17 Episode results for "Bloc Quebecois"

Words to define on the eve of an election

Party Lines

24:10 min | 1 year ago

Words to define on the eve of an election

"This is a CBC podcast. Hey everyone I'm rose Martin and I'm I mean up-to-minute is party lines and we are here to help you make sense of the federal election for these last days somehow ruse excitement gets and with Justin Trudeau as the spokesman but the end EP calling the shots he is still boldly and confidently talking about a majority government even though there's no poll away with gazillion seats or anything it just means that they are having an impact in some particular regions and then the block which is really that big story of where you know they might get thirty EP would beat a position to actually threaten the Liberals lead as it turns out we are now in a situation where we might face a possibility of minority government I'm because anything under that you're into minority territory and if you're trying to get a budget passed difficult legislation you're trying to do anything that matters it means but I think understanding what that would look like it is the next part the Canadians need to think about right so nobody goes to the polls to get excited about it really love this party either so let's talk about the possibility of the Liberals Waking up on Tuesday morning and finding the have still the most seats but there is a recognition more broadly that's probably where we are headed unless something strange happens and it's due to those two things that you just said there the MVP coming back from what we were talking about the beginning of the podcast maybe not even forming official P- getting official party status with twelve seats to now having an impact in some races that doesn't mean they're going to walk you have to fight or deal with other parties in order to get that done a majority government you just blow through everything and do what you want so that's that's the why we're talking more about it no longer heaven majority that's right does anything change in the country so probably not I'm going to guess the Liberals would have the most seats and forty seats in Quebec of course no party wants a minority government no no party want relation where they have less than one hundred and seventy seats in the house because that means that baked possibly well first of all there's one person not talking about it right now and that's Andrey sheer so my message to Canadians is this only a conservative majority government can prevent a government can't get any other big decisions through easily right without the support of at least some other parties now one seventies the magic number which gets a majority surge of the block is having a bit of a search everybody's talking about the possibility of minority governments hi I'm ashamed to say I'm no different I also like to talk about minority of a late surge in the people's late surge in the block polls and everybody's talking about minority governments what's your first sense of how parties are talking about these murder are there no poll tracker nothing that would suggest that's going to happen but sometimes you have to talk about things in order to not talk about the possibility of other things but it would seem as the they get your mere days now I always hear like I'm dreaming of the Friday after when I'm lying in my bed nope not talking to anybody gotta go through it right now okay so you could certainly see everybody crisscrossing the country hitting those like key writings they need to win in order to try and form government or pick up seats because Justin Trudeau is still prime minister and incumbent we get the first chance to form government and we'll probably do that and the reason I say would get the first chance okay let's hear it let's do it one of the things we started talking about when we started this podcast was whether the we're all crazily running around the country and it's still out here extremely close between the parties that's Kinda changed a little bit I'm is that the NDP's Fuminori government like not a thing that we do it's a result that happens when when when Canadians are kind of like we don't really love this party but we don't because if there was more seats on the other side and parties could come together and form a government instead they might try and do that although that seems hard to imagine because they're not ideologically aligned in the other party's necessarily so yeah I think they wake up they decide Oh we're minority government not quite what we wanted have a majority yes because in that particular case it is custom and tradition in this country to let the party that won the most seats attempt to form government there is but we can plow through and sort of look at things on a case by case basis with that be flare but see where it gets interesting to me if the Conservatives have the most seats but don't even so in the case of Indra sheer having the most seats but not a majority I think liberals might still try to make an argument that Indo law that requires that right because the whole point of our parliamentary system is confidence is the name of the game so if you have the confidence of the parliament then you can continue to have to try and defend that position as you say working with other people so should we talk a little bit because I feel like people sometimes get confused around what minority government is would a coalition is you WanNa talk about that is again by tradition by these crazy things smarter people than I know about would be allowed to go to the Governor General and say I'm going to keep going thanks a lot and then abundance on twitter will go crazy because he's so much fun to watch it would be so much fun to watch the thing that would protect them would be the fact that he's still has the job and so he is and at a national dental care plan investment and housing they also want to waive interest on student loans to me that is the party that is certainly angling his doing things together they can do some pretty incredible things Lester B Pearson is the clearest example worked a little bit with the EP created a pension plan hated an agreement to keep going some parties we've seen in this country long before that I'm a party might prop up a governing party without any kind of formal agreement right they might say diminshed like you're getting married right and you're blending your family's that involves like sharing cabinet that's right that's the blending of the families so if you don't have all they tend to last about two years on average give or take and when they work together successfully which is sometimes what people wanna see political parties all of those pieces it's not a real marriage that's that would be my crazy get analogy I love it I love it whereas if you have a minority and you we just like to get are the ones who can command the confidence because they can actually like reach out an and form some kind of coalition whether it's formal or informal and all the ladies for his party to support the liberals should the liberals fail to lock down that majority so their priorities are a national single payer universal pharmacy. Hey Liberals I like what you're doing on climate change so I'll give you support for this budget bill if you do X Y and Z liberals would say okay we can live with that so it gets passed more than likely complain and say yeah they won the election so they should be the ones to form the government yeah and if they if they were trying wasn't there so if we are headed towards a minority let's kick around what that would look like under a conservative view of things conservatives wake up the next they have a majority so you're just gonNa pull back a little bit to make sure there's enough checks and balances that's like that's a good way to look at it but there are minority governments that get things done that voters will keep this going because that's exactly what ended up happening the follow election they also gave us the Canadian flag how does that yeah that was more divisive affair people that you know might think about sovereignty but are willing to think about other things and could be pulled toward some conservative ideas trying to say you can look after to form government whether successful at that or not depends on how large the seat gap is liberals so one thing that we saw in the last where the Governor General says okay I'm GonNa give this other power sharing agreement an opportunity to to to form government it will be really interesting to see whether Trudeau well let's do it okay so let's coalition offers like a formal coalition former coalition so involves one or more parties is like a formal affects get done yeah doesn't mean they will get done of course it just means that's their wishlist for starting a conversation and I think you hit the nail on the head what minority governments really are is up to say we want to be the progressive option for voters and if you entrust us with the power to sort of keep the liberals in check and we'll make sure that these things it to a point where we need your help to survive confidence votes here are some things that we're willing to do to get that the problem with that though is the closest we resigned as prime minister or not because if the differential is not that big he gets a chance to form government I anyway and so the Conservatives will and we saw a speech from Andrew Scheer this week in Quebec that was very much trying to appeal to soft nationalist easily be action is on the BBC Liberals won the most seats but not a majority and they're like we'd reelected formed government and they failed at the very first liberals and the MVP decided will were GonNa try and try and stop this from happening they got together and formed that coalition that formal agreement find more about two this is where we bring you back to this election okay the end ep are not uncomfortable talking about coalitions and not uncomfortable talking about a minority government and to try and toss the conservative overboard but because they didn't have enough numbers they also asked the Bloc Quebecois to join sort of as a side dance partner just the not only are people feeling about the election as you said but also a way to keep government in check in a different way like you're just not sure they're doing a good enough job has has intimated that he's the kind of leader who would want to give the block any kind of opening yet no I agree with you and maybe the speech in Quebec was really about trying to get the all economic update where they had plans to cut spending to sell off some assets to get rid of the provoked subsidy that that wasn't confidence vote and so after government fell the end ep and the Greens formed or coalitions that we liked it without an election so this is is a lot of danger for the Conservatives or any party in trying to align themselves with the block in a formal or even informal way Why would image here in allow the Conservatives to regroup it was an insane time in Canadian politics and the coalition fell apart ultimately destroyed Steph NGOs career and Sandy P not interested Green Party in no way aligned people's Party of Canada may not even win one seat so we'll see so that leaves the Bloc Quebecois stay and they have a minority but what do they do do you think depending on first of all the first thing that they would do is demand at the prime minister to resign so that they get a chance to okay this week I want to talk a little bit about strategic to cobble something together they they were minority government and then they were trying to get votes past? It's difficult to see where that support would come from is it not a cause so as you said and because the Bloc Quebecois was at the table which outraged conservatives Stephen Harper sort of destroyed all of that by calling this an agreement with the scary separatists a place for parties for every vote they got they got a buck ninety five back in return so a bunch of things in there that really upset the opposition parties the Liberals the MVP and the block so that scare in this country like that that's a pretty successful minority government for a government that was only around for a couple of years right peers and Tommy Douglas that partnership you might even voting we hear about it we talk about it I don't know that we always understand what it means I'm not sure I do but I just want to look at the at the idea of strategic voting you get the right numbers to force that confidence vote but because Stephanie O. who was of course the liberal leader at the time had said in the election I'm not going to form a coalition allow that to happen you know I'm not advocating for one version of minority versus another I think if you're feeling like you just WanNa have government and elected officials God to any sort of coalition in recent history would be back in two thousand and eight the Conservatives had formed government they put on the table you know sort of a regular most votes wins but that doesn't mean they have to have a simple majority bright the easy way to look at that is like if you are in a writing where candidate gets thirty five percent of the vote where I had largely invisible role the governor general becomes a bit more visible because their discretionary matters right it becomes a from the moment things in your own house and I will empower you to do that which to me is not only an opening too soft nationalists to vote for him but is also an opening to the block habit qua- to say if we Volunteers and they say that it works that they were able to block conservative candidates from winning and I think it was nine nine writings now we don't factually elected in part one of their promises I'm was to get rid of our curdle Joel System the first-past-the-post-system and and here we sit actually want I should say that we were not supposed to be having this conversation in the Year of our Lord Twenty nineteen twenty fifty the liberals quoting Liberals so they've already ruled out supporting the Conservatives have should win the most seats not a majority but he's laid out six urgent prior votes of soft nationalists and less about reach out to the Bloc Quebecois but given that we don't see anyone else that would be naturally aligned with the Conservative Party they have to see Oh yeah but that's but that's what we're stuck with so how do we operate inside of that system for now in in two thousand fifteen there were a couple of organizations leave now and vote together who decided that they didn't want Stephen Harper anymore so they pinpointed a number of writings in the country the canvas they got petitions we know whether that's true because there was such an overwhelming desire for change in that election that it could have been that not these people campaigning against someone rather than force and managed to convince the Governor General Mikhail John at the time to Perot Parliament which means end the parliamentary sitting prevent vote from happening thinking about that too if you're in a minority government situation and you don't WanNa go election in six months and Lord I don't WanNa go where do you want to do this again I dude on but the idea is an interesting one that if there are sort of outside forces beyond the political parties saying don't do this do this and that might sway your vote is that is the best message for Canadians because here's the deeply cynical part strategic voting will work you know it will work uh-huh is it simply about wanting to make sure that they get attached to govern after the election because he does not strike me as a person who has at least nothing he said so far earlier this week was talking about how the EP cannot stop enter share and the only way to stop these conservative cuts is to vote liberal entry of at least talking about strategic voting which is to say of voting for a party in order to prevent to prevent outcome from happening as opposed to voting for the thing and don't go the that's that was reporting is trying to stop an outcome I'm as opposed to saying hey progressives that get you WanNa vote for something else with their ballot jagmeet Singh on the other hand this week as well as museum about a coalition which he sort of dialed down a little bit was also saying you should vote for what you want because if you never it is not doesn't make you feel very good about your democracy and we have no way of knowing where people are with this yeah I I would say on the will likely win that writing but it's still sixty five percent of the writing did not vote for depressing yes depressing inspired that that's an interesting notion I just don't know that it's actually real right I mean real or not you hear a lot of the leaders now yeah hockey right so just introduced because just like the MVP couldn't stop Stephen Harper or Doug Ford they can't stop Andrew Scheer because that's what is happening is you end up trying to to sort of like plug the tighter leash that'll probably what minority situation is for you well I think that's kind of a decent segue into the thing that you WanNa talk about it let's do it so we're having we're having the same conversation again yeah because first past the post sort of limits US I in terms of the weight of your vote I guess in some ways right because the person with the most is how you feel about the actual ballot that you're casting because I imagine that if you have droves of people in writings were just casting their vote to stop it outcome it's not like I just need to lie down for this where do they find that support and I think that's the part that's problematic but it doesn't but it doesn't mean the Canadians shouldn't go ahead and is leaks of people who are being I think I want to vote for you but I'm not really sure that you deserve my vote and you're trying to say be scared

Bloc Quebecois Justin Trudeau rose Martin Stephen Harper thirty five percent sixty five percent six months two years
The First Week Back

What You Need to Know - a #CDNPolicast from Bluesky Strategy

19:35 min | 9 months ago

The First Week Back

"The welcome to this week's episode of Blue Sky Strategy Groups a Canadian. podcast what you need to know about this week in Canadian Indian politics. I'm Alison Fair and joining me this week. My colleague Hussein shortage and Cam Hallstrom Welcome guys how are you. I'm very willing you good happy Friday looking forward to the weekend ahead of us. I think things are going to warm up in the capital. We got winter lewd. Everyone's excited right now as well as excited as you can in the winter but yeah there we go and Ottawa excitement and autoways its own thing. Okay well we did have excitement because all the MP's came back this week. That was the excitement for us us. it's like being back. I back to school after Christmas break and I want to get your thoughts on what took place where we kind of shocked surprised not really surprised about how everything came to play this week Once they came back to pounding HAL can. Let's start with you well. I think we've been waiting to see what the totally because obviously yeah. This is not the first time they've sat. They sat for seven days before the holidays. Borelli we just the way that went out really wasn't much of a real feel for how things are going to be. And obviously this week we had a good test of things you saw the first of the Cana China Committee and how that went down down we saw obviously the house coming back we saw some big legislative pieces. We saw the ways and means vote on on Nafta two point Oh. US LESS MCA YMCA. Whatever you WANNA call it and to me? What's interesting is this to now? We're starting to see we obviously been thinking and postulating. What are these guys going to do and now are you starting to see the road? The roads are starting to take and how they're going about it and obviously it's going to be interest how plays out. And obviously you know the old saying events my dear son events happ what's with The Corona virus coming out of out of China. That's forced a lot. Obviously a big part of the discussion. What how things are going? And it's been interesting to watch doc people's responses I think for me the big thing that I found very interesting compared to the last time we were in minority parliament is at the last minority. Parliament was much more combative out of but I think that would just because of house composed you had a government. That wasn't that didn't have any natural allies on the opposition side wasn't really looking to make any any and it was more of a hand to hand combat on a daily basis. And we've seen a little bit of that in the Committee and the committee work That's a little bit of start so far but with this government. Obviously they have at least two dance partners on the other side and then the great example was the Ralph was the ways and means portion ocean. Vote on on the two point. Oh I was surprised that it was premature. I if I'm not mistaken believe unanimous the and that blew my mind for a couple reasons first stoff the fact that you managed to get everyone on the same page on that vote for one but also an minority parliament. It's real normal to see okay. Well if if party is gonNA vote in Party. B. Is GonNa vote while I can vote Nay and make a point and I put myself out there so I was very surprised to see both the block and the end. EP Repeat get on side with this because both had very good reasons to not get on side with Seattle this case they jumped on board even the Greens really have literally have nothing nothing to lose every time they cast folks no they can't take the whole thing down even they went with. I find that very interesting that they all took that route and I ah to be. It's very interesting on both. We talk a little bit. More later. Buys found that very interesting. I'm kind of curious to see how that continues. Yeah what do you make of the tone like Cam. I'm was saying you compare it to last minority. I actually was looking for some fireworks. I thought we would see some fireworks but this week is kind of been very even Keel. He'll What do you make of that? I mean I'm not GonNa go as far as the last minority. I am going to go back to. Let's in December right before they went to us You would've would've expected the tone to be somewhat combative on certain issues certain topics but let's face it. Twenty twenty has been a state of crisis crisis communication for this government with facing issues such as the downing of the Ukrainian plane krona virus these issues these international crises essentially have asked us to be united more. So that's the tone. We've seen in parliament in a way that like there have been on certain issues where obviously certain parties will have a different tone such such as Naphtha of course the Bloc Quebecois not happy with that the the the conserved parties going through a leadership race. So obviously they're having their own internal issues. They're not going to be combative. Live for now at least to say but I still feel that there is some some some good that has come out of this in a way that you've seen parties come together putting motions putting forward. I think for now we'll see in the next couple of weeks is is a very moderate torn parliament where we won't see a lot of things happening we'll just see the pieces. This is in place for the next coming months. Is there anything wrong with that though. I honestly don't think anything is wrong with that because there is no need for that the type of combativeness to begin at this point in time. Because there's not a lot of things that are moving. If we just take talk quickly about Nafta it just makes economic sense for everyone to just pass that bill moving forward. The premiums are asking of it. The associations are asking you know Canada and Mexico. US are waiting on us right so for now. I just think that the the pieces needs to be in place and we need to move forward from that but there's a difference between we'll do an example is there between passing it and the politics of minority parliament and to my mind like I said all you need one dance partner for that being to pass and for all the parties there look basically. You're going back over every vote that you take over in our more murdy parliament trying to make a story of when you go to the next election in what you've done what you've stood up for etc etc and there are going to be time to Nordea parliament where you're going to have to eat something you're gonNa have to take a step back and take one for the team team and just bite the bullet because you're not going to have a choice. But because you have to do that you want as many you WanNa Markup as remarks the other column and there's going to be time for that exactly now. It took me by that rise because I'll take the. EPA is an example. This has always been one of the big bugaboo of the MVP was that you know you never support trade deals. Why don't you support? Trade deals heels and the MVP comeback has always been we support fair trade free trade. And it's it's always internal discussion but what I find interesting. Is that in this bill. There are some serious concerns in the in the Nafta Bill. The one that jumped out at me and I'm very moderate on these. Even this kind of got my backup a bit was that we actually have provisions in this in in this agreement that actually prevents US trading with other partners that the Americans actually putting quota on us to stop us from competing eating with them in say Europe or Asia are elsewhere. That's new that's some that's gone well beyond but it's one thing to say okay between us you know. Here's the accident each other. It's another thing to say. Okay you don't get to compete outside of that. Now it's basically capping our sectors and that that to me is the. I have a real problem with that. Even Conservatives serves in the house you listen to the debate. They were going on about that. And obviously somebody was gonna give something was going to happen. That's fine but I'm surprised that someone and didn't use this as a chance. Okay I'm standing here now. Yes it's going to pass. That's going through. I can't stop it but the very least I can make the point. And that's the part that surprise me is that known simply trying to really make the point and I and I would expect I would expect that to not continue. I would expect that at some point to change but to me. That's that's what really struck me was more the once once. Everyone agreed because that does happen from time to time. It just more of the idea of. I'm surprised that happened on this. In this it is the case then though that all parties just want this Nafta thing done but the enough is enough because we know we have an American election the biggest thing. That's the thing though. If the block handy PIA voted. No it's still gonNA wind through it. Wouldn't it would still be disposed but right so but it was. I see that they did vote for it and the the thing is that you have to understand one thing that and and I don't wanNA sound repetitive. Here but I think it probably will. Is that this was probably the best deal possible for Kenan we Ford and the thing is that of course. There's going to be some concessions that Canada had to put up the table and just give them away to the US. But I definitely think the benefit outweighs them right and just figure for example on that that. I told you agree with that. It blocks from trading with other partners so broad same thing with aluminum aluminum sector as well We're essentially it's not the right fit for the industry in Quebec which Blah Blah Blah Blah Belka spoke about but at the same time blanche came out saying that. There's a mechanism with the NAFTA that. In the future we can amend that and go back without reopening the deal we can essentially address that issue or concern later on but for now. Oh you know logo even came out saying that you know. He supports that The Nafta other premiums that came out saying that they support the new Nafta. So I feel that there is is a consensus in parliament and across different party lines across the country that this is the best for us just just so we can can put uncertainty behind us the finish line in terms of the negotiating. I don't think there's much to answer what I find very interesting historical sense and it's funny that you need. We can't touch the concerned leadership race in the debates. They're having themselves on certain issues and the idea being that there's a general consensus in society. And what does your party do when you're basically the outside that consensus. You haven't kept up with the time you're outside when we say the conservative race right now talking about whether it be same sex marriage or whether it'd be bilingualism for their candidates we've we've we've seen that right and the effect it can have and for the MVP side of it. I think this is the big one. It's it's the it's the it's the trading snapped up. Because you think back thirty years ago when NAFTA AFTER I was the first start talking about free trade with the US and Nafta and the fight is just the epic battle of what that was. And it's and we've now arrived at the point where obviously the the battles over it was. It's been decided that consensus is this works and for the GP. I find it interesting because because I don't want to say the position hasn't evolved but it hasn't kept up with the consensus and now what do you do. Because I think that's the thing that you can hang your hat on that one piece. That's why I'm going to oppose it but I agree. It wasn't enough to say kill the whole thing. And that's an becomes part of that problem for their paradigm and opposition just one example. But I think it's an interesting going going forward because you're you're seeing these debates happening all the parties and shifting and how do we what do we stand for. Where are we going? What are we talking? That's GONNA be. You'RE GONNA see a lot of that this year and we I WANNA make it sound like as if everyone was on board from the start of course. Some parties obviously did their level best to extend the debate. You know the. MVP The dad the Conservatives were certain point as as well as well so you know members of parliament did express their dissatisfaction with the deal because they have to death constituents in the in the different sectors. Here's where Nafta obviously affects them. But overall I think this past the finish line I think this will go through the the Senate and we can go from there. I WANNA bring up to other to other things. Talk about NAFTA kind of yeah. It's done we can move ahead this week. We also had to announcements with regards to the Telecom and Broadcasting Industry and we also had plastics. What do you guys make? Are these two areas that now that it kind of NAFTA is put behind US per se. Are these two areas that we can see a little bit more spark in the House of Commons. More Combativeness we most Canadians. WanNa see that but are we going to see something like this. Play out a little bit more in the house in the coming months Who said what do you think? Think I think more on the single use plastics than the new recommended channel telecom recommendations just because of the just because I definitely feel that the recommendations that were made we're pretty straightforward. I think for a lot of them. For for for major of Mitchell political parties You know the Bloc Quebecois DP pedigrees even the Liberals The essentially had a lot of these things that the recommendations put forward such as taxing The the big service providers at the same time. GST netflixing all that sort of stuff so the recommendations you know like I'm just GonNa talk a bit about the recommendation just to give you a bit of context or is that that from the beginning of the last decade I would say you know whether it was academia whether it was essentially industry experts. There's always been this huge debate on you. Know how. How do we protect the data? The rights of our citizens how governments evolved with new technologies evolving technologies right broadcasting casting content absolutely absolutely and and this was coming if anything this should of these recommendation of came four five years ago right and Canada has been lagging behind behind that right so if you read the recommendations. They're pretty straightforward The coffers urgency and we will probably see some overlap with the government's current mandate because they covering government has already prioritized for example a digital charter. which will probably overlap with the recommendation on the protection of data and having control over that and being the mediator between the service providers? So I do feel that this. The recommendations will probably be get debated in the House of Commons but not extend the single use plastics. Well because I think that was probably the biggest singles passing in the environment was one of the biggest topics and contentious issues within the election. I think this will be Moving forward An issue that probably the conservatives even after their leadership race will probably bring being back and contest the government on What the liberal government brought forth This week I'm GonNa have to be the country and here. It gets a lot in life I actually I I actually think the AL report and the broadcast suggestions are actually GonNa be are actually more difficult because actually there's more of a consensus around single use plastics especially with that report came out talking about just how firm the scientists on the macro plastics talking about plastic bags and bottles and all those things and even for conservative. There's a lot of consensus since around that. So I think that's going to the micro-plastics peace will see where that goes but for the macro paths plastics. Because I don't much of a hold on me. What's the difference for just for those who are listening? Macro and micro macro is operatives bought bottles plastic bags at the grocery store. Mike and micro-plastics are small miniature. Little Plastic said. We should raise a shooting in the last problem a lot. Yes a whole lot is brought enough to invite an invite debate base. Yeah By the broadcast piece as she's a bigger one for a couple of reasons the first being that because of the nature of our country obviously whenever you talked media and Utah Culture please very big in Quebec and Quebec. has an outstripped role outside when it comes to a minority parliament specially with a a group like the block and yes the net flicks tax. Some has urban push for for a long time. But let's face it the conservatives push just as hard back against that and I don't see them backing off that idea now even though the idea that they they should be on the exact same footing as a crave TV or TSN or anyone else who is offering an online service in this country happened to be in this country. They should under Pagan. And that's a very easy debate argument to make but still the argument happens and when even when it comes to the Production Peace Now a lot of the last prominent. The liberal government was re rightly criticized for the deal they made with net flicks on production in house and how Netflix openly admit we are. We don't see ourselves broadcaster caster so evolution in technology that the law does have to keep up. Because I'm sorry if you're they are broadcaster they are they may be online. But you're still broadcasting something right and the laws to catch up with that so I actually see this as being a bigger debate because part of it is going to be the Quebec Angle because there is a very unique need when it it comes to Quebec in the cultural industries there and how that comes but at the same time. I think it's also gonNA play into some other debates so we saw the the recommendations John. CBC which when I read that. I'm like Oh boy Sun Media's going to have a field day with this about you know in the defend the CBC crowd so it touches which is on the good recommendation sensible recommendations but they also touch on a lot of old tropes. That I think are just kind of fire those up and it's going to it's going to give something for for for for those who are always opposed to these things to rally around into fight. Their Co gives them new oxygen. So but I would. I'd be curious to see and I know the ministers did mention. They were looking before legislation a few months. I'm very curious if they actually keep to that timeline because to me. This is one of those things that the longer they let it. Sit and let it and let and let people get the harder. It's going to be to get these ideas through because I think the there's not a whole lot of new ideas thrown into this this piece. Lots of we've already known we've already seen but I think the longer the longer it allows for the debate to happen and the harder to be give time people get activated around it and then it takes on a life okay. So you're you're thinking This the communications broadcasting. We'll get more fire in their bellies plastics. Not so much the the opposite feeling so we'll see we'll see we'll see I. You know what I think who send. You're totally right the plastics. It's what Canadians want to hear. It's it came out of the election and good for the government for an awfully are more progressive than I would say majority of the members in the house a and the thing with the plastic is. I'll say this is not a new idea like we've already seen Julie jurisdictions municipal and provincial already banning plastic bags in certain places also bees as a today no more lasting in the store exactly right so that's why I see it as maybe a little a little bit easier to get through because there is a wider consensus. Well we we shall see. They are here for another weekend and a bit two weeks before they go on break again. So hopefully we'll see what comes out of the a House of Commons over that time. So Husson Cam thank you very much as always thank you and thank you to the listeners. For tuning into blue skies strategy groups team of political critical observers for this week's Canadian. podcast what you need to know about politics this week in Canada. Loose Sky Strategy Group is one of Canada's leading public affairs firms for government relations lobbying and strategic communications advice across Canada. Visit US at Blue Sky Strategy Group DOC KIRK. Blue Sky Strategy Group is a proud member of the Global Communications Alliance

Nafta US Canada Parliament MVP House of Commons Bloc Quebecois Quebec liberal government Alison Fair Cana China Committee Ottawa Sky Strategy Group Hussein shortage Nordea Seattle
Can the Bloc Qubcois return from the brink?

Front Burner

21:38 min | 1 year ago

Can the Bloc Qubcois return from the brink?

"This is a c._b._c. Podcast <music> crisper sitting in for jimmy push <music> so if you're an english candidate you're probably not paying much attention to the block quebec wa but remember back in nineteen ninety-three the block was the official opposition they had a lot of political sway or going around the fabric of dunedin institution but to make the heart of more aware of the aspirations of the people today but the last two elections have almost wiped them out and block has kind kind of crumbled beginning in two thousand eleven when it seats were reduced from forty seven to four they've had six leaders in the past eight years and now the block has a leader tasked with rebuilding the party. You have to build a lot with very few resources and with a lot of humility. I think that's a good thing for the idea for the party the movement today we're talking about e. Francois blanchett's. We've been doing these profiles of all the major party leaders in the run-up to the october election. I'm joined by martin patrick metric when he's a politics journalist based in montreal and we're gonna talk about the state of the block and whether blanchette has a chance to make them relevant again. This is front burner martin. Thanks for coming back on front burner. Thanks for having me so e francois blanchette. He came to politics politics from a pretty different place from the other party leaders so what was his life before he got into politics <hes> well he was a music manager so there's a quebec rocker rocker by the name of ethic lapointe and he sort of considered the bad boy of quebec rock floats up trying to think of a way we over here how to how to describe eric lapointe or points like nickelback crossed with joe cocker but in french and everything that entails so <hes> you know sort of a guy who's walking blue song like you know is basically a victim of his own proclivities and successes and all that kind of stuff you <hes> and he was his manager <hes> and that meant sort of making sure that he got on stage making sure he got paid <hes> so he went from that that name is also <hes> president of leads disc which is the independent recording industry sort of umbrella group i guess right <hes> and so he was in there for a long time and then he went into politics he went into he went with the pets cubic well then he was back doing punditry on here on rental canada politik. Should we make these is your and then through that back in and decided to go back to politics with the buchwa so what actually drew him into politics like what are his convictions. He's very very much a as you can tell from his background sorta steeped in quebec culture and he comes out with a very that old school mentality that <hes> <hes> quebec is fundamentally different from the rest of the country and you all you have to do is look at our language and our culture and that while we can be good neighbors. We should really be separate. <hes> <hes> quebec should be a separate country the idea for nation for people to have its own country cannot die in cannot be irrelevant. It's been chosen by so many people in the last century. Why would any of that be any bad for quebec and that's a very i mean look. It's very sort of a prominent worldview as far as of people within the artistic community here in quebec certainly a certain age of his ilk. I guess <hes> and so that's that's that's what he brought into politics and then you wrote a profile tim a couple of years ago and got to spend some time with him like what was that like. He's <hes> his nickname. It's funny nickname his goon known for short temper and his you know <hes> sort of blunt speaking style. He was nicknamed that by one of his colleagues and it just sort of stuck in talking with him. I was talking to them. In the context of the two thousand twelve quebec election during what you saw some of the the beginnings innings of the party cubic was saying french vive edge towards identity issues voted to what we have the right to be ourselves. We have the right to be proud and his big thing then when i spoke to him was <hes> was language and the existential problem that is montreal free all because of the spread of english to the detriment of the french ram. It's that sort of reductionist arithmetic that is to say if you hear english. You are necessarily not seen so. You're not speaking french and you're you're. You're you're speaking at the expense of french and so one of the anecdotes. He told me we're sitting there. In a tim hortons in drummond ville and the first thing is is that he was looking at his tim hortons cup still remember this he's looking at important scalp and it bothered him that it said caffeine tim hortons and not leak efi because that's grammatically correct right <hes> the and and the other anecdote that he told me was that he was he was getting dining at a vietnamese restaurant somewhere up in rosemont which is a historically francophone working class neighborhood and realized is partway through the experience of dining that he was doing most of his ordering in talking to the waiter in english and he and he sort of did that did this without it thinking that really bothered him and you know i it is really really easy for for people like us to sort of make fun of and say oh what an idiot but amongst a certain generation of sovereignist that is the that is the sore point. Yes is the ideas that you are in your you are in your city and here you are speaking english rush because the person across either doesn't want to or can't speak french or doesn't occur to them to speak french. Put put it that way and that is a visceral visceral thing <hes> because that opens up all sorts of old wounds and i i understand the knee-jerk reaction just sort of laugh at that like a laugh about the apostrophe and tim hortons or ray f as opposed you say to say that doesn't seem as important as the other issues that you have to take on when you're running a federal party that's right and to be fair to him is running into provincial party is her <hes> and and the the fundamental issues that it always comes down to that existential question here in quebec is that we are a people of eight million six and a half million of which are french speakers and we are in a sea of millions an hundreds of millions of people who don't speak our language so we have to have this garrison mentality in order for us to survive and to be perfectly frank is that there's a there's a bit of truth. There's certainly a bit of truth there <music> now quebec sovereignty. It's not really a top of mind issue. I think for a lot of people especially clean english canada coming into this election. <hes> and i think the big question you have to answer when you're the leader of the bloc is how much do i push sovereignty as her main issue. And how much do i push sir referendum lake where does blanchette stand on that. I was looking at the website this morning and so it it has mowed down which is the president sort of forward then it says <hes> the lady asked this is the second underneath <hes> if you look at all the literature and everything like that it's still very much friend of mine they present themselves as being <hes> the anteroom to sovereignty <hes> in ottawa one that it exists for the exact reason that lucian push art created the party in nineteen ninety-one which is to say we are here as a pressure party to get quebec out of the canadian federation thing that we we needed a different from what it is now with the rest of candidate. It'll be a radically different arrangement. That's in theory in practice sort of really the push and aggravate the differences between canada and quebec and so one of the things that blush pushes the lot on these days is the question of oil well oil pipelines this idea of adding people buying more and more and burning more and more oil which will bring to hold plymouth nowhere as a nation nation like any other nation. We have to put a lot of pressure on any country. That keeps doing that. We are killing this world. We have a complicated relationship with oil here in quebec that we use it nearly as much as any other north american society but we critique it a lot. There's a new angus reid poll out that tells ask the oil and gas industry is becoming a priority for canadians in this election year. There's support for pipelines in every province except for quebec makes it a lot lot more in the environmentalist movement is stronger here and a lot more vocal than elsewhere <hes> and blush it counts himself amongst one of those right in some ways oil is really an issue where you can draw draw a line between quebec and canada's represented by the west right like having pipelines. You have to have a pipeline. Come through quebec. If you wanna move albert oil to the east coast so that's that's how that issue kind of manifest itself. That's right so if trudeau wins the election <hes> in october he has less of a problem with someone like e francois blanchet because trudeau rudo isn't advocating for a an east coast pipeline so energy east was here as as everyone knows we had the plan put it in and then it got cancelled because the the the company pulled out transcanada edible though in a statement today transcanada said it made the decision after careful review of changed circumstances the massive pipeline expansion was put on hold in the wake of new and more stringent environmental approval requirements for the national energy board. Would you consider championing west east pipeline. It doesn't have to be energy east. It might go through quebec. If there's going to be <hes> such a proposal it has to come forward from the private sector it has and has essentially bought a uh-huh has bought a pipeline to push to the to the west coast so that takes care of that <hes> the interesting part is if the conservatives come in one of the key points in andrew shears. Plank is a quote unquote energy. <hes> what is it angie <hes> corridor running through canada canadian resources and energy coast to coast we could create wealth and opportunity while uniting statements like negligible and so necessarily that means putting a pipeline through quebec back and it's interesting he talks a lot about that very issue outside of quebec but mentions it hardly at all when he's actually in the province back and that extends to his language to you you look at some of the some of the stuff that they've put out the conservative party is put out in the it wasn't me figure this out. It was a journalistic quebec city that he uses the word oil in in english angus candidate uses the word energy in quebec energy's pipeline that would have taken energy from western canada eastern candidate displacing for now yeah when blush took over the black abequa he had his he said we really have to reach younger people and it feels like kind of these identity issues and the issue sovereignty is not so top of mind for younger people. Oh but energy and oil really can be away that it can be both a quebec issue an like something that reaches younger people worried about climate change. That's right so if you were the <music> <hes> sovereigntists version one back in the day you would have aggravated the differences the linguistic differences in the cultural differences between english and french canada so what you're seeing now <hes> <hes> with mr blanchette is go look. Candida is a petro state. Look quebec is greener than green. We wanna make things very green. We are green <hes> and everything around us. <hes> <hes> that has to do with canada is is soaked in oil. That's the difference that he's gonna aggravate not so much linguistic one but the petrochemical based ones yeah. It's it's not the the cultural differences. Actually we have a policy difference on the rest of canada that makes it necessary for us to become more independent from them. There's a bit of truth to this. There's also a lot of myth making that. Quebecers are inherently greener than the rest of the country. Now we do use a little bit less oil than everybody else given the fact that there's a there's so much hydro hydropower here but look the top selling car here in quebec is <hes> is the f. one fifty people's by s._u._v.'s as much as they do anywhere else. Quebec is a massive massive province <hes> geographically geographically wise with a very small population. What does that mean. People drive more. <hes> look whereas addicted oil as anyone else regardless. The misir are difficult difficult break and i never said that kickers were saints which does not mean that have to be forced into being you come police to this development of tar sand oil. I wanna talk about one of the biggest challenges for blanchette and that is the party that he's actually the leading right now. Because the last years of the block becua- i looked into this it was they've had six leaders in the last eight years by my count. It's been like a pretty tumultuous leander's and interim you leaders right right exactly and if we go back to the last election i mean the party only had two seats they had been wiped out by the ep party says it's seeing a surge of support lord across the country but particularly in quebec they coax jill out of retirement to subsidize the m._v._p. Has failed to defend quebec's interests in ottawa. Al could sovereigntists be represented in ottawa with people always saying that their ideal what happened in that election because they did turn it around to some extent to some extent fisher so she'll this was brought out. There's a there's a great term in french. <hes> people can google this. It's called soviet <hes> and that means ba- essentially saved the furniture <hes> the the water's creeping up <hes> get the furniture on the roof so that you know we save. We don't doesn't doesn't get waterlogged and we all get drifted away to see that's basically what is you'll duceppe. <hes> did not election <hes> he was not to say he was a spent force but he had suffered a very sort humiliating defeat in two thousand eleven forget the phone. He says he's accepting responsibility for the crushing defeat and came back in two thousand fifteen used the last of his political clout to to turn things around. Did it work. He didn't win himself <hes> the his own seat but but it worked in the sense that people around managed to get elected when they probably would have the probably should've lost and anywhere in in other words though seats that would have gone <hes> that was probably gonna lose. Anyway didn't go to the liberals. They went back to the block so that's what they did so now they have. If i'm not mistaken if ten they won ten seats in the last one but they also ran a campaign that i think especially in english candida struck a wrong note for a lot of people. It ended up being a very controversial campaign. You're allowed to use the word abhorrent okay so that that's interesting testing <hes> that you bring that up. I'll explain is basically what the ad was that one of the main is was and it was pretty close to the election date. Basically it was <hes> a drop of oil sort of morphing into a kneecap humane sony protocol. I think nepal dini cap and even if we're not okay with wearing a niqab to vote or taken south thomas mulcair he's fine with it. It's one drop too many because the was the main was seen as the main opponents to them. If you elect the dp quebec will be overrun run with oil in kneecaps right now <hes> again. I use the word appoint. There and i stand by it. It's it's a it's a brutal thing. It's particularly brutal because jill duceppe himself elf when at the provincial level was going through all the sort of identity stuff and a charter of quebec values which would have seen the prohibition of the the of the hijab and the the key etc etc it would ban the wearing of ostentatious religious symbols. The minister responsible for this bernard granville says he thinks these rules are necessary because there's tension about this. He calls it a crisis. The state must be neutral jobs. Sep was sort of one of the ones who spoke out against it to the extent that he could and has said for as long as i can remember him being in politics that a quebecer quebecers comebacker <hes> to paraphrase justin trudeau <hes> <hes> so for him to come out and do this. It's sort of showed me exactly the limits of civic nationalism right because he's in trouble. He's got the breathing down his neck and what does he do. He reverts to this sort of scorched earth idea that was straight of his stephen harper playbook to say look if you don't if you don't vote for us we're the last bulwark against oil in kneecaps cabs. Did it work. I mean they did do. They did do better than they thought so in a way. Do you feel like the party the block becua- changed because of that election because has they have been seen for the longest time kind of socially progressive party like they had a policy of voting for same sex marriage for example when that came up years ago <hes> and now they're playing on these kind kind of identity issues and issues around specifically you know islam in quebec like did that fundamentally change what the parties about i mean the the block of it was is often seen as the poor cousin of of the particular and that's exactly what the party gave it d- <hes> in the two thousand twelve when they first elected in the election after that pushed as i mentioned before the charter quebec values the particular kwa which i will remind listeners started off as not quite multicultural but very very very open to newcomers difference within the society also close ranks so the fact that the bloc quebecois is doing that now doesn't really surprise me so i want to run through just the last couple of years because duceppe as you mentioned lost his seat in the two thousand fifteen election <hes> and then he went back into retirement and the party went through a little bit of soul searching and they ended up picking this woman martine roulette yup to run the party well. That's spoke about the party sovereignty anti agenda and how many underestimate the strength of the bloc quebecois leonova. Mike system is also very blue and she lasted a year sure. I mean it was a very tumultuous time like seven members of the ten person caucus quit in protest has right the seven fed up m._p. Say she didn't listen and they fundamentally under mentally disagreed about how to best pursue independence the way mrs won't at the cdc the our job. It's like being salesman. I i believe it should be independent but i don't believe that saying that they after day will make people believe the same you know. We'll let she came in. She lasted a year in this leadership position ended up being essentially forced out because she lost her entire caucus basically and into this void comes the francois blanchette and now now he's coming by acclamation. He becomes the leader of the party and he's walking into a party that clearly has had this kind of disorganization the last couple of years. What does he do to get the party back on track with bloodshed now. His convictions are very very well known. They have been for a long time what he brings to the party. Though i think is that name recognition everybody sort sorta knows this guy for for his time within a as manager for point <hes> as president of leads and then he was a pundit on on radio canada ah here on a show called his ex the cavs in this so the phony elective the console was on this law so he's a very very well known entity eighty <hes> and has experienced within politics frank so i think that's a lot of what he brings <hes> and you you know you sort of reflected in the polls. The bloc quebecois hasn't done anything thing because there's there hasn't been an election but the second that he was sort of elected leader the bloc quebecois went from dead in the water to <hes> not quite dead in the water within the space of a few weeks it was it it was actually interesting to watch. It's going to be very interesting. E francois blush. It will be in the debates. He's one of the five leaders who <hes> will be part of those so <hes> for people in english canada who he doesn't have a huge profile with like that'll probably be introduction. I think for a lot of people <hes> yeah yeah and <hes>. I hate to say it but he doesn't really careful since i mean fundamentally he doesn't he doesn't really <hes> he doesn't care about the rest of the country at all. I mean that's the that's the nature of the bloc quebecois. You know he's he's. He's says all the right things you know candidate candidate lovely country but but we're fundamentally different that's the way he is and that's the way it's always gonna be martin. Thank you so much for talking today. I really appreciate it. Thanks for have aw <music>. This is the third in our series of profiles on the federal party leaders. You can actually find our episodes on justin trudeau uh-huh andrew scheer in our feet. That's all for this week. Fritter comes to you from c._b._c. News and c._b._c. podcasts this week. The show is produced by shannon higgins. Imaging burchard matama and ashley mac derek vander. Wake is our designer. We had helped this week from billy heaton. Our music is by joseph. Chaban boombox sound this week. The executive producer front burner was elaine chao sitting in for nick mccabe locos. Your host of course is jimmy hustle and i'm chris birthday. Thanks for listening to front burner you for more c._b._c. Podcasts go to c._b._c. dot c._a. Slash podcasts.

quebec canada quebec mr blanchette justin trudeau francois blanchette bloc quebecois president montreal quebec energy jimmy Francois blanchett jill duceppe ottawa tim hortons joe cocker martin patrick blanchette eric lapointe angus reid
Trudeau familys ties to WE Charity

The Current

06:26 min | 3 months ago

Trudeau familys ties to WE Charity

"Hi I'm Dr. Brian, Goldman if you haven't heard my new podcast the dose. This is the perfect time to subscribe. Each we answer your most pressing health related questions and right now we know you're grappling with covid nineteen on those we bring in top experts to answer your questions about the corona virus and post some of our own. Get the latest evidence in a way. That's easy to understand by subscribing to the dose. It's your guide to getting through this difficult time. You can find the dose wherever you get your podcast. I'm Jonathan Goldstein host of wiretap each week. You're invited to listen in on my telephone conversations whether funny, sad, wistful or even slightly strange. You never know just what you might hear on Wiretap I. Show I just I just didn't think that people actually listened to. The breadth of your genius is not that you're funny, but you can be cripplingly pointedly ethic. The Wiretap Archives available on CBC listen spotify. Apple podcasts and wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. I'm Mary Burton and you're listening to the current now. We I love it the most because it is neither a political movement nor religious. Encompasses all political parties off as all beliefs. Because we feel that together, we can shake the world. That's Margaret Trudeau the prime minister's Mother's speaking at the twenty seventeen we day event new reporting shows that Margaret Trudeau has been paid two hundred fifty thousand dollars for such appearances with the organization Alexander Widow. The Prime Minister's brother has received about thirty two thousand Sophie Gregoire Trudeau received some money before the before. Justin Trudeau became prime minister. David Cochran is a senior reporter for CBC in Autumn. Morning David so. Why is this all coming out now? I guess is the question. A lot of people have yes, so what happened? Is that the we charity disclose this information to the CBC, but it only did it because the charity had to. And that's because Jesse Brown who's the publisher? Of Canada land, he literally had the receipts at the showed the money changing hands, and he was going to disclose this, so the charity tried to get ahead of it, and what these revelations do rose kind of changed the story a bit. From the government giving a contract to a charity that was close to the prime minister to a story about the Trudeau government, giving money to a charity that was giving money to the Trudeau family right and the contract was for nineteen point five million dollars for we directly, and they were supposed to handle these these student grants for volunteer work. How is this different now than what has been said or what has been told about the Trudeau families relationship with the charity and their past appearances. It's about three hundred thousand dollars different because you know Austin. Everybody else had been told by the charity that no money had ever changed hands that nobody in the Trudeau family had ever been paid for work with we. turns out quite a bit of money to change hands quite a few times, and the reality is rosy of that. If it wasn't for Jesse Brown and Canada, land getting the paperwork, this disclosure never would have happened. You can hear birds in the background. That's because Davidson is backyard. Just, in case, people are wondering pandemic. How has the prime? Minister's Office responded so far. David, yeah. We got a statement. That essentially says look. I'm not my mother's keeper. I'm not my brother's keeper. Things on their own accord contract that we gave the charity that was about helping kids. There's a few issues with that expert explanation. One is at cabinet made this decision and the prime minister did not recuse himself from from from that decision making process he himself used to make. Make his money on the speaker circuit before he became the leader of the party that was his job, so the should've at least been a general awareness that his mother and his brother, appearing at all of these events were making some cash and it also the explanations yesterday expects us to believe that the Keel burgers and everybody who runs the me to we foundation, and the we charity that they didn't remember that they paid the prime. Prime Minister's mother, a quarter of a million dollars despite all of the controversy and all of the scrutiny that was happening over this contract that they didn't remember this much money changed hands until they are confronted with the paperwork. It's it is curious. What are the opposition party? Saying? Because? Obviously they were already upset. There was already an in ethics investigation before this party even came out. Yeah, the Bloc Quebecois the leader Francois Blanchette came out. Out last night and said that Justin Trudeau should quit, he should step aside and let Christa freeland run the government while this is being investigated, the Conservatives, and Andrew Scheer saying this is just more proof of liberal. Corruption Liberal entitlement and a lack of ethics and power in politics. Last night I spoke to Charlie Angus. The ethics critic said this is basically the stupidest candle in Canadian history says it shows a real lack of judgment. In the Trudeau government, and you just raises the question of whether there was an adult in the room to use his phrase when all of these decisions were being made. This is now the third ethics investigation for this prime minister, the first around his trip to the Khan's private Ireland, the second around SNZ LA LA What does this mean for this one and the Prime Minister's image here? Yeah hattricks are good at hockey. They're not in ethics investigations I mean the these revelations are a critical information because those direct deposits to direct family members and a top of the ethics investigations got two committees. Who want all of the paperwork on this to see how the decision was made I. mean the governor said that only the we charity could do this work well. Their homework and their paperwork better add up because the invoices sure. Sure do and this could really cut into the kind of the goodwill. True and the Liberals Have Garner for a lot of the good work. They've done in the pandemic. This kind of stuff money for mom people get this. It's not a complicated controversy. Okay, David, Cochran in his backyard David is a senior reporter for CBC in Ottawa. The Conservatives have now also called for a criminal investigation into prime. Minister Trudeau's lene with the we charity. Hey podcast listener. We want to hear from you. A lot has changed over the past few months, and we want to make sure the currents podcast with for you with quick survey about what you WanNa hear. It'll take less than ten minutes. We promise and you'll help. Make the podcast the best. It can be to take the survey go to our website. CBC, Dot, CA, slash the current. For more CBC PODCASTS, Goto CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

prime minister Minister Trudeau Trudeau Trudeau government CBC Margaret Trudeau David Cochran Sophie Gregoire Trudeau Jesse Brown CBC Minister's Office CBC Jonathan Goldstein Canada reporter Bloc Quebecois Dr. Brian Charlie Angus Mary Burton
September 21: Her courage, his conviction

As It Happens from CBC Radio

1:11:08 hr | 2 years ago

September 21: Her courage, his conviction

"This is a CBC podcast with breaking news, suspected leader of a capital region chloe's been charged with sex trafficking and forced labor, serious. Awful pain was big, dragged across by body. What happens when someone you know tries to take down a bizarre self help group, which has been a part of for twelve years thinking, how am I going to get out of your like literally wears the back door? How do I scape escaping? Nexium from CBC podcasts, uncover subscribe now at CBC dot CA, slash uncover. Hello. I'm Carol off. Good evening. I'm Jeff Douglas, and this is as it happens. The podcast addition. Tonight, courage, his conviction, he I raped her when she was twelve years old. Now, almost two decades after police dismissed her allegations. Our guest will finally see the man who nearly ruined for life go to prison. He's made his bridges and now that he's left the conservatives to start the People's Party of Canada maxim sits down with Carol to explain what he means by extreme multiculturalism. You can't leave as like this after European Union leaders declare that the British Prime minister's Brexit plan simply won't work a frustrated to resume demands. The UK be treated with greater respect exit strategies. After we spoke with a woman who was worried, she'd lose her approval for medically assisted death. If she lost her capacity consent, we had questions about Canada's laws tonight. We'll get some answers a sneaker suspicion, the latest proof that fancy stores. Are out of touch is a pair of shoes on sale. Nordstrom, which are fashionably filthy wrapped in a strip of soil tape, and they sell for seven hundred bucks and a one track mind that he's tracks. A new study suggests our brains are responsible for our bodies being lazy because it takes more energy to even think about being active as it happens. The Friday addition radio that suggests you free your mind and your ass. Perations will follow. She was raped when she was just twelve years old and the assaults continued until when she was thirteen she became pregnant, the child was put up for adoption. Now, nearly two decades later, her abuser is going to prison. The long delay. Injustice is due to the fact that auto l. police initially deemed her complaint unfounded after an extensive investigation by the globe and mail's Robin Doolittle police reopened their investigation into our assault this month, Brian, Lance pleaded guilty to sexual interference and was sentenced to five years in prison l. is an alias used because right entity is protected by a publication ban. We reached l. in Ottawa. L. it's been twenty years since you were abused of salted by this man. What does it mean to you that he will now go to prison. It's a very little consequence. I'm happy that he will be on the sex offender registered so that he doesn't have a chance to do this to case. But at the same time I've been suffering from twenty years as as my son with the consequences of this. So the sentence that he'll have to serve, it's not nearly enough you twelve years old when Ryan Lance began to abuse you and he was twenty six and married. How did he gain access to? My mom had just graduated school in certain jobs who's a single parent. These two needed to place live and my mom agreed to having stay with us in exchange for childcare. And this happened over what period of time? How long did you have this access? And he was abusing you. It was your between when I was twelve and thirteen, and the last time was when I was thinking is that when you found out, how did you find out that you pregnant? I actually didn't. I didn't know at first. I, I had only had my time. I think one time before that, and so I didn't really have any anything measure up the game of having a regular curious or anything like that. When I realized that I was headed was when I felt my fun kicking and after that I didn't really know what to do. So I just word and bigger close. And then during the summer when it became more paying, trying to go back to school is when people realize and I was taking the doctor and. And did you tell anybody do out this man? Did you did you tell your mom know? So at first I didn't come on, but I did tell another kid. She actually didn't believe me because I was kind of the nerdy kid. I was really small a bit of a tomboy and she said you only wished you had a boyfriend and that kind of thing. And afterward when it was discovered that I was pregnant. The next question of course is, who did this you? And I actually had made up name of across meet that just didn't exist. And there was never any investigation by the school into the fact that child that I didn't even exist. At what point did the police I get involved? So my mom had a realized that what I was saying that this kid that didn't exist, obviously that's not what happened. Right. So when I told her the realization sort of occurred to roll at once the abrupt way that they sort of moved away and then just didn't really come back. After. So she contacted the police. I was brought in to do a statement and the glue male has access is. And the way that I was interviewed was more of a thirty year old woman who had been caught shoplifting than a child who is coming to school sexual trauma and you with this point, I had just turned fourteen. And so now you were talking to this now retired detective. How did he respond to you? Why did he think you were not credible? So I think that part of the demeanor on my part was that I was giggling like really, extremely nervous. I had him on one side of in another stranger on the other and video camera right in front of me. I really, really felt mall and not taking seriously to begin with and the way that he approached me with the questions was these sort of like, where did he touch you? Did he touch your vagina? It cetera. And I mean, what I was there to describe was a long-term period of psychological, emotional, sexual difficult views. And so even the questions were not in such a way that would facilitate in telling the story the way that it happened. I did also try to reach out to him after and he couldn't not remember who I was would seem pretty unusual team as he told my mom. It didn't happen the way that I said it did, and he didn't believe me one of the things in the video that I mentioned, actually, it was I had a child from this and I know that the NA is something that could probably help. So are you going to follow up with that? And he assured me that he would not never happen. So this detective who thought did you weren't? Credible. 'cause you were giggling and nervous and he filed it as an unfounded allegation and left it is that does filed away. That's it in a drawer. What happened to you? How is your life affected over the years at followed? Oh, well. After that hopping I, I began to sink that I didn't really have a purpose here. I, I constantly thought about killing myself. I, I would starve myself thinking that that I was just going to Sapir. Right? Because one of the consequences of this detective not believing me was that you know, in the neighborhood that I lived in, like we were very tight knit neighborhood and I'd just really served further isolate me police finally did get back involved in one of the reasons for it was because Robin Doolittle the global mail. Got hold your story. What what affected that have after the story was made public? Jamie Dunlop from the Ottawa police reached out to Robyn and said he was interested in reopening the case. So I agreed to go through the whole interview process again. And from there, Carolyn Baden's did a really good job of collecting evidence and putting the case together and. And he was charged. But one of the key things that helped with the case was that your son existed. He had DNA. How did they connect that DNA with Brian lands? It's been reported that they collected DNA off a cigarette butt to get a judge to sign a warrant for actual DNA samples from Brian Lynch to reconfirm that sort of. So finally connected him, there was no doubt that he was the father of your child even though he had denied having any relationship with overall this year's that's correct. Now that this is miss Brian, Lance is going to prison. I know you say that it doesn't give you much comfort, but does it help it all to know that somebody believed your story and this man is to be punished. The fact that people have listened and been supported is the thing that's the positive from this. I think that our ability to come together to bear witness threes. Things and to have discussions around it. That's one of the positives from this. The fact that it was like pulling teeth even throughout the final process, how it feels him going to prison. That part does not even affecting because I still have to continue picking up the pieces of my life and my son's life, my granddaughter's life. I Meyer your strength and your courage. I'm glad we know your story and helps love other people, and thank you for speaking with us so much. Carol. Take care. Bye-bye. ELS identity that is letter l. is protected under a publication ban. We reached an auto Wah. Earlier this week, we spoke with Audrey Parker an ova Scotia woman with cancer who has been approved for medically assisted death. Now, Canada's laws ask patients to consent to the assistant dying procedure twice once at the time of their request and a gain on the day, MS, Parker's concerned that she will lose the mental capacity to consent, and so she has chosen to die earlier than she had wanted to to avoid the possibility of missing her window. After that interview, Chris Ryerson from Ottawa sent this Email. I was awestruck and inspired by Audrey, Parker's composure and good spirits, though. Her plan to death is only six weeks away my father as well as his brother sister and father. All died with advanced Alzheimer's disease, though. Not necessarily from it. I witnessed my father's slow death at age ninety. After he decided to stop eating and the painkillers which were administered for his prostate pain. Slowly built up in his body. My dog died a better death. The drugs are pet was given ended his suffering quickly while those my father received prolonged it, the law needs to be amended to allow advanced consent. So those who are no longer of sound mind when their suffering becomes intolerable. Condi- Mercifully a someone who has a slowly advancing chronic lung disease and elevated risk of Alzheimer's and future. I would welcome this change as I am sure. Would many other Canadians, that's an Email from Chris Ryerson in Ottawa, Mr.. Ryerson. Thank you very much for writing. And right now, an expert panel commissioned by the federal government is reviewing Canada's legislation on medical assistance in dying. Jocelyn Downey is one of the experts on that panel. She is a professor in the faculties of law and medicine at Dell house university. We reach her in Halifax fisa Danny, we heard a description. Of Audrey Parker. The woman we interviewed earlier this week about this to step consent process, which she's quite unhappy with. Maybe you can explain to us what it is. So the key pieces that you have to be capable at the time of the provisions of the made as well as the time of the request for the mate, and there's a ten day waiting period in between the request and the provisions. So you have this double moment of capacity assessment and made being medical assistance in dying. Yes. And so you have been considered to be a candidate for this is a been approved. You've made all the qualifications, but then right at the moment when you are about to initiate your decision that you have to say? Yes, I'm of sound line. I'm perfectly wherever I'm doing precisely. And so if you have qualified met all the criteria and you're inside that ten day window and you unexpectedly loose capacity, you will be. Trapped and not be able to access made traps is how Audrey Parker feels because she said to move up to date of her death. So time early much earlier than she wanted to because of that. So how is it that that when the law was written, that was considered to be fair? Well, one thing that's really important for people to understand that while the law sets this up now it actually the palm. It didn't take a permanent view on this issue on whether we should be allowed to access assisted dying, thread Vance requests. What they did in June of twenty sixteen is say, we're going to take some time to review the evidence and think through this issue of advance requests are actually three issues that they're reviewing. And by December of this year, they have to put a report into parliament that provides an assessment of the evidence around this issue and then make the public policy decision about whether or not to allow it. We'll have to see whether they change their minds thinking behind that. Well. The reasons to not have advanced requests. So I think there's there's two ways you can look at one is they didn't feel ready. They felt rush. This is a complex issue, and so they wanted to put it off our time and do some announces. The other is that there are actually looking at the arguments against allowing advance requests. And typically those arguments or that, for instance, people say maybe it's a different person, the person at the time when they were capable who made the request. And then the person later when the conditions for the request, maybe that's different person. So personal entity issue. Another would be, how do we know that the person didn't change their mind? You know, right now I completed events request. I say, if these circumstances happen, I want assisted dying for years from now. So service dances have been realized, how do we know I didn't change my mind in the middle of that or people point to they say, you didn't understand what life would be like, for instance with dementia. So the decision you made in your advanced request, it wasn't informed. And so we shouldn't respect it. Final typical argument you'll hear is that there's ambiguity in the request. How do we know what the person really wanted? Have we met the criteria that they set out what they described as what they consider to be, for instance, intolerable suffering. So those are the major arguments that are made against allowing advanced request. Some of the concerns Audrey Parker raise these is that she understands that we're in a situation where this concern that there may be family members that want to push the door that want you to accelerate the process. Is that possible? I think that that is raised frequently and there's just no evidence for that. In fact, what we see is that family members want the individual to stay allot in the context of a sister dying. The family members are frequently, the ones who say, no, don't go yet, don't go, yeah, please go yet. They're not pushing people out the door and another thing you could do if you have a concern about that. As you say that it's actually a clinician who makes the determination of whether the conditions that the individual set out are actually met. In which case there'd be no possibility for that will take before we have a decision and possibly include events requests was in the law. I need a better crystal ball than I have. We know, at least we won't have a decision before December because the panel report is to be delivered to the government in the fall in the government must they're obliged under the legislation to presented in parliament by December, but then you enter into the realm of the election. And at that point pretty much all bets off because there are many, many, many, Canadians, the vast majority of Canadians actually support assisted on through advanced requests. But it is also a very polarizing issue because it's within the terrain of the pro-life movement. So all I can say, these will be the pressure points and the elements that those who make those political calculations, we'll have to take into account and I don't know which way they will go. But in the midst of these political calculations, there are many people who are in this trap as we talked about the beginning of the interview. Absolutely. And one of the things I would flag is that. The government went into this with a lot of advice from thoughtful groups who's recommended to them that they allow advance requests after diagnosis had been given. So not carte blanche you make an events request versus a dying at any point. But rather once you have all the information about your condition and you have agreed in your immediate medical condition, which is the criteria they said you should be allowed to have an events request. So I think there is an accountability for the people who are caught in this trap that rests at the doorstep of the government down the appreciate speaking with you. Thank you. You've given this a lot of insight into this. My pleasure by Jocelyn Downey is a professor in the faculties of medicine and law Adele house university. She sits on a panel that is currently reviewing Canada's medical assistance in dying laws. We reached MS Downey in Halifax and a week this Sunday on the Sunday edition. You can hear the story of Ron pause. No, a retired teacher from London Ontario, and because he has been diagnosed with cognitive impairment, he sees his future and it is not pretty. So he wants to do something about it now while he still can so catch a Lisa Segel's documentary about assisted dying, advanced directives dementia, and Ron pause knows one man crusade for change a week. This Sunday on the Sunday edition. If you choose the couch Chevron evening interval session tonight, you can blame your brain a new study by a group of researchers from around the world found that humans are Lisi because our brains are wired to be lazy. We really want to go out for that run but has just so exhausting for our brains. Matt bog on EBay is a postdoctoral researcher at the university of British Columbia, and the senior author of this study. We reached him in Vancouver Matt a half, say that when I get the idea to go to the gym, something like gravity takes over and sex me into my chair, holds me there against my will. I can't get up what's going on. Maybe it's not gravity him. Maybe it's just the result of Evelyn that has shaped your brain. I'm lazy. I don't know how to lay the but varies some processes in your brain that attracting attracting you to three behaviors like begins. My I'm trapped to seven -tary behaviors. And so that sounds like laziness. You wanna try. So you have to magic attraction, but you can decide to go away from this. If you have strong intention, you can try to contract this automatic attraction but have to do through an active will. I have to really will myself to get over this affinity for seventy eight so far. This is the only solution we have yet with land. Try to retrain this automatic. Attraction, but we don't know if we, if it would work, what did you test you wanted to find out how why people have to hard time exercising even if they know that it's good for them. What? What did you discover? So what would try to discover whether the brand was fighting to contract some attraction to sit on behavior on this is what we found out. Actually, we asked participant to come to the lab and we put them in front of the computer on the control of an unscreened manichean, Abba. And we ask them to reply vied as fast as possible picture depicting physical activity or inactivity. And what we found is that Dow faster at avoiding sit on SRI behavioral fast approaching physically, which is great. But when we look at the risk into brand with fond outs that being faster was actually to cuss. This cost was increased activity of brain. So van stand correctly when people were given the choice between being active and being inactive, being sedentary, having seven -tary behavior or or active behavior, they, they would go to the active behavior, but it was it hurt their brains. They had to actually do more brainwork in order to do that. Is that right? Yeah, it's fits. We only find significant result falls avoidance action. Would you find any significant results? Applaud action. Intern were Brin, so we focused on the avoidance and we, we show that it's a lot more difficult to avoid sedentary Bayview than avoid of physical activity. What do you conclude from this? What does that tell us about our species and fact that we have a hard time doing things even if there are in our own self interest. So what we think is that this minimisation of ineptitude cost was very use. During volition because it gave you an advantage for survivor because you are more efficient at finding food fighting Bitos on everything, but now don't need to do. This hack is not using physical activity, and it's this automatic attraction to sit through behaviors is not health food anymore, but still there in our brand and we need to find it. You know something. I've noticed that if my subway station in Toronto, if when you get out the doors there is the closest place to go up stairs is actually a staircase, walking staircase. And then further along is the escalator, and people will walk right by the circus they'll walk further to get to the escalator and walked right past the staircase. So sometimes the actually spend more energy voiding spending energy here. What's funny? I didn't this example. I have another example. It's when you go to the gym and you take the elevator, doesn't make sense. So now what what should we take away from this people who are perhaps even now as they listen to you sitting there trying to decide whether they should get up or not, and do some exercise, what? What's your advice? I think when I was two option, the this should try to take control of their brand on decide to go all the more active one and outside scientists will try to see if we can retrain this automatic talents use to approach it onto behavioral, then they won't have to take control anymore. But we don't know food be able to do so because retraining things that this automatic maybe complicated, maybe give into our brains and sit there and turn on Netflix. You can still do this. All right. Thanks for talking to. Matt. Thank you. Bye. Matt Borgen. GE is a researcher at the university of British Columbia. We reached him in Vancouver. And now a sneak preview of the as it happens. Winter collection a pair of scuffed boots with a missing in Seoul, duct taped over a hole in the left Seoul and no right heel on the boot. A pair of tan pants with the coffee stain on the crotch frayed hems and some Canadian tire money in back pocket, which has been laundered past the point of possible use, okay. Yes, this is my old stuff, but I'm only asking a hundred and seventy five dollars for the pants in two hundred and fifty bucks for the boots which is less than half of what nordstroms is charging for a pair of sneakers that look like they were hung from the back bumper of ATV for six hour offroad adventure. The shoes are made by an Italian company called golden goose and our cold superstar taped sneaker leather sneakers with quote, a grungy rubber Cup, soul, and quote, crumley, hold it altogether, tape wrapped around the front. Seriously that is just soiled tape around it. Five hundred thirty US dollars. Six hundred eighty five Canadian. The shoes are in fashion terms distressed. And so are we now because people with too much money are spending that amount on the kind of damage footwear, most of us already have in our ashamed of and because complaining about the tone deafness and insensitivity of fancy shoes is a cliche as well warn as those stupid shoes. There is outrage of course, but Nordstrom says, quote, tasted subjective will so is lack of it, which doesn't matter either. Because right now the superstar taped sneaker is sold out. It's been a bit like musical chairs in the house of Commons recently and seated in the corner back benches. The Bloc Quebecois and the green party have a new neighbor Maksim bow near miss. Your bony made his first foray into the house this week as the leader of the newly minted People's Party of Canada. He stood to speak on Wednesday this time without the support of his old colleagues in the conservative party. Here's how that went. Gutmann to put the complete abolishing of the system of supply management. In order to. We don't. And bring the prices of meal, three Kennedy and consumers. Member unanimous casinos house to move the most. There is no. Maksim Berna. They're seeking unanimous consent to put candidates supply management system on the table in the NAFTA negotiations and as you heard failing. But despite the raucous reception in house mister Barone y- is setting out on a new political experiment, he hopes will succeed and you'll recall it was less than a month ago that the Tory m p bolted from the conservative party of candidates start his own political movement, and we have questions about his new venture. A lot of questions, maxim name, leader of the People's Party of Canada set down with Carol for an in-studio interview. This Bernie welcome to the as it happens studio. Thank you very much. I'm very pleased to be with you. I was watching your face as he listened to that. What was going through your mind as you listen to yourself in the house and your first day in the new party? You know, it's bizarre that the only politician in the house want to fight for canyon consumers, and that's the reality. Is your colleagues your former conservative colleagues, laughing and jeering choosing? No. No. And just sort of rejecting you all together. Was that like for you. I'm not so surprised at the end because you know and the only one who wants to have that on the table for the NAFTA negotiation. Actually, that's what a President Trump is asking for the last six months in and it's so important for the future of this country. Twenty percent of our economy. It's depending on the US and the relationship between us and US. So if we want to deal, we must be able to put that on the table and at the end that would be good for canyon consumer. So I was disappointed at the end, but I didn't have a lot of expectation. Also, Donald Trump to peace Nepad on this issue. What I said to the prime minister and Rashida when they were saying we must stand up against the prison troubles and no, we must sit down with him. We must sit down in a real negotiation on NAFTA on free trade. You know they're putting at risk the automobile industry here, no tear you and all your industry just to protect nineteen thousand producers. On the spend management in this country, and now maybe we won't have deal. We must be a shame that mixed EKO and they were able to deal before us with us. So that's a very bad strategy that they're through government. They're doing right now with the l. of the conservative party of candles, your new party, the People's Party of Canada. I mean, just one question about that because I do remember I'm sure you do remember when coalition Avenir Quebec introduce their party and the acronym was calcul and how much derision there was going, you're going to be p p of Canada. It's PPC. PP up. See I'll the PPC, but you know the name, it's important for us at people's and we are a party that want to work for people in this country, and that was special interest group and the best example, it's that cartel of supreme management. But you eat talks about your former conservative party that you ran for the leadership of not very long ago. You them morally corrupt and you are now going to represent the people who are the people that you plan to represent Canadians that are fed up with traditional politics. Canadian new don't who doesn't believe in the petition. When you're saying something and the opposing the other day, Canadians that want to have real bold reform in this country for being a smarter and smarter government in a more freer and prosperous country. So our our platform is based on the four principles, individual freedom, personal restaurants, everyday respect, and fairness, and people believe in that there will come party. We can. Adult of support, not only from conservatives, but also from people who voted for other parties. I'm listening for that thing that's going to make me drop everything and folly wealth the door in join you. I mean, I was there when Bloc Quebecois started. Does that movement the Reform Party of Canada to powerful things and to be in the room. At those times, it was like a match was lit, a room, full of fuel. It was like it was an idea is who I am movement that whose whose time had come, what is it about marketing boards and supply management and equalization payments and small government. It's going to set off that Ignace movement also where more than a political party. I think we are movement because for the first time in this country Parisian one to speak about the reform of equalization Fermanagh saying it, its own fair for province who received money and from province who are giving the money, we must questioned that must review that. And the only one I'm the only one you want to have universal l. care the real. Services by public and also private delivery, like in other countries in Europe. So people they want will change. And I think we we are part of the solution. I don't think that I saw much or heard much about your party and about your ideas until in the middle of August, you began to talk about immigration and what you call extreme multiculturalism. Did you do that because you hooked it would generate excitement about your? No, no, it's wasn't. It wasn't new when I said that at that time during the summer, I said the same thing in the leadership campaign I said at the time that remorse question the level of new Canadians that were having every year. It's always more and more and more. I don't want our country to be like other countries in Europe and a challenge to integrate their new vendor new immigrants. So can't I Bill built by immigrants and we are proud of that just thanked what do we sing that you can. Is opposed national state without any identity. That's not too. There's a Canadian Kucher and Kenyan values must be proud of that. So I just want to open that debate in Canada, and I think it's it's okay to have a debate. Well, you did open the debate, didn't you? Because you you had very provocative tweets, and by mid August, you were talking about two does says diversity is our strength, but where do we draw the line? Why should we promote every more diversity? What? What is the line that you want to draw diversity? It is good. This contrast been built by diversity, but diversity in sharing of values for me, good a person that wants to come to our country. Marsha are Canadian values. What are they? What are these values? We all know that equality between men and women equality before the law, democracy tolerance in the diversity. I want this country to to be like that in a near future. So I'll give you an example. If you have to new Canadians who are coming to. Kinda and one want to kill gay people and another one Sanyo it's okay, they can believe in what they want. So is it good to have two people having different point of view on that on that subject. Well, where does this come from? I mean, you haven't example of somebody who said, oh, well, you know, you, you wanna kill gay people. You can come in and you. You don't want to. You can come into it. Where did this come from would be better to have people who share of what we're not gonna move on before you tell me where this comes from this idea that somehow letting in people who are say, I'm coming. That I don't want that example to happen. Where is the evidence is going to happen? Are you sending the straw man here to say, this isn't? I need to fight something that doesn't exist. I want to protect something that exists. So that's the difference. So we need more immigrants in Canada. We need more kinda making me grants in my own writing in BOS. We have a lack of employees over there. So let's have a bit more gonna make grants and I want them to come here and to have a job that would be good for them, but that will be good for us also who this undesired will is it you feel that the liberal said this, of course, we all agree that this person who wants to come in because he doesn't like gay people, he wants to kill them. Okay, agreed. We're not his shouldn't or she shouldn't come in, but what is what is. What is this image? What is this person? Did you find undesirable? We know those guys shouldn't come in. Who is it that you're trying to keep out with that example, I think is you saying to ROY thing? Diversities Auth rink. It is not our strength. If you have gay people isn't diversity that's crime, but the diversity of values. And you think if we have diversity, we end up letting people who kill gay people known. I'm not saying that I'm saying we must promote what United, not always what divide. I'm coming from Quebec. I'm a francophone from Quebec. If people want to keep a part of their own culture. That's okay. As multiculturalism evil, you said that's wrong. You don't want that extremity wilty transam. It's wrong extreme. What is that? What is extreme multiculturalism? When you always doing the promotion of the diversity for me extreme, we must do the promotion of what unites us. How about allowing diversity? How about is that you say, okay, you want to learn your. Want your kids to learn your native language that you brought to the country. You want them to know this values to learn the dances and the music, and you want to have classes after school that's multiculturalism. What's wrong with that? Doesn't the letting wrong with that. Where does it cross the line for you when you have forty nine percent of Canadians that are thing that we have too much immigration in this country. We must listen to that and I'm the only polish who was listening to that Amon saying to these people. Immigration is good. Let's be sure that the new engines that will come tomorrow next year in ten years from now will always share Canadian values. That's the debate that undoing. We have people coming from other countries. They're coming from war, coming from struggle from dictatorship. Tyranny from poverty from all kinds of things coming for what to share Canadian for freedom decorate. Yeah, that's great. Yeah, against that. And maybe they could also maybe they could teach us something of value. Maybe they have seen things that maybe these values that you cherish. It's a western civilization values, yes, decides it is not a block of highs that want? Yes, it will involve if you want the canyon society to evolve and progress, you need to be able to to have people who shared the basics enor- culture and share the basic values. And yes, they will have something to our values and maybe in fifteen years from now, this country will change for the better. What is your evidence that people come into this country? Don't share the values or not wanting to take part in this thing that I just want you are in these twin tweets, your warning about the, here's another quote, having people live among us who reject basic western values, such as freedom, equality, tolerance, and openness doesn't make a strong. They wanna live in a ghetto. They that's Bokan is Asian. These people ring distress, social conflict, potentially violence, who are these people miss you? It's people who don't who don't share Canadian values. I said, I didn't being of the tw-. Tweet. There's a lot of things that's happening in Europe right now in France and Belgium. Do you want that, you know, I want my country like it is right now being the same in twenty years from now. This is as it happens. I'm here in the studio with Maxine. Danny. We're talking about his new political movement party the People's Party of Canada. And I, we just we talk about compare this to Europe with hovering Europe is extreme, isn't it? I mean, they have. A little bit. We, we know this is a particular moment in time when it say Germany, one million people in the course of about eighteen months walked into that country. This is something that's happened because of they share a border with refugee producing areas. We don't. It's very, very difficult to come to this country. It's very control. It is not it is. We have refused. Refugees coming from the US. We are asking question ten, twenty thousand. That's nothing. Not a million. It's not with yet, but they're coming here in two years from now. We'll know if they're real refugees. The government is telling us that half of them won't be refitted will have to go back to their country. Twenty thirty thousand come and ten thousand get accepted crisis, but that shows that our people people want to come to this country. That's on fair for the real refugees that are waiting in camp. Their life is in danger, and these people has to wait because the system has to us to process these people that are coming from the US we must be able to solve the problem and the loopholes that were having with the American about the the safe third country you this to processes you referring to one people coming across the border. They go before the refugee board for an assessment. The people in the camps, people in other countries are part of the resettled. Programs that Canada runs through the United Nations. I want more really Fuji's well, one I don't want to help, but whatever. Okay, but because people cross the border does not mean that people can't be settled from other countries. We're still having those programs and we having their program, but they're waiting over there. They were waiting waiting five, six, seven, eight, nine years to to wait ten years more. Perhaps that's why they're coming to incoming into Canada walking across the border because they can't get into their don't agree on. I think it's two different people were coming to the border to the US and as a refute the relief Eugene, I think to situation very different. You want to cut immigration by how much I said to good and fifty thousand people year like we had on the upper government. And why was that? Why is that better than having the numbers that liberal government is is prescribe. I want to have more economic immigrants and less occasion of family and less refuguees because I'm following what the markets want, and I want to be sure that these people will be able to participate to our society and having a job. See you want fewer refugees. You just said that. Why why? Why that we need to make a choice and in this country, if you as the business sector, they need people. We have a lack of people. We have a lot of jobs available, but we don't have Canadians and the population is aging. So we need to insert this. I need I, and but again, I don't know where it's either or we have an immigration policy. We have refugee policies. We have international relations to help resettle the many people, but we are sovereign country also, we can decide our immigration policy in Canada. You tweeted that if you can buy a plane ticket from Nigeria to New York, you're not a real refugee. Why? Not what I'm saying? It's not the definition of refugees. You're and showing to people that people were crossing the border down that in danger and I want to people in danger in refugee camp. I well, I'm just wondering if you think that somebody who can purchase a plane ticket couldn't be a refugee. I just want to get an idea, my mind what you think. Refugee is I know that efficient, very few. We want to the real one that person who the war in the United States and theaters state and want to cross the border just for more economic opportunity that had, no, that's the case. I mean, we know the United States Ford hostile toward refugees. So maybe he really is. Austin, we have absolutely. Mr. Trump has made that clear that he doesn't want people. View, do you notice that they're coming some refugees? Maybe they have reduced their numbers consider audio style because they reduce it. When the world Gration because I want to reduce the number at a time when the United Nations is asked the after right of rent country, they have the right to do what they want to do, and we have the right in Canada to decide our immigration policy and our immigration policy for the last fifty years was a big success, and I want us to be a big success for the future. So here you are you articulate numbers and ideas about what you want for immigration, which went for the country, and and it is thought out is interesting the same time something's you say like you in August, you, you target to park in Winnipeg. You said that this is extreme liberal multiculturalism because a park was named after the founder of Pakistan and why celebrating father of Pakistan. We have a lot of that's an example of celebrating diversity. We must celebrate what unites us at the same time, destroy a statue of Johnny McDonnell. This was vandalized this footage this. They vandalized people were. That you sing that that tweeted painful in the Pakistani community believed that tweet led to the vandalism knows that. About why tweet because of my tweet, I'm responsible of what happened. Believes that you, you believe it also, I'm saying the coincidence coincidence that it was it was vandalized right after you give me approved at people, did it because of my tweet, listen, this is what people this is what happened. This is the concept that you don't share. You don't share. You don't share my position on immigration understand that you don't agree with what I'm saying. It's okay. It's a democracy. What undoing in politics, I believe in strong ideas, and if you don't like what I'm seeing and telling don't vote for me these times when you do push the buttons when you do this. But that's not a policy to talk about the this is wrong to have a statue named after. It's like, let's parks in Canada. Why can't they be named after people that are represented communities who are here can be named it can be named. I'm just seeing that you had a set your fear, Johnny McDonnell that you decided not to. That's what I that's best example to to promote Canadian values and John McDonnell. That was an example John McDonnell and that part. So I put the two, the two together. This is as it happens and here in the studio with Maxine Barney, the leader of this new political party, the People's Party of Canada just now I know your plan is to run candidates and all three hundred thirty eight ridings in time for twenty nineteen. How are you? Gonna do that? We'll have good and thirty eight candidates. That's it. What we have to do right now is to build writing session. That's what I said too good and thirty eight writing association before December will have that right now people are calling our office to be candidates. So we'll have to good and thirty eight candidates in every writing and will be very company from the next election them because you already have a lot of interest from people like, well, the Canadian nationalist party which promotes white national sights will come in our party said that you on the phone with tribal returned my call when somebody's calling me gonna return my call and I did that. And that person wants me to be against Gration and we had a very good discussion like what we are in right now. And I said no and believing immigration, the build this part did this country, and you know, you're not will come in our party. And if these people want to be part of a party, they can create their own party and telling them good luck. The one thing that matters to you. Great deal is that you don't like the policies of prime minister. Trudeau what he's doing to Canada and yet many conservatives are saying that you've given such a gift to Mr. Trudeau because you now you're going to split the votes or conservatives. I think that Andrew, she and just introduce about the same and at the same, either one you don't want either those guys do, but the two of the two are playing politics with NAFTA. The two there have the same position. They want to protect cartel that it's not good for Kennedy and consumers who are paying twice the price for poultry dairy and milk and deacon. Get rid of that for Canadian consumer. And at the same time, having deal with US both of them, they want to protect special interest group. I'm working for the people for all, Canadians and I won't protect an special interest group. So that's the difference, but also will attract some liberals liberals who voted for John Kitson Paul Martin for a balanced budget and road taxes. There will come in our party. We will do that would attract some Indy. P also told me that Maxine. We are. We like your position. On abolishing corporate welfare. We don't like when the government is giving a lot of money too big corporations. I'm serious about that. I will abolish couple of fear will save five billion dollars a year. So we are building accordion, and I want to thirty percent of Canadians that didn't vote at the resurrection, thirty percent of them. It's a huge, huge clientele because they don't believe in politician anymore because they're, they're tired of the political correctness. So that's what I'm doing and I think would be able to be successful this. I really appreciate you coming and thank you. Thank you very much. Maxim is the leader of the People's Party of Canada. He joined Carol here in the as it happens studio to hear that interview again or share it. It's on our website. CBC dot CA slash AH. British Prime Minister Theresa may has had enough. She wants the EU to treat her with more respect. And she said, so publicly earlier today after what has been characterized as a quote humiliating couple of days for her and her country's negotiations to leave the EU at a summit yesterday she was unpleasantly surprised when European Council president, Donald tusk, said parts of her plan. We're just not gonna work in her address today. MS may respond it at this late stage in the negotiations, it is not acceptable to simply reject the other side's proposals without a detailed explanation and counter proposals. So we now need to hear from the EU what the real issues all and what their alternative is so that we can discuss them. Until we do, we don't make progress. In the meantime, we must and will continue the work of preparing ourselves for not ill. In particular, I want to clarify our approach to issues I the over three million EU citizens living in the UK who will be understandably worried about what the outcome of yesterday's summit means for their future. I want to be clear with you, but even in the event of no deal, your rights will be protected. You are friends on neighbors colleagues. We want you to stay. Second, I want to reassure the people of Northern Ireland that in the event of no deal, we will do everything in our power to prevent a return to a heart border. British Prime Minister Theresa May's speaking earlier today. Jonathan lists is the deputy director of the pro e you think tank and campaign group British influence. We reach Mr. lists in London. This this, it seems that Theresa May is pretty angry about how the EU has responded to her proposal. Does she have a right to be angry? Not the slices as she had an ounce of Liska judgments and into reality tonight it is coming because we've been warning thoughts of two years. The EU told her the day off the referendum, David common. The thing could be divided and threes may even acknowledge they can be divided in speech in January loss, which is less. You said we wouldn't be part of the single market. So the EU understandably perplexed when in July Theresa May came up with a check as plan, which survives thing market keeping the u. k. in cinema, the goods but not Catholic people, the EU quite clear that you have to have all food. Freedoms of the single market and not just one of them. One of the things that she said is that she doesn't feel that the EU negotiators Mr. to really respect her that she's being respectful them and she points to. I mean, there is this, this, this, this Instagram, that Mr Bush put out rather insulting saying that it's picture of him and Theresa May offering her a piece of cake. Perhaps Sereno cherries. That is to be flip about it. I mean, doesn't that indicate to MS, may that the that they're not taking this seriously as she is and they're not respectful. If I had been go-to station meter advisor, I wouldn't advise particular Instagram story it safe to say, but I think that we risk missing the big point, hey, which the has been out the respectful and clay with the from the get the EU fifty k. that if you came welcomes leave, it was e- Rivera thought fake go, but the UK would not being talked to. A special privileges. If you won't leave the European Union, the you would be a start country, and that's way it would be treats country. So what trees amaze been seeking the last two years as special treatment on the eastern behalf. The push back and say, no, give special treatment and the Cousy other points that the e us key piracy is not the case, but off and on the case seems to understand that the u. k. will two things. The k. wants the each treats it as an equally powerful country, which it isn't an won't sit, sit the streets it as a member stay still deserving. East protection, isn't that either. So Dublin's point from San is keeping an open booting island. So that will be the ease points, Rosen, appeasing trees me her idea that what she put forward yet. You mentioned the checkers plan, and that is sort of across the board in the UK and Europe is saying that it's a dead duck. It's gone. Checkers is not. A plan that was ever going to fly? What is the checkers plan and why? Why is it being so universally dismissed? So the checks, as I say, it's most of the time is fine because it provides a blueprint for the case, proposed each relation with e, but are to keepings the convict settlement. The I, as I say is that would keep the UK in the thing among it just too good. The EU says that you have to be in the single market for good counsel and people as well. So not the first reason not hop, see red lines. The the second reason the check is might fly if because it proposed as a customs arrangements and the island island, which means a Northern Ireland and would have different towers and the governments in Dublin, and the EU say that would mean some requirement for physical infrastructure on the Irish Buddha, which is a total red line. And so they say the Northern Ireland has to be in the customs union note in customs array. Enjoyment and has another reason which I only fly because check is refuses to concede the possibility of the customer different. Basically we're down to is that this not very long before this has to be decided because this the clock is ticking to till mart that you're still such such a long way apart between the EU and the UK and they haven't agreed. What does the economic relationship between these two entities that has not been determined? Has it? Yeah, it's we all wanna drink in the loss Jones lean. It's very, very serious indeed. But here's the thing. They're only four options. Threes may. The first option is fool thing among customs. The whole UK. The second option is the Irish t. the third option is a people's which brings it back to which is a new referendum for the people of to check with. They actually won't see this on the full options. Tough, no deal. And that is absolutely impossible because they can't agree deal. Legally, we leave the EU next much without any deal tool, but it'd be studied conto clinic for our economy. The Theresa May would never be allowed to do it. I will because it would mean economic chaos around Christmas time, three months beforehand, so we'd know heading for disaster and people stop it. I'm Secondly because his name majority for parliament, liking the pets, bring down a government rows, allow ideals Nori. So often the position that that will be deal and not means that we got about the powder and the us more powerful than the k. in a bus of red lines, the win a not means the trees may have to capitulate. A re depends. Now which way show capitulates and she doesn't have many. She has no calls the to. The only college she had was went trick off fifty. The deposits mechanism for leaving the because a lot of people said she should by that time, she should prepare recruits among us about what we did before we left. But the political circumstances dictated that she trigger it very quickly. I'm not. It's been the down fool the case. We weren't ready to trade route, fifty date. And now there's no time what's the mood in the UK. I'm just not just I mean in the streets among people, but also in the markets and and and business. People very, very concerned. I mean, festival Barry's the majority in Brixton now to remain in the mean trust out enough every single pose it is commissioned the moment as vice majority for people's votes. And you've friend and say, to remain in the by tops, fifty, four fifty, five percent on this is very, very detailed polling which is replication every single poll. That's one thing, but but didn't say they're incredibly concerned because when the government's talks about no deal Theresa May did today, they g tree dot takes them once that place that today seeing that contingency plans, which if they are not today's would lead to across in our economy. I mean, we already sue the pound going down today when Theresa May was to about no deal. This is incredibly responsible by the government because they know how hard it is, not a realistic proposal, they'll think I lease people's economic life. We will be watching this list. Thank you. Thank you. Jonathan list is the deputy director of the group British influence. We reached him in London. The odds of winning big on a lottery, scratch card are about the same as those of catching a rare blue lobster. Phoebe, Dwayne Cox know that they work in the lobster, fishery wreck cove Newfoundland. So in the Cox couple bought a scratch ticket which revealed they were the winners of a million dollars. The could not quite believe it. Here's Phoebe Cox telling the story yesterday at the big check unveiling ceremony, just stop in pick a day, decided to get a couple of scratch to it. Then I picked ten dollar crossword in Alterra, so I like it up the road. I started to scratch my fortune and that was not a winner. So I went up another couple Clumber so excited, scratch my all Tra and of the backseat. Although I started scratching and notice the number fifty five. And then I scratched I at fifty five and. I thought, well, you know what? I got like ten dollars one time. So as I was scratching going over new, I had more than ten dollars. It was being it was the big number and I said, oh my God, Dwayne. Oh my God, Wayne. Just one of million dollars. Dwayne, jeff. Million dollars fee. It's only bony yesterday. It's only money. It's not a hundred thousand. Stop the. So I jumped at the taking in going around. Get into. That was Phoebe Cox describing her reaction when she scored a million dollars on a lottery scratch card. That is how all lottery winner should sound. She's going to splurge a trip to Cuba with her husband Duane PB's. I ever plane trip on the couples also going to build a house replace or mobile home, but they have no plans to retire from the local lobster fishery for now. As we go to air, the Canadian Wildlife Service is still investigating an incident that took place last Friday. It happened near the 'twas ferry terminal, south van Cooper, the scene has now been cleaned up, but Kevin beach is not about to forget what happened that day. We reach Mr. beach in Surrey Kevin. How did you first come to notice his something very unusual was happening. I was going to take from the terminal and we had some time to kill school. You went down to see a friend of mine that was on the twelfth and first nations reservation out of the corner, my as driving toward nice like three or four hit the ground really fast, and they're big right? And I'm like, what? What? The hell on get out? And it was like, I thought it was like twenty thirty birds. Supposedly, the count was forty. Two, they picked up. There was a whole pile drove right into the ground. It was there was a couple of broken wings and legs and like I'm an animal ever, right? It was horrible. A couple of little little blood pooled around their heads and stuff is terrible. And right into the ground. So this describe again how you saw the Many's forty birds when they just dropped or they flew. Flew flew right into the it was it was not named it. Suicide birds on my Facebook and it's gone completely viral. And what did you do? How did you react to this? Well, there was another lady that was the scene it too, and I'm like, should we call the SPCA? She said that she didn't think they would come for them. And there was like I said, there's only like four, three according to allied. So I was just like, okay, can only not much we can do about it. And I took a couple of pictures and her back in the car, and we went down to the deed. So my buddy for about ten or fifteen minutes when we go back by the rogue on what do you mean your old gun? They were gone. It was really weird, but I gather the l. rescue society here in blur mainline came and take them up, and the official count was forty two. And now the Canadian Wildlife Service is investigating at this point. Is that right? A little bit of a weird. They told me mortality event. What do they mean by mortality event? I'm I'm not sure what that's that sounds to me like like they don't know what's going on and just saying whatever they said that they will wherever it the fishing pole that I talk to you the contacted me. So this was the one that talked to them. And when I told her where exactly what happened, she went out there within the cameraman and ended up finding three birds dead bird still there. And she said into the lab and. I don't know what the results are back as she says. You let me know. Obviously, everybody else, right? He knew what species burns were. No, I was still. I'm not a bird risen. I'm not sure, but I was still there Starling or something like that. He knows starlings you've probably seen them. They are those extraordinary bird. You know, when you see those flocks and they're all moving in unison in those great swirls and swoops. And so on over yet. That's exactly because there was a couple of sewer couple of lots of the playing around the rescue center or whatever it was like, oh, it was probably migration and hunger, and I'm thinking to myself, what are you talking about this? A million blackberry bushes right there no way these hungry. And like I said, it was two other swarms and flying all around over the place, right? I don't know why he's decided to to drink the Kool aid so to speak and drive. I didn't fly right into the brick and payment. But yeah, it was really creepy using it now so that this time of year I, I'm not an expert either, but usually birds have eaten quite a bit. They're getting ready to migrate and and and starlings are migratory birds. They go stay go south into the state. So they're usually pretty fattened up and ready to go at this point. I think there I don't know they were. They burns went skinny malnourished or anything. Like totally. Like I said, it was kind of brutal an animal lover, and I don't see any animals hurt and they, you know, he might mess alive walking like broken wings and and I don't know why why they flew into. But it was really weird, so disturbing. And did you see them where they flying with a super doing that swirly thing before they? Well, I didn't see them before. I just like the the hitting like the last three or four of them hitting the ground right when we were looking at them, there was like I said, there was still like two three know call the flock, whatever. Still find all over the place. You know, I went online just to see if this is something that's happened in place else. And there was apparently in Penticton last March. There was an incident where starlings did the same thing. There's, like I said, when I posted the picture, look at when absolutely vital. So many people have posted so many opinions and ideas. On and so forth. But there's been a lot of people posted all sorts of weird bird events all over the world, Kevin's dairy, disturbing I, we have our show lots of people that's of a bird levers. Bird watchers people know favorite about birds, amateurs and otherwise. So I hope to hear from some of the maybe they have some theories as to what might have happened. And anybody that wants to to, like I said, well, over four hundred shares on my Facebook, my Facebook Sunday k. e. b. e. c. h. any see the posting yourself good, at least for you to be able to share that and and maybe get some ideas because I can hear from you that was really quite disturbing to witnesses was like I said, I don't know what I don't know because let the people over Pinon, but I don't know. Just really creepy kind of like, you know that Hitchcock movie with the birds. It was like, that can increase. You know what I mean, Kevin. Thank you. No problem. Kevin beach witnessed a bird mortality event near to Watson British Columbia. Last Friday, we reach Mr. beach in Surrey. The Canadian Wildlife Service is planning on conducting necropsy to determine the cause of death of the forty two starlings, and they will have a preliminary diagnosis in the coming weeks. And now for something completely mysterious witnessed, fourteen hundred meters below the ocean surface. Other something. Dark over to the left and side served in the center. It's moving along there. We take a look at that. What is that. Oh, wow. You just heard the crew aboard, the exploration vessel Nautilus, which is currently sailing in waters off Hawaii. They were monitoring video being captured live by deep sea submersible when into the frame slithered a loan black slinky thing topped with a head that looks like a driver a Gulf driver. Now, listen to the cruise reaction when that golf club starts to move. Is it encouraged or is it like that. Little. Like. Mike. Blow up so I can show how big I. Yep, he's doing the shake. Is that a gopher? He'll then. Oh, yeah. Crazy was awesome. Awesome. Where to end the. Amidst the excitement. You may have caught that what the researchers spot. It was a gulp ill. It has a pouch life poach like mouth that it inflates scoop up, much larger prey and ward off potential predators props like a pelican, but black and slinky. And if you're freaking out, this is key. It's very far away from you at the bottom of the sea. You've been listening to the as it happens podcast. Our show can be heard Monday to Friday on CBC radio one and on Sirius satellite one, thirty seven following the world at six. You can also listen to the whole show on the web. Just go to CBC dot CA, slash AH and follow the links to our online archive. Thanks for listening. I'm Carol off and on Jeff Douglas. For more CBC podcasts, Goto CBC dot CA, slash podcasts.

Canada People's Party of Canada US government European Union Carol Europe Ottawa Audrey Parker prime minister conservative party Maxine Barney Nordstrom UK Brian Lynch Vancouver Robin Doolittle Bloc Quebecois Ryan Lance CBC
Going into the Homestretch

What You Need to Know - a #CDNPolicast from Bluesky Strategy

17:23 min | 1 year ago

Going into the Homestretch

"Welcome to this week's episode of Blue Skies Tragedy Group's Canadian podcast. What you need to know about this week in in Canadian politics? I'm Cam from a consultant here. Blue Sky and joining me today or Neil Brodie fights president lines himself with the Blue Team and Jeff Aft- Turner Senior Consultant Who's closely following the liberal campaign. All right well here. We are the end of the end of this big week. And as of today voting has begun with advanced polls now open and threw out the long weekend. There are a lot of undecided voters out. There we'll start off with this wondering here. We'll Canadians Canadians. Come out this weekend to vote or will people wait the twenty-first to make up their mind. What do you think Well I know the I think the trend over the last couple of years is people going to advance dance polls to avoid the crowds on on election day I think the The question this time around will people want to go out and vote There have been no the change in the numbers in the polls since the beginning of the campaign which kind of reflects the No big winning issue. No big winning in plank For any of the parties It's kind of the Seinfeld election. It's really about nothing even though there have been some some large policy announcements by all the parties. Hardee's I I don't I don't know it's Thanksgiving weekend. If the weather's nice and people are with families they might stay home and the twenty-first but I think it's only I think that's it's only a a result of the weather. I think the bigger question is will people want to own vote this this time. What you Jeff? I don't think the proverbial undecided voter person who sort of ascribing identifies as unidentified. We'll go out this weekend. Because those types of voters tend to play chicken with the polls they go right to the very last minute before making up their mind I've been to lots of doors on the day before Election Day. Where people are still telling you? They're undecided so I don't think that's who's going to go out to advance polls weekend but that's not who is supposed to go to advance. Polls as far as campaign when is concerned Campaigns are working this weekend as many election day. First and foremost it's a way of warming up your machine for the big show on next Monday but secondly it's a way. AM getting the people you know or suspect highly are going to vote for you to the poll to effectively deposit that vote into the bank. So you can focus on the rest of the people on your list for the remainder of of the week. So that's that's what's happening this weekend. I think people are going after As far as campaigns are going after. ID voters to try to get them to go early. There are some voters who just naturally know that they're are gonNA be busy or they're traveling or town or it's not convenient or maybe. This weekend is more convenient than a Monday afternoon. So you'll definitely get those types of voters who may not be coming because as they are particularly strongly politically aligned or other things just convenient for them So I think The truly undecided voter which is who were talking about in this question I think they're sitting down over dinner or family engagement this weekend. And they were having that proverbial Thanksgiving conversation may not make up their mind but it will substantially advance. That and I think by next Monday they'll be ready to go. I think there are two factors really play into this. One is over the last couple of federal election cycles. We've seen more and more people get attuned to the idea of strategic voting and and that idea of trying to stop the lesser to whatever that may look like and therefore I've gotten more used to the idea of going at the last minute letting things play out see what happens at the polls for alternate jumping in because we face stories in two thousand eleven of people are saying oh I voted liberal to stop the MVP and Jack Layton surgeon. I feel terrible. How can I help you? And and I saw the opposite opposite in in in two thousand fifteen and I think you're seeing people are wising up a little bit and thinking okay. I'm GonNa wait a little bit longer to do this. The other thing though. I think it's interesting plaintiffs additive so well advanced polls open. Friday universities had polls open all week. And what's happened with that youth with that university vote at the did they actually get out to the act and AH obviously those votes are already now in the bank. That's the big thing I agree with that. You're saying Jeff at this point in the campaign you WANNA Walk People in as best you can and this an opportunity to do it so the people if they if they are feeling your way and you can get him out to vote now because it wasn't they change your mind will will cast. It doesn't matter anymore but I think it's going to be interesting when it comes to the polls calls we start to see some movement in the last couple of days especially in the personal approval numbers for Mr saying. I think the question is that does that continue play. And I think that's one of the things that keep people who are undecided undecided on the sidelines. This weekend is why does he does play out wanting to see you know it is. There is another option for me. If they wait they wait ten days. I'll have a better idea of where things in stand now. The other big thing this week we had we had. Both the official commissioned debates Monday night on on on their last Thursday night in French and quite the spectacles new formats live audiences. All this lovely stuff built up around so I wanted to get both your overall impression on this. Who who want who lost? Who looked good? Who wish they'd stayed home? Jeff Yeah I think. The format lost I think that was the unanimous. As far as the English language debate was concerned I think that was unanimous amongst no matter what your partisan stripe And that was just a bit of a shame because I think people were looking forward to this as a bit more of a neutral space jason bit more of a different format than before in past campaigns and I think a lot of people were disappointed with the election Debate on in English. The French nice to be made a lot of changes. I don't know whether that was always their plan. or whether the producers went into a bunker for a couple of days to really take the the sort maelstrom around the English debate and turn it into something better in their own production So either either Kudos if they did it. Better from the GECKO or Kudos if they turned it around in a couple of days for what was arguably a much better format I think we actually heard the leaders able to communicate they all. I think the leaders and the party certainly got the message that viewers and Canadian for frustrated by this kind of scrabble talking over each other in in those sorts of things in the first debate because they were all very polite. They're all very very accommodating if you will of other people's Time on the microphone and so I thought the French debate did a better service. So it's the it's the Canadians across the country. Hopefully should've watched. Unfortunately that won't be the case in in in English Canada I think in terms of just a answer question who who sort of broke through. Didn't I think it's it's it's fairly. Well accepted Jagmeet. Did have a pretty shiny day a on the English debate. I think in part that was because First of all he's obviously a fairly positive guy. That's his brand that's his. That's his His way of doing politics and I think that was contrast especially this year coming out with a giant bludgeoned right off the bat. I think set sing up perfectly to be that Middle Guy. Hi who he was to say. Okay well you guys are arguing. You look at me while I say something. That's universally accepted by whoever hears it. It's easy to be the Nice Guy Candidate when you have nothing to lose. Yeah and no disrespect intended but Justin Trudeau was the same way in twenty fifteen. He had nothing to lose. They were the third party. He'd come in and say anything he wanted me. Obviously there's a different dynamic in play when you're a liberal the Liberal Party leader But it's nice when you're in that third third position where you can come in you. You really can't do anything wrong and I was just thinking I mean in terms of Jagmeet in this sort of this moment that seems to be lifting him a little bit in this week and I just find it interesting and maybe this is a partisan comment but I find interesting. That that he's he's he's sailing to become a very important person or A. You know a winner of this campaign by losing half of the seats. It really is this awkward dynamic of Catching Fire while the ship is burnt while the ship is sinking. It just is this dichotomy. That is hard to figure out. And it's accurate. I think he is. He is catching on. He is reaching people he he is you know sort of having that actively to frustrated voters but the stark reality of the of the of the chess pieces on the map is he's GonNa lose half of all of those things where they are today. We've got another week. We'll get into that. Neil your views on it. I will Second Jeff's opinion that One of the big losers. There's was the debate itself Having both debates in Ottawa. With at least the English language debate with five moderators Did a disservice to the National campaigns that people are running that there's only one debate French and English autosomal. There should have been one in Halifax I'm partial because I've got a very good friend in Halifax there should have been wind. You Know Edmund. Ten or or or Vancouver Just to show that this is a big country and there are different Political imperatives across the country. That that that that the regions care about My take away from the two debates is the liberals and the Conservatives fought to a tie Which I think was the best that both could hope for This is the winners. Were the smaller parties. Who who had a hard time Getting their message through up until the debate. So yes Mr Sing Mr Blanchette for awhile. He's he's now burst onto the national scene as the next Great Bloc Quebecois leader a and and Ms May of course you never know as the fifth or Sixth Party in the House of Commons. She never gets much airtime so Getting whatever where. She got twenty minutes in the debate. To talk about. Her issues is is always a good thing My my understanding. I didn't watch the french-language take did of my wife's Twenty Ninth Birthday Just catching up she can. She's catching up to me. I understand I watched the English debates Mr Single All. I understand Mr Sing Kinda ran out of talking points in the French debate. I don't I don't know whether that will hurt him in Quebec But if this is going to be a minority government which it looks like it is to your point Jeff. He may be the most important person in parliament. Y losing a quarter a third a half of a seats. Yeah I have to say. I found interesting using the frontliners debate last night. Some of the most heated exchange was actually between Andrew. Scheer and bloodshed. Like they. Actually were fairly viscerally going after each other More than just on policy points. It was a little bit personal which I find interesting because the you know. The minority speculation is that the only possible partners the Conservatives have their minorities minorities the Bloc Quebecois or piecemeal with the Liberals. But that's unlikely and I don't think that's going to be interesting to come out of this. This this last week of a campaign comes in these playoffs. Playoff the debates is that you're starting to see where the pressure points are coming whereas Mr Singh spent a lot of his time last night in the French debate going after Mr Trudeau even though when he wasn't matched up with them He went after him. You saw you saw sheer going. After blanchette you saw Bernier going after sheer like e you. You're seeing where everyone's pressure points are and where this is really going to play on the next week. I think the thing that I found very interesting about about both debates again aside from the format which. I'm hoping they take some lessons from this and learn from to me. I think the big thing comes I take away from. This is going to be the importance of campaigns and the importance of debates. We've seen this doesn't happen all the time but we've seen it again again. We even the situation where things have been deadlocked had moved and this was the thing that shook it started shaking Lusa bet and the value of having more of these debates. I agree with Neil. I think one of the sad things about the English debate was that it happened at seven PM Eastern so four. PM on the on the on the west coast it happened at eight pm on the East Coast. We're huge country with six timezones. You're not gonNA in a find a perfect way to do this. Between that's all the more reason maybe maybe why you do an east won a West one bring your topics at folks in the region bringing journalists from those areas to actually actually drill down on it. I think there's actually good value and same thing in French too. I appreciate that. Obviously the MO the largest frequent ovulation candidates in Quebec and. I'm glad that the consortium brought in from outside of Quebec this time but I think there's something to be said for doing for having that maybe Quebec debate outside anyway. Let's toby in violent agreement. That debates can be better next time. I think let's just not let's just not hopefully see the debate commission kind of wither and fall apart as a result of this this is their first tryout and I think we can we can hopefully see them become more ambitious as a result of that failure and hopefully be more ambitious. We've talked about by doing things. I I agree entirely. It's a big country Patrick so onto the last points starting to run out of time so we're into the final week of the campaign rendered the homestretch. Everyone's going to have Turkey this weekend. And then after that we're into the last seven days where do you see the different parties focusing all star. Neil well parties are going to go to their target ridings For everybody that means Southern Ontario Quebec and the West Coast Those are the areas that are in play So the campaigns will focus on that What I'm looking for if the polls stay fairly early tight I look forward to the last week. Commercial that liberals will drop I remember fondly the two thousand and four campaign with the Darth Vader esque liberal commercial. It's Mr Harper was going to put the army in the streets That I know I was. That was the line fine By look forward to what there will be a push for votes over the last week both are on the ground with the campaigns over the airwaves as well and I'd be interested to see where where the the parties go with their over the air attacks. Jeff Yeah I think for every party in every campaign that last week is choices in contrast so you know that sort of rounding up the back end you need to make a choice. It's now Speaking undecided voters or people who are waffling and and and the primary way of doing that There's already been for or what about four weeks or four months of trying to promise things to people to get them on your side now as well that hasn't worked for you. Let me let me show you the alternative or let me show you. Who so you think you might be voting for and why you might WanNa think about that again so choices in contrast has always folks do and for the Liberals I was just at the Justin Trudeau Rally in Ottawa? Why this morning? He was obviously thanking mostly volunteers and partisans who were there and say I'll see you on the flip side. I'm about to go across this beautiful country for the next ten days and and so we'll see what is it certainly will be key writings and major media markets and great photo ops. And all that stuff. But I don't WanNa let neal's point get lost. I think I think the last week is going to see. A ton of air were advertising from all accounts the conservative at by has been heavily back loaded. There's a lot of a lot of speculation that it will go negative particular McCain the conservative side but doesn't preclude the liberals from from doing that as well. They seem to have been doing more positive ads. But we're GONNA see a lot of clutter and noise on that we're GONNA see a lot of leader saying you know really think twice about voting for this person because you're going to get that person or really think twice about wearing for that person because they're not gonna be good for your interests well just to wrap this up. I think for the orange gene in this can be very interesting to see what happens to the polls the next week because we are certain. See this surge coming from your side if it continues. I think it's going to be Kavak on this. And it makes me think back to two thousand fifteen gene when the MVP campaign did not really have a plan B.. When things start to move you could see it from the outside and the last ten days of the campaign is all about Stop Harper? Stop Stop Harper literally the MVP had orange stop signs and all their Rallies Stop Harper. Stop number and what's the message worked. Because they went to stop they went to vote for the liberals those who were in the position actually stop them. That's part of what could blow up in the in the liberals face this time on the other side if play the strategic vote. Carter said we have to. We can't we can't habit. Doug Ford Jason Kenney Name Conservative kind of government in Ottawa. They may sing. Is your option and decide to make that flip I think buffet for the MVP one of the big things in in this last week. It's going to be very strategic. Because obviously they're the party with the least resources but they've had some of their best fundraising days year so far in the last week and they've actually raised more money in this campaign gene already than they did all twenty eleven in the big leagues and breakthrough. So the question will be. Do you take that extra bit of resources and put more money into the air war or do you try to get to a few more places. I think it's going to be very interesting to see. Just how strategic they use the reward resources. They've got or how much they're hoping to be able to use their social media game and earned media to push through the door so anyway thanks everyone for coming on. I wish you a happy Thanksgiving and we will do this again next week. The last one before we all vote on the twenty-first I saw this weekend. I I. We're we're we're beavers here. That's what we do day so eh. Thank you all for listening tuning into the blue skies. Tragedy groups team political observers for this week's can Canadian. podcast what you need to know about politics this week. Kadam Blue Sky Strategy Group is one of Canada's leading public affairs firms for government relations lobbying and strategic communications advice across Canada. visit us at blue sky. Strategy Group DOTCOM into blue sky strategy. Group is a proud member of the Global Communications Alliance.

Jeff Neil Brodie Justin Trudeau Ottawa Mr Harper MVP blue sky Mr Blanchette Jagmeet Quebec Liberal Party consultant Jeff Aft- Turner Senior Consul Hardee Quebec Bloc Quebecois Blue Team Canada
National affairs panel on Bill Morneau's political future, and the final days of the Conservative leadership race

The Current

18:39 min | 2 months ago

National affairs panel on Bill Morneau's political future, and the final days of the Conservative leadership race

"Hi I'm anesthesia abuse I am a two time Olympic speedskater my whole life I have been surrounded by athletes and every one of them has a story that a scoreboard will never capture. It's not an easy thing to be with an athlete that don't understand why they're making fun of me because I like to figure escape players on voices all about the person inside the performance when you're so in it, I think perhaps we're the people that understand the least subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts. This. Is a CBC podcast. It really is with the Liberals about who you know not what you know. So can the prime minister tell us always not here sorry Ken somebody on the side tell us why the Prime Minister of. Rules do not apply to him. That's conservative MP Candice Bergen yesterday in a heated session of the house. Justin. Trudeau is off on vacation and is absence didn't go unnoticed as opposition continued to criticize his record. The Bloc Quebecois is calling for an election unless the prime minister resigns along with his chief of staff and finance minister it all comes amid the fallout of the we charity controversy, the conservative leadership race. Also on, of course, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic, our national fares panel is ready to connect all the dots for us. Media. Rabson is national report for the Canadian Press in Ottawa and Emily Nikola is a columnist for the d'avoir. She's Montreal good morning to both Good Morning Mia wraps and let me start with you yesterday's summer session of the parliament. It certainly got a little heated. The MP's behaving. It was really interesting because they started off the Solomon Congenial passing motion to recognize the bombing that occurred are sort out the bumming explosion that occurred in in Lebanon last week and then as soon as that was over the gloves really came off there was a lot of tension within the first question the speaker had to stand up and say look. I can't hear anybody you need to stop yelling at each other it. It was not I mean it's not unusual behavior, but it was definitely very heated between the particularly the conservative, the block and the liberal we heard from under share in the intro there likely Mr Shears last day in Parliament as Conservative leader what did he have to say? Yeah he before the next that next time, the House of Commons meet. So the Conservatives expect to name their new leader The conservative argument yesterday is that Justin Trudeau has a pattern of of breaking ethical behavior You had Kenneth Happenings, their house leader refer to him as the setting the lowest bar ever for Canadian prime minister when it comes to ethics and they really want they they mostly they all want him to resign. They want to bemoaning the finance minister to resign they've been caught up in this we charity issue. and and they really want some answers as to why some of these programs are not necessarily working as well as they should. It's interesting. However, the only ones really talking about a follow up action about a confidence vote are the block. I do want to ask you about that but before I do Emily. Nikola. As MIA, mentioned, the opposition parties have just been hammering the Liberals I. on the we we carry controversy all summer house, the story been playing in Quebec. It's been playing but not as much Interest of in bed in the rest of the country, I wanted to reason, for example, and we grew back to SNC Lebanon scandal that was very much a Quebec backstory you the the the whole purpose of. Scandal. From the point of view Justin, Trudeau with to you know save jobs and kickbacks economy. Now, this is a different story in the sense that Burgers are very well known we in in France supposedly unique but it's also not that much prison in schools and that's something that also came up during the investigation that the parliament or you know the the question department did that have you know basically no assets back in that actually although he was said that. We were supposed to be the only organization suitable to be a national partner. We would have actually had to sub subcontract part of its services, and so it was national minus get back basic to your minus francophones and so because of that yes, it has played out and obviously the bucket looking for for reasons to you know exclude or just in Trudeau about Mario from from from neater or to launch an election but anything time IT'S W. You know how much the public's actually following. Me Robson in. This we charity controversy has been going all summer and it seems now in the past couple of weeks, the knives are really started to come out for for bill more known we're hearing speculation about. His political future it can you tell us a little bit more? Yeah I mean them were no It's been known her for at least a few months that bill no, and the prime minister didn't really see eye to eye on all parts of the pandemic response programs the the we've been hearing that there was a bit of butting of heads between. Those two offices and those two men about. What exactly the government should be doing more was reportedly unhappy about how much money spent exactly I mean he's and I suppose in some ways that's what you want out of your finance minister who man who's holding the purse strings should you kind of want someone who is going to question? Do we need to spend the money and especially because he has the finance minister will essentially wear any money in. Any deficit that they do spend and now you have this There's news that Mark Carney. The former Bank of Canada governor is is now as an unofficial adviser, and so they'll know might be feeling a little bit squeezed out at least on the advice front, and then he had this latest controversy and he's not he's not the first time. He's had questions about ethics to properly disclose every all of. His properties which you're supposed to do when you become an MP, and now he has ties to we should have probably recused himself as well. The Prime Minister of course has a problem because if he moves bill more no, aside because of his ethical lapse on the we charity thing. Well, then what is the prime minister do because he has similar accusations being launched against him and earlier this week I can. Remember 'cause yesterday or the day before when these stories about marketing questions about Bill Maher knows future first arose people were calling the prime minister's office and saying this is going to fire him to his confident and it took a little bit of time for the Prime Minister's office to finally come back and say, no, we have we have competence he he has confidence in the prime minister in the finance minister. You can read into that. What you want I. Mean it made it just been a communications delay but not immediately just single of course is is very interesting tact. Emily Nick. Mark Carney obviously has a stocked resume star power. How much is some? Some are suggesting perhaps you might make a finance minister. How much should we be reading into that? I think it's interesting. How that story broke I think it was in the globe about the policy differences with more no You know I think if I was a little bit Machiavellian and their prime minister was hesitating to get rid of Moore. No. On the basis of ethical scandals you know making public policy. Their disagreement is actually a great tragedy for them to be able to get out of scandal but I think that Carney. differently was India's part of the public be a choice in the sense that it would. It would reassure Canadian that there's you know a person. Who's WHO's been deemed competent at the helm of our public finances at the same time having Carney on, we don't know. Lots about his public policy ideas in terms of you know what? What is his view of the revival the only thing we've known from the job. So we have to the information that has that trickle down. This is the idea that he has a point of view that's more aligned with that prime minister but we have no idea what that is, and so I think there's still a lot of questions. To be. The other thing that would be difficult is is the is to get him elected trigger a by election in this context of minority party meant where you have opposition party trick in action So there's a little bit of logistics there. Of course, he doesn't need to be elected to start as minister, but tradition Kennedy makes it that he would need to our by-election election to actually take the role. I'm now I add host of ideas in this age of Click on shouting ideas is a meeting ground for people who want to deepen their understanding of the world join me as we crack open concept to see how it plays out over place and time and how it matters today. From the rise of authoritarianism to the history of cult movies, no idea is off limits. Ideas is on the CBC listen or wherever you find your podcast. I'm Dr Hillary McBride. Let me take you microphones rarely go. Into my therapy, office. It's where my clients hurt he'll and ultimately thrive. You're going to hear private conversations that we rarely ever have with ourselves. Let alone share with others. Welcome to other people's problems. Maybe along the way, you'll discover that other people's problems are a lot like your own. Season Three's out now. Subscribe on CBC listen. Or wherever you get your podcasts. You both mentioned The Bloc Quebecois leader Francois Shatin what he's been saying. Let, me play a clip for our listeners on what he had to say about his faith in the liberal government right now. The question becomes. which is worse keeping them and this government in place or creating. Temporary distortion in the management of the crisis. In going into an election, which might replace them with people better suited. For the job Emily Nikola. france-soir bloodshed is talking about a possible election here. WHAT'S THE CALCULUS THERE I mean, he's talking about people better suited for the job. It's obviously not himself. He's not aspiring to be prime minister. So I don't know who sees exactly who he has in mind. It'd be interesting question to ask but basically in back to the the map liberals still do have more MP's in Quebec than the block Ubiqu-. As if it was not the case and if the liberals have been using some feathers the block is basically the only other option that could gain from data and so for them it's a very safe thing to say because with the polls right now, they don't stand to lose much but they might same to again to gain zone although there's still. This me too reckoning movement that's happening in Quebec and So we don't know how much that would play out if there was is that by addiction right now in with the stories that have come out about about blase So there's like the Bloc Quebecois Kanter can't trigger this alone I mean they they need to would have need to have the MVP so so I mean, what did the PSA about Mr? Blanchett's called for. Essentially they need everyone else in parliament to agree because the liberals liberals are about fourteen seats shy around thirteen when that Toronto becomes MTO later this year but. Yeah, they need the conservatives absolutely and they basically need the MVP, and the MVP yesterday pretty much threw cold water on the idea they think Charlie Angus talked about he's not going to respond to the latest Marsha Tantrum and Jimmy sing the the MVP leader said, they wanna make parliament work and there's problems but there are ways the government can get the confidence of Canadians. But of course, he's really referring to himself and his party I by working with them on improving the programs. and. So the offering an olive branch to keep this government in power, they want to improvements to the Employment Insurance Program for people who are coming off the the pandemic emergency benefit that's ending later this week or this month, and they also want to improvements to childcare to help people who returned to work and ensure that they have to save childcare. So this is the end ep don't want an election finances are not in any position to have an election I'm even a conservative MP yesterday. said that he doesn't think it's time for an election. I mean, they're they're in the middle of an alert leadership race having an election, just a month or two after their new leader takes place is not ideal for them either. So they aren't seeming to be expecting this but to be honest, the only party that would really want to do well in an election right now is the block what they've done. It cost US money to run. The election just in in Quebec, their finances are are are pretty good right now, and so they can afford to do this the other parties less. So and of course, there's the pandemic and would voters punish you for forcing them to go to the poll would be a very difficult situation. Of course, for the Conservatives because the conservative leadership races is in the final stretch right now, ballots are due on August twenty first mirror ups and our. THINGS SHAPING UP BETWEEN THE LEADING CONTENDERS It's actually taking up a little bit I. Think earlier this year it seemed it was always a race between Erin O'Toole and Peter Mackay. Lusa Toronto. Candidate not an MP actually shaking things up a little bit few people right now that seem to think she could win but she's definitely having an influence in this race and doing much much better than anyone I think it's expected her to and so yeah, it's just over a week away the twenty first of August. The ballots have to in hand on the will announce the winner shortly after that. So it's Lewis percent I wouldn't say who's GONNA win rain. Lewis. Really has sort of emerged from politically nowhere and and made a name for herself Can can she emily Nikola? She doesn't speak French What what is what's being said about her in in in Quebec? Nothing That's I mean it's since the beginning of conservative race is is basically drug no attention whatsoever ever since Teased out the water and then and then sailed to actually. Enter on. So since then it's been, it's been done and I think one thing that's important to understand is that is because it's been dead that the block swing. So well there are a lot of people in your back war. You know nationalist people vote for to catch who could have some association or or some you know keen. Or? Some some some some some values in common with with the Conservatives and certainly that was one of the strategies that Super Harper was trying to put in place with a strong kickback left and then trying to have a different campaigns Friday. There was very much focus on regional economy its autonomy in a way that somehow it's weird sometimes, but actually Quebec in October to have some some some things in common but. We haven't seen that in this year leadership and we haven't seen that in the ship race. It's very much. seems to be a party that is going back to its bravery roots and so No there hasn't been much conversation about it and I really doubt that literally they would do well here I want to ask you though again about about Leslie Lewis I mean there's some saying that she's breath of fresh air that that. Most were swimming that it was a two-horse race if you will a tool and Peter McCabe and she is not Aaron and not Peter McKay is is is not going to be. Going to be forced to be reckoned with. Well. It depends if she doesn't speak how does a person who is not banning Walkin do on the federal? Seen during an election, it's never been seen before actually on. So So yes. So I, think there are people who might be theoretically a force to reckon west, but I think the bottom line is how much can you actually be? Forced. To within the federal election if you're. It's not up to par I think it's a question that the country's wrestling with you know It's like every year every two years at question comes back and I guess it's only by the test of time in the test of the election that we see whether or not. It's in the shoe. We're we're just at the end but I quickly I want to ask you about American politics. If much is being made about about Mr Biden's a new running mate to Kamla, Harris and her ties to to Montreal, of course. So Emily Nikola, what do you make of? Miss Harris and what she might do that with that Canadian connection. I think for people of color especially women of color. But actually we've seen it with barrack. Obama. There's always pressure in Canada in America to prove that you're a Canadian or to prove that you're American and Harry. Harry's a her parents are immigrants one from India one from Jamaica and she did live sometime in Canada and that's actually some attack ads material in some way. So for the Republicans, the way that American politics functions. So I although I do see a lot of enthusiasm and maybe it is going to change Canada US relationship I do think that There's GonNa be an additional pressure for her to actually prove that she's American I in American Lee in the way that she presents herself and that if she was to present in a way not to worldly, let's put it this way. This is something that doesn't play out well, differently I campaign. This doesn't play out well in American politics. This thing while yes because. Of Her background she might be you know more aware where candidate is on the math and what it does But at the same time it's hard to say whether or not. You'll be able to actually do something with that policy wise or international relations wise. Speaker she'll she like to be tracking position where she needs to prove that no, she's actually just about America. Well, we will leave it there. Thank you both for the talking politics, us. Thank you. Thank you. Muir. Absent is a national reporter for the Canadian Press Auto and Emily Nikola is a columnist for Lavar in. Montreal. podcast listener we want to hear from you a lot has changed over the past few months and we WANNA make sure the current podcast works for you got a quick survey about what you WanNa hear it'll take less than ten minutes promise and you'll help make the podcast the best it can be to take the survey go to our website CBC DOT CA, slash the current For more CBC PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

prime minister finance minister Emily Nikola MP Justin Trudeau parliament Quebec Quebec Mark Carney Montreal Bloc Quebecois Candice Bergen MVP House of Commons Bank of Canada Canadian Press India Lebanon Ottawa CBC
January 22: Open wound

As It Happens from CBC Radio

51:31 min | 9 months ago

January 22: Open wound

"I'm trying to winter and I'm a little long. Welcome to chosen family every second week. We talk about art sexuality and identity with a special guest usually Queer airport not always. I completely struggled coming out to my parents. As a comedian being in the entertainment industry for a Middle Eastern people is unheard of affecting change requires requires people to shake it up. Listen to chosen family wherever you get your podcast. What sign are you by the way area? Of course I love it. This is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm carol off good evening. I'm Chris Boden. This is as it happens. The podcast edition tonight. Open wound wound is. You'll do steps. Mother died outside her Montreal nursing home a year ago locked out and overlooked for hours in the cold for the former Bloc Quebecois acquire leaders says it feels like yesterday because nothing has changed. And that's why his family is suing hacked off a United Nations. Expert tells us she believes is the Saudis accessed. Jeff bezos phone and. She's demanding an immediate investigation by American authorities. syfy under quarantine. China has stopped all travel out of Wuhan Ground Zero for the Corona virus outbreak. Our guest tells us the mood in. The city is one of anxiety and fear many people wondering if they're getting the whole truth persona non grata. An Iranian Canadian truck driver tells us he's been stopped twice recently trying to cross into the United States. He believes it's because he shares a last name with the Iranian General Killed By. US forces take our money please. A group of very rich people apple is urging world leaders to raise their taxes and their chairman tells us the motive is not altruism. It's more like enlightened self interest rest and feeling Willie headed a fifteenth century masterpiece depicting the Lamb of God has been restored. But I have to warn you. It's left many people unsettled. They've described it's is as alarmingly humanoid and compared its pout. Zoo Landers as it happens the Wednesday edition radio that puts you. Aw in one year ago Jheel Duceppe got the shocking news. His ninety three year old. Mother Elaine Rowley. Oats Duceppe had died at her nursing home. The cause of death was hypothermia. Mr Left the building after hearing a fire alarm and got locked out it was minus thirty five outside. She froze to death earlier this week. Mr Duceppe the former leader of of the Bloc Quebecois along with his six siblings announced they were suing the residents looks Gouverneur for one point. Two five million dollars. We reached Jill Duceppe up in Montreal this at first of all. I'm so sorry for your loss. Well it's a year ago I it is like it is yesterday addition to nothing's installations then so. This is why we were suing the company because of the the report of the governor was ric. Here you made a lot of mistakes and we have to change the way of taking care of the the oldest people and the company should face their own responsibilities. It was it was shocking for everyone to learn last year that your mother was locked out of residents in the dark trapped in outdoor courtyard six hours in mine is what was really shocking. Rocking the fact that the ratio of the looks that goes on to say that she went out and she fell down. She didn't move after that. Well the win we Coronas Saudi images of the cameras is she said well. She fell down five hours and a half later. So it's quite different. Who Actually has card wouldn't work go back in no but the thing is when you're opening that kind of a door there's an alarm and instead of just changing the alarm you look on the other side of the door she was? They're trying to get back inside the details as you're mentioning she. They didn't look. They turned off the alarm without looking outside and then look at the cameras. They told defy remanded the check. If everyone was back into room which was not true they waited. You didn't five months before apologizing to to to the family. After the car owner made the report she was had a fear of fire. Which says how do you think that meant that? She would react to this alarm. Because that's what started all this right. She had agreed fear of fire because when she was young was four years old when In the theater in Montreal seventy two children died because of the fire so she had that in mindful since since she was young so when she heard the alarm and when she heard the police was there it was firemen whether ambulances were Oh to follow the rules she she went for the food door to go outside and but it didn't check if people were outside after that or if the it came back back in their rooms so near partnerships I should say as a choice being treated thousands of another nine months without me so it was a nice place of course but but We convinced her to go there. Because of the security measures were they were announcing and advertising. It's so disturbing that. She was did everything that she thought was the right thing to in order to protect yourself in case there was a fire. And that's that would lead her into the situation and did did did before I was before she was I was thinking of the poor people in the street. So C. P. told My sisters into she will sit as an English three cut the fourth Carson Carson Fox's knitting knitwear warm woolen for for for people in the streets is too cold so I'll do that all the along in tomorrow Come take that and give them to those poor people. He was not because of the the cold. It was minus thirty five with what a lot of wind in the night. I can't even imagine what that moment was like. Maybe you can just tell us. What was she like? What would tell us a bit about your mother? Enrolling and my grandfather was a British owned child. She wasn't in great shape for age like the last one to see a few hours before was going to Mexico and vacation and then she was coming from Montreal downtown coming from her hairdresser. She was reading the papers have morning a book a week and uh very alert and even she she. She saw her doctor a month before she died and heart was at one hundred twenty on eighteen. So so The doctor road this is the heart of a younger and she was on and yet this is a home. You had confidence in wasn't it. This is the residence. Yeah obviously this is why And we condensate to go there and she wanted to stay in the eastern part of of Montreal where she was she was born she all their life life and this is a beautiful place but the thing is even if you have the cameras if you don't use them is served nobody you said elsewhere that your mother other never stops dying. Is that because of because it's always as not settled and we're always thinking of that and people are asking Gosh was going on. And what are the next. And it's always tough when your mother. Your father died like Winston the paper when it's not settled when and you don't receive a people. Don't apologize but about five months after is coming back. Every almost as a politician you understand the obligations nations and governments. So what do you think needs to be done immediately to make sure this never had any immediate thing to form the employees working in those places to have enough employees lawyers working in those places all their commissions made by cover knows because not the first time it happened and I think all implanted and not waiting to implement and plan and all of them at the same time if something is ready to be done with right now and I think we should have protected the old age people do. They're the one who we'll build Quebec in Canada the world and instead of discussing we should pay the security of the Prince Harry and Dan Megan we should discuss predicting the security of all these people in our society. What advice do you have for for? Families Families People who are in the midst of decisions about having their loved ones go into homes. I think they should ask how it works. They should read those reports. It's public and ask questions concerning their recommendations if they're implanted into places they WANNA go. But how can they trust a home. This is a very very highly regarded resident. So how can they trust a home after what you have gone through if there's a judgment and all the recommendations are implanted inflammation then. It'd be more profitable but today certainly not should step. I really appreciate speaking with you and again. I'm so sorry about your mother. Thank you Jill. Duceppe and his siblings are suing the seniors home where their ninety three year. Old Mother died one one year ago this week. Their lawsuit has not been tested in court. Mr Duceppe is also the former leader of the Bloc Quebecois. We reached him in Montreal. And for more on this story go go to. CBC DOT CA Slash A. H. In Han China authorities are taking drastic steps to try to contain the outbreak of Corona virus. The city of eleven million plus people is closing its airport and train stations to outbound passengers and suspending its local. Don't transportation networks people are being asked not to leave the city starting tomorrow but with the virus already popping up in other Asian countries and one confirmed case in the US us there are fears that it's too little too late today. The World Health Organization held a press conference to share the latest on the spread of the virus. Here's Dr Michael Ryan in the Executive Director of the. Who Health Emergencies Program. Primary issue is to limit human to human transmission to reduce secondary infections actions especially amongst close contact particularly in healthcare environments we need to prevent transmission through amplification events and super spreading events and obviously obviously prevent further international spread. We need all member states to focus on early identification and isolation of suspected cases and probable and confirmed cases racist there are many unknowns to address including clinical severity and the true extent a nature of disease transmission so the organization Asian is fully activated at all levels with our partners in response to this event. That was the. WHO's Michael Ryan. Speaking at a press conference today the organization says it's holding off on declaring an international health emergency. But we'll meet again tomorrow. For more deliberation William Yang is the east. Asia correspondent respondent for Deutsche. AVELLA's English service. We reached him in Taipei Taiwan. William what are people in hand telling you about the mood in the city right now so my sources on the ground are telling me that the mood right now in the city is just pure anxiety and also a lot of fear about the what exactly is going to develop. But only until three days ago that they finally started getting official confirmation from the government so they are considering the handling of the government a little bit too late for the outbreak. And so what are people doing. What precautions are they taking? The government actually just introduce introduce a official law that require every citizen in the city to wear masks at public places so like movie theaters and department stores or even if they go to lake a government buildings. They are required to wear masks. And so is that happening are as everyone wearing a mask. Yeah according was this like basically everyone that they see on. The streets are like putting on masks and also hand sanitizers in like sanitizing. Energizing wives are basically all sold out. But this is already spread from Wuhan and sped from China's in other countries one case of it now in the United States that's been confirmed. So how much wider does this need to be. What are you what are people saying? What are you hearing about what efforts there are to try and contain the virus so right now at least in East Asia where I am based we are in the region where a lot of the overseas cases popped A governments are coordinating among themselves and Ozo- frantically communicating with the Chinese officials to try to get the latest information. How the virus Including the original source of the virus and also. How exactly are the virus being transmitted because they considered this as the very recruit Information for them to be able to set up mechanisms to cope with it. And this idea of where I've how it's being spread is key isn't it. It's originated in one unspecific market in Luhan. Doing no what what was in that market. That might have been the source of the virus right so actually one of my source of lived not far from the market itself and what he said start. The market has been known for selling nudges of fisheries. He's that is being atra ties by the name of the market but also while most of them are actually illegally being sold on the market but Because because the local official never actually crackdown on the that behavior so the local residents are just very used to going there and get all all too rare delicacy sta of these businessmen catch or imported from different parts of China so they've narrowed it down to that right and then they didn't close the market immediately. What are you what did your friend your source tell you about how slow it was for them to actually act on that market so information? Information or rumors about the mysterious infection started circulating in Wuhan at the end of December. But at that time the market was just open and At least at some of the biggest local newspapers a WHO Bay province what they were saying about these mysterious consumers were just simply telling the local residents that these are nonsense infections. And so they don't worry about it too much and the the market was still operating for at least a week until the outbreak. Really got out of control you know when they first realized that this was was transmittable in fact it was. It could be passed human-to-human so it was when dozens were over. Hundred people suddenly all have the same symptoms him. The pneumonia symptoms in a lot of them being hospitalized that some local residents who are more connected to social media started a frantically searching for relevant information on a local social media in what they saw confirmed that this is not just a simple infection cases and in fact the symptoms reminded minded them off the SARS epidemic was really damaging in a Plaguing China back in two thousand in two thousand and three you live in Taipei. What personal concerns do you have for you and your family? What are you worried about this? Yeah so people here are actually also very worried about the spread of this virus. Just because we have hundreds of thousands of Tony's people working in China and In fact because starting tomorrow is the Lunar New Your holiday in most of them are going to fight back from China and just own alone had thousands of Taiwanese people working there and we actually already ready have one confirmed cases. That's a actually a lady in her fifties who worked in Hon on a daily basis and she was confirmed to a have already contracted the virus now at the local store drugstores everywhere all this Hannitized masks are also out in a there there are no stockpiles at many of local places here. We know that during Lunar New Year in Asia just massive numbers of millions of people will will be on the move because of that holiday. Do you think it will curtail those movements. You think people will think twice about doing their normal trips to see their families because has it the virus. A lot of the fronts who were originally planning to travel to different parts of the island are now you know limiting their schedules. Visuals in experts are predicting the of the next two weeks are going to be very crucial when it comes to whether this virus is going to have an outbreak break in Taiwan or not. We will leave it there. Stay healthy and thank you for speaking with us. Thank you so much good night. That was William Yang the East East Asia correspondent for Deutsche. AVELLA's English service. He's in Taipei Taiwan. And you can find more on this story on our website. CBC DOT CA Slash Ai. H in some of the wealthiest and most powerful decision-makers on earth are currently enjoying or pretending to enjoy each other's company in Davos Switzerland at the World Economic Forum and with all those bespoke suits rubbing elbows. You might think there's general agreement among among the millionaires but today some of them have a message that has others clutching their platinum credit cards. Protectively the message is we want to pay more taxes. Hundred and twenty one people have signed a letter headed millionaires against pitchforks including Disney heiress Abigail Disney and former Unilever's CEO. Paul Polman Morris Pearl is the former managing director of black rock one of the world's largest investment firms. He's the chair of the group the patriotic millionaires which issued that letter reached Mr Pearl in New York City. Mister Pearl in this letter asking rich people to pay more taxes. You sign off sincerely your fellow millionaires millionaires and billionaires. What kind of response have you had? Well you know. We have all those people signed the letter. That we've we've been you know recruiting for a few weeks and I think most people really agree with us. So there's a serious problem. It's just some of them. Don't want to pay more taxes and that's the issue. What are they saying in Davos if he had response to people there to this idea I haven't heard from anyone who's in Davos the act but we were? We were pretty impressed. That people are making a difference. I think people are switching very short term timeframe bait money this VICI- months to more long term timeframe. What can I do to be making money next year the year after for the next generation I guess I I want to hear your argument because as we know for many wealthy people? Tax Avoidance is kind of a point of pride so what. What's the argument you're giving as to why they should look into this idea of paying more taxes I'm telling people that the world is changing. That people are not putting up with this anymore. That's what we we saw in two thousand sixteen election here in the United States. The people were rejecting the status quo. I think that's what we saw in the United Kingdom that when people voted to actually in both cases it's sort of they want to believe there's some anime that's causing their problems and deal with that yet. They don't want to cooperate and be part of this massive globalized economy. Because it's not working for that and I'm afraid that had you know as we said the letter that people are going to start marching with pitchforks and we're GonNa have social unrest and things are going to be bad so we have to have a change so the the argument is is enlightened self interest. I don't claim to be purely altruistic. I don't think anyone who has. Maybe some people are but I. It's in the enlightened self interest of the wealthy people to change to do something. We are known as situation as you talk about which is that. There are now handful the billionaires but two thousand of them two thousand billionaires who have more wealth than sixty percent of the planet's population that since we have this idea. I think Warren Buffett started talking about this years ago when his discovered his secretary was paying taxes and he was that this had to change and he had continues the rich people continued to try and find on ways of avoiding paying taxes. So why is that. Well I think some people are just greedy not everyone you know Warren Buffett. I pointed that out but even he was talking about the income tax rate he paid ten million or so dollars of taxable income makes every year disregarding the billions of dollars he makes every year and the appreciation of his ownership of his company. Berkshire Hathaway I think. We have to realize the wealthy healthy people are just more wealthy than everyone else that it's becoming clear to the everyone else that they don't have a chance if you're telling doing them that the alternative to acting on this and and having a more a fair distribution or redistribution of wealth. The if you don't do that you're going to be facing pitchforks folks. Isn't that just more of a reason for them to be wealthy so they can protect themselves from that. Well sure people can do things like buying buying a small private island coastal New Zealand building their own airport in hiding out there but most people don't want to be there. They want to be here at the ORGANIC CISCO and in London Toronto Places where people go to enjoy their lives and so people. I think it's much better. And and most people agree that we want to avoid revolution not sort of plan to deal with revolution. He taught you say the chair of patriotic millionaires. And you're an American. So why is this movement. Why are you looking to make this a global movement and not just focus on your own country? We are mostly focusing our own country. But we have you know hundreds of people here in the United States and we're realizing that we have to you know go other replaces to and it's really international problem because so much wealth can be easily moved from nation. Asian the very wealthiest can easily move from formation Nobody really knows where they are anyway. And that's the kind of thing that we have to do. And of course people say well they are doing something about. They're they're they're giving money to philanthropy donating to charities. They're building wings on hospitals. Isn't that way to do it. Very rich people. Hello deciding how societies wealth should be spent whether it's a hospital here and an opera house where we need all of the people through the elected elected representatives. They vote for making those decisions. Not just the few wealthiest decided to spend a tiny tiny tiny fraction of one percent of their money on things that look like philanthropy. Okay you know that their ideas that you're you're you're talking about we're talking about redistribution of wealth it sounds a lot like doc Like Bernie Sanders and we know that Mr Trump is is warning against creeping socialism. What kind of response do you think you'll get politically in the United States to your ideas? Look I think we're seeing huge response politically to our ideas. More people voted. Against Mr Trump voters forrester tropical. The last election in the ideas that were proposing are mainstream. Now when they're considered completely arthur warmer five years ago so so yeah. We're seeing a very favourable political response right now. ALL RIGHT MR pro. We'll be watching. Thank you show. The Morris Pearl is the chair of the group the patriotic millionaires and a former managing director of the investment firm blackrock. And we have more on this story on the as it happens website. CBC BBC DOT CA Slash Ai. H Have you ever wondered what possesses as you to cut little crosses into your Brussels sprouts. Well it's about. What possesses them people in Medieval Times believed? Those little crosses would protect you from the miniature. The demons that lived inside Brussels sprouts my point. Is that people back then. Were wrong about almost everything including science medicine and demons in vegetables and it turns out art for example check out the newly restored get altarpiece at Saint Sava cathedral the`dual in Belgium more specifically the lamb of God at the center of the altarpiece. When you see it you won't believe your eyes or it's is? The altarpiece is an elaborately symbolic multi panel work painted by Yawn and Hubert van in the fifteenth century and in the mid sixteenth century. Story someone altered it pretty extensively so as part of an ongoing project restorers have been stripping away those alterations to reveal the Works Original Majesty or in one case monstrosity. The restorers discover that whoever painted over the original made some changes to the lambs is to make them look like lambs is because the restoration has revealed that the van brothers gave the lamb up persons. is which makes its face in the words of Smithsonian magazine Alarmingly humanoid. It is alarming. This the scariest lamb. You'll ever see further the proof that even medieval artists were affected by the era's general wrongness. So it's no wonder that that sixteenth century painter decided it was time for a fresh fresh pair of eyes Hi I'm Jamie Palm for the last decade. I've been a newspaper reporter and lately. I'm just finding it hard to keep up with the news as of today. Simple possession of marijuana is no longer illegal it can me hard to make sense of things spent nine hours in the consulates appearance. I want to change that. At least a little. Join me weekdays at six. Am for front burner at daily podcast from CBS. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts. By now Jeff bezos probably regrets ever exchanging numbers with Mohammed bin Salman the Amazon boss swapped contact with the Saudi crown imprint at a dinner in Los Angeles in two thousand eighteen according to a report in the Financial Times and now it appears the Saudis used. That personal connection to hack Mr Bezos phone today. The United Nations is demanding an immediate investigation into the U. N.. Experts believe the phone was likely accessed using spyware sent by a WHATSAPP WHATSAPP message. That message came from an account belonging to the Crown Prince and they believe the surveillance was meant to influence reporting on Saudi Arabia by the Washington. Post Post which is owned by Mr Bezos and yes Calamar is one of the UN experts. We reached her in Salt Lake City. Utah he's Kinda my. Do you believe the the Crown Prince was personally involved in hacking. Jeff bezos phone. Well I believe that there is sufficient evidence pointing tweet wet sap account having been used to it to input a malware into Jeff bezos phone whether the account rose directly and personally used by MBA's all by people working for him that I I cannot tell you this is for people who don't know or remember Mohammed bin Salman is NBA. Send us the crown prince talking about so what what's your what's what's the evidence about the hack to summarize it sometimes in February twenty nine teen. Jeff Bezos security team became aware aware that there were a possibility of the phone being hacked. It took them three months to conclude that the most likely source of the hiking hiking woes of they'll find sent former WHATSAPP account owned by NBC s sometimes at the end of a pole twenty eighteen eighteen. Okay I'm just trying to think of trying to make sense of the dates here. If the this malware was entered into mist Mister Bazo. Sa's phone April twenty eight. This is before Jamaica Show G. was murdered. So what what is it close to this. This is after. Mr Bezos has become the owner of the Washington. Post is that is that are those related facts. That allegations we are raising. The phone of Mr Business was hacked at at the time. When Jemele Kashogi add been writing for the Washington Post Very Critical Reporting Eastwood's hacked at the time when the phone of four other? Saudi dissidents wear hats. So we see. The hacking of bills have sparked of the beginning. Aw Aw at the full implementation of a campaign seeking to control negative reporting on a Saudi Arabia. I do not suggest that the hacking woes directly related to the killing of German casualty. However it is clear that hiking as played central part in the killing of German casualty in that it information gathered to the hacking reinforced reinforced the conviction in Saudi Arabia? That mister Germany casualty won't a threat and that needed to be addressed. Less than we spoke was about the murder of unite spoke was about the murder Jemele Kashogi. He was murdered in October. Twenty eighteen and so just so again trying to get at the the motives here The the security consultant for Jeff Bezos says that the the he believes that the Saudis were intent on harming Jeff Jeff bezos and because of the relentless coverage by Jamal Kashogi and that's why they The gained they wanted access to his private information on his phone Do you agree with with that assessment. In a we have had no evidence so we at least I have received no evidence that Mr Business Economy can commercial activities in Saudi Arabia. Where in any ways threatened somewhat the object of illegitimate pressure on the part of the Saudi authorities? So that leaves us to uh-huh to The Washington Post Angle. It appears to be the most likely reason as to why me Stub is for me. I've been act at least within the timeframe another details this as you know Jeff bezos. He had an extramarital affair where the details of which and photographs of which ended up in the national enquirer and there. There are many suggestions that has to do with the Saudis Since there was also a glowing portrait of the Royal Family in the National Inquirer at the same time. Do you tie those things together. Do you think that the that if there was this hack into Mr Barroso says phone that they were looking for this kind of personal information. Look I think disease We will have to wait for for the outcome of the FBI. Investigation into the blackmail and extortion of Mr Biswas because I suspect one of the issue the FBI. Yeah he's GonNa come see the user source of Of the the Association of the information in the hand of the national enquirer mean in my view it is incumbent upon the American authorities to do orange can the fact that Saudi Arabia may have hacked the a phone of the US citizen that is essential economic actor in the country and the richest man on earth shooed who'd give them material to proceed ways of thorough study. We know that we know that there is a relationship between the President United States. Donald trump that he wants good relations with the Crown Prince. So do you think at some point it becomes a very political and perhaps very difficult to get the answers that juicy can yes. I'm Possible this is a difficult environment elections at the end of the year. There is an impeachment process right now in bipartisanship not POSTSEASON has proven which worked very well last year with regard to Saudi. Accountability may not work so well right now so that to me is a wakeup call to take the issue of packing and surveillance extremely seriously we will leave it there. We'll be following this story. This Calamar speaking with you tonight. Thank you thank you very much. And yes. Calamar is the UN Special Rapporteur on summary executions executions an extra judicial killings. She was in Salt Lake. City Utah Ooh ooh. ooh ooh Jonathan Holloway. He has a truly amazing resume. GRADUATE OF STANFORD AND YALE PhD published author provost at Northwestern University Dean of Yale College all of which is pretty staggering but to Mr Holloway himself the latest addition to his. CV is the biggest deal of all yesterday. He was appointed the president of Rutgers University. It's partly a big deal to him because he's the first ever black president in the schools long history and partly because as Jonathan Holloway revealed in a speech following yesterday's announcement. Rutgers is the place he's wanted to work for a long time as a historian by training and spent my follow the career focused upon the postmaster patient. Nited states my work exists at the crossroads of intellectual and social history meaning that have explored the history of ideas and and the people who generated them most. Recently I've written about universities through my scholarship I have come to appreciate the nuances that are woven into the fabric of a research university in unblinking acceptance of complexity in an unwavering dedication to service. These attributes make universities special places and although it may sound quaint to some that may sound ridiculous when one thinks about. How large workers is I think of universities as beloved communities? They are far from perfect route but they are deeply committed to the pursuit of perfection. One last quick story twenty nine years ago when I was in graduate school found myself talking on the phone along with eminent. Historian David levering Lewis then a professor at rutgers. I don't recall the specifics of the conversation but I do remember being so excited that uphold my mother right right actor to tell her that I might have a job at rutgers. Somehow I was able to ignore the fact that I was only my third semester. My doctoral program. And in retrospect I'm quite certain that professor wasn't offering me anything of that time to know I'm the kind of person who hope always springs. Eternal folks get through this moment. You know at this time. I hope paid off. Jonathan Holloway is the newly appointed President of Rutgers University New Jersey and the institutions. I ever black president that it for four years by back so the money has been working as a truck driver delivering goods from Canada Canada into the United States but now the Iranian Canadian is worried. It's the end of the road. A week after the United States assassinated a high ranking general. Mr Solomon says he was denied entry at the border interrogated for hours and told not to come back to the. US ever again now. His job and his family's future feature are at risk and although he wasn't given a reason for being turned away Mr Solomon he believes he was denied entry because of his last name which just happens is to be the same as the late Iranian General Qassem Soleimani. We reached Burbach Salamone on the road in Ontario. But back did you have. Any reason isn't to believe that there would be trouble crossing that border on January tents. No actually I heard from Iranian people there. Stop the some people and they asking some question. But I'd never think they doing like these to me. Have you ever been stopped in questioned like that. The American border before I never stop for any reason and they just you go through the normal procedures as a truck driver carrying stuff. They they ask you questions and you keep going exactly. What was different about this stuff? What happened I they? It stopped me and the agent at the border. He said the your transponder doesn't You should go inside for paying for that. And until fifteen minutes One of agents border with the police car. He came to me with the lights on the escort. Me To inside. They took my cell phone. We pass forward and they took my wallet. They made the copy and they keep all all of them dimmed like itself online wallets until they let me back to China. Well and did they give you a chance to let anybody know that you were being stopped at the border because you make a phone call. Honestly the worst thing is that my wife. She was working very worried about me and I asked him okay. Please give me my cell cell phone. I WANNA just make your call to my wife and I wanNA tell her. There is no reason worry. They didn't give me this chance to doing this since midnight. Midnight to seven A. M. Executive. All Time I was over and your your your wife just had a baby to some weeks ago right. And that's a problem for us right now. I'm Harris she got my last name to. I'll give you. I'll get to that in a moment but concerning concerning your last name your name is. Money is the same as a General Qasim Soda Money. who had just been assassinated in era era over in Iraq? The week before it was that an issue is it your name. That was the issue actually same same last name but this is a very popular last name in Middle East. If you surging this last name like maybe a hundred thousand people with this relation to the man who loved US Nestle absolutely absolutely no okay. That's one thing you are a Canadian citizen. You came to Canada from Iran. You left to escape from the Iranian regime. And now you're Canadian Canadian. Is that right exactly. When I'm going anywhere I'M GONNA interviews myself by Canadian then? I'm escaping Iran. I'm running from all madness in Iran. I found that when I came. Actually we came to Canada me and my wife. We find the good place for build a life. That's why after thirteen years. We decided to have a baby in this country. And I'm happy to living in Canada. I guess this is a biscuit from. I've got the only this happen. It's making me sad. I guess it's not fair. It's not fair to me okay. Let's get more details about what what happened to you so you. What kinds of questions were they asking you over all those hours? You were detained the main question. They had it. That was my last named after a couple of question. They asked the same question. Like this is my last name. They asked me more than ten times from different way and they asked me about my opinion this situation between Iran and US and asks them honestly. Maybe that's my fault. My opinion was the trump killed one guy in Iran and they crash the airplane in Iran on the finally we lose the Casey. Yes what you said you said that because Mr Trump key club so the money that these canoe it's an opinion that many people full share on both sides of the border. You Express that maybe that was not the right thing to do but there was nothing. They didn't have anything on you right. There was no there was any anything that they could point to. There is nothing changes. I'm attractor earth. I'm not a part of any government our political system so what has has happened. That many people Canadians and Americans were being detained at the border. After what happened in the Iran eventually many of them were able just to go through. Were you label to carry on into the United States. The first day they stopped me at Windsor Border and the second day I tried to cross the border order from the Buffalo and I have a five to stop second day. A supervisor from that birthday he said don't come back to united the state anymore he said I can give you the detail. He also took my heart and ask for a receipt from him. I said you don't need a receipt. Okay so it looks like you can't go back. Lee Night States as as far as that information says right. That's great now. What does that do to your job? I have to say appreciate about my company. They know my situation. They know I have a newborn baby and I have to work more than before. They try to keep me as a local driver around the Toronto onto but I have no idea but future and how long they can keep me like this but but you might. You might lose your job at this point. It's maybe maybe it's happened. Yeah so nothing cleared up able to get any answers anything any more information from the United States about your status Addis Honestly No. I don't know what's the dinos I'm worry about my kids. My family is life. Look into me I have to be assigned but I'm soul pouring Janet right back. I'm sorry to hear that and I hope you keep your job. I hope that works out. Thank you very much really appreciate by box. Sulaimaniya is an Iranian Canadian truck driver who's been denied entry at the US border we reached him on the road and we contacted us customs and border protection for comment. We we have yet to hear back. Once you become eligible for the National Baseball Hall of fame in Cooperstown New York you have ten in years within which to be elected if you haven't made it by the end of those ten years you're out of contention this year was Larry Walker's last chance and like a true Canadian. When he was pretty confident that he was not confident yesterday he tweeted? Although I believe. I'm going to come up a little short today. I still want to thank all you that have been pulling for me and showing knowing your support well yesterday. The Baseball Writers Association of America elected to players Derek. Jeter who was a given and Larry Walker who at least in his own opinion wasn't Mr Walker was born in Maple Ridge. BBC and played seventeen seasons in the majors including six with the Montreal Expos Expos and ten with the Colorado rockies he won National League batting titles in Nineteen Ninety eight nine hundred ninety nine and two thousand one he was an all star five times and one seven golden gloves those stats plus yesterday's vote. Mean Fergie Jenkins is not the only Canadian in the hall of fame anymore in an interview with with the MLB network. Larry Walker talked about Mr Jenkins and about his homeland for the record. Hey Larry Bob Costas. Congratulations just said that you really sincerely. You weren't Kinda. Just girding yourself up for disappointment and lowering the expectations. You really didn't think you would make it so this has to mean something extra special emotionally to get that call Jack. O'CONNELL it was Bob I it. It was so special Like I say I don't. I barely remember the moment I was kind of floating floating on air and having some friends and family around me and a lot of things entered my head when the phone rang and as as I was hearing what was being said to me you know and as a Canadian I was a proud moment for me to to represent my country and join Ferguson Jenkins in the hall of fame. Larry Larry Tom Verduci congratulations. I'm glad you brought up your home country. I spoke with Ryan dempster and he talked about taking a ferry forty minutes to go play baseball because you you made the dream possible for him as a Canadian to be a major league player Larry Walker and inspiration anybody in that country growing up with an idea playing baseball baseball. So my question is for you. Where did your dream to be a baseball player? Come From and when did it include the hall of fame. This moment right here would never entered my mind as a child growing up. Of course being Canadian. You're born into this world with a stick in your hand and skates on your on your feet. So so. That's how I was a kid. You played hockey. And that's all that really mattered Win Hockey didn't quite go the way I wanted baseball. More or less found found me as The story I've always told and I didn't work hard at baseball the beginning until I realized I had a little bit of ability at it so once I figured that out watching a lot of people play learning from their mistakes learn from their successes and listening to my coaches and fellow. Teammates led me to this moment here here and here we are Larry Walker from an interview with the MLB network which added some music in their later in that interview. He continued to be Canadian acknowledging that his fellow inductee Derek jeter was somewhat bigger name. Larry you waited ten years for that phone call. And when it came when you're going in not alone but with Derrick jeeter what does it mean to you to be inducted this summer and cooperstown with their jeter. Yeah Pretty Awesome. Ah I mean we're talking about one of the icons of the game and jeter and Derek. Congratulations obviously for for your induction. And I look forward to hanging with. I guess this. I'll probably be seeing them shortly. But you know one of those names that goes along with the greats of any sports that you say you say name and you're talking about one of the best ever so I was thinking about that as great as Derek is. I'm kind of going to be like that. Remember those old forty five. We used to listen to and they had the song on the side they didn't know about Canadian. Larry Walker speaking to the MLB network yesterday after he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of fame. You've been listening to the as it happens. podcast our show can be heard Monday to Friday on. CBC Radio Radio One and on Sirius Xm following the world at six. Even listen to the whole show on the web this Goto. CBC DOT CA slash. Ah and follow the links to our online archives. Thanks for listening. I'm Carol off and I'm Chris. How for more C._B._C.? PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

United States Jeff bezos China Montreal Jheel Duceppe Larry Walker CBC Saudi Arabia Iran United Nations Bloc Quebecois Taiwan Mr Trump William Yang Crown Prince Deutsche Canada AVELLA Mr Solomon Chris Boden
Ethics investigation into the prime ministers relationship to WE Charity

The Current

22:12 min | 3 months ago

Ethics investigation into the prime ministers relationship to WE Charity

"Pin-drop from Ted is a new podcast that takes listeners across the globe escape with host. Salim, Russia Walla as he finds surprising stories and ideas from each place with local journalists and creators, as your guides learn about fun and fierce art movement in Nairobi Kenya that challenges the common narrative of the region and find out why residents of Bangkok call a radio station instead of nine one one subscribed to pin-drop wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. The prime minister's relationship with the we charity has been in the spotlight after the government awarded the Organization in one thousand nine point, five million dollar contract to administer the candidate student service grant, and that deal has since been canceled last week. It was reported that Justin. Trudeau's mother and brother were paid large sums of money to appear at we events and on Friday the revelation that one of finance, Minister Bill more knows daughters works for the we charity the Ethics Commissioner is now investigating the Bloc Quebecois called for prime ministers to step aside while that happens. The Conservatives are calling for the RCMP to get involved and yesterday. The Party's finance critic Pierre Paul. Made this announcement announced today that I will be adding Justin Trudeau's name to the list of witnesses I will be calling on him to appear and testify under oath after being sworn in. We'll get into more of the politics and ethics investigation in a moment, but first the ongoing political controversy is also shining a light on we charity itself as well as its relationship with the for profit volunteerism company me, we for insight into that I'm joined by Cape. Main is managing director of Charity Intelligence Canada which reviews publicly available information on more than seven hundred fifty charity's good morning. Good morning when we're talking about we there are. Really two different organizations. Can you explain the difference what differences between the we charity and the me to we organization? And that I think is the heart of the issue of genuine with right now. Everybody I think is very familiar with charity. It's we days it's it's school programs that help give us a voice, and it's work with children, and it began in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety five, and it originally began doing international development where you're doing the water and building schools, and that's that's still we charity, so we charity has it international? We've villages, and has it Canadian programs also in the UK and the US working with schools and kids and giving them a voice. The problem comes up and what is less well known. Is it sister company me to we? And these two joined at the hip. While we is a charity, we charity is public me to we is the private social enterprise, the private business that is controlled by and correct kill Bugah and it is private, so it's just it's it's its revenues and its profit on disclosed, and that's why you have the conflict between a public charity and the private social enterprised. Your Organization charity, intelligence, rates, charities and their impact, and you've given charity the we charity a rating of fair. Can you explain how charity intelligence does its ratings? What are based on? Just briefly because with impacts, more and more donors looking deeper at charities, more and more donors want to look past fundraising costs administrative costs, and they want to know what kind of difference a charity makes. And when you're looking at a difference, you WANNA. See Dollars Dollar. How much did my donation do good and so for charity analyzed programs both in Canada and internationally and. It has Sarah impact in our. It has demonstrated impact in our assessment. To that assessment exactly. So so you would be looking at the at the we days. What is a demonstrated impact? What is the change in the kids who attend we days relative to the cost so when we is spending twenty three million dollars on its Canadian programs, is that a demonstrated impact that it is creating know twenty three million dollars in value. Are you seen the benefit? So that's that's what demonstrated. Impact is like so now we look at me to we, which is the for profit arm of this organization? Can you tell us a bit more about that? What's the difference exactly between what they do and what the charity does? Well a lot of difference because meech, we is the private business, so if is buying and selling saturate coffee. It has the kiosks at the we day. It's bottom line. It's intent is profit, and it is privately held by Craig, kill. So, it doesn't have any disclosure requirement so the workings of me to. We are not publicly available so what we know about me to. We is that it does an awful lot of business with charity and Metoo we business says that since it was founded, it has given twenty million dollars in support to we charity. Now what is less well known is how much money we charity gives to me to we over the last ten years. We charity has given an paid me to we. Eleven million dollars, and in the last two years twenty, eighteen and twenty nineteen. Seven percent and eight percent of charities, total revenues have flow to me to we the private business of the kill bugs. No speaking more generally, how common is it for organizations like this to two wings? In this kind of arrangement. Many companies big companies. Public companies have salons. Rock comes so you will see a corporation have. But we've never seen the backwash before. Normally. It's the corporation you know giving. It's prophets back in some. To, you know to a charity whether it be a Canadian tie with its jump. Start Initiative. banks maybe be having foundations. That's where you're seeing the the the company. Give money to the charity. It's very I think it's very unique. This complex structure between me and me to we and I'm not aware of situations where we see the charity giving money to the for profit business. So what is the difference between the volunteer trips that we hear about that Metoo? We organizes and the ones that the we charity. It separately. SUMITA, we does the volunteer trip so when the kids go to the Weedays, and they and they see the wonderful work that we charities doing internationally, and they want to go to village, and then they fundraise within that community to pay for those trips. They are paying me to we which is the private business, so it's not like the girl guides when they come to your dog where you're fine girl cookies and you're paying your money to the girl guides in this situation that the switch it's people. Go to the we've villages, and then a pain me to we the private business for that trip. So when so, what when Paris Hausky if they should let their children go on these kinds of trips, what do you say? Well I. I think travel is fantastic I? Do and I think there are serious concerns about volunteerism? For one. I think it's very well documented If? You're not qualified to do work in your own country. We should not go abroad to do this work if you don't I mean I know for myself. I wouldn't let my teenagers a building Goule in Canada. Why would they go abroad to build a school I wanna I wanNA interrupt us from amendment. I'm sorry to interrupt you almost out of time I just wanted to get through, and we did invite that we charities and and me we to be on the program today. And they declined, but we charity sent us a detailed statement that I wanted to run by you. It reads in part that we charity and Metoo we. Social Enterprise are clearly distinct entities and that when purchasing a product it is. Is from me to we social enterprise when making a donation, it is to wheat charity. They also told us that the structure was quote created by legal counsel to adhere to Ciara guidelines and that quote, additional extensive reviews of the structure governance and relationship have been done by several parties including a former Supreme Court. Justice and impact measurement groups like the fairtrade foundation just briefly. What do you make that statement? It's a highly complex structure. It's highly unusual. It's highly sophisticated, and it's very obscure it's massive holding companies and subsidiaries that are owned by me to we and it's it's. It's very complex it's it's a social enterprise, or be call, or whatever the Buzzword is, but at the bottom line full profit, and it's private, and when you have a public charity and a private business. You really need to have arms length. Do you need to have clear guidelines about where? where the money is, and is we charity already given the extent of its purchases from me to we. Is it getting value and that's a key issue, and when you have to organizations that are so close together it causes massive confusion was the government contract with we cherish he, and how was me to we the private business going to benefit from that? That is what a key question will be that we need to have answers to. CAPE. Thank you very much for your time this money. Thank you kate. Bane is managing director of Charity Intelligence Canada which reviews publicly available information on more than seven hundred fifty charities. I'm Elena hundreds, lyle and I'm than the Rodwell. And where the hosts of inappropriate questions did you lose weight? How're you doing? How'd you get pregnant? We talked to people who have been asked these questions we ask where these questions come from, and we learned some more respectful ways of curious, so whether you've asked an inappropriate question or been asked an inappropriate question gum. Get inappropriate with us. Inappropriate questions is available. Now you can find it on the CBC. Listen APP or wherever you find podcasts. The theatres have closed, but the show look on, play me. PODCAST is through to present a new series. The show must go on featuring provocative productions from some of North America's most acclaimed creators for the stage. Sit back and experience everything from chilling thrillers to Gut wrenching dramas to irreverent comedies each month experience the exhilaration of theatre from the comfort of your home, claiming available wherever you get your podcasts. Now as we mentioned earlier federal conflict of interest and Ethics Commissioner. Mary is now investigating Prime Minister Trudeau's involvement in the choice of we charity to run the grants program Lori. Turnbull has written extensively about ethics and politics. She is director of the Public School of Public Administration at Dalhousie University Good Morning Lori. Good Morning. What do you make of the concerns that you just heard? It sound so unusual right? I mean I've been having a hard time trying to figure out what the differences between me a me and sorry, we metoo. We and I'm glad you're other. Guest has explained this as complicated because it just struck me as extremely hot and yeah, the this is dual flow of information of money. Where you've got the charity giving money back to the organization. The private organization seems so odd, but I think What we get in the public is a very consistent identity between the two organizations that are linked together, and so you see all of the the activities of the we charity, and that's that's the kind of public face that. The whole thing has and so sometimes I think we probably we aren't as attentive to the fact that there is a for profit. Entity within this thing that is that is integral to the activities of the whole thing, and so it's it's you know it's not it's it's. It's not easy for everybody to figure out sort of what's happening with the money. What the impact is it confusing? It is confusing. It is likely to come up in this investigation. The Ethics Commissioner who investigating the government's decision to task we with administrating administering the candidate student service grant What do you think that investigation should focus on beyond this complex situation that you mentioned? I think the the Ethics Commissioner is going to focus on the behavior of the public office-holders I mean I'm sure he'll try to get into the weeds of the difference between these two entities that are connected together, but that's not going to be his his primary focus because he's not you know an investigator. His his mandate, his job is to kind of shed some light on what public office holders are doing, and whether they made the right choices, and so he's going to be looking at two sections of the conflict of Interest Act, specifically, the one that relates to. Whether or not, there was a conflict of interest you know proper, and then also whether there was preferential treatment for the we organization, and so he's going to be looking at the behavior of the prime minister decisions that were made who might have been advising him. you know what? Where the advice came from in terms of this being the only organization that's able to carry out this this grant. And so his his focus is going to be very political, and I say that not in a partisan fence, but in focused on the behavior of elected officials and people around them in the simplest terms. Slow Laurie. What did the rules say about all of this? So the rules in the conflict of interest act basically say you can't be in a conflict of interest, and it defined conflict of interest as something that would carry a benefit to to you as as an elected official as a public office holder, or to your family or your friends and so there will be, that will be the central question. Right whether the decision that was taken even though it's been canceled now. The central question will be. was that decision going to confer a benefit on a friend of the prime minister and then the central the the? One of the central us from the opposition, parties will be yes. This organization is a friend of the prime minister and hear all the reasons. Why here all the photos and everything else? And the other part of it is going to be The other rule that's that's important. Here is the one against preferential treatment, and so the allegation there would be. There was a preference made to this organization because of its relationship with Trudeau family, and then here all the examples of where that friendship has been cultivated over the years, and so certainly preferential treatment is an issue, and so that that'll be the argument there and so that'll be. What Mr Deal has to sort out right now. You've watched a number of these investigations and given the know putting that sort of in the landscape in the background. How significant do you think? Is it that members of the Prime Minister's family? His mother wife and brother receive speaking fees for participating in we events. I mean. Obviously The Trudeau family has had a long relationship with the we charity and. It's not the case that you know. The prime minister has started this relationship as prime minister. And then he you know, then then there were there were contracts that went to we, and then his family did speaking engagements for which they were paid like. The the relationship is longer and more complicated than that and on some level You know we have to acknowledge that. When people work, they're paid for their time, and it's completely normal for people to get speaking fees when they when they were on the Speakers Bureau, and they command those fees like, but now There's just a there's a sense of of the closeness of of the Trudeau family in organization, and I think that's where people are looking at the prime minister. And saying you know? Whether there was even if there wasn't preferential treatment to the organization, it's the optics. It's you know why because of the relationship you even if there's nothing wrong, go you know there's nothing going on here at all. Why did you not think Oh my goodness? This is just going to look a little bit too cozy and I better take every possible precaution to make sure that this thing looks clean on the other side when it's announced a Canadian. So what would some of those cautions have been? What would you have advised him? What should he have done differently in this case? I think one option would have been for the prime minister to recuse himself, which a few others appointed out to like if there was a conversation that was going to be had about advice that had come up and what the decision was going to be and prime minister knew that this was an organization that he and his family have ties with very public One option would have been just to. To take himself out of the conversation so then when people like you and me come asking questions later, the answer is everything was above board. He wasn't even in the room. The advice came up and everything was handled properly, because there's no reason that the organization can't compete for contracts that it is eligible to you know to deliver. There's no reason that that the organization should be disclosed like to be. Taken out of the equation, just because it has a relationship with the prime minister and his family that would be. I would see how that would be unfair, but. Because of the closeness, because and that's really what the conflict of Interest Act is about right? It's not this is not like a criminal code. That's not what we're talking about. This is really about managing public trust. It's about managing the expectations that the public have of people who are elected to high office and making sure that things are happening way that people are comfortable with and with Oh. Yeah. Would that apply equally? Do you think to the Finance Minister Bill Maher? Know whose daughter works for the charity as well. Okay so from a political accountability perspective in I would make the argument that even all ministers of the crown are are equally subject to the to the act right, and there's no difference in terms you know no matter how powerful or less powerful you are everyone's obligations under the actor the same. That said there is a particular accountability around the prime minister at a political sense on this, and there's nobody who is going to you know kind of hold responsibility for something like this quite like the prime minister. That's the whole point of the office of the Prime Minister in a way. It is you know the buck stops with him truly and so although there has been you know we learned on Friday, there's there's also a connection with with Mr Moore's family. I I really don't think that there's going to be a scenario prime. Minister Trudeau and minister more. No come to be kind of. Equally duly accountable for this I. This is this is. This is a detail on on minister more, but this is. This is going to be primarily a conversation in the story about Prime Minister. Trudeau, so, how likely do you think it will be that? He will actually appear as he's been called to do in front of the Finance Committee to testify. The prime minister that is. Yeah I mean it's. It's hard to predict at this because there are so many steps to that so and the fact that it's a minority parliament makes it a little bit more difficult to predict because there'd have to be some cooperation. Among in more than one party to be able to get the prime minister to to come forward, and so usually, when when the witnesses invited to committee, the witness voluntarily goes whether the witness wants to or not they they still do so. It depends on. If the committee intends to invite the prime minister, first step is. Does he want to go? is He willing to go? If not the committee can take some action against. They you know kind of tried to push go back and forth, but ultimately whether he appears or not will be calculation. By Him and his staff about whether. It's really worth it for him and what he wants to do, and if he does not to go, and he he you know he'll risk. All of the the reprimanded goes along with that. Is that a better option for him? You know ultimately we're wondering. I guess what is at stake in terms of public trust and elected officials when you look at this and the difficulty of legislating as you say Legislating integrity. How difficult is it going to be going forward to win back? Public Trust when cases like this, keep coming up. So when these things happen, there's always an immediate hit two, usually the the kind of personal or brand popularity of the person who's involved or the party involved right, and so the liberals could expect to see a hit over this. That won't that I would say probably won't last. In light of the fact that we are in a pandemic situation where the government's response to nineteen, both as a public health and economic crisis is going to be very much present in people's minds there, thank you off the people who who say I don't care, but what he did. We but at the same time I Trust I'm sorry, but I've got to go Lori. Lori Turnbull is director of the School of Public Administration. Adele House University thank you very much and the see news is next I'm not I add the current? We'll be right back. For more CBC. podcasts go to CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

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NPR News: 10-22-2019 6AM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 10-22-2019 6AM ET

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like xfinity X. by get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply all classic Washington beat Saint Louis to take the National League pennant in four games. I'm Korva Coleman N._P._R.. News in Washington President Evo Morales had a small lead but not enough to avoid a runoff election then the election count was frozen for about twenty four hours when the returns resumed Morales had a wider lead in votes just enough to give him a victory and avoid the second election. Japan's new emperor has formally proclaimed his enthronement in a ceremony Trudeau gets to keep his job after Canada held national elections Monday but Trudeau we'll be leading a minority government as Emma Jacobs reports Prime Minister Justin Trudeau there have been clashes in the streets of some cities in Bolivia after new election returns were released the presidential election last Sunday showed incumbent Bolivian already of seats in parliament and will need coalition support from smaller parties to their political laughed to pass their legislative agenda The nate also resulted in today is part of the impeachment inquiry William Taylor has been mentioned by other witnesses expressed concern that president trump allies pressured Ukraine to investigate Joe bye the decision to withdraw US troops from that country NPR's Giles Snyder reports on today's hearing the hearing is being held by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee the panel is cutoffs a reminder of why we do this reminder of why we and the other California Utilities and actually now many utilities across the West initiate public power ears for NPR news I'm Jacobs in Montreal California Utility PG and E. is warning it could shut off power again to some customers last week the delegation negotiated a five day pause and Turkey's military offensive in northern Syria that sent ethnic Kurds fleeing Kurdish fighters have long been ally as gale force winds are forecast for the state the utility fears the winds could knock branches and debris into power lines or even blow them down and start a wildfire dramatic rise for the French Nationalist Party the Bloc Quebecois introduce home province of Quebec the average lifespan of a minority government in Canada is around see this week as well as the Senate Appropriations State Department Panel Trial Snyder. NPR News Washington. The top diplomat to Ukraine is set to speak to house Democrats back to seek answers about the withdrawal from James Jeffrey the US Special Representative for Syria engagement. Jeffrey was among those who accompanied vice president pence to Turkey didn't Taylor also sent a text message that it was quote crazy to withhold US military aid Ukraine for help with a political campaign Canadian Prime Minister Justin Jio Court Attendance Pulled Aside Purple Silk Curtains to reveal Emperor Nero Hito an Empress Masako on thrones wearing elaborate robes and headdresses narrow he algae's could temporarily lose power this week when the strong winds hit is predicted by forecasters you're listening to NPR is in the fight against Islamic state the decision to withdraw US troops from the region has been criticized as a portrayal to every also to appear before the House foreign affairs honey filled with rituals as NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul the emperor ascended to the throne last May after his father abdicated at the imperial palace in Tokyo Doug Offset all as a simple answer is safety hundreds of thousands of PG any customers in at least a dozen Talafar knee oh proclaimed his enthronement and pledged to fulfill his constitutional role as a symbol of the state then Prime Minister Shinzo Ave led a cheer of long live the emperor followed twenty one gun salute by abdicating now if he does our utilities equipment has been cited for some of the deadliest California wildfires in recent years PG and he president Bill Johnson says there's a reason for the power father tried to modernize the monarchy by retiring instead of serving for life is Japanese emperors have traditionally done Anthony Kuhn NPR news soul live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman Congress will learn more this week about the trump administration's policy in Syria this follows the president's controversial IOS liberals did eke out a

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NPR News: 01-22-2020 4AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 9 months ago

NPR News: 01-22-2020 4AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens for arguments. Begin today in the Senate impeachment trial President Trump purpose charged with pressuring Ukraine to investigate a political rival in exchange for the release of US funding and obstructing congressional probe of his actions. Deputy counsel also the President Michel Potpourri says. The trial is pointless because the details are in the records of trump's July. Phone call with Ukraine's president. You've seen the transcripts which the president released transparently unprecedentedly. There was no quid pro quo for anything security. Assistance funds aren't even mentioned on the call. The Senate approved the rules for the impeachment. The trial only a few hours ago following debate in which eleven democratic amendments for additional evidence and testimony were defeated the US Supreme Court hears arguments arguments today in a major case that could alter the line. Separating Church and state at issue is a Montana law similar to those in thirty seven states that bard direct or indirect aid to religious schools details from. NPR's Nina Totenberg in two thousand fifteen. The Montana state legislature enacted a law that provided dollar for dollar tax credits to organizations providing a scholarship money to students in private schools. Twelve of the thirteen schools. That got money. Under the tax credit program were religious schools and ultimately the Montana Supreme Court ruled that the tax subsidy violated the state constitution's no aid to religious schools provision today advocates for school choice backed by the trump administration are asking the US Supreme Court to revive scholarship aid program in its entirety. Montana Tanna maintains that would be a violation of its right to determine how to fund it schools Nina Totenberg. NPR News Washington doctors at a Seattle area hospitals are treating the first use US case of the potentially fatal corona virus Washington governor. Jay inslee says the patient a man in his thirties recently visited Wuhan China where four hundred get forty cases of the disease have been confirmed. We're very happy to say that. He is in satisfactory condition. And as of this moment is being Very helpful in US identify particular people that he may have been in contact with the CDC plans to expand screenings for corona virus to two more airports bringing bringing the total number. Two five and passengers from Wuhan will be required to use one of those facilities to enter the US. Boeing says it doesn't expect federal regulators to approve updated software and pilot training for its trouble. Seven thirty seven Max plane until summer that several months longer than Boeing predicted last year the jet it was grounded worldwide last March following two crashes that killed three hundred forty six people you're listening to. NPR News Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says his government will ratify the new north. American trade deal as quickly as possible as Dan Carpenter reports at least one. Opposition party opposes the agreement. Canada's the only country did not yet ratified the US Mexico Canada Trade Agreement or US MCA Prime Minister Trudeau. Pseudo says the first steps for his government to do so. We'll begin next week when the House of Commons resumes after its Christmas. Break through said passing. The new trade deal is a priority but his as liberals have only a minority government so they will need support from other parties now the Bloc Quebecois leader says his party will not fasttrack the agreement he says talks about. What's in the deal or not over. Eat Francois Blanchette says the US MCA does not provide the kind of protections for Quebec's aluminum sector that provides for Ontario Steel and auto industries for NPR news. I'm Dan Carpenter in Toronto. Lemon has formed a new government after the Shiite Hezbollah movement and its allies. Agreed on a cabinet to deal with the country's worst economic the crisis in decades. The new Finance Minister says this nation needs foreign aid. Help the country move forward. Lebanon has been without a government since prime minister. Hariri resigned last October amid massive protests. UN Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez says he'll work with the country's new premier suspended recording academy chief. Debra Dugan has brought a discrimination complaint against the organization that presents the grammys the complaint filed with EEOC allegis allegations of sexual harassment corruption by the academy. And Its board. The organization says Dugan was suspended after a female employee accused her of but again. This is N._p._R. News.

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Did Canadas election reveal a more divided nation?

The Heat

19:56 min | 1 year ago

Did Canadas election reveal a more divided nation?

"I heard you my friends you are sending our liberal team back to work back to Ottawa with a clear mandate we will make life more affordable we will continue to fight climate change we will get guns off our streets do you have a comment or question about today's podcast send us an email you can find us at podcast at C._G._T.. In America dot com a combination of factors weighed him down but a relentless focus on making voters concerned about what Andrea Sherr his opponent would of politics so the progressives are all that much more progressive and the Conservatives are all that much more conservative and so certainly wearing the badge of honor of progress election well certainly the main takeaways are that Justin Trudeau despite disappointing many voters manage to triumph but he signed to do wasn't properly explained in many of the actions in its execution we're not properly done and so he went into the election with problems you also had the mcface scandal which merged which certainly sullied his image as a great progressive leader and one that many of the progressives around the world looked up to and so was the most dissatisfaction with him well certainly he came into office with Sky High expectations he promised quote sunny ways and the challenges when you set the bar astronauts so how does Trudeau now govern he governs on a case by case basis and so there are natural alliances with many of the parties on many issues so when Word Prosecution agreement which I think we're terribly mischaracterized in the press in many ways but certainly weighed him down at the polls because what the government was election campaign accusations that he did not fulfill campaign promises and of course the Boho load of personal scandals that he was involved in as well where do you think I would certainly tell you. He was very progressive but Justin Trudeau wore progressivism as brand and what we've seen also internationally is a fragmentation discuss what the slightest connection reveals about changing Canadian society is Eric Miller he's a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center Candidate Institute and is President Awesome Help Justin Trudeau a lot and some parts of the country but in other parts of the country it really didn't help him very much trudeau face challenges during the ounce only in the vote rich areas of Quebec and Ontario and so he did very poorly in the west and so that leaves the latest trends highlight and increasingly diverse nation agreeing practice that threatened to divide Canada Hello I'm on a night welcome to the heat. podcast with US narrowly managed to win the popular vote but the election results appear to show more than just left to right throughout Canada political regionalism has been intensifying do these gap that he will have to fill in terms of reaching out to the West and in terms of ensuring that they feel included in listen to in the Federation we conservatives in a liberal Mickley high you're bound to fall short and so there was that and also the mismanagement of the SEC lalain scandal which was efforts to set up a d you and a focus on the voting geography of where he needed to win helped him to carry the day. Well let's look at the lay of parliament right now so the Liberals if what you've seen is Justin Trudeau is very consciously progressive in in a way that said the government of John Cray Champ was not John Craig the party's clearly took home most of the votes but there were other emerging forces not president in previous elections can you out these main divisions for us well certainly with a clear agenda for issues like climate change and social equality for years later Trudeau managed to keep his own job but will be leading a minority government as conservatives of the Rideau Potomac Strategy Group Eric Nice to have you welcome thank you for having me I let me ask you straight off the top what are your main takeaways from the outcome of this support him you will also expect to conservatives to be supportive to the extent that it's necessary on the Trans Mountain pipeline and so there will be a lot of different climate change issue and so on the one hand you have people who are saying If we don't act now within twelve years it's going to be Armageddon and the natural news on which the parties will work together certainly they'll be disagreements but it's hard to imagine more unlike bedfellows than the end EP and the Conservatives a great following of people you also had a lot of leaders at the UN and other places that wanted to meet him but now having shown himself won the most seats then you have the conservatives then you have the New Democratic Party which has got twenty four seats and the Coca Cola party which has got thirty two the government leader will be very important because it will be a nonstop process of both counting votes and negotiating there will be things that many of the parties want in the comes to pass the budget he will no doubt tack a little bit left and ally himself with the New Democratic Party who will be looking for things like Glenn so one can expect deficit to increase on issues like trade agreement with the United States and Mexico. US MCA you can expect the concert and so he will deliver progressive policies that will keep them happy but there's a difference between being more or less satisfied so reaction to that for many people is to say it won't be and certainly all of the talk about green transition and so on is not met with specific on most issues so would it be fair to say that Eric that there are no real deep ideological divisions between these parties they they more pragmatic how does he reset his image internationally and how does he he make amends with those who deeply hurt with his decisions particularly on black face no it doesn't and this is going to be part of the challenge that you will see he doesn't at least publicly acknowledged that he is going to in western Canada in the nineteen thirties they had become very much a party of progressive well educated left leaning people who are focused on issues like I would say that there are deep ideological divisions certainly the MVP they came out of the Industrial Labor Union and impermeable populism women cabinet ministers some visible minority cabinet minister some indigenous cabinet ministers he doesn't look like the the great progressive hope that many had thought Liam it change the Conservatives are very much focused on issues set chas energy development and climate change itself is a real friction blinds including moves on the carbon tax and he has put himself in a very difficult position because in his first term he said everyone must have a carbon tax and if you help the MVP but the place is a condition on saying we will help you if you help us with this say climate change provision yeah and they will certainly do final farm medicare national dental care and an expansion of social entitlements luckily for them Mr trio is not particularly focused on fiscal discipline to need to figure out a pathway that that that melds together his strongholds in Quebec and Ontario with particular his election in two thousand fifteen there were actually young women outside of the Renwick Gallery screaming as if he was a pop star he had a great Washington again that they will still be a group of women outside the Renwick Gallery screaming off to him. Well I I would I would imagine there may be a new generation with a propensity for for black face photos having been seen as someone who has taken a high handed approach MVP will get some things the Bloc Quebecois we'll get some things indeed the Conservatives we'll get some things looking at Justin Trudeau both as a politician and a personality just four years ago he was the I I think when you look at his image in the world his image in the world is deeply compromised when he first came to Washington after title of Canada will not just county was the the world was a very popular figure throughout the world but now he emerges from this election victorious but he is bruised hands about how you're going to do that in terms of governing let's look at a situation a hypothetical situation where Justin Trudeau Liberals want to pass a certain piece of legislation but they need the seats in Alberta and climate change and the carbon tax at the Trudeau government has implemented and imposed on some provinces has had Dan you there will be a lot of bartering I put on twitter last night that went after the election that the role of the government whip and point in the Canadian Electric you've had during this campaign Greta Teutenberg touring the country and has put a big focus on the I minister and so after Black Face Brown face came out it was there was a lot of speculation even that Justin Trudeau may have to step down okay. profoundly challenging impact politically now when voters start to get rebate checks and you start seeing it play out br province acts doesn't do it then I will impose it on you did implementing a more Progressive Environmental Agenda Alienate Trudeau's party from voters in Alberta and other places an insurance broker when he spent years claiming that he was and it came out that he was a US citizen and hadn't declared it and so in essence they kind of equalized each other art this to come out and talk about why we need to do this as a national project doesn't mean everybody's going to agree with you but it does mean that they will respect you for selling your is this was never sold properly they didn't spend enough time in Calgary explaining what this was they didn't get oil CEO's some of whom see but in a scenario of low motivation that tends to drive people toward the incumbent because they will ultimately say better the devil is shortly after the results came out to Meta victory speech and he says he regards as victory as a clear mandate from Canadian voters does the outcome really reflect that that he was unworthy of the job than the Globe and Mail the largest newspaper in Canada did an investigation and found that Andrew Scheer was not in fact is some of what's happening if you're a progressive and thinking that someone is this great leader who is moving mountains I suspect though this is just a hunch of mine that he does come to read the prairies part of why the Conservatives won the majority of the popular vote was because there are a lot of writings on the prairies that voted eighty five percent conservative past post basis and so it's Canada much like the UK is whoever wins the most votes even if it's not a majority ends up winning the seat so the communities who've signed benefit agreements with the builders of the Trans Mountain pipeline who will get a lot of money into their communities that they can spend on schools and on road money but the challenge is what is reconciliation and the question of the pipeline who decides on resources well there are many indigenous have been thrown out of work so if you are an unemployed or oil worker or you are someone who fear that you may become unemployed and are in that sector expectations were raised so high and There was no clear pathway on what they wanted to do the government had good intentions they spent a lot of election system was a promise that was broken from Twenty Fifteen Justin Trudeau made a big deal of saying that this will be the last election run on the first could rematch so backers have not at the moment said that they are looking for a vote for independence if you have restive regions in position and try what were the core issues which the election was fought so climate change was a big issue and the other piece had to do with who was fit to be and that would come but they will perhaps not be as keenly interested to see him and this will for him will be the challenge of and raised very high expectations they got huge support from indigenous communities before and they weren't able to articulate what they were doing and this is a theme that comes up over and over again route and so if you ask a lot of Canadians what did they think of the campaign they were utterly disgusted by it and nobody was excited about who they were voting for not in favor of separation but they are in favor of strong Quebec powers but they represent small town values more traditional that Jim tends to amplify victories that are that are one with thirty five forty percent of the vote on the indigenous peoples front the challenge was again the US seats in parliament What you attribute that loss Jagmeet Singh first of all didn't connect as I said with voters in Quebec and the end EP had a big share who or who have family in that sector you're going to react very negatively to the notion that you are putting a tax on energy production and part of the challenge within on Housing and other things there is a process of transformation in the relationship between governments in Canada and indigenous peoples but the government again in countries the question of their relationship with the federal government never truly goes away and so you see these things come up from time how that will look at it remains to be seen but you've seen the price of oil come down very significantly in Alberta since two thousand fourteen and many people country all versus the rest of the province let's talk about Jagmeet Singh he is the leader of the New Democratic Party that party actually lost seats after the selection so they have they didn't see him as a credible prime minister or let's talk about foreign policy well regional policy the US MCA the leaders of the United States Canada and Mexico of course racing Environmental Enforcement Labor Enforcement and the whole question of trade remedies and the broader enforcement of all of the measures in the agreement most tell us as they manifest themselves in Quebec and so the Bloc Quebecois come from the Francophone heartlands outside of Montreal and we're very success one of the issue and that is Quebec the block Quebec quark a thirty two seats does this latest election indicate that the

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June 18: Sorry not sorry

As It Happens from CBC Radio

49:49 min | 4 months ago

June 18: Sorry not sorry

"I told the court. To? Use One small man. Giant wheel. I do wish say official that I'm wrong person right now. Uncover season seven. Dead Wrong. Killed Tipple it the. Be. Available on CBC. Listen and wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. Hello! I'm Carol off and I'm Chris Ouden this is as it happens the podcast edition. Tonight. Sorry, not sorry and EP leader Jagmeet Singh tells us. He has no plans to apologize for calling the Bloc Quebecois MP racist and the House of Commons yesterday and he thinks it's time to rethink. What constitutes unparliamentary behaviour homes. Dane Joshua Contractors has been living in the united. States with the fear of deportation for years with a new Supreme Court ruling today is a new day for him and hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants, connecting the dots Canada is rolling out a national covid nineteen contact. Contact tracing up and privacy concerns abound. Blackberry is helping with their project. It's chief technical officer says Canadians should trust the process divided loyalties John, Bolton's book about Donald Trump is the talk of Washington, but Democrats have some choice words of their own for the former national security advisor, saying he chose book royalties over loyalty to his country and and despair, and some really wild quacking. We reach the scientists who things he has decoded the meaning behind the distinct toots and quacks made by Queen. And imprisoned heirs to the throne, we get to hear them to and the best laid plans. One invented a flying lawnmower. The other runs a lawnmower museum, but despite their enthusiasm for landscaping neither of tonight's guests from the archives is great at keeping a long story short as it happens the Thursday edition radio that keeps you coming back for more. Jug meets. Sing is not apologizing. The MVP leader was thrown out of the House of Commons yesterday for Calling Bloc Quebecois MP and Ontarians resist. He said after Mr Terry voted against an EP motion dealing with systemic racism in the RCMP. Today Bloc Quebecois, leader, Francois Blanchet called on Mr Sing to make amends. I hope. That the leader of the MD.. Will Apologize. sincerely. And if not I owed the president. Also, comments. Will be quite severe. Because if dion leap and alty is not being allowed into the room for one day or not being allowed to speak for one day. Everybody will feel entitled. To do the same and trade insults accusation on the floor, which is not a good idea. So I hope that this will be fixed. rapidly. And I Ask You. please. Explain to. The Canadian people. Watch, really happened. His anything with a racist person. That's Bloc Quebecois leader. Francois Blanchette reacting to an exchange between block. MP Atlanta an end. EP, leader Jagmeet Singh in the House of Commons yesterday. We reached Jug meeting today in Ottawa. Interesting, I'm going to begin with asking you. What did happen yesterday I mean? We heard you lay out the motion. The was to be a vote. You need a wanted to needed a unanimous votes. We heard the as in the know. What happened to provoke your reaction? We're we're in a moment where people have taken to the streets in the thousands across Canada in community, small and large, saying you know what black lives do matter indigenous lives, matter, and that moment has been really special. It's been painful. People have talked about the pain and. Agony that they've gone through their own experiences. And then the same time we've seen the RCMP at the heart of some horrible examples of police brutality, we all saw the images and the video of chief how an atom and the lives have been lost and have been killed by police in response to wellness checks or healthcare checks or mental health checks in light of all this. This and the inaction of Prime Minister Trudeau and the inaction of the Liberal government, we put Ford emotion to push for some real change, so we laid out one. Let's acknowledge there are systemic racism and the RCMP completely federal jurisdiction fully within the powers of the House of Commons to legislate. Let's acknowledge that in two. Let's do something about it, so use of force review. Emphasizing deescalation and then really responding to healthcare crises with healthcare workers in that moment. When motionless presented I was confident top. The speaker called for the consent and I heard a lot of days, and I was not surprised. I expected this with tough, and then there's one no, and the the speaker didn't hear it because it was so overwhelmingly. Yes, and was about to move forward, and that no repeat and I look back my saw one person in the entire House of Commons saying no. And and then I look back, and they kind of just made this gesture of dismissal, and that gesture of dismissal really is what I wanNA talk about eight. Is this notion that it doesn't matter? Can we need you to describe this gesture because this is? This has become key to this discussion. What was the gesture and describe what you think it means? saw I look back on that sign. MP wave their hand in a dismissive motion I while saying no, no of course not almost like. Of course, not, why would we support emotion like that and I thought how offensive to all the people, all the indigenous people, the black people, the race slides people that are fighting for change to just wave of a hand, dismiss and say no to something so vital in meaningful. And so, what did you say to Allenton? I called him a racist. You're racist for voting against US I I put my hands up saying how do you do that? And he said Yeah I did it and said how could you do that? I did it and I said. Racist for voting against us. Any challenge me to go outside. And then he and he raises voice and I said Yeah I'm calling you racist. This is wrong. This is wrong. I can't believe you voted against. This is wrong. Mr Bunch, says that by extension of coup accusing Antillean of being a racist that you are calling Bloc Quebecois. Racist Party that they were always this. He says that that they're not that Quebecer. They come from a nation of Quebec which is welcoming and open that they appreciate diversity Do you think the blockade qual- is a racist party? This is a really important question, and I don't WanNa take a moment. I have never named this. This experience I have not named a party I called a person but I will name a party. The systemic racism that we're up against was created by those in power. As far as I know the only two parties that have been empowering Canada have been either conservative or liberal, so let me name the parties that are responsible for systemic racism in Canada Liberal and Conservative, full stop. Do you think that? At least the Liberals that Prime Minister Trudeau has acknowledged systemic racism. He! Absolutely has and I and I want to know is A. Very positive step, but I just want to highlight that it enough to just say the right thing and the prime minister has. It's Nice Nice things, and in fact set some really kind words about what happened yesterday, and acknowledged that I appreciate that what people are demanding action, and while I know the prime minister said very positive things it is just not enough. We need to see the systemic change in fact and this. Say because I've been very critical of president trump, but in this moment president trump has actually moved more quickly to put in place changes to policing then Prime Minister Trudeau. Has That is? That is wrong because that's the reality. Whether any other. Parties are members who who voted no yesterday and that motion. You. I can't say with a hundred percent accuracy but I only heard one percent in the entire. House of Commons, it said no I did not hear no from either the Liberals or conservatives in fairness I wonder we just finally where you will take this from here because we just remembering different times when you have confronted racism in public and going back to when you were campaigning for the leadership that extraordinary moment, when that woman racist woman came up, and was talking to you, and you reached out to who said she's loved. She wanted to include her. You want to bring her into an understanding. Do, you think that you have changed your approach in that regard. No I think that is the only way for it and I. Don't think that the naming. Is Good enough we have to actually change the policies and the laws and so. While I. Don't take back calling out systemic racism. It can't just be calling. It has to be more than just calling. It has to be the systemic change and I want to really use my. that. We have to bring people along. It's gotTA. Be Through love, and and having the courage to to do what's necessary to make the changes and I still believe that Mr Blanchette said he thinks. Maybe you just had a bad moment that you lost it and he thinks that there's a way to move forward to patch this up to get past it. He doesn't want this to go on and on. What do you want to happen now? I agree that this is should never be about you know to. Peace should be about. HOW CAN WE FIGHT SYSTEMIC RACISM? And how can we bring in new policies and new laws to change it, so I feel like if anything can come out of this? It should be. Let's commit to making some changes some real changes. Let's say people's lives. Are you going to apologize? It's no longer about me if it was about just me I. I'm quick to apologize I. Believe in the principle of not having not letting egos get in the way, but it's gone beyond me, and people have looked at this as a moment where someone has finally stood up for them. People send me so many messages saying you know we face this in our lives. We face this for someone to just not back down makes us feel like matter. Racism sends a message that people don't matter, and in that could meet. People feel like they mattered and I don't WanNa. Take that away from people, so it's become important for you not to say you're sorry about this. Young would be. It would be a Kintu thing. I'm sorry for fighting stomach races now and I can't say that I'm sorry for fighting I. Don't apologize for wanting to. To Fourth Liberal government to do something I don't apologize for being upset that the House of Commons couldn't just acknowledge. You together united couldn't acknowledge that there is the RCMP which is so. I can't apologize for that. I'd be letting down to many people. Misusing thank you. Thank you very much. Chug meet sing as the leader of the federal and EP. We reached him in Ottawa this afternoon. We requested an interview Bloc Quebecois. Tehran and did not hear back by airtime. Hum. By this point, it's widely accepted that contact tracing is an integral part of any successful response to covid nineteen, but what exactly that looks like depends a lot on where you are and who you ask. When prime. Minister Justin Trudeau was asked today, he revealed a new tool that will be part of Canada's approach. Led by the Canadian digital service, and with the help of Sherifi blackberry and the government of Ontario, we've been working on a nationwide mobile APP. That will notify users if they've been exposed to covid nineteen. We will soon begin testing this APP in Ontario. They're already a number of other provinces including BC who are working with us on this, but it will be available to everyone in the coming weeks. Now I want to stress this APP will be completely voluntary. It'll be up to individual Canadians to decide whether to download the APP or not, but the APP will be most effective when as many people as possible have it? Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Sharing details of a new government endorsed contact tracing up. That will be rolling out across Canada in the weeks ahead. Charles Egan is the chief technology officer for blackberry which is involved in the development of the APP. We reached him in Ottawa. Charles I know a lot of people WANNA know. How does this work if they're actually going to assign on what what to give us the basics? Yes, so this contact tracing solution that the prime minister has just announced is basically when when two phones become close to one another as determined by the Bluetooth Signal That event is noted so that. in the future, if one of the people that have come in close contact. Test positive for covid nineteen. It's much easier to determine who they've been close to. They don't have to rely on their memory We can use the technology to help you know determine who might have been close to that unfortunate person that has just tested positive, so the phones note the fact that you've come close contact so later on, if someone test positive, the Apple, notify you that you've come in contact with someone who tested positive. And how do we know? How does they know that that person is tested positive? So an innovative part of the solution is when when someone has a test and they test positive. They're giving a code by a healthcare professional. the person that has been tested voluntarily puts that code into the APP, and then the APP very securely, and privately notifies all the other phones that it's come in contact with that. They've been close to someone who has tested positive with covert nineteen. So if I get a signal that tells me I have been in close contact with someone with covid nineteen. Does that mean is like? How much contact is that? Someone who was on on a bus with me? Someone walked by on the street. Someone working list. How how much contact you have to have before that's going to happen. Yes so the flexibility is you know? How long have you been near someone? Let's say it's ten minutes. Or how close have you been? And and so so you can trigger it to be more sensitive less sensitive, so the idea is. If you walk past someone on the street that would not register, but if you sit beside someone on the bus for ten minutes, and you're less than you know six feet apart, that probably would register so so there is a there's a configuration that allows us to. Give it the sensitivity that we want to. To determine that there's an increased risk and that sort of the healthcare tune -able per setting that we can do with the solution. Would I have any idea as to who it was that with whom I got into contact with lead, Cova. No not at all. So you know privacy has been designed into the solution. It's completely anonymous. You don't have any idea when or where that contact happened so that this privacy is protected. Okay, so this'll be a voluntary a program right? Yeah, it's completely opt in, and you can opt out at any time. The more people that opt in the the more chance of providing this additional information to help help fight the pandemic. And how convinced I e that it would be entirely voluntary I mean what are the possibilities that employers might want there and might even make it necessary as a condition of going back to work that they download this APP. I, you know. Carolina not heard that that that scenario I think as the prime minister line. This is completely voluntary. It's it's not a employer led activity A. Citizen led activity and and and I expect that that's the way it will be rolled out, but if it becomes something is is crucial to knowing whether it's safe in a work environment safe to go back to work I mean if a lot of things depend on this. kind of technology, don't they? And so, what kinds of pressure might have been on? People actually be part of this program. Yes, so so so I i. You know in terms of the the employer. incentive for employees to use this APP. It's not something that I've really thought about so I'm not sure what the comment on that one I do believe that there's other techniques that employers could use to provide the safety. You know just by information, and you know distancing of employees in the workplace so that they're not coming in contact. We've also seen those safer facemasks where it was completely voluntary, but but encouraged to wear face mask, and now increasingly it's going to be the condition of getting on a bus or subway or being places that you're wearing a face mask. Do you think that this might evolve? you know I hope that a lot of people opt in given the it. It sort of at least amount of information. You collect enough to be useful, but but there's not any personal information that's being shared here. You know I expect. There's more privacy being shared with people's flashlight APP and Kovic nineteen up, and there's a you know a social good. That comes along with the Covid Nineteen Solution it's people share on personal information on facebook and everything else. Roller carpet to the red carpet brother in in other ways sometimes now. How does it become national as the prime minister was saying that it was going to be a nation wide program? Alberta has already launched its own APP So, how does that complicate things as far as having a having national adoption of this APP? Yeah so the the healthcare back in is the tuning that's required for for each province, but the solution that the CDs has announced with will work on a like that one single apple work for all Canadians, and it's being. It's being first introduced in Ontario, but as the healthcare cans are added I, it will be effective for for the entire province. So so you know how it ties into Berta. I'm not completely sure I think we're you know we're in early days of the deployment, and that's really in the hands of the CDs. Canadian digital services is that serious justice? And finally, when might this rule out? You know prime. Minister Trudeau mentioned in the next several weeks for very soon. All Right? They're interesting Charles thank you. My pleasure, thank you very much. Charles Egan is the chief technology officer for blackberry, which is consulting on the rollout of covid nineteen context tracing up endorsed by Canada's federal government. We reached him today in Ottawa. Human Queens have their own way of communicating orders. They can just articulate what they want with words by saying for example off with his head, or please help me shampoo the Corgis, but Queen Bees issue their orders non verbally in a way that to human ears doesn't sound very regal. Hurt At. act. That is the sound of Queen honeybees in a hive. They are tuning in quacking. We knew they did that, but now scientists at Nottingham Trent University decoded why they do it. Their study is published this week in the Journal scientific reports. Martin benchick was the lead scientist on the study and we've reached him in Nottingham England. Madness, first of all, what would the previous theories as to why honeybees made these different sounds, so we're talking queen honeybees and the striking feature. Is that these sounds or responding to each other? They'll do it and so beekeeper scientist race, the theory that perhaps it's queens sizing each other up. So the idea that these queens and potential queens are speaking to each other, and with these tooth's in quacks with within the colony. That's right so They are competitors and visual evidence that they will fight each other. If they resigned colony together and in biological world, people and animals tried to avoid unnecessary fight. If you see your opponent is wealthier to you, there is no point in stopping the fight. So one idea is that these signals where queen sizing each other up to avoid the hub and unnecessary physical fights. And what have you discovered? What do you think is the reason why they make these toots and quacks, so an alternative explanation, the to and quacks or signals sent to the colony. And we have strong evidence. Supporting that idea, we think these signals are information released to the Queen to thing would say something like if she was speaking English she would say keep the quacking queens captive. This is what she's saying to have. And the quacking Queens. They'll attending the colony release us, release. Something like an English. That's quite translation so. Okay, so it's not just that they're. You figured out what they're probably saying, but it's who they're saying. They're not talking to each other. They're talking to the other. The worker bees I like that I like that I like what you're highlighting, indeed I think. The breakthrough is to suggest that the signals are actually social communication signals to the society, not between two individuals, but they'll signals regulating the social behavior and I think that he's what's surprising, and I think it makes much more sense than other explanations and again we have substantial evidence to support that you. Can listen to them again if we can hear the sounds of toots and clocks. Off! So maisy so now that we're hearing it in this context. What tells a bit more about what you think that conversation is? The first one you heard was the tooting, and this is definitely a a free roaming queen. And I think she's saying Keep the Queen's skeptics. So. The other Queens quaking that was the second signal. You Quack, quack, quack, and these queens already to emerge. They'll ready to come out. I, think that perhaps they'll saying release us. Let me go out from the cell. And as long as the -tuting resides in the colony, we have seen that the quaking keeps going on so indeed the work of keeping the other queens captive, and as soon as the tooting disappears then one cracking queen is released, and she starts shooting. Where does the tooting Queen Go? she forums away, so she leaves the books. We have the worker bees, and she tries to establish a new colony somewhere else is usually in a cavity. You are lucky in Canada to have substantial woodland, so is usually in a hollow tree that she would try and start a new, so it's the splitting of the colony into several colonies. It's the reproduction phenomenon, and then what becomes of the quacking Queens so we. We then measure after the swamp off. The team has gone. We collect a new two teams three to four hours later, so the work at these must have released one quacking queen, Jude to the absence of the tooting that was in the colony. Do any of the quacking cleans? Never get released? They just once. You're saying release me. Release me from this this wax prison. Do they ever get sort of like left there? that or multiple the quacking Queens? That's all the more or less simultaneously that you heard on the recording. Cooking is usually simultaneous. You will have several individuals cracking, and it's a problem to release them, and the mechanism is not perfect, and we'll have occasionally two to three queens release. They're very strong. Animals strong that the wikileaks so sometimes the more than one queen will be released in the colony I've seen myself. But no, they They all come out. Eventually I have never seen. quacking Queen, remaining Steve and locked forever dying something like this I have never seen it in my life. They will eventually come out the problem is. To avoid too many of them to come out together similtaneously. Were they have worker, bees and drones etcetera to take someplace else or they just sort of be at the at the end of the one hundred left behind the he's sometimes the case, but worker bees or two inches yesterday they make too many Virgin Queens, and indeed they run out of staff and the smallest last forms to exit the colony or This is fascinating, but why is this important? I mean th. There are beekeepers who need this information right? The idea is that we think the to and quacking is fulfilling very sophisticated, important mechanism in Dakota knee, and what we're saying the to the beekeepers is to be careful, because when this period of time takes place in the year. It's usually April to me. we suggest that to be very careful to disrupt this mechanism, which is warranty in the old lead release of one queen at a time in inside the colony, and this is absolutely fascinating, I really appreciate you explaining this to us, thank you. Thank you my pleasure! Thank you so much. Bye, bye, Martin benchick was the lead scientist and the study of Queen Honeybees, and why they toot and quack. We reached him in Nottingham England. I told the court that I'm friendly. From you. To. Use small man and giant wheel caught, but I do wish to say official that I'm wrongfully right now. Uncover season seven. Dead Wrong? It killed pit bull if they maybe not. Available on CBC. Listen and wherever. You get your podcasts. The! He smashed pretty much. Every billboard and streaming record that matters it has already been streamed more than a billion billion people still to this day. Point to this is the moment everything changed, but whether you agree with those claims or not, this podcast isn't really about him either. You're not an astute businessman, or you're inherently racist. When it comes to black music in this country, this is not a drake podcast available now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. Dreamers were able to breathe a sigh of relief today this morning. The United States Supreme Court blocked the trump administration's attempts to end the DACA program. DACA stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals. It's an Obama era policy that protects hundreds of thousands of. Immigrants who were brought to the US as children from being deported in two thousand seventeen, the trump administration announced it was winding down the program and gave Congress six months to figure out new legislation. Josh contrast is a doctor recipient. The twenty-three-year-old came to the US for Mexico. When he was eight. We reached him in Tampa. Cash, what was your reaction when you heard the decision at the Supreme Court? Whoa my reaction honestly Carol. I broke down. I broke down crying immediately after I heard the decision. I read that decision It's been a very stressful few weeks. we all knew the decision was going to be made in June so it's been every single week kind of thing we've been I've been checking other nonprofit oryx that I've been touched as well have been checking pretty much week by week when the next. Days will be scheduled on usually on Mondays and Thursdays. So. We knew this one was coming up I thought it was going to actually be extended until July so today was actually very surprising for me, and so, what does that mean for you I mean this. Is it for you? Personally? What what effect does it have on you that? The deferred action for childhood arrivals is not going to be canceled. It means a lot. It means a lot because not only does this week with childhood arrivals being still the rule. They are for us, but for me. It means hope I'm very inspired by all the activism that was done for not just myself for many many. People as well and just activism that has been done for over ten years, before the decision of the fruit action for childhood arrivals Obama as an twelve especially in the United States currently in the environment that we're living of racial injustice, not only for the immigrant community, but also for our LGBT community. The Trans Community are black community it proves a point that activism dust, work and effective all the way that can make it happen to the supreme. Court and not only did they ruled today in my favor by on. Monday they also ruled in my favorite because I am gay, so this week has just been amazing for me, but. Today, we celebrate tomorrow we continue the fight. Only a small celebration for me okay. Wasn't the celebration Donald Trump who said that these two decisions you've just described by both affect your life in the supreme. Court, he described it as the supreme. Supreme Court doesn't like me, and this has been shotgun blast to the face. What. What what what? What do you say to to Donald Trump about what he wants to do? Just talk about the this, Daca. Project now. What what? What do you want to tell him as to why? He should not dismantle it. I think today's decision proves a it's. It states very strong point from the court, saying that nobody is above the law including the president of the United States and that includes Donald Trump in itself and I think that it presents a very strong points of the president's for months away from the election. And like I said today, we celebrate, but. In November, we will say goodbye to trump because what's next for me, it's this is not over. You know I'm GonNa. Continue my activism, and just because I I I can't vote. I can still encourage people to vote. And were for months away from the election. That's not a very That's a very short period of time so we're hoping for November to have a good as well not only for myself, but for the nation. You're twenty three years old now. You came to the United States from Mexico and you're eight years old. Is that right? got. His correct and if DACA was this if it was canceled if you didn't have that that deferred action for childhood arrivals. What would happen to you? I would have lost my opportunity to continue my education. I actually stopped going to college last year because I personally didn't want to continue and. Spent so much money on something that could have been revoked. Saw I decided to not go to school and I decided to continue working I've been blessed to be able to work for an amazing company It's transfer wise. I work for Public Affairs Team and they've supported me one hundred percent but if today are, the outcome would have been different. I would have lost the opportunity to continue my employment with transfer wise. Old They've supported me. One hundred percent, said an amicus brief directly to the Supreme Court with other tech companies but I would have lost my employment. I would have had to come up with a a backup planned This is the only country that I've known or all. My life since I was eight years old and this is the only home that I know so if today's ruling would have been differently it would have not only affected my entire life, but it would affected. The economy might company my family. My friends would affected every single person around me and I do have to do with this possible that you would have been sent to Mexico. Absolutely my work. Permit expires next year May. Of next year, And that was the fear, so it wasn't something that was guaranteed so the petition, but it's always that fear of deportation and you know Carol growing up as a kid undocumented. You know. My parents always told me to give this story that was not true by myself to tell my friends tell my teachers that I came to this country legally, and this was the story that I was supposed to give every time and full I just didn't think that was stride lying and also like me growing up as being gay, you know it took a toll on me. So this means a lot to me because it meant means that I can be my true self. Josh! I'll be watching and thank you for speaking with us. Thank you for the interview. Carol appreciate it bye. Bye. Josh Contra is a doctor recipient. We reached him in Tampa Florida today's supreme. Court ruling did leave the door open for the trump administration to make another attempt to rescind the DACA program. When John Bolton declined to testify before the house impeachment inquiry last December, the former national security advisor said he was doing things by the book, but now Democrats are suggesting his real motivation was to get folks to buy his book. In that new book, which is scheduled to vote on Tuesday Mr Bulletin says Congress should have investigated US president, Donald Trump not just for his dealings with the president of Ukraine, but with other leaders as well the book describes Mr Trump as incompetent and says he showed a willingness to intervene in criminal investigations quote to in effect give personal favors to dictators. He liked on quote. Today House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi weighed in on John Bolton and his accusations during an interview with MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell. Here's part of that conversation for the record. Ask You about John Bolton's book, because in his there are new revelations including the president at that summit, the G. Twenty Summit as President Xi of China for help winning him reelection, helping buying soybeans from American farmers to help him win reelection which would seem to be. Akin to what he? Reportedly, with Ukraine also the president, not knowing that the United Kingdom is a nuclear power, saying that flat and re Putin can play them like a fiddle the president praising President Sheaves for concentration camps, holding the Muslim. your reaction to all of this. I said already the president ethically unfit. Intellectually, unprepared, personally unqualified to be president of the United States and I think that what we're seeing in some of the statements of those who have served the president. To see that point confirmed as far as the book is concerned. The. Shame on John Bolton for not coming forth during the impeachment, he wants it con. Con with the far right by saying. Oh, I'm criticizing the Democrats for not of going further in the impeachment, but the fact is, he refused. To to receive a subpoena from the House of Representatives, he said he would only receive from the Senate well, he knew the Senate would never issue one, so he chose royalties in this book and said of patriotism to our country. Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaking with MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell today. Part. Lots of people have grass in their yards, but not all those grass covered yards our lawns, because dictionary definitions of lawn include one qualifier for example from Merriam Webster ground as around the house, or in a garden or park that is covered with grass and is kept mode. Now, the LAWNMOWER was invented in eighteen thirty, as we all know by Edwin, beard budding, and because we already know it, I don't need to rehash his inspiring story or his famous quote. I invented the LAWNMOWER, and it goes without saying that Mr Budding made all subsequent lawnmower developments possible including. The achievement, of Kevin, cleary a British butcher who invented a more that was maybe a little, too cutting edge of flying lawnmower. Barbara from spoke with Mr Cleary, Nineteen seventy-six. Hi Mr Clarrie. Hello. We understand. You've got a flying lawnmower there is it for sale? No. Quite enjoy. What do you call him? Can it also cut the grass. That's good. If, it crashes to the ground too many times. Though maybe it'll all come apart on you. Know crashed into a tree one. But fortunately. It well. You didn't trim any branches it. Is this a product. You've been working on for some time. Two years is the full. Nine of. INTRIGUING IDEAS People in high-rise block the window. When you go to this place, there's normally align of the across that a few helicopters and nothing to the kids up. So long same the appropriate thing. What keeps this thing in the air. Has It got wings? You rely on the grass catcher. Has No wings. Just a flat platform Monday. aerodynamically sound a lawnmower. no he's on Iran. Originally. But. It wasn't very clever flying his. So. It's down to the pilot skill. Is this a conversion job or a custom built lawn more? Mock run was a from Russian. And we couldn't find. That toilet, so we had to another one special features. Have you built into? Get an airborne. the engines now on the front. With propeller. and it has either on Purnea crossed on the back. And a little girl. It's the anybody. In order for up and down. Now, how improved latest version what can it do? Loop. WRONG SPIN retail that you to. As far as you can see so, this isn't just an ordinary flying lawnmower. well, it's. A robotic. Airshows. But we try to tell them. We've got lying all they tell us we made. which you are of course. Not Really. What's next? What will mark five? Be Able to do well cry. into has. A road on the back, but whether it will fly with a roller. No idea at the moment. And we go. Think is on another project. Which is even more insane off. which is that what's next? Pig. Animal! Miss Piggy is going to fly. Or. Do you mean a real pig? No. Laws police starring. Take full size. What will it do? We hope it will be clear about it. And the cow jumped over the moon. I'm serious. Well. It's a marvelous achievement Mr Mr. Going to be seen to be believed I'm afraid. Every photographers just rode up with laughter and or legal teach that the governor consoling well. It sounds like you have to be there to really appreciate it. Nice to talk to you, congratulations. From nineteen seventy-six Bubba from talking to Kevin, cleary inventor of the flying lawnmower, which weirdly did not take off. I don't know if Mr Clear is scary. Innovation is among the exhibits at the British Lawnmower Museum in Merseyside, but that Louvre of care does contain dozens of other amazing things, most of which are lawnmowers. The museum is the creation of Brian Random and in Nineteen ninety-one Michael Enron found out more about his collection of splendors in the grass and be warned. You'll hear the story of Edwin Beard Budding for the millionth time. Mr Adam. Why does the world need a Lawnmower Museum of all things? I'm not quite sure if the world's ready for alimony. It's machines that I've collected over the lost. And over twenty years that we're all destined for the scrap yard and I just could not bring myself to throw them away. This nearly a hundred altogether. Hundred. Where do you keep them there all and Oppose the shop where I. which is in in south for near Liverpool. England! All of those the shop. Back, she's A locksmith a garden machinery shops. This passion for Lawn mowers. And when I was brought loan loss, and when last school I went to work for a little more company, and it Sorta stem from that, my father went to in a hardware shop. And we although MOS in three pass, and once they got to sit and age. There's no spare parts available for them and they went straight to this. scrappy out, and some of them were so well built and. Designed and everything that I just couldn't bring myself to do it. What's the oldest you have the oldest one? This moment in time is eight hundred eighty green grains made in Leeds, in England and it's a push from. One of the features on it, besides and not to pay. They didn't have the materials and technology today. Everything was my doubts. Gastein out Capstein gays to drive it. All the CAS- timeframe and he's very heavy. the. The other difference on not source of age machine is the handles quite a lot lower than modern machine because people are not day. Were she also grow? Grow is still. Wet. Who invented the lawn more I don't know anything know. Edwin, voting with the first person to manufactured long put paint until. Edwin Edwin beard budding who lived in Pasta. And England and eighteen think. He took an idea from It was from one of the woolen mills, and they saw he saw this machine that was coaching the nap off the top of woollen cloth as if you wanted to MOA carpet gets little bit so. And then He. He made one it. Also cut the grass, and that's where it stemmed from and in the last. Hundred and fifty years. That style of machine is never changed. It is still the same basic principle. What is your favorites model? My. Favorite one would have to be a little colder as manufactured by JP engineering they would. They started in nineteen, twenty two, and rather than a more company, really a precision engineering. Company, but they they made. Long. it was top quality everything was. A low more was home built from by one professional craftsmen, and from start to finish. and the quality was so good at. and. Later on Rolls. Royce bought the company and they carried on producing almost. And Nineteen nineteen seventy was the last ones that came out in the country, literally the Rolls Royce of lawnmowers. US Yeah I mean. There's lots of good loan on the market, but that was certainly one of them. Thank you for talking to us. Okay? Right all right. Good bye now! Ryan Rodham has just opened the world's first lawnmower museum in Southport, and that's just a few blades of grass north of reading. From, Nineteen ninety-one Allen May Lyndon before him. Like right speaking with Brian Random Creator and curator of the British lawnmower museum. You've been listening to the as it happens podcast. Our show can be heard Monday to Friday on CBC Radio One non Sirius Xm following the world at six. You can also listen to the whole show on the CBC. Listen APP. Download it free from the APP store or from Google play. Thanks for listening I'm off and I'm Chris Hallam. For, more CBC PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

quacking Queens president Donald Trump Canada House of Commons Prime Minister Trudeau Carol RCMP United States prime minister CBC Ottawa United States Supreme Court Lawnmower Museum John Bolton British Lawnmower Museum Francois Blanchette Edwin Edwin Jagmeet Singh
Election fallout: A divided Canada

Front Burner

22:30 min | 1 year ago

Election fallout: A divided Canada

"This is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm Jamie so we're two days out from the election now and I can't stop thinking and he has now put himself in a position where he doesn't have representation in the West and it's a Ralph Goodale last night one of his work Aaron wary about why this election shook out along these fault lines if they're being overstated and how a fragile liberal minority can govern from here always fraught with the memory of his father the memory of the national energy program the fact that he's a trudeau and everything he did was going to be framed by that three is difficult to because Justin Trudeau is Justin Trudeau and the son of Pierre Trudeau this was always a pretty volatile situation this was back and Atlantic Canada combined Saskatchewan Premier Scott Mo said the election results show quote the sense of frustration and alienated especially color coded map at this point it is pretty stark so let me start by saying it's not entirely different than it's it's sort of been for the this electoral map I C- Canada divided what do you see I don't think that's an incorrect take when you look at the map minute members can can you unpack that for me this idea that you know Justin Trudeau is living in the shadow of his father's legacy for people who might last Fifty Years Liberal Party has has never been particularly popular now Berta it's always struggled to win seats there The four seats that that I to know this history so his father brought in a attempted to to reform energy policies in the in the early nineteen eighties sweeping twelve the block and in and around the major urban centers of this country it is liberal red or and EP Orange Today on front burner I'm talking to Parliament Hill reports numbers people really came out NOBRE CISCO and motivated to to vote conservative and to vote against Justin Trudeau and that is not you can look at that like I was saying and say well look the liberals have never been particularly popular at West this isn't a huge deviation but I think the intensity is different now and I think the and in both those cases in both Pietro's case and shown croutons case those sort of small breakthroughs were followed by setbacks the can we dig into the industry and it coincided with an economic downturn and if I'm not mistaken a drop in world oil prices so we national energy program ever to have been put into effect in Canada transforming our energy consumption patterns drastically changing the nature of our energy he's got mobile hyperbolic I do think it is more intense than it has been at least since this the the height of the national energy program and the the sort of let the Scotch WanNa know Berta for a second because we saw a sixty percent of people voting conservative in Alberta in Saskatchewan that is more than people who voted conservative income. Today I'm I'm hoping that we pick up today where I left off yesterday with our colleague She Capello's When I look at eastern bastards freeze in the dark era the turnout numbers you saw Albert Ah the margin of victory for conservatives in Alberta Saskatchewan I mean those are huge on is now greater than it has been at any point in my lifetime we have a very divisive a divisive we are at a very disappointing a point of going back to Alberta and trying to show that he wants to find common cause and a Monday night Alberta and Saskatchewan really a in this nation we are at a crossroads in this nation if he will I get your point that there's been some serious animosity between the West and the Liberals before but is this worse than we've seen it as has its roots in what happened with Pierre Trudeau and Albert in the early eighties and Justin Trudeau has always had to contend with that and Justin Trudeau won in twenty fifteen were a high point sort of match the basically match the gains that that his father had one in that drunk rich and one in nineteen ninety-three and it coincided with a period of very significant economic hardship in Alberta and likely contributed to that period of economic hardship and Berta and it the roots of Western alienated early to say well if they had Ralph goodale everything would be different but there's something symbolically powerful about the fact that they don't have eaten Scotch when now Berta whereas before it became this this idea of Western alien nation that gave birth to the Reform Party and and arguably set the stage for Stephen Harper and his government I it really has effectively turned their back on him right and worse than that sort of told him to get lost and that is real repudiation yeah I mean you don't WanNa like it seems higher hurry of pain but are you thank you so much for joining me there was a question about what's the mood in the West they could they could turn Ralph Goodale and he could speak to that and now they have they have effectively no one and now he's got figure out how to put together a cabinet that at this point would look like it's not GonNa have any representation from two pretty major provinces premier Mo from Scotch one is is calling on the liberals to make a new deal with candidate I know Jason Kenney also wants his voice heard the prime minister said to Canadians Alberta words but if we are to avoid real lasting damage to the unity and prosperity of this federation they must that's when quotes I've heard your frustration and I want to be there to support you unquote well Mr Speaker those are and one of the immediate questions when he first declared that he was going to get into federal politics are run for the federal leadership of the Liberal Party rather was what's he gonNa do about Berta and he has made it they had Ralph Goodale and they had four liberals in Alberta but they had had Ralph Goodale who is one of the strongest senior members of cabinet around the table so that whenever being built in I don't think there's an obvious proposal coming forward for another one equalization will be a point of debate I suspect right these are some demands of equalization payments is be more than words premo wants the carbon tax cancelled pipelines built how how are the Liberals going to navigate this Orne it's hard to know what they can do when you think about the fact that Justin Trudeau invested four point five billion dollars to buy an existing I suspect that they are still figuring this out I think they had some advance knowledge that things were going this way and that it's possible Ralph Goodale was going to be an MP anymore but I don't know that they have the Trudeau is such that it's not clear that he could change one or two policies and simply reverse it he almost two degree I think he needs to find voices in the West accusations that this was like a conspiracy by the pipeline to shut the pipeline down the the western resentment the restaurant anger the western just opposition to Justin playbook yet for what they're going to do but this so they I don't think the federal carbon tax is going anywhere I don't think much can change on pipelines necessarily right away there's one chair right so these demands is this what it will take to ease the tensions in the West is there anything that the liberals can do here moving appliance with a commitment to spend you know upwards of eight ten billion dollars to build another pipeline and the amount of credit he got in Alberta for that was effectively Zilch and and using federal tax money to do that and the there's a complaint from the West that they believe they put in more than they get out they feel aggrieved like they've been putting in like more more of the which like give me a Quick One oh one equalization payments effectively it's the federal government trying to ensure that all provinces have a common level of services and Resources Titian in in West right now certainly one of the most high profile politicians in the country and I believe he's called the Trudeau government an existential threat right yeah would win him some goodwill and maybe it would start to turn the tide but I think he needs people in Alberta an instance Koch one who will stand beside him and say we he can use his allies I don't know that you know maybe he he could go to Albert and Scotch One and do a series of town halls and interact with the public and try to explain himself and maybe king with us there needs to be something more than just policy here I think right really get you through it and do you think those people exist Jason Kenney is probably the most high profile sure and so he to a certain extent needs to show that he can handle the situation would be it would be a mind bending thing if Jason Kenny and Justin Trudeau suddenly became allies I think what he needs to find at this point is some kind of bridge but I think he needs seems like Justin Trudeau himself is a threat to national unity I would wonder whether voters in Ontario and British Columbia and other places would start to worry about the very idea of him being privatised support this guy we see what he's doing and you know we are bringing the wests concerns to him so that he is aware of them and you know is is work and they have a chance to stir up some trouble and see if they can sort of reignite that sense that there should be a new deal for Quebec or or even sovereign let's move on toback so the Block had the best Salaam I suspect in that you need to break into that vote whenever the next election comes but you view Alberta Saskatchewan is more of a mass mm is that voters you look first and foremost the prime minister's responsibility is to hold the country together so there's a real there's a real responsibility there but I think the secondary part of it is if it you've sort of existential Christian of how Yan how you deal with it how you keep it from becoming a real separatist idea how you the and so it's another complication I don't know that I mean if I think if you're the prime minister right now and you're looking at the map you view sort of the block as an electoral ain't any of the parties really gained twenty two seats value I talked about this yesterday but I'm curious to hear why you think that happened the after the the sort of late care era and so hey the blocks here and he seems nice and he the leader seems like kind of an interesting guy and he is hearing a lot of rhetoric around the block really played down their interest in that issue in this election so I don't think it's that I think there may be a certain amount of just sort of a protest vote gration a single tax return managed by the province and they won't auto essentially standard of any efforts to overturn the Providence controversial Quebec never fails to be interesting election night so first of all I'm not convinced it's a this is the rebirth of sovereignist sentiment overcome the the rhetorical and the political and the practical issues that you're going to have to overcome to reach out to those provinces to somehow make inroads again there you know these are Justin Trudeau liberals and they don't know where else to park their vote yeah they're not they don't love the Conservatives they don't love Andrew Scheer they've turned away from the end EP is to deal with it he probably ends up having to deal with it head on I don't think this is the sort of thing that you can just sorta hoped to ride out right because I think the secondary risk for him yeah not yet at least but here's the thing like if now that they're here now that there or back rather and that they can play a real role in the debate in the federal discussion interesting conflict point okay do you think they'll push the liberals on climate change I suspect so I mean I think that if you listened to Trudeau in his speech all essentially now progressive parties even if Quebec it's complicated you're essentially progressive parties are essentially one action on climate change and I suspect I do think there is definitely part of Trudeau that would would once this if this case gets to a level in the judicial system where other it's there's an opening to intervene I suspect so I don't know that you should look at the resulting go the block Quebec was back towards another sovereignty prices huge device a fault line you're not there was a progressive agenda and Canadians had voted for a progressive agenda and I think that is the one thing if he's looking around he's seeing the Greens the MVP and the Block Bloc Quebecois Demanding better deals on equalization the block is a party the cares about combat obviously but can they contribute to earn here is a real split between resource-based Connie's that are emissions intensive and are going to you know is it fair for me to say. Vs Us at the block will put on the table in for for Quebec the issues they'll be arguing for the you know more power over the political cleavages is significant to it's not just a split on on resource development and climate change it's one section of the country the resource section is be the hardest situations to convert to a low-carbon future and then you have the rest of Canada which is less focused on oil and gas and industry like that and more eager to move on climate change and you're always going to have this point of conflict between the regions of the country in terms of climate policy and in terms of resource policy but now it's into account when it comes to equalization which adds a significant degree of difficulty so it will be interesting to see how that factors into things because ultimately what you have there's there is risk in overstating things like I don't think the country's breaking up tomorrow and I think that that politicians who seemed to be trying to stoke or exploit the situation will probably be at the block will fit into that idea that climate change is where things will move the interestingly the block has pushed this idea that climate policy should be proceedings to a certain degree that the sovereignty issue will become secondary to the fact that they are MP's with political views but the flipside of that would be when there are these perpetual opposition. Yeah I suspect that the well I don't know if they'll be able to make a deal but I suspect the to flash points I would watch for would be I I'm bill twenty one second resume bill got a million more votes than any other party no party earned more votes than the Conservative Party last night at six point two million votes still counting we are in the third most votes represented entirely by conservatives and the rest is predominantly liberal right and this goes back to what you were saying that you see this as really a divide between this the rest of Canada is heavily progressive and that's essentially the split you have and it's not insurmountable it's not you know we're not into a national unity button issues when it's when it's bill twenty one when it's any kind of arrangement for Quebec that's when it'll be oh right it's the Bloc Quebecois and that's when you will have these sort of whereas law bill twenty-one the BL- The law that prevents public service workers in positions of authority from wearing religious symbols maybe they could make a deal on at least some of them national parliament in a way like where where do you see them contributing to more national discussion Yeah it's funny like if when you're in Ottawa you at least I found fact that it looks like the Conservatives actually got more votes right like they actually won the popular vote Andrew Scheer said in his press conference today talking about the environment and and he's essentially saying look I'm GonNa go to auto going to protect what Quebec's priorities and interests are you know there's there's a there's a certain appeal to that lead to real animosity especially when we have to have conversations about how we're going to move forward to a low-carbon economy you these two sides can't be in crisis like we were in the nineties in the seventies and eighties but it's not something that seems super healthy in the long run or that seems like you can just let it go because it will recast for political party in election campaign including the conservative majority of two thousand eleven so obviously popular vote we don't it doesn't that's not how we run our you want to take it and so that will be hard and I suspect than the other the flip side of this is you know we talk about Alberta and Saskatchewan being worried about equalization we'll but now there's a block Quebec while who's going to say British party in Parliament people kind of look at like two heads but you know they're parliamentarians now they will they will mix into the parliamentary debate into what happens in parliament into committee punished for it but I don't think you can you can look at that map and say okay this this is an issue that needs to be addressed advocates data who's a pulling from hearing essential threat in the West and essentially the rest the rest of the country. Yeah I mean I think there are some problems in Quebec for the liberal sure like I think there is intro needs to address this head on to govern from here but how does he do that I how does he govern from here and Ottawa took to breaking they're pulling down by Alberta Saskatchewan on one hand and the rest of Canada on the other and Albertans Scotch wonder heavily conservative and you need to change how you operate and you have to decide what you're doing here and I don't know that it's necessarily quite the same thing for the Liberals I mean I think the what what do you mean you want to deal with equalization this better also treat tobacco and so you're GonNa you're GonNa have dueling pressure points here you're going to have the west and now a revitalize arrive you know other places in the country wanting climate change addressed This liberal victory is very fragile you mentioned that you think just for instance Khachaturian sort of the main driver of that the fact that the Conservatives ended up with a lead in in the popular vote so I mean I don't the only the easiest and most tempting example is what his father didn't seventy two which he got knocked down to a very very narrow minority Monday night or Tuesday morning it was speeches that they were all having the exact same best speechmaking he leaned on the idea Um hum well what do you make of the ahead several conservatives immediately jumped out to say no never So I mean I think it I think it's more of a rhetorical against the liberals it's sort of a psychological difficulty for the liberals to to argue that the government when they didn't quite they didn't get as many votes I do think again the the massive outpouring for conservatives in for more CBC podcasts Goto CBC dot ca slash how this country is looking pretty divided more so than it did for years ago in Alberta and Saskatchewan there is a sea of blue and Quebec I see a block of political system although I t today perhaps the Conservatives will now become proponents of proportional representation which is something that they oppose before the idea that we had more of a sense of what they wanted to do these these liberals addressing trudeau liberals had more of a sense of what they wanted to do with government than Pierre Trudeau did but

Pierre Trudeau Quebec Alberta Canada Alberta Saskatchewan Jamie Ottawa She Capello Us Quebec Albert Ah MP Saskatchewan eight ten billion dollars five billion dollars twenty one second sixty percent Fifty Years two degree
National affairs panel on coronavirus response, Wet'suwet'en protests

The Current

19:33 min | 8 months ago

National affairs panel on coronavirus response, Wet'suwet'en protests

"This is a CBC podcast. Hi Matt Galloway. This is a podcast from the march fifth edition of the current. There is a lot of concern that people have around. Corona virus have already seen global economic and supply chain disruption. People get the most up-to-date information and it's important that Canada prepared for the effects of this new virus beyond those of Health Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and health minister. Patty hijacking about the new Corona Virus Response Committee. Yesterday it was set up to coordinate. Canada's response to the economic havoc the global outbreak could unleash and that sounds like a good place to begin with our national affairs panel. Susan Delacour is the Toronto Star National Columnist Hannity. But Oh senior reporter was CBC news and Egon Sinclair is a columnist with the Winnipeg. Free Press. Good morning to you. All grown virus continues to dominate the news headlines after weeks of coverage. We learned this morning that the Canadian government is suggesting that Canadians avoid all travel to Iran because of the spread of that virus and now the prime minister has this new cabinet committee. Susan is a good thing or is it. Just another layer to the government's ability to actually deal with the krona vars well It's being much criticized as a lot of process That you know. That's what governments do. When they're in trouble they set up more talking. I actually do see the point of it. that it's not. Patty Haider's Headache anymore it is. This is A A problem that is now as she said there in the opening A problem that is affecting economic prospects the future there is a lot going on a lot of moving parts I was actually comparing it to I looked up what Britain and the United States have been doing students. It's not dissimilar The the British cabinet has set up a war room To you know handle the public health aspects of things we see in the United States. That trump has got His vice president in charge of this so I think it's it's borrowing from what other countries are doing and I I I don't see it as a bad thing. You cover the first meeting of this committee. What is the committee actually went to accomplish in the best case scenario? Well Susan was saying there. This isn't just a response to the health issue. This is an economic response because even yesterday we heard Deputy Prime Minister Chris. Phelan saying there is an impact on of the global economy and she says it is starting to be felt here at home so they have to be prepared for people who may have to go into Corentin people who may not have some type of job that will pay you to be in quarantine so those are the types of things. They're looking at. They're ready to implement fiscal measures as needed. We heard Finance Minister Bill. More no was talking to his g. Seven counterparts There have been affects around the globe. There are facts here at home so they do say that. They will implement fiscal measures as necessary now. What measures are in the works? Freelance of the government is analyzing the situation right. Now she's looking ahead to how it may evolve. Get ready to act when when is necessary nothing concrete as of yesterday the first meeting but they do admit things will change because yeah I was GONNA say Bill. More no is on power in politics yesterday just talking about because people are worried about the the economy. Whether is the supply chain issue whether it is as you were mentioning as we just talked about the whole issue of employees. And what would happen if you're put into quarantine for fourteen days have listened to what Bill Maher No said. Yesterday it's premature for me to be saying what the economic impacts are going to be clearly. The duration of this issue in the severity is going to be important in determining what might be the right course of action. So we're not going to jump to conclusions without a facts and information but we certainly are going to be prepared to respond appropriately so Hannah just the last point on that. Is the government handling this crisis appropriately? Is that the sense in Ottawa. The people are are are saying that this is being dealt with in a reasonable way or do people want more now. I think it's it's really interesting because the risk in Canada is still low. The numbers are cases. Are Low. Were under forty and there have been no deaths compared to other countries. You look at Iran. You look at Italy So if you look at that something has been done properly. People who have been brought back have been put into quarantine but then it was interesting. I was tweeting about this when they were having this meeting yesterday. Talking about what the government is doing in people are really afraid they are afraid of the health impacts they're afraid of the economic impacts but that's because there's this void they don't quite understand and when people have avoid they fill it with whatever they think in their heads. Megan one of the elements of that economic concern is what you see at the big box stores people buying you know carts and carts full of toilet paper and many other things as well. What are you hearing when it comes to stories of stockpiling? Yeah can't agree more with Hannah. The the the kind of public concern and lack of information is leading to a whole bunch of different conclusions and I was up in northern Manitoba yesterday with predominantly indigenous people and the amount of Info lack of information in terms of. What is this disease? Or what is this Virus Surrey? Wh what is the sickness and then you know stories come out that are virtually half rumors and not sure coming out of China involving are there to now krona viruses ones aggressive less aggressive and and I think I was in a store here in Winnipeg couple of days ago and it isn't a panic situation but it is certainly an urgent situation and it's quite a situation that's become quite agitated. I think for regular everyday Canadians. And so if anything for the government the federal government needs to get in front of this and get a very clear message deal on fact and not fiction but then I think also be prepared for the fact that I think all it will take at. This point is a A large scale announcement that a large scale pandemic has hit a major Canadian city. And then I think they'll be some panic and so the real situation is just to have calm calm heads cooler heads prevail in this situation continue. Go ahead sorry says yeah I I think some of the panic is That Nikon is talking about is the fact that the United States the US media has has latched onto this now too and he's whipping it up a bit And and I do agree that it is time for calm. It's it. We should stress and it is an interesting fact. There is but not yet an as I came in here today Been a case of local transmission cannon that every case has been from outside the country so that does speak to the fact that it is so far being contained. here I think you know there's only so much you can do to tamp down panic but But I do think that that we should also try to be calm as well in the face of this. Did you leave the store neon with any supplies prepared prepared for for what prepared to be home for a few days? There's certainly and but you know what really helps. Yesterday as I was with the gathering of several hundred people mostly indigenous people and the healthcare people in the room actually came up to the microphone and began to have kind of informal information session on the information that they knew and kind of ways to be proactive. And it is amazing. How quickly accurate information around? Wash your hands Make sure to clean up Make sure to not If you interact with people I mean we are talking about northern Manitoba. It's very unlikely anyone. From milley's infected countries are going to be showing up anytime soon so I mean just the amount of information that needs to be clear an accurate and the government needs to get in front of this and be the ones leading this government though made a good point in this was Deputy Prime Minister Christian freeling. She says their approach is called the. Goldilocks approach she said. Not Too hot not too cold but adequate to the situation says the government can't be too slow to respond but also not overreact and I think that's absolutely accurate especially in this case especially here in Canada. They are preparing. They're going to meet with the premier's next week because currently they're looking to see if there's enough personal protective gear for healthcare workers. The federal government says that they'll buy more if that's the case and should hospitals consider canceling elective surgeries. These are all types of things they're going to discuss next week with the premiums because of course it's provinces that are in charge of healthcare one of the other issues certainly that will be discussed with the premier's territory leaders will be the situation. Nbc in the blockades that are still up in parts of this country gone. The government is hoping that this agreement that was reached on the weekend between the BC government And the federal government over the coastal gasoline pipeline in the conversations with whatsoever and hereditary chiefs. That this is going to solve these sorts of issues from happening again in the future. That's what we heard on Monday on this program from Carolyn Bennett. The Minister of crown indigenous relations. Is that actually going to be the case? Is this Never going to repeat itself again in future I don't know I mean I. I want to appreciate that. The ministers trying to do the best tube to create a Kind of sense that this situation is overhaul but unfortunately the situation has just created a whole other can of worms We've got a situation involving the recognition. Now this agreement of the hereditary chiefs that traditional chiefs which really follow the nineteen ninety-seven Supreme Court decision. So Canada should have done this all the way. Going back to nineteen ninety-seven recognizing the traditional leadership in the community. So now it is going to but the problem of course is they want to have their key can eat at two. They WANNA recognize the Indian Elected leadership as well which. It's difficult to disassemble that because it's so deeply entrenched within Canadian law. So now what they want. Is they want the elected chiefs and the hereditary chiefs both to come together to agree. And the you know we've got one hundred fifty years of divisive history behind us and so I see this issue is not In the portrait. Particularly for the. What Susan not reconciling anytime soon and I also have deep concern with this is going to be passed by. The Woods twits and people but the larger issue is that by recognizing the traditional governance within a first nation the nation ever might not first nation and a nation like the initial bay for example so the initials are several dozen communities spread throughout Manitoba Scotch on Ontario and as a result we also have our traditional governance and to open up the possibility that our traditional governments can be speaking spokespeople for our community and the fact that that transcends first nations lines has really opened up a real situation within the country because the government is undermined the Indian Act itself and the most Conan part of it. Which is the Indian Act elected system? Susan is there any win for the federal government here? Oh it's hard to find a win in this situation You see that the the polls the recent polls have shown that That Mr Trudeau has been accused of or is I think it's around sixty percent say that he's handled it badly. I will say I've noticed that Things have died down on week. That parliament is not sitting. I contended that Last couple of weeks I actually think the way was being debated in parliament. was Making the situation worse The it was It was rapidly developing into a polarized situation in which Some of the goodwill toward reconciliation. I think was a apparel. Wh So I think I think some of that has has died down. I think there was the. It's a really good idea to distinguish in this case between government and politics and Government has been sort of quietly working in the background. We still don't know the details of this true yet and and politics I'd be I'd be happy if it stayed de politicized for another week or two here. There is a way out of this. Which is there is. There is a very clear way out of this and Involves FIRST OFF FOLLOWING CANADIAN. Law can't get Canadian governments following Canadian law. Which is going back to the Supreme Court decision and then also looking to major commissions like the Royal Commission Aboriginal. People real problem is that the federal government doesn't include a digits people's whatsoever in terms of their decision making process other than the consultation process which is constitutional mandated and usually happens in the back. End The real path out of this in terms of this situation could be found in the British Columbia Bill. Bill Forty one. Which is the declaration on the rights of Indigenous Peoples Act which recognizes the nation's declaration of the rights of digits which the Federal Government was. There were rumors. The federal government was going to Enact as well and that act says specifically that that the government can appoint a cabinet minister to directly negotiate with first nation on the means in which that first nation wishes to negotiate. And so if in this case the Canadian law dictates that is the hereditary chiefs that will negotiate on behalf of these twenty two thousand square kilometers which the pipeline will pass you negotiate directly with the hereditary chiefs. You're following Canadian law. And you'll find a a situation of reconciliation coming out of this. In the meantime the blockades continue Hannah. Having listened to what the prime minister said yesterday it is really important. We settled this issue of blockades in a peaceful manner. In a way that will be lasting. We do not want to see these problems continuing to To jump up Every few months in the coming years but as I've said many times I do not think it is ever appropriate to send The military against Canadian citizens that Hannah is a reference to a demand by some conservatives to send the army end and the blockades what is the prime minister. Do in the face of those demands. Well a lot of these are conservative. Leadership hopeful sutter saying. Here's what I would do. If I was prime minister this was Maryland. Gladue who said the military should be brought in Peter Mackay tweeted that he was happy that a couple of L. Burton's who took down rail blockade in Alberta were able to do more in an afternoon with a pickup truck. Then true do in four years. He was clearly criticized for that for supporting vigilante. In that tweet he did He didn't say it was put it back up and he did but he did say it was utter nonsense and that the individuals did clear the tracks for being good citizens and then there are also being called terrorists by conservative leadership. Hopeful Erin O'Toole Saying it was terrorism now the Conservatives. What they're doing here. This argument is for an immediate intervention. Because the economy's taking hit there's propane shortages there's temporary layoffs millions of dollars being lost each day because aren't getting to market container. Ships are piling up at ports. But there is that concern that with police intervention it could provoke allergic crisis Because of the tensions so of course as you know what we're hearing from Susan. This is a lot of rhetoric and ramping up. But maybe they're tapping in to what Canadians are feeling. They're feeling a bit frustrated. Because of all of these issues I just talked about. Maybe they're a laid off worker and Canadians are thinking that this is going on too long. Recent polls are showing this. I can't agree more. Also just point out that the the it is very interesting. We just spent a number of minutes speaking about the krona virus and the fears that around the crow virus and wound. How the economy is used as the primary fear in which to make really coney decisions potentially notice how indigenous peoples are put in the same situation. They're seen as a threat to the economy. Therefore they must be dealt with aggressively notice how the rhetoric is the same. You know what I've noticed all this mad I wrote about this last week and I've really noticed throughout the first two months of this year. How no one is calling for. Smaller government We all expect the government to solve a lot of problems this year Nobody's saying that the private sector or the markets are going to sort this all out which I think is going to be interesting when it comes to the conservative leadership race we we are just going through a state right now in this country where we want the government meddling in our lives a lot And we're we keep calling for the government to fix every problem. We just talk just briefly in the last couple of minutes that we have but that conservative leadership raised. Some of the candidates are saying Hannah that's They would like to force an election as early as October is. That is that going to happen. He said nervously realistically. Don't expect to head out on the campaign trail you guys Here's the reason why so it's McKay O'Toole and gladue Who are saying that. Canadians need an election as early as October. Yes I did say this October But remember the next leader elected by the conservative government. These hopefuls are speaking to membership so that membership is about one hundred eighty thousand Canadians. They're trying to rile them up to get some votes. Because these members believe that true is not doing a good job. They're clearly supporting the conservative. But here's some other facts They don't have the votes in the House of Commons to bring down the liberals alone they would need to secure support from the Bloc Quebecois the MVP. That is not going to happen because the end EP does not have the money for another election campaign. The soon not only. That leader meeting told me when I did my article. That don't rely on them to help. And then also let's remember the Bloc Quebecois Net thirty two seats. This is the performance. They've had in quite a few elections. They're enjoying this position of power and they're not ready to head back to the polls to give no reason to cancel our plans for October. Then well I'm GONNA keep those dates open. Just I'm I'm kidding. I hope I would. It reminds me of Actually there are so many parallels to wear the liberals were in two thousand and eight. They were just passed another losing election. They were working on their second leader. Michael Ignatieff in that case and they were under the impression that rightly or wrongly that Canadians hated Steven Harper's government as much as they did at which was Hannah was alluding to I I and will remember the Liberals did Michael did not long after he became leaders. Start talking about taking the government down to and never did you concerned at all. Is there the interest in remaining seconds? We have the possibility that This could happen come fall. Why don't I I think? Fear is We've been talking about feared to the theme of the episode. And I think that right now. The conservative leadership hopefuls are really stoking fear. The problem with fear is that fear is not a growth vote like it's on a long-term growth mode it might be a reactionary vote and. I think that they're speaking mostly to the base and that kind of base doesn't have a long term Reach within keen-sighted but it could be could work in the short term. Good to speak with you. All Andy Gun. We're coming to a shelter in your bunker with all of your supplies. I can make very long. We'll be there. Thank you go ahead. Susan Delacour National Call. The Star Megan Sinclair columnist with a Winnipeg Free Press Hannity vigneault senior reporter was. Cb's parliamentary bureau for more CBC podcasts. Go to CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

government federal government prime minister Hannah Susan Canadian government Canada Winnipeg Justin Trudeau United States Iran Supreme Court Matt Galloway Susan Delacour Megan Sinclair Patty Haider reporter chiefs Bill Maher
Western Alienation, Part Two: Climate collision

Front Burner

25:05 min | 1 year ago

Western Alienation, Part Two: Climate collision

"How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell him that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark net the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police ace who hunt down online predators. The environment. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made it hunting. MOORHEAD subscribe wherever you get at your podcasts. This is a CBC DC podcast. Yesterday we did a whole episode the roots of Western Alien Nation. And we did because of what we're seeing in politics today real anger at Ottawa and Justin Trudeau in particular a leading energy industry frustration about money that flows between provinces and the rise of separatist ideas. I think that if Albertans decide that they want to do this and the momentum builds You know we're GonNa make snowballs snowballs and I just know well. We've seen it all before under the leadership of Justin's father Pierre wouldn't be surprised to see the country split and I think it would be too bad because we'll all lose so it felt important to look at that history and learn from it. If you miss the episode you can go back into our feed. Check it out today. We WanNa look more at the present present in the future because there is one big thing that this country did not have to deal with the last time western alien nation spiked climate change. I'm Jamie poem this is from. I'm here today with Jason. Marcus off he is the Alberta correspondent for Maclean's. Hi Jason so first off look I I really want to get your thoughts on this breath. This webex it sentiment you're on the ground in Alberta. Are People actually talking about this in bars. coffeeshops is a real thing. I think it's important in this conversation. Distinguish between three separate things wax it separatism as an idea and the frustrations I there's weks which which is this is shorthand term while using separatism. But it's actually this organization led by a former rcmp guy who's running a bunch of different online movements western Canadians. We will not allow ourselves to be divided. We're GONNA make Albert agreed again and that is when we cut ourselves off from the Leach that is eastern Canada and it's quite fringe. What they're doing? They're they're mostly based online. I mean they have drawn some decent sized crowds in some forms including one last week end in Edmonton but they are really based on the fringe. Some of the yellow vest ideology creeps in. There are hard edge right wing talking points. That are in the main of where people are feeling right now in this frustration. We're sending in our application to elections. This cat's tomorrow to register websit Canada as a federal western Canadian political party. That's the second element. Separatism separatist sentiment is actually alarmingly high in Alberta as an as an idea there have been some polls saying it runs around twenty percent twenty five percent which is really really high That's people saying you know this poll taken before the election that if Alberta if if people were voting on separatist referendum before the election it was running near a quarter popular saying yes then So people that frustrated that they're thinking that they don't belong in this country anymore and maybe they need to take a look. Look but you know as you get further down that line. How does that work? How do we get pipeline? If we're landlocked province really want to abandon Canada are we. Sick of Canada's ASNA DEA. Do you want to abandon on. These trade deals that have been negotiated between Canada and other countries. That that's right there's so many complexities there that that is still. Oh I think even though there are some polling number showing it's very high still might be considered a fringe fringe idea or a far fetched sort of fence. Fantastic idea born out of frustration. Thirdly is actual Western nation the frustration that is ranging really really high. You saw it in the vote. Getting both Albert Albert Scotch one getting rid of all their liberal. MP's losing his seat in Wisconsin statue in Tonight's First elected to parliament in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy four is the only member to have served with Pierre Trudeau a father and Justin Trudeau the sun to all of you. Thank you tonight. The by high sixties percentage of people voting for the Conservatives and just on the ground you hear a Ross frustration at Justin Trudeau at that were the national debate is at the attention and power that has a vested in Ontario and Quebec and the West seems shut out of the national interest entirely People get pretty upset about the fact that the votes over East count for so much more people have been kicked around. They've been working hard jobs. Jobs have been disappearing and The sad reality is the federal government. Hasn't paid any attention and that is something that is a real and being addressed by politicians auditions across the spectrum and it does strike me. You know listening to how this anger was quelled before in the nineteen eighties. Oil prices eventually went up. A Conservative government got in we are going to say that the liberal government and what it stands for and what is done to this country is not good enough but here it feels like something different is going on right. We have this existential threat of climate change and some of these demands from Kenny and Scott mode the premiers of Scotch on Berta. A new deal that includes a canceling of the carbon tax withdrawing devastating policies like Bill C Sixty Nine restructure equalization formula so that it is fair to all provinces as substantial progress in the completion of a coastal pipeline. And a new deal that would allow us to get our products to market their completely diametrically opposed to what God Trudeau elected. That's right you know. Justin Trudeau was elected with a plan into forward his progress on climate. Change a lot of the proposals from Jason Kenny. And Scott Mo- would be to halt. His plans halted that progress. A lot at the core of this frustration and a lot of the proposals are to our basic not go so hard on alberta-saskatchewan that's one which are on a per person basis the biggest carbon emitters in the country alberda despite the fact that is not the most populous province is the highest overall all carbon emitter So when you're talking about reducing nationally missions a lot of the attention and pressure goes on how Berta and Saskatchewan performance And while albarn Scotch one or not Wide ranging climate deniers but there is the least support for the climate science and willingness for climate action here in Alberta and and in Saskatchewan Both provinces in a wave you carbon the carbon tax as a as a tax on their industries. They view these bill. C Sixty nine which is Environmental Projects Oversight Bill and and Bill Forty eight which was Trudeau's ban on northern tanker traffic as a direct attack on their industries. Mellberg has always been oil-patch since what the nineteen thirties. You can't change overnight announcement. Somebody's trying to win. It ain't going to work. There does seem to be a collision course between environmental. Oh protection and climate change. Action and the oil sector's right and these demand. That Kenny and mower making did they think that they're going to get any of them. Some of them I mean certainly. They're hoping to they. You know I think what's going to be a challenge for Justin Trudeau and his liberals is to discern what are sincere demands from Kenyon Mo and what are them playing to their basis. You know we heard Jason Kenney me tell the global mail that one of the things he would like is for Katherine McKenna. The federal environment is for it to be moved in the cabinet coming up and how realistic not that well. I think there's a lot of arguments and I tend to subscribe to these arguments. That if you WANNA make sure Just keeps administer be the Alberta the premier says he should he should get rid of he might have just saved Catherine McInnes job really. Here's what I want to ask you today. The idea of industry leaving of investment. Leaving this anger that you talked about whether it's separatism or just general resentment towards Ottawa. There's this real sense of Deja Vu here you know. We spent the show yesterday a diving into all the similarities between the nineteen eighties and today and I've heard people argue that this whole national unity problem is really being overblown. That liberal liberal governments have been locked out of the period before that when it's politically expedient provincial leaders will rekindle the anger and frustration with Ottawa and that this will pass right the the next time a conservative government is elected. Do you think anything is missing from that argument. I think it's the facts on the ground that are pointing to even if the but now that the Conservatives had had one we wouldn't have seen this level of anger as exhibited by the fact that when the Liberals won this anger sort of exploded it felt like it was a tinderbox some leaving kindled interesting to see the difference of the facebook posts like this morning everybody is talking about like Western separation last lake lot of anger Social media from family from friends from people. I don't even know it's democracy. The mob takes what they want and we're left doing what we do. He feels like now. It's the rhetoric getting even worse. This election people hit the panic button but even if the Conservatives lives had won there would have still been a lot of these. The base frustrations that are at the root of this the fact that the energy economy is not doing well. Alberta's not the sizzling sizzling jobs market that used to be pipelines are still frustrated even if you know whether it was sheer or whether it was Justin Trudeau coming into power This month you'd still have Trans Mountain. Expansion pipeline being potentially held up by protesters and by the courts and a lot of that would be out out of political hands ratio. Couldn't just snap his fingers and get this pipeline bill. It's about fast tracking some of the questions that have been raised referring those types of original questions to the Supreme Court right away so that we can get certainty as much as people would like to believe. No he can't those are those are tricky things and this whole issue of equalization which we could probably spend another three podcast episodes getting into the agree on that one but the sense that there's a fiscal fairness to to Al Burda. I'm not sure if shear certainly had no political agenda no promises getting said much on that. And it's not. I'm not really certain what he would have done would have been willing to do you. That would have helped out burden on equalization front and not harm some of the provinces. He's trying to get get votes in Quebec and the Maritimes which get equalization official funds. You you know. What do you think Justin Trudeau can do here to try and bridge this gap with these western provinces? Is there anything he can do. That's bridgeable chapel here. In there there are probably two buckets of things he He's going to look at doing. Our people are asking them to one of them. Is this process stuff and this is where you hear about. Should he appoint a cabinet minister Mellberg and schedule and even though he has no impeach their you know some people in Alberta talking about that but they're not really conservatives. It's a gesture. Certainly people want this idea of having a voice in just Trudeau's inner circle is important but there's a lot of sentiment in the Kennedy Conservative camp or in other people's camps Out West that. That's not what matters what matters is prime minister means what he said last night about listening listening to Alberta and Scotch won the clearest way he could do so would be to Unequivocally commit this new government to the completion of the pipeline that the federal the government owns. So you've seen Jason Kenny. And the Premium Scotch Awan. Scott Mo- put out a list of demands made it very clear what they want And a lot of those can be sort of boil down to Alberto albarn Scotch. Wan Don't WanNa be such a such milk. Cows for confederation we we heard yesterday but milk cow cartoon it it came out around confederation and it. It's a cartoon of a cow and the people in Saskatchewan this Gotcha working very hard to feed the cow and eastern a look they look like bankers are milking the cow at the other end of Canada. Essentially that this this has been a narrative going as far back as confederation. You see that That cartoon I mentioned on all sorts of social media facebook and twitter later It becomes ever popular around this time in the political political cycle. The other things that they're demanding are basically for Justin Justin Trudeau to implement provincial and federal conservative policy platforms They're demanding. He embraced the energy corridor. Plan that Andrew Scheer had add it'll be a transnational quarter. We would envisage this terminating imports. That will allow us to ship our energy around the world so that more countries have access to Canadian Energy. They want him to pause the carbon tax which seems very unlikely given that whole election that was one of the main things that people voted for MHM in this election. They wanted to scrap some of the bills that people view as anti pipeline. We would be willing to be flexible on for example both the emissions cap on the oil sands if we could exempt oil sands projects from the The disastrous new bill C sixty nine. There's another layer to this as well alright. So yesterday on the show we talked about. How Burdens Scotch one thing? Ottawa panders to Quebec that their demands are taken more seriously in that threats of separatism have worked in Quebec's fever and today we have this federal party the block which holds a huge amount of power coming out of this election more power than it's held in years and talked talked a lot about climate change policies. Getting rid of oil. His US energy is setting. Relation is Subic is us. And how do you think this will complicate. Trudeau's job moving forward. He now sits minority government and he needs other third parties to get stuff done. He faces there to pressures that. You're speaking to here. One is can he bridge to Alberta and Saskatchewan and still get votes from the minority partners that he has lucky. BECUA- the MVP that's going to be one of his biggest challenges right now. The good thing is he can You know there'll be some issues. Say if Trans Mountain pipeline has to come to a vote again. The Deacon get votes from the Conservatives and not have to worry about what what the Bloc Quebecois Gua- or the MVP think right But the other thing you talk about when you think about the Bloc Quebecois you also think about the potential out West for another Western splinter party to perform because not only does just treat to have this This challenge of bridging so does anders sharing the Conservative Party A huge chunk of their. MP's are this big Saskatchewan. So Scotch One BERTA block. And their voters and their constituents are going to be demanding that the Conservatives fight for them under Shear said he's GonNa fight fight for the interests of Auburn's Scotch wanted so rejected the liberal. We'll do everything we can to make sure that this liberal government understands that it has to change course. I cannot continue to attack her energy sector to kill a big projects that get our natural resources around the world but sheer in the Conservatives face risk if they play too much to the wants and needs of the oil producing base in Saskatchewan and Alberta the risk alienating. Some of the people that they're trying GONNA get votes from in Quebec Ontario so they have that same Balance Act Bouncing Act. That Trudeau has right Canadians in Alberta and Scotch. You know that you are and the central part of our great country. I've heard your frustration and I want to be there to support you. Let us all work hard hard to bring our country together if the liberal count follow through on some of these big demands from Moen Kenny. I like repealing bill. C Sixty nine like guaranteeing transmission pipeline gets built and on top of that the liberals were elected at least in part because of the promise of future action on climate change. Let's say they try and meet in the middle here and they did some other massive thing like through all this money it all Berta to help with renewable energy projects to get people back to work. Would would that do anything. I have a feeling it might not it. Depends on what what exactly is For two reasons one is if he puts a lot of money into renewable renewable energy in talking about the transition away from oil and gas. Albertans are really afraid to talk seriously. And there's a real resistance of talking about the transition transition away from oil and gas you think back to that one time in two thousand Seventeen Justin Trudeau talked about phasing out the oil sands. We can't shut down Wilson's tomorrow. We need to phase them out. We need to manage the transition off of our dependence on fossil fuels. He's had a non-combat. Paul is right. Away I misspoke. I said something the way I shouldn't have said it to hear out burdens. Talk about it. You'd think that he said that every day for the last five years so that's one level of skepticism. The other is that I spoke to the liberal MP's running Alberta in Edmonton and Calgary and they spent a lot of their campaigns talking about the structure That Justin Trudeau did bring hit the spending he did in Alberta and I they talk about the four point five billion dollar pipeline purchase. Do those did not sell well. Those were not good sales There is something. It's you know how people talk about the the oil price differential going out BERTA. That bitch is worth a little bit less a certain amount less than regular oil. Well I think in Alberta there is something that I call the Trudeau credibility differential if any any other politician were to buy a pipeline or to create a large infrastructure project in Alberta. They would get this much credit true that much less but just generally distrustful all of him here so of course like we heard yesterday that is certainly informed by his father's legacy that's right people are just the the name is is tarnished here and people are very sensitive. Anything he says. That's derogatory toward the energy sector or gainst outburts Scotch. One is regions. There's a bit of a hair trigger. Here you're so almost anything. He does That's could be argued as throwing money at the problem Might well be rejected popularly So I think this brings me back to the question that I asked earlier. which is is not clear to me that he can really do anything here to quell this anger anger particularly with this threat? Existential threat of climate change hanging over all of this like Paul right like the Liberals World have bought a pipeline for four point. Five billion dollars. It seems to have done nothing to quell any of the discontent in Burton's Scotch Awan and it's not clear to me. What other real options they have? Besides what might feel like tokenism to the people who live there and please correct me. If you think. I'm wrong wrong. I think Donna's his inner circle must feel a bit of damned if you do damned if you. Don't you know if they if they pick a cabinet minister from the senator they appoint a a a mayor from one of the big cities in Alberta Saskatchewan. They'll get accused of being undemocratic from out here and if they don't do that they're going to be saying. You guys have ignored us. Why couldn't you pick anybody? Aren't there any of the five million people from the West that he could pick Four one of those seats you know. So only as their this tension I mean if you if you make some equalization reform it harms Quebec. How does that benefit Alberta? How'd you bounce that But there's also the will they just dislike almost anything I I do You know until I suddenly some. Maybe maybe he can change his last name right or maybe he can change his last time or or or you know. The Carbon Tax holiday holiday to Auburn and Scotch one on the carbon tax would be to to severely undermine Canada's national climate. Change Plan So he faces a frustration. Is there an people will be ticked off. You know. There's not much sympathy in a large swath of Progressive Canada for the out the plight of Alberta Saskatchewan Part of that is born out of not really understanding the the employment situation here the economic situation out here the the sense of dread out here and part of is just because people have a perception that that Auburn's schedule and it's our our rich whiners. That's not helping but that's a certain a huge sentiment from from progressive. That you hear out here to the great for a facing of people out here right because you know we have certainly heard a lot of stories on this podcast of people who have lost their homes. The economic anxiety is Is Real there. There was no British green that people in Saskatchewan Newfoundland in interior B. C. had to work on the rigs make money. Bring it home to your family. That cream is largely gone that that that is no longer thing. And that's very disorienting. That fact Jason. I really hope that We can stay with you on this and they'll come back and let us know what you think in a couple of weeks or months time I'd be happy to thank you so much cheers and the before I let you go some news. I just WANNA mention late last week. It was announced that Encana accompany with a very long history in Canada is moving. Its headquarters from Calgary to the United States. The company says the move isn't going to impact jobs or spending but it seen as a real blow by Burton Work in the energy industry. So I feel you know maybe we can build a company. That's the biggest strongest oil and gas company had there for we have no chance really notion Sabih takeover. But what I didn't of course anticipate is that through government policy that actually debilitated the industry. It would excited necessary to kind of export itself of I get put it that way and then on Monday. The Alberta separatist group W- exit the one that we've been talking about for the last two days here on the show show. Will they apply to become a federal political party. Elections Canada is now processing application

Justin Justin Trudeau Alberta Canada Ottawa Saskatchewan Albert Albert Scotch Pierre Trudeau Jason Kenny Jason Quebec liberal government United States facebook Scott Mo Edmonton Mellberg Berta
October 22: The map is all over the map

As It Happens from CBC Radio

49:40 min | 1 year ago

October 22: The map is all over the map

"You Welcome to party lines this is the podcast where we're going to try and get you up to speed on what's happening for the federal election a new episode every Thursday Yeah Hey I'm Rosemarie Barton and I love politics you don't possibly mean that I'm elevated mood tonight tweet about politics but I don't want to Russian tonight this is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm Carol off Hello I'm the Nabet Duncan this is as it happens the PODCAST APP is all over the map Canadian voters give the Liberal Party a minority government for to look across the country shows distressing partisan division Azero liberal MP's and a frustrated former western MP says that shows it's time for those two provinces to go solo politics John Lighthouse away from the brink as it happens the Tuesday edition radio that hopes they didn't go off the beacon track regained across the country Trudeau and the Liberals lost he lost seats in every region and Canadians have put his government on notice Canadians woke up this morning to a more between the two parties on Pipelines F- rock of ages while visiting a village church in England our guest discovers a fancy cloth draped on the turn the turns out to be a four hundred year old dress it was once draped on the body of Queen Elizabeth I and many hands make light coast to coast tonight Canadians rejected division negatively they were party's disappointing showing the opposition leader will be a powerful counter to Justin Trudeau the Voice of Region Alberta Answers Gotcha one elected exactly he's when I spoke to Justin Trudeau last night I urged him to take notice of the significant and troubling results and more words and platitudes will not cut it house work it was in danger of toppling into the sea because of erosion so today in Denmark a dedicated team moved an entire seven hundred makes strange bedfellows things were nasty between the Conservatives and liberals during the campaign but a liberal MP says he sees a possible collaboration yeah he must be willing to change course to stop his attacks on the energy sector and to recognize when Western candidate succeeds all of Canada succeeds and to the active cuts and austerity and they voted in favor of progressive agenda and strong action on climate change me waiting to clip Mr Trudeau's wings Canadians have pass judgment on Justin Trudeau on his four years failures scandals and mismanagement and just as that was gesture judo doing his best to sound optimistic at his victory party last night but Canadian voters have reduced the prime minister and his liberals to a minority and it wasn't a check mate but Andrew Scheer is promising to keep the prime minister in check outgoing conservative MP Lisa Rave says that despite in parliament that leaves them looking for opposition support before any of their legislation can take flight and this morning in Regina Conservative leader Andrew Scheer promised his supporters that he added country the separatist bloc of KWA is back on the rise in Alberta and have completely rejected Trudeau's policy in the West I hear your frustration and your anger that was Conservative leader Andrew Scheer in Regina today and the frustration with the liberals isn't all in the ask Lisa rate was the conservative deputy leader before this campaign but last night she lost in her Ontario riding of Milton to the liberals giant killer Olympic past certainly got a message that Canadians were not going to give them an automatic majority and the Conservatives did better than they did in two thousand and fifteen so alert atom Vancouver Dan we release rate in Milton Ms rate what happened last night well clearly The Liberals Heard Andrew Scheer sending a message to Mr Trudeau that he says when the Liberal government falls conservatives will be ready to win and we we ran a great campaign I'm so grateful to all my volunteers and we put the effort in but you know the voter always gets it right and they chose to go in the direction with Mr Etienne's set out to give somebody a minority whether it was us or the Liberals they clearly had decided that nobody was going to have a majority in the does that mean that we'll be seeing a lot of the bitter partisanship that marked this campaign is that going to continue in the future for all of us I believe that can on the rise and they are on the fall and it's going to be an important parliament for the next couple of years what happened to you well you know I'm grateful that I made it through that gouvernance and I all I can do thank them for the best eleven years that I've been able to experience we won't be seeing you in the House of Commons but last night we as they plot their course because Canadians are watching and they wanna see people to work with one another but they also want to see the party's uphold the values that they voted country and that they wanted to see us work together and I think every party every single one of the parties now if I could say speaking from the outside are going to have to have that in the back of their mind reached out to every constituency and we reached out to every NPS candidate to put forth their ideas and what we put forward wasn't amalgamation of it all we'll have or a potential government and I think that is exactly the way that you should move forward when we did our policy platform we developed a very strong framework and I think talking to Canadians and grassroots I is an important part of understanding what they're looking for from government there's going to be smart folks and Ontario looking at all of the individual ridings to see what would have changed vote or if you could have changed the vote so it's hard two thousand and fifteen I mean I was the lone holdout for that giant redway that came through the GTE and as a result I was able to represent they'll Tony's for another four years and BP decide how they're going to approach parliament coming up we've seen in that election sixty five percent of Canadians voted for parties on the left or the central left more so I think you know our our leader share set the course very well last night when he said that we'll be ready and we're going to hold to account and we'll have to see what the Liberals and one thing in common among them is that they all had they're very passionate about fighting climate change one party did not have a platform that was passionate about is and where the party goes from here without you you you have been perceived by many as well as the deputy leader of the party but you for for many concern axe but there are some similarities in their we both talked about the home renovation tax credit and we both talked about using technology and investment and technology and we've all talked about have to take a look at whether or not it resonated with certain parts of the country but we also won more seats than we did last time so certainly did resonate and the Liberals they're hell to minority the importance of sending our product around the world so there's a lot of similarities carbon-tax was the big divider of course we still don't believe that it was something that's going to help reduce emission parliament but I'm still a card carrying conservative and I'm GonNa be working within the grassroots that I have here in Milton Ontario and I will be making been more on top of the climate change file than more passionate more determined about it you might have one last night a lot of what if and I know that the fighting climate change and that was the conservative do you think that that hurt you you know it's interesting because if you look at the liberal platform our platform the biggest difference was of course the carbon errative because the platform was as Chris Sally the columnist was saying today that it was a dumb pandering unambitious mess that wreaked a focus group in my concerns known in my voice known if I see anything that's happening that I'm not in agreement with just like every other conservative can across the country and I think that with an overhaul not count that's what he was expected and that's what we anticipate it he also held Mr Trudeau to a minority and we also now have far more maneuverability tapes you were the the Progressive Face of the party you were the one who would be in the pride parade when Andrew Cher and others would not you're the one is but nonetheless we're going to go forward in a minority parliament and deal with the issues that are are brought to the forest they come up from the government you think had you done more how'd you how'd you and it's GonNa be up to other members of parliament to determine exactly what they're going to bring to the House of Commons from their community and I'm sure that there's going to be people that we don't instability of the prime minister and the Liberal Party is to make this parliament work it is they lost seats every party is gonNA learn from where they lost I'm sure the liberals are going through this now is and EP and you WanNa make for a better election next time the liberals and that's where we reached Misrey and we've got more on Lisa rate in the election results on our website just go to CBC dot ca slash ai h anything you see you can point to you say you should do differently or do you think that what you did was the right campaign was right platform in my local campaign we did every savoring now what would have made the difference but I know that going forward we're going to try to find those things that will make the difference in the next election do you think people did not vote on committees to allow us to ask questions and get answers that we were unable to get the four because of the majority control of committees so I think that mission the vendor share would never reopen the abortion debate because quote you wouldn't let that happen so who plays that role now without you well I may not be allowed and that'd be great thanks Carol to day bye-bye Lisa rate is the former conservative deputy leader and Milton. MP Last night she lost her Ontario ridings accomplished and who would have thought in two thousand and fifteen that they wouldn't have had an automatic eight years we will leave it there and I suspect we'll be speaking again inca back last and there's a law saying that mandates are suppose to last four years and should do what it takes thing that we were asked to do my team work so hard they did a great job and I was proud to run on the policies that we ran on and I enjoyed explaining them last parliament it was his job to keep legislation moving as government whip we reach Mark Holland in Ajax Ontario Mr Hall and how difficult will it be in twenty members that Andrew has to work with it's going to be fantastic Michelle rental candice Bergen Erno Tool I can I can name them all they're gonNA do a fantastic job and repeated to the Liberals winning just a minority government but block Becua- leader Francois Blanchette says he's eager to see the liberals make that status work their response wish then Mark Holland and his colleagues are going to have their work cut out for them. Mr Holland is the newly re-elected MP for the Toronto Area Riding of Ajax and in the make this parliament work every parliament is a challenge You know this the nature of our democratic system trying to balance all the interests across the country advancing Quebec in the interests of Quebec and Quebecers I don't necessarily think the people that voted for them were supportive of the idea of separating from the country those are two very different things have to balance the different interests of the country you have to find a way to compromise to make things work and to allow everybody to move ahead together in a minority government three different parties with different interests and you're trying to cooperate with them in order to not have the government fall is not the same thing as having different interests and different undefined common ground and that's what the people who elected us expect us to do is you're going to have to work cooperatively with these other parties and so you got one is in there that's dedicated to taking minority so what does that mean it's my fourth minority op so you don't have gone through this a number of times but I think the challenge is well they're more intense or the same that you have last night was a big one for the block Becua- They went from winning a mere ten seats in the twenty five federal election to thirty two this time around and that shift people who voted for the Bloc Quebecois in in large part I it certainly my belief looking at the way the numbers of moved are interested in sure or housing there's lots of things that that we have in common and can work on together that the work that we have to do is to move the country forward in complete respect of the decisions of the Canadians and Quebecers to make this work but if e Francois Blanchette is going to get it the country isn't it so what what will stick together I think we'll stick together is the will of Canadians there's a lot of things whether or not it's the environment or it's investing infrastructure join it to work on issues like the environment and if people are going to play games or try to play off other agendas that they weren't elected to to proceed with continue to work in that direction but you have no seats now in Alberta or Scotch when the liberals don't so what obligations do you feel you have to the concerns of those provinces who would speak up for for the social agenda you were the one that we interviewed you just some weeks ago you said that the reason why you knew the conservative government the idea that we didn't get seats in a particular place that somehow we shouldn't care about that place misses the point of the drives office which is to make this country a better place their responsibility not ours not the responsibility of the Arctic conservative Mr to do as duty part of the country out of confederation that breaking up the country essentially so how closely will you cooperate the bloc Quebecois I look at it this way the cooperation is just more evident but what's the sticking point here is the same as all but really when you have two different parties it gets and I think that that Canadians feel very strongly about The need to do that while at the same time take care of the environment and certainly we're going today today we're going to say loud integrate member-parliament using under should step down no not at all I think he added to the In having to find ways of of discussing how to move the country forward so he's saying you would you would collaborate with the Conservatives where you needed them to do the job and I think anybody who's fixated on electoral politics instead of delivering results for the constituents that elected him is going to have a very hard time in the next election building pipelines or doing what you want to do with Albert and Scotch when that you'll be working with the Conservatives when when you need them that I can do that at their peril you've got a great big honking issue don't you you got pipelines that are going to be quite politicized here the DP the Greens the block all oil to new markets right now over ninety nine percent of our oil I'm goes to the United States we're not getting the best prices that we can get for it and we need to be able to diversify Wednesday you probably will be working to see in this minority government is that we have to work with different people on different issues and that that there is there is balanced is to be found in all of these issues now in terms of the environment we've altered just clarify something very important you just said so so there's a strong possibility that when it comes to to negotiate room to to collaborate with the Conservatives any party that says that their objective day after an election is to cause another election I have the same obligation to the concerns of the people in Alberta as I do people in my riding who didn't vote for me and and so I think that the green the MVP and the Conservatives on an issue by issue basis and and I think that's what a minority government is about and I think that's what people expect from us a yes enter do good on behalf of the citizens who elected us in those who didn't did you say you have an obligation you you you want to help to get the product of the in order to get some kind of legislation or some movement on something even though the Conservatives say they're dedicated to bringing down your government so we you think you have room yeah sure I mean I don't see what the problem is right working together I mean that's that's what people expect us to do I I think where we can find common cause where we can find a way I need to work with an opposition that is dead set against pipeline so when crucial position of the Conservative Party quietly right but the others with former Conservative Party and PJ Hill who's calling for Alberta's independence and Carol Conversation with the First Green Party M P elected outside BC against pipelines so is the Trans Mountain pipeline deal dead look there we've said from the very beginning that it's essential that we find a way to get when Queen Elizabeth the first died she reportedly owned nearly two thousand dresses four centuries later the only parts of her wardrobe thought so I you know we're going to do is provide a progressive agenda to move the country ahead to help those who are in the middle class to help lift those who are trying to to L. where you're you're liberals and Conservatives will work together in order to get pipeline spilt I can see a scenario where we can work with of the Royal Palaces we reached her in London very when did you first see this dress that you believe belong to Queen Elizabeth I Sonian and trying to sell the on what our vision was they didn't accept it and the voter always gets it right to stay on your role and the the work because the opposition couldn't afford to fight another election but then when he finally faced a non-confidence vote he used the powers of prorogation is that word of the the the oil sands product to market do I guess all oil or fossil fuels from that province want to get them to market with the pipeline you this object just online I thought well that looks a bit intriguing so I drove to this tiny church in rural Hertfordshire to go and visit is absurdity look we just spent more than six months every single day doing a job application hundred times a day and people now expect us to to advance the interests of the nation together We should embrace that just one final question we saw when Stephen Harper had a minority he made it that's Mark Holland who was re elected as the liberal MP for the Toronto Area Riding of Ajax yesterday you stay tuned for more election coverage coming up including an interview areo I mean one of the things I know about now this being my fourth minority government is that clairvoyance I'm blessed with Mr Hallam thank you thank you focused on their their electoral calculations or on on agendas that they were not voted for Then that's something they're going to have to answer for take that as a yes well I I saw it about four years ago now I was researching my book to you to fashion and I came across an image of who is reserved for the immediate members of the Royal Family and actually this particular church was the birthplace and very beloved family home of one blind but it wasn't address was it no that's right it's actually an Osa cloth so it's a t shaped panel that had been used by family I Larry Lynn found that loss dress but spoiler alert it wasn't address when she discovered it Miss Lynne is the collection's curator of charity called historic you know I I I other than a few hours of sleep I'm there's not a lot of time that has passed since the last election what you can expect is that that we're all going to be working together unaggressive agenda to move Canadians forward to help the middle class to help industry and we're going to invite other parties to work with us to accomplish that and if other parties list thing is that I supported evidence of pattern cutting which means evidence that in fact used to be addressed but the second thing was that the embroiled incredible value and rarity at what point looking at this did you think this might be Queen Elizabeth's dress immediately for lots of reasons the all the finest fabrics and dresses for herself she didn't particularly like having other women it court because she wanted the attention of her male courtiers for her not to incur the wrath of the rather sort of notoriously mercurial queen so it's very unlikely that Elizabeth would have granted permission for anybody when she died the infantry of her wardrobe listed two thousand items of the most sumptuous luxurious stresses but none of them were known to have survived in one very exciting direction but why isn't it possible that the dress belong to someone else in the court why why specifically do you think Elizabeth I was wearing it have survived were some gloves and riding boots but last week a special exhibit opened at Hampton Court Palace called the loss dress of Elizabeth the first is an also closed for several centuries but they were lots of clues about it that immediately told me that it used to be something else Josh Parry and Blanche Parry was the first lady of the bedchamber to Elizabeth I and we know that Elizabeth had great affection for her and she gave him me gift of her own clothing we know that blanche had great affection for her village she gave them lots of charitable donations so all of this seemed to be pointing can get it wherever you get your podcast from I don't know how we're going to end it out can we literally drop Mike well at the time that this stress dates from Elizabeth was nearing seventy years old and in fact she got it very jealously else most of the other women who were allowed to be there were quite elderly ladies all were women who express told to dress down he's sick of sixteen hundred in Silken silver and goals and the real clinch was that it was embroidered on cloth silver and shoot at times cloth we on it which is beautiful flowers and vegetation I was as a professional standard that I hadn't ever seen before dating to around the fifty nine nice to one something like it we know in our research the amount of silver in this object with worth as much as a Cheetah mansion so we really are looking at a real thing that you could see the liberals doing I look what I envisioned for this parliament is it we we as Liberal Party is going to put forward Russia oh my gosh so this is one dress of her finger hundreds and thousands in her wardrobe was worth the price of a tutor mention yes absolutely so we know I'm fine with that I that I felt but but you can interpret it I mean look I mean projecting a hypothetical into the future about an imaginary city Safai reading makes a unique piece you figure it came to be in this church and Saint Faiths because of Blondes Perry so why did they turned it into an altar cloth it's not least because the great storehouse of the Royal Wardrobe was Very famously burns during the great fire of London in sixteen sixty six so the fact that each last night Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he wants to govern for all Canadians but not all Canadians want to be governed by him or the Liberal Party in court palace in London and if you want to see photos of the draft you can go to our website go to CBC DOT CA slash AIH blue in his victories afoul of conservation and research so it was in a fairly good state considering age but it had to sort of to be wearing this kind of fantastically embroidered cloths fills for you to be no doughty looking at the Queen there is a great story and I appreciate you telling it to us thank you a little bit more about it and we found incredibly tantalizing

Mark Holland Liberal Party Rosemarie Barton Duncan Ajax Ontario Mr Hall Michelle Ontario Andrew Toronto Quebec Becua Quebec Francois Blanchette four years Milton ninety nine percent sixty five percent four hundred year four centuries seventy years