35 Burst results for "Blanks"

It's Never Too Late To Start Doing What You Love With Paul E. Kandarian

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

07:00 min | 4 d ago

It's Never Too Late To Start Doing What You Love With Paul E. Kandarian

"What's interesting about you. Is you start got into acting a bit later than most which is an interesting story so You went down. And we're doing something with the play then decided audition. Is that what it was. Yeah i was doing a story on This he was the then new artistic director. Trinity rep company in providence. Which is one of the few if not the only rep company left in the country but he came from steppenwolf in chicago and i always wanted to be an actor in so i started hanging around with him going to shows and just watching people. Just the mac nations of theater and i. so what am i waiting for. What the hell am i waiting for. This never had the courage to try it. And that debt gave me the courage to try it in in the bug. Bit hard and i've been just been ever since. What was that night. The play. I saw their addition for sorry took. That was later life. So you didn't audition for that play. You were interviewing him. And then that motivated addition for another play for another play calendar life in the then i want to see like the cherry orchard at trinity rep in one of the actors the came in from the sides on the the the lobby area one of the actors were standing right next to me and i could see like the hair on his arms his nahshon flaring and i swear almost cried because it was so electric and so immediate a what. What power this. This medium has to on people to vote that kind of response and offices. I've got to try this. I've just got to do it. I don't know why. I denied myself all those years. I think i just feared failure. And i don't like doing things unless i'm good at it. You know a a so. I just tried it in a fairly good at it and it's been a great ride ever since. I'm curious what that first audition was like. When you just kind of went down there no having no experience in then handing me a script and basically he. Oh hey read this. Yeah and i never forget it. Because i was sitting in a group of other people including a couple of guys it was competing with and it just felt real in in good in normal. It just reading somebody else's words pretending to be this character. The characters name was austin in the play austin from boston. Oddly enough and it's just reading it and it just felt if folic completion of some sort pretend to be somebody else my whole life of always pretended to be other people's joking around making people laugh. Or whatever just being a class clown sort of thing and then when i was reading this it the legitimacy to to acting out i mean all those years is a goofball it just gave that sense of like you said legitimacy said so this is this is what it feels like to be someone else in in a setting where you have permission to be someone someone else and i loved it so it absolutely loved it and they gave me the part the lead and it was phenomenal. I got on stage and it was like i think lewd to an in the email The lady who was going out ahead of me said my heart's in my throat is at normal. Because i don't think so. And she smiled and went out and i laughed and it just got out there. All nerves went away. It just felt like this is the place. I've been my whole life but you know you come to things when you come to them so i've been making. Yeah that's beautiful because it's true too because you you might be off stage in your heart's racing but as soon as you're out there in that zone how yet none of that matters. You're just you're so focused on what you're doing it's exactly yeah off. If you're an actor too right yeah yeah. Yeah yeah so you know let me. Just what a feeling he asked in. It's an honor privilege to do that. To take some take people somewhere else just to get them out of their own world for a little while and take them into yours it is. It's a privilege that we don't take lightly. Was it stressful being. That's your first play in your in a major role in your first play and you don't have the experience so i'm just thinking even stage directions right. So if the directors like okay. I needed to go stage left. And you're like okay. Is that way exactly because we started rehearsing. And they said we're going to go of blocking like tomorrow and what's blocking this where they tell you where to stand said. Oh that'd be helpful because if you're not used at the film even and you just see people walking and now i really obnoxious points. My girlfriend us to see that guy walking. He's just wasn't walking randomly. They told them where to go. And the so many moving parts to play in film yet and it was all new to me and it still feels new in so many ways. Even though i've done till dozens of films and bunches of place this just a newness to it and there's an earnest embrace of the entire process. I love reader player hill. Says i don't like film rehearsal so much i think it kinda rob's spot and eighty but you know just referrals to play rehill so i like to go to rehearsal sometimes. I'm not even needed off just to watch other people do it so hopefully hopefully at newness and a new hobby you just want to devour. Everything still feels that way. That's been twelve years now so it's great yeah Just from my experience as well like it doesn't go away because you've got a new production and cast that you're working with and in a lot of ways it's new even though you might be doing the same show night after night for a while. It's still that you ever hersal process. And in that excitement of that opening night and in i've always said this i mean an audience is a living breathing organism in it changes when you change. Do it's different every night. You know this. I mean some nights she deliver line and raucous laughter in the next night since crickets. How does that happen. It's the same joke. It's the same way just two different different organisms out there taking it all in you ever had a situation where you like blanked online or tripped over a stage prop or something like that during a show. Oh yeah it's balked on the few lines here and there and i think one time you know. He skipped an entire page in it. You just kinda pick up the pieces and go on but as you know this. The they'll say latest the audience know unless they know the place specifically the scene by scene or whatever they don't know and i and i've been to place of dead i didn't know and i could tell i think is an actor. You just kinda know. I know something screwed up there. No they did something but the covering so you know you. Just pull inform form at that point. Sure yeah think we've all gone up One of the funniest things. I've seen was at trinity rep in angeles korea. Thicker name is just a legendary axe actress. In the new england area. She stopped and she was like kind of looking around and then she gave the line as she just looked. The crisis thought forgotten. She's totally brooke character. Brook in fourth wall. But she's a riot so she got away. Everybody laughs hilarious.

Trinity Rep Company Trinity Rep Steppenwolf Austin Providence Chicago Boston ROB Korea Angeles New England Brooke
How to Generate Hundreds of Content Ideas to Support Your Business with Melanie Deziel

Entrepreneur on FIRE

07:33 min | 4 d ago

How to Generate Hundreds of Content Ideas to Support Your Business with Melanie Deziel

"When we're talking all about how to generate hundreds of content ideas to support. Your business and melanie is a wonderful person to talk about this wisdom melanie. Why why do entrepreneurs need content for their business. Break it down. One of the things that we realized in our in our human life are like interpersonal life. Is we tell stories all the time you know when you're catching up with friends or talking to family. It's all about sharing information in telling stories. And i think what happens is when we put ourselves in our business mode we forget that sometimes those human natural stories are what really connects best with people. And so. it's a really important tool for us to be able to attract consumers who can attract customers who will have a better understanding of what it is that we stand for and what we do. It's a way to showcase your expertise to show what it is that you are so good at that you actually went out and created a business around that skill. it's also a really good way to keep that customer engaged because for a lot of our businesses. It's not something people are buying every single day right. There might be weeks or months or maybe even years between each time that they engaged with us. So we need something worth saying in the interim so content can be a really powerful tool for attracting retaining engaging your audience and making sure that you're still top of mind. They're still thinking of us to learning from you and engaging with you when it comes time to make a purchase decision down the line do all businesses need content dues every way shape and form every type of business need content. I think absolutely you know one of the things kind of toughest. Content is a bit of a buzzword right. And so maybe some of your listeners are thinking that content means youtube channel or podcast like yours but content also includes emails that you're sending to your audience that includes the copying the imagery on your website. So you know it's everything you're doing on social media and so i don't think there are too many businesses out there that are thriving without a website without a social presence without any email list. They're generally doing at least a couple of those names. You know so we have to. We definitely have to be more aware of how we're communicating with our audience and all those different ways so back in two thousand twelve. I looked in the mirror. And i said john if you're honest with yourself like you're just not a super creative quote unquote type and i was honest with myself that i just wasn't so i decided to go down. The path of encouraging and asking and then having other individuals provide the content for me. And i was gonna be in the form of these interviews. And i've now done over twenty seven hundred interviews in past eight years and guess what like i'm relying on other people's creativity other people's content for my content distribution channel. Which is this podcast entrepreneurs on fire. So that's my question like what if we're not creative types. What if somebody in fire nations like kind of like jail delek. I'm not super creative. Can we still come up with content ideas. I have a confession jail day when you said back in two thousand twelve. I wasn't creative. I got a pit in my stomach. And i held my breath like no no. We can't have that. It's so sad because some of us in studies prove this out when we're young when we're kids. We have so many creative ideas. We are really uninhibited with sharing all the crazy things we think of. You're telling stories about dinosaur aliens that become zombies and take over your middle school. You know you. You are totally uninhibited and as we get older. We learned to ignore those things to suppress. It were afraid of being made fun of or making a mistake or failing or whatever that that fear is for you so we all have that native innate creative ability and the way. I convinced everyone that you are in fact creative is think of all the creative ways. You have imagined that things would go wrong you. There is absolutely no end to the creative solutions. You can come up with for all the reasons why something won't work or or why it's going to be difficult so we still have that skill. Usually what's lacking is a prompt or inability to activate it when you need it so when we say we're not creative. It's usually more that you you're sitting down to to achieve some goal like come up with content idea you know figure out what to say and your next youtube episode or email and you can't come up with anything on the spot and you convince yourself it's because you have no creative abilities deep in your soul anywhere So really what it is. We often lack a system. And that's what's really important is understanding that you do have that creative ability everyone does and it's more about figuring out how to activate it when you need it. It's sort of like if you think someone woke up in the middle of the night and said arm wrestle and you lost and then you're like well. I have no strength. I am a legal arm. Human being you know and that's often how we treat our creativity we give it no warning we give our brains this challenge to come up with some huge solution out of nowhere no warning and then we we count ourselves out you know and that's one thing as well that i think that a lot of people don't realize is that being creative doesn't mean you have to come up with a great idea every single day or just this stroke of brilliance every week or so it's like i can look back over my eight year career where i've generated over twenty million dollars in my business and i've come up with like three or four good ideas like i've been creative like with these ideas like just a handful of times but they've made all the difference like those two or three or four or five things again over eight years fire nation are been what has been responsible for the bulk of my success of my financial success of my brand six ass etc etc so one thing that i want to talk about next melanie as you break down a really impressive content system in your book so first off give us a little background about this book in then expound upon the system yes the the book is called the content field framework how to generate unlimited story ideas and i wrote this book because of statements made before saying that you're not creative it breaks my heart so what i wanted to do is really break down what it is that i do in my head when i'm trying to come up with content ideas i know that that's kind of my superpower is to come up with ideas off the cuff and so i wanted to put as much of that process into the book as possible so people could adopt that for themselves if it's helpful for coming up with ideas so at the core it really just means understanding that while we think of content ideas and creativity as this amorphous saying you know amuse or a lightning strike or lightbulb moment it's really just two things there's a focus so it's about something right there's a perspective or a lens through which were telling our story and then there's a format we're bringing it to life in some way like audio here or video max info-graphic whatever else so if you understand that formula that every piece of content is just a focus plus a format all you need store a laundry list of focuses in formats at your disposal and you can create combinations at the drop of a hat so that's really the goal with the book to kind of prompt to think about content ideas in that way unless you have that shared language to talk about it becomes a lot easier to say okay. I want to tell a history focused story about this particular topic. What's the best way to bring that story to life Maybe a timeline would be really helpful. It kind of gives you a step by step process to activate that creativity so that you're not just sitting at a blank whiteboard or a blank google doc and hoping

Melanie Youtube John Google
Cowen's Co-President on Why SPACs Are Having Such a Moment

Odd Lots

04:12 min | 6 d ago

Cowen's Co-President on Why SPACs Are Having Such a Moment

"Twenty twenty will obviously be remembered for a lot of things no doubt you know after the pandemic the all of the the political stuff that we saw the extraordinary sort of year in economics and the stock market and everything somewhere down the list. Maybe like down like fifty or seventy or ninetieth in terms of like the The things that people look back on i would say is kind of the year of the spac. Yeah certainly definitely if you're in capital markets is a year of this back and i think I'm trying to remember the latest numbers. But i think it was something like sixty billion dollars raised in twenty twenty which was more than the previous ten years combined. Yeah something like that right. So we've just seen this extraordinary surge for people who don't know the these vehicles where people buy into an ipo and then the company has some certain amount of time to then go out and actually acquire a company Bring it public subject to the approval of the people who bought into the ipo. We've seen a lot in the electric vehicle space. We've seen a lot and other technology other areas but just generally in a exploded and be you know once like many things in two thousand twenty not the type of thing. We expected to see in the first half of the year. I think like thinking back to march april. May we would not expect it to be such an extraordinary year in capital markets. Right and i think one of the reasons facts tend to draw a lot of attention. Is that most people are a lot of people associate them with these sort of pre two thousand eight financial crisis excesses so. There's this idea that there's so much money. Sloshing around in the system people are sort of desperate to put it to work so they'll just stick it into a blank check company not knowing what that company is eventually going to be just sort of hoping that their money will get deployed in one way or another so i think a lot of people look at it as another example of froth in the market but again as we discussed on a previous episode with someone who is actually running back. There's also an argument that this makes sense. The structure makes sense for a lot of companies in the market. Yes i think that's right for a lot of companies that make sense. And i think that's also a part of the change. Which is that. Not only were. I would say respects. Maybe associated with speculative excesses. I think they were associated with shady companies. That it's okay if you had a asset if you had a company that couldn't do the typical ipo route couldn't really withstand scrutiny. Maybe try to take it public. The spag and i figure it sort of like you know the they didn't leave a good Flavor taste in people's mouths and. I think that's changed and i think that one of the things that we saw this year is like more seeming. Higher quality assets came public that way more investors and banks with sort of a reputable or strong reputations willing to or eager to use this type of financing capital markets vehicle for this and. So maybe there are. They're shedding some of their previous reputation. Which was sort of not that these back stigma shedding this. That's well put shutting this back stigma. I mean we'll see. I mean who knows maybe twenty twenty-five we'll look back at the class of twenty twenty s bags and all have flobbed. There have been some flops. I mean like you know. Obviously not flops. But you know controversies. Nikola was very popular Spec that surged the moon for awhile and then all kinds of questions rose about its business and its ceo left. So there's still like a lots of questions about the type of companies coming public this way but it certainly a It does not seem to be going away anytime soon. Which means we need to learn more about Learn more about them.

Nikola
Where to Invest First by Derick Van Ness

Optimal Finance Daily

04:17 min | Last week

Where to Invest First by Derick Van Ness

"Where to invest i by derek. Van ness of big life financial dot com. What i'm about to say is controversial. So-called pundits don't want you to know this in eliminates reliance on them they become obsolete su. Here's the unspoken but important truth. Nothing is more vital than investing in yourself. You are the key to everything in your life without you know doors open. No opportunities are unlocked if you are worthless hopeless and helpless than your results will be the same your finances. Your relationships your health without these. What is life were yet. You'll know that you suck that can be crippling and you playing small. You can't let it. You were the only one who can choose nobody else chooses. This verdict or can take action for you. So what do you do. Becoming strong is the answer. Now so you can bulldoze or take advantage of others the complete opposite strength to become so valuable that others don't wanna live without you and what you've created. You know you've accomplished us when it's as if you've become a great lover in their life without you there existence doesn't taste nearly as delicious. You are creating the music they dance to. At that point they will do whatever it takes to keep you around. You have become the soil where they want to lay their seeds and grow their life. This is the goal. It may start slow but it doesn't have to quantum leaps exist but you'll need to suspend your current beliefs to see them. He needs to paint from a blank canvas. Not the one with your current picture of life. It sounds scary. But that's why it's a leap as you get. Better sodas your life. It's a simple equation. And you are the key variable the multiplier that expands everything in your path ambitious. This means becoming indispensable the key asset strive to become the wheel rather than a cog in the wheel. Someone whose value is so powerful that you're not dependent on outside circumstances for your success. This is non-negotiable if you want freedom your primary business or income will dictate the lion share of your financial standing. This is your foundation the rock upon which will build your kingdom. You must master your craft so that you can access resources without proper resources. It's difficult to become your best self. Your financial success will go a long way and paving the smooth road for your relationships in health. Money isn't the answer. But it's far better than poverty if you want true success if your goal is to be a contribution to the world when you invest in yourself. The possible returns are unlimited literally. Where else can you invest five thousand dollars and make six figures. I did it you can too. I spent sixty thousand dollars learning to invest in real estate and it has made me several million dollars. I've spent six figures in seminars trainings in self-improvement and business courses they returned triple digit returns. Even better they continue to earn for me each day. More business income better relationships healthier and happier lifestyle. More intimacy with my creator. So this is your warning. Success isn't somewhere out there. It's an here invest in your human capacity. Your skills and your business you are the craftsmen who will scope the picture of your life. So focus on being the best crossman. Possible once you're performing at a high level and the money is flowing then we can talk about the framework to take you. Even higher optimize cashflow build assets save taxes as you become more successful. You'll need better systems for saving growing and protecting your assets. Until so then dropped the distractions focus on the most important thing developing yourself and your business live the life you were meant to live pursue. Excellence and all you do. The world's will reward you with a rich life and not just financially. You'll experience more love appreciation and gratitude. Best of all. You'll sleep better knowing the world is better because you existed

Van Ness Derek
GOP senator rebukes 'dangerous ploy' to fight Biden victory

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

GOP senator rebukes 'dangerous ploy' to fight Biden victory

"A Republican senators criticizing the efforts of his party to disrupt the final certification of Joe Biden's election victory next week Nebraska Republican senator Ben Sasse has issued a pointed rebuke of the GOP on social media urging his colleagues to also reject this quote dangerous ploy senator Josh Holly was the first to say he's going to raise objections when Congress meets January sixth to affirm Biden's victory other Republicans are expected to join Holly sass disputed the GOP allegations of voter fraud in key states and criticize trump raising more than half a billion dollars for his legal defense when it's really a blank check calling that swampy politics Jackie Quinn Washington

Ben Sasse Senator Josh Holly Joe Biden GOP Holly Sass Nebraska Biden Congress Jackie Quinn Washington
Managing your time effectively

The Tropical MBA Podcast

05:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Managing your time effectively

"Let's talk about time then. In the next thing i was thinking about what are some effective time hygiene or time habits that we can about to institute in the new year. And you know there's just so much of this thinking in the entrepreneurial world that the idea is to just go out there and to work all the time to sort of sacrifice other areas of your life. I caught myself seaney. Lan must describe how he puts ninety hours a week into his business. And i have a hard time relating to how that's possible and the reality is it's i almost feel like a little bit ashamed to it in the light of how this kind of hustle culture is so glorified but i spent more time. You know working on businesses. When i had a job and i sat in a desk from eight. Am in the morning until seven pm at night. Then i do for the businesses that we've run together and part of that is having good time hygiene and focusing on the things that count tell you what my trick is. Dan and it has been the last three. Years is just have a kid because that will clean up your act immediately. It's kind of a joke but it's kind of serious which is like there's a limit now on my time. That was never there before so when people had said to me in the past like oh man. I got so much more disciplined with my time. When i had a kid. I can totally relate to that so i guess what i would try and tell myself before is like how could i engineer that into my day like pre kid because actually used to pull it on must end like you used to make fun of me for it. You'll be like oh. This diesel just like sits down for like twelve hours and the reason i did that is because i kind of enjoyed it and one hand but on the other because i was like super inefficient and the way that was approaching some of these problems so it worked out because they didn't have anything better to do and certainly that's a okay position to be in. If you want to sit there for twelve hours you can do it. If you don't have much else going on which i didn't but now i can't afford to do that so i just have to be a little bit more deliberate about the way that i spend my time. It's weird because like besides being braggadocious on youtube about it. No one's keeping track of this stuff anymore and no one cares right and so it doesn't matter whether it takes fourteen hours a day or four. It's really a matter of practicing the fundamentals simply asking yourself. Are you being efficient with your time if your being efficient with twelve hours a day and what you want to do is grow the biggest company in the world and become the richest person in the world. Then more power to you. Know that's really cool a couple of things. I mean for me. My time hygiene habit in two thousand and twenty one is calendar in a lot more and the strategy essentially is time boxing and time. Boxing is an approach. That leverages parkinson's law which suggests that task expands to the amount of time that you a lot to it and this is particularly true in knowledge. Work and men. You've been through this a million times. Essentially you finished the task by the deadline. Yeah and especially in knowledge based businesses where there are these moving grey lines as to what constitutes being finished. I think time. Boxing is a really excellent approach. The so typically in my calendar has been only for meetings meetings blank space and in two thousand and twenty one. I'm going to get more serious about time. Boxing and putting in projects deliverables deadlines and areas of focus in the calendar. You know one of the small examples started happening in our businesses one of our team members. Alison i would set aside an hour to work together on our sales literature every week and it was simply a matter of like. That's a time hygiene thing. This is a very important thing it tends to get put off and we think it's important so how about we just work on an hour week together and keep each other motivated. This is something. I really wanna explore in two thousand and twenty one interesting. I mean that is a real example. And that's something that we've talked about behind. The curtain with our businesses like ourselves pages needed to be updated. And i like the conversation that we had is like. This is an ongoing project. And so you know with these habits. Die ideas like identifying what's valuable and then making it a habit one of the thing. I'll add to hygiene dan and this is something that i implemented in twenty twenty as it relates. A time is a bedtime. I to stay up really late and i know. Sometimes you're up late to text. You still be up but it is rare. These days dan that i stay up twelve thirty. The reason for that is because i get up later and then i can't be productive during the day as much as i'd like to be. I don't know. I guess this is being part of an adult or something. I don't know. I've always kind of you know moon lighter on the night owl. The best stuff happens at night really. It doesn't for me the best things that happened at night or like more interesting so i cut myself off. And this is one of the habits that i implemented for twenty twenty. I'm looking forward to in twenty twenty one as

Seaney Boxing LAN DAN Parkinson Youtube Alison
What if you were hunted by the Japanese Mafia?

This is Actually Happening

04:53 min | 2 weeks ago

What if you were hunted by the Japanese Mafia?

"By most profound theory lights was that i would lead and uninteresting life and i was forever in envy that other people would read an interesting life and i wouldn't. I came from kind of a prototypical new york city to kid. Jewish family father was a stockbroker and my father became time to perfect barometer of the stock market so he would come home in the evenings and his behavior was completely function of how the stock market had done that evening. My mother by contrast was a much more complex individual who had been a market researcher at the beginning of her career and felt that no amount. The questions she asked of her children would ever be enough growing up. Under my mother's careful observation was extremely close to the experience of being cross examined by a brilliant attorney so speaking through my teenage years. She was a person to be diligent. We avoided this wonderful figure in my youth and my teenage years. And i've actually my college years. My mom's first cousin who was art buchwald art buchwald by first cousin was america's preeminent political satirist in the sixties seventies eighties He tried to hide as much as possible that he was highly aligned with the democratic party. But he in fact actually was at became the godfather of bobby. Kennedy's kids as ethel chose him To help advise her and support her. After bobby. kennedy's assassination and sixty eight. He wrote a series of. I think about thirty five books that made the new york times bestseller list was syndicated in seven hundred papers and he was an incredible force of personality. Everything about art was kind of exuberant consciously or unconsciously As i went through college. And i spent a little bit of time in dc where though i did live in his house i tried to live as much as possible on his dime soaking up as many free lunches either in his office or what may some blank where. He held court several times a week. in his company just because he was so funny and so connected in washington society the closer my commencement from university came the greater. Manning's -iety grew that. I needed to come up with something interesting to do. My experience upon graduating from university was a lot like the film. The graduate i moved back into my parents house and settled into. What i think is for a lot of people the most profound depression that the ever have to return to their parents home and to be faced with the prospect of organizing the rest of their lives. I moved back in and tried to come up with an interesting concept and The only thing interesting. I could think to do it seemed lucrative and it seems. My skill set were Jobs on wall street and since my father had spent thirty five years on wall street and was a good guy. I received an offer to go to work for bear stearns and the idea of accepting that offer filled me with horror so one night upon accepting that offer. My mother and father took after dinner. My mother in attempting to make levity of suggested that she would buy me a picture book of the world and this idea stopped me dead in my tracks me sitting in a cubicle up two. Am in an investment bank office and taking the book out for my desk and looking at pictures of japan. I decided that japan was paris. Paris was where buchwald had begun his career. So this moment hit me like a brick. And i. I never showed up. I never accepted the job or went to work. Through a series of connections. I found out there was position open to become a newspaper reporter in tokyo naturally. Went to see my uncle about it. He said you've got to go. This is your moment. There's a travel agency on the first floor. Get up off your seat. I'm going downstairs to buy the ticket for you.

Buchwald Art Buchwald Bobby New York City Ethel Democratic Party Kennedy New York Times America Manning DC Washington Bear Stearns Depression Japan Buchwald Paris Tokyo
The fight for civil rights and freedom

TED Talks Daily

05:13 min | 2 weeks ago

The fight for civil rights and freedom

"This is such a great honor for me to be in this room with you to have this conversation. I can't tell you what it means to me to have this opportunity. You represent something so precious to so many of us not just wanted to start by thanking you for that for your willingness to wrap your arms around people may and to make me think that it's possible to do difficult things important things and i just want to start by asking you to talk a little bit about that experience. Growing up in rural alabama and the black belt of america and how that cultivated the spirit that shaped your life and your vision. You used to have to pick cotton on your family's farm while usa fuss as a young child complaint. Why this to. Emma motherless. Avoid so many things we can do. She's to his hard work with. What are we going to do. We have to make a living. But i was hoping in prynne. What a day. When people wouldn't have to work so hard in hot sun she was hoping also the thing would be better much better for us as a as a people and for my family my mother She was always thinking ahead. Did we get up early and going pick as which climb as we could. We get more money. 'cause she knew declining would be heavier. Coulda do we own it so it was weighed. Miami will be increased. Your mother sounds really strategic my New mother one day. She came across a little newspaper in downtown short. That says something about the school in nashville tennessee. That blanks students could attend. She encouraged apply for that. Even though that met you'd be leaving. The house should be leaving the farm. You would not be contributing that that extra labour will out was willing to go to try to do what mine. We'll call during better yet to get an education but in the beginning i wanted to choice state you wanted to. To desegregate. estate submit an application. High school transcript and never heard from the school saw. I wrote a letter to dr king at india. my mother. My father enema sisters brothers in an teachers told him i needed his help. He wrote me back. iran Around bus ticket invited me to come to montgomery to meet with. You can never ever forget it. You knew about dr king even before the boycott you'd heard his sermon The apostle paul preaches to american christians. It's the speech she gives to. All the people in montgomery four days after rosa parks has been arrested by at the end of the speech. He says one day they're going to tell a story about a group of people in montgomery alabama and then he says a black people who stood up for their rights and they stood for their rights. The whole world changed and you had an immediate response to that call to action. The message really appeal to me. Yeah it was sort of a social gospel message. I wanted to do what. I could make things better coinc- something that is not variety of just you have to assess something you have to do. Something was like a fine burning up in your bom and you cannot be silenced. My mother was said to me. Boy don't get in trouble. Don't get in trouble. you can get hurt. You can get killed. Dr king and rosa eating nixon and others that are read about done it time and later met in spine. Rena get when the trouble necessary trouble. And i've been getting in trouble. Ila sems- the citizens to freed awry. You went to nashville mcgann. The work of leaning nonviolence winded nonviolence become an essential part of your worldview in the theology and the activism that you wanted to create grown up wanted to be minister. I felt that dr king was saying in his speeches in keeping of jesus so readily accepted the saadia nonviolence. The philosophy disappoint a nonviolent. We talked to respect the dignity in the worst of every human being

Dr King Emma Motherless USA Montgomery Alabama Nashville Enema Miami Tennessee Rosa Parks Apostle Paul Iran High School India Rena Rosa Nixon Mcgann
SPACs: The Backwards IPO That's Taking Over Wall Street

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 2 weeks ago

SPACs: The Backwards IPO That's Taking Over Wall Street

"The hottest trend on wall street. This year is a spec. That's spelled s. p. a. c. constantly house backs backs best back frenzies. Back actions back is the new black former house speaker. Paul ryan's got us back. Shaquille o'neal's got us back and the youngest self made billionaire ever just brought in all that cash through a spec. What the heck is a spec will let. Npr's camilla Explained in an ipo or initial public offering. You start with a company that wants to go public and then investors toss a bunch of money at it. A spat or special purpose acquisition company kind of flips that around investors pool. Their money together. I with no idea what company they're investing in then. That pile of money goes out and looks for a company to merge with the company gets the money and the stock ticker with a lot less paperwork until recently this was not a well regarded way to go public. They have this sort of shady origin. Story right rodriguez is a professor at the university of georgia school of law. There are these blank check. Companies really had a bad reputation a lot of blank check. Companies were outright frauds. So the federal government. Crackdown suspects added more safeguards to the blank check model like investors can get their money back if they don't approve of the company that gets picked but they were still on the fringes of the financial world until now and probably done one or two huge back combinations a year for the last five years until this year and then i would say the of the market just exploded. Sarah morgan is a lawyer. With the firm. Vincent in elkins specs today over fifty percent of my practice this year. Why now well if you look past the bad reputation specs have some real advantages there. Faster than ipo's and have less uncertainty for founders. Both attractive during this really uncertain year. Austin russell is the ceo of luminary a company. That makes lighter. That's like radar but with lasers it's used in self driving vehicles. He founded the company as a teenager. Now he's got contracts with companies like volvo. It was time to go public and he saw the appeal of a spec. You've got the process end to end and in a like four months as opposed to having to spend huge time distraction for the better part of a year or two and he'd seen several well respected companies. Do it i. it's pretty cool. His spac merger earlier this month made him at twenty five forbes's youngest self made bilionaire. Today's specs have clear benefits for founders. Like russell who can go public with less paperwork they can also mean big bucks for the sponsors who organize them in fact sponsors make so much money if they close a deal that some critics worry. There's an incentive to merge with a mediocre company just to get that payday and that raises a big question whether this spac craze will be good for investors shiver drita says the risks are real because the flip side of making things easier for companies is inevitably that the risk of fraud to investors goes up. I don't know anyway to square that circle some of the sears specs have performed badly on the stock market and others have raised bigger concerns after zero emission truckmaker. Nikola went public through respect. It was accused of fraud which the company denies despite the skeptics the spectacular rise in specs shows no sign of fading away camilo domino npr news.

University Of Georgia School O Paul Ryan Sarah Morgan Shaquille Camilla Austin Russell Neal NPR Rodriguez Elkins Federal Government Luminary IPO Vincent Volvo Russell Nikola Camilo Domino
The Psychology of Finding Your Voice with Emmanuella Grace

For the Love of Podcast

04:07 min | 3 weeks ago

The Psychology of Finding Your Voice with Emmanuella Grace

"What can we do to move beyond what maybe our perception of what we sound like. And i think come to terms with the actual voice that we have because you focus a lot on the psychological components. What else should we be thinking about. Or what else do you think about as a coach and as somebody that really does focus on boys. What are some other things that realm that that come into play. there's a couple of components. Amy cuddy did some amazing research power poses. Which i think if you're not living under a rock you've come across at some stage and what we understand. Even though that their research has moved on because it's been ten fifteen years now what we did understand from that research is that how he's our bodies effects. How our minds feel and so by getting into a good head space before you communicate in an important context. Let's say the word or even before you get up and connect with your family at breakfast table. Get yourself into a good head space but you can use your body to do that. Which might be doing some sit ups doing some power poses or We put on a record and debt seated or anything where you're feeling good in your body will affect the sound. That comes out if you think of your voice as the sound that an instrument is if instrument feels good like. Let's he's example of a trumpet because that would make sense for people right. You hear people talk a lot about the diaphragm. It's important if it wasn't working. You're not breathing. But i don't think that it needs to be the focus of voice training. It really is just the air that goes into the instrument so it's important inasmuch as the power behind the sound but it doesn't deserve the amount of tension i think it's gotten in the past diaphragm important. It helps you. Get the air through the trumpet. But if the trumpets been banged against a tree and filled up with mud and you haven't cleaned it lately and it's still got a bit of spitting. it's going to be bradley. And a bit outta choon and it when you hit a high note squeak and it's going to be a good sound right so if you don't look after the trumpet sound that comes out the other end of it however good the air going in is it goes through the instrument. Which is your larynx and your farrington your sinuses and it'll resonates in your face. If that part of the instrument isn't functioning well the sound that comes out. The voice that comes out of the instrument is not going to be great so that is also true that if we look after our minds which is the thing that controls the instrument we look after our minds i if we get off body feeling good straight away. Your voice is going to sound better because you're looking after the instrument does a whole. You're polishing that trumpet. Your removing this spit. You're taking care not to bang it around keeping it warm. All of those things will make your voice and your instrument yield a better sound. Would a fantastic analogy. I love that another analogy that you'd give it at least a thought is this idea of having childlike mindset. I absolutely love this thinking and we are so conditioned as adults to move away from this imagination that we have as children where sky's the limit and we could do anything we just have this. Everything's possible mindset. And i love the child mindset when it comes to voice and one of those things that you talk about is even singing in the shower. Oh yeah the hotel excelsior. Why why are you gotta get exercise. Firstly the acoustics are usually really good if all the rooms in the house where you get a sound great because it's like naturally some echo. It's good but one of the things that can make it challenging is your naked and so people will feel expose. what like. Hopefully you're naked shower. But even for me. I can have moments where i'll get in there. I'll be like okay. You know this is where it's few now saying all my mind will go blank. And after being a professional singer for more years than i want to tell you i will still have a member. I'll be like. I can't think of anything to sing. So then i'll usually go dance with somebody so always worse as port of call and hope that i don't slip and fall in the shower. It's one of those things where you've just got to set aside your inhibitions and be like i'm naked. This is the best thing in a sound. Let's go and just go with whatever goes into your head first because it's warm and steamy so your vocal folds are in a good space and you relaxed because hopefully no one's banging on the door and telling you they want breakfast and hasn't used the litter or to spin cycle isn't going in the laundry because now we're all living at home at a lot more than we used to. But it's one of those things where it's just somewhere where you can get really uninhibited and if you can feel uninhibited when you're naked. He's going to be so much. Easier to feel uninhibited. You're dressed in front of an audience. Like your rib

Amy Cuddy Bradley
How to Pick the Right Music For Live Streaming with Matt Schick

Launch Your Live

09:30 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Pick the Right Music For Live Streaming with Matt Schick

"Why is picking the right music still important for your livestreams. Sure thank you yes. So here's here's where we're at currently so there's a lot of great ways to produce great streams that are engaging in this new virtual world. The problem is most people still aren't doing that so we're left with you. Know we're left with this condition where we're just all so Saturated with three restoring ed screens on with meetings and family get togethers and family. Holidays in lung were laying in bed. Scrolling instagram watching videos of of our favorite influencers. So we're constantly looking at this stuff and it's getting old. I mean zoom fatigue was a real thing back in may and here. We are in nearly december. And it's the problem so the ability to add something that changes up the rhythm of people's day days is very important so they're used to watching talking and listening to talking hearing people talk about them so in order to in performing world. When you're building a stage show it's really important heads and flows so you have the not just the same tonality the entire time of wakes people up it it. It just it gets people gets the juices reenergized. So it's really important to do that. And music is a great way of doing so where just keeps the energy moving along and It just it it it takes from being just a monotonous talking which people just hearing all day as a little bit of Of of levity in some cases excitement in other cases the most poorly just a tone that you get to create with music so when okay so obviously you know picking write music very important. I love the ebbs and flows. You talk about their so. I mean there are times where people shouldn't use music on their livestreams. I mean. are there certain times where you know. Oh well you should use maybe just an interim you know an intro and then continued that throughout your stream and have altro that goes with it or should you have like sound bed. That goes plays throughout seem or. Are there times where you shouldn't use any music. That's those are all great questions. Yes for sure you don't want to overdo it with music. a little. a little goes a long way especially when it's very very delicate right like we're talking and we are the feature so right now if i were to play a song overpower us and he couldn't hear what i was saying. Were you were saying christian. It would be it would degrade the performance not enhanced the performance because i say performance. Because that's my becker the podcast so you. The ability to hear your. Your speaker presenter is above importance below that having a nice music sets the tone for what exactly is going on at the same time is is very helpful so fun example that i always use it. Sounds sounds silly but if you try you'll really see how effective it is just like film video on your phone of of your wife or your husband or child walking to the mailbox right and that's all you need right the walking out to the mailbox to get the mail. If you put a sad slow cinematic song behind that this thing becomes tear jerker i mean if you put it in black and white forget about it. You're you're you've lost your audience but it really can set the tone for just fills in the blanks and paints a story. That video only cannot do you put upbeat peppy music to that now. It's a story of a of you know your daughter going to get the mail excited for package to come and wants to see if it's there and nat music change alone without changing speed. The weights shot or anything else. That music can completely repaint that picture for you. So it's very important. It's very nice if you're talking about something very serious. Music isn't the way to go for talking about something with some comedic levity something a little more upbeat and and comical would really help that It's just a really depends on what the stream is but the run of show is when to use it when not you mentioned a couple of different You know use use case studies. I should say so. There's there's what's called the music bed. Music bed is as music that literally lays underneath. Or i say you lay on top of the music just like you sleep. Innovate and so The music is underneath. You just like beds underneath you when you're sleeping so its music. That's pretty low in the background. You still hear. The music is typically no lyrics. it's looking instrumental. Ambient sound that again crates. That mood as you're talking and that can go. If there's like ireland period is speaking or let's say you're europe demonstrating something or sharing a screen and you just fill it in and just make it a little more interesting. It's a really great Great no. You study for music bed. There's also it's called stinger or stings or some people need him. Bumpers in that can be like up next. We've got a really great guest. It's adam shark tank. But i but i borrow a bow and that's your stinger. You know just a bit of just an energy jolt so again people. Listen to you for ten minutes. You've got a fun. Jingle or sting that comes in maybe weren't throughout the entire show that people are used to that. It's on brand for you. Music great way to establish a brand and stick to it. Maybe it's a sting that you used. Throughout the entire event they'd be at the beginning and the end you've got to prolong jazz insurance altro and it just is it. All together into a nice cohesive package so yeah there's a lot of ways of using it overdoing it is definitely something you don't want do Service just really important to make sure that you're picking music at the right time and making make strategic choices and along those lines to do you think that sometimes People are like you know you hear a lot of times like oh i wanna play all this music. And then they're they're stuff's getting taken down and it's almost like they feel like if they can't have music they're like somehow doomed a-. What are your thoughts on that. Yeah no it's it's very important if you and if you're not aware of i'm glad you brought it up jim because you know you can't just play music that you're not licensed to us. And what is that pretty much everything you've ever heard before i mean if you listen to radio every single track you've ever heard on. The radio is is owned by another entity. A record label or an artist. You know when when you When we used to do our live show in cedars you pay their to organizations. You pay the right. You pay rights to There's as cap in this. Bmi and those organizations essentially pay. These blanket costs covers the Your ability to play tracks in a theater. So currently there's no real way where that translates super well to to live because if you're streaming youtube heavens youtube know that you paid for the rights to iraq harry song in fact there's been funny stories of actual artists to play their own materials. Clearly their licencee in many cases own it and they're streams are getting pulled down because sites like youtube and facebook and pinterest our end What's twitter periscope rather not patriots video yet. That'd be drifts yet you know. Those sites have robo scanners that automatically detect a copy written material whether it's video audio so they can in many cases. Just pull your stream down altogether Because they think you're using it with permission or many cases. A lot of us are trying to monetize streams so they say hey. You're not allowed to make money off of this other person's contents or naturally they pull your stream down and that could be devastating if you're livestream producer or livestream host of your of your own show. Have you strip pulled down as certainly very frightening so you have to do it. The right way and there are quite a few right ways of doing it. So while you can't play again You know whitney houston or lady gaga song because those are obviously owned by their respective record labels. You can't play other types of music there's public domain music and there's royalty free music so public domain music is basically a library of music that known space gates. It's used for us for one thousand. Nine hundred seventeen is the year or anything before that year Songs such as happy birthday for example. Anything was released before that are public domain. So you can use it anywhere. No one owns the rights to this Annual not getting you to would never pull your string down etc so you're surly allowed to do that The wider umbrella a portfolio of music. That you can use 'cause 'cause you're limited with public domain is what's called royalty free music this music that's been created for the sole purpose of being used by content creators. So many cases for all two free doesn't mean that it's free Although there are certain free royalty free websites but royalty free basically means you are allowed to purchase the rights to the news this music and typically purchased the rights. One time now you have access to use the music and while youtube still doesn't know somebody's telling you to have oh match. Schick in new york purchased the rights to the jiffy. Pop one eighty fitches a song. I just created morning. Everyone doesn't know that usually youtube does know. Is that jiffy. Pop eighty is a royalty. Free song that they will fly or poll down so when i buy the rights through a website. And we can talk about websites. I like to use but when you buy the rights to those websites essentially you now get the track and full quality without any audio watermark. And i can use that without being pulled out of my stream so

Youtube Ireland Cedars Europe BMI Pinterest JIM Patriots Iraq Whitney Houston Lady Gaga Facebook Twitter Schick New York
Higher education now offers pathways into medical marijuana industry in Pennsylvania

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Higher education now offers pathways into medical marijuana industry in Pennsylvania

"Blank, I know doesn't sound appetizing. Then again, it appears only plant workers took the food's home. A worker's been suspended from his job. There's now facing at least one felony charge. It's unclear if anybody else was involved in the operation. But the idea of drinking wine from the sewage planet well, trying to get that image out of your mind now w p h I FM in HD Jenkintown k y w NW, my pfm HD to Philadelphia radio dot com station. The Children were nestled all snug in their beds. While visions of cyber threats danced in their heads and

Philadelphia
Sweeping it All Away

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

05:19 min | Last month

Sweeping it All Away

"Morning. You hope your old dame well can you hear thumbs so great. Excellent now so again. Yeah hope you're doing well. With the the covert and everythin- and anything else menu lives just a big. Thank you for those of you really help with fundraising that that really has been touching thank you. We really helps us get by through all these difficulties when it's very difficult to raise money so thank you very much and today i wanted to come another case and this is Case twenty eight of the blue cliff record. And one of the reasons i i picked. The self is a little bit like remind us the way that we did a few weeks ago but also this is why nonsense who was the feature in particular call on basically loses adama conversation with another teacher so it just shows you know. You don't win all the time. And it also highlights some of the some other aspects of the teach him so last week basically. We're just talking about that aspect. To wonder of wonders. I o beings the great earth of the wisdom virtue of the awaken one to us. Of course it's The traditional robot hat sued This this This week The seventh beer eight isn't the eighth being. Let's see tuesday. I guess that that way. So it's important to to reflect on the buddha's on the buddha's life and teachings so wonder if one does i o beings the great earth are the wisdom virtue of the awaken to thus snus and what we tend to deal with more importantly as because var upside down views. We've failed to see it. You know usually the grassi's green elsewhere. You know people things have a better time than than we do. That is always better. Better places to practice in the place that i stand so i mean you can fill in. You can really fill in the blank as to why it isn't like say the awaken life for the buddha's life if you wish. So we're we're more dealing with the socal relative aspect of our own lives the set right from the beginning. So can we swallow somebody else's words in many ways Better not to that a to see for ourselves in in whatever way but it's also important not to rely on our own stories quite often the stories we have about ourselves and our our own life not reflective of reality. This reality not that is fixed. This reality is occurring now wherever we no matter what would do and then the thing is can we really take that teach in the comes on a momentary basis or do we want another one. That may become in lighter so anyway i'll bring up the case and obviously it's tied in with what i'm saying right now not mind though. Buddha miss this got no preamble straight into the main case nonsense cooled on masta. Yakusho navan jaka. Joe asked have the sages. Since time immemorial had a teaching they did not tell anybody nonsense said yes yakhio said. What is the teaching. They did not tell anyone role waiting for the answer. Now and he nonsense said it is not mind it is not buddha. It is not a thing k. Jaka joe said you said it. Nonsense said that's all i know. What a what about you jaka joe said. I'm not a great Zen t cherry data. How would i know whether it has been told on out. So he's he's having a bit of fun here now. You got to see how he says that to him though to could be sarcastic could be could be praising any any way like that nonsense said. I don't understand yucky. Oh said. I've already told you too much so The zen master zim buddhis- nev- a helped people harrison. Why are we doing this. Zan masters in buddha's never help people see kaz past and present run as if racing

Adama Grassi Yakusho Navan Jaka Yakhio Jaka Joe JOE Nonsense ZAN Harrison
Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

Fancy Free Podcast

05:21 min | Last month

Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

"Thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me joanne. Absolutely fill in the blanks. What did i miss about who you are and what you do. Oh boy. I am a montana toddler. Mama which means that. I spent my time outside. Four seasons of the year chasing my one year old around right now league us. My background is in social science. So i'm actually a trained social scientists in published research on persuasion so that was kind of made. I love if you will. I married my husband. Eric works medicine. And so this has been a very interesting time Yes australian co bed. I'm sure you can imagine for all of time spent apart. We have a one year old wilder. Tell me about how you came to be part time professor. Yes i went into academia. Because i love people in their brains since i came out of the womb. My parents would say that. I asked why about everything. Why why would you now. I understand as a mom myself. So i found that social science was the key to why people do what they do and i fell in love with the idea of studying people's brains and how we form relationships in dot world of communication research. There's as little tiny nisha research called social influence or persuasion. And so it's basically the science of how we get people to say yes to things and within that i researched health communication so basically how we get people to say yes to wear seatbelts or donate their organs or in my case have safe sex so like use a condom and that was a really interesting topic to study. Oh my gosh. that's so fascinating. Yeah i think. I missed my calling. I listened to several podcasts. That are along this line hidden. Brain and invisibly leah and i like revisionist history with malcolm. Glad well even. Though i know that he's more of an observer at he's not as much of a scientist but i just find anybody who thinks about humans and what they do and how their brains work in a different way or a unique and new way. I'm so fascinated with i. I just can't even get enough of it. So i love eating this. Yeah you hit. The nail on the had hidden brain is exactly my realm of study. I love it. And i actually wrote a blog post about one of his episodes about tunnel vision. I almost felt like it unlocked. A part of my understanding about other people that was missing about how people can make such terrible decisions because they're under duress and there's a whole episode. I think actually unsafe sex. And you're rational decision making in your thought process when you're sitting in your office chair. Drinking a cup of coffee talking to a girl felt like well. Of course. I would never put myself in harm's way but then when you're under the influence of infatuation and the moment somehow suddenly our brains make different types of decisions but that that episode about tunnel vision. There's so much more there. I think he just kind of grays. The tip of the iceberg on why people make unexpected unpredicted decisions and why people kinda dig themselves into a deeper when all of the outside observers are going wait. Why don't you just stop doing this and start doing this. But because they're already in that whole they just can't you know yacht. We get super married to our convictions. In so our brains are really uncomfortable with information that goes against our beliefs so we end up seeking out and believing information that even if it's not really good information as long as support previously held beliefs. We just roll with it. I haven't heard the tunnel vision episode but that sounds exactly like the type of research that was doing which kind of explains like people who believe that cohen is a really scary disease will contain to believe that more and more staunchly. Yeah they will reject data to the contrary they will collect data to the consistent. Exactly that is exactly the same thing we do with politics and so many things all right. Well let's do rapid fire questions. If you had to describe yourself in one word. What would it be bold awesome. What is your number. I'm in achiever. Which i think is a three with an individualist swing so achiever in midwest yes okay. So three wing four. Fold your baby. I love it. What is something unexpected. That has changed about you in the past few years so i became a mother which wasn't unexpected. Because i didn't know if. I wanted to have children but i became a mother in a very unexpected way which i'm sure we'll talk about. Yeah gosh. I can't wait to hear more about that. Wow becoming a mother is like the earth shattering and paradigm shifting. I opening and exhausting. What's the scariest thing you've ever done for fun moved to africa. Wow you did it for fun. And when was that twelve years ago. I was in college. Amazing and africa is a continent. Where were you in africa. Yes i was in ghana which is like no armpit carnival area of the west coast. So we're kind of curves.

Nisha Joanne Wilder Montana Eric Malcolm Cohen Midwest Africa Ghana West Coast
A Spiritual Take on The Surrender Experiment

TMV Podcast

06:30 min | Last month

A Spiritual Take on The Surrender Experiment

"Saddam and welcome to another team To you by the muslim vibe as always i'm your host and qassem And on this week's podcast. I'm joined by dr shake joa shamali. We've had a few times before. All the episodes is built have been really really fascinating. Listens and some of the most listen to episodes. Actually that we've ever done so on this week's podcast We're talking so we start by talking about. A book called surrender experiment which i was reading and we had a few of line conversations about and i said you know. Let's let's talk about on the podcast. And then we kind of went onto discuss islamic spirituality in the kind of mainstream rome and where it's letting us down as a community and why on the kind of white doesn't have the same mass appeal that these other books like this render experiment to have surrender experiment by the way is a really fascinating. Read highly recommended i had an audible. I was listening to audible. And i think it's a michael singer who's the author who actually read out as well but it's a fascinating journey. Really interesting concept definitely recommended on my side. Obviously we discussed on the podcast that orbit and yes. I've been told by the way by my team. By team. by the team. I rambled too much. Dina the podcast. I'm trying to keep it really brief and succinct one. Half minutes isn't bad. Here is my conversation with Dr jawara shomali saddam's saddam. Sally rank you very much for for joining us again on the podcast That appearance now. And i feel like we've covered quite of ground in the past But there's always more that we can talk about and we've always wanted to and i think for context how this kind of came about was the last time you were on. We were talking about Changing habits as a means to get closer to got into find god and we. We spoke about a variety of things. I think the where we started from was The power of now. No the power of now it was. How hormone the name of the book. The power of habits the power of habit. Yes charles doug it something like that. Remember his name That's where we started. Yeah and then. The conversation went on some winding routes incredible discussion wind blowing beautiful discussion. If you haven't heard the podcasts do check it out. i'll put the link in the description. But what i said to you after that. Actually i sent you a voice. No 'cause i started listening to a book that you mentioned on that podcast. I believe if not then someone mentioned it to me afterwards. cold I'm really blanking. Names of surrender experimental surrender experiment By michael a singer. And what i said to you was when i finished this book. It will be great to sit down and like any time i do. One of these read one of these self development personal growth books. Yeah it will be good to sit down with yourself. Because i think you've covered off why you've read one of them but you have seems have enough time and to kind of have a conversation and i guess i guess start with the concept and the notions within the book and then use that as a leapfrog into just where it goes. Yeah and ironically with this one. We'll talk about surrender at the beginning. But when i tried to sit down with you and discuss what we're going to talk about you just gave me nothing and said just surrender and we'll see where it goes So i think let's start with the book and the notion of render so so i guess for people that haven't come across it it's it's quite a fascinating book. I think in terms of. It's almost like an autobiography Like a very introspective autobiography of of micro housing Is is big on yoga and rich rotting through that means but he started out on the journey by kind of the appreciating the fact that his in a his thoughts that run through his head in the narrative in his head not necessarily him And that's just a part of him that he can detach froman and whatever else And then he started learning how to silence his mind. And then the journey took him to kind of surrendering to whatever life was put in front of him. Yeah and it led him down a a remarkable road. I mean as the book went on. I was like okay. This is getting a bit more and more farfetched. Yeah until you get to the. I don't want to ruin the his his story in his journey. Yeah but it's it's quite crazy. And i i was thinking throughout and i guess i'll start with this question. I was thinking throughout. You know whether. It's just a coincidence. That someone who has this kind of approach to life of surrendering went on to have a remarkable and an enormous crazy life in that sense. Or if that's actually part of surrender Very tuition despite of or because of yeah. Yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah. It's a very fascinating book. And it's been received really well of course. This wasn't his first book. He had the untethered soul which is another amazing book and really recommend it to people who are going through anxiety or basically anyone who wants to have a better life but this one was very interesting he basically as you said mentions the story of his life and how this one simple practice of surrender basically changed the course of his life and i think the way he puts it in the book and we can discuss whether we agree or not is that it was actually because of surrender that everything happened to him. And what was your personal like. Take on like when you were listening. Could you relate to it or or coffee machine something to say. I think i love your coffee machine. Even last time we to participate and i really feel good like if people don't want to listen to me at least the coffee machine. Yeah yeah yeah. We'll wait for it to stop I think hopefully done So in terms of. I guess what when i'm reading these listening to these books. I'm i'm trying to see if i can resonate with the narrative

Dr Shake Joa Shamali Saddam Dr Jawara Shomali Saddam Charles Doug Michael Dina Froman Rome Sally
What Is Alpha Fold

Data Skeptic

03:48 min | Last month

What Is Alpha Fold

"So what is alpha full. It's a software system. Relying on many of the techniques we discuss on data skeptic deep learning and that sort of thing as well as many biological techniques. Don't discuss on the show. It is a truly interdisciplinary breakthrough which is able to predict the three d structures of proteins based on the sequence of amino acids that compose them proteins consist of twenty different amino acids and the structure of that protein. Which is the hard thing to predict. Sadly also the most interesting thing. The protein structure determines its biological function proteins. You can imagine are quite small. That's why we can't just look at them to see what their shapes our or at least not look at them directly. This is something that bothered me when i was younger. I was learning about things like the atom and hearing that the electron was never exactly in one place that it existed as a potential cloud or really just a probability distribution over where it might be. Maybe that worked out on paper. But i wanted to know what if i could zoom you know or shrink myself down or get a really high powered microscope. What would it really look. Like if i could get down there and see it. And i eventually learned. That was a nonsense question. It's like asking. What is the son taste like. We're talking about atomic scales. The errors that alpha fold made were on the nanometer scale. As far as seeing at least with my eyes that's going to require photons. And if something is skinnier than the period of the photon within. There's no way to really see it. But it's so. Scientists have developed many ways of seeing or. I'm just gonna start saying observing of observing proteins x ray crystallography is a diffraction technique nuclear magnetic resonance takes advantage of properties we know about oscillating magnetic fields and cryogenic electron. Microscopy is a technique whose mechanism i can't well articulate but these have been the major techniques that scientists used to experimentally determine the structure of proteins. So why do we need al full that all if we have three techniques all of these are insanely expensive require tremendous amount of training and are in some ways error-prone although no disrespect to the operators of these machines that work in those labs. I don't know where this figure came from. I couldn't find an original source. But i found a lot of popular press quoting the number. Two hundred thousand dollars is the cost of establishing one protein shape through some of these methods. So you've got the choice between i. Guess what a down payment on a house or knowing the shape of a protein also commonly cited is the opportunity for this to advance drug discovery. My understanding of this is that in many cases drugs are designed to kind of fill in the blanks or do something that a protein isn't doing to mimic shape and therefore mimic its mechanism. I was trying to come up with a programming. Analogy here may be saying that the amino acids were the binary code and the proteins were the assembly language. There's a structure to them but very archaic and hard to read by humanize. I prefer to read it in the original. See myself. i'm not a biologist. So i'm not going to speculate on this but it is quite clear. This is a fundamental and major breakthrough. I don't know if my analogies fair. But i would. Maybe compare this to a breakthrough in quantum computing that doesn't change everything about computing overnight or soon thereafter. We'd see improvements in search thanks to grow. His algorithm and an integer factor ization. Thanks to shore's algorithm but i lack the creativity to appreciate the full breadth of what it might mean for practical quantum computers exist and i'll select the background in creativity and breath to understand what alpha fold is going to do for us in the future. But i'm very eager to watch the story unfold. As i'm sure it will

"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Blow everyone. . This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, , and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. . In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. . But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. . Cam Maybe, , we could just start with. . The decision that both you and I made not. . Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, , there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. . Well, , my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. . That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. . Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. . Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it <hes> so. . Wasn't even the novelty I just found. . The options that we would given. . If we wanted attending things in person, , we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. . Come on a room. . That's a surprise because you know at the early. . Onset pandemic, , we were talking about Sasha <unk> demonstrating graying potentially. . Some shows never happening again. . You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. . and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. . You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, , but this has been an education in. . So many ways a pop aside from the fact, , I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. . It doesn't kind of. . Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. . You know the as so many people said, , and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. . The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, , and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. . To cross-references and to. . and to be entertained as well. . I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. . You know we've had a couple of. . Dummy, runs , <hes> that went. . Wildly convincing. . And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that <hes> anyways. . Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, , very different game I felt. . Yeah. . You also got to spend. . More time with the designers because. . So much more I. . Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, , and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. . It reminded me of. . When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. . You know half hour forty, , five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. . It was a novelty for them to be talked to, , and you would get people. . You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. . Meanwhile, , the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, , this is in a funny way. . This is what it was like that. . You would be having quite you. . You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, , it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. . It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. . I guess.

Tim blanks Imran Ahmed CEO founder
"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:18 min | 3 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"To the podcast around this time of year, each season Tim blanks is sit down for a chat to recap the fashion season. That was it's a tradition that we wanted to continue again this year in this very unusual season even though neither of us have attended a physical fashion, show all season, but it was an interesting season for technological innovation and creativity. Here's Tim blanks inside passion. Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO.

Tim blanks Imran Ahmed CEO founder
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 3 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Midnight Moment - The NFL - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

57:00 min | 4 months ago

Midnight Moment - The NFL - burst 1

"Patriots Pau Spartan here from the Midnight Patriots. So, one of the. Feel about anchored now. When we started this insanity, we always tell people. The reason we do this is because insomnia sucks almost as bad as tyranny. We would have these conversations between ourselves the group chats. Throws and things like that. We thought, hey man, you know we should just record a podcast, but the more we looked the more expensive became. Get Cross anger. Anger gives you all the tools you need to do this to make your voice heard and get your voice out there. You have an opinion you gotta use anchor everything from recording to editing to distribution that you'd be all the tools that you need. To allow you to record your podcast right for your phone or your computer. Anchor covers distribution by getting on Apple. spotify and many many others. I mean how you can make money right from your own podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need in one spot in one place simple at effect. So get yourself anchor make voice her. Midnight Patriot, nation welcome to NFL. Mid Nitrates it is you boy spartan here with the the ever ever pot and flaming premix A good to have you as D to ultra. Sports nerds. In specifically football cards. On the end on the. Patriot staff. Phoenix tonight decided that we were actually GonNa do kind of a deep dive into what is pissing us off most about NFL and. Most pro sports in general to be quite honest. But we're GONNA focus on the NFL in this particular case because. Both Phoenix, myself have. A long history of both fandom and and. Playing Sports, we have a unique appreciation of what it takes. More it doesn't and how it is devolved into the into this shit show that it is. Just, we're just GONNA go from there. So Phoenix you had you had some thoughts that you wanted to start with go ahead. Well specifically. I I have a major gripe with the NFL in general. Being more politicized. And the. Let's End Racism. Okay, I get my left. Black lives matter. No sorry. They do and I agree with the message just not the manor which is being delivered. We've said that before on the organization go ahead. Exactly. All of a sudden you know we have a organization. That's Through much. Yup You can't do this. You know we have this. AFOREMENTIONED SCAMMED EMMA GOING ON. You can't do this. You can't do this. Well Yeah you can't. Okay. And then we have the social unrest of the nation being thrown into. A sporting. Venues. that. For All intents purposes let's call it. What is it's an escape. It allows us the viewer. Fan. That three four hours. Sunday evening Monday night whatever that. It gives us that escape from eager live love get up go to work and deal with people you come home you deal with cranky wife and kids don't listen dog that Shit's in your shoes. You've taken that away. And now have made it. Well we got to get on board with this. Well, we're relevant to. We're a large. Organization we goner? A multitude of platforms. That we have viewership. There any given? Day that we have competition So now we're going to. Paint messages in the end. We're going to have. Athletes will we're going to kneel to show solidarity. I got a huge problem with that and for our listeners I'm sure you have your own platforms as well. The American flag comes I stand for Gore country you back your country everything else second berry period. That's my thought on that. That's the way it is. Unfortunately when. The NFL NBA MLB hockey underwater basket weaving has become politicized in what we have to show solidarity with this. I have a question. Are you showing solidarity four? Message. Or are you As the NFL did let's put. The name of a known fell one on a helmet. Let's. Let's praise this guy because shot back when a an. Amplifier point in accused rapists. Is someone with a warning active warrants? For Rape Yes. So here in my eternal gripe with this, that will probably go down in flames just like the rest of them. Why are we? In fact. Standing behind. Someone. WHO BREAKS THE LAW? WHO does walk. Yes. They didn't listen. They got shot in the back whatever. House we say. Extenuating circumstances came to be that this ended up how that was. We have to stand behind this person as a form of. Instead of. Waiting, for all the facts that come out be proven beyond a shadow of a doubt. And then move forward from there. Well. That's the real question. Isn't it is is you know? All we've seen is what has been allowed to be released. Okay I mean look I think in his thing I agree with everything you just said save one thing. Okay. I don't think demand deserve to be shot seven times point blank in the back now. Having said that. He has an active warrant for his arrest, what he should not have done to prevent that whole situation was to surrender. Get handcuffed and be taken into to engage whatever process there is. Okay, you don't fight cops in the street if you do. You mess with the bull, you get the horns. Okay. He's admitted he was armed. He's admitted he was going for a different arm- armament. Okay. And what do we expect the COPS to die? I don't think so you know I'm. In the eyes of them, that's probably what they're saying. Well. Preserved by life fuck yours. Well exactly. The COP Exactly and and my my attitude would be y is either one wrong as far as you know, one one has a duty to behave professionally the other has a duty to follow the law. Or face the consequences you know it would have saved him from getting shot in the back if he had stopped if he turned around if he'd Toronto. Surrendered Okay Understand that I understand the Warren has has since been vacated, but that's beside the point. When a COP's his I warrant for your arrest I mean you're supposed to do is say what am I being arrested for? Okay I'll go peacefully ears might whereas my lawyer yeah. Instead, of no fuck you fight you tooth and nail, and if get away up the war still there, but you don't have me. Right. Exactly. Exactly and you know I got I got I got a I. got a interject because you know. My personal opinion is if you probably agree Is this. Cancer of case. started. It may have it may have had other sources. Okay. But its primary. Protagonist, in growth factor was Colin. Kaepernick a few years ago and I don't say that in a flattering manner. Okay. I've said it before the my opinion that Colin Kaepernick is the biggest fraud on the planet as pertains to the NFL. At least Ryan leaves when he signed what Leash Langley, when he signed, he knew he was shit approved the wish she had any faded off politely into the sunset because he saw a gay. young just tell the story as I. Recall it and you you you feel free to chime in when you. When when you when you if I'm off base okay. A lot of people don't remember this but you and I as King's football and many things in life have a have a memory quite a bit longer than than your average goldfish. Okay? I remember watching the first incidents of Cabernet court on code kneeling and he wasn't fucking Neil. He had just had an argument with his with with the head coach and I don't think it was Kelly. It may have been horrible. But he had the yard, the head, the argument with Joe it was horrible wasn't horrible yet. So out of you probably saw the clip to you can't find it now because it's Youtube everywhere else. He had he had A. Verbal altercation with Harbhajan and I can only assume in what we were told. You know later was that harbaugh. told him. No you're not starting a colon Cabernet got very unprofessional and like the diva quarterback that he is. Turn Turnhill stomped over to the bench slammed his helmet down in plop disaster down on the bench now by sheer and toll coincidence. Anthem had just started. The anthem it just started when that HAP-. ACI. I know you remember this is I think you and I talked about this at the time that it happened because we were mocking him because when I weren't weren't quarterbacks when we played the game and we know what divas they are even princesses, they are this. If you remember and I know you do espn headlines a couple of days. Later words were that Colin Kaepernick was going to be fine. Substantially for multiple instances of unprofessional conduct conduct deleterious to the team. Leading up to the altercation with harbaugh that happened where he plops his ass on the bench you remember that ideas that. Dakhla and it was it was post practice I. Believe I want a That later that week that a reporter asked him. About the state of the fines and Based on his lip based on. Let's just call it what it was temper Tantrum. Okay. And that's when Cabernet sold all this bullshit about he was doing it in protest etcetera etcetera and he played the race card, which we all know the press eats up hook line and sinker and never ever questioned. Ever On. Me It came across and partner Jackie No, you're good. The the instance of which we are discussing out my first thought on that was yes it's a temper tantrum and I'm about to be busted for having a temper tantrum. So allow me to make up some juicy. To Garner more attention to the fact that. This is happening to be Gimme Gimme. GimMe and I lost my starting spot. Well, that's the that's the point I'm making. He played the race card to avoid fight. For on professional conduct and he was he was outright given a past. I don't think he ever actually even actually got find something that was overlooked too is that is that nick is not a person of color is really not us he is a multi-racial okay and part of that find that he was going to get for unprofessional conduct was calling somebody else on the field the N. Word back can't say here because quite frankly it's feds even and number two I don't WanNa get show you monetize but that said that was part of that that was part of the fine to be levied. The fine was vacated. Okay. Because he was successful, you successfully played the race card and got out. Okay and this whole shift started this snowball at that point. as we as we all know you know he was he was basically the the the face man for chip. Kelly's offense that you know while short term short term effective was absolutely not sustainable. Okay. We all know that. And you combine that with the fact that the guy had. Just over just under a shooting just over sixty percent for completion rate. Even in that offense at his best day, he was a mediocre quarterback surrounded by a bunch of very talented people. Okay. So now it has become the fact that you know this whole narrative has has escalated by people that that know nothing about the actual game because. Football is simple. It's not easy, but it's simple. Is. The ultimate meritocracy. Okay talent hard work equals success. Okay there's a lot of guys. We can probably point him out on the field you and I. There's a lot of guys that that. That just simply outworked their competition to get where they are I'll give you. I'll give you one prime example and right now they call him the goat Tom. De. Tom. Brady was drafted was I can remember he was drafted. He was I. Don't think he was Mr irrelevant. But he was real close. He was the very bottom. Yes. Six he was very close to the very end of end of the draft in and he is he outworked is is competition. Now granted drew bledsoe. If people can remember back set for was not a very good quarterback anyways. He was only borderline better than Ryan Leaf and he went down Tom Brady took over in the rest as they say district but. No? One ever questioned, Tom? Brady's work ethic in those dynasty years in in in New England. Okay. Because he outworked he, he worked his ass off. Yes he was talented. Yes. He's physically gifted but that plus hardwork dedication to his craft turned into in the in the the hardware for the hand so to speak. and. anyways back to my point about Cabernet. All, these people talking about how Catherine doesn't have a job because he's bad for business or half rights, they're only half rice. Now I posted this to the page I know you read you probably it is I. Think I read this week we went to this is from ESPN DOT COM itself. Okay. ESPN DOT. com. The actual date this was published as March twentieth two, thousand seventeen. By their staff writer Kevin Seaford. and. I am just going to read it. I'm. GonNa. I'M GONNA. Try to read the whole thing. I'm trying Doug only try to read the parts that are relevant. But those those listening. If you go to our face, a bitch facebook dot com slash midnight patriots. You'll be able to find this article and we shared it the title of it is calling Kabir Knicks based problem performance. Politics. Day It starts off real simple. So Don't over think why Colin Kaepernick is still a free age simply put years have passed since he was ineffective quarterback he's twenty nine years old has succeeded in an unsustainable scheme as part of a well populated group of former starters who also remain available at as this week began now getting that was march twenty, twenty, seventeen. So they were in free agents. Okay. Let's. Let's move on here. It's blamed Colin Kaepernick's unemployment on his protest is to misread the way NFL teams make personnel decisions. that. I don't think there's any more true statement on Earth. Do you I? MEAN THAT'S Yeah. So it goes on protests where does say at any type of business that if you have lackluster performance, did you are guaranteed two hundred million dollar job? Number One and two I was GONNA say there have been divas troublemakers in the NFL before? Okay and Kim's and? Lewis Terrell on. You know. List goes on and on. And let's not forget the NFL is the lead cut an outright banned ray rice running back from the Ravens for domestic violence. Okay. Before he was convicted. Suspended A. Peterson for disciplining his child. Yeah for banking hit saw. Yeah. Okay for spanking his own child. Okay. So now they put criminals names on their helmet. so by but I digress I digress let's get back to the article. Just to just to go just to go. Teams are swayed I by players potential or lack thereof to help them win protest or not kapernick would be under contract. Now, if he had demonstrable if he had played demonstrably better in recent years. Let's look closer at where capper nick is as a quarterback and why that has left him sitting in a group that also includes fellow free agents, Jay Cutler Josh mccown Ryan Fitzpatrick and Robert Griffin the third. Again keep in mind. This is from shelvin teachings of this is three years ago. Okay. But. It goes on to some of the reason I liked this 'cause this is based on facts not just you know a bunch of race baiting bullshit. Kapernick grid NFL success came as part of the San Francisco Forty niners read Options Skiing Twenty, twelve to twenty four. In those three years, he rushed for Fifteen, hundred, seventy, eight yards which okay. I will give credit that impressive gudgeon impressive number. For. More than any other quarterback with the exception of Rush Russell Wilson Cam Newton so let's just call it what it is. He was third rushing quarterback against. It breath. Okay. I will not fall the net. His. Success. He threw more than twice as many touchdown passes interceptions helped him compile eighth best time quarterback rating in the NFL seventy point to over that period. But even then capper nick was one of the lease most. Least Accurate quarterbacks is sixty point one completion percentage ranked twenty third in the NFL and has percentage of off target throws judged on video by espn stats and information ranked eighteen. So. Based on just the stats alone he was a middle of the pack quarterback middle of the pack. Does that mean that he's better than half the other guys absolutely does that mean that that you know the drama he brings? Outweighs his skills is still setting the money in the monetary investment probably. Okay I agree or disagree just on that statement there. I would agree that yeah, he's a middle of the road quarterback. He had some skill. At. That position. That offense. You're right. Would it work somewhere else probably not but that's Changing teams, you learned their offensive scheme you learn what they do best blend yourself into that and you become part of the team not a one man show. that. I, mean you'd have to agree that most had coaches that have half a brain would go sixty, four, sixty point one completion percentage. even if you're even if you're going to do A. A bootleg offense even if you're going to do a boot offense. Play I can. Still going to have to be better than sixty point one. Periods I mean just entered discussion. Quarter, you're talking college level quarterback. Even if you're on a naked, do either one side, you're still depending on receivers tied ends backs to be open at some point that you can actually say, Hey, he's opened easel bewitched of the two weevils need a cheese her who exactly exactly union able to identify and hit those targets or at least give your guys in a position to succeed you know. I'd like to. Bring to Light I. Not Very long after capital started his quest masqueraded by some of justice whatever you WANNA call it only because he got in my mind and correct me if I'm wrong, he got busted out period. That's just the way it is you through Tantrum he got his ass busted will now I gotta cover with this to cover that with this, and then all of a sudden we have one big lie that snowball into the entire solstice thing that's going on currently. You're. Going to look they had to go. He ended up in Washington. In front of US rest. Explaining his side of everything that goes on great. Denver Broncos of whom I am a fan. I it. Does not get into that because. Pirate about that right. That's ultimate digression. Go ahead, John. elway. It had in fact offer Catholic before your contract. said. Hey. COMPLA-. Can come down because it wasn't enough money. Wait a minute. Let's look at your stats a sixty sixty point something or other completion percentage. Yes. You had fifteen hundred yards rushing, which as we've discussed is pretty phenomenal quarterback save. Russell. Cam. Newton. Maybe rg three hundred healthy. That's stretching it buttle throw it in there. Anyway. I. Really. Wanted to see if capital could be plugged into that offense and sell. Well, that's the that's the real trick. Isn't it? I mean? End and let's be clear. He turned it down because the salary was too low, not the money. Or maybe remember correctly, he turned it down because John elway wanted to load the one at the loaded up with incentives and say, okay, you exceed this mark you get ex you this you get what we go to the playoffs and when you get Z. Experience Cetera so wasn't of excellent. Yeah. But exactly to perform at your very best as cut your in the NFL, they don't take ship nothing while the that's when the NFL stands for not for lofts. That and let's be honest. It was not only. Did he had he had to meet performance criteria he had to me behavior criteria, EXAC? elway and the broncos weren't going to stand for this s J. W. S. J. W. Crap. That he's pulling. So let's go back to the article real quick. It'll it'll. It'll really start driving the point home. Okay. So I believe he started kneeling rating was two fifteen. So. Article Goes On. The issues that we were just talking about the increasing. Or decreasing completion percentage decreasing accuracy except sets. Those issues intensified in Twenty fifteen and twenty sixteen amid forty nine ers. Coaching turmoil in talent drain since the start of the twenty fifth season Kapernick ranks get this. Last in the NFL thirty five all five passers in off target percentage is off target twenty, two point six percent of the time which when she is the least accurate quarterback in the. League. As of the twenty. Fifteen. It goes on. Is Complete. Complete is completion percentage ranks number thirty, two at fifty, nine point one. He was still one of the NFL's most productive Shink quarterbacks, ranking number four total yardage over all those years but it didn't mitigate his passing deterioration and this is in my mind. This is the absolute most important line in the yard or ear and an adult. There is no more important attribute for quarterback accuracy especially for a free agent who is shopping himself teams with various schemes. In, the long term a quarterbacks running ability is considered a complimentary skill and one that is story. Fade with age or because of injuries, scrambling ability and arms drank are secondary to whether you can hit the target. That analysis backed up by numbers essentially wreck stay shit out of this current narrative will Cohen Governor never draw. Back. Dinners. Any beds no sorry. Have a fucking job because he sucks. Sex At what he does also, there's a theory going around the going around that it was right about twenty, nine, hundred he met his I don't know if she's still has girlfriend whatever evidently these ideas about radical justice one I'd ever definitely his girlfriend is, is some sort of radical s j w as well, and he was too stupid to either a lever to the side or be not listen door and just agree to disagree on stuff but then again. Go ahead exactly what it is. Power Pussy with exactly exactly and you quite frankly I can't fault them for that because you know that's ninety percent of marriages happen. We'll just we'll just leave at this point. Is that right there? That's You were saying regarding his ability to suck. But it started then I mean he the guy the guy got lazy. He got loud. Through the race card to cover his shit then he couldn't back up his mouth with performance. You know do you your ears? Rocco's fat okay. Let's talk about just a second. Let's talk about Shannon Sharpe just for ten seconds or for a few seconds. Okay. Shannon Sharpe. Is An arrogant prick agree or disagree now When I hang on, hang on that said. Shannon Sharpe liked to run his mouth about a lot of stuff at a lot of different times also true. Yes. Yes. Shannon Sharpe never failed toback his mouth up with his physical actions on field. Also. True. Unless I'm Clinton mistake, it have you seen the. I know he's A. He's a beast. His and by that, I, mean his physique and his skill level we're just unprecedented but you know I do I think running your mouth there's unprofessional Mind that you buy then back it up on the field nut so much. I mean. Go ahead. If I if I remember correctly now, remember this because there is significant events happened in my life sixteen nineteen. broncos are in the midst of the run to Super Bowl thirty two. Tonight game. In Kansas City in Kansas. City. I can remember. Watching a few days later because of recovering from surgery on. Shannon. Sharpe was literally being drug halfway across the field for most of the game by his helmet because he was talking some serious Shit Oh. Yeah. I. Remember Correctly Dr Thomas. If. If I get an incorrect Thomas Yeah. So. So pissed off the guy, he knocking, Kane insane composure in his professionalism in the game. You got what? I think. Say He lit it up. He was like Yeah. That's ten to twelve for. The Gargantuan One, twenty, one, twenty, six, and what two touchdowns. Yeah he was a month. So. All of a sudden sanders our. Love the Guy I've actually met him. Helvin individual. Love Tall. But he can copious amounts of Shit Oh. Yeah. Oh yeah that that man can back his mouth up. Oh Yeah. We have an and. He. End Let's let's break that down from an NFL perspective. So I'm a personnel manager. Okay and I have Shannon Sharpe as a free agent. His name comes across the wire I go holy Fuck Ball sharps available, and I already know that a he's allowed mouth be he likes to talk shit and sees extremely opinionated man but D-. The Guy Backs should have on the field I picked up the phone. I pick up the phone and say Hello Mr Shannon. Trump's lawyer her agent. This is me at the I would like to pay your your plant, a lot of money obscene amount of money to come help us when football game sets. Ended up with the. Exactly for whatever he was with the Ravens what three years. Say but he wanted them for four super bowl with their to. The argument that Colin Kaepernick doesn't have a job because Hashtag grace is complete an utter bullshit. Bullshit and the the fact that Roger Goodell has bought into this Shit Hook Line and sinker is even worse. Okay. You would think that that to be the commissioner of of a National League or National Professional Sports League that race in what eight to ten billion dollars. A year in gross revenue. You have. You'd have to have an IQ above your shoe size. Goodell even that these people that that they're they're professing to support. Social Justice. Wise. He realized that the vast majority of them do not watch the Games couldn't tell you five players in the league and doesn't even know couldn't name five teams lot I mean. She probably I mean. Look at some of the fan base. Did Not tell you the difference three, four, three defense. Yeah don't try to get him to describe the Tampa to. Exactly or various offensive formation. You're the simultaneous simultaneous possession roll which you and I can quote by heart understand completely. Exactly. Our guys we've got another segment coming up right after this brief break. Stay tuned. Midnight Patriot nations spartan with a shameless plug for our new gear shop shop. Dot. MIDNIGHT PATRIOTS DOT COM. T shirts, hats, hoodies, mugs, phone cases, and just about everything else in between we got you covered whether you're looking to embrace your insomnia, show your patriotism or make a liberals headaches blowed. Really, Shop Dot Midnight Patriots, Dot Com, and now back to the show. You know that's that said. I made a prediction in in midnight moment the last night moment and I want to run around wanted to run that by. Not. Only understand that the business portion of the of the game, but also the game itself. So this is going to the business portion now. One. Of the things that you and I both know is that owners very rarely. SAY WHAT THEY THINK Or say or reveal their plans in advance. Okay. I've noticed that the owners have remained. Suspiciously quiet. About the social justice campaign that's currently going on I do disagree with that. I mean like I said, I think Jerry Jones is really the only one that's actually made any sort of statement and it wasn't a very long. I ever Jones ever quiet. What that's that's my point. And say instead of instead of. Me thinks he protests too much. Me think she says nothing for more sinister Okay so I wanted to run this by this is my theory. Okay. Now we've confirmed the the the Monday night compal atrocity from last night. US. Or Susani from two nights ago that. We've confirmed that the viewership was down approximately twenty nine percent. Across the board in that double header. So if we take the two games Monday and the overall ratings of of being down for Sunday you're talking an average of of a twenty percent downer. It's one fifth of the audience of the television audience told the NFL the PISS off. Okay. Considering the the significant financial investment ESPN has for for the right. To. Monday night football. Let's just let's just call that loss unsustainable. Okay. So I am going to ask you to engage your owner brain for just a minute. Okay. So We're GONNA fast forward to the week after the Super Bowl's okay where things are notably notably quite Rosalie quiet. The coaching carousel began and things like that since. Day. Except that, there's going to be a rumor. Going to be a rumor. That the NFL that the owners are considering locking out the players because they want to renegotiate the contracts. And this will come as a surprise to dumb asses in the AT ESPN released. They're going to feign surprise. Okay. And we're going to start hearing things like while the coaches are not gonNa make anymore are putting hiring decisions are the owners are going to. Put a hiring decisions on pause for just We're going to review a few things and Blah Blah Blah. While then we're going to get to Russia's started free agency. And we'RE GONNA. Find out and it's probably going to be one of the one of the What's The guy's name? Remember his name. One of the reporters Schefter Adam schefter because he always breaks up he's. Probably. GonNa be schefter becomes. We have confirmed reports, the owners who are going to lock out the players affected nine am tomorrow or whatever. Okay. Now what's going to end up happening is this. The overall I would say, the overall revenue is going to decline somewhere in the area of twenty percent across the before the Lee across the. Across the season. Okay. Now again does just a prediction it might be higher. I hope it's higher until they stop dish this personally but. This is what's going to happen. You're going to get a massive ratings ratings cut. Even in the Super Bowl. Which means revenue is going to be down roughly thirty percents. Okay. What they're gonNA say is this is an unprecedented drop in revenue and the the losses are unsustainable. They're going to have to renegotiate the contracts. The players are GONNA have to take less money and this time the the ownership is going to be able to show concrete. The because of the drop in television revenue in Jersey sales and everything else. That they're going to have to renegotiate the contract. They're going to vote on removing Goodell as the commission. You're actually they're gonNA, they're gonNA end up forcing him out but the way it's GonNa play out this players are to get locked out. There's going to be a review of the deal of the of the current Labor Labor Agreement. The new agreement is GONNA. Have a significantly lower. Revenue Pool total that that the players are going to get. And they're going to have conduct they're going to have enhanced conduct policy which include the jewel stand for the national anthem. You will not hiding locker room for it. And you're going to we're going to not endorse anyone as far as any sort of political failure, your ideology on the field, and if you do not only will your contract be terminated but you'll be you'll be on the breadline by your suspended for a year. Now maybe the suspended for year won't come to pass but. Engage your own our brain for just a second and then look at the strike years that came up and you tell me how how how. Or how far I'll fight on that. Will. Allow me to. Dive into this plan I mean. Here we go. I am an owner of a NFL team. Meaning I have had to. Put Out. Let's use an arbitrary figure five hundred million dollars cash right upfront. Chooses five hundred. Half a billion. Cool. I'm. Glad. Yeah. Five hundred million dollars up front in order to gain my team have somewhere to play. The voted on passed and approved by the NFL. As either an expansion team whatever then. To, Cherry pick the other teams around here so I can build my team. In hopes that a I get a return on investment. That said if I'm going to dump five, hundred, million dollars out. A team equipment place play contracts that are stretched for X. number of years. This mice guaranteed this much at a signing bonus this much. Not. including the money paid to the team from the NFL for reaching a wildcard round, a divisional round championship round, and ultimately the Super Bowl. There are incentives paid to the teams by the NFL for attaining postseason plum. Yeah So that said with everything that goes on here. Currently we're martyring. Convicted felons we are. Using the NFL. As a soapbox. As an owner. would. Say? Okay. I can understand. The Point I understand where you're coming from I understand yes. Shit doesn't like this doesn't need to happen. It does there's nothing I can physically do about it personally except point out to you that you're not them. You are a multimillionaire more working your way to that point because of your talent, your skill and your ability play the game price. You as a athlete. well-fed well trained. Best shape, your ever loving life you have a house bigger than anything you've ever grew up in, you've got cars for days all these other things but. You need to remember that you are entertainer You're not a politician. So, that said. When to go into your point? After the Super Bowl. Until they actually have one right. That two weeks later, when everything's died down in the in the winter sprayed is over and losers or duck griping and the coaches players have made their way to their respective all. Wherever. That may be they're probably their private castles. Yes don't don't live in a castle guarded by you know dogs bigger than. Most people's. Cars. Were we will probably see as you said. Well you know revenue was down. Because of viewership is down across the board anywhere between currently twenty twenty, two percent to encroaching upon thirty percent. For Games you know TV, rights merchandise sales are going to be down. People are actively boycotting across those media and they're actually making their voice known by not watching. All of a sudden if we were to take thirty two current teams. And we look at. All the owners in this how much money they have? Now if we were to take thirty percent of total investment apart. As a conglomerate figure. We're talking a loss of probably and I would strong. Guess. Somewhere in the neighborhood of anywhere between two and two point, five, billion dollars while even go you want all you can go one better I think since the economy has basically picked up I mean you gotta remember the day to ten billion was during the Obama Konami which was one of the worst economies history. Okay. So that said you gotta figure that now it's probably going to be between ten and twelve. So if you have a twenty percent revenue law, if you have a almost thirty percent, you're talking about three billion dollars. That's a three billion dollar loss. So even if even if you spread that across thirty two teams, you're talking about what? Three hundred, million dollar loss per franchised. and. So and a lot of the smaller market. Good. So again, as an owner with Joan, arbitrary figure of five, hundred, million dollars starting I just lost seventy five percent of your or yeah of my revenue that I put into have an NFL team. Well, exactly. Well Number One and number two what anybody thinks that now? Okay. We all understand the cats at the revenue sharing For Those of us that are initiated, understand understand the the the reason for revenue. Okay. That's that's a given. Okay. Even still a thirty percent cut to that revenue devastates small-market teams devastate. Okay that's. Cleveland Cleveland Cambe that's Detroit. Well, I think Detroit is a bit bigger, but I catch meaning. into. Jacksonville. Flow? Buffalo Alright. That unders. Anyway. They're too big but no I hear you here's here's here's the thing the smaller market teams are going to move may if this continues maybe on the verge of bankruptcy and and if you really don't think that the NFL owners will lock out the players to avoid that. I just think everybody's so naive that they shouldn't even be a football fan you can. Football I in my opinion, these played the players and Adele are cutting the owners throats and I don't think the owners appreciate it number one and number two I. Think the owners are more in touch with their demographic their fan base style people want to believe i. don't say that they like their fan base because obviously as the executive class billionaires general ended the tend to hate working people or at least have a disdain for them. Okay. But the point being is that it's unsustainable model for them to go forward to continue this crap. Of K, it's it's absolutely ludicrous. So I think about beat that horse to death did you have anything to add on just on that? Final thought regarding that as an owner is a businessman I yeah exactly. Exactly. His businesses to? Yes he owns the team but as a business owner, you're always looking to. CRUISER BOTTLE BLONDE Increase but also you know they've got, they've got a commitment. You know what I mean I mean the bottom line is there are associated with raising revenue to pay Patrick mahomes half a billion dollars over the next. Seven years. Of. The point the point is this is that there are costs associated developing that revenue and win the players behavior or when when the when the the players union in the League encourages behavior that is deleterious to to that mission. Then what are the owners supposed to do? Gordon exactly. They locked the doors take resigning before we open this and then players you're GONNA WE'RE GONNA have to do a big restructure here. Sorry. You know this is this is not you? Not You know you're not this side of the world you guys are on the upper echelon. Of money you have succeeded in. On yourself up by your bootstrap for lack of terminology, you have made it playing a game that you love passion for three enforce your point duty not only are they a privileged class? Okay. Let I verified this I verify this last night. I made a statement that that. The NFL, the people on the NFL minimum as in rookies that that you know what we're undrafted free agents, right that are somehow made the squad, which is more powerful MAZAFA. A No experience. Rookie. Signed as a free agent this year in the League makes a minimum of six hundred, thousand dollars. Six hundred, ten, thousand dollars I then went to the Department of Labor's website guess what the average household income for Americans is as twenty twenty. Sixty, one, thousand, three, hundred. Yes. They working person would take ten eleven years to make. They're making six months show and this is not this is not an insult. I'm only going to use the label for for effect. Hacks in the NFL make ten times. The average working family does and they dare fucking lecture us about what our values should be faulk them. Big F what. Exactly. With a with capitalize all letters with with several exclamation points at the end. So that said I. Underlined and and I tell us is never. That's that said, I I wanNA give credit where it's due also understand that you know. What did I just go off on the NFL to you know to to to the end up with surprise we'll tell you why because You know even in the worst of situations, even even in the darkest night, there are rays of sunshine out gather are rays of light and I want to heap praise on two particular players, and these are the only two players. That I'm aware of have done this if any of you out there. Needed to midnight Patriot nation are aware of more please let us know. So we can give them their just desserts in their props. I want to give particular a credit to a hundred in the way of of the of the Pittsburgh steelers. Mr Villanueva is a former army ranger That said he made a big splash stirred shit storm by doing the right thing. I'm not going to get into the to the criminal that that the that the steelers. We're trying to honor Norma GonNa try to justify it didn't happen there but. Mr Vienna wave. Did something very classy He caped over the criminals name and he chose to honor sergeant first class all when cash. Now I believe I'm saying that correctly cut me some slack by brute if I if I. A brutalized his name that is not the intention. To say how I believe it's spelled. But sergeant first, class all, when. Cash. who was killed in Afghanistan? And I I, WANNA. I WANNA take. The chance to really You know he preys on on Mr Villain away for for going against the grain and for honoring in a true fallen hero on instead of instead of the criminal. So. Well on on that. The next one and probably the biggest honors of the latest give to the Jaguars tight tyler effort. I think I'm saying his name correctly also I don't think it's effort at the. But again, please forgive me if I've Jaguars fans if wrecked his name to. That being said that were I for also You know went against the grain he chose to honor the life of David Dorn David Dorn for those of you that that don't know was retired police officer. I believe it was Saint Louis. He. police chief Sir about that. He was retired police chief and he. was acting on behalf of a friend to go and check is Friends Pawn Shop. And he was gunned down he was killed Doing doing that by a felon in possession of firearm each shot this this legitimate euro From behind in the back of the head, which was incredibly cowardly act. ADORNS widow. was featured at the Republican National Convention. So those be the she told the heart wrenching story and As much as I am I gotTa tell you broaden orphee side, but he loved me misty. I was just her story about David's life was very touching and the impact on her family were simply crush. So I wanNA other drove I drove home the point. Your choice exact life exactly as what makes you? Exactly you know people people come from from bad situations and rise to great heights in as far as I know. This is the only country in the world that that can happen. Where you can make what you want of your own life. Okay. The biggest prison that we have in this country, the prison in our own minds. So A. Big Praise to do Mr Bean away and Mr for will done. I still have the continue my. My boycott because of my standards but you gentlemen have shown that there is a a ray of light in darkness. So Phoenix where you have anything to add or have we beat this to death. By by Pres for. There are people in the NFL that are serving of. Respect for me for one. Not because of their wallet or their house or their cars. But they chose stand for the national anthem. As. SOMEONE WHO Leaves in their country. Leaves in the American dream all though little hard to attain sometimes. The anthem regardless of anybody's political stance. The gentleman across the nation. And the NFL NBA MLB. I stand with you guys choose to stand in honour your country. That is. The way it is your will said. Anybody else wants that is your choice. I. Respect your choice I don't like it but I do respect it. But I stand with the gentleman who chooses stanton honor the country, the greatest country on this earth. Gives them every opportunity to excel in anything that they choose to? Like professional football or professional athletics exactly. I think it. I think it's worth mentioning here. I know we said we beat the source of, but I wanNA bring up another topic to. Weird Midnight Patriots all of us. May disagree with with what someone says, but we would fight to our desk to protect their their right to say those words. That being said I think one of the other things that the public is piss pot tired of is the privileged wealthy assholes. Being able to have different sets of rules at their workplace than we do. In the Corporate World in William and most smaller companies you do not have. You do not have freedom of speech. Okay. You will be shown the door if you bring up politics religion, etc etc. Okay. With social justice causes or otherwise. They can show you the door. Okay and I don't think I don't think it's Ok these. Use Their their platform on the field or in any way while a uniform to promote their agenda. Okay. Now, I think you and I would agree with this if the NFL Players Association wants to get together and host either a live event or televised event. when they are not playing and they're out of uniform. And they want to tackle these issues donate money to causes give away money whatever I think that would be a perfectly acceptable display. That's fine. Okay. But I think the reason they don't is they know that the cause is a loser. Okay. They're not willing to risk their own money you know to they're not willing to put their money with their mouths are in order to have their protests but but you know somehow everybody else should just shut up and and honor was they're trying to do and I think that that is excellent. You know policy at its finest end. America's PISS POT tired of turning channel I. think that's a big factor as well. As your thoughts unfortunately mean here to. Drive your point. I could see. Getting together having one big party fundraiser l. have running toe board. Hey, you know we're raising all this money great or even several. Yeah Go. But the reason but the reason they're doing it on television is because they can reach a mass audience all at once. But. They haven't had. They had the NFL network. If. The shows a winner, they could sell it to their to their allies in the media. WHO's to say ESPN would cover it. You know for God's sake ESPN has the SP one of the worst ward Joe's ever. Okay and if they want to go up to that into a social justice show fine. Go right ahead or create when like it again. Fine. Or if you know even Amazon or Netflix wants to pick up something about you know the S J W 'cause in the NFL an interview players follow players around their charitable work while they advance these causes grace go ahead I mean I think what they'll find his a there's no interest in be nobody cares they approach it that way that we far less backlash in their their incomes would be far safer than if they continue down this path. the ratings would actually come back to a more normal. That's where I'm talking about I. Mean there are only cutting their own throats by doing it the way they're doing it that that's all I have to say. So that's a wrap for this midnight. Mama we we went really long hopefully provided you get some insights, maybe some food for thought. Ob Spartan in Im with Phoenix, and we're just reminding you one last time in forever. The constitution is not just a suggestion sleep. Well, everybody. EARN. Thanks for joining us for another edition to midnight moment. Be sure to join us for the main podcast, every Monday night, and Thursday night for more midnight moments. If you like what you hear and what we do about subscribing, go to listen dot midnight patriots, Dot Com Click, support, and subscribe. Be sure to pick up some merchant, our gear store shop that midnight Patriots Dot Com. From the Mile High Command, CENTER ABLE TO PRESENT DOT COM studio. This is sport reminding you that the Constitution is not just a suggestion.

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Trivia With Budds

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

"Food Network shows fill in the blank from the show titles. . Here's number one. . It's guys blank games, , guys blank games number one. . What is the blank guys blank games number one. . Question Number Two, , twenty, , four, , hour, , blank battle number two, , twenty, four, , , hour blank battle number two. . And number three bakers versus blank number three bakers verses blank number three. . Number four meals without blank meals without blank number four. . Number five, sugar , blank number, , five, , sugar blank. . And, , number. . Six Set Blank ready set blank. . Number Seven Iron Chef America Battle of the blank number seven iron, , chef America. . Battle of the blank. . Number eight the great food blank race number eight, , the great. . Food. . Blank race number eight. . and. . Number nine blank takes the cake number nine blank takes the cake number nine. . Number ten, , dinner blank and pretend dinner blank. . And the bonus question for two points have blank will travel number eleven for two points have blank will travel. .

Luke McKay facebook Ryan Buds A. Appel Brooklyn Wisconsin California Australia Greg
"blanks" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

Armstrong & Getty

07:29 min | 5 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

"The Armstrong and getty show. A stunt double in England reasonably set himself on fire to propose to his girlfriend. so He's extremely romantic in bonus he already knows how it feels to be married. Hey now. We do have some breaking news that's probably not donkey worthy but trump or maybe it is i. don't I think it absolutely breaking. News. We're not GONNA have break. Some of ours have been furloughed. So we had to really make sure we we use them properly. Oh I see. He's only working twenty hours a week. President trump announced an historic normalization of ties between Israel and the U A specific tweet was a huge breakthrough today exclamation point historic peace agreement between our two great friends Israel and the United Arab Emirates. The E is run by that guy NBC. Along, with s are hell bent on putting Iran in a corner. So the UAE is with Israel and saying, okay, we're on the same team. Now it's you and me and Saudi Arabia against Iran the enemy of my enemy is. So I think that's good for us. We need more countries aligned against Iran I. Think so. The ever shifting sands of the middle. East. And you use that term smidgely apt metaphor. There are ever shifting sands there. So Sandy yes. So getting back to Chicago's Englewood neighborhood I found this delightful. Honestly a bunch of woke jackasses decided to organize a march leaving the seventh police precinct in Englewood vacation vacation, a, and neighborhood in Chicago. I'd have an freaking auto play video. Stab at. Man I'm a first amendment. Can I want to end auto play? To take a vacation, they're distract me anyway. So they organize these woke jackasses heavily white people is always organized this March to the COP shop and Englewood. However, unorganized there later told Fox thirty two that groups decided to leave after confrontations with nearby residents felt left them feeling. Unsafe. Unsafe the great. Call of the woke dope. Resident Daryl Smith shouted at them. If you ain't from Englewood, get the F out of here. They're gonNA come to Englewood antagonize police then. Go back home to the north side or Indiana are police are better. Charles McLean, a community violence prevention group volunteer concurred saying we refused to let anyone come to Englewood and tear it up. Protesters maintain that they had come to demonstrate peacefully in favor of defunding them but the please. Get OUTTA. Here. Lot of people are saying the looting sparked from Englewood. We're not having that it didn't spark from Englewood. Those looters are opportunists and we're tired of Englewood getting a black guy for anything in everything that happens said Smith the guy quoted earlier I just love that a bunch of Awoke Chicks Indiana show up and are GONNA fix Englewood by marching and chanting their idiotic slogans I say. Hail to the folks in that neighborhood, trying to make it a better place to live good for you. How bad was the looting in Chicago, the other day the Wall Street Journal with an article today after Chicago looting and Corona virus businesses considered closing shop on jewelers row businesses saw their inventory wiped out one man saying forty two years of business, and all of it is gone. We've been through recessions lost conventions. Nine eleven was a blip but this is unprecedented while Gimme Clinton hundred. Amazing on. Schanche. Jackie. Wrong. It was good when people start looting. People in this city are struggling through pandemic. So I don't care and somebody decides to Luda Gucci or a macy's or ninety because that make sure that that person eats. That makes sure that that person has closed that makes sense that that person can make some kind of money because the city obviously doesn't care about them. Not only that that's reparations. Area Latte Kuenz the black lives matter organizer for the city of Chicago. How many cities in America could say we've had the route worst rioting we've had in decades or ever a lot of them. Yes. I would them and that needs to be more of a campaign issue and not just you know kind of the bumper sticker sorta headlines around what's going to be done about this is this okay this now, all right that if people get upset about something, they can just destroy all the businesses in one St Holy Cow I've lived on long enough now to see several of the several examples have always said that society's veer from guardrail guardrail. They hit a sweet spot in the middle. Then don't realize they're in it and they keep veering well, there were very soft on crime e feelings about in the sixties late sixties especially and violent crime crime in general property crimes just exploded in the early seventies the seventies were horrific depending what city you're in. So those tough-on-crime measures that Joe Biden's getting beat up a for the past because people were in mortal danger way too often and lots of. People went to jail now everything the crimes way down. So everybody's decided that wasn't necessarily look look there's no crime. Let's. Let's try lawlessness in its especially on the west coast and some blue cities like Chicago where there decriminalizing crime, they're letting all the criminals out of jails and you're seeing an explosion in crime and rioting and looting in the rest of it. I was watching a video last night on twitter of somebody driving through Portland just with. Like their cellphone out just going down streets and it's just boarded up window after boarded up window all these business. Yeah. Yeah. I've the windows smashed out. It's amazing well, and at some point, and you're seeing it from some interesting quarters including the folks that are in Englewood Chicago saying, no, we don't WanNa live like this. How about Y'all do what we pay to do and round up the criminals and put them in jail, prosecute them by the noma. County the Portland that county prosecutor announced he won't prosecute hundreds of rioters who are accused of all sorts of crimes they will not prosecute only the very tiny percentage that were caught doing serious felonies will be prosecuted in other words. He's announced that a fair amount of lawlessness will go unpunished and unprosecuted Multnomah County. If you have a lick of common sense, you know exactly where that's GONNA lead. So I'm going through some of the notes is as going through the news yesterday of variety of things Tim Carney who we liked tweeted out. So now that Biden calder camera, can we drop the Pearl clutching every time a conservative or? mispronounces her name did he accidentally call her camel I've read that a couple of places. I understand I hadn't heard. But whatever but I agree let's quit acting like it's a you know some sort of an attack on everything. That is good. If you say ammo onset Kamla at some point On the economy remember when the quarterly report came out and we had contracted eight percent, and then a lot of people reporting.

Englewood Chicago Iran Joe Biden Portland Indiana Daryl Smith NBC Israel Armstrong England Multnomah County getty Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates President trump COP
"blanks" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

Armstrong & Getty

03:07 min | 5 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

"About vaccine little bit ago, and we had the numbers the other day of The pretty large percentage of people that will say, they won't take it of Democrats twenty percent won't take it about half Republicans won't take it. Will the won't we end up with a situation where like where you work will say, well, you're not coming back to work unless you get the new show you have gotten the vaccines entirely possible. You can do that. Sure. I think so. I mean. Yeah I. I would expect so. I'm not far from an expert in labor health law but. As a condition of coming back to the office yes, and then they could say and you gotta come back to the alright. Yeah. That's their alert probably be court cases but I suspect you know I think there'll be a lot of that you. Okay. You don't have to take it. But your kids not coming to school and you're not going to work right and you're coming in store. I'll bet we'll have to carry around a little thing than to go into the store. Yeah I don't know about that. It's possible. We've just seen that the governor's in state and county health people have enormous latitude. During an epidemic or pandemic so Yeah I could easily believe employers will say, yeah, you gotta get the vaccine if you WANNA come back in I can also also easily believe that restaurants would make you show your little thing before they let you come in out. Yeah Yeah I'm not saying you're wrong it's harder for me to imagine by the way I would take the vaccine. Blink of nine without even thinking about it. Sciences sound is good stuff who vaccine? No US maxine. Yeah a good. You know the phase four approved a go ahead and use it. You know what? Series of shots in your belly button oh Lord would you shut up? What are what are you doing i? Don't know what is your purpose here have no idea. So coming up, very controversial email from a teacher who's a listener of the show? And a controversial email from a listen to the show who is a black person answering my question about Kamla Harris if he didn't hear it. it will shock you. Stay to. Your tweet yesterday Jack Getting. Tremendous response. What did I tweet has to do. Yesterday. Listen this is important. No matter where you live. Cal Unicorn, Lia with realism is GonNa die. Passes laws that according to all of the progressive types are leading the nation toward our progressive future and you and they will sell this stuff to you. They're very good at it. They'll sell it to you and make it sound good and fair and equitable and enlightened, and there is where here to tell you how damaging this crap is for instance. California's infamous ab five passed by a the the the one party legislature at the behest of a woman who is absolutely in bed with the unions and does their bidding no matter how evil? but AB five attempting to turn off GIG.

Democrats Kamla Harris US California Jack Getting
"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:05 min | 6 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Hi, this is Ron Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to the podcast. Each season after fashion Mumbai. Sit Down with Tim planks, and we hash out what we've learned what we've observed and what we've taken away from the latest season, a fashion shows of course this season was completely different, but it was still worth having a catch up with Tim to explore. Fashion goes from here here's. Tim Blanks inside fashioned. Everybody a welcome to be oh ethel lives. I'm here with Tim blanks our editor at large, and you know usually around this time of year, Tim and I have spent. Several weeks on end in the back of a car. Navigating Fashion Week. And so we thought well. We can't do that this year, but <hes>. Tim, I've still been keeping in touch of course and <hes>. We usually record podcast conversation. Just reflecting on the fashion season that was <hes>, and so we thought well. There's still a lot to talk about so I asked him. To join me, welcome Tim. I am Ron. How're you doing good? Good I like your shirt. He said mutually good. I'm seeing. New, thing glamour. Lack Raw Glam rock. Okay Difference. I'm not capable of climate, but I am capable of Glam rock some. Well. Our conversation today is called where it is fashion. Go from here and I know it's something that's been. On your mind a lot, it's certainly been on my mind <hes>, but before we dive into that specifically you were I guess four months foreign a bit months into lockdown now or limited I, I sort of I date the transitional moment I came back from Paris on Much A. Figure that March the was the day that you could feel the storm, clouds had kind of well and truly Gabid of the fashion so I kind of date everything for much. The I think the last time that we saw anybody actually in our flat was March the seven nine. And said however many citizens. Zana's how how however long it is since we haven't seen anybody. <hes> and everything's being done like this kind of digitally signed the last time you and I saw each other in person was record our podcast for the end of that season and I. You know I don't know. I. Don't know if you remember what we talked about. It was obviously a very strange moment, and we didn't know what was about come, but one of the questions that we were grappling with. was whether we would all look back at that fashion week in and wonder if it was irresponsible for all of us to be sitting in a snuggled up next to each other at fashion, shows and dinners while this. Virus was spreading and what we know now tim is virus was spreading. It was readying actively in Italy and in France just as fashion week was going on so looking back now. What what do you think? I. I wasn't thinking irresponsible I mean there was. But because you know, we live Italy the the day we left Italy giorgione cancel the show. And Joe Digitally and there was a little bit of kind of. Huffing and puffing about that and Oh let's so dramatic whatever and I and then the airport in Milan at night was like. The fall of Saigon <hes>. It was just so crazy. Wasn't people trying to get out of the country? Where was people trying to get out of the county? No because they were panicking about virus necessary. Just it was a set. It was sense of. Some enormous. Ominous! Force? <hes> and then getting to Paris and finding that you know people were saying. Shall we shop wait? You'll have a show in nothing. Really the either a couple of shows cancel. was still you know I always competitive? This that whole moment in World War Two that was? One that was a sinkhole. The phony war before the war actually started. There was moment where everybody knew that was going to be a war, but it hadn't happened, so they were kind of. Suspended animation and that's kind of what it was. Td that this because. I don't think anybody knew it was gonNA. Be As bad as it turned out to be at coins. But still it was a solo. Remember I was in the I. Requirements often <unk> before his show. He said to me. You think this is the one. And <hes> I said well. Do you and I just didn't know that point, and and you know what the weird thing is. Allocating many months later, this March April may June five months later. We still don't know because I. Feel, the feel it. Still the the doctors who will leading out shaping our opinions on this I don't think. Completely show what it is at dinner would. It just it just feels you know when you read. Eddie meteorologists is so excited by this virus, because it is such a challenge and a multi focal. It's just this incredible. Opportunity to delve deep into something that human beings have never encountered before and inside the fashion industry has just kind. I'm concerned is still like everybody else is still not this dilemma. What's going to happen? But I think we do know that this is the one I mean. There may be others at come after this based on what I've been reading, but this pandemic is shaping up to be you know one of those. Collective experiences of complete. Change, yeah, an and I think it's at fifteen million cases now. You know hundreds of thousands of people at I mean I think it's as you said I. Don't think any of us knew back then. How bad it was going to be, but it's certainly. It's certainly shaping up to be much much worse than I think. Many of us expected I. Mean I think when I was talking to a couple of CEO's in this over closing. We thought we were closing our stores down for a couple of weeks. And then obviously that turned into months. And you know the all the talk about first-wave second-wave I am using the Spanish flu as a as a as a sort of. Precursor. You know the fact that the first wave was in the full in there was a summer at the second wave was in the following fool. Could Lord I mean. We have no idea of what we could be looking at in. Another four or five months so. <hes>. Yeah. It's A. It's being A. It's been a challenge I. Think Real, good huge challenge for the everybody on every level of every life almost everywhere in the world. And the nothing like that has ever happened.

Tim Blanks founder and CEO Ron Ahmed ethel Mumbai
"blanks" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

03:04 min | 8 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"They meet some new people awesome they have a new boyfriend and then it's not quite the same as what they were putting out there but they also have this fan base it already expects a certain things so they keep doing it and then you kinda run the risk of if if the truth gets exposed and it's you realize it's really not You know what's going on. It's Kinda changes the perception of the pocket. So it's out hell that being said though. There's these guys are such fans that if Alex and Sophia whoever returns and does it just said Yeah. Listen I don't know we you know we got caught up and we got really successful really fast. We're split here to do our thing. I think they'll be there to listen to you. Do you actually think that these two girls can get back together and do this. No I do not I I mean all the time two girls you know starting out as friends get caddy at one point and not getting along. Now I feel like it's I think if I had to guess which is really all it is is a guest. I don't have any other inside Info than what you guys know as well. I would bet that Alex the blonde one will be back and Sophia. The brunette will not and that will be the name and Sophia and Peter. Nelson will get married. Of course I mean you know the makings of a long happy like Jenna. Bush will be at that wedding. Like I feel like the type of person but all right so if this happened between you and final Berg who would be the person that would be having sex with the HBO Executive? Ooh What a question. I mean I can't imagine I can't imagine that being final word. I don't think it would be me either but if you had to take between us with person is more likely to be. I guess I would be having sex with the HBO back all right. We will end it there. Thank you for clearing. Thanks Kevin did you start to. Kfc Barstool are clear and all that what a mess. Oh Man Yeah. That's what happens though man. He explained when you go from nothing to something that quickly. And then all of a sudden everybody's all over you and you gotta make the right choice. You gotta stay grounded. I I've never listened to the podcast but just looking at the gals imagining what they've been talking about. You can understand why they are extremely popular but you could also understand why Peter Nelson would be attracted to one of them. Well of course Peter Nelson everybody most of us on Peter Nelson is I just you know. I've never met the guy I don't think so. Well you've met guys like him. I feel like you probably have aright for on on what's a Madman Madman was about say mad mex for some reason looks like that. Yeah the quagmire Don Draper Mash up like Kevin said all right boomer and Geo on the fan and CBS sports that were telling Ford boomer and a couple of other things will come back. Talk to Jerry again right after this. All righty man. That's that's unbelievable..

Peter Nelson Sophia Alex HBO Kevin Ford boomer Jenna Bush Jerry Berg Don Draper CBS Executive Geo
"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

06:44 min | 9 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

"Night and darkness allowed that to happen. I could take that same scene during the day and it is. It's not just a river. It's the Columbia River from this point looking down and seeing the trees and perhaps the roads and paths and the trails and the rocks and it records the whole scene quite evenly and the thing that photographing at night and having these slices of light cutting through it is that's the fragmented memory for me versus the whole picture. If you will the mechanics of making these landscapes required Adam to slow down in his own process at least for a little. While he discovered that the best nighttime images could only be taken in the narrow window of time right before the sun rises or sets he could only take a small number of pictures each day because there were so little time and the film had to be exposed for anywhere from two minutes to half an hour all of these landscapes. They were made with an eight by ten inch camera so it looks like an antique. It's fifty pounds of camera. Oftentimes I I would. I would not be able to carry the camera. And all of the necessary camping gear it would mean with six or so film holders meaning I could take twelve pictures that was always that restriction which I actually find to be a wonderful part of the process of just not being able to shoot shoot shoot an and and keep making exposures but needing to be somewhat meditative and practical and focused when making the pictures because I have a mule team or or a team of Sherpas helping me to to lug the stuff sometimes getting the perfect picture involved. Adam hiking out to a location in the dark and taking photographs right before sunrise many times it meant hiking out and getting to the position because I really would need to be there before. There was any light on the horizon or any light that our is our vision could perceive so that meant for some hikes and darkness focusing on a ground glass and trying to see what the picture is going to be. Almost pitch black is is not not an easy task so I hurried to the place to be there before sunrise and then I'm waiting waiting waiting and that that's the time that I've been diligent about getting to that location well before sunrise. Then that's the time where there's I can't do anything. I'm sitting in the darkness. There's no light to to be working or scouting or anything like that. And then all I can do is sit and oftentimes in somewhat cold conditions. So I oftentimes will bring a thermos of tea or coffee and just let the sun do its thing but then when the lights right then I have to move very very quickly and then once the sun's up then you know it will be six o'clock in the morning and al-saaa job for the day is done other times. Adam would hike and scout locations during the day utilizing the small window right before sunset. Finally when I would hone in on on the place that I wanted to stand and wanted to be that it was it was a waiting game and I found that to make pictures about the Black Knight if you will or real darkness. I couldn't photograph in real darkness. That's when the camera starts playing tricks and doing its own thing. I really had quite a small window of being able to make that picture. Oftentimes it was. You know a half hour so so it was hurry up and wait and then then it was like that's where the rush ends up happening and where I would say that the process of making the pictures is very different than I think. The experience of viewing the final images on the wall. There's something very still about the pictures. There's something very meditative and almost forcing you to slow down and to look at that and and on my end I think that takes a lot of hustle and working with light that is fleeting at every second and sort of counting the minutes of exposure. That I'm going to have to accumulate. I had this like window of after all that patients and no I've got one shot at it in that night or that morning. Yeah or means coming back. There were a couple in Iceland. Actually that it me about four days to make this picture and I would wake up. These were long days inside. Wake up before sunrise. I'd hike out to the point and then realize up the fog's there when that Sun finally does give just enough light that there was no picture there and I couldn't see that I couldn't see it at all you know certainly when I was waking up and then getting to the location and realize not pack it up and yeah then the Russia's over because well I can't I can't rush this fog away and I get to just appreciate being out in this place and then I'll come back later in the evening or the next morning and there's even been a couple of times where I knew that that vantage point required a different time of year all of this took a ton of trial and error on Adams part often the picture that resulted from hours of scouting locations and studying. The light just ended up looking like how a camera recorded the world at night. Not How it looked and felt to him when he was there and so that was the challenge for me. That was the that was the task of like figuring out. How can I manipulate or harnessed this thing? That has potential to record but but twisted into this way that is more about the way we feel or perceive and not that took diving into the mechanics of it over time of the nitty gritty. Like playing with exposure. Times and what's available? Light was and what those lighting conditions were. How the film was processed than how it was scanned and basically every step of the process tailoring tweaking and it took me the better part of a year or so before. I started getting pictures that felt like what I had originally seen in my mind or what.

Adam Columbia River Iceland Russia
"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

08:44 min | 9 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

"So the transition I would say of making pictures about night about darkness about the not knowing what was in front of you. I was using night to communicate what I was actually feeling being. In those places Adam found himself using night darkness to convey those feelings and he did that by altering what was familiar. He was using the viewers internal image of the places while simultaneously removing familiar. Details for instance. Let's take Yosemite. That's an easy one to everyone knows Yosemite and I felt through the pictures of mobridge Watkins and salons. And you know everyone else that this was a place that having even never visited it I was familiar with it and the thought that you know a place three picture at least for me has been proven wrong quite a few times and assembly was certainly that so. I knew when it started that it seemed to me to be important to be able to almost replicate that experience that I had in Yosemite Adam extrapolated a key feature of the night in order to imbue his photographs with a sense of the unknown. He incorporated what you can't see. I think the night leaves room for us to to. I think our vision ends up being so limited that our other senses start taking over our our hearing becomes elevated our sense of smell and I think our mind start becoming more active when when our I stopped working essentially and this sense of vision of knowing you know where we are in the world when that's stripped away there's a void and what appealed to me about night in general was that our vision is minimalist. We we are not seeing everything we have to strain. We have to work for it. Our eyes are not capable of recording all of the details. And so our minds fill in the blanks and it provides its own content. If you will and that to me is very reveal. I think that's a wonderful way of bringing oneself into work as seeing when you're when there's not much there what are we providing and I think when there's a void of knowledge of vision we invent we invent stories we invent sounds I mean I think that's what makes you know the nights so scary for some people is that we started inventing and whether there's something lurking in the darkness or not. I I find it to be a real opportunity. I mean when there's have void that void of information what recognized as that was an opportunity to use the night as a springboard to allow people to bring a lot to the pictures. You know to bring themselves to the pictures. And maybe that's fear you know maybe that maybe it's fear maybe it's joy maybe it's a calming feeling. We can learn a lot about ourselves about our own perception. Our own fears our own joys. Our own ideas of the world and sometimes it just takes removing things and then also what is neglected for me in photography and what was the biggest challenge of this work was getting the picture to look like the way the night feels to us and that was a challenge. The goal was not to photograph night. I wanted to make pictures about the feeling of night. The feeling of the mystery that comes with night the feeling of standing out in this grand western landscape in the pitch black and having an overall a body experience. We're so often amazed by the way a camera can record something and the spectacle of it at times and I I had to. Dumb down that spectacle. The camera specific way of recording with the aim of putting the way we perceive first and foremost my pictures aren't about reversed per se or yosemite per se. Or or Gosh. Even the night necessarily it's about that experience that mystery that feeling of not knowing and finding ways of making that happen in a photograph sitting with true feelings of mystery and of not knowing is perhaps not western cultures strong suit. You know what you know what I think's neglected in our society and in the Western world at this time is time of spending time with something and allowing you know especially with technology today. We're so quick to fill in every void with puttering on our phones or or you know searching for something and I think that allows very little room for us to just be still and to experience. What's around us? And I suppose I think that's what night forces in many ways is that it just takes time for it. Physically takes time for your eyes to adjust and for your pupils to fully dial eight and I from my research is indicated. It's around a half hour for your eyes to fully dilate being out in very low light. It's about a half hour till they have fully opened and that's something that I think we give less and less attention to is patients and having an experience that is not constrained with business. How many people have sat in darkness natural darkness and just allow themselves to be there for thirty minutes and to not look at a screen to not have a headlamp to not have a flashlight of him. It's actually quite hard to do but by the end of that thirty minutes no matter how you know it could be a moonlit night and just stars but you can see you can actually see quite well. We actually could see much better at night. It's not the limitations of our physical bodies as much as it is the lack of time spent in those places without a bright light source. I think it's about slowing down and that is neglected. I would say in our society. I think that's something on the decline and I would say the night requires that for sure slowing down in this way that Adam describes when looking at a piece of art like a photograph allows us time and space to more deeply participate and engage with what you're seeing Adam also titled many of his night landscapes to accentuate this element of your engagement. I never titled The rivers like the Columbia or the Snake River. There were always river. One two three four five not to say that the locations wherever secret. But I wanted there to be the ability for the viewer to fill in that blink too and so I think what I was searching for in the rivers and those forms whether they were waterfalls rivers. Some craters was the idea of a river. Not The river itself but the memory of the river..

Yosemite Adam Snake River mobridge Watkins us
"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

04:52 min | 9 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

"And the river photographs all seen from above the water is utterly emotionless and gray but glowing and the sloping riverbank seem submerged. As if it's details only partially visible. You have to strain to see the details that you know are there. There's a strange quality of stillness and movement at the same time also simultaneous feeling of being drawn in and pushed away looking at these photographs. I feel several things at once. The first thing I'm struck with is that my pulse has sped up and I feel a little scared it's like there's barely restrained power or even threat in these dim and shadowy landscapes. It feels like something could be waiting just outside the frame or maybe there isn't. There's no way to know and I also feel mystery. Aw in a way that accustomed to feeling while I look a photograph. There's strange alchemy at work in these pictures of night landscapes. And it has to do with what you see and what you don't fortunately Adams early mishap trying to stuff. The film back into the canister didn't dissuade him from pursuing his curiosity about photography. I went to undergraduate photography at Massachusetts College of Art and design and in two thousand ten. I'm I moved to California to go to graduate school at Stanford I'd been to California before but not certainly always lived in New England. The landscape of the West offered new challenges particularly with regard to its expansiveness. I think the scale of oneself within the landscape is for me what the West was about compared to the east and part of. That's just the fact that you can see so far without you know dense trees and forests and but just the size of the rocks and I can remember my first time going to Yosemite we. We left the bay area and drove and arrived at night and it was clear night and and The stars were out but I can remember pulling in. This was probably around one o'clock in the morning and this was my first time there. This was like Oh my God. I'm I'm I'm in this place and I can remember seeing what I thought was potentially the the valley wall and and where the top of the valley wall met the sky and mind was inventing the whole scene but I can remember feeling the sense of scale that I had never fully Felton. My Body and feeling I was so insignificant in many ways and feeling very overwhelmed by it. I mean almost horrified. I mean there was something scary about it. It was something scary about seeing a cliff face at close to where you're sleeping but not seeing the cliff face that this thing is there but I have no idea what's above it. I love that. I like a little fear in experiencing a place. I think that's partially what appeals to me so much about night that feeling of being in a place that you think you know what it is you think you know you have this idea in your head but you realize that that is a fabrication arriving at Yosemite at night in the dark. Adam was odd by a landscape that he could only partially see when he awoke in the daylight. The scenery was still impressive but it felt different. Atoms mind created aspects of his visual experience based on memory and emotion in the morning when this on rose and then I could see it certainly a little bit of that mystery was gone and I did realize that my mind had invented quite a bit of what I quote unquote saw that scale. That feeling like I was just a little pin-prick within this landscape the experience that Adam had in Yosemite planted a seed about how he could transform landscape photographs by showing less you know. I think I made competent. Enough pictures. I- lugging around the big eight by ten camera and going to a lot of the vistas and the scenery that you know a lot of my heroes of early photographic methods were but a lot of pieces came together that led me to realizing that. I needed to find a new way. And and that way was was working at night and using darkness to convey. What I felt was missing from the pictures I was making the landscape..

Yosemite Adam Adams Massachusetts College of Art California Felton I New England
"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

"You're listening to nocturnal. I'm.

"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

02:57 min | 9 months ago

"blanks" Discussed on Nocturne

"From Keith Adam. Cats is a fine art photographer based in Boston. His work has been shown in museums and galleries and has also been featured numerous publications including the New Yorker and wired magazine. Much of his work focuses on the natural world which is where he first discovered his interest in photography so I started in photography late in high school and I remember going to Walden pond growing up in Massachusetts. That was always a class field trip and I remember being with a friend who was a pretty avid photographer. And I had never picked up a camera at that point and I just can. I can remember walking around with him saying. Hey take a picture of that. Take a picture that. Hey Hey come back over here. I want you to take a picture of this and that and this and finally said my God you were going to take this camera yourself and make your own pictures because I'm tired of this and so for me. The magic happened actually with a mistake in that he gave me the camera. This was filmed thirty five millimeter and this mystery box and he mentioned that sometimes. This camera got a little bit jammed and didn't rewind right in that if that happened to bring it back to the dark room and we would we would take care of that together and so sure enough this was a Pentax k one thousand and I remember being out shooting and just the experience of it was like a gave me this excuse to wander and to look into observe and I probably made a lot of lousy pictures but it almost justified. The exploration of everyday things which for me was was one of the most liberating moments of my life. I think but the camera itself got jammed and I was. I said I'm pretty handy. I I don't think I want to keep shooting. I don't WanNa stop now so I and I have another roll of film so I opened up the back of the camera and I watched the film sort of I said I. That's there's word got jammed and I started pushing the film's back into the film canister and I pushed it all in pretty proud of myself. Put IT in my pocket load. Another film did the same got back to the dark room and I showed my friend what happened and he said wait a minute. So you're saying you saw the film and I said Oh. Yeah I saw and he says about how much of it and I said. Oh good couple of feet of it. I'd say probably. The whole thing was pretty chipper about this thinking. Like I'd really been handy and because Gimme the role that I handed it to him and he just tossed garbage and I said well what the heck was that why why I was sort of John robbed and he said do you really not realized. It's light.

Walden pond wired magazine Keith Adam Boston John Massachusetts
"blanks" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"blanks" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"In case you missed our thousand dollars on that day paddy's data right now there's a note in here it's borderline by Madonna it plays in in two PM our grace Taylor what I get for not looking up seven fifty ramblings here is he on sun and man about town I was just about everything by the latest fads and he's talking about the visco girls now you know about him too right no I'm just trying to learn about yeah it's pretty fascinating and in you know what's amazing is you were talking about the kind of close these kids where exactly what we wore when I was a kid in middle school and high school yeah back now that this go round it says this is a news story about the fad you've never heard the term visco girl baggy tease Birkenstock scrunchies shell choker and of course a hydro flask if the look of a so called this girl the trend that's currently dominating teen and preteen girls in fashion and on social media what you say this is simple a lot of the components the name comes from this kind of social media apps for editing and posting photos but that doesn't count flights are comments think Instagram but without the pressure of tracking numbers for approval Harvey blanks reports explicitly or that makes you know this call girls.

Harvey blanks thousand dollars
"blanks" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

Phil in the Blanks

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"blanks" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

"Fill in the blanks is brought to you by progressive did you know the drivers who sign up for progressive car insurance couldn't get an average of six discounts in six minutes for things like enrolling in automatic payments insuring bring more than one car going paperless in of course being the safe driver plus if you bundle you're auto whether you're home or add renter's insurance you could save an average of twelve percent more in once you're a customer with progressive you get on match claim service with twenty four seven support online or by phone it's why more than eight teen million drivers trust progressive in why they've recently climbed to the third largest just auto insurer in the country get a quote online at progressive dot com and see how much you could be saving discounts not available in all states or situations you wanna brighter more even collection yes then check out the complexity and protection duo from robert mcgraw revelation created by my beautiful in amazing wife robbing the welcome back used retinal serum helps to reduce wrinkles even skin tone and improve skins last saturday while you sleep with fifty fears spf fifty plus both eight sunscreen anna moisturizer protect skin from both you'd be you'd be be raise the today this multipurpose product has hydrating in skin nourishing benefits while also meeting the current fd standards for sun protection it's important to you is spf every single day before leaving the house order today and get a free dot iran has power peptide ice cream to help brighten up your eyes and get rid of dark circles puffy nece and crows feet using they add night get all of these and everything you need for smoother younger looking skin now at robert mcgraw revelation dot com that's rob immigrant revelation dot com for all your new parents out there who want the best for their kids in are tired of choosing between what's best for you baby and what's best for you budget you have to check out a little below it's the new brand with premium ingredients from my son's good friends kristen bell and dax shepard that includes diapers why shampoo bubble bath even bug spray well it's just basically everything for you baby best of all it's really affordable i personally check this out and it's amazing but don't take my word for it check it out yourself breed labels their motto is hell bello goodbye bad stuff and they mean it.

robert mcgraw kristen bell dax shepard twelve percent six minutes
"blanks" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"blanks" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"Blanks. And your name. Lips crystal skies show, you incredible. All things. Kisses ready? On your what you want that for. I get drunk. Darling. A nightmare dressed like a daydream. Feeling gone. All right. Only one love. I didn't say I didn't warn. Only one. So. Yeah. All right. Your name..

"blanks" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"blanks" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Commander blanks. We want to hear from you on a breakfast. Hello. Who's this? This is brianna from Orlando, Florida. Hey, Sabrina, get it off your chest. Mama. That I actually did early voting. Florida. Yeah. I mean, I thought Andrew gillum had it. I'm not gonna I'm not gonna really really really couldn't. I'm not even gonna say anything less than eighty thousand votes. I mean, it was super close. But we also have to stay in Florida. States in the world. We have a lot of Republicans that live here that they don't believe that they do idea. They want to go back to the old day. Right. Really upsetting. You got a lot of people that are tied at leave other states. Go there retire, and he's still got like you said, they they believe in the old thoughts in the old way of thinking. Get off wear. Happy hour. Right, mama. Thank you. Have a good day guys. Hello who's this? Good morning. This is this is the morning Jambi. Angela you might you. Good morning. Armone calling because I'm blessed just wanted to say we have made my wife had a baby I'll five months ago. Thank you. She's doing an amazing job. And I just wanted to tell her things on the radio. I know she's sleeping now. So she won't hear me. But I'll wake her up and tell her hundred radio, okay? Yeah. She's doing a great job. So I will continuously support her and bless her. And her a nice surprise and a couple of months around the holidays. So okay. All right. And enjoy that baby men and babies grow so fast. You're going to look up their baby going to be two to five. So enjoy each and every moment. Alright brown. Thank you very much. I have a great day. I do always I I live about two hours from where I work, and I need a job is good. Well, when I get home exhausted. So just gotta keep going. But I bet you don't want to go to sleep because you wanna play with the baby sometimes. Joy. Hello. Who's this? Jalen, Ohio, AJ, get it off your chest. Okay. So one did not pass in Ohio because that would have been a real big thing around people. I'm pissed about that. But I am blessed. Because while I was able to I've seen a lot of black and Brown people voted yesterday. It was thin. I also be time. I am doing my first acting debut and a stage play here at Columbus, Ohio. Okay. Let's hear it. Let's hear a little something. Okay. So the play is called widely here. Columbus Ohio at historic palace. Peter. We need to get one of your lines girl. Line alo- monologue. I'll give it to us. Come on. Okay. Kimberly. What's it you so long? Door knocking like a Jehovah's Witness. I was in the bathroom getting ready. What what you mean? I can tell you weren't ready. Did you forget that? I was coming over. I show. Don't tell me. I drove all the way over here. Tell me that. Well, listen, you know, girl, it takes a long time for me to get ready. And I just appreciate the fact that you're always on time. I just went apologize. I'll be ready next time. But let's get going. I don't want to stay here argue. Here we go every time I come over here. You're never on time. Sorry. You more time right now. What else do you do? Well, this is my first acting. Oh, yeah. Great. Congratulations to you, man. You send us some clips when that play happened. So we could just sounded out one more. What we see we got. We got it. Columbus, Ohio policy. The eleven TicketMaster now because people see on TV doesn't mean you can do it. I just want to say that it's going to put that out. There might be me. But my daughter is starting in her first acting debut this week as well. She's a kangaroo. Okay. I don't know what lies. She has. But she's a kangaroo is she gonna have an accent. That was imagine a kangaroo was speak with an accent. I don't think kangaroo speak. But I don't get it off your chest. Eight hundred has no line. One zero five one if you need to vent hit us now is the breakfast club. Good morning the breakfast club..

Ohio Florida Columbus Andrew gillum Commander Columbus Ohio Sabrina brianna Orlando TicketMaster Angela brown Jalen Kimberly historic palace Peter five months two hours
"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Inside fashion. I'm here with our esteemed editor at large, Tim blanks. And today we will be taking a deep dive into the fashion season that has just concluded last night in Paris every season, Tim. And is it in the back of a car and all of these fashion capitals. And we have a Chit chat about everything that's going on at the shows would also what's going on in the world. And we just thought it might be nice to have that conversation here and recap the season. That was all of you. We've got lots to discuss. I'm happy to turn it over and start with Tim, Tim. It's been a very intense season. It's been a season with a lot of conversations around the fashioned system. However, it's also been a season with very uneven fashion. So did you want to just give us what? How have you been thinking about this season? One, one thing that you and I talked about in the back of the car was this idea of escape and engagement and the shows kind of escape escape this a singer. Yeah. And how the shows kind of divided into two camps. Well, the division wasn't wasn't that acute, but I do think that. The world is the world is so extraordinary right now that that everyone is being compelled to take a position on on all the questions that are being honest. The things that are happening in politics and in society and fashions different from any other creative area where people. Choosen to to go for these sort of. The uplift of escape or to try and say something more meaningful. I think what what has been so interesting about this season? It is a women's with season, but. People have really been talking about women the season. I mean, really the issues that are confronting women and particularly women and. I mean. It's it's a, it was. It was. It was such. It was very intense month. You're right, but that particular moment in Paris that coincided with the supreme court hearings that those particular today's would just so. Interesting that I mean, so. It was just this. Extraordinary coincidence of current affairs and fashion affairs, which I can't. I can't remember anything like, well, no, I think obviously you have. You have events like nine eleven, which which impacted enormously on the industry. But I can't remember a time when. The were. There were political discussions. People people not people not being scared to not not invading issues, but actually confronting them. And I think I think what's very promising about this is I feel it will intensify over the next few years. Do you think that this was the intention of those designers to to kind of put these issues to the forefront, or was it just a coincidence that you know these Cavanaugh hearings happened in Paris, and then everyone kind of interpreted those shows through the lens of what they were witnessing happening? Well, was a coincidence. I mean, I'm Rick Owens this show, I think was one that really struck a chord with people because his staging head had three or four women black black models walking with burning torches and in the middle. Of the in the middle of his, his show space. There was a wooden tower which was set which was set afire and burned, and the tower representing. Authority and the show was called babble as in the tower of Babel. But I think the the tower represented the sort of solid stolid implacable patriarchy. Well, because that's what that's the spin that everybody Brian it, of course, instantly was that it represented the patriarchy now regards is never been that over in the past. But I think I think. Being an American in Paris and observing what's haven't been happening in this country. I think he he feels he feels compelled like I said to take a position, but it was so graphic to have these women his his women dress like dress like priestesses and dress like this is always an enormous quite eerie spiritual component and what he does, but to see that happening as Washington was was in metaphorically flames, figurative flames. I'm literally watching that hearing on mobile phones out God. Yes, I, I stopped..

Paris Tim blanks Rick Owens Brian editor Cavanaugh Washington