35 Burst results for "Blood Pressure"

‘How are my kidneys?’: How to be proactive about kidney health

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

‘How are my kidneys?’: How to be proactive about kidney health

"Or undoubtedly heroes, But for those who do there's a lingering fear about the health of their one remaining kidney when you see your health care provider If they don't do it automatically be proactive and say doctor or her my kidneys. Dr. Griffin Rogers of the National Institutes of Health says people with increased risk should be asking that question if they have, say diabetes, high blood pressure, family history or heart disease. Simple tests can reveal whether there's damage depending upon how extensive it is their measures. That can be instituted that can either reverse or certainly slow the course of that future kidney damage. Christi King wt O Penis Coming up in money

Dr. Griffin Rogers National Institutes Of Health High Blood Pressure Diabetes Heart Disease
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | Last month

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
When It's Okay To Be Emotional In Front of Our Kids

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

03:43 min | Last month

When It's Okay To Be Emotional In Front of Our Kids

"I think that where we will come to in this is probably like most things. There's some balance right that we understand to certain degree that there is harmfulness in kind of using our kids as like coat racks for our baggage right like dumping all of our problems on them. I don't know how we're gonna make it like. They want to see strange from us. And they want to see that we're okay and that's important for them emotionally but at the same time like doing the crazy tap. Dance of like mummies never side mommy's always the clown at the party and then mommy goes in cars in the shower. That can't be right. Either right yeah no. It's not and there's a bunch of reasons. Why should we get to that to start talking about why that is. Let's dive in me. So there is an expert named john. Lambeau he researches emotional awareness and kids and so he talks about the different sort of ways. You can approach this and you know the strengths and limitations of each approach so the first one is what he calls suppressed emotion. Like what you were saying about like everything's fine. Mommy's never said never showing emotion in front of the kids. You know julie's grandmother who never cried in front of the kids when her husband died when her oldest was eleven. You know the like the complete toy soldier. There's a reason why that doesn't always work very well when you hide outward signs of emotion. You're the work that you do to suppress. The emotion causes your blood pressure to go up. And that stress is outwardly manifested. You're suppressing the emotion is also coming across to your kid and as you like to say kids make everything about themselves. So if the kid doesn't see you crying about something but sees you battling with yourself not to cry about something while you're you know slinging the chicken nuggets for dinner. They're going to see that. And without an explanation around it will maybe create one that centers on themselves and something that they have done wrong right. So that's why you can't suppress entirely and you also i think there's another aspect of this. You can't suppress because kids know the try and that's hard too because if your kid sees you lie they're gonna know you're lying basically you know and i went through this. My mom passed away. Three and a half years ago now and it is really hard because i was really sad and i honestly it wasn't that i wanted my kids not to be sad. It was that. I didn't want one more thing on my plate and i really didn't want to have to deal with my mom's you know end of life anxiety that i was there and talking her through with my incredible sadness that she was dying. And then like looping my kids in so that they could also put more stuff on my plate. That seemed very overwhelming to me. But i remember at the time my oldest was probably Let's say nine. And i walked upstairs one day after coming home and he said how's grandma and i said you know she's not doing very well and he said issue going to die and i just had a moment of like. Yeah i guess she is. You know and but i do remember like. I don't think i would have offered that. He asked the question. I wasn't gonna lie about it. But i really understand why people don't wanna loop their kids into it and it's not just that like they were taught to keep a stiff religion. That's wrong it's because like it adds germinal burden that your kids are burdened

Lambeau Julie Nuggets John
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | Last month

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | Last month

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
What’s considered ‘high’ blood pressure may be different for women and men, new research reveals

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | Last month

What’s considered ‘high’ blood pressure may be different for women and men, new research reveals

"High blood pressure? Well, there's new research out that suggests the answer to that depends on your gender. A lot of what we do in medicine is based on large studies that may not have traditionally included. Women Cardiologists Rachel Burger with Virginia Heart and women, as opposed to men may have different goals. Blood pressure, for example, lower than 1 20 over a V is considered normal, but new Findings based on 30. Years of data evaluated by the Smith Heart Institute at Cedars Sinai finds women who have blood pressures of even 110 over 80 may be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Later on, consult with your Doctor Christi King. W T o P News.

Rachel Burger Smith Heart Institute Cedars Sinai Virginia Cardiovascular Disease Christi King
What’s considered ‘high’ blood pressure may be different for women and men, new research reveals

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | Last month

What’s considered ‘high’ blood pressure may be different for women and men, new research reveals

"You may be used to hearing that a so called normal blood pressure is lower than 1 20/80. But a new study looking at 30 years of data show Those that may not be the case for women really have to look at men and women differently. Dr. Rachel Burger is a cardiologists, with Virginia Heart talking about findings from the Smith Heart Institute at Cedars Sinai while men had a correlation. Between high blood pressure and heart disease at a higher number, like 1, 20 or 1, 40 women had increased risk of heart disease, even with the blood pressure is low is 100 or 110. Berger says. Women What you need to do is know your numbers, knowing what your blood pressure is. And speaking to your physician and finding out if that's inappropriate blood pressure for you for seeking w T o P news.

Dr. Rachel Burger Smith Heart Institute Cedars Sinai Heart Disease Virginia High Blood Pressure Berger
Randomized Trial of C5a Receptor Inhibitor Avacopan Shows Promise in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:41 min | Last month

Randomized Trial of C5a Receptor Inhibitor Avacopan Shows Promise in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

"C five a receptor inhibitor. Of copan is being studied for the treatment of anti neutral fill. Side of plasma antibody anca associated vascular itis in the advocate randomized trial. Three hundred thirty one patients with anca associated vascular litis were assigned to receive oral evacuate pan at dose of thirty milligrams twice daily or oral prednisone on a tapering schedule. All the patients received cyclophosphamide followed by as thia prynne or toxic. Map remission at week. Twenty six the first primary endpoint was observed in seventy two point. Three percent of patients receiving vacco pan and in seventy point one percent of patients receiving prednisone own sustained remission at week fifty. Two the second primary endpoint was observed in sixty five point. Seven percent of patients receiving vacco pen and in fifty four point. Nine percent of patients receiving prednisone serious adverse events excluding worsening vascular. Lettuce occurred in thirty seven point. Three percent of the patients receiving a vacuum pan and thirty nine percent of those receiving prednisone in this trial involving patients with anca associated vascular. Itis a vacco pen was non inferior but not superior to prednisone taper with respect to remission at week twenty six and was superior to prednisone taper with respect to sustain remission at week fifty two the safety and clinical effects of vacco pan beyond fifty. Two weeks were not addressed in the trial in an editorial kenneth warrington from mayo clinic. College of medicine and science rochester. Minnesota writes that. The advocate trial heralds a change in treatment of anca associated vascular lightest that was previously unthinkable. The possibility of inducing disease remission without glucocorticoid however all patients in this trial did receive a brief course of glucocorticoid during the screening phase or early in the trial. As press own was being tapered off and discontinued and also could receive glucocorticoid as rescue medication. An innovative aspect of the advocate trial was the use of a glucocorticoid toxicity index. That captures common glucocorticoid related. Toxic effects including change in body weight glucose tolerance blood pressure lipids myopathy neuro psychiatric features and infection

Vacco Thia Prynne Copan Kenneth Warrington College Of Medicine And Scienc Anca Mayo Clinic Minnesota Weight Glucose Tolerance Blood
How to be a Body-Positive Parent

3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

03:06 min | Last month

How to be a Body-Positive Parent

"Dive into your first takeaway of how we as parents can set up to hopefully have a positive relationship with their bodies and food. Yeah so my first takeaway is really really important for everyone to hear russell as which is to understand that health and weight are not one in the same and this is an enormous misconception. That most of us have i think. I even had their so many misconceptions that b. m. I is kind of this perfect metric of health and that the bigger the body the less healthy body and i think increasingly people get that in mainstream ideas that you could be in a bigger body but also very fit but there are limits to the way people are able to kind of flex their minds around this issue. So it's a really important one because there are so many ways in which we talk just colloquially with our kids or with other grownups around kids to say things that are not intended to do anything other than maybe promote health which has a value. You know it's nothing wrong with valuing health but there are ways in which folks talk about health in a way that ends up being quite a process and not uplifting and not inclusive enough and so we never want kids to get the idea a while. If i lose a few pounds i'll be healthier. Oh mom gained some weight so she's not healthy. Health and weight are not in the same. And so how can we really make that clear to our kids to talk about how you can't actually tell much about someone's health by the way they look and know that in doing that. We're actually offering our kids an opportunity to be much more inclusive open minded in compassionate towards all people themselves. Yeah exactly. Yeah and we haven't talked too much about health at every size. We've talked about intuitive eating on the show before but there's a book health at every size by linda bacon If anybody wants to dive into this more. Because i do think that there is some cognitive resistance. We're like no that's not true. Wait does correlate to help our instinct. Is that and in this book. She walks through all of the research that shows. Actually it is not directly correlated. You can be very healthy and be in a bigger body. It's more about the way you care for that body movement and all those other things but it's hard to accept it because of the media and the diet culture that we've all grown up with and even well meaning doctors and people saying the bmi chart and focusing on that or really encouraging you to lose weight if you're not within a certain range while not looking at like well. My blood work is great. My blood pressure is great. And all of these other things that i'm caring for my body. That is a better indicator of

Russell Linda Bacon
Obesity: Appetite drug could mark 'new era' in tackling condition

The KFBK Morning News

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Obesity: Appetite drug could mark 'new era' in tackling condition

"By researchers and great Britain are showing that a new obesity fighting drug it's called Sema Glue Tide could cut your body weight by up to 20% this new drugs being called a game changer by researchers. More than a third about 35% of the people who took this new drug for treating the condition lost more than 1/5 of their total body weight. This is according to a global study that researchers and great Britain conducted. So now there are, of course, other weight loss pills that are available on the market. Currently, they work differently. Dr Aretha Cas. Ooh, boy is with WebMD and she tackles right now. This question that many people who are looking to lose weight Russell with on a frequent basis, So the question is Should you try one? The truth is weight loss. Drugs can help. You may want to try one of your obese or if you're overweight, with a condition, like type two diabetes or high blood pressure, So

Britain Dr Aretha Cas Obesity Webmd Russell Diabetes High Blood Pressure
Frailty Is A Thing?

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:33 min | 2 months ago

Frailty Is A Thing?

"I am excited today to introduced to you dr mucci. She has the coolest instagram page. That you're ever gonna wanna watch so her pages linked in the show notes and we are going to discuss. Frailty today which. Until i ran into her. I didn't even know an actual medical thing. So thank you for joining me. Have i so i just thought frailty meant you know i have a very good definition of frailty. I just thought it meant that you started losing the ability to move freely. And then you've told me that there's actual stages and it's a medical thing so why don't you start by telling everybody what frailty actually is to a medical doctor a right. Thank you very much for the kind introduction jets and so frankly is very commonly used announced a families look after all people and they just say oh mommy's a bit freia and she's slowed down a little bit out. Of course they chum failty in medical world as means completely different thing and their definition official definition knees highly if they reduce physiological reserves allocco physiological reserves. This means and why is it important to understand while this happens. As a result of amalgamation wolf three major factors as a result of aging process amalgamated with age related diseases we accumulate over the life span as less side effects of medications. Let me give you an example. What this means. So recent example for my clinical practice beatrice is ninety two year old lady. She's quite fit. Well lead independently. She before the lockdown. Actually it was running classes in a swimming pool oval senior citizens so very engaged with her community and leaving a beautiful life with quote a good quality of life however decreases ninety two and in the lost two three years. Should he'd have a few medical problems into stroke clinic with couple of meanest strobes diagnoses on. Jain ah should also has a little bit okay. High blood pressure. Some kidney disease muggle problems. None of them are actually bad enough to impact on. Have day to day functioning. She takes madison's will. These conditions is on block thin as full day mini strokes or cholesterol tablets. So she's functioning will and then one day should develops really a bad kid named action or you're north talked infection and it was bad enough for her to be a stylized in hospital and what happened. She became very confused. Deal various and rather than spending just two three days in hospital For intravenous antibiotics shea had two weeks admission in hospital because have confusion was resolving and of course what happens told their doubts if they spend a lot of time in in bed completely condition muscles wasted away by them. Homeless admission is keen swimmer. Could not stand to go into a rehabilitation facility and it was good two months before she actually returned home and she was not back to normal cell sure required carrozza assistance required Family to help. And that's what frailities. It's their amalgamation. She did not know that. Race frail have family did not understand why mom sophie to while swimming the day before teaching her class next day hunterston agen and actually swearing which Merited before in. How confused state why this will happen into. It was very traumatic for the families. And that's what i said. I explained frame because of course as a result of a previous mini strokes should have reduced brain reserves and urinary infection. Eat infection there are toxins in the body which up poisoning the brain. Now in you. And i we might not have a major program but had strokes if so bring presents lou and should develop a confusion shays ninety two age related changes to the boogie moss and muscles. Do you know on net. After the age of fifty we use about one to two percent muscle mass every year. So just imagine when you come to ninety two remember. She's actually switch. It wasn't bad But you can't go against the nature so there you go mini strokes causing reduced brain reserves. Shays ninety two year old with reduction in her muscle mass spending two weeks hostile bat eligible kidney problem on the background and of course urinary tract infection led to deterioration that and have completed different individual at the

Dr Mucci Carrozza Swimming Kidney Disease Confusion Madison Shea Urinary Infection Sophie LOU Shays
Avoiding Weight Gain During Stressful Times

Dishing Up Nutrition

17:07 min | 2 months ago

Avoiding Weight Gain During Stressful Times

"If you're worried that you have gained or are gaining way during the stressful time. We're definitely so stressful brittany with this pandemic and the ongoing at home and working from home and you're not the only one i'm hearing it more and more in clinic in fact a survey of eight thousand. Us adults published in the journal of obesity. Found at least a third of adults in the us reported. The corona virus pandemic has led to dramatic changes in their good health habits. Today we want to talk about some of these behaviors and ways that you can avoid weight gain during the pandemic or during any other highly stressful time in your life. Now that you know what we're going to be discussing this morning. I want to myself and our co host. I'm melanie beasley and have been a registered dietitian for the past thirty years one of the joys of my life is sharing the benefits of eating real food with as many of you as possible. I can speak to the benefits of eating real food both professionally and of course personally as well if you read my bio on weight and wellness dot com. You'll see that. I've had some very serious health problems over the years myself. So i truly know the value of eating real food for my own health at nutritional weight and wellness. We all believe health is so much more than the number on the scale does so true. It's so much more we have to feel good. You have to feel good. Everywhere had shoulders knees and totally. It's sad to say but is true. That many people just focus on their weight and now their overall health. Well i know that for me for years and years. This was really important. So i was always looking at what was the scale. What was on the scale now. What was going on internally. Well joining me this morning as you can hear. A voice is brittany. Vincent who's also a registered dietitian britney. You also have had some health problems that went away when you switch eating real food. Yes very transformative. I understand so share with us. Some of your pass health struggles with the listeners and how you overcame them well good morning everybody. You know I was in my early twenties and after finishing while towards the tail end. Finishing school to become a dietitian started having insomnia migraines. I was really tired. i will never forget. I was at a bar with a group of friends. And i like conked out in the in the booth because i was so tired. Oh no and i. It was not from partying. It was just ringing so tired. Exactly as like oh i know. That's when there's something going on. And i always say i saw the light finally an eating real food. I was looking at what i was eating and it was really just processed low fat. I mean everything that i was taught in two and so i made an overhaul of eating more fats Real vegetables purchasing better quality foods and then all of a sudden. My energy got better. I was sleeping better Eliminated gluten as well. My magazines basically disappeared and hers. Feeling great feeling as you should as a young adult and i think that a huge huge Switch that. I made was really the fat really because i was not eating those healthy fats. So making sure and getting that tablespoon of butter or olive oil avocado oil. Some not some avocado. I think really made made a huge difference for me. Plus just tastes delicious. Oh right so much. Easier to eat your veggies with some delicious fat on it and you know i think that For everybody listening that you can definitely be touched in many different ways of just changing changing your diet. Some just curious did you have anxiety that is sort of resolved. I did not do not while the insomnia would be racing thoughts but other than that. No no no. But i'm happy. That's that's over. That is not fun So you know. Understanding the science of nutrition to help to solve a personal problem is so powerful. I think that Experiencing these things ourselves just allows us to better help. Our clients visits us mercy and compassion for everyone who's walking through door or through zoom. Yeah right so you know britney when you were talking about that. I got to thinking. Let's discuss getting back to our topic. We're discussing ways to avoid weight gain during stressful times and certainly living in the midst of the pandemic has its own unique and unpredictable. Stressors right but many of us have had other times in our lives that we have also had highly stressful times so when i was going through cancer and treatments and all surgeries. I was stressed and my family was stressed. In lots of scenarios we can have tremendous stress. I think the most important thing that we can learn during these stressful times is how we manage our stress so true that we have some. We can develop some tools today. We wanna focus not on the stress but on how how each of us can increase our stress management skills. I want us all to focus on the foods and behaviors that increase our stress management skills. The first step is to to see that we have the ability to improve our bodies ma- how it manages that stress. Think of it as adding some tools to your tool box that you can pull from that. You have some control in how your body manages stress. Yeah and i hear that from clients who really are dedicated to eating real food throughout a stressful time and they comment. I am handling this a lot better than i. otherwise would be. It really is about chemistry. And i know people's character. It is in our survey reported in the journal of obesity included peop- people from different counties but also from different states in the in the us in the study found that the corona virus pandemic for many adults has led to a major decrease in their healthy habits and that they had that they had practiced prior to the pandemic and the study found two thirds of people eight more junk food well only a third eight healthier meals cooked at home again about two-thirds exercise less because gyms were closed but many rescue dogs and consistently walked their new dock. Some have more anxiety slept less where others were able to sleep longer to to less commuting time some people viewed the pandemic as a time to cook more healthy meals at home sleep longer also to have time for a pet. The sussex study also broke down the results by the different bmi classification such as normal weight overweight and obese ir that study in the study i noted to the study found the stay at home. Order had the most negative impact on the individuals in the obese category actually found. They found the anxiety. Scores increased most dramatically in people with obesity. The people with obesity also gained the most weight during the stay at home order so from results of the study. There are many different questions we could ask now number one do people of normal weight. In general practice better healthy habits for number two d normal weight people have fewer cravings. Find it easier to maintain a healthier eating plan number three to overweight and obese. People have more stress in their lives. Very good questions. Yeah do you have the answers necessarily but we're gonna talk. We're gonna right so to answer some of those questions. We want to share some basic lifestyle and eating habits to help you avoid weight gain during stressful times. Because i am seeing in clinic. I do see clients who've gained weight who've had a weight problems stressful and if it's a chemical chemical process and perhaps another way to live at this time is to find ways you can increase your stress management skills those tools in your toolbox that may be a new thought for you and yes you can learn and practice certain tricks to manage your stress whether it's during the pandemic or taken high school or college exam whether you're going through health crisis and i think time to dig into a demystify these tricks and the first trick to come out of the magical hat is eat breakfast every day. Not a sundays days. Breakfast is in spat especially important if you have stressful meeting or Chemistry exam or presentation or you studied all night absolutely. We're going to get back to eating breakfast but we have to take a break. I you are listening to dishing up nutrition and we are discussing how you can avoid weight gain during stressful. Times will be right back. Welcome back for dishing other for many of our clients. Tell us they need healthy new snack ideas so we decided to share a couple with you today. Make an egg. Salad with celery and expel or pressed. Safflower may or avocado mail. Then place a scoop of the egg salad and a half of a red pepper love I love deviled eggs as well. So my favorite is our salmon patty recipe that's in the weight and wellness way. Cookbook and nutrition guide. It's also on our website weight and wellness dot com ad and variety of raw vegetables. The vegetables to and you can Dip in some mayo at that. And then you've got this nice balanced out snacks so stay tuned and we will give you additional snack. Ideas have to say i love that I never tried it until pre pandemic one of our front desk staff gals was eating it. And i thought oh. I want to try this and she goes. Oh get a fork. I tried it. I was like it so delicious but when looking at the ingredients. I thought me when i wanted to make now i make it. You just plop it. Cook it and then take those patties and freeze them. They freeze great. Yeah so easy. It's awesome so stay tuned because we're going to have more of these ideas we are and i think it's time to dig into and demystify these tricks that we have the first trick to come out of the magical hat was eat breakfast every day. So fringy have for breakfast. I had leftover hamburger patty at six thirty. This morning did in samantha's and For something quick. I had part of an apple. Yeah wonderful e you got a gun. It wasn't gone. My husband always makes a eggs for me. He always gets up. When i have the radio show and So a couple eggs. And i also do half of an apple with sunbutter easy. Yeah got it done early in the morning forest feeling good for the radio show feeling over the radio show and you don't take out your energy you know and i always tell my clients breakfast really Tone for the day. You are going to feel better having a balanced breakfast. And then you're naturally going to make healthier choices because you're starting the day with a balanced blood sugar. It really makes the world of difference. And i the key to that balanced blood sugars like i had the eggs the protein and you had the hamburger patty protein and that kind of anchors not only your blood sugar but also begins the process of making those rain chemicals. The neural transmitters us that helps us with our day. Yeah yeah. I have absolutely recognized. I need enough protein in the morning just to feel good the entire day so i need at least three ounces. Good to to get me started. And i think that you know. A lot of people aren't in the habit of taking the time to make breakfast Your after something easy so you might sit down. Pour your favorite dry cereal in a bowl until the bolas fall. Always you know not a cup of cereal. Several cups of syria but that may be inviting obesity earnings -iety to come visit. There's been many studies. Demonstrating that high carb. High sugar diets often lead to anxiety and obesity. So what could be happening when you eat a big bowl of breakfast cereal which could easily have eighty one grams of carbs. When you consider how high carb that is in how high sugar foods affect your brain chemistry. It's very likely this unhealthy breakfast is causing a reduction in your serotonin. Level and serotonin is one of our. Most important are transmitters. You can think of neurotransmitters feel brain chemicals and serotonin helps to make us happy calm. Less anxious more focused all things that we that we need right. If you could just have a cup of serotonin But the next step we can just buy a coupla. Serotonin is that protein xactly so importantly we know a diet. High in processed carbs raise blood sugar level above normal and then the pancreas produces excess. Insulin leading to people being overweight or obese So when we say process carbs pathetic of the foods that come from a factory versus a farm Cereal is one. there is no serial bush. No there's not another interesting fact. Is obesity associated with having more anxiety one study found at the obesity. People have a twenty five percent increased risk of suffering from mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally chronic stress can also increase the fat stored in the abdominal area. And around our organs it is also an increased risk for type two diabetes heart attacks. High blood pressure so many risk factors we want our clients to avoid absolutely. And that's often a question i ask A new client. If weight loss's one of their goals asking them whereas there where they have gained weight where they're storing it can indicate to us. Hormonally what could be going on. And i'm sure you can agree. But i'm hearing more and more. People are starring in their abdomen that stress. And then also you know. Eating more processed carbs increases insulin resistance so can really be twofold mentioned earlier. We talked about if you have that bullet cereal and maybe skim milk. Possibly sugar sprinkled on. Tom It raises that blood sugar. And when your blood sugar goes higher than the body once it to It really is a stressful event entirely. Yup and when we have that stressful event internally we're increasing our stress levels yep so that's a simple tool really it is and you know. Our body doesn't know the difference between that stressor of eating cereal or the stress from covid. No good point. We respond to it the same way So keeping that in mind and again we have control of everything. We're putting in her mouth. So if that can impact stress that much We really need to take control of that is that is to have control over few things and that is one of i

Obesity Melanie Beasley Insomnia Migraines Britney United States Vincent Insomnia Hamburger Patty Cancer Apple Samantha Diabetes Heart Attacks Syria Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Bush TOM
How to keep your love of chocolate from destroying the planet

PODSHIP EARTH

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

How to keep your love of chocolate from destroying the planet

"In case you're wondering dark. Chocolate is in fact the more environmentally friendly and healthier choice. 'cause no milk is used and there's less sugar than no chocolate dark chocolate. Even been linked to lowering blood pressure and heart disease and at its best. Cocoa production has the potential to do no environmental harm and fortunately sustainable management practices that widespread which leads to damage of the rainforest. Ecosystems in which cocoa is grown to avoid these impacts trying by chocolate. That's fair trade. Direct trade and certified. The result is chocolate. That's healthy for you the pharma's and the planet

Heart Disease
This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

05:58 min | 2 months ago

This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"I wanted. I didn't want to have not only smoldering away in my pelvis. bit also small does away and you hit. It's always in your head as much as i could rationalize it and say i'm very scientific in my approach things and it wasn't a problem every day would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when i sat a worrying about all the other things worry about three o'clock in the morning you will saying parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves. Also get tonight. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today. That people want to see the inside. Bids cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media. you know. i've seen all your videos on youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes up in this episode. It's a franken. Feel this conversation about an experience. Men don often talked publicly about. So let's meet the scientist and the surgeon interested in nature. This is professor robe ramsey as a molecular biologist and kansas scientist and on the saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rossi's by his husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a i love of his and i've always been driven by trying to understand biology and i'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially sells Machines and i like the way they operate and they're really have siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day i was in an operating theatre watching people take cancerous. Lump sexually as it was then breast cancer. I was instantly captivated. This is professor. Declan murphy lading urologist and kansas surgeon. He's been in a for over a decade but you can he he's rh lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Died dot. I was in the operating theatre was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly i just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them. That it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but i was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field work. In it's everything from the kidneys dancer. The bladder and the prostate and the pain is in. The testicles are all areas in the urology domain that can be affected by cancer. Now dick lennon rob happened to be call. Eggs at the pay to mccallum will pay to mac cancel santa in melbourne as a scientist rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing vaccines that target gastrointestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as a surgeon declines leading the way with us robotics in the operating theatre and often the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally makes much but robin declan like many others at paid amac a different because i want to do science. That reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them are remember being at a hospital where declan was doing a tag team robotic procedure on a patient was having some colorectal surgery plus a prostatectomy and i was there on saturday morning with my eyes pocket collecting some samples clincal trial without doing their in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case. That was a patient to kansas. Quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as some cancerous tissue to take into the lab. And i was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a of beauty in any group of people that do things well together and there's almost subliminal communication. What's coming next that i'm bumping to each other The theater staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a formula one team. It a stop and i'd never. I've never worked in the center where you will have a a professor of colorectal science in the operating room with you so and we get used to that at peter. Mac it's the same prostate the same for melanoma central breast and and i just find as an extraordinary environment. I've never worked in a place that has that. Degree of translational multidisciplinary care where people are. They're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials etcetera etcetera. And it's just a extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lab question. I of been geneticists for most of my research life and we can do cool things with jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always and i want to the always it is relevant. What happens in a patient. It's all about the patient in the has always westbound lot that though so these two colleagues late in their fields in cancer but then kind of a sudden curve ball and a role change. The scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. And he's patient he's rob i have a great jp. I've been going to for quite a long time. Really thoughtful considerate kanda guy. We've we always have a great show. When i go to visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exercise and diet.

Robe Ramsey Declan Murphy Kansas Cancer ROB Dick Lennon Rob Gastrointestinal Cancers Robin Declan Franken Rossi DON Mccallum Youtube Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Declan Melbourne MAC Melanoma Jane
DECLARE-ing Another Victory for Dapagliflozin

iForumRx.org

06:04 min | 2 months ago

DECLARE-ing Another Victory for Dapagliflozin

"Well hello and welcome to the i former x podcast where we explore the evidence that informs aleatory care pharmacy practice. This is stuart hanes the host of the i former x podcast in about a year ago we reviewed and discussed the data h f study which evaluated the benefits of the sodium glucose transporter two or s. l. t. two inhibitor. Adaptable flows in in patients with reduced ejection fraction. Heart failure even in patients without diabetes. And if you are not familiar with a data h f study. I strongly encourage you to read the original study. And the i former x commentary of course. The data regarding the use of the sglt two inhibitors to prevent cardiovascular events and to treat heart failure or quite compelling but can they also slow the progression of renal complications in patients with chronic kidney disease. Well i was excited to see the much anticipated data. Ck d. study published in the new england journal of medicine a few weeks ago. And i knew just the right people. I wanted to review this study for i former expert. Dr jennifer clements dr stephanie. Nitro jennifer and stephanie are no strangers to i former x. They are members of the i former x oriel board and have been frequent contributors over the years. That clements is clinical pharmacy. Specialist in diabetes transitions at spartanburg regional health. Care system in spartanburg south carolina indoctrinate grow is associate professor of pharmacy practice at the university of connecticut. Stephanie jennifer it's great to welcome you back on the i former x podcast. Thanks for the invitation stewart. Thank you for having us back so before we get started per usual. I'd like to get your thoughts on a patient case. A i think that is not unlike. What many of our listeners encounter in their practices and want to imagine. You're seeing k t a sixty one year old african american female in the primary care clinic today. The patient has a longstanding history of hypertension type two diabetes dyslipidemia and. She's morbidly obese. She also has osteoarthritis internees. She recently was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease in her primary care physician referred her to you to make certain quote. We are doing everything we can to protect your kidneys. According to her medical record katie has been prescribed lysenko pearl twenty milligrams twice daily resume astatine twenty milligrams daily metformin thousand twice daily and insulin Twenty it's bedtime and in addition over the counter. She takes aspirin eighty-one milligrams and naproxen sodium for arthritis pain. She currently weighs two hundred sixty four pounds of bmi forty point. Nine blood pressure today when thirty. Eight over seventy six and her most recent labs yesterday include a fasting glucose of eighty seven and a one c of six point seven percent. Sam crat nin of one point seven milligrams per deciliter and an estimated. Gfr of thirty seven seven potassium of four point seven. Ldl cholesterol fifty six hdl cholesterol. Forty eight triglycerides of one. Oh seven in addition. The patient had a timed urine protein tests performed and the album into creating ratio was three hundred fifty. So stephanie. Before we talk about the study that you reviewed in your i former x commentary. I'm wondering what's going through your mind in this case What are some of the key questions you ask this patient during the encounter and what additional apps if any might you want to obtain and is there any additional treatment options. Who'd be considering at this point to stewart. I would agree that. Kt really does mirror. Many of the patients that are encountered in clinical practice. And i think this case excites me because there are many opportunities for the pharmacists to intervene here and if we're going to utilize the ppc process. I would. I want to collect additional information from kt. for example. Does she smoke. How often is she using her naproxen. And at what dose. I'd also want to collect possible. Her a. one c. Blood pressure and serum craton and trends and we know how important it is to not evaluate labs in isolation so seeing her patterns would provide additional insight or care planning. It's really important to know. Kt's renal function is stable or if it's consistently fluctuating as this information would help our assessment of how we can manage. Her current metformin does since her egfr is approaching the cutoff for continue at minimum. She needed both reduction. And also story the for thinking about the potential use of sglt two inhibitors for katie ensuring that arena function is stable. What help us feel more comfortable recommending. Its use since we know that there have been reports of a two kidney injury and volume depletion upon initiation of these drugs. I don't want wanna collect a bit more information about her. Lifestyle habits including a general understanding of her dietary choices notably her sodium and protein intake and see if she is engaging in any physical activity given her need when the patient and osteoarthritis. I'd also wanna know her insurance provider and learn if she's burdened by any of the cost of her current medications in case we want to add anything in the future cd management perspective. I'm really happy to see that. She's on than a pro because she has albumin. Urea but further management is needed to help delay rano progression and when we think of good. Ck d. management. We need to consider it. I optimizing her glycemic control which looks really good for. Kt at this point and also painting and maintaining a blood pressure will have less than one thirty over eighty if we can do that safely

Stuart Hanes Chronic Kidney Disease Renal Complications Dr Jennifer Clements Dr Stepha Nitro Jennifer Spartanburg Regional Health Stephanie Jennifer Hypertension Type Diabetes Dyslipidemia Diabetes Stephanie Sam Crat New England Journal Of Medicin Heart Failure Stewart
4-Step Self Care Breathwork Protocol To Beat The Blue Monday Syndrome]]]]]

My Seven Chakras

05:14 min | 2 months ago

4-Step Self Care Breathwork Protocol To Beat The Blue Monday Syndrome]]]]]

"It's monday morning here on main street. Vancouver it's dry. It's cloudy and the weather is still an crisp. I woke up at five. Am did my morning. Routine had accord shower. And i'm feeling great right now. How you doing recently. I came across the term blue monday. Which is a name given to. The third monday of the year due to the combination of both christmas blues chord dark nights at least here in the northern hemisphere dismal results from the new year's resolutions that some of us have set and the arrival of unpaid credit card bills entered offered all in most parts of the word were still in a lockdown socially isolated mentally stimulated because of all the social media apps and there's a mass hysteria about the virus. And i know that it is very hard for most people around the world to deal with. And that's why i decided to put together a four part breath work protocol for you to try out. It is guaranteed to make you feel better. Promise me that you'll do this. And then you will reach out to me to give me some feedback. I want how it went for you. And how you fared after your promise. Now before we get started. I wanted to give a shoutout to magda who reached out to me with an email a few days back. And here's what you said jay. I started listening to your podcast. After i was recovering. From my niece edgy in may two thousand and twenty. Your show was my one. Stop shop to all things spiritual and bronzed on from there. Researching and learning about all sorts of different topics is much of wealth of knowledge from your shows. Many thanks for shedding it. All with us mukta. Thanks mugged up so glad that you get value from our shows and i appreciate you listening. I also wanted to quickly answer this. One question from kendall christine from our podcast. Facebook group is asked me this question. If someone's typical unconscious breeding Is impacted by trauma. How does one this store regular breathing patterns without actively making the self conscious and aware of their red twenty four by seven. And that's a great question and there are many ways to look at it. A simple way to look at it is when we expedient drama of any kind it creates an emotional signature that is stored inside our body as it a minor for us to avoid experiencing similar negative experiences in the future. It makes sense right so the body wants you to a wide. Negative expedients are another drama. Potentially in the future in so it's sort of adding a minder. Storing it in the body and this dramatic expedients how you breathe because we're always on the lookout for danger. Something suspicious on a stimulant that can lead to eight relapse off that same expedients typically when we breathe shallowly at his breathing only to the chest and not all the way down to your belly were unconsciously on a state of alert our fight or flight which is associated with high stress levels. High blood pressure and constricted blood vessels by learning how to correct our breathing consciously breathing diaphragm medically and breathing nearly through the nose rather than through the mouth. Were training our body to relax and active the rest and digest system. Initially you're doing it consciously but then over a period of time it becomes unconscious now. This breath work along with visualization and mantras and some journaling and other practices can slowly but surely release the health drama. So that your body is convinced that there is no danger and that you can breathe fully and easily just like any other habit through practice through repetition and self love you will unconsciously start breathing correctly in a way that supports your health and white daddy. For example at night. I is small piece of tip o'neill like a three m. micro poor small tape on my lips. Go train myself to breathe through my nose. Evil while i'm sleeping. I've endured that to snore sometimes at night and this advice from the book breath by james nestor has really helped. Correct my nocturnal breathing. Batons but again. Sometimes good habits can take time to farm and you need to shower yourself with self love index small steps baby steps because that will make all the difference. I hope that makes sense scandal. Thanks for asking me that question. And with that being said let us begin with our four step breath work protocol step one do and bianca younger literally means self love and it is an ira vedic self-care practice of oil massaging yourself to balance your dossiers. Relax nova system and make your skin glow. There are many ways to do this and some can take one or two hours. But i'm gonna give you the short and simple method. That will take about ten to fifteen minutes. Firstly

Kendall Christine Magda Vancouver JAY Trauma Facebook James Nestor Neill Bianca
Interview With Mary Anne Shearer

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:42 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Mary Anne Shearer

"Today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet

Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Maryanne Google Tonsillitis Marianne South Africa Johannesburg Cancer United States New York Times Janet
Interview With Mary Anne Shearer

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:42 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Mary Anne Shearer

"Today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet

Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Maryanne Google Tonsillitis Marianne South Africa Johannesburg Cancer United States New York Times Janet
"blood pressure" Discussed on Menopause Management

Menopause Management

06:41 min | 3 months ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on Menopause Management

"Hello there everybody. This is menopause. Taylor bringing the state.

"blood pressure" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"But to tell you to slow down or to grip less is counterintuitive, but it has to hold you in that exact exact range in order for you to get the benefit of the exercise, so as their correlation between controlling a blood pressure and having a good memory not kidding. Kill me. But yes, actually, there is actually one of the one of the things that is being studied right now is the connection between proper Brad Fleischer, and, and brain oxygenation, because many people have been diagnosed with you, not want to get into the claiming of medical things, but people who are who are showing signs of dementia, are, in fact, poorly oxygenated brain. Well, this is legit because this actually happened to family member. And it happens to huge numbers of older people who are diagnosed with Alzheimer's and senile, cognitive dementia. They have they have medication for high blood pressure. That push their blood pressure, too low. So there's no oxygen in their brain right? And Daniel Ayman's been on the show a couple times he looks at blood flow a hemodialysis. They call it in the brain, and even though I recovered my brain from all the toxic mold stuff that I had going on. It was actually chemically induced brain damage, I still have lower blood flow in the brain than average. But I have none of the damage remaining from that. So I do things to make sure my blood pressure is high enough because I don't have high blood pressure problems at all. And I do track it measure it. And it's, it's really fascinating that if we took all these people who are overmedicated, and don't have enough blood pressure and said, hey, let's get you off indication. Let's train you on how to control your own blood pressure. Do this by feedback for a while lit you learn how to do this. You won't need medication. But you'll have enough blood pressure that your body can regulate the way you're supposed to. And then it's like your brain just wakes up. Yeah. One of the things that the, you talk about the, the juxtaposition between using the medical device like Zona as opposed to using blood pressure medication. What pressure medication in no way helps your body regulate itself, but pressure medication is doing the regulation. It's itself. It's actually doing it. It's forcing the number lower, which means too much blood pressure, medication can actually put you into even Dayton even more dangerous territory than the blood pressure that you started the medication to treat using something like the applause..

Brad Fleischer Daniel Ayman Alzheimer Dayton
"blood pressure" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"So that's that's a game changer for somebody yes absolutely and i have a friend recently who had m click a postpartum sustained high blood pressure she has proclaimed an pregnancy and typically their treatment for that is you have the baby and her blood pressure didn't drop after pregnancy and so they're still trying to bring a down but the cbd has really taken the edge off for her and at least gotten a safe issue level so she's not you know at risk of stroke which is huge all god i get together blood pressure issue a diabetes right again because were bringing the body back into balance were dropping into that in connecticut line system which is going to send signals out to the rest of you got organs on what to do and i will touch on the kid thing for just a minute i personally have given it to my son and i don't give him a full dose i give him just one pomp and he was recently released sick in his recovery bounceback time usually sick for a week he was back in school the next day so i've seen and he also it's so funny it's like oh next week com uh and then the next day it wasn't like that it was totally different experience against that i think that's the nature of uh the fighter cannabinoid dial is that it is an adopted in so it will give you what the body needs so i it's i think fantastic resource for kids as well yeah when there's so much great research about adapt agents i know that's something i've been researching quite a bit and i've i've mentioned in a few post but it really is a whole category of its own to they're all these amazing plants and herbs and things that are an amazing adaptions that helped the distress response so much and for this to help kids i'm guessing there's a lot of moms listening going i want my kit to be calm and sleep.

blood pressure connecticut
"blood pressure" Discussed on Healthy Lifestyle Show

Healthy Lifestyle Show

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on Healthy Lifestyle Show

"Uh also known refined sugar as allowed as part of this night yet no sorry disallowed you can dig a rock sort yet the himalayan or some of those rock yet sorts auto k r uh the reason why some of this is there because there was no commercial production at that time and then they started adding all of this basically these started a making us system unfit for water system is gouda act if you read more such on this you'd see that may to you off the more done how did shoes house challenges are due to the died system in which we have invented in order to feed millions and millions of the people because the population is going yet and that's a particular issue yet so because of that we have invited many of those issues like blood pressure you heart issues in thyroid diabetes you name it is a long list of things you now the gentleman who has worked at his entire life dr lauren yep his duty says that um if you go back to this kind of paleo diet yet many of these issues it's everything is there the system can't relieve move while the toxins what you asked yet but you can come drew all you can manage backed by keeping your diet mold the pity type died because that's what got our gut cannot handle many of those new mike grow our goodness nah bacteria all over you talk about all of that it cannot handle all of that and despite so many years of development technological agricultural inflammation industial you name it we have acted more a more elements will be have changed our diet further we will keep growing the production yet so that we can keep feeding this.

water system blood pressure mike
"blood pressure" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"The more that you do this the better you'll feel the more relaxed you'll feel the healthier you will be because you're allowing your body to relief healing hormone your allowing body to release relaxation and the more you do this the better off you'll feel the healthier you'll be lower your blood pressure you will become healthier and also resting your mind this is with meditation is all about is being in the now relaxation focusing on breast focusing on potted a positive times is being on good things for you i want you to stay here a little bit longer just a little bit longer embrace these beautiful feeling but you have right now just embrace them enjoy them braving in this beautiful played now i want you to do is slowly slowly i want you to start coming back to when you're at on your share your bad or wherever you're up relax right now i want you to start really being conscious of keeping your muscle tension low a b really excited about waking up a little bit more and moving on with your life because he give in your mind a great round be given your positive thought and you've released a lot of most positive chemicals in your body bring new health so what i want you to do now is ongoing accounts you up for more than two two n and as i do you going to become more away going to feel very alert as if you've got a really nice massed this is what i call little einstein breaks two other navies count you up from one to ten and age number two i go out and become more and more alert to wake but you're going to feel trashed and you're going to feel fairly early energized but not excited in a negative way no anxiety through muscle tension will begin to just be.

blood pressure muscle tension
"blood pressure" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Blood pressure was one thirty nine over ninety they prescribed an ace inhibitor it worked much fewer headaches now that i'm retired much lower blood pressure went off the medication no more headaches of that type that's interesting to igf migraines so i might what its lots of my doctor about the two temer but itself like a lot of folks like temer may a needed makes a variety of lifestyle changes temer mentioned when she stopped working her blood pressure went down which i think is something she should discuss whether old boss and then be they're all these other factors that kid come into play in hypertension this is a complicated problem to solve it sure is and there's a lot of genetic basis for high blood pressure there and there's not one high blood pressure gene that how much sought people eat fx blood pressure in many people stress affects blood pressure in some people and not in others the foods they eat and can affect their blood pressure upper down and how they respond to stress can be affected migraines are somehow associated with blood pressure although it's not entirely clear and there are different different genetic they cease for these that's why there are so many blood pressure drugs on the market as well some people respond to the asem have better some people do well the just a diuretic which basically get some of the fluid out of your system other people have to use the betablocker drugs it's different for every person what's the sense that you get from the medical establishment of how people are doing with controlling their blood pressure clearly cardiovascular diseases the world's numberone killer so we may not be doing very well but it's also i think easier for people to think about popping a pill as opposed to joining a jam or walking around the block or buying more fruits and vegetables what's the sense you get from doctors about how their patients are doing while again this is something that's different for every person joshua but one big problem is that people don't take their pels high blood pressure doesn't causes symptom uh the the one person who set a message and said you know i had headaches but that's not the usual symptom usually you don't feel bad when you have high blood pressure and that's a problem with getting people to take their drugs they don't feel bad if they forget to take.

Blood pressure ace inhibitor blood pressure joshua
"blood pressure" Discussed on 560 KLZ The Source

560 KLZ The Source

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on 560 KLZ The Source

"I i'm taking medication my blood put them michelin blood pressure medications the question that i have is how do i know um the reason why i developed high blood pressure i at that time i don't know if i still have the today what's because i was deficient in magnesium when it when it look i'm a test nowhere does it show but mcneish who liberal far no uh it won't and the reason is that um blood tests for magnesium are pretty much useless because uh magnesium is held in the blood by adrenaline and in my opinion it's unlikely that the magnesium was the problem uh it's more likely that you sweat very heavily you depleted salt you eight food that may have had bugs in it and it got carte blanche to the circulatory tree that's the most common phenomenon that links us to uh issues with blood pressure is so could it be magnesium yeah but it'd be real hard to tell you could go in a good drugstore announced stick your arm in there and see what your blood pressure there is no cost no obligation to get an idea of where you are now what i see over and over again with athletes like you is you sweat very heavily and you're not paying attention to salt now most americans in my opinion eat too much salt but athletes especially endurance athletes anybody doing anything endurance often.

blood pressure
"blood pressure" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on WDRC

"Pressure for an warmed from one forty over ninety uh to uh one uh twenty over eighty okay uh previously systolic blood pressure is of 122 129 had been designated pre hypertension now they're elevated blood pressure's and so he got a common facial got many comments on this article which we published in our newsletter in which is up on our website uh which takes on of the new blood pressure categories uh the articles entitled overnight half of american adults reclassified as hypertensive his it diagnosis creep by diagnosis creep i mean the tendency for medicine to appropriate new customers basically uh as we extend the guidelines for high cholesterol uh we're playing cholesterol limbo hollow can you go sane things happening with hypertension and yes hype attention is a a real problem and perhaps it's underrecognised but i'm afraid that these new guidelines are going to get a lot more doctors to be a little too liberal with the prescription pad and sowa i'll share with you a comment that i got two which cut of is representative of many comments that i got on my article uh hello i was waiting to read your take on the new guidelines which seemed ridiculous some laden with ulterior motives and inaccurate reasoning thank you for is always taking on establishment actions with subject matter knowledge and unambiguous dataa hefty.

blood pressure elevated blood pressure representative
"blood pressure" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"High blood pressure had no idea sorry are there i guess she dr no symptoms to speak of for high blood pressure or are there there are usually no symptoms until things get very high and sometimes when things get very high you can have things like a headache for blood vision or a precious sensation in your heart because you're pressure is so high that you actually conceal the pressure inside your chest shortness of breath could not be violated thing to the symptoms of high blood pressure but most commonly blood pressure causes no symptoms you're absolutely right showing most of the time in many people until your blood pressure becomes very very high there are no symptoms and that's why they call it the silent killer nausea we left untreated how does high blood pressure affect the body and and you just said that uh it can be fatal if it's not addressed so i like to think about it in categorizes in certain phases in our body high blood pressure in it's en it's just basic form destroys the circulatory system it destroys the arteries of our heart and it destroys the tributaries or the blood vessels that come off of our au water our biggest blood vessel in the body which includes the brain the kidneys every single distribution of blood flow has to get to the body through the circulatory system high blood pressure damages those arteries and what happens is as a result of the pressure overload on those blood vessels these arteries become narrow and they'd be and you destroy that inner unwinding of that blood vessel could begin to feel you'll sell which then set you up for a further progression of pla deposition which is cholesterol and triglycerides and all those fatty substances that certainly not body it narrows our blood vessels which then translates to the heart because now the heart which is a pump it's a muscular pump has to actually compensate for those restricted or narrowed blood vessels and what happens is that heart muscle then starts to grow and thick edge.

blood pressure blood vessels shortness of breath
"blood pressure" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on WDRC

"That the net result is that we're all going to over medicate lots of americans this is all based on a steady call the sprint study that's cut his sketchy because the study showed indeed that there were benefits to taking people with high blood pressure uh a borderline blood pressure is beyond one 221 uh 129 systolic and aggressively treating the with blood pressure medication but the benefits were were very very marginal and what the problem was with his particular study is that they very very carefully selected the people who were targets for this blood pressure to they were people who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease that represents only fifteen percent of the population of the us who are having high blood pressure or borderline blood pressure this case and so what could go wrong if you get your very proactive tree sub would with high blood pressure with medication will many especially older individuals are very sensitive high blood pressure medications you feel lightheaded woozy they may fall they may hit their heads they may have a brain bleed they may get broken hips hands it's long been recognised but especially with older individuals aggressive treatment of high blood pressure his not great in fact the cochran collaborative a big outfit that review studies worldwide it's an international it is not connected to drug companies took a look at the strategy of treating people with border light blood pressure and what they found was that there was absolutely no benefit in terms of reduction of stroke or heart attack or death and if you look at even the sprint study which provides justification for giving people all.

blood pressure cochran fifteen percent
"blood pressure" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on WDRC

"That the net result is that we're all going to fourover medicate lots of americans this is all based on a steady call the sprint study that's cut his sketchy because the study showed indeed that there were benefits to taking people with high blood pressure uh a borderline blood pressure does beyond one 221 uh 129 systolic and aggressively treating the we blood pressure medication but the benefits were were very very marginal and what's the problem was with this particular study is that they very very carefully selected the people who were targets for this blood pressure to venture they were people who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease that represents only fifty percent of the population of the us who are having high blood pressure or borderline blood pressure this case and so what could go wrong if you yet you very proactive eu treats of would with high blood pressure with medication will many especially older individuals are very sensitive high blood pressure medications to feel lightheaded woozy they may fall they may hit their heads they may have a brain bleed they may get broken hips and it's long been recognised but especially with older individuals aggressive treatment of high blood pressure his not great in fact the cochran collaborative a big outfit that review studies worldwide it's an international group that is not connected to drug companies took a look at the strategy of treating people with border blood pressure and what they found was that there was absolutely no benefit in terms of reduction of stroke or heart attack or death and if you look at even the sprint study which provides justification for giving people all these blood pressure medications to reduce one deaths from cardiovascular disease you'd have to treat 166 patience unnecessarily that simply call it nnt a number needed to treat well it's one.

blood pressure cochran fifty percent
"blood pressure" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"High salt diet their lactobacillus levels and their blood pressure remained on altered said what they shuttle with this study was that a high salt diet affects the gut microbes by um uh uh depletes lactobacillus but that treating with lactobacillus prevented salt induced aggravation of these t helper cells and it modified salt sensitive hypertension so i love probiotics for all the reasons that i have talked about them time and time again you've heard me talk about probiotics and i think it's important to make sure that you're pro biotic features from various lactobacillus strains when you look at the strains in sometimes more isn't necessarily better times i see these products that are 50 billion but they have you know a dozen or fifteen different strains but not a lot of the pre eminent lactobacillus varieties and busy do bacteria varieties make sure that your probiotics are rich in the lactobacillus and the video bacteria that is just critically important but i think that this is an interesting key for tool that could benefit someone with high blood pressure you need to be on a probiotic to mitigate some of the impact of saw this is food for thought we'll.

blood pressure
"blood pressure" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on KOIL

"Hold oh man brands perfect health that's the bulls and all the good healthy saw any garbage the i two i was pretty healthy and i didn't take maintenance medications ally was fifty so you got a few years the at all oh oh oh picture sorry sorry oklahoma hold on the minute victor have you had your blood pressure checked legally yeah because the population now because half the population i'll have high blood pressure because they lowered the number of of a high point they're change let me on him to settle people all but your healthy change on health right if steve all the people changing laws to make lawabiding citizens criminal it's it's all the same situation it's all the same big cisl it's all the big ten foschi in to take control out of our hands and put it into their job well like i said they change the number for blood pressure 70s half the population now has i blood pressure and we'll have to have treated what is all blood pressure number does anybody know uh blood pressure guidelines yeah to change the highblood pressure and we should abide well now to abide in and make good on your uh you little a topic there you a little low axiom none of if you're doing good behind to take the bill wait wait a minute attracts you kinda like i don't know a chip who you're you're taking it voluntarily so there you go a little so i mean what what are we going to do i mean here's the dilemma some people are gonna have to take the chip but it's not gonna be under the skin they're gonna have to take it as a pill ludi lin leg you never know i mean pillsbury the i mean this going a little piece of electronic wouldn't imagine like you hearttoheart but it's easier to hide the mic chip you know you had to go and get a staff in your arm perch it but a phillies just with it and let me look pizza putin yup it gowns people wouldn't even now yup buying into the pacific region there you go i may be hiding in there and i'll unita.

blood pressure phillies oklahoma steve
"blood pressure" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on Super Station 101

"That's why more than normal blood pressure so you're good there next not like you have blood pressure that's all over the place it's it's too low or too high so sounds to me like they've got that managed with medication which is a good thing this means you getting dizzy and as far as you feeling that way there's there's several things that can be caused in that one is you wanna make sure that you go see a do and the as the doctor boston pathak medicine and the reason i think that'd be good for use because on the structural side of our health you got to look at the bones the muscles and the nerves and when you're looking at all three areas of that you've got you've got to get in there and with the vertigo or it with dizziness potentially if it's not chemical than it has to be structural and there's nerves and everything else it sits within the spinal column and the first area underneath the skull which is the c one or the atlas vertebra that we need to be evaluated and looked at they can you x rays there several tests that they can run to check that dios typically will get in and they'll work on some of that is certain positions will do that physical therapists will get in and look at that sometimes but i gotta deal first get their valuation get their thoughts see what they think and then go from there because right now just take your blood pressure medications sitting back and waiting and hoping for the best it's not were you one of the main obviously you're frustrated because you know there's more to it and you feel right so there's a lot of treatment that can be done if things are not right as far as with your net goes in that that sort of thing that can be very helpful so go see a deal let them actual your body several days you need to do remember an avocado a day keeps prostate issues away contains a component in it called sister all work lucky charm so working.

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"blood pressure" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on The Science Hour

"The eu little crazy creatures supermarket will bring him up in particular well because uh that that fascinating from many aspects but they that venom is is actually used in laboratories when they inject that prey are they induce a form of spastic paralysis and so they make nerve cells fire and what scientists have done is they've fraction it you know the the venom and they use it in cultures to study nerve communication on one of the cool things about it is that can switch it on switch it off a so they can wash of buffer through their their cell culture once they finished it turns off the spastic paralysis so it's teaching us about neuroscience i mean that's interesting you you pro that's a scientific using either of promise me before program that you have uses yet of a venoms more generally well that that the classic he's is the brazilian pit viper which when it bite somebody induces a lowering of blood pressure to the point where each pray them for sort of fools over an and it can consume it now when they when they realize that that's what this snake did somebody said hang on a sec we can use that to lower blood pressure and people who have high blood pressure and that is one of the first big drugs to come out of of the venom well but there are others and and ronald i he took me to one of his he's fume covered you know these these places where you know they they take all the fumes up so you don't breathe men and he had a jar there and in preserving liquid was was literally something that is called a monster and he explained to to me why that one is a the big dahlem machine.

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"blood pressure" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The pay hin diabetes fibromyalgia high blood pressure is danica migraine headaches multiple growth is muscle crowd parkinson's osteoporosis and the list goes on and on in this is this is associated with a lack of magnesium in the body simply a lack of magnesium fully to sell it nothing through really meth around with now what happens is that you need the magnesium in your body in order for the calcium to be absorbed oh so it's it's a necessary thing in order to get the first component which is calcium that's right they work in combination with each other now there's many more practical applications of this talbak formula um first of all like i said he'd drink at they'll get into your system and one of the first thing we corner clinic is for people who are under a lot of traffic and they can't sleep well it works better than anything i've ever think for people that have trouble leave it really because it relaxes you ride any do actually fill the relaxation f you drink the afc you drink a cup of the comeback formula hm interesting the other thing that it's really really good for our people who are in pay okay i have all the story to tell you in any case that it of people actually taking the calmac formula and getting rid of hand and this is included arthritictype pain fibromyalgia which are the form of arthritis back pain muscle spasm migraine headaches there's a whole category of of areas i'd like to discuss with.

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"blood pressure" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"blood pressure" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"So just don't do drugs if you've got hall of fame is very few episodes were it's great if you've got her was because a lot of any stimulants increase the pressure on the on your heart and increase your blood pressure but this one increases the pressure on your heart but it also reduces your blood pressure so is particularly dangerous if you're on blood pressure medication and it's also really dangerous if you're taking biography which is again a potential problem for rex our problems if you take a lot of it for a long time and again this is a really vague thing saying i'm sorry because it's not really known how much is the risky amount here but it can lead this thing called method gloom anemia i think i pronounced that right which is oxygen starvation due to a change in hemoglobin let's hemoglobin is what's in your red blood cells in its war carries the oxygen around your body to oxygen a oil south pretty important the description i read of of methaemoglobin amia getting better not says it it turns the blood so of chocolate brown kind color colors like the hemoglobin as the red blood cells it's the red in in your blood regenerative sound delicious noon nor benefit live narrates it's yikes potentially extremely dangerous anam if you've got this this i'm sat get on a mathemically anemia then it can look like this live symptoms of withdrawal will say things like if you're sort of lethargic cannot kind of thing.

blood pressure