent guidance, they emphasize the issue of co boarding, You know, get kids and smaller Groups and keep that same cohort together throughout the day. Now, that's a lot easier to do in elementary school than it is in middle and especially high school when kids have different kinds of classes and move around, But also ventilation is an important factor. I know schools are looking at ways to upgrade the ventilation systems, which really gets back to Scarlett's point about how costly It is for schools to be able to put all these measures in place and then other schools in other countries have put up you know plastic barriers either between students or or in front of the teacher to give them additional safety. There's a lot of discussion about you know, Denmark and other places that held classes outdoors as much as possible. That is a great idea. We should be creative and thinking about other spaces to bring Children. But it's not going to be possible for for all schools in all places in all states as we, you know, start in the hot summer and Continue through the cold winter, especially given how much it rains here, Jason I mean, you can set up all the tents you want, but when the rain starts coming in sideways, that's not gonna work Very well. Yeah, it gets cold here in the Northeast. I say that as someone who grew up down south. It's cold. It's cold here in December, January and February, all right, we're going to continue our conversation with Anita sister in just a few minutes. On the other side of some news. She's the deputy director. Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and effectively member at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Joining us on the phone from our nation's capital. And you know, Scarlett, you I have to say you've been a great resource for me and sort of understand. We've been comparing notes a lot because we live Not too far from each other here in the New York suburbs, But it's also strange to think about You know, sort of different parts even of our state will probably approach this differently, right? You have to because the infection rate varies from upstate to downstate to the city. Right now, we're feeling pretty good because the transmission rate is fairly low. But again, all that can change with one bad egg or when unfortunate incident and the cold weather. Yeah, And you think about right? And.

Scarlett Bloomberg LP Jason New York Anita Cicero Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Bloomberg School of Public Hea Bloomberg school public Health Charlie Muzak deputy director Johns Hopkins Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg Philanthropies Mood Media California Taiwan Canada CDC Department of Education
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:11 min | 10 months ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And its own heavy debt load, watching Alcoa this morning, up 6% in early trading, it reported preliminary second quarter results that beat expectations. That's a Bloomberg business Flash common call Karen Thanks so much it has changed. If you look at any given newspaper in this country there used to be 234 articles. On the pandemic. Obviously a statistical review as well. And now it seems all encompassing. 10 12 14 articles of day is this pandemic touches this nation. We've been very fortunate to speak to the professionals of Johns Hopkins University medical system. Bloomberg School public health. We should point out that Mr Bloomberg, uh, is the owner of Bloomberg LP and these television and radio facilities as well. And he has endowed Johns Hopkins and their many different institutions, including their engineering department. I should point out Today we speak with Lauren sour of the Johns Hopkins University. Think the problem is is that there's a difference between no evidence and evidence that there's not airborne transmission and what we are seeing is that we don't have enough evidence to conclusively say every airborne transmission is a major driver. We know that aerosols. Have some element of driving cases, especially in the health care setting. And what that letter I think was trying to say is that the's aerosols maybe a bigger driver than what we originally understood. And so the while we're not seeing widespread, an airborne transmission, like in some other viruses, there is a possibility that aerosol is driving more cases than we currently understand. Lauren. If the virus lingers in the air indoors, it changes everything from school re openings to bars and restaurants. Indoors. Re opening. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think the police where we worry the most about these aerosols is in a crowded indoor setting with bad ventilation. It's why people are are saying that they prefer you to be outside if you're going to congregate. That you want more outdoor space. You want better ventilation. You want better air flow. You want to be further apart on DH. The movement of the air really helps with getting those aerosols out. You know, Lorne? Not that I would ever think you would darken the door of Mary Jane's in Boston University. I'm sure you didn't do that. Your freshman year up BU, but the kids have to go back to school. Give us some wisdom here of the intractable nature of this from kindergarten up to freshman year at Boston University. How do we get the kids back to school? Yeah, So just yesterday. I think secretaries are said that we, since we don't see as many cases of spread in health care settings, we can apply those practices to school and get kids back. And I think it's just not that easy. I think we need a much more local Approach to how we reopen schools. One of the cases look like what is the spread look like a local community. And do we continue to apply these out of school measures? Tio continue to educate people Do we keep doing online or in places? Where where there is not much spread and we have cases control them. We can use things like contact tracing. Can we put kids and adults back in the classroom, so I think it requires a really local approach. A bit more in this takes resource is that you know, this is an ancient United States Thing for a global audience. The issue of state's rights versus federal rights on education is 1/3 rail across the United States history. Well over 200 years. How does Johns Hopkins believe? That we should fund the needed funds. Now that will be utilizing all of eight weeks. Education funds have to be an absolute priority, and I think penalizing places because they reopen The school's in a different way or because they can't physically reopen the doors of their schools. Isn't it's a crime and we have to prioritize, especially the Children who who, really, They have to be back in the classroom, and we have to look for ways in which we can do that safely. So everyone wants kids to be back. Everybody wants kids. In an educational setting, but it has to be done safely. It cannot be done safely will be right back where we started. What should older teachers do? We've got a number of tragedies in New York, where we've lost faculty members at schools. Public and private schools as well. They're of a certain vintage. There are high. Do they just not show up to teach this year? Yeah, I mean, I think that that older teachers, teachers at higher risk teacher with teachers of multiple co morbidity Zehr, other vulnerable teachers have to have an assessment done with their physician with their personal position they have to take into the count. Account their personal risk and their familial risk, and then they have to make a decision about what safe for them and again they should not be penalized because they cannot safely reenter a setting where we don't really understand what the risks are yet. So because we don't fully understand the picture of Corbett and kids. We can't say to a teacher who's older or higher risk. You're safe. You're fine. Go back to school. We have to find other ways that that those people can support the educational system, even if it means making curriculum online making resource is for other teachers who can be back in the classroom. Their way is to continue to engage teachers who cannot safely back in the classroom. Lauren, When will we understand Better? You know how this is transmitted through three Children in the UK many schools if not, almost all schools reopened for certain classes. And there was a belief that actually it's just much more difficult for a child, smaller child to transmit it to another small child. I mean, when are we sure that that's the case? If it is I think we'll see that this year as schools do reopen. We have to be very careful to to understand what's happening in kids. So that means testing kids. Even when there is symptomatic it means I'm taking kids to doctor's appointments means paying careful attention to mild symptoms and kids and getting kids their flu shots in particular and other vaccines on schedule in particular, so that we understand this is cool bit versus something else on getting kids tested when they show even the mildest cases of symptoms. That's how will really understand what's happening and what those transmission dynamics look like. Lawrence, our that Johns Hopkins University with us this morning, Paul Sweetie, I'm looking at a market that's lifted. It was very red Red red early in the New York morning, and we're now features a pate. Dow futures of 41 NASDAQ 100. Paul. What is it a new mandate? It can't go down exactly that the basic idea of 4/10 of a percent. It's I think that's the Federal Reserve backstop. That's out there that I think gives Investors on the margin, you know, on ability to bid for stocks a bit for risk. Yes, that's when maybe thie economic data suggest a bit more caution. Heels move a little bit higher we curve flattening earlier. That's reverse is now a risk on field. No question about that Tuesday in spread That measurement of the deal between the 10 year and the two year the difference in yield, I should say between the 10 year to year, uh, 49 basis points. It was different.

Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins Bloomberg LP Lauren sour Bloomberg School Mr Bloomberg New York United States Alcoa Boston University Paul Sweetie Federal Reserve Mary Jane Karen Lorne UK Zehr Corbett
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"And we really? It's not a lot of money. And you can change your life in a really significant and positive way and a m dot com slash and dot COM NEUM DOT COM Slash Shapiro. Go check them out right now. Okay so what are the best case scenario worst-case scenarios here so Nicholas Kristof. Believe it or not has a pretty Good York Times talking about this. Best case scenario is the possibility that the virus mutates and actually dies out. Dr Larry Brilliant. I hope happily name an epidemiologist. Who's young doctor was part of the facial radical smallpox explained that only movies do viruses seem to become worse over time? Sars and mirrors both petered out possible here cove in nineteen will not survive as my hopes had Dr John. Charles a professor at Stanford Medical School China is reporting not a single new case of domestic transmission. Now they're serious doubts about whether China is lying or not if ever in doubt China Islam Channel Ads the. Who and who believe them? This is why when you hear prescriptions from. Who or their takes on life the WHO. You should really take that with a major grain of salt with that sad. According to Nicholas Kristof Singapore would be the best case scenario where everything is shut down for a while and then go back to a more open society. Tom Ingles be expert in pandemics at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Health said the fact that Singapore Hong Kong Taiwan South Korea and China and some extent. Japan flattened curves despite having the initial onslaught of cases. Should give us some hope. We can sort out what they're doing well and emulate at Washington state seems to have been stabilizing. The weather may also help us because some respiratory viruses decline in summer from a combination of higher temperatures and people not being huddled together so it's possible that Northern Hemisphere nations enjoy a summer break before a second wave in the fall. Okay that is the second wave is what I'm worried about and I think most epidemiologist are worried about is what happens when you release people from confinement even if this thing goes away during the summer if it comes back with a vengeance during the fall it can be super damaging the Spanish influenza. Which by the way you know how ridiculous it is that our political world someone wikipedia and just changed it to the nineteen eighteen flu because they wanted to forestall trump's argument that you can say Spanish flu so you can say Chinese virus anyway. The goal would be that maybe this thing dies out loses sort of it's it's fire and it's flare also the death rates. I've been saying this for weeks and I've been criticized for the death rates that were being. Put out there by the whol. We're just not real in South Korea and in China outside who province about eight point eight percent of those known to be infected died. That rate was point six percents on a cruise ship. I talked about all this weeks ago. That's not to suggest the viruses and dangerous. It's very dangerous. It's significantly more dangerous than the flu. It is to suggest that people were suggesting that four percent the people get it are GonNa die. That was not true about four out of five people known to have had the virus had only mild symptoms even among those older than ninety in Italy. Seventy eight percents survived. Two thirds of those who died in Italy had pre existing medical conditions and were elderly ninety nine percents had pre existing condition. Dr Harrismith epidemiologist states. That I'm not pessimistic. I think this can work. She said it will take eight weeks of social distancing to have a chance to slow. The virus successful depend on people changing behaviors and on Hospitals. Not being overrun. And that's what I've been saying about increasing that medical capacity. Now there is the worst case scenario. Dr Neil Ferguson a British epidemiologist. He said he produced a sophisticated model. That showed a worst case of two point. Two million deaths in the United States is best case scenario according to Nicholas Kristof one point one million deaths which is obviously frightening as all hell the the hope that the US can emulate import south. Korea could be a leap because South Korea took the really seriously they have tremendously effective testing. It's very widespread. We are still as I've mentioned way behind in testing so far behind the end up with situations like Peggy Noonan so peggy Noonan from the Wall Street Journal was sick with two weeks one hundred one fever coughs and chills and she had to lie in order to get Kobe test. Because right now the the CDC still has restrictions that suggest you can only get a cova test even if you are in the most risky age demographic and you have all the symptoms. You can only get a cova test if number one. You have been traveling to China or number two. You know somebody who has been diagnosed with corona virus. Which of course is ridiculous. We've now had community transmission in the United States for weeks on end which demonstrates the dramatic lack of testing. And that is the fault is we will talk about of the CDC and at the highest level of the trump administration because in the end. The buck does stop with the president and doesn't mean presidents and doing the right things now to fix it. He is but it does mean that those two months the CDC was blowing it heads need to roll over there in Nicholas Kristof says that there is an interactive model of the virus. That suggests that up to three hundred sixty six thousand. Icu beds might be needed in the US. For CORONA CORONA VIRUS PATIENTS. At one time which is more than ten times the number available as a Harvard? Study that has said the same. How quickly can we roll those things out? That is the big question. We've heard no no estimate as to how all of that is going to be rolled out and that does raise the question of. How long are we going to have to do this? How long exactly is this going to last and as I say. Even this is a suggestion that there won't be a massive second wave that takes out enormous number of people. The the fact is that in China which is now claiming they've tamp this thing down there serious questions about whether they're lying about damping down in the first place in California. The governor has announced that we are in a state of lockdown Gavin. Newsom on Thursday ordered forty million residents to stay home except for essential trips extending similar restrictions. State wide area counties previously enacted. One of the serious questions about this particularly is number one whether it's effective number two whether it is designed to achieve the goals that they say it's designed to achieve meaning. How can you lock people down this long? And the answer is it's going to be very very difficult to walk. People down. This long stricter the lockdown the less time it can last. It's one thing to tell people as I said yesterday about diets. It's one thing to tell people for the foreseeable future no cookies. It's another thing to tell people for the foreseeable future no food. That's just not something. That people are going to be able to outlast for very long time. Here's Gavin newsom. Are Kendall of a governor announcing that it's time to shelter in place in the California number of days ago there were six bay area counties that lead with stay at home orders Now as I speak some twenty one point three million California's reside in a community in a city and or county that have similar orders estate as large as ours. Nation state is many parts but at the end of the day where one body. There's a mutuality and there's a recognition of our interdependence that requires of this moment that we direct a statewide order for people to stay at home. That directive goes into force in effect this evening and we were confident. We are confident that the people the State of California will abide by it. Okay so we'll see how long people buy because you cannot tell. People interminably stay in their homes again especially as the economy dies and these jobs. Do not come back. It's very easy for the governments. Say we're going to freeze everything in place. None of these jobs will die that. It's just not true. These are major systemic place. It changes taking place throughout our economy and they have significant significant ramifications. Newsom said this is not a permanent state. It's a moment in time. Okay well then we need to know how long the moment's GonNa last or what your estimate of the moment is going to be. I was talking to panic friends last night. Who have businesses in state of California and now those businesses simply will not run because nobody can go into the office and this order by the way from new some supposed until April nineteenth. Okay a full month. How long do you think this is actually going to last now? The as it were now in the star wars scenario Princess Leia says the the more you tighten your grip later. The more star systems Tarkhan the more star systems will slip through your fingers right. This is where we are the more. The government tightens its grips. Its the more there's going to be pushed back against all of that particularly as these losses mount. We work hearing that. We may lose this week over two million jobs in the American economy we are hearing estimates at the economy contract up to twenty percent in q two one fifth of the American economy poof disappears at the behest of the American government. So as they say you WanNa make the case that we ought to do that. I need to hear a very strong case. As to how this is going to prevent deaths it is not enough to say that. We're doing it to prevent. That's I want to see the plan for preventing the deaths. I WanNa know how many beds you're creating how many ventilators are creating. I want to know how you plan to stop the slow of this virus when we all go back outside after a month and when half of us don't have jobs and by the way all of the Republican relief efforts Democratic Relief. Efforts are not going to fix this problem. They're not the best you can do. At this. Point is provide floating loans to the banks to not call in their bridge loans to businesses back the commercial paper window for example but at a certain point people are not going to buy. American bonds and number two. What makes everybody thinks is going to be a v-shaped recovery the longer. These businesses are out the lesser chance. There is that businesses ever go back in if you spent your life savings to purchase a rib joint and they've been running that rib joint for ten years and the government is shut down and shut down every restaurant across the country actively do you think that's coming back anytime soon. And then one thousand dollar. A month check is going to surprise. It is not and by the way economics Israel life when people say well you're choosing the economy over real. No economics is real life. It is people's jobs it is people's livelihoods. It is how people live. It is the suicide -ality rate it is. The is the sense of community. This is not to argue that we should be weighing. The economy against human. Life is arguing that we should always take the tack that is most likely to preserve human life and that would also include. Human Quality of life isn't an argument. We should let everybody out right now. I've not made that argument anywhere in here instead the argument. I'm making his if you're going to if you're going to do the most restrictive thing any American government has ever done in the history of the United States to the American people right. We're not in wartime here. There's a virus if you're going to do this. Unbelievably restrictive thing. You better damn well have a plan for how we come out of this and that it saved lives because if you just destroyed twenty percent of the American economy and sent the unemployment rate up to fifteen or twenty percent and save zero lives in the process. Then I don't or here's a net loss of life because it turns out that poor people are more likely to.

China California Nicholas Kristof United States Gavin newsom government South Korea CDC American government Dr Larry Brilliant Dr John Nicholas Kristof Singapore Stanford Medical School China Peggy Noonan Italy Good York Times Korea Japan Charles
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Welcome back to the Jewish showed your health. Your greatest wealth. What he's struggling with. Let's talk about it. Go to the website. All kinds of information there. Now, we're gonna go to Brenda. Hi, Brenda years old hinder out menopause problems. Like a starting. And. Shoulders. I'm pretty healthy. Otherwise with wondering supplementary anything I need to be doing health wise for that. Appreciate it. The the issue with menopause and a lot of the symptoms that go along with that. There's some great great supplements out there that can be helpful. And of course, black cohash blue cohost. But I really like to focus more on the eating patterns because when you look at hormones, you've gotta look at what stabilizes hormones in the body overall. The majority of it is fat in the good healthy fats in the night are so critical to optimal health all the way around. But specifically with hormones getting enough fat in your diet, which many of us don't we get the wrong kind of fads like saturated fats, but the good monounsaturated omega threes sixes and nine are the ones that we really want to focus on. Getting the right kind of fats in on a regular basis is the ultimate key. That's what you wanna focus on on a regular basis is getting that in and I would encourage you because so many times when you're when you're focused on when you're focused on the different eating patterns, if you if you don't get those lined up, well, if you don't get your meals say four or five small meals a day with good quality fats, and then then your hormones, really, especially if you have high and low blood sugars can really begin to be affected comes a big nightmare becomes very that's when women really start to struggle. Sue before you jump in and go to the creams, and the dentals and all that have someone work with you to really balance out your nutrition plan and program. Even when you think you're doing will, which I've talked to so many so many ladies that have eat grain. And I've got this whole plan together. And they've got like ten percent fat in their diet, right because they're so worried about gaining weight. And actually, the fat helps you burn body fat shrinks up the belly. The more fat you eat the, leaner, you can get another. It's a big oxymoron, but it's true. And in today in today's world of how we look at things. It's it's extremely important to make sure that you're getting the kind of nutrients that you need is not just about supplements. Well, when a recruit them to come in fix everything. Not really the way it works. So I would look at that. And they don't forget don't forget the cannot exercise. That's a big one in exercise is such a key, especially when you're dealing with hormones. I mean, we know for a fact that hormones are much better regulated when we get exercise on a regular basis. And again that's about three to five days. A week is what I encourage people to do five if you can go twenty minutes a day five is weak net. Would be fantastic even walking that can make a big difference can really support your overall hill taking you to the next level. So again couple of tips to help you along the way, but don't don't just run out and think you have to start taking hormones to feel better have better energy cut down hot flashes. All that kind of thing. Because many times it could be something so simple that could be corrected in. You wanna look at that? First before you jump into any of these other realms. Okay. Triple eight two eight three seven two seven to give me call now or go to the web. Just remember whatever you struggling with the body is amazing. So even if you're taking five medications in you need to lose thirty pounds. You don't feel good got brain fog. Can't think straight. Throw in the towel many people that wanted to throw in the town. You don't have to do that. You really can go to the next level. It's all about your mindset. Do you wanna get? Well, that's the question. Do you want? It. Are you willing to do whatever it takes? No matter. How hard it might be. Do you want it? Being well living will. Attitude. It's a choice. It's something that we decide that we want and being well since of whole wholeness and wellbeing is something. That's so powerful in. It comes under choices that we make every day. So it doesn't matter if you've made bad choices in the past. That doesn't matter today is a brand new day you can make new choices today and have better health tomorrow. But it comes down to you. It comes down to the choices that you make the key. Of course have been a hot topic in. Of course, the diet sodas in the sweeteners and everything too big topic. In a lot of people wanna know. Well, if I if I drink a diet soda, Emma saving the calories and not getting all the sugar. So that's going to keep me from getting overweight, or it's going to help me lose weight. Right. Not so much. They've actually have some studies that have come out recently in the American journal of public health and with within John Hopkins University, the Bloomberg school public health. They studied. Diet soda drinkers. And the reason is they were claiming they were seeing if when you drink diet sodas if it actually goes in and still does trigger the receptors in the brain to tell the brain to release the blood sugar in the insulin. And in that it does the same thing as the actual high corn syrup for the sugary drinks. And they found that it really did. So whether you drink something sweet or you don't what happened is because the dice the diet drinks have the artifice sweeteners have no calories in then it triggers, the brain to think that it's getting more calories. So what happens is actually making making you eat more food. And as you begin to eat more food. That's where the challenges because you gain more weight. So they're saying it's almost better to if you're going to drink a soda drink the regular ones because you're actually get the calories out of of course, there's some debates on the health of the natural sweeteners to certain ones in what they can do the overall health example sucralose has got chlorine in the sugar molecule that they use. There's some thoughts behind that. So just be cautious in making your decisions. I personally like stevia like the fruit. That's out in xylitol. Those are all very good sweeteners that that.

menopause American journal of public hea Brenda Sue Emma John Hopkins University Bloomberg school twenty minutes thirty pounds ten percent five days
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Welcome. The not so standard deviations episode sixty nine and I'm Roger paying from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school public health. I'm here with Hillary Parker of stitch fix. All right started. Yeah. Let's do it. I have some a little bit of follow up. Just from the last episode perfect. First of all, I did get to do jury duty. You did all that. I did not. Yeah. Because you know, so the last couple of times I got called to do it. He's just call it the night before and see if your number is going to actually get him be needed to last like two or three times that I've done I've done that. Like, they've always called my number. So I've just gotten it. So this time, I I didn't even remember that you had to do that. I was just going to go ahead Szekely allow. My wife's like well. You should call like the night before like, oh, yes, I checked and they didn't call my number. So maybe the whole time you've been showing up and they didn't call your number. No. I did check the other times. I just forgot. Yeah. Well, yeah. I usually still even though I totally agree with you, especially now after that conversation. I I mean, I've always had the attitude of like, I'm a, you know, I'm obviously genius. And I'm like a careful decision maker. So like, it's my civic duty to show. I guess the good of the nation people need, you exactly. I still would be like quite relieved when my number was not called. But I don't know. I think I am now kind of interested again as more of an observer for the process, and like how decision making happens, and you know, practice my leadership skills cetera..

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school Roger Hillary Parker
"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"bloomberg school public health" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Welcome the not so standard deviations episode fifty eight and i'm roger paying from the johns hopkins bloomberg school public health and i'm here with hillary parker at stitch fix we are a fortnightly data science podcasts we talked about a variety of things that are of interest data scientists if you want to reach us with any feedback or comments about our episodes you can always contact us at an ssd asians at gmailcom or you can find us on twitter at nsf deviations before we start today i just want to mention that we have a patriot page where you can support us in making the podcast you can find it at patriot dot com slash nss deviations and you can support us at the one dollar two dollars or three dollars per episode level at each level you get a little kind of bonus that you can check out on the web page and so feel free to go over there if you'd like an support us making this podcast all right so the bit of follow up comes from tesla are where we talked last time we talked about self driving cars and like what and who who's to blame he's simply literally after we finished recording i saw this article in the wall street journal so there was a tesla crash and the driver died and the ntsb israel is investigated and it turns out the family of the driver is suing tesla because they believed that the autopilot system.

hillary parker twitter wall street journal ntsb israel tesla roger johns hopkins bloomberg school three dollars two dollars one dollar