35 Burst results for "Blockchain Technologies"

The Power of Decentralized Marketing

Strength In Business

09:25 min | Last week

The Power of Decentralized Marketing

"Of the centralized marketing gone are the days of critical thinking and freedom of speech. Those who don't comply with the mainstream narrative are d. monetize d platform and often labeled mentally. Ill it's time to leave the centralized marketing land of Facebook twitter youtube and all the other platforms and join decentralized networks. That welcome people who are bold enough to question everything. I joined twitter and facebook game. Twenty seven. I mean those were fun times because nobody really what we were doing. Social media marketing was a new term and the vast majority of people and businesses including major league corporations had no clue what to do with these platforms. I remember the first. At s-. I ran on facebook. I mean back then. Ads were approved instantly and costs. Were ridiculously low. Like in the good old days of email marketing everybody on facebook was clicking on your ass to find out more about this new feature along with whatever you were offering early internet marketers. Were mostly running ads for free e books. You can download from a website you were sent to. It was simple and straightforward marketing approach. That worked seamlessly then greed kick in and what used to be a peaceful place together with loved ones and like minded people turned into an ugly spot. That reminds us of certain behaviors and character's humanity rather knock made acquaintance with so here. We are today as more and more people awaken to the luge of this three d game which is designed so perfectly that a tricks even our most advanced spiritual teachers into believing it's trip for those of us who decided to go all in and up our level of consciousness in order to play this game to our utmost capabilities. We're now faced with incredible challenges. Those who think they can control this amazingly designed game by enslaving the entire planet when most likely encounter some cataclysmic surprises that being said. Let's leave the spiritual playfield for moments and discuss a few tangible marketing solutions to assist your transition from centralized to decentralized marketing networks. And i like to talk to you about the new marketing disruptor which is blockchain so library odyssey minds float p- research. None of these brands and companies are a household name remember two decades ago the same for facebook twitter and youtube the blockchain technology that underpins bitcoin therion coin and all the other cryptocurrencies is already changing the way we do marketing and promote our businesses the biggest difference between the centralized social networks and the decentralized blockchain based attorney tiv- that i just mentioned is that these companies reword users for using their product instead of gathering questionable personal data and selling them to third party corporations and even government entities. Now if you wanna find out more about library minds and flow for example. I highly suggest you listen to my other podcasts. And also check out the my blocks on strengthened business dot com especially the one aware i Wrote and i talked about minds adds that episode is called. Why bother with blockchain social ads. And you might want to hop over to strengthen business dot com and going to that block. Because i shared some a screenshots with you as to how i set up these ads on mines Although there are in the early stages of the platforms per se aren't sophisticated as aloud words any especially facebook but still a lot that he can do. Okay so here are some of the podcast episodes. That are highly suggest. You check out First one is where to go win. Centralized social media kicks off their platform. The next one as i already mentioned why bother with blockchain social ads and another one would be humans or machines. Whom do you create your content for so if you've been listening to strengthen business podcast simply search for these episodes the one with the centralized social media where to go with the kick you off their platforms was the episode that are recorded before this now a lot of my clients and also people that i talk to come to me and say okay. What now especially professionals medical professionals who have different opinion than big pharma. They'll like okay. How i wasted my entire life Or mine tire to last week. All the laws of decade posting on youtube and facebook and now that they banned me were the platform. me what do i do i mean. Have i literally wasted my time. And here's something that. I want to highlight an. I want to suggest That you do and first of all Something very critical in terms of thinking and mindset so first of all your time invested into f. a. m. g. is not wasted so in the past two to three decades f. a. m. g. with Fans for facebook. Amazon apple microsoft and google had a blast they seemingly appear out of nowhere. I mean that's what the majority's purposely deceived to believe and slowly but surely they gained control over our behaviors are thoughts are interest and social interactions. Now to this day. I recall the article written by robert booth with the title. Facebook reviews new speed experiment to control emotions. It was published in the guardian. On june thirtieth. Two thousand fourteen. I repeat facebook. Reviews newsfeed experiment to control emotions. If you're interested in that go to the guardian. It's on june thirtieth twenty fourteen. Very good article. You might wanna read it now. The offensive strengthened business. That was more than six years ago cake. Twenty fourteen now. What do you think happened in the meantime so knowing all these highly unpleasant and disturbing facts about facebook and all the other companies. Why do you think. I still suggest that you haven't wasted your time on social media. Look i've been running ads on the face of ecosystem since two thousand eleven. I educated hundreds of students in my life courses and workshops on how to run profitable ads on facebook instagram and messenger. I created their academy. Where i taught students how to opt game so that they can get the most for their buck went advertising on the social platforms. Now don't you think that. I learn quite a few things about targeting copywriting design call to action network interoperability and so forth that i can immediately apply to block chain advertising. You bet i can. Actually it makes things super easy as these platforms are still in the early stages. While facebook's advertising product is a behemoth in terms of complexity structure and data points compared to these platforms so facebook compared to minds as i mean. It's it's still a joke. Or if you take a p- researches which is a decentralized search engine keywords taking compared to google ad words or google ads. I mean early stages. There's so much that you can take away from everything that you learned on these platforms and apply to the blockchain. Now for you specifically this means the following if you have run ads on any of these platform. I don't care whether that's facebook. I don't care whether that's lengthen pinterest. Snap tiktok whatever you this if you have done. Follow management on twitter or instagram. If you have worked on improving your copywriting skills if you have learnt to shoot and edit videos an audience say for example for youtube if you have engaged in any kind of social media marketing and david these you most definitely can take all that knowledge and apply it one to one to the decentralized marketing networks based on blockchain technology. Remember their technology changes that is there is no one entity controlling whatever it is that you're saying you're putting up now. The only thing. I'd encourage you to do is to stay humble. Be open to learning new things. And more importantly to be willing to engage in marketing activities that are created for humans. Not some stupid machines. And they're all greats like in the early days everybody's setup their pages and all these. Seo thing for google please write for humans create content for humans

Facebook Twitter Youtube Robert Booth Pharma Google Amazon Microsoft Apple Pinterest Instagram David
Protection of Personal Data in Blockchain Technology

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

03:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Protection of Personal Data in Blockchain Technology

"Zor. Res- asks what do you think about. Privacy designed blockchain so. It's kind of interesting because these blockchain's are sort of under attack. I guess you could say from regulation right now. A melted mirrors actually talked about this in the episode that he did with her and lynn alton Where she said that. That's kind of the main thing she'll be looking out for twenty twenty one and i think You know we at this moment that i'm recording this. We only have rumors about what type of regulation it was that Treasury secretary steve mnuchin wanted to put on crypto right. Now because i think actually you privacy coins were in the crosshairs and this was something night. Jessie liu who came on unconfirmed talked about She was the what was it. Former attorney for dc. She's prosecuted a ton of cases are around some of the biggest ones involving illegal. Use bitcoin and via actor state actors like north korea or by the child porn website in in korea. Welcome to video. And and some of the other big criminals like terrorists and stuff and weight point. Is she highlighted by a something that she was noticing in. I can't remember it was the dot enforcement framework actually and I do think you know this is going to be something that comes up again because brian brooks the action control of the currency. Also kind of you know. When i asked him about what how he thought the. Us might regulate privacy. He said oh well you know the. Us is different from other countries because we're We're the victims of terrorism or or were subject to terrorism or something like that and he said that he thought people would be willing to make a trade off for that. Which i thought was very interesting. A really was curious to know what the crypt communities reaction was to that comment. But yeah so. I think we're going to see that kind of come up as a battle and i actually. I would be surprised. If in the end there wasn't some way to have Blockchain side feature privacy prominently because in a way. I can't imagine the technology really taking off in all the ways that it could take off if there wasn't such a feature and you even see that like in a forthcoming episode. I have unconfirmed. It's a panel discussion but there is somebody from the federal reserve who talks about building systems for central bank digital currencies. Who says you know flat out like you can't design these systems unless you have privacy you as a consideration from the beginning he said it cannot be an afterthought and and he's talking about for central bank digital currency so. I really do think that you'd at least some of these vaccines will have to feature it prominently and i. I don't think that we're going to end up with blockchain set it at all. I would be surprised on a long enough time scale. I do think in the in the beginning. There might be a bit of a battle. But i think after we got real adoption then i would be very surprised if we don't start to see more privacy

Blockchain Lynn Alton Steve Mnuchin Jessie Liu Brian Brooks Treasury North Korea DC Korea United States Federal Reserve
Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

Data Skeptic

03:57 min | Last month

Byzantine Fault Tolerant Consensus

"Everyone this is ted. I'm from cornell university. I'm finishing up my phd now my fifth year. I also worked part time at avalanches which is in our startup. i co-founded with adviser. Tell me a little bit about your phd work. What are your specific areas of interest. Yes so i think for the a democ- part you know as a phd. I mostly were distributed systems and that sounds like a very broad topic so more specifically within the systems i'm mostly focused on consensus and within the consensus topic. They are also different kinds of consensus protocol. I mostly focused on so called. Byzantine fault tolerant consensus protocols or t protocols. We are nowadays very hot topics. Pickus people are interested in blockchain technology and walk. Chang's need such kind of consensus in order to work. We'll definitely spend some time. Talking about blockchain byzantine fault. Tolerance is not as newest blockchain. So it's a i guess. An older theory. Could you help some of the listeners with the basics. What is bef t absolutely so. Yeah indeed. I think there has been like misconception. Many people think of b. f. Some kind of new stuff especially in that community even when we're talking about blockchain's but to me when i started my phd at cornell this of t kind of consensus as the coolest consensus at heard of at a time. And before actually dive into that world so what is not so byzantine fault. Tolerance has a weird name. So what is byzantine is. Sounds like the name of the old empire in l. a probably medieval or or some time period and the reason that this kind of protocol got his name as thanks to leslie lamport so may have heard of this research. His very well known ing Systems community clothing his works on taxes all sorts of consensus stuff. The also proposed the name for this new career of consoles protocols to be. Fd consists and beat byzantine just is part of the story if you read his paper about the whole consensus. So let's forget about the name of paying so what this protocol is usually about as maybe you are familiar with the phnom visiting kind of consensus or you know people usually call them crash fault tolerant protocols such as taxes or rafts so those protocols they work great and they're widely adopted by the current industry. Google uses passes as a core for cloud service and the reason that we need to another category of consensus protocol is because this kind of protocol a does not assume malicious behavior by the participating machines nose so that means than those can only crash build knows can only like human beings they can always say. Oh i die and then you just shut down or crashed without creating any noise into the channel into the network so then people begin to think about how we should handle the case where there some node. That could go crazy. Say i'm an node than when i don. I don't die peaceful eight. But i crave bunch of noises. The noise could be interfering the entire natural and even worse. I could be you know. Some zombie not controlled by the x. Turno attackers so i could exhibit arbitrary behaviour visit lab. I'm like a you know the insider send on by some other parties. So i'm like spying this system. So how do you handle this kind of situation in a protocol. While at the same time you still want to achieve the same goal as the noun byzantine one usually call them or crush full tolerant protocols we want to achieve the same goal but was different assumption

Blockchain Leslie Lamport Ing Systems Cornell University TED Chang Google
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 3 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Why NFTs Are Attracting Everyday People to Crypto

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

07:11 min | 4 months ago

Why NFTs Are Attracting Everyday People to Crypto

"Everyone's been talking about tease or non fungible tokens this week for those in the audience, you aren't sure what those are. If you remember Crypto kitties which were unique collectable digital casn I still think they exist. That's just one example Jake. Can you define what a non fungible tokens and then we can dive into why there's so much chatter about them. Now, absolutely, I mean the simple definition of a non fungible. Is a token. That represents a unique asset work to crypto currencies where we have many units that are all worth the same like if I had one ether Laura when ether those are you know they're the same value but if I had one crypto kitty and you had another Crypto Kitty, they actually might be valued totally differently your crypto kitty might be really scarce and valuable might be resume common, and so non fungible tokens they really represent this this. This class of unique assets that's out there. Into what's been going on with them recently, why has there been so much chatter. Well. As someone who's been watching the space for for a very, very long time for from the very beginning. When Rare Pepe? Images were to be traded on counterparty with it seems like about Elian. Years ago. It's a long time ago. How is before Cryptic Eddie's? I think what's what's actually happening is that the space of non fungible assets is maturing a little bit and what we've seen is actually a little bit of interesting early conversion of digital creators are creating art and collectibles and other kinds of NFC assets, and they're starting to trade them on marketplaces in the volume on these marketplaces is going up a bit and related to that I think investors have matured a little bit in their thinking about the NFC space and they've started to position in. Make investments a venture style mostly so far? In companies that are that are in the NFC space in it's been very exciting. And there's even a little bit of the yells farming thing going on within fifteen. So I think that's another reason people are getting excited because even though the crees has died down from the fever pitch, I still see. In it But you actually wrote a really interesting blog post about an of to any you had like another definition that you gave, which is you said that NFC's liquid intellectual property for digital content. So what do you mean by that? Yes. This is exactly. What I've been sort of saying is like most people have so far rushed off the NFC spaces. People trading funny pictures on you know on blockchain's. and. If you sort of thought experiment a little bit in you in, you start to understand a little bit of a kind of financial use cases that NFC's enable. You start to realize that if you take this view of teas as strong ownership of digital contents. Things get quite interesting and the first thing to observe is that there is just like a lot of different kinds of digital contents. Certainly there's certainly there's collectibles. But there's also three d models or metaverse assets. There's also stock photography. There's also blog posts that people right and then monetize through syndication. There's music on which artists earn royalty. There's movies which get distributed on platforms like Netflix on and so forth, and if you start to count up the number of digital objects on the Internet and in the world, you actually start piling up quite an asset classes of objects, and if you start to think of NFC's is being kind of a very fitting technology to denote ownership of these objects to denote the royalty streams of these objects on the start to get away from a little bit of the speculative aspects like, Oh, I buy Crypto, Katie I'm going to. Flip it to somebody else later, and you start to get into the more fundamentally valued aspects of of non fungible assets, which is like, Hey, maybe, I'll own the revenue stream to Taylor, saw Taylor swift song or album or something like that or maybe I'll own the movie rights to certain like digital character that I'll be able to license out and when you take that view of. NFC's as liquid intellectual property. What you start to realize is that most intellectual property doesn't live on secondary markets today, it's kind of liquid and what blockchain enables is the liquidity of these markets, and so the reason that I'm super excited about NFC is as an investor is I think that we're about to unlock a whole lot of value that previously has been in these non-traded like. Paper rights, but as about to get a lot more digital. So I have so many questions about what he said. But before we can into those, I do just want to make one comment, which is I notice near blog posts that you had a chart of different kinds of content and one of them said written content. And underwritten it was like movies and videos, and I was like what about articles and e books as a writer? I just had a point that you missed. Right there because I would not call videos and movies written content and and also like even just knowing your example when you mentioned blog post. So is like their professional writers to who like a living writing But. Anyway. Okay. So we were talking you were talking about if he's from the Creator's perspective, but I wanted to ask also. So right now as a consumer I already have you know multiple libraries of music that I can tap like you know music stream from apple or spotify or Pandora Soundcloud, etc or you know I can go into these different stock photography sites or whatever. So what's in it for the end-consumer like what would get them to make a switch? Because basically democratize is the ownership in in this kind of content, right? So if if you think about of stock photography site today like getty images or shutter stock or something like that, I mean you're talking about a private business that is facilitating marketplace between stock photographers and purchasers of stock photography like designers or making websites, and so on and so forth. And this marketplace model is exactly the thing that blockchain. Technology in my opinion was really born to to disrupt and what basically wh what can happen is we can replace that proprietary provisioning of the marketplace with a decentralized smart contract based system, which is exactly what marketplaces like like recently wearable have done, and we can give the ownership and the governance of that system to the community of people who are participants in that marketplace, and that's really really powerful value proposition that blockchain's in general

NFC Blockchain Jake Pepe Laura Netflix Eddie Taylor Apple Writer Spotify Katie I
Dan Guido of Trail of Bits - The Evolution of Smart Contract Security

Epicenter

03:26 min | 7 months ago

Dan Guido of Trail of Bits - The Evolution of Smart Contract Security

"So I've been doing security stuff for the better part of my life started probably when I was about thirteen fourteen, breaking into my school computers, like when does as when does. Luckily escaped being severely punished for that but I ended up going to college for concentration program and cybersecurity. It was called politicking university when I went there, but now the Nyu School of Engineering and they have one of these NSA center of excellence programs that teach kids a formalized education in Cybersecurity I think the people that are a little bit younger than me have a lot more formalized education and people that are a little bit older than me, don't they learned? Learned from their peers, learned and kind of like a master apprentice kind of set up, so I'm right on the cusp of that, so I have a formal background in computer, science and computer security, and this is the only field that I've ever been interested in working in, so I've worked at the Fed reserve doing incident response, helping prevent people hacking into the currency reserve the United States. I've been a consultant at Isaac Partners now NC group I saw that Isaac. Isaac partners before they were acquired help start their office in the on the East Coast worked with dozens of technology companies across the globe, but I was pretty frustrated that it seemed like an unending treadmill that you kind of go back to clients year after year, and there's always the same bugs, and they don't really internalize the information that you give them. I thought that there was some improvement that we could make, and I wanted to make fundamental improvements to the. The whole field so I found a trail with two friends of mine back in twenty twelve to fundamentally advance the science of computer, science and computer security I think by and large succeeded at doing that very small ways. The company started as a Darpa contractor. We worked on for your long research programs in Automated Program Analysis and Advanced Cryptography, and then from there we've branched out to help provide those advances to commercial firms and now to blockchain firms, so that's. I guess the medium length overview of where I came from and what we're doing now. Tell us about how you got interested in blockchain as a cryptographic field. Because basically found a trade of bits and two thousand twelve, and obviously, then it was pretty new, so what exactly spoke to you about it? A couple of things I think it was really driven by employee interest there about two or three people in the company that were just really enamored with blockchain technology, because it was a Greenfield, not necessarily because it was anything that you could do with blockchain, but because the field was in its infancy, it was a chance to start over it was there were no security tools. There was no security knowledge. People were building their own programming languages building their own compilers. The execution environment looked a little bit different, so there was this huge gap of knowledge that we could rush into fill and create things that were. From the first step back about three to four years ago, we had a couple people dabbling in that area of technology, and what we contributed was a symbolic verifier. That was our very first thing. We didn't raise our hands and say hey. We'll audit your code for you. We're engineers, so we set up a little unit of people that wrote Symbolic Capable A. A theory in virtual machine, a tool that we have called manticore, and then once we were able to do that. We realized that Hey, this is actually kind of valuable and people would love to work with us to improve their own security, so because we'd already mastered the field through that activity that research activity. That's how we started offering services for

Isaac Partners Isaac Nyu School Of Engineering FED United States Darpa Greenfield Consultant East Coast NC
Interview With Chris Coney and Tony Dada

The Cryptoverse

07:30 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Chris Coney and Tony Dada

"When did it stop for you? When did you get the The bug as it were twenty fifteen? It was twenty eight. Fifteen five years five years ago. Yeah why don't you think about it like that? But yet I've been in the game is so what happened. I mean because you know was it. Was it like a Eureka moment because for many people they still don't understand what this whole thing was games about. Tell us a little bit in one of the things about Chris. Leads is really good at explaining simply finding so how would you simply explain this whole cryptocurrency space for people so I use Russian? Dole's right big rich Dole. The smaller one inside small on his side. Right so I have this little one two three that I put these together I say. Bitcoin cryptocurrencies and blockchain right. Those are the three big words thrown around. But the reason. I mentioned the Russian dolls and explaining to the SEC. He's like Bitcoin. The low one fits inside big Agricole cryptocurrency which fits inside a bigger calgary cold blockchain technology right so. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and cryptocurrencies puzzle because of blockchain technology right so that's the overview of how it all fit together so SA- bitcoin was the first the first example. A something that was digital that could not be copied. That's basically the revolutionary break-through. So if you think you know when all the file sharing networks came along the music labels lost their mind because you know. Cd's were great but then yet these CD copiers in your home pc see could copy albums but it was still you had to buy the disks and no one knew how to do it but when went digital it was an MP three file. You could just emailed you friends. That's the beauty of digital. Is that he just send a song across web. That's why streaming services so popular now is because it's convenient for the listener. Both the labels get to maintain control of the files right because before it was just a free for all wherever was sharing files everywhere. No one was paying for them. And that's because if something's digital you just copy a million times which means the song lost. Its value count. You can't sell it anymore. 'cause won't buys it. She has friends which is why you couldn't have digital money because if you got coin there's a digital file on your computer. You can make a million Kobe. Kobe scored and then it has no value. Because you can make an infinite number of gold right goes out. It's called in the ground therefore retains its value because of that. So that's that's the big takeaway is. Bitcoin was the first ever thing that was digital. That could not be copied. And that's how come it can be named digital money. It can be digital and it holds its value because he can't just copy and paste the Bitcoin so that was where it will began with that and everything exploded from that by well okay so it used to be really cheap like it used to be ridiculously cheap. We've said that every it was great in two thousand nine and add no value. Was you know didn't have a didn't have a price wasn't traded against anything so? Bitcoin is just to Bitcoin with just the bitcoin being passed around amongst in the inventors view like And it was just won't Bitcoin was being sent here there and everywhere until someone was willing to say you give the the Bitcoin. Now give you some. Us dollars at that point is it gets a price which is a an exchange rate and the famous story is the the first of actual transaction. Was someone on a discussion for said someone by me to Pepperoni pizzas and have them delivered to my house. And I'll send you ten thousand bitcoin so that was kind of like the pizza place. Took the dollars so would pay for the UK the twenty dollars for the pizzas delivered to my house when they go to live without. Send you the ten thousand bitcoin. Summer fest of Patches with Bitcoin. Ten Thousand Bitcoins petits and if that person still has those ten thousand bitcoins ads. Are you like less like how much they pay pieces? Cause Bitcoin might nights trading it nine thousand while human bitcoin and nine thousand dollars ten thousand bitcoin ninety I don't to night. How many million ninety million dollars now granted? You had to wait ten years because I was in two thousand nine so if if that pass and if obeyed ten dollars bitcoin sound them till twenty twenty. That twenty dollars would be ninety million and not have to pieces. God now that brings me onto the point because rolling with you. I mean you've you've enabled me to to to learn and what I've come to realize. Is that most people stay broke. We came just going to say it a case that most people stay broke because they just don't have vision in the sense that like you just talked about the pizza guy. I mean I've seen Things that you show me where you know. Bitcoin is concerned and there were forces at work that that trying to shake your hand to make if you're holding bitcoin. That will give you full snow and ideas about what's really happening. Trump took about the vision. Because unless you're very clear about and have an understanding of what this cryptocurrency weld is about. You'll give you you'll sell your. Bitcoin says the price goes down right so without takes. My mind is the rural of fads in the business world. Psycho Tony's Tony's doing Amazon FDA or Tony's doing shopper fire to property always doing internet modeling almost like almost like the passing fads. The they come and you make a bit of money from him and then they go. So or Tony's doing four x four x take instagram so disposable right and that that's fine but some people. I had a lot of people especially when it exploded in two thousand seventeen. We're talking about it like that. The language was on now. Now Tony's doing bitcoin like as if it's just the next thing like the next fad to play with until it comes and goes and that's that's how people have tried it because it was like it was hard because the price was absolute mental. And then when pretend to know melody be Blah. Last that fad passed in the pocket. And maybe for the reason you said which is unless you really understand what is about in a broader context. You will just pick it up like a fat and put it down and if the thing that got your attention was the price going from three thousand to twenty thousand. Well then you missing the whole game

Bitcoin Tony Calgary Chris Dole SEC Kobe United States Instagram CD UK Donald Trump Amazon
End to end solutions against COVID-19  insights from Blok BioScience

Insureblocks

05:16 min | 9 months ago

End to end solutions against COVID-19 insights from Blok BioScience

"For this week's podcast rigby discussing end to end solutions against couve in nineteen with special insights from block bioscience. And I'm very pleased to have returning to intra blogs aerial Walla no CTO of block bioscience and managing director of experts aerial. Thank you for joining us today for those listeners. Who Haven't heard you in our first podcast. Could you please give them a quick introduction on yourself and on block bioscience they'd thanks and It's great to be back. My Name's Arielle. I've been working in the blockchain space for a while. Is it six years now. It's a longtime Komo experts. Blockchain Because we are all still figuring out a lot as we go but I've had the good fortune to work on a number of really interesting solutions from trade finance to insurance And now working Working in the biotech industry on something. That's really needed excellent. Excellent so as you'll recall our first question is could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work but here? I'm I'm curious to see if your definition has changed since the last time you are on the show due to the work you're doing it blocked bioscience so if if memory serves the definition. I gave you a hasn't changed much. Which is that blockchain technology that allows multiple companies where people to share a single version of the truth Without having to spend any time effort or money on reconciliation messaging Synchronization Or other such that the benefit from from gained from That sharing often allows completely new business. Models or new ways of solving problems. Ought to be possible in terms of how it's changed. I think the the main thing that's changed is a very welcome maturation of thought blockchain. I think it's fair to say no longer. A thing on. It is a tool kit For solving problems And for accomplishing what previously would take large numbers of people or expensive software solutions off. That can now be taken for granted when two people are talking and one is sharing a. I found this amazing new APP on my phone. What what we what I wouldn't say to you is. I found this amazing new APP in my phone and it runs the IP stack. That's given so if we're now talking about a solution and that solution includes our two companies Having a common record of a piece of data the presumed solution is that you would use blockchain so that you would share that single solution than do after create a business function hired people or build software to keep our version of that that data and yours in sync great great and I have very fond memories of our podcast where you took us all the way back to the Sumerians to talk about the Boola but I'll let our listeners to check it out for those. Who Haven't had the chance to actually on your on your on your webpage that Keith. Bear actually Commented on similar context of the indeed Princeton this world so in our last podcast I introduced you as managing director offensive experts. Now you've added to that the role of CTO block bioscience. What is blocked by? What is your mission blockbuster? Science is Is A team of thought. Leaders thought leaders in the medical industry thought LEADERS IN TECHNOLOGY THOUGHT LEADERS AND SUPPLY CHAIN. Who grouped together because we think that is needed fast that it needs to reflect how quickly things are changing And that it needs to represent Delivering the best possible medical diagnostic and supply chain capability to the fight The unprecedented impact that covert nineteen is having on the world. Ob conserve experts has entered into a business partnership with block and we are providing The technology delivery capability. But that's only one piece of block block is also about the medical expertise on supply chain in the network of relationships To get things where they need to go on and together we are creating The solution that we're talking about today. Excellent so just to confirm this blog bioscience was created because of the president pandemic or was it created prior to that block solutions. Which is which is this. Group of thought leaders will was already created what we did is mobilized specifically to solve this problem. We've been working on it Pretty much since since Cova I started You know emerging from China in in late January.

Cto Block Bioscience Managing Director CTO Rigby Komo Cova President Trump Keith China Princeton Bear
AAIS OpenIDL update and developing a network data strategy

Insureblocks

09:24 min | 10 months ago

AAIS OpenIDL update and developing a network data strategy

"Joann thank you for joining us today. I can't believe it's been eighteen months since our last podcast for our listeners. Who Haven't heard our first podcast. Could you please give them a creaky deduction on yourself? Well thank you. Well lead happy to be here again. A lot has happened in the last eighteen months. And it's great to have a chance to catch up with you I have a background technology as a CIO. Even though I'm a operations senior vice president operations today and I've been with a s a national advisory Organization for the past eight years a serving in both capacities so with that We have completely restructured the way we serve as a national advisory organization and that led us to the creation of open idea and I am the executive sponsor of the open ideal brilliant. Thank you so much for that. So like in our lives podcast in September. Two thousand eighteen. Could you please explain to our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work but additionally this time I'm curious to know? How much has your opinion changed over the last eighteen months? Blockchain is a technology. It's a distributed ledger. Technology and that is a a starting point for lots of things that could be done with this technology. What makes what makes it different than other? Say Data Technologies is that it is a distributed ledger in which a copy of the ledger is available on. All of the nodes the participants in the network and that solves a key problem that is existed with other technologies that we have an immutable record with blockchain technology that we don't with other data technologies so it enables us to create systems networks based on that concept and it can be used for a wide variety of a solution such as transactional networks or in the case of the open ideal using it as an analytic platform so the technology itself provides a secure way to store data it provides transparency in how data is used and then it provides that immutable record that is so critical to trusting any activity that happens with with the data on the network. Then after that. There's lots of things that you can do. In terms of private data stores. How transactions happen and get stored on the network And how the results of those applications are delivered to the participants. So we're going to see lots of blockchain networks but they're all going to look very different accents. Thank you very much for that so for our listeners who Aaron familiar with the American Association of Insurance Services. As could you give a little introduction on it please? So in the United States the insurance industry is regulated at the state level and there is a mechanism to provide some consistency between all those state regulations. And that's a national advisor organization so our or our company is formed by regulation and we are licensed in all fifty states to do a couple of things. One is we serve as a bridge between the carriers and the regulators and the way they Exchange information or share data and through that exchange we also use some of that data to create products such as a homeowner's policy with a rating plan or an auto plan and with that we then bring consistency across all the states in the way those products are delivered to the market. And certainly the curious pick up our products and the ad a lot of value on top of that that that baseline is what we're doing for the industry and we've been doing it that way at for over eighty years and we know that it is not as efficient as it should be and it needs to be modernized because we have different needs for data today in our industry so while we've been doing this for eighty years a lot changing for us as well as as for the carriers themselves brilliant. Brennan so in August two thousand eighteen. You launched the open. Insurance data link known as open ideal. Could you please give us a recap on what is over ninety? L? And the problems. It's looking to address well. We didn't know that we are going to create the open ideal when we started on this journey. We actually started with the problems we needed to address. We knew that The way we were collecting data and sending the reports over to the regulators was fundamentally broken. There were a lot of pain points in all of the participants in that process. The old style statistical data plans had been used forever. Don't contain enough information for. As in advise you organization to do everything we need to do. The result of that is that the regulators also found the same thing that they stabbed plans. Don't have the graded answer the question. They're getting from their legislatures. So they started doing data calls many years ago where they go directly to the carriers now and they go around the adviser organizations to get the data they need that was causing a lot of pain points with the carriers they see increasing volumes of data leaving the security of their data centers being transferred to third parties and they don't have any insight into how that data's being used once it leaves they worried about security that data so through a number of design thinking sessions. We were able to identify those pain points. And then look at what the possible solutions might be and as we looked at the data technologies that are available today and were at the time we had a number of problems with those platforms in terms of data security when large files are being transferred from one entity to another the transparency. In how that data's being used in then of course As a regulated industry that audible record that immutable audible record about all of the activities that are occurring with that data. So that's what led us to the use of blockchain technology and we started with a prototype. That turned out very successful. It solve the problems of the curious and the regulators We went through one Pivot on our architecture. We changed the way we think. About what stored on chain and how we ensure the privacy of data in that resulted in the open ideal that we have today so that architecture has been completed. It's it's stable. And we're now building out the network for increased use We have some prototypes around regulatory reporting. it's not being used for all the regulatory reporting that's occurring today but the regulators in the carriers love it and so we're moving forward with it now. Okay so you've been running for for eighteen months and you mentioned on some of the prototypes that you've been running during this period of time. Could you share with us? Some of the data points that demonstrate the impact open ideal has head has added to the property and casualty industry in the US. Will the impact has been? I on how it's changed the relationship between the carriers and the regulators and how they think about using data for the benefits of the entire industry in the past. It was kind of a contentious. The relationship that lacked trust and so the first thing that the open idea brought in to the community was that sense of trust. Then we've been able to work on a number of reports that bring value to both the carriers and the regulators that was a key component of our design. If we're going to ask security is to provide data around for example a cause of loss To the regulator so they can make good policy about that. They'd like to get some value back. And what we've been able to do is create reports on a statewide or national basis that allows the regulators to understand what a cause of loss might be offer fire or some sort of other catastrophe. And then the carriers can see that reported the state or national level and they can compete against the data that they have internally and make better decisions at the same time so the platform itself has changed the way this whole process is viewed and the regulators now are so excited about it that we have a coalition of those regulators that are interested in changing the laws about how regulatory reporting occurs To make the use of this blockchain platform the standard in the future and the carriers are excited about it because they've seen the value and regulatory reporting but they've also seen the value in the new data stores that are available through the blockchain network. And how that might be used not only for regulatory reporting but also for some of their internal operations as well.

Data Technologies Blockchain United States Joann CIO Senior Vice President Operatio American Association Of Insura Advisor Brennan Aaron Executive
Crypto-plumbing with Arwen CEO Sharon Goldberg

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

09:42 min | 11 months ago

Crypto-plumbing with Arwen CEO Sharon Goldberg

"So why don't we start out I like ask all my guests about their origin stories. Because it's fascinating especially at this stage to hear all of the different drivers that ultimately propelled people into this industry What what was your background. How did you initially get into crypto and and then how as an entrepreneur did you settle on Arwen as the project that you really wanted to drive forward for years? Yes so actually I. I didn't start out as an entrepreneur and I I still find that description to be a little odd because my background is really technology. I'm a computer science professor at Boston. University and I started out as a PhD student. Really the my interest in this field came during my phd and it was really only about two and a half years ago that I kind of jumped out of academia started this company with one of my Phd Students. So so the story is really really doesn't start from entrepreneurship. It starts from really technology and engineering and being an academic so I started my PhD at Princeton in two thousand and four and I actually started out doing optical engineering. I was doing like conveying conveying communication messages over light at the time in two thousand and four and so somehow I fell into this project which we were studying encryption using light so using light to encrypt signals and then about three or four months into that project I realized I didn't understand would encryption actually was like what is the definition of encryption. Like we all kind of no. I didn't really know well enough to actually develop systems or think about them and so I took a course in cryptography at Princeton in two thousand and five boss black and you know at the time. I was an engineering student so I didn't really understand. Cryptography at all because Christophe at that time at Princeton was taught as a theoretical computer science topic and I went into this class and I just loved it. I just like I fell in love with it. I ended up deciding that I was GONNA switch my focus for my PhD. I ended up switching advisors Moving from electrical engineering into computer science and really really wanted to work on cryptography In two thousand five after I took that course and it was like this thing that happened where I got involved in this Carson. I just like couldn't do anything else. I was spending like three days a week. Out of five studying for my crypto class which was really unacceptable because I was supposed to be producing research as you know my PhD. And I wasn't doing any really so that went on for four months. They finish that course I switched. I switched into computer science and then I realized I wasn't very good at being a cryptographer because I still wasn't a computer scientist and so I started working on something I didn't know which was communications networking and back in two thousand five. Two thousand sticks in the early cohort of people working on network security still applying to internet technology And that's what I did for my PhD. And I finished in two thousand nine as network security researcher in academia at the time no one really knew what network security was in academia. I remember having to answer questions about whether I was. Ics theorist or was I building systems. No one really understood and and then you know became a professor at Byu in two thousand ten and was there for a while and by the time you know. Two Thousand Fifteen came around years in. Everyone understood exactly what I was doing because there are a bunch of us who had kinda come up at the same time. We're doing this type of research which is really applying. Cryptography Two Systems. And so that's my background relief from academia and I've always you know all through my career I've always been really drawn to like building systems getting people to use them but also with like crazy new advanced technology And so I did that for for a long time in academia really focused on the Internet so internet routing DNS like the naming system. I did a bunch of work on network time so how your computer gets time on. Its clock all that stuff literally the plumbing of the Internet. I love that stuff and then in two thousand thirteen I have A. PhD student. Joined my lab. His name is Ethan Almond spoiler. He's my co-founder And he was obsessed with Bitcoin so I was aware of Bitcoin up until twenty thirteen. But I wasn't obsessed with it but Ethan was obsessed with it and You know having him in my lab you know initially came in. He worked on problems that I was interested in. So our first two papers together. Actually our internet routing security but then after that you know it was like apparent that we were going to have to work on Bitcoin twenty fourteen. We started working on Bitcoin and we wrote a couple of papers together. One of them is Eclipse attacks so if you're interested in blockchain technology you're probably aware of the standard attack on blockchain's which is basically you surround a node with adversaries. Feed it bad information. That's called an eclipse attack. Because you've owned all the connections to that node menu can just lie to it and tell it all these things so we actually were the first really to think about that in the context of blockchain and Bitcoin in two thousand fifteen he was. You know a a bunch of improvements to the bitcoin protocol that we came up with us part of that paper that actually ended up contributing to bitcoin core. And that was sort of where this whole thing started. We'd abundance more things together one of them tumble bits. Which is a mixing protocol for Bitcoin? On that we did in two thousand sixteen and that was really when we started to notice what was happening in the industry and the amount of excitement innovation that was happening industry and we as a professor at like some of the stuff that people were doing at that time. It's hard to describe. It's like it's like take your most brilliant first year Grad student who has really no training in how to think about this really advanced technology has just taking the latest and greatest things and just throwing them together and coming up with new systems and there were many many projects like that. It was really really interesting to to see that happening. And we were watching that From Inside Byu an eastern and I were just like every month we we need to a company when he just turned down and And so we did in In the middle of twenty seventeen on. That's how we that's how we started our win so but I never really. It wasn't in the plan like I kind of thought it would be interesting to to work on a startup or to work at a startup but this was just sort of a perfect storm of like interest in what we were doing Watching what other people were doing looking at what we knew how to do. And just saying like we have to go out and try and see what happens and so here. I am two and a half years later. Still on leave from working at the start tends to be out happens when you fall on the rabbit hole. What some see what if anything has changed about the direction and and general focus of company. Because I think the problem that you're working on now and in terms of Basically facilitating exchange without giving up control or custody of your own. Assets is In many respects the holy grail for security without losing all the benefits of of this highly liquid tradable asset class. Yeah I mean so. There's a lot of things I want to say here. I so I think the reason I'm in this face to start with. Is this whole aspect of what we call non-custodial the non-custodial nature of a lot of this trading or settlement or or security. All of that stuff is what fascinates me right. So what is so interesting about blockchain technology? Right I can have control of my asset holding cryptographic keys and I can do things with my asset. But I'm not trusting any single party I'm trusting the blockchain and that is just really almost like the holy grail for cryptography. Because what cryptography. Actually is you look at your systems and you look at all the different points of failure and you just try to get rid of them. One by one and in traditional cartography we always have this notion. It's almost like a cop out of this trusted third party. So if you look at for example if you look at for example which is what secures your connections on the Internet. Https we all see the little lock in the corner of our browsers like at the end of the day. What is securing Ta less? It's actually these things called certificate authorities which are trusted to certify the correctness of public keys and one of the things I worked on know previously is just like the amount of places that you can attack the certificate authorities because they're essentially a single points of failure and it's even worse in fact. It's like multiple single points of failure the system. So when you look at cryptography and you look at like the way these systems applied it always kind of goes back to this one single point of failure and this is what we hate as script carver's right and so when the whole blockchain technology burst onto the scene like the the the fascinating and and and breakthrough aspect of this from a technologist sense as you've eliminated the trusted party. And so you know you talk about. Cypher Pound Libertarian. Like I'm really cryptography. Academic in background. But we always look for like. How do we get rid of the trusted third party? And blockchain does that and that's the reason that it's fascinating right and so when I look at the space and when I am in the space and why I think almost everyone on my team is in the space I is is the same reason. Is that we. We look at this technology in an issue. It just allows us to do things in a way that eliminates risk eliminates centralized agents eliminates trusted parties. And that's fascinating and that's something that's impossible you know in the regular world. You just can't do that with money with Fiat. You can't do that with stock certificates or corn. You can't do that with with traditional assets but you can with with blockchain

Blockchain Professor Princeton Ethan Almond Boston BYU Researcher Christophe Fiat Carson Co-Founder Scientist
Tracking Coronavirus with blockchain by Acoer

Insureblocks

06:28 min | 11 months ago

Tracking Coronavirus with blockchain by Acoer

"For this week's podcast. We'll be discussing tracking corona virus with blockchain by Ecuador. And I'm very pleased to how gymnast. Ceo Eko. Jim. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners cooking deduction on yourself? Yes Hi will eat great to talk you good evening in in London and yeah thank you for having me on your podcast of her prior once in a very good job I think the content is very relevant so lower the background about myself on the Sea of a core acor is a software development company. very narrowly focused on what? I consider modern open as in Iraq. Rable Helped us off right. And wherever it makes sense is relevant blockchain enablement of acknowledging. That's really what we do at Acor. Acworth been around for about five years. It's when I wrapped up my the either Start UP. A head cold our media. I started acorn an for low while I did my own engagements on machine learning and predictive analytics and things like this. And then then for little while I kind of Moved on to some other engagements specifically working at the CDC The Centers for Disease Control in the US and really kind of getting much more much more detail into healthcare. And I'll be calc in particular and then now circa twenty twenty really kind of I guess a lot more experience really any domain much better understanding some of the mechanics business models and data sources and obviously connections within the space in thinking. This is the right time to really get back into software development As part of a core and I'm fortunate to have a very very very good team of developers that have come along with me and we're you know essentially trying to deliver on this mission of building modern Open interoperable technology healthcare brilliant brilliant so as you rightly say use blockchain from time to time way makes sense so let's discuss a little bit about what is blockchain. And how does it work? Yeah you know a good question. I think he's probably the kind of question for which you get a different answer every time and and Drag and maybe for good reason depending on to whom you're speaking So here's my read on it. I think of blockchain as Three pillars if you like not to be confused with that conjoined triangle of success silicon valley reference but three pillars that. Really make this undercurrent as lock chain or distributed Ledger Technology. So the first pillar. I think that many people are probably familiar with the prayed about this distributed. Ledger idea. This I think set of technologies protocols and things that we have spoken about at length and I don't really want to necessarily going to again. I think I think There's plenty of information around including on your prior podcasts. Just talking about this. So there's technology I think the second pillar is this idea of of what I think of as value creation attribution That blockchain's and really here. I'm referring to public blockchain's in again not not to derail the conversation. But but I'm GONNA when it comes to quote enterprise blockchain's I think in many many cases that they're really not necessary in that have significant issues. In terms of computational trust which is really the reason why WanNA use blockchain and I think in many cases than did no more than sexy version of an enterprise portal but nonetheless I think this idea of valuation attribution is very very important to public blockchain. Because you know essentially this is where blockchain reward you if done correctly in a public setting transplant manner rewards you for creating value so if you take for instance the bitcoin network the minors. They're racing to solve a mathematical challenge which requires them to make investments in Graphic processing units and and certainly electricity and things like this and if they do resolve that challenged and they get a reward for it to get the twelve hundred bitcoins and fees and such so. This is really kind of a very very important. Concept that non necessarily available in other kinds of technologies or other kinds of patterns. So I think a very very important concept is one that really largely falls into this idea of token economics which is really again is based on science of Game Theory As you have spoken just recently my myself and my collaborative our CTO and my collaborator ban. We have written a course and took an economics for the Georgia's I certainly very much believe in is a fundamental differentiator for for blockchain technologies third last. But not least certainly is is kind of pillar of of you know what I think of as distributed architecture and and distributed computing where really. It's a culture culture question where you actively want to distribute competing power distributed power of united kind governance across many knows many different participants as opposed to have one or two or three central figures central terrorism and That's the motley go with. So I think fundamentally if you put those three pillars to get it s away I think about blockchain essentially the technology this idea of talking economics and this culture of of distributed computing and removing mediaries and central Data centers and. Things like

Blockchain Blockchain Technologies CEO Iraq JIM Acor EKO Ecuador Cdc The Centers For Disease Co Rable CTO United States London Twenty Twenty Georgia
Vinturas  finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain

Insureblocks

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Vinturas finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain

"We will be discussing into us. Finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have John Cooper. Ceo US. John. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners cooking deduction on yourself? Yes thank you very much. My name is Sean Kapoor. And since one year she of Fin Tunas Beck around in Finnish vehicle just as a CEO of one of the leading logistics service providers in this industry before this worked for many years in corporate jobs in mostly operations and supply chain great great. Thank you very much for that. So could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work? Yeah I'm sure many of your listeners have read and heard about blockchain and basically I can tell you what blockchain means means for us in our in our business segment of supply chain for finished vehicle. Logistics important for us is the book chain of course distributed. Let let your infrastructure but it allows us to create an infrastructure where we can truly collaborate with each other as logistics providers basically as all stakeholders in the ecosystem and through an in-depth collaboration define a single through some older transactional processes that are happening in the Finnish. Vehicle supply chain. I'll probably get your community from you to explain later. What exactly that means. But this is what blockchain technology means for us in a Finnish vehicles by chain drake. Thank you very much for that. So I read a study by the global market insights that value the automotive logistics markets size at over one hundred fifteen billion dollars in two thousand eighteen and it is estimated to grow to one hundred seventy billion dollars by two thousand twenty five. Could you tell us a little bit about the finished? Vehicles supply chain industry and some of the challenges it faces from a high level perspective. Lease happily do basically if you look to this very important industry segment. Of course you see the changes in your motive in the Swedish everybody sees the move to mobility services to move to electric etc and becomes more more about loving the brands than loving the product in in terms of mobility. Move to mobility services. And what you see that changing segment is a few key issues. Few key themes one. If the one is to structure lack of real time supply chain visibility can a dinner at least in Europe. Tell you exactly where that you've ordered from the factory on its way to the leader. You're the challenges. Of course. It's normal pressure on reducing the cost infrastructure for oems and combined the significant amount of inefficiency that we have because of scattered supply chain lots of paperwork etc and thirdly to challenge we have in Europe is the fact that he remarketing industry company selling cars. Let's say lease companies or rental companies selling cars after the initial us into Europe. This is really become a European market Europe market as a structural lack of collaboration transport capacity and end to end visibility for this specific industry segment. Great great let's. Let's take each of these three points one by one and so the first one by the structural lack of real time supply chain visibility. Now I understand that when new vehicle is generally distributed by three to four logistics providers also known. Lsp's before he had arrived at its final destination that most of these processes are executed via paper based ones. Could he tell us a little bit more about it? And what are the outcomes issues of that? Yeah indeed in the process from factory to dealer. There are multiple handover points between different logistics services provided to you think about officials to transport vehicles from for example a UK manufacturing site to European continent onto a terminal onto a trick of yet another service provider. Multiple handover points that are managed historically because Infortunately this industry suffers from a lot of legacy systems in suppliers but also in so for months standardized data exchange and also suffers from the fact that all these handover processes are done by paper. The result of that is that. Oem's don't have real end to end real time visibility auto supply chain and result that is also that dealer when he's ordered from the factory often knows when it is manufactured that not when will actually arrive for the customer and as a consequence of that data. Kennel plan to the last mile processes like adding towbar ordering formats. Most important more important telling the customer wind equal arrived can use it when he goes on holiday so this is pretty crazy because in a sense you know most customers are are used to an Amazon shopping experience. Where you can trace you know. Virtually by our where your product is is not a big issue with regards to logistical problem. And how the GUZM receptionist of it you can almost. It's unacceptable that in this industry. This service does not exist yet. Where Technology of course enables this And it's not. It's not rocket science to implementers a structure like this industry. So we thought this is to start off interest and we'll talk about later we need. We need to move the needle here. We need to do with. Technology enables and to provide to our customers exactly and now. I also understand that. Oem's original equipment. I factors along with fleet owners have tried for decades and to improve their cost base by tendering for activities in a logistical process. Why has why has that been a success? Yeah you're right. And certainly when when like everybody we are looking for breakthrough cost reductions further tendering and tendering basically asking every company who can drive as at the lowest cost from eight to be just not really create value in industry. And of course if you tender you do not optimize your networks. You do not take out wasting the process you just pushing on the same bits. And all the time they'll the margins are so low that it cannot investing in technology solutions. You never got the breakthrough solutions that you're looking for And and the third challenge the explained is the one around the European remarketing industry. Now what do you mean by that Remarks basically of course since Internet's is available for everybody in everywhere in the market for selling used vehicles? Let's say he actually vehicles for years old. This market has become truly European. It means you can sell a folks wagon Polo in Poland at a better price. Then you can in Spain so this leads to a lot of transport requirements and a lot of cross-border traffic and especially in this traffic a lot of issues with fraud on used vehicles. Most of his notice seems mild Florida's most. Most people are familiar wits. If you buy a used car you also need to be careful. That the Marlins is okay but also a lot of issues and throw it in cross-border traffic as importer import taxes. Importation you had high fell U S. It's so generally speaking throat delivers a lot of value for people want to act fraudulently. Now when when we're talking about remarking are we talking like you know Consumer to consumer where I can sell a car my car just someone arlen or someone in France or are we talking. More like bb name where its fleet? Managers selling their cars to two other companies. It's basically a B. Two B. companies selling their used vehicles to other companies other other parts of European countries of Europe and basically all these companies after objective to act interior to have just could business but many of many things many processors that are running are invisible in other words. If I sell to somebody in another country you accept my offer for car I sell. I can get my money. I cannot see the fraud that is behind his like for example the mileage for fraud so many B. to B. Companies in Europe. In general terms are looking for really solutions eliminate fraud in these processes.

Europe CEO Fraud John Cooper OEM United States Sean Kapoor Fin Tunas Beck Marlins UK Florida LSP Infortunately Spain Amazon
A Throwback Way to Hire Tech Workers: Apprenticeships

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:45 min | 1 year ago

A Throwback Way to Hire Tech Workers: Apprenticeships

"Every company wants to be a company. One consequence of that tech workers workers are in higher demand than ever and companies are struggling to fill their open positions so some of them are going about things the old fashioned way. They're bringing in apprentices our reporter Adam. Shot is here to explain how they're doing it. Adam thanks so much for joining us. You're welcome okay. Let's start start by zooming out. What exactly is the problem? Here for companies. What are they trying to address? The problem is there are many entry level roles that are going unfilled eld today especially in. It support and programming. And they're not enough college graduates to fill those roles. Also college graduates prefer more skilled jobs. As opposed to entry level jobs that could be in support of a website or other tasks so companies are now turning to high-school graduates and those who hold. GED's to actually fill those roles and they're being trained to actually start working in the company they're given a salary and the training typically lasts about twelve to twenty four months and at the end of the training. They're put into full-time jobs with the full skills they're expected to display. It used to be the companies were only competing with other tech companies for talent but now most companies have attack tech team so they're competing with everyone to get people in the door. Let's talk a little bit about these companies. It doesn't surprise me at all. The Bosh is leading the way here. Germany has has a very well known well established history of apprenticeships. But I do know that TAC was always one of those areas where they still were specifically looking for people who had college alleged degrees so Germany implemented this program and now we're seeing that being replicated in the US that's correct in two thousand. Fourteen Obama called he talked about during a state of union. He pointed out. APPRENTICESHIPS is being more geared towards the traditional jobs that could be vocational and he talked about the importance of apprenticeship in new areas like healthcare and technology. Ever since. Then there's been a lot of focus on starting those apprenticeship issue programs in the US especially in companies that are using a lot more tech and are increasing the hiring of tech workers. You mentioned the way in which these apprenticeships usually are. Set Up twelve to twenty four months programs on the job trainings. What do they do to supplement the education that somebody would have gotten in a college program Graham for example? The idea is to make sure that these people will get the skills that they need and get a salary at the same time. It's what IBM calls a pay as you go education method so they don't take on the debt of college but get the skills necessary to actually do a job so in in one case. IBM trained A nurse to actually take on a job in blockchain and it's only a support job so in this case she was given the skills necessary to support the blockchain technology at IBM one thing. I'm sure people are thinking about. Are these apprentices taking a payout now for less pay later One of the things that we often look at our that people are going back to college to get master's degrees because they they think that is going to get them to the next level of employment. So do they talk at all. About what kind of career pass these apprentices can expect to have if they they don't have that four year college degree a lot of these programs actually especially the one from IBM and the one being implemented by Bausch they're actually certified by the Department of Labor and at the end of the apprenticeship programs the actually get a certificate on the kind of skills that they've obtained so those skills could be moved to a new company in some cases the The apprentice may not want to continue on the job but they can take that certificate from the Department of Labor on that specific specific skill to another job so it becomes an important part of the resume I just pilot programs or are the companies expecting to build them out in some way in New New York City there are about three percent of apprenticeship programs are dedicated to tech and that's not enough According to a particular study I read. So there's not enough focus on technology right now though. The focus growing a lot of the companies still are little hesitant in hiring anyone the one with just a high school degree the still prefer to look for talent with the four year degree. It's a mentality that they have that they're trying to overcome. So some companies are breaking molds and looking at this new talent just because there is a need. It's interesting actually. If you think about the people who who are heads of a lot of these big companies college dropout is something that you read on a lot of their resumes. That is true this in this case case a lot of the apprenticeship programs are geared towards people who cannot afford college at all so with the case of Barclays. They're actually really working with underserved communities or underprivileged communities in the city to actually hire talent so it adds diversity to their workforce as well so this problem actually addresses an issue of those who just cannot afford to go to college or does with associates degree. Who Don't want to go to college? But only join the workforce. Are there any challenges that they're running into as they're implementing these programs here in the US. Yes one one of the challenges the mindset especially with the human resources folks folks the challenge is to especially in engineering companies like Bosch where the talent level is highly skilled for them. The challenge is to convince the engineering engineering heads to. Actually you know. Think differently about hiring people so in this case Bosh is actually hiring. Software programmers to develop technologies for autonomous cars. And these are jobs that are typically geared towards a four year degree holders also. They're running into challenges with employees are technical people who could be mentors because it takes a lot of time to make sure the the apprentices is actually learned during the program and the learning experience is actually fun so these people are busy. They don't have time and they have to take time out of their busy schedules. Israel's to do that and some of them are really excited about this Idea mentoring new talent shot. Thank you so much for joining

United States IBM Adam Reporter Germany Department Of Labor Bosh Barack Obama Barclays Bosch Graham Israel New New York City Blockchain Bausch
How to monetize and tokenize data  Insights from Ocean Protocol

Insureblocks

08:46 min | 1 year ago

How to monetize and tokenize data Insights from Ocean Protocol

"I'm very pleased to have Bruce Bruce Pond founder of ocean protocol. Bruce could you please give listeners a quick introduction on yourself. Yeah I got into the blockchain space about almost six years ago. So Trent mccown again myself we. We're kind of early to the space in getting excited about bitcoin and Then seeing how the tools bitcoin or the concepts of bitcoin could be applied into nonfinancial use cases like data before that essentially I was this building banks around the world for over a decade in Asia in North America as well as in Europe and that informed a lot of the way that I was thinking about how we could upbraid the financial system and Bitcoin was a strong inspiring on a factor for for us to for myself to jump away from building banks and move into building building infrastructure to unlock data. Brilliant Brilliant. So here at inch long we always ask all our speakers acres first question which is what is blockchain. And how does it work defense he giving a defining it. I given a lot of talks at at multiple levels of abstraction and the best way that I can think about blockchain is it's it's what we call a general purpose technology. There are only about votes thirty to thirty five general purpose technologies that have ever been discovered on earth by humanity and humankind. you start with things like fire higher agriculture domestication of animals. And you go all the way back into this century century before and that is electric occasion. It's the rail system in this decade. We're going to see things like a blockchain bioengineering these types of general stack -nology steady essentially infuse themselves across the entire world. And that's why I think particularly for this podcast. When it was originally geared towards the insurance industry your audience is much much broader because a blockchain is affecting more than just insurance? Because it's it's the holistic view. Just it is all around us whether it's in our devices are machines are cars in the street lighting. It's been integrated enjoying Chhaya world and so at the highest level. The way that I explained blockchain is one of those fancy new technologies that is going to change the world over the next thirty years At a more in depth technical level you could just say that it is a way for us to use technology where you don't need to trust in authority and I saw line interesting concept. I read about it yesterday and it was science in the enlightenment. took us away from believing in authority. The supreme extreme kind of knowledge of authority in when whether whether it was in Or the king. Or what have you. And it made us take a different methodology for understanding the world around us which was the scientific method which was criticism and understanding. This blockchain is taking us away from believing that we need a central intermediary to hold things of value for us like bank like a government or any other enterprise that holds for instance our data and blockchain allows for data to now be held in a way that there is no authority. You control your own data and for me that is probably the most powerful way for people to understand. Is that we question authority now. Now when it comes to holding things evaluators before in the scientific method this this whole trend over the last four or five hundred years is that we question authority for knowledge and so just Internet which came let's Thirty years ago to the general broad public allowed US access to information In a way that was never before possible now. Blockchain is going to allow us to get access to control our own assets in a way never before apostle I'm just not even going to go into the technical aspects. I absolutely love that definition in a clinician. Thank you so much for that. So we've we've had the pleasure of having Trent mcconaughey your your partner. CO-FOUNDER I'd ocean protocol here on blogs but for our listeners who are Aaron Familiar wiz Ocean Protocol. Could you please give us a quick introduction on it. Ocean protocol is the confluence of six years of working in the blockchain space. As I said. We're Kinda pioneers in years in space. Where in two thousand thirteen Trent mcconnachie and his wife Mash Mikan and he came up with the idea of Bitcoin? Is this really interesting. Global database that allows the people to have perfect knowledge about who controls what financial bitcoin right and we said well. This is one of the problems. In Intellectual Property Copyright who owns the copyright who owns the rights to control the distribution of for instance music or books or anything else of of value that is more of intellectual nature so we started a company in two thousand fourteen. Called a scribe to do exactly that to try to put intellectual property copyright trademarks. All these types of things on the Bitcoin blockchain now we we know. We found out pretty quick about eighteen months later that using bitcoin Bitcoin as the transport and storage medium for Meta data for copyrights was not a good idea. BITCOIN is meant to be essentially financial infrastructure actor digital cash and we realized that we needed other infrastructure and this is when all the other hybrid different blockchain started. Come out so a theory we were kind of in that same cohort There was other things Around such as the theory that we kind of gone into Zeitgeist and we created this called Big Jane Devi which was a database that was built on blockchain technology to store meditate. disolve exactly a problem. With a scribe and as we worked in big chain we did about fifty to two hundred industry proof of concepts we realized that. Where does this all lead and thinking taking the bird's eye view once again? We realized that UH who needs data with providence who needs control of their data it is the people either providing data And trying to sell it for the consumers because a is actually sucking up all the data we don't necessarily realize add the normal person just hanging out on the street but everybody viscerally feels else that Google Amazon facebook and a whole bunch of other of these online companies are sucking up the data to feed their Ai Algorithms and and the more sources where you can get data from and not just one source for instance the better your albums going to be and if you can ensure that you know the provenance the ownership the origin of data. Then you have something that can start to change the economic model. Aw for society when it comes to nonfinancial use cases such as intellectual property I just WanNa take segue and say that. In the mid nineties there was evaluation of all the land and all the intellectual property on earth came out about half half so land and was worth multiple trillions and intellectual property was worth about the similar thing. Going thing was we didn't have the proper kind of valuation method for intellectual the property nor did we have the infrastructure to track who owns what and with blockchain we finally have that we both have a financial infrastructure from global borderless payments micro payments as well and we have a global infrastructure to track ownership of intellectual property property and so we think that this is a defining moment for human society where the things that most people are now starting to do the service economy the knowledge economy. Amy is going to be valued in a way. That wasn't possible before and that in a nutshell is ocean. Protocol is trying to make that bridge between the current world. Where if you share something on the Internet it's gone? There's no value other than the knowledge that you can transmit and you have to find other ways to monetize and after ocean port goal which is where you have the providence of the data you have a means of exchanging value and money for that intellectual property and we can build build a new data economy that everybody on Earth can participate

Blockchain Intellectual Property Copyrigh Bruce Bruce Pond Trent Mccown Bruce Europe United States Trent Mcconaughey Founder Trent Mcconnachie Asia North America AMY Co-Founder Jane Devi Google
The Dublin Digital Identity Project

Insureblocks

10:33 min | 1 year ago

The Dublin Digital Identity Project

"For this week's podcast. We'll be discussing discussing the very interesting project called the Dublin Digital Identity Project and I'm very pleased to have doug McCullough chief information officer her for the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Doug thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. Quick introduction on yourself sure so my name is Doug McCullough chief information officer for the city of Dublin Ohio. It is a small city really a suburb on the North West Corner of Columbus Ohio which is in the middle of the state I am a private sector guy and I may government guy. I've worked for four different state of Ohio agencies and two cities in the united estates and I really love municipalities into innovation into smart cities. I'm into smart ability obviously into blockchain. A it just really interested in sort of emerging technologies and how I can help public sector organizations integrate them into their daily operations Excellent excellent and I think also inside you're going to be able to share with our audience later in this podcast so straight off the bat as it has cost me here in Intra entre blocks. Could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work. Well I'm sure that many have gone before me and failed. I probably will fail as well and I take no credit for getting it right but I will say that I can tell you what it is to me and from my perspective because this is one of the most simple technologies while also being one of the most complex and I don't want to oversimplify it but you Kinda have to a small Description I see. blockchain obtain is a technology infrastructure innovation that combines existing technologies like databases peer to peer networks encryption distributed computing algorithms to form a different way of distributing compute data storage and data security so in its most basic form it works by recording pieces pieces of data into structures. We've taken to calling blocks. The definition of these structures is such that they exist within a chain in that if they do not not come after another block or not part of another block they by definition do not exist. This structural definition allows the existence of a block to carry certain certain cities simply by the fact that they exist in other words to bear Fi. The data of a block one needs to verify its position in a chain that contains other defined blocks each addition to this chain makes the entire structure more and more difficult to invalidating. But if you did and there is a press process process for invalidating a chain the fact that a change to this basic infrastructure would invalidate the whole further makes scenario more trustworthy so that certainly is over technical and quite possibly wrong But the important thing to me and from my perspective is that as an infrastructure it is superior to other databases databases networks or distributing distributed computing models for certain uses and the High find it to be superior for is data transactions injections not necessarily data storage but data transactions. What happened when where and with perfect while if this was was an incorrect or definition what correct one is so thank you so much for that it was it was really good definition? I'm GonNa will definitely always As he knows. So well you know. There are many different schools of thought when it comes to blockchain and different tribes who who liked to defend their view of it right so so could you tell us a little bit about the city of Dublin and just in our Irish listeners where referring here to the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Not Dublin. Orlands so I love to hear more about your lovely city. There are folks in Ohio. We know Dublin wealth and the rest of the world who have heard about it but for a lot of the world people people are like. I don't know what you're talking about. Here's a bunch of Dublin's in the United States as well But as I said we're a small community of around fifty thousand and up apply. Some years ago started along the path towards innovation through fiber optics in developing one of the first publicly-owned city owned fiber optic networks networks. And so we're kind of a techno-centric kind of a place that has embraced using technology to advance its economic development interests from air. We've been kind of a leader or innovator when it comes to smart cities up whether it be a sitting next to smart Columbus on being part of that same region or being being a part of the Intelligence Communities Forum in which we compete and go for awards where that is the city has an institute the Global Institute for the study the of the intelligence community to help share some of what we've learned about intelligent communities in smart city development and derive more from around the world and share those lessons since with other communities so we kind of want to be a conduit and in a light in showing how communities can use technology to improve the lives absorb their citizens. And that's kind of our brand at this point. I mean it's fascinating because you know just to remind him what the point is said of the city of fifty thousand people and you are quite forefront of developing new technology and. I'm sharing your best practice. What you've learned for me you know you sound very much like a city similar to Silicon Valley and also what is amazing because as it is a subject of our podcast that you've managed to develop a digital identity project based blockchain technology? Why how did your city managed to get to this point to be so tax heavy? Well well there are a few advantages and a few good moves some investments that the city of Dublin made that strategically placed us in a different position. So if there's there's any other cities out there listening you'll recognize some of this first of all. We did introduce me as a chief information officer. and honestly if you're not a very large arch city like a Boston or New York or Los Angeles or Atlanta or a London. You don't have a chief information officer you have an. It director director whose job it is to keep the technology running. Not necessarily to envision. What's next in what's new and so- Dublin Did that they invested in that in part because we're small there's less to run and there's a lot of innovation happening here in our region. We've got a great research institution Asian in in Ohio University and the Ohio State University. And there's just a lot of resources here that make it possible for us to do it. But if you're another city Anderson later saying it. We're not doing that it in part. It's because it's difficult for a city to hire someone in give them that job so hello. Dublin is benefiting from brilliant brilliant now so you've developed a digital identity project based on blockchain technology. What problem were you looking to address? This is interesting Because I WANNA put you in your listeners in the in the stance of considering what a city is we tend to look look at cities and say Stay in your lane plows. Snow Mow the grass. Fix The potholes and cut my taxes. And I'll be happy happy. And we don't think about all the various services and things that a city doesn't in has been doing but if cities do not innovate than we are going to be disrupted roughed it just like any other business. If he didn't think that the United States post office could be disrupted and of course. It is being disrupted because we always thought that we will deliver letters in boxes and Amazon changed all that you know taxes are being disrupted. Everybody's being disrupted cities can be disrupted and I think that that could be devastating for us. So it's my job to try and stay ahead of that and to continue to. Innovate we are candidates for innovation. Just like anybody else. I do believe that there's going to be a new distributed data environment just as the web changed to everything Blockchain the distributed data environment is going to change everything and we don't want to get caught off guard We were concerned about and remained concerned about preparing for kind of leaner government. government As it is now may not look the way. It is automation boxer. We're subject to impact by those as well. So what happens if we have far fewer people in a lot more automation. They're a how're we going to build the service model that serves people I mentioned you know sort of a digital disruption Russian of government just like anybody else right. Now I'm out in the Wilderness crying about this. Nobody believes it but I think we're going to see it happen Also mentioned sort of a declining in degrading trust in a sort of a more dangerous data privacy in firemen for people and we expect this to have but negative impact on citizens in public transactions. If we don't prepare for that Mrs all before thinking about blockchain as a potential solution But then also generally just as a person who uses technology I desire new level control or autonomy Regarding my data and I think that cities are local governments or even national governments can play a role in providing that security and privacy to citizens perhaps through some sort of a service but then finally there's a huge amount of pressure for cities to become smart cities to become programmable to use data to make decisions and I'm afraid that we're all gonna run into a big brick wall if we can't identify people or other private things that need to be identified in order to program around them We're all very excited about cars. Driving down the street being automated but if we don't have a mechanism for identity that's going to be a problem so should have government Create a new identity Regime I feel that blockchain gives a lot of control and privacy obviously back to citizens so that if we do need to program aspects of our lives that we would control of privacy back into citizens hands Eh.

Dublin Ohio Chief Information Officer Doug Mccullough Columbus Ohio United States Ohio University Blockchain Usa. Silicon Valley Amazon Publicly-Owned Orlands Ohio Usa. Ohio State University Intelligence Communities Forum
Securing Oracles for Smart Contracts

Insureblocks

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Securing Oracles for Smart Contracts

"Riggan discuss how to secure articles for smart contracts with special insights from chain link. And I'm very pleased. Used to have yuan product manager and evangelist at chainlink John. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself yourself. Hey thanks for having me Yeah sure side. Jones space a few years ago origin so I was always presented by Bitcoin by Theam wasn't relating to the topic of interoperability. When Jennings channing basically made a lot of sense to me fill? Did the gap for me. We take this space. which is we have so many ambitions than such a great vision for the Bloodshed because stem which is three plays the real work right. But in order to transition you need to be able to connect the rewards to some blockchain and two blocks networks. I think a few the months ago now and yet it's been three working on this project which basically for me is filling a gap user industry. And I think we're making huge. Basically big strides rides towards creating more connected word through blockchain technology. Excellent accent so thank you very much for that. So as it has caused me here injure blocks. Could you please explain explain to our listeners. What is blockchain and how does it work? Yeah sure I mean luxury very simply ledger right. Ledger is basically a records of transactions. Where basically you engine ducts balances of every addresses on the network right it? So it's basically a decentralized ledger which people from over the words can update experimentation nece. It's transparent everything. Everything is public right like Bitcoin so in its current very simple in concept right displeasure like ledger is exist everywhere. Liking banks for instance banks today keep track a few JR ledgers huge databases recording transactions. Right the big did the selling point of ructions that it's fully decentralized and it's free public and it comes at the points in our than the word food where centralization transparency yet Burma can have tremendous impacts in the way people interact between one and the nicer Sir right so basically. We started out with Bitcoin and away. With your address you can create so much choosing basically the simple concept of of distributed ledger. You can create an revolutionize the way people interact with each other using disconnect checked and using what here mattered to the basic concepts of bitcoin. Great great thank you very much for that. So since you've already given us a few definitions I'm going to ask another one. which is could you give us? A quick definition of what is a smart contract it's key properties and how they differentiate themselves from traditional shnell contract. Yeah sure I mean contracts contracting the real word right. Let's start by this. Is People want to interact his each other. They don't trust each other because why would say people tried to basically each time right so they. They give dressed with archie rights and third parties to enforce that contract executes as it should now. He's third partisan today's Dan Edge. Our our banks are huge institutions which basically has accumulated power rights. And these are people who basically enforce Zicklin trucks trucks after. Today's society. Now what smart. Trump's at of you to do is to embeds allergic and Tang Soo enforcement for contract on Puzo blockchain rights so whenever contract into executed if it's if contract or if it's an insurance contract thanks to properties of bloodshed and to the priorities are smuggled trucks talks which are basically deterministic outputs. Whatever input you get you get the desired output right output chicken project and you can have basically trust less contracts from people who don't know each other from one part of words to Yaser so to that could get into twit agreement with someone in China or someone in Malaysia or wherever and trust disagreement will work? Because it's enforced forest. Both my contract and just Markham product is based on hysteria or any uneasy as which is basically public trust less and Ike interest entrusts message of course now if smart contracts servewell revolutionary secure and useful earned being used regularly by enterprises around the world? It's a great question. I think it takes a lot of time to basically adopted Right so in. Today's skin through damage enterprises whenever they get something which is working are which is hard for king which is a current system. Today is a stick to its rights So I can do the same situations as we have today. Where basically enterprises we probably start with? UPS Markham threats Wednesday. Start seeing to be fed yours. There's current system produces and I think. Actually we're getting some really was jim results from enterprises Google and other like minded businesses which she's revolutionary power is at smartphones and are starting to work towards them basically are searching to other than to start in tweets. It takes some time for the full switch but I think we really answer right where it now

Bitcoin Ledger Theam Product Manager Chainlink John Jennings Channing Burma Puzo Blockchain Google Allergic Jones Dan Edge Archie Yaser IKE Donald Trump China Malaysia
He Gave a Cryptocurrency Talk in North Korea. The U.S. Arrested Him

Daily Tech Headlines

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

He Gave a Cryptocurrency Talk in North Korea. The U.S. Arrested Him

"The United States attorney for the Southern District of New York announced criminal. Charges Against Virgil Griffith crypto currency researcher with the Theorem Foundation following his attendance attendance of blockchain conference in North Korea back in April the charges alleged violations of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act saying Griffith gave a presentation and participated in a conversation into how blockchain technology could be used to avoid economic sanctions. The complaint states that in his interview with the Attorney Griffith maintained his presentation reviewed basic concepts easily found. Online grip was arrested on the charges on November twenty eighth.

Virgil Griffith United States Attorney International Emergency Econom North Korea Theorem Foundation New York Attorney Researcher
What is Blockchain?

CRYPTO 101

08:40 min | 1 year ago

What is Blockchain?

"It's typical that Bitcoin bounces at the end of the month. Like this as we have futures contracts expiring pretty soon people people are Panicking to sell off after that last bump and we've seen this for about four months in a row now so I'm onto you Wales anymore your shitty contracts and I'm making a fat profit I let's rock and roll and we are joined by an extremely special guest. His name is Eric Larsen. He is the CEO and the founder of blocks route. So hurry welcomed the nation. Welcome CRYPTO WANNA one. Thank you so much. Thanks for having having make yes and reason expert in literally everything that has to do with blockchain technology so you guys are going to have a very special treat and I'm going to start off not with asking his background. I'm going to start off. Asking what the Hell is a blockchain. Why should we care? That's an excellent question and thank you for keeping the background. Everybody have heard. Oh tell us how you got into blockchain who cares how I got into the box. What's going on here? And that's all that matters right there. Like do you really care what they need. At least two thousand fourteen two thousand fifteen hundred zero no But what in the blockchain chain and more importantly why should we care about. Blockchain is an excellent question so blockchain's forget for a second how the technology works and what he does which sometimes it's people over focus on the idea that the does it it allows for something quite unique it allows for people who don't stand next to each other who just just like you know sending messages to one another on the internet or whatnot. They allow them to collaborate without using a single server that supports them gates eight Sunday control the server the same way that we're not using Xuemei. Thanks so zoom has servers were all talking and the recording this conversation and it goes through their servers and stuff stuff gets done but if somebody hold the servers to some level he controls everything he can say. Oh I don't like rice anymore and like okay okay. Knocked allow you to participate or it's like that old saying possession is nine tenths of the law right though it's nine ten but like it's also also the tents tents if you hold the biggest gun or you have the most money so it is practically everything so this example of the conversation is not the interesting but how about if you think about Stock Exchange or the banking system. We're the banking system. It's kind of like whistle. bitcoin being the first I example possibly the most One that idea that fewer snowden or something and then if your money is being held in a system that somebody else control that somebody else can throw you off the system and not allow you to project you access to your monthly at Cetera et Cetera. So that's the usual example. People that people say oh if I controlled my money and not somebody else. Nobody can throw me out. But there's more okay that's like cool and important than if viewer I didn't know it reach Asian family. You might be very rich but that doesn't make your money safe because if the government isn't very fair or just they can just everything you have cetera et Cetera. But even for more day to day examples if you have to company is that want to joint venture okay I think of two funds okay. They invest stuff and they want to do something that they need. Go to them to do it. But the operation will only have at one of them right either Sunday the oil funds be and whoever runs it can screw over the other guy not pass the money is supposed to or whatever are the details and other guy can sue him but if you have any legal bag around the fact that you can sue somebody doesn't really mean so much that it will take many many years and you might get it and might go get it so don't get started on that really. Don't get me started. How how much we're paying for lawyers? But the idea is that it. These two funds might decide not to do a joint venture. Just because you don't have to wait to cooperate collaborate and cooperate in a way that doesn't require one. I'm to trust the other and blockchain's that allowed for people to transact or to send her to do all sorts of stuff without placing their trust in the other got to run the operation. So that kind of make sense. Oh yeah absolutely. I think that was a great definition. What do you think Pete's does that? Suffice yeah I mean just to quickly summarize it it makes makes a way of communication happened between two or more parties and a trustworthy system where no one is in charger as advantage over the other. No perfectly said cool so so. Let's talk briefly about the scale ability issue with blockchain's what is that issue. If you could distill distill it down to a couple of paragraphs. Let's let's let's talk exactly about. That's a because that's my job to talk about that and be because it's an important topic so everybody who has been into Crypto ever send slade twenty four the indefinitely in twenty-fifty and everybody are talking skill ability the problem skill ability problems skill ability of Baba and the usual example. That people say is that well if we want to remove credit card companies companies and banks and Kinda like compete with them will a credit card companies are processing six thousand transactions per second right now on average the peak at what Alibaba peaked at three hundred twenty five thousand transactions per second in singles a Two years ago that's for regular transactions if eighteen thousand transaction per second if be going or a theory or whatever blocks they want to allow to do micro transactions transaction of. Just if you sense let you can't do which credit card companies because the fees are fifteen cents per transaction so you can't transaction now three cents if you allow these you open the door for all sorts of really really really cool use cases. Think of it as you park your car and rather than open your parking gap in pay for an hour and pay thirty cents like for fi how how about the car will just automatically delete communicate tuition the meter next to it and pay every minute pay like three cents. Another reason that and when you're done you get into to the car and you go and he's no longer pays a new never have to pay yourself for parking Twenty nineteen we have better stuff to do with our time. So these micro payments Aymen's requires something like ten times more fifty to seventy thousand transaction perspective and if you want to do the really really cool stuff okay. All the stuff that people I want to do on his theory on for example decentralized exchanges right you'd think about a thousand traders trading on an exchange and they're not doing the full blown outta trading forty thousand transaction per second they do each one hundred transactions per second that's one hundred thousand transactions the second. The numbers are huge. They were pretty much. Swallow any number of transaction processing. You'll keep them so. That's the need for transaction. Thousands tens of thousand hundreds of thousands of transactions per second and beat can do three transactions per second. Now we have segue so he does four point two transaction transaction per second. Okay three four. Five orders of magnitude do small ethereal is doing not like the the capacities just too small so when we described what is the scale ability problem is why or how can we process much much. Larger volume of transactions action per second because that. Describe the problem. Well enough it. Does I think from there we talk about. What are the different approaches to solving all being this so even even prior to talking about okay Larry to solutions and lightning? It's I think the one thing that is the worst. The better explaining is what is the bottleneck. Why can't we do more? Transaction per second in blockchain's everybody creators actions and minor listen to these transaction in every so often some minor aggregate to bunch of transaction into a block. Senator everybody in these blocks crate lunching. Why can't we doesn't do anti entire larger blocks or a hundred times larger blocks which would allow for one hundred more transaction per second or reduce the time between blocks by ten x one hundred x which will also gave save one hundred x more transaction per

Blockchain Cetera Et Cetera Eric Larsen Wales CEO Alibaba Senator Founder Larry Pete Slade Aymen Baba Four Months Two Years
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Digital Business Models

Digital Business Models

20:48 min | 1 year ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Digital Business Models

"For today's session we have with US Jerry Coma you for having me I like your name yeah absolutely it's a you're actually done in so I guess that explains everything and you've doesn't fifteen actually a you you became vice-president anyone reading we strength to understand what kind of business model and also AH Genaro I've had a pleasure of working on and third generation of transaction process in generation one that era is still running as we speak with systems like Saber running many yeah so we helped the likes of Ebay crate their web and so all banks and insurance companies and governments called in two thousand fifteen is was the next generation but was there even you know make those go away and earlier maybe twenty thirteen twenty fourteen sure I thought the value of blockchain could be applied is that the the notion of teamwork meaning a group working together auto at the center of Blockchain it's decentralisation that brings trust to data applied to any industry and that set off the journey for fabric which I'd say the blockchain technology that was made you're a few years later seeing the fruits of that starting to pay off also assaulted boom of currency industry twenty and probably through in the long run but then I think right now would and you know how long expected to see three since the blockchain revolver enterprise blockchain has many common characteristics but let let's just say there are some base qualities to blockchain it's a blockchain that apply to any type of blockchain you will see when transacted transactions consented on Day our thereby making a chain that is resistant to tampering and forms in hyper ledger fabric was probably the first enterprise blockchain not the only one here too this type of enterprise blockchain members were anonymous is a bearer instrument no need s early to possible to gain trust in a in an institution in healthcare Hicfa or in you know around privacy number two is while they're known enterprises need to operate with leger fabric supports notion of if those users out there familiar with slack so hypoallergenic fabric supports that allows for number three is need for immense performance and scale ability is a base requirement for enterprise and can't fork it has to stay it has to become final and that transaction once committed is final and then last big it budgets some might have small budgets so may have great security the latest patches of an operating system and you have a failure of your food armaments finality and full tolerance security all kinds of bad because those core aspects of above in in your experience what what sort of a question and businesses have spent the teamwork and a group working together I like to save blockchain is a team sport that you're still responsible like if you're in a B. Two B. lending network adding money to and they turn out to be a bad actor and Oughta go to jail so how so the big trick in the business that might sound difficult but again in a B. Two B. World this is an example of financial services where companies financial services uh of an exchange right to to to be able to record the reference data associated in distributing reference data so if we can just distribute it to ourselves in a financial services situation is another example like if 'cause fraud in their banks right so setting up a network though those are win would hire intermediaries to disseminate that adding friction but now with blockchain you think the biggest one of the biggest tricks is looking at those business models and twenty companies are collaborating on it. So that's that's you know the change to the playbook number one dat leverages the power of group versus the Individual Company operate such a network what what are the obligations and and you know I guess the other the other thing ormer industry think about some one of the quotes from wool mark the world's biggest food companies have complete from one of their stores to the farm in which the you know the the let's say a foodborne illness in so how big of a Bite d take out of the initial project in some people the big idea the next big question in a blockchain from business you know doing it with one company is hardly ecosystem that's like an ecosystem of one although so one company might be too small you know twenty companies often it is the harder place to start so starting more centralized that if you're joining and your number five to join that at some level change based on the plurality hundreds just to get your ideal off the ground you know you can start with a group of three or four the group has control but no one is exclusively in control so I think that's the hanging I was thinking probably one of the most regular added the whole thing is about creating companies which might look like Google Amazon facebook I mean this companies stay centralized most of the prophets make the rules of the game in blockchain base business modeling instead month any more I mean he sees fed assumption it's all constructed a tea is you know people people think about and say blockchain for for Web three point to take a take root it and in fact a really good platform based on blockchain doesn't ever again the obligations and rewards are for joining the network and sharing the value of it it may or may not even have to come up so it does it could platform business models so.

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Just the general user experience of blockchain <unk> haitians and stuff is not there yet <hes>. They've got a long way to go. Avenue is a utilize of bangor. I don't know if he's a he's basically said that in future. They won't think of cryptos investment investment. They'll think of it as a product of reserves. They won't really care what's going on. Underneath the point. You know like why why do want eighteen brings a lot of benefits but really product and offense and a lot of white announced gonna changes as is not going to be this blotchy in central hype. It's going to be just another benefit that it <hes> good products in our with clear benefits will pay back now. I actually had had a conversation jason the other day with a v._c. Who is in san francisco and i was making the comment about how these blockchain projects are leaving america and in the bbc said that about seventy to eighty percent of all new startups that are happening in san francisco c._b. Blockchain related and then they get to a point and then they move. You've so they're they're builder. They're being built in san francisco and then being moved to other parts of the world now. Is that something that you had experienced. In your research search you find anything about innovation and we're block or these blockchain thought leaders are congregating currently yeah is it because too. Many people are crapping on their front porch. Is that that doesn't that have lost your born in conceived here than go elsewhere. I think there's a lot going on in ukraine <hes> but we didn't you know we didn't really ask the question. Where's this happening. We do have less where everybody is but it's not you know. We didn't really consensus of where things are happening. <hes> so i mean you can see you can you can look and you can tell a lot of this stuff is just getting much more kind of ground work done in in europe and and ukraine some less regulated areas right and i think that's that's one of the things that we came over. This is is there is this kind of like want for regulation that i thought was interesting like a that. They felt that it needed some regulation nation that bought the whole industry needed some regulation from the top down and i thought that was kind of interesting is when i entered more antithetical to what like watching and crypto allowed its privacy you know elad bringing regulators enzi give their sample approval was down something they they thought was necessary and i can't get you know they've got. There's probably a lot of money waiting in the wings. You know a lot of lot chapel like waiting for for that. You know that the kind of stance come down so they can say okay. Now we come in some big dollars but not there is a big dollars flowing there already but i think a lot of night is waiting on the regulation whether that's not yes so what is the buzz that you've picked up on that. When are we gonna see regulation. I you know i. I don't think anybody's really willing to weigh on that one. I we didn't get that in our responses. That was just kind of like you know it could happen. It could be helpful but we didn't. We didn't really pull that. We didn't really find that to be something that you know that we wanted to ask for one thing it. Maybe the starts asking like you know. Predict the future kind of you know. I don't know it just didn't come up so we know the financial industry is being sort of rebooted with block chain crypto but say maybe maybe give an ally over the next three to five years i what are what are you seeing some other top industries industries that are most ripe for disruption with the blockchain among i mean yeah fifty cents fifty six percent. I think said that financial services. This is was the biggest opportunity but there was a lie. A health care supply chain gaming gaming came up quite a bit <hes> there was a couple of really interesting comments is he is a <unk> from <hes> boots user lunar digital currencies it was it was this this idea of national currencies..

san francisco ukraine bangor jason bbc europe america fifty six percent eighty percent five years
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Matter what comes frescoes better with live with love live. Nothing gets to you. Stay for staying. Thank who knows the freshman yes. The bed crooked podcast where we inspire commercial. Old jingles got add spotify lists. I suppose you think that's fair. The mentos jingle bells jingle. I bet it is yep for those who don't know what travis is referencing. We did set up a spotify playlist for all songs that are referenced on this show. Whether sung as travis just did even very nicely i might add or whether we just reference the lyrics on and if you go to bed co dot i._n. Ford playlist you can enjoy that listening for all the times that you're not listening to this podcast. That's true and this is the first time you're listening to the podcast. Thank you for tuning in make sure to hit the subscribe button up there. I tunes likes that sodas. Mr joel calms mom is she's a big fan of people subscribing to her baby. Show and it's a good way to stay in tune with what's what's going on. I want to know what took you so long. If you're just just now listening to the show for the first time you know what you know the <hes> the i tunes algorithm algorithm sometimes move things around so maybe they didn't see us until now i did look for mentos on spotify by the way and i it comes up is a guy named pablo francisco cisco. Yes he's hilarious he. He has a segment called mentos which maybe we'll just add that in reference to it and the title of the album is knee to the groin. He is so he does the best impressions you've ever heard he gonna listen and if this mentos is actually if he actually talks about mentos as i suspect you will i will add that to the platelets okay. Let's give us how to shout out to sponsor for which <hes> <hes> the show was made possible today mr tracks right sure each r._o. For a lot of crypto fans it's hard to find just.

spotify travis Mr joel pablo francisco Ford cisco
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

"I actually can't you know, we are publicly traded company. So I do have legal requirements around reporting and disclosure. I can tell. I can't tell you just yesterday. We did another press release we announced nobody's naturals. And nobody's naturals is a distribution. Come at the moment. In in in the CD space, we acquired exclusive distribution rights to a CD line, that's manufactured in California. And this is CBS topical z-. These are EMU oil-based muscle and joint rubs that are specifically designed for athletes, and and it's really funny because it's athletes in the elderly, and you think of those things is really different. But they actually have a lot of the same problems. A lot of you have a lot of osteo base problems. You have a lot of joint pain, and and muscle muscle sort of issues, especially around the joint, and I personally have had to shoulder surgeries. I've had both my shoulders completely rebuilt and done. Visit therapy. I've been you know, I I've I've been prescribed lots and lots and lots of opiates. Any careful with that? And that was and that was really what what led me to, you know, my own news, and I live in California. So you know, it is what it is. But now news of medical marijuana instead of opiates, my own news of these CBD products to manage pain to manage willing to be able to sleep. And and you know, they have been a gift in my life. This particular product that we acquired rights to is a product that I found I am here in California. So it was it is manufactured, you know, within a hundred miles of my house, and it's a product that I found I try to use it. I loved it. And I loved it so much that I went back to the owner. And I said. You know, how how do I get with you guys because this works, right? And I love a product like that. I love being able to or Ganic find something and say this works solutions that were looking at in that number one phenomenal business the congress just passed the criminalization of Hampton heme production and CD production at the federal level in the farm Bill a couple of weeks ago. So the timing seems pretty good. We were we were already under contract in this deal before that happened. But I think that that shows that we're on the right path their mum, and we're looking at that industry very aggressively as we do any industry, but we're looking at it with multiple sets of glasses number one. I'm looking at it as what are what are the margins in this business of selling this product to the public, and who are the demographics that need it most in? How can I get it to them? Right. Well, let me let me ask you are you are you interfacing with people who are. In solar energy. Are you interfacing with farmers in terms of wheat, you know? Have you thought about that? Have you already connected with these kinds of people knowing we've of the future in other aspects in terms of climate consciousness global consciousness. We we get we I want to say we get contacted by lots of people for lots of reasons we specifically has not come up. So I'll I'll say no to that. I'm hey to all the week people out there. I don't know what I don't know would love to talk to you. We too big one. Honestly, we've is a big one and one or you know, like are are you connecting with desalination plants water while I was at. About six months ago. I was at a water convention in in Las Vegas. I I have some direct involvement that that have had direct engagements that have had with the with the local water authorities here in or I live waters waters. Very very interesting. Are you interfacing with people on the Middle East? You know divide by. You know? Should be from what you're doing. You had. We've had some interesting. You know, we've had some interesting phone calls. We we feel a lot of inbound queries. And the question for us becomes you know. What what are the things that are most interesting to us? What are the things that we see that have the greatest impact? And when we're saying impact understand social good is vitally important us. My daughters have to live on this planet afterward, but we also have to make money I'm a four profit corporation. Yeah. Get it. You know?.

California marijuana EMU Middle East Las Vegas CBS Ganic congress Hampton six months
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

"AI powered customer retention software tool. And now it really allows us to come inside of a vertical in having engagement where people are already used to doing business with us. People already used opening our emails and reviewing our offerings. And that's a powerful tool for bringing forward. Some, you know, fairly futuristic, tools and mazing so for people who are listening to this. And again, we appeal to all kinds of demographics who are in all kinds of various spaces. You know, in terms of breaking this down to a terminology that would resonate with the layman person, including myself year, actually. So in terms of business, you're talking about micro business. You're talking about macro business. We know that you've already gotten people in the fold people who are repeat customers. People who see what you've done for them. The first time in the way in which you're now expanding and extrapolating upon things that have already proven to be successful, tools, and just honing it, you know, what types of business owners because we've got people who are serious preneurs. We've got people who are in the personal development space. We've got people who are in the suite space. We've got people all over the place, I've got corporate sponsors. So, you know, if it's a vehicle industry if it's if it's natural products. If it's, you know, can you just kind of give us a list of who this might appeal to in terms of interfacing with you and setting up a console tour or an initial meeting with you. Absolutely. So that's a very interesting viewpoint. And I'm glad that you ask that question, you know, first and foremost. We'll talk to anybody. You know, primarily what we're looking for. So nobody's labs is. Our software development bubble. Right. Christopher and his teams have deep experience in cloud. Native in cloud hybrid applications. They have played with lots and lots of things around predictive analytics, and obviously blockchain is is a tool that they understand and know how to build quite well, and so those skills, and that, you know, confluence of of power and knowledge that that we have kind of compiled there is very very interesting, and we use it internally to to do these things both to analyze deals to empower the customer engagement reengagement marketing and remarketing of those customer channels at end, those those those verticals so four. A solo preneurs and the small businesses. I would say, you know, if you have a in an Amazon FDA if you've got an app, if you've got an e commerce, something and you're looking for a place to sell it. And have it goes somewhere that it's going to be in a very positive powerfully go system and have a lot of additional stability in support to contact us. You know, we are in. We are looking for acquisitions, and we are looking to talk to those people if you are a person who has what you believe is a very interesting project that would require artificial intelligence or blockchain or, you know, a a large scale cloud solutions something like that. And you're looking for a joint venture were definitely interested in talking to those folks. With the cease. We side of it. I love those folks. Right. Yes. But, you know, at the end of the day, I think if you're a C suite person, and in your interested in these things, you may be all alone in that C, suite we saw a lot of that this year, you know, one or two people that were very excited about the possibility. And then another roomful people who just didn't quite get it. And and we believe that's where our opportunity lies right wing leave that that the fact that there are large groups of people in these industries that don't quite understand how there's value here. Opportunity for us if you are C suite, and you do see the opportunity, and you have something that is impactful that you want built we do take external non joint, venture of development and architecture contracts for sure so we will definitely do that. Our preference, though is really to joint venture. Most of the really cool things that we saw. And that we've been introduced to were things that our team looked at each other after you know, consulting on it or idiot or scoping it out or whatever. And we were like, wow, it would kind of like to be a part of that that school, you know..

AI Christopher
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

"And we have acquired a distribution business in order to be able to impact supply chains and in order to be able to offer technology tools to these verticals. You know, one of the things that we saw this year as we looked at all of the different things that people asked us to build or work on. Yes. You know, you know, how to do something specific people come talked about it was that was that a lot of businesses on a lot of leaving large corporations were not really at a point yet where they had a clear understanding of how these tools either individually or together working together impact of their business and how they make changes to the way business done. And that you know, personnel. Chris CTO Christopher Brown. You know, Chris, and I spent a few days together just kind of Cohen. Do do. We do we see the path more clearly, you know, than than the people in these industries, in some cases, and the answer that we came up with was kinda. Yes. And so we so like there was an additional opportunity for our company and for our shareholders to realize that by not only offering technology solutions to these verticals not only building things for different verticals. But owning the way that gets there as well. And so we've taken massive action on that. You know, we we have embraced our public company name, which is no borders Inc. Our ticker symbol of were trading on the OTC market in the US under the ticker symbol, NBD are. And so we now have a multiple subsidiaries inside of inside of no borders. We have no borders dental resources, which is running our meditate supplies brand. We just announced yesterday to launch of nobles naturals, which is which owns the distribution rights to to the CD retail brands that we had spoken about and. Immigrate example, you know, we we were able to make a deal to get access to a market to get access to existing product lines in existing face and right away with that we rolled out a beta offering to some of those clients for an.

Chris CTO Christopher Brown borders Inc US Cohen
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"We did x y and z that could be abstracted the things that aren't necessarily currencies. I would imagine law would be useful for blockchain technology to have a universal ledger of everything that happened in terms of laws changing or in terms of how people voted on things. So that's kinda why I'm not exactly thinking about it like crypto currencies or thinking about it. Like, the Amazon example, I'm thinking about it in terms of what's a way to keep track of all the things we're doing as humans, and I think blockchain is a great way of making it easier to hold people accountable for the transactions they're performing. And I think that was the big reason why people clung to crypto currencies because they felt disenfranchise by the way that the banks had handled themselves in two thousand and eight and they wanted a way to say, no, we want to take responsibility for the. The we handle our money. And so I think that's why cryptocurrency was the first big thing that come out of blockchain. And that's why I also think that blockchain it will stick around, but it may not necessarily manifest as bitcoin. Crypto currencies and maybe some other crypto currency, and maybe some other use of the ledger that isn't even related to economics that could be something that people just go. Oh, wow. How do we not live with us before? So that's kind of why I think one higher level of abstraction from crypto currencies and more about blockchain technology in general. Okay. Well, anyway, hopefully, VR VR is a much easier case for me to get behind. And it's one of those things I had a friend. Tell me one time that he said that you can't really see the awesomeness of yarn to actually experience it. And I completely I believe that to my core. I was very much skeptical of ER was like, well, I really only see this being used for games. And the last time I did VR I use like a GameBoy VR. Which was from like nineties. Yeah. You eat virtual Virtual Boy. Yeah. That was it. And it was like the the rent was like it was like you were in Toronto. But everything was read, and it really was it was just like a projector screen like it wasn't. It's nothing like it is today. And so I was like all right. I don't know if I'm so into this. And then I actually tried an Oculus and I played this game. Where it's like you're in the matrix, you Lilly, like people are shooting at you and time slows down, and you grab bulletin. You. Literally throw them back at them. I was like completely blown away. And then I played this game where you're rock climbing, and I rock climb. And I was like that's fine. And I get in your like thousands of feet above the ground and my body like the hairs on the back of my next. And I was and I'm a very rational person. And I was like what is going on this make way into it? So it's like you wear a VR headset while you're in a rock, climbing gym know, you're in a rock climbing simulator game, I was just in a regular room. But that was the crazy part was I was in a regular room on a rational person who knows I'm in a regular room. And yet, my body is having this nervous reaction whenever I would look down and see that you know, if I let go of my left hand, I'm falling thousands of feet. Right. So in my head. I'm like, this is fine. This is I'm in a room. I'm standing in a room. I can feel my feet on the ground. And yet I would instinctively like move my legs as if I were rock climbing when I was pulling my hands up in this game. Like, it's amazing. How much VR can transform your life. And put you in this scenario, you're in even when you're thinking to yourself. I'm not in this subway car. I'm not on this mountain top. I know right here in a room. And yet your body is totally tricked. And if you get in a really immersive experience, it just blew me away. And as soon as I did that that's when I realized that fiar in some form, or fashion is going to transform the way that we live our lives. And I and that's where I'm going to definitely Hodel in bet..

blockchain Amazon Toronto Lilly
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"It's a potentially near infinite numbers will as many nodes as want to hold the information can and as opposed to it being immutable simply because it's written down in to several places. It's immutable because its cryptographic we secured and again mirrored on all these different nodes. And all that does is take the trust that was injected by the very first receipt in the western world. And again, just massively amplifies that it's kinda like the transition from the first spark of gunpowder to our modern bombs. You know, it's the same basic idea combustion in that case, but it's simply been magnified over the decades in really centuries massively. And so in its modern manifestation becomes almost revolutionary even though it's basic functionality something that's been around for hundreds of years. So how'd you get involved with Q? Oh, how did you end up? So like, many people, you know, I had heard of blockchain and crypto currency before you know, the big hand of twenty sixteen twenty seventeen explosion. But it had not always been in positive terms. I remember one of the first things I heard about cryptocurrency was around the silk road FBI court case, and you know, talking about how is involved cryptocurrency that has was involved, you know, the the distribution of illegal drugs and all these negative things. But then in two thousand fifteen later in the year, you know, a friend of mine started really talking to me a lot about it in twenty sixteen. I ended up going through a bit of a career change myself and had some free time on my hands and start educating myself, and then in early twenty seventeen is when I kinda like Baden, quite literally and started, you know, trying to figure it out in the more hands on way. And then. In later, twenty seventeen. I ended up applying my old skill sets of marketing business strategy that kind of thing to this new technology that I was really interested in Acura L, I was a community member they in their slack because I was sort of the summer of slack in twenty seventeen and the belt report with some of the developers and founders they ended up having a vacancy or they needed. Somebody initially just to handle marketing and then to handle a bit more than that as time went on. And I saw through my hat in the ring and the rest is history. I asked me to a roof key road for bitcoin in the will to cryptocurrencies sweep rather than talk about that. I wonder if you could share with listeners your opinion on quantum computing, and that threat he's going to bring to bitcoin blockchain technology and also how blockchain pilot coons he's also comes to security threat from hackers and the agents alva-. Yeah. So the the idea of a double sided coin or, you know. Double sided sword, or whatever something that gives and takes is very useful concept and blockchain because it had pies in many different ways. One of the main ways in this, particular instance, is the decentralized nature of this technology. So we all love the decentralized nature of blockchain technology because it enables the end user the person who's actually holding their of their private key. Massively gives a massive independence, the massive amounts of control. Unfortunately, it also leaves them kind of on an island security-wise, you know, as much as big banks charge high fees and how exert a lot of control and can manipulate people's accounts without they're you know, knowledge or consent. They also act as a as a mediator and that gives and takes in its own way. But in blockchain if somebody accesses, your private key takes your funds, there's very little recourse because there's no way to reverse that transaction was also one of the best things about blockchain. But from a network wide secure. Standpoint upgrading security infrastructure in blockchain is incredibly complicated compared to upgrading security infrastructure in a centralized system. You know, if Google wants to upgrade, their g mail security infrastructure, I as g mail user am not required in that process. They don't need by knowledge. They don't need my participation. They do not need my consent. If bitcoin just use the most the most well known example, though, this also plies to like pretty much any other crypto currency wanted to change its signature scheme. It would need the private keys of every single wallet. On the network will nobody knows the private keys of every single walled on the network. And that's one of the things we love about bitcoin..

blockchain FBI Acura Baden Google bitcoin alva
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Love Your Work

"In the first place now i left silicon valley more than ten years ago and it would be revisionist to say that it was simply because of the damage technology was going to do i didn't know precisely where technology would lead but i did now that after being involved in the initial excitement of the web two point oh movements which was all about using technology to connect people gradually my work in tech started to feel increasingly without purpose nor positive impact which is something that i talked about more on episode sixteen which is entitled earn it so if the silicon valley elites had been able to detect the vacuous ness of the companies they were building if they're hungry for meaning had been stronger than their hunger for wealth than they wouldn't be in a position that they are in and since they ended up in these positions through this blindness they're coming up with these what i think are inelegant solutions so no i don't think ethics will solve the problems of tech i think the economics needs to be fixed as long as it is profitable to build products that divide us an effect or emotional and physical health these are the products that are going to be made but there is a shining star of hope that has emerged and to me that is blockchain technology blockchain technology may enable what is good for us to actually become profitable so i've talked about blockchain technology and its potential to fix these economics i discussed it with steven ceo ned scott on episode forty six and i have shared my experiences with earning money from my writing in my steam it tutorial on episode one ten and by the way a bloomberg columnist reached out to me based upon that steam it tutorial i was quoted in a bloomberg article websites that pay users with blockchain aim to disrupt facebook and my quote in that article in case you don't get a chance to read it i feel like i'm in the stone age when i'm on facebook or twitter they have no value without what you're contributing to them.

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"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"Israel j than i was at israel j denzel not a great booby did you like event all right but one of the things that he was accurate he thought about pleabargaining basically there's overcrowding of courts so they just say plead guilty even if you didn't do anything wrong in we'll let you out after three months in jail verses if you go to court and we find you guilty its mandatory ten years so they freak people out so people are saying 'i'm guilty when they're not and then they put them in a system for a year or whatever and they learn how to be criminals and the recidivism rate which is the rate of people going back to prison is nuts you got seventy eighty percent of people falling back into some thing i think it depends that's don't trust that suggests gets a high amount of people so the block chain could theoretically you could put evidence up on the block chain and let 7 billion people vote on if the persons guilty or maybe seven billion too much but you could let forget a jury of twelve twelve can be corrupted but a jury of ten thousand people in twenty countries of all ages backgrounds is more likely that's collaborative intelligence you've you've probably free half the people maybe not half but you've free twenty percent of people on death row i just i contribute to this thing called the innocence project in which is i can it's a charity it's a good one if you wanna give money to and they they give money to do dna tests for people who have questionable and they just let out a dude who went into prison at 17 years old for rape and robbery and they just let them out now he's forty seven years old dna exonerated him that it was impossible it's like a one in a five hundred million chance that he was the person and this happen also in tennessee about three months ago and and the state of tennessee gave him for twenty years unjustly in prison he got a 100dollar are a thousand dollars it's the max two thousand or ten thousand imagine someone takes away twenty to thirty years a year like this.

j denzel rape tennessee Israel robbery three months seventy eighty percent forty seven years thousand dollars twenty percent thirty years twenty years 100dollar ten years 17 years
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"The fuck who cares i grill did you think a problem on planet earth is marijuana see alcohol lobbies have completely corrupted the government system and found consensus that alcohols legal which seventy percent of the murders and crimes are committed on alcohol but marijuana isn't because marijuana to have a big enough lobby there's no centralise there's no giant bob companies and budweiser in all these that can lobby for with billions of dollars so you get a we have a completely twisted but the same thing happens in the criminal justice system for one you have for profit prisons i didn't know this victoria's secret is using prison labour which is mostly black people and latin people mostly brown people we can say too literally that's why victoria's secret part of the reason that girls are buying what is they have this on my axes tell me she like victoria's secret 'cause you got like four 420 or something it was like some deal for twenty bucks you got like four bras and panties or something yeah it's be done by slavery labor they pay them like 35 cents a day or something to sit there and so all day so big prisons talk about beware of what ben perverse incentives should not be about what i think prison should do why not the money pay him a fair wage but take them and pay back what people done restitution but anyway that's not even the problem in now in the criminal justice system there's another perverse incentive which is they did that dent lausanne denzel movie we saw.

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"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"The idea of 12 jurors sounds great it's a primitive form of decentralised consensus because you get a jury of your appears right bob suzy andy you know they've they're supposedly don't know oj simpson they supposedly don't know the peterson trial but unless there on another planet nip prop anybody who didn't know oj simpson wants who made it to the jury you got a question is this who we want deciding so in a criminal justice system the consensus mechanism is 12 jurors okay but let's look at pleabargaining here's a plea bargain is doing to people i just had someone by the way break into my house on camera for two hours tried to break get all four my car i four guards in the garage to outside try to start the lambeau the rolls royce he backed out two hours he packed snacks which is the greatest part he went in my kitchen they need pack nuts it is thin which put him in the trunk of the maserati backed out couldn't figure out opened the gate the beliefs come with guns drawn put them in jail its four counts of grand larceny because our grand theft auto because he's turning the car on he went into the house while there's people were upstairs my brother and his girlfriend not you my other brother jacob was there and so that makes it a strike 'cable offence because if you break into a house when people are in their it's more dangerous than if it's empty house most robbers why he thought it was an empty house professional thieves a police officer was telling me the detective on the case told me they try to break an empty houses so if they get caught it's not a strike bowler fence threestrikes in california get life prison this will strike striker but the dudes only in prison he was in jail for sixty days he pleaded guilty and it's two overcrowded as another problem got overcrowded jails 'cause you putting people in could induce shit wrong or they smoked we'd these two people in jail they still do in countries.

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"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"Since prudence is the technical subs facet of some of conscientiousness conscientiousness is highly predict uh correlated highly correlated if you look at something went the heck's ago score conscientiousness extremely correlated with one day better outcomes oney success better outcomes and one of the force of vazquez to concierge this one's prudence prudence as decisionmaking basically everything you won't like about your life is because of a decision you made a decision to procrastinate on something to be lacey to trust the wrong person to mary the wrong person to picked the wrong career to go to the wrong school and get the wrong major to get take the wrong deck dr spend money when you didn't have all these are decisions so prudence and prediction that to peace these go together so if you can up your prudence levels by increasing the quality of predictive value than you buy the right house then you choose the right career they make the breast you pick the best business partner who doesn't one of my friends got a visit farner on the east coast who just took one million dollars and ran and actually sued my friend saying he is owed more even though he literally just stole the money and my friend goes now i gotta go to court and the courts bullshit because my lawyers like yeah you'll get your million back because the guys obviously defrauding don't call seven hundred thousand illegal fees or six hundred thousand 'cause the guys using the million dollars to hire his own lawyers said another thing we haven't even got to imagine if you could more accurately predict who committed crimes centralized the current criminal justice system is you know how many people are rotting in jail or accused or in jail for shit they didn't do and then there's people out innocent who are actually guilty.

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"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"The mastermind so i'm just gonna let a few of you in at a low price and it's already filling up quickly so if you want to get in a few of you in so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast all one word bilo busy dot com slash bitcoin podcast if the course disclosed when you get to the page put in your name in the waiting list you missed out on the first round uh in if you see it welcome to the group glad you didn't procrastinate okay back to the show what if you could predict that x y z actions would make you depress suicidal and kill yourself once you die it's an infinite eight sideways decrease in quality of life zero you're are even if you have a shitty life and you go to zero well you know why a lot of people are depressed there's many reasons but i talk to dr david bus extensively on this good bit of depression and anxiety or functionally adaptive functionally adapt what that means is functional adaption means that evolution has kept it in their belushi mary chain because it was helpful people who have this trade so depression than sadness it is a functional trait if you were doing the wrong thing over and over and getting depressed about the results it was your brain going dole do that the more so if you're drinking a ton alcohol or you were marrying the wrong person having kids and then you're depress because they take everything from you and teach you in light the depression that comes in everett ably after that if you're a normal same human is like evolution going stop it or will wipe you off the planet now that's an oversimplification depression is a complex thing there are other pure physical reasons people have some people have frequent my harm on my neuroscience friend just did a brain scan you can have problems in the brain areas that never fully formed areas that have you know all form of of uh decay or corruption is not the right word but you have malformed functionality in your brain and so people are depressed because their mom drink alcohol when they were in this nothing they did wrong but many people many of us who experienced pain suffering sadness depression it's a direct repercussion of not having what's called prude.

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"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"Yeah playlist video games he less bad food smoke eastman requests where he definitely but maybe set it going i wouldn't go to hire travel were all out of drugs komo work for you if i would know what i know now if i'm just saying so one of which are saying is you could revolutionise your life if you had that predicted power at age ten at your hands for sure so though i agree with you that's a good point you make that we can live without block chain improving the quality predictive what i'm saying is if i had to choose between improving two things to make my life better the us dollar switching completely decrypt oh that's going to bring me a lot of benefits i think in the long run and society maybe it's eight steps forward you fix the damn predicted problem it's eight hundred thousand steps forward eight hundred doubt it's an order of magnitude six and i'm probably understating so if you're interested in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and wanna learn how to make money with bitcoin i'm opening up a brand new bitcoin crypto academy for you crypto is starting to fundamentally change everything from currencies to the very structure behind the internet and if you don't understand it you will be left behind remember if you had put one hundred dollars in bitcoin in 2010 you would have over a hundred million dollars right now i don't want you miss out on the coming opportunities offered by bitcoin in the cryptocurrency space so i brought in the best experts in the game the people that are teaching me in training me and i'm gonna share that with you because it's not too late to understand bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and the block chain and to make money with it so to sign up for my new bitcoin crypto academy and learn how to invest how to make money in this new exciting say's i'm gonna open up room for a few of you have early access to the new online mentor mastermind so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast to learn more song.

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"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"In who do you want having their thumb on the nuclear bomb somebody who loves war or somebody who's like i only do this if i have to and were ruled by mad men and we can't understand why our life is in great ball block chain can change it now i don't know all the technical i'm not a dead i'm not a programmer i but i do understand the general concept of current collaborative intelligence ability to do predictive more guinean this will change the damn game for you may kids grandkids if we can pull it together and that's why i'm pro cryptocurrency because cryptocurrency is one fifth maybe less of the potential the blockchain's this this this ability to do predictive and to solve problems of centralisation and corruption this is 95 percent of what there's whole crypto movement is bought chamber this is 95 everything available ninety five ninety five maybe nine for the design we haven't even thought about the yeah but it will be around future predictions richard dawkins amazing book i interviewed him about four years ago you know he wrote the selfish gene and one of the things in the salvage gene is he goes organisms is talking about evolution organisms that can predict the future without trial and error so you don't want to have to alexa joseph stalin to presidency for forty years ago groups we made a mistake because he goes trial is costly and mistakes are deadly so organisms the reason you and i hemans have a very developed front part of our brain the nieto cortex like we still have the same brainstem like an animal the rip titley in mind we have the madouas low we have the serra bells you've got the loeb you have the mig villa where you storm memories lots of things had that but humans have in man's nieto cortex this front part they call the p pre median pre premium pm scp.

programmer cryptocurrency alexa joseph stalin loeb richard dawkins forty years 95 percent four years one fifth
"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"blockchain technologies" Discussed on Bitcoin Crypto Mastermind

"Terry are just normal people who wanted psychopath and didn't want to be able to shoot people police should be like this you take the people the block chain breaches consensus through some voting mechanism it's verified as not manipulated through the blockchain's through this open kinda ledger system and you identify in the city of san diego seventeen thousand people who could be police officers you send them all on email who here wants to be at him your nominated to be a police every you don't have you can say no or you can say yes but you can't become a police officer without be nominated and i i saw this all interesting thing in maryland there was police officer that were a woman approach because there this big thing in maryland where the police took a guy put them in a headlock and he basically died in the before he even got to the hospital i mean to the police station because they just were rough on the guy and they just the pose that they compared that to this female police officer who approach to people in a fight instead of pulling her gun she said dance off and believe it or not the two dudes that were fighting turnaround there were like young teenagers and they had like a dance off and she's solved it who do you want to be your police officer the due to pulls the gun when they don't have to just because they on a power trip or some person who's light armored try the easy way if a dance off doesn't work i might have to pull my gun but why not try the dance off first see if we add consensus on who's nominated to be schoolteachers and presidents and military lee.

Terry san diego officer maryland