23 Burst results for "Blakey"

"blakey" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

02:28 min | Last month

"blakey" Discussed on The Daily

"It's tuesday september fourteenth. Can you tell me about david. Blakey what i know about david blakeney. How long were you very. Okay is through his wife of forty two years yvonne blakeney and she lives in south carolina. And how did you guys meet mohammed. Okay that would be good. And she told me that they met through family and at the time she had four young children. When was just a baby. Eight months ago. Wow so that's a. That is a lot of work. And what drew her to him was that he said he would take care of them. He would take care of her and the children a few help. You know told me oh. And he did to miss the next forty years together and he raised those kids as if they were his own and tell me more about him you know. What would you might work. I regard work every day. Working on on you know in rhode he worked for four decades of farmhand and she said he was a big muscular guy when he was young man. Two hundred fifty bucks. Okay she said you know he. He wants thought nothing of just scrambling up on the top of those dig irrigation ribs to fix something and then and then right back down every day you know so. He worked hard for most of his life. But when he was in his early sixties his health started declining and he developed dementia. He became increasingly. Confused forgetful He would wander out of the house. People would bring him back kalman. kenya way. You.

david blakeney yvonne blakeney Blakey mohammed south carolina david rhode dementia kalman kenya
"blakey" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

05:49 min | Last month

"blakey" Discussed on No Jumper

"No jumper coolest podcasts in the world and we got my man to two gs in the building shit labor to blake. Hey good l a whole lot. Lot is a whole lot. You got the in the right show. You gotta work with that. Used to be going crazy on a gravel in new york city. We we put that in the microwave. The oxycodone microwave. Chris putting nice container for you about they which spicy growl you go. You have them do that for you at the bodega. That's what i say. Why started that shit. I thought they started in brooklyn but they started. That shouldn't have bronx. Wow that's incredible. That's amazing. I'd had no idea that they were fucking with. I'm tracking my head on straight joke. You're happy rapid. Don't you remember when we met. I was hard for you to atlantic. They put me into a studio. I remember back in the day. And they're like this is too and i met you in and i've been watching a hooker since then but we. We met for a brief moment before the first interview remember. That's how hobby crazy so you start smoking more during the pandemic or something. Have you definitely be locked in. his shit. Waving was came up with news back really had to just get more more in the zone. Because you didn't use to smoke. When i first met you or non smoking. I've been smoking this shit. This is basically. We're started to. Jeez right here. We should right. And i just turned it into right. That's crazy. yeah. Because i i went back and i was watching your first videos. Like two thousand sixteen twenty sixteen would have been the first ones you like twenty six twenty eight twenty six. I mean it was just crazy looking back at that. Like you're young as fuck talking crazy as folks get crazy crazy when i look back at it too late right. Yeah that's that's i got past. That will always be able to tell my kids and shit like my pass on his ally like definitely if you had like a sixteen year old son. You'd be able to be like listen. Look at my rap video. From when i this we will while you can't tell me shit already lived because look at this shit that i was doing like when you think back to that time period though like really got you make an raviolis and stuff because it's kind of crazy when you look at like how much of an influence you've had in the game and how early you are on so much shit at that time who has influence in you to make music and what made you really wanna go all out. It'd be doing music videos and shit at that age i must say Chicago definitely vivas looking at chicago videos shit grownup issue and i'm gonna say competition in brooklyn to light. There wasn't per se during drill but it was still competition going over like the young ship within the city for me so it was. I turn show out why she got a million views shit so i just kept going crazy with me but you know. Yeah there's competition like who. Who who were you hanging out with though was there ever a moment where dudes we're like. We're like older dudes kinda like yo. You could be the voice for our people. You know you can really do this. Yeah i mean at the. I got the i mean us. That's when the whole hood condor like kodo fake talented ship filming still a hit me though like everybody else around me like yo. I'm nice with this. Shouldn't it hit me. Like i got locked up in miami. She then. i'm like yo. I'm on news brooklyn rapid that i'm about to take the serious when i get home. So episodes locked in definitely. Yeah so you were super influenced by the chicago stuff musically because that that was one of the biggest changes i guess that sort of came about like with the whole drew wave is like there's always been this classic new york sound and all of a sudden there was just like a totally new sound that sort of combined some of the uk influence some of the chicago influence etc. I told this was on youtube when they clicked. I i have my own stoller at my own flows. Shine wanna really sound like nobody else you so i really just click the beat on youtube. I it was a uk. Be you for me. So i was like the first young nigga from brooklyn with the uk. Be so just sounded different. Everybody just stuck to that. They started looking for them. Type of visas is stuck on that. Touchy you listened to much. Uk music at that point up to no. I mean now. I just thought it's happening got older you like. I'm i'm smarter now so i could go google. Uk drill definitely. You get love from those people. Because i feel like when i was on the uk and stuff. That i was. I was hearing people say like yo like kids out here. They really listening to gs a lot. in the uk. I ain't never been out there. But they show a lot of level they should 'cause we show a lot of love to the uk you know we really fucked which beats hall. We stylish fire shit shot up. Shot pseudo. 'cause that's that's the originated to me for me on a percent. When did you first hear the word lucky because that was the whole wave in the beginning. That's that's the craziest part is watching this young kid in the videos. Blakey every other word and and you know there aren't any actual blakey's in the video. I mean they might be blake. He's in the. There's no firearms in the video but Where where you. I hear that term and then how did it become such a focal point for that. That early area career blakey to word. That's a new york city work. I'm not even going to say that. Because they say in any other cities too. But i'm pretty sure it started in new york. City it really. We just bought the word back to life like it was saying that blakey should know more until we came back with that shit so as really what it is. Shut out the bills belittle he started. He said you'll keep this strap like bills. Blakey fill me that. Just put put the light bulb in the air for the young negative and we just ran with with that right there but it. It sounds like you really kind of like made brand. You know like you really just remarked. It branded all want some serious business. Shit really Definitely.

brooklyn uk vivas blake chicago bronx new york city atlantic Chris youtube blakey Chicago miami new york Blakey google
Christophe Robin: Get Stronger Hair with a Healthy Scalp

Art Beauty

07:06 min | 9 months ago

Christophe Robin: Get Stronger Hair with a Healthy Scalp

"Scrub end like why is it. Important to detox. Are scalp scalp. Yeah so everyone always talks about skin. Care how right and we always focus on face But our scalp is really just an extension of our based. Nobody really knows. The effect with healthcare You think haircare you're thinking you're strand you're thinking keeping your ends You know shiny and keeping split ends away But when we talk about scalp it's usually a little dirty and nobody ever wants to talk about it. so you get. That's where all of your issues cover right. Like if you have any eggs demise or dandruff any sort of europeans whether it be from color styling anything like that. It really starts with your skull. So taking care of scalp is super super wherein using a good shampoo. That's really going to give you your your beautiful hair on the long-term Because that's all we want right. We don't wanna do endless treatments to end all of these time consuming things Like i said we're we're not big into styling or shampoos. The reason for that is he knows you find a lot of still counts while everyone loves a good silicon from time to time. You know for those really important saturday night. Fun nights that we used to have on that we will get back to you spoon. That's not sort of thing. You gotta clean your scout afterwards. Exclusively said it's like you know going to bed with makeup on your face cadillac. Your scalp reads just like you. Let your skin. And that's exactly with our with our sea salt scrubbed and i love that you know. Listen for for those of us who are in the northeast. the colder climates The northwest for those of us who are in the north or in colder climates in the winter You know we. I get the itchy scalp right. My scott gets dry so it's not even about over styling or over shampooing. I think a lot of it is just whether rated definitely every year every year. And i i talk dirty about scalise. I can deandre right. It's just like you said. We live in the northeast new york. Especially we get super dry super flaky Especially if you colored to you now through times that can dry scalp so the good thing about this sea salt scrubbers Going to kind of get rid of all that those little sea salt crystals getting deep blakey said it gives you a queen feeling but without stripping your hair Similar to the ocean you go into the ocean sea. Salt water come out. Your skin is like really glowing any feel really great. Same effect on your scalp. I mean another thing that is totally sort of been ruined for me. Now that i knew that like carrington and any sort of sodium chloride do not go for some reason. I thought it was sulfates. Isn't that embarrassing. I i used to get it once a year. And i thought it was the sulfates in. Khartoum are good. But it's not it's sodium chloride. Yeah any sort of foaming agent you really don't want to mess with with Undocked everything you did okay. How okay so now. Let's talk about you know once we have detox star scalp in terms of keeping things healthy. What are sort of the next step in. You know making sure that we're fortifying are hairless. Say so actually in our world detoxing kind of like the last step so i'm gonna walk you through good okay all routine on how to properly wash your hair rate. It's super super common But it's a very common misconception that people don't understand and everybody that i talk to. You is like oh my god. I've been washing my hair the wrong way my entire life so i just wanted to walk you through a few steps on how to really you now. Detox your scalp. Get that clean feeling again. In a proper way their steps to get there and tell us like writer yes cash so the first step is actually detangling. Something super simple. How many times have you washed your hair and then have not even brushed it before you hop in the shower. I never russia before. I hop in the shower. You just take out your body a ponytail or whatever you have and you. Top shot right. Super super comment. Christopher always said these. I became really gonna stimulate your scalp It's also going to help natural in in your air and to help distribute the oils from your scalp down to your end's okay. Well we have. Our barbara still brash. again recommend bristle because it actually mimics the church in that we have in our hair naturally as you can see. They're all different life. Bristles anakin evenly distribute evenly. Brush your hair and get all of it the strands in your hair. Look your head over. Yes go ahead is as i see you doing this motion so you wanna do it upside down your over and i would totally demonstrate. My hair is curled today. For you look gorgeous. You look gorgeous ready to rush it. I'm going to look like a duck. It's also kind of volume so it's a really amazing little dole so the but answer the boar bristles because i know that is sort of like the gold standard of like your good brush. Do absolutely need that. You really think you do I've been using it for years. I am not the plastic. If you don't her for all war or you wanna get away from all plastic. You can kind of do a mix between a plastic board but really get get used to the warriors let so much better for your hair Once you use it to you'll also realize it doesn't tangle like sometimes you know when you get useless plastic bristles they kinda get a twisted around the bristle oranje. Get on this nothing. No no not so honestly like if we are making an investment and i mean how much is aboard. But they're they're they're not cheap but they're not expensive expensive rush for hundred dollars an audio for life as long as you bike Wash it gently Yeah i told that you're gonna use every single day so worth the investment. Okay got gotta add that to my list fair or you having a shower and wash your hair. Turn your head over. Start on the ends and with your scalp to ends in really detangle and get your hair. You know nice than practice for your shampoo. Okay with statue. Is the shampoo right now. Everyone thinks you glob your shampoo and then you do this right wrong You wanna start with a little bit. a little. Bit goes a long way especially our products. Very heavily concentrated Start with a little amount distribute into your scout. Don't worry about your ends. And then you want to ask a little bit of water in jeopardy massage the shampoo into your scalp so using your fingertips circular motions and just you your scalp right when you add the water. The shampoo is gonna run to your ends the reason why when he shampoo like this if rakes your hair more prone to split in that way and it does

Scalise Deandre Blakey Carrington Khartoum New York Anakin Christopher Russia Barbara Warriors
"blakey" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:46 min | 11 months ago

"blakey" Discussed on KOMO

"Vision was for a return to that glory. Bobby Watson, Call me on the phone, and I'm looking at Spire Blakey record that he plays out. It's on my night stand. Herman Bihari remembers it like it was yesterday. And he said, I want you to come to you can see when you come can city Bobby Watson had years before answered a similar call from the University of Missouri Kansas City to come home from out East build a real jazz conservatory. And grow new talent to fill the clubs that have never disappeared. They were just waiting for a new dose of some good old talent. My education wasn't just the school. It was also the city attracts students from all over the country to come here. I was learning as much on the scene when they come here as I was in the conservatory cases, the plague, Gan says he's almost every night somewhere, you know, not every conservatories in a place like that older musicians. You're looking for younger musicians to inspire them. As art Blakey inspired Watson as Buster Smith mentored Charlie Parker and his Watson has grown the new generation of jazz artists by combining the classroom and the stage in a town where just a few months ago. The joints were still happen every night. We're just waiting now for the club to be able to open up face Lee. They're hurting everywhere. And when the club's come back, they'll see the guys who know where home is long and rich. Defend Dominique Sanders, Ryan Lee young players anymore, Herman Bihari! Guys.

Bobby Watson Herman Bihari Spire Blakey University of Missouri Kansas Ryan Lee Gan Blakey Dominique Sanders Buster Smith Charlie Parker
"blakey" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:08 min | 11 months ago

"blakey" Discussed on KOMO

"A return to that glory. Bobby Watson called me on the phone and I'm looking at this car Blakey record that he plays out. It's on my night stand. Herman Bihari remembers it like it was yesterday. And he said, I want you from the UK. See when you come can city Bobby Watson had years before answered a similar call from the University of Missouri Kansas City to come home from out East, build a real jazz conservatory and grow new talent to fill the clubs that have never disappeared. They were just waiting for a new dose of some good old talent. My education wasn't just the school. It was also the city attracts students from all over the country to come here. I was learning as much on the scene when they come here as it was in the conservatory places the plate is, Gan says he's almost every night somewhere. You know, not every conservatory is in a place like that older musicians. They're looking for younger musicians to inspire them. As art Blakey inspired Watson as Buster Smith mentored Charlie Parker and his Watson has grown the new generation of jazz artists by combining the classroom and the stage in a town where just a few months ago. The joints were still happen every night. We're just waiting now for the club to be able to open up faithfully. They're hurting everywhere. And when the club's come back, they'll see the guys who know where home is long and rich. Defend. Dominique Sanders. Ryan Lee Young cleared anymore, Herman Bihari! Guys who are now spread around the world. Have used lockdowns and closed clubs to hone their skills. Self published new music, collaborate using technology and prepare for that next trip back to that little cow town on the Missouri, one of the cradles of jazz, a cradle that's still rocking. Century later coming up.

Bobby Watson Herman Bihari Blakey University of Missouri Kansas Gan Missouri Dominique Sanders Ryan Lee Young UK Buster Smith Charlie Parker
"blakey" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:07 min | 11 months ago

"blakey" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"City was a center of the Jazz universe. Bobby Watson's vision was for a return to that glory. Bobby Watson called me on the phone and I'm looking up. Our Blakey record that he plays out is on my night stand. Herman Bihari remembers it like it was yesterday. And he said, I want you from the U. K C. Where were you going? 10 City, Bobby Watson had years before answer to similar call from the University of Missouri Kansas City to come home from out East, build a real jazz conservatory and grow new talent to fill the clubs that have never disappeared. They were just waiting for a new dose of some good old talent. My education wasn't just the school. It was also the city attracts students from all over the country to come here. I was learning as much on the scene when they come here as it was in the conservatory places the plate, Gan says. He's almost every night somewhere, you know, not every conservatories in a place like that older musicians. They're looking for younger musician to inspire. Now, as art Blakey inspired Watson as Buster Smith mentored Charlie Parker and his Watson has grown the new generation of jazz artists by combining the classroom and the stage in a town where just a few months ago. The joints were still happen every night. We're just waiting now for the club to be able to open up faithfully. They're hurting everywhere. And when the club's come back, they'll see the guys who know where home is. Logan Richeson, Dominique Sanders, Ryan Lee young players anymore, Termina Hari. Oh, guys who are now spread around the world, but if used lockdowns and closed clubs Hone their skills. Self published new music, collaborate using technology and prepare for that next trip back to that little cow town on the Missouri, one of the cradles of jazz, a cradle.

Bobby Watson Blakey University of Missouri Kansas Herman Bihari Termina Hari Gan Missouri Logan Richeson Dominique Sanders Buster Smith Charlie Parker Ryan Lee U. K
"blakey" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:13 min | 11 months ago

"blakey" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Collaborator. Some eight decades after Kansas City was a center of the Jazz universe, Bobby Watson's vision was for a return to that glory. Bobby Watson called me on the phone and I'm looking at this far Blakey record that he plays out. It's on my night stand. Herman Bihari remembers it like it was yesterday. And he said, I want you to come to you can see when you come Can the city Bobby Watson had years before answered a similar call from the University of Missouri Kansas City to come home from out East, build a real jazz conservatory and grow new talent to fill the clubs that it never disappeared? They were just waiting for a new dose of some good old talent. My education wasn't just the school. It was also the city attracts students from all over the country to come here. I was learning as much on the scene when they come here as it was in the conservatory places the plate is, Gan says he's almost every night somewhere. You know, not every conservatory is in a place like that older musicians. You're looking for younger musician to inspire now, as art Blakey inspired Watson as Buster Smith mentored Charlie Parker and his Watson has grown the new generation of jazz artists by combining the classroom and the stage in a town where just a few months ago. The joints were still happen every night. We're just waiting now for the club to be able to open up face Lee. They're hurting everywhere. And when the club's come back, they'll see the guys who know where home is. Logan Reed Defend Dominique Sanders, Ryan Lee young players anymore, Termina Hari. Guys who are now spread around the world, but if used lockdowns and closed clubs Hone their skills. Self published new music, collaborate using technology and prepare for that next trip back to that little cow town on the Missouri, one of the cradles of jazz, a cradle.

Bobby Watson Kansas City University of Missouri Kansas Herman Bihari Termina Hari Ryan Lee Gan Blakey Missouri Logan Reed Buster Smith Dominique Sanders Charlie Parker
"blakey" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:11 min | 11 months ago

"blakey" Discussed on KOMO

"Was for a return to that glory. Bobby Watson call me on the phone, and I'm looking at this far Blakey record that he plays out. It's on my night stand. Herman Bihari remembers it like it was yesterday. And he said, I want you to come to you can see where you can city Bobby Watson had years before answered a similar call from the University of Missouri Kansas City to come home from out East, build a real jazz conservatory and grow new talent to fill the clubs that have never disappeared. They were just waiting for a new dose of some good old talent. My education wasn't just the school. It was also the city attracts students from all over the country to come here. I was learning as much on the scene when they come here as I was in the conservatory places the plague is, Gan says he's almost every night somewhere, you know, not every conservatories in a place like that older musicians. You're looking for younger musicians to inspire. Now, as art Blakey inspired Watson as Buster Smith mentored Charlie Parker and his Watson has grown the new generation of jazz artists by combining the classroom and the stage in a town where just a few months ago. The joints were still happen every night. We're just waiting now for the club to be able to open up faithfully. They're hurting everywhere. And when the club's come back, they'll see the guys who know where home is long and rich. Defend Dominique Sanders, Ryan Lee young players anymore Terminal Hari. Guys who are now spread around the world. But if youse lockdowns and closed clubs Hone their skills. Self published new music, collaborate using technology and prepare for that next trip back to that little cow town on the Missouri, one of the cradles of jazz, a cradle that's still rocking. Century later coming up turning planes into art.

Bobby Watson Herman Bihari University of Missouri Kansas Gan Blakey Missouri Dominique Sanders Buster Smith Charlie Parker Ryan Lee
How Indigenous skateboarders use their boards for creative expression and land reclamation

Unreserved

04:50 min | 1 year ago

How Indigenous skateboarders use their boards for creative expression and land reclamation

"Neighbor down the street was like, what do you like skateboarding? So much I was like Yo, check this out kick flipped I try and I was like see that that's like magic to me. That's a magic trick that just happened in like I get to do that over and over and again, and I get to do other magistrates to been like. So that's why I love it. That was Blakey White Cloud. He has spent a lot of time at skate parks whether he skateboarding or making documentaries about indigenous skateboarding for both CBC and a t N.. Here's a bit from the dock he produced for CBC arts called how the art of Skateboarding can also be an act of empowerment. Me skateboarding gave me the voice of community. You can stay when you're sad you're mad depressed and at the end of the day to day mind. So clear. PARTICI-. Relaxing it's almost meditation. Gave me pretty much everything down to like personal confidence. gave me a wave. Accomplished something I never thought I could do we concentrate so hard on town nail one trick and determined that you want it I went to have it feels awesome but you build up to your bruise you blood for the phone for A. Thank. God. That was a clip from how the art of skateboarding can also be an active empowerment a documentary by Khawaga Blakey. White cloud. So, Khawaga. What is it about skateboarding that you love the most the thing I love skateboarding the most is the visceral reaction when you lend something that you thought of that, you self actualized that you were like, I wonder if I could do this or your friend was like I wonder if you could do this and then you're like I don't know if I do this and then you know you try it and you might not make it and you're like Oh. Maybe if I shift my feet a little bit differently and then Lo and behold, you make it and you're just like like your hair stands up on ends you just like. People might. Be Cheering for unions. And so like that's what I love most about it is that kind of visceral passionate? Yes. Did it. So, what would you say is the relationship between indigenous people and skateboarding that's like an interesting one because I think it's unique to every person. But in my case, it was definitely the getting kicked out of private property and like having a discussion about like, oh, like let's have a discussion about treaties, Mike and Private property right and then some people just refuse to do it and then other listen they're like, Whoa, like you have a really good point. Right. So there's that and then also the kind of spiritual aspect of being out on the land like hanging out like outside all day and. Doing something that's leading to a good life, right like that like your emotional health like you're getting all that out your physical mental, your occupational like just the way you're spending your time. You know you're you're doing something really good with your life, your environmental rate you're hanging outside and your intellectual being challenged all the time to break because sometimes a trick isn't working out like you're just like Oh. Maybe just move my feet like just a little bit back and then like. It happens and you're just like Oh my God that was the key right. So yeah. So all these things like all of them are challenged. All get amplified and you just feel like a way healthier. Person Afterwards and I think like that's kind of pushed through in like we talk about health from an indigenous perspective like it's not just like your physical health rate and it's like all these other aspects of it that we don't necessarily talk about but that that comes to you and skateboarding And you said it's. Like reconciliation in reality. What do you? What do you mean by that? There's a long history like along colonial history that we've never. Really. been taught through the regular education system nor in the media and it's missing from a lot of the discussions around what does it mean to be indigenous into Canadian society when we start talking about like oh You know skating on your private property, but this is actually true one and like the best example was getting kicked out of the Manitoba Hydro Building by an employee he was like Oh like you should get out of here and I was like we will in five minutes. All respect and he's like, no, you need to get out of here. Now they don't you know who paid for all this and I was like well, like no Manitoba Hydro derived a lot of its profits from like indigenous lands. Expropriated and then they really properly compensated them. So as indigenous person like I think the right to be here and like he had no clue to say to that right like he was just like he just put up his hands and he turned around left and I was like that's right like you're talking to somebody who's like who has an idea of what the history is and I know that deep down inside you know what the history is and so. Like let's acknowledge that but to some people like they don't want knowledge it right like just like him. He didn't want acknowledged he just wants to run and go grab the security but I think like the more we have these discussions the more we come to a clarity of like what's actually happened and what needs to happen in order to move forward for justice for indigenous peoples in Canadian society.

Skateboarding Blakey White Cloud Manitoba Hydro CBC Khawaga Blakey Manitoba Hydro Building Khawaga A. Thank LO Mike
"blakey" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"But change is really seed used carbon spewing private jet knowing full well that the use is equivalent to 1000 Kalle farts. You leaked the story. Bernie Sanders took all of these flights to help out Hillary Clinton and then Hillary Clinton turned around and clocked him with a broom. Well done. Team Clinton well done teams. And is this sarcasm make his butt look big and I'll add sure makes his mouth talk fast and Shapiro days 2 to 5 on W. L S am 90 Give her that Donald Trump is means the media and his cruelty has resulted in Jim Acosta receiving a massive book contract from Harper College right about how hard it is to be Jim Acosta, while simultaneously making out with Jim Acosta. See, he doesn't only pick on Alexandria, Cassio Cortez, and I can't calling her. He does do that a lot. Doesn't she Smart? I know she's super smart, because the media telling me she's super Smart and Shapiro, we may be down is a country with days to defy. It's time to hang it up and turn it on. W L S a M 8 90 The detail, tuck and get a little sticky. She decided to glue her breast to the asphalt to protest the climate. Do you think they call it crazy Glue? A little sweaty Michael Moore tweeted out that he was gonna cancel his membership at Soulcycle. The good news is that frees up like three seats at Soulcycle, but always sense of all the work in the things that I believe under assault everyday and I defend Chris planted nine Russian 11 then Shapiro and to the daytime talk on 8 90 W. L s And midnight's redeye radio at 5 a.m. America this morning, 8 90 W. L S. Mark Levin found Blakey's monk within radio show. May I ask is a side point all the newsrooms in.

Jim Acosta Hillary Clinton Cassio Cortez Shapiro Kalle farts Bernie Sanders Donald Trump Soulcycle Harper College Michael Moore assault Mark Levin America Alexandria Blakey Chris
"blakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Because a couple of months later, the same quintet recorded most of the same tunes for live albums issued instead. Both spirited volumes of the live art Blakey and his jazz messengers at the Jazz corner of the world. Let the band flex and stretch, but this compact, more crisply recorded studio session is a gem. The band's frontline paired two players who already got alone 20 year old trumpet phenomenally Morgan and gruff tenor saxophonist, tank mobile. Mostly wrote three of the six tunes including Hip City Blues. Art Blakey's band epitomized so called hard, Bob. Hard driving, heavily swinging style drenched in the blues. The drive mostly came from the drummer in his prime Blakey was a great, innovative and aggressive.

Art Blakey Bob Morgan
"blakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The average fan would never get near home plate. If he ever got hit anywhere, let alone in the head before I let you go coming back to this season. Do you think we'll make it to the end? Will we see playoffs? Well, that's about a three hour discussion day, but note my hesitation. I don't think we're gonna make it through this season, and I sure hope we do the owners really want to make it through this season because all the money most of the money comes from the playoff money, and that's in October, But With the latest cove it and with all the road blocks ahead. I think I would be surprised if we finished this season. And if we don't finish it because Corona overpowered it. I'm okay with that. And so should everyone else. Health and safety should be all that matters, not a truncated 2020 seasons. Well, Tim Kurkjian. Thank you so much for speaking with us. My pleasure, Dave. Thank you. Tim Kurkjian is an on air analyst for ESPN and a senior writer for ESPN dot com. His latest book is I'm Fascinated by Sacrifice flies Coming up. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly discovered session with drummer Art Blakey and his band, the Jazz Messengers. This is fresh air. This is fresh air Drummer Art Blakey let has banned the jazz messengers for almost 40 years, making many classic records with top musicians. A newly unearthed 1959 Blakey.

Art Blakey Tim Kurkjian ESPN Jazz critic Corona Kevin Whitehead Dave analyst writer
"Mythbusters" co-host Grant Imahara dead at 49

The KFBK Morning News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

"Mythbusters" co-host Grant Imahara dead at 49

"And some sad news this morning about Grant imahara. An electrical engineer who was well known to fans of Mythbusters. He has died. The 49 year old died yesterday, reportedly after a brain aneurysm. Imahara first appeared on the Discovery show in its third season, and he stayed until 2014 when he then left with co host Kari Byron and Tory Blakey. The three actually joined back up for one season of the 2016 Netflix show. White Rabbit Project. Imahara also worked for nearly a decade with Lucas Films Industrial Light Magic and T H X. Also working on models and effects on films like The Star Wars prequels, The Matrix Reloaded and Terminator three Rise of the machines, so Rest in peace. Grant Imahara only

Grant Imahara Brain Aneurysm Lucas Films Kari Byron Tory Blakey Engineer Rabbit Project Netflix
"A Medically Induced Economic Coma"

Why It Matters

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"A Medically Induced Economic Coma"

"So the Wyatt matters team like everyone else is home and it's hard things are scary. I don't know about you but I've been having endless video chats with my friends and family and aside from drinking wine while showing off completed puzzles or homemade bread. We're mostly talking about two topics health and the economy we bounce back and forth what starts as a question about how someone's feeling turns into an update about who lost their job. These conversations are happening everywhere. Nobody wants to get sick. Nobody wants to lose their job. And it can feel like it's one or the other as people deal with these worries. Some politicians and business leaders have called for a return to work in order to save the economy even at the expense of lives. It just keeps coming up and so we decided. Hey let's pick up the phone and ask two of our fellows to help us understand the problem. One an expert on health and the other an expert on the economy. Just a heads up that this episode is going to have a different style than our other shows. It's essentially two conversations without most of our usual music and narration and possess. Don't worry though we'll be back to our regular format and non corona virus programming for a season to premiere in two weeks. But for now I'm Gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today saving the economy and saving lives. Do we have to choose okay? First Tomboy key senior fellow for Global Health at the council. He's getting a lot of these calls so hopefully he's not tired of answering Tom. Blakey how are you? I'm okay grappling with the shutdown. Like everyone else. Yeah what is your work from home situation? She asks while sitting in her closet so he answers while sitting in my in my bedroom where we have three small kids. So you know. That's a challenge and we live in the city of DC so there is no great backyard for them to run around in so they bounce around the house. More or less like excited molecules at this so we have officially made it to April. Felt like we would never get here. Longest MARCH ON RECORD. I believe is the expert opinion. Do you think April is going to be worse than March April in the United States will definitely be worse than March? That's because by and large it takes about three weeks for people to start showing clinical symptoms so starting to get physically ill from having contracted the virus. It spreads as everyone knows at this point exponentially with a lot of cases occurring among people who have unreported infections. So I wanna ask you about something that I keep seeing people arguing about on social media even though I'm trying to avoid some of this stuff pretty pretty hard but do you feel like we have to choose between saving the economy and saving lives. No I think saving lives or more specifically keeping people from getting infected is really the only way to save the economy. The reality of this is is that we are not going practically to be able to go back to work until we get this back under control so the best economic policy. We have is health policy. At this moment we can have a bad. Economic impact of this pandemic with good policies will still end up there or we could have a much worse. Economic impact of these with bad health policies plus all lives lost. And I choose the former. But I've heard people say that if we don't spend money saving the economy. Many more lives could be lost in the long run due to recession. So do recessions kill people? They do recessions. Do Kill people. There have been a number of studies that looked at the great recession. We saw health impacts deeply for men and racial and ethnic minorities and it ranged from a lot of our Diseases of despair that exists out there already in terms of suicide or alcohol or substance abuse traffic fatalities safe harm declining fertility. You name it. You see that in recessions and we just saw a dozen years ago so we're going to see that again but again. The option here is not preventing recession by allowing this virus. Free Rein to run rampant. It's we want this to be a shorter recession or we want this to be a deeper and longer recession so the idea is to focus sort of on the immediate and the short term and that will help naturally the long-term absolutely know China's starting head back to work South Korea which had its first case the same day the United States head. Its first case is back to work. You know we can do this. We got off to an awfully slow start but it can be done in the sooner we can do it. The better for us both from an economic and health perspective. So I've read that half. The national stockpile of ventilators has already been sent out. Which sounds really scary. So if we want to stimulate the economy and fight the pandemic at the same time. I don't really understand why we can't put more people to work making masks the protective gear the ventilator is the things we need so we can but we need to mandate this. They're going to be still supply chain issues about. Can we make all the components? Can we get all that but you know we can manage that? What is difficult to manage is to be doing this in April instead of doing it in January February. You've in early March. So what choices has the US made in situations like this in the past? Are there any past success stories? We can emulate USO in the past in World War Two and in the Korean War. We granted the executive branch broad authority to regulate industry so that we could ramp up supplies that are needed for the nation's offense. We are in that kind of moment now. The president is talking about doing that this week. On a limited basis. And that's great and I'm glad for it and we should but we are awfully late for this wave but here's one thing. I do emphasize unfortunately. Is that even when we get this under control? This isn't going away. This is just the first wave of this now. If we can manage to get ahead of it we can do what some other nations have done which is have good surveillance and testing and really minimize the effect of future waves. But until there's a vaccine are really effective therapeutic set can reduce people from getting sick from this. We're going to keep seeing waves at this point. There're more than a million cases globally. It's a virus said isn't going to go away. There's signs that it's going to go away with weather so ramping up production is good for those second ways. I'd just wish we had done it earlier. So is good for this wave two. So has the timeline on a vaccine. Become any clear so it's a year and a year and a half away. That's what we're looking at. The other thing to know about the vaccine is once we have it. We still have to make it in the kind of volumes that can address people's needs you know how do we do that? But even once back scene becomes available. We'll take a little time for everyone to get it so I shouldn't be pending all my hopes to that vaccine Not In the short term in the long term. I'm a believer in human innovation. What I do think you need for that to have. Its effect is realistic and honest. Assessment of the challenges we face in the urgency in addressing them. But when you have that I fundamentally believe in us to have that innovation to address that we just need to mobilize it sooner than we have been. What does the endgame of this pandemic look like to you? The medium-term and people should be honest about this. So I'm going to try to be in. This podcast is that you know even in countries that have done well with this. They're still seeing cases. They get cases from people returning from abroad with infections like sparks. You know you need to control before they set off at wildfire. That's going to be the reality for a year or two years with this virus that we will have that risk so it. This is not going to immediately go back to the way it was. That's the medium-term this the long term is there only really to either. We develop a vaccine or at least sixty percent of the population needs to become immune the challenge with the latter route. Is it will come at a great human cost so I would like to bet on the former.

United States Senior Fellow For Global Healt USO Blakey DC Sierra TOM China South Korea President Trump Executive
"blakey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on KCRW

"Your friend I was born and raised in Philadelphia and growing up at thank you again jazz musicians of my generation our number one hero the person who we all wanted to play with more than anyone else was Art Blakey we wanted to be a member of our bleak in the jazz messengers every great jazz musicians since the fifties play what art Blakey from Freddie Hubbard Clifford brown leave Morgan Wynton Marsalis Wynton and Branford Marsalis Wayne shorter they all play what are the key so as a teenager I had my wish list of people I wanted to play with are believed he was unquestionably number one number two was up for grabs but that was answered the first time I saw Freddie Hubbard perform live it was in the summer of nineteen eighty seven in Philly and I've grown up going to a lot of rhythm and blues shows a lot of gospel shows so I knew with that intensity that that fervor that drama was in the music and the stage part of these great soul and gospel performance I never quite got that with a jazz performance too many times with jazz concerts you leave going I think I liked it because we got you here but not here all the time first time I was off ready however it was the jazz equivalent of James Brown he might as well got on his knees with his trumpet.

Philadelphia Art Blakey Morgan Wynton Marsalis Wynton Marsalis Wayne Philly James Brown Freddie Hubbard Clifford brown Branford Freddie Hubbard
"blakey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Your friend I was born and raised in Philadelphia and growing up that thank you again jazz musicians of my generation our number one hero the person who we all wanted to play with more than anyone else was Art Blakey we wanted to be a member of art Blakey's jazz messengers every great jazz musicians since the fifties play what art Blakey from Freddie Hubbard Clifford brown Lee Morgan Wynton Marsalis Wynton and Branford Marsalis Wayne shorter they all play what are the key so as a teenager I had my wish list of people I want to play with are believed he was unquestionably number one number two was up for grabs but that was answered the first time I saw Freddie Hubbard perform live rules in the summer of nineteen eighty seven in Philly and I've grown up going to a lot of rhythm and blues shows a lot of gospel shows so I knew with that intensity that that fervor that trauma was in the music and the stays are of these great soul and gospel performance I never quite got that with a jazz performance too many times with jazz concerts you leave going I think I liked it because we got you here but not here all the time first time all star Freddie Hubbard it was the jazz equivalent of James Brown he might as well got on his knees with his trumpet I had a guy come up with the cables back but that excitement every time he would take a troubled soul in the whole audience which is star screaming like anything you could ever imagine Freddie Hubbard quickly became number two on my list I moved here to New York in nineteen eighty nine and as fate would have it some.

Philadelphia Art Blakey Freddie Hubbard Clifford Marsalis Wynton Marsalis Wayne Philly Freddie Hubbard James Brown New York Lee Morgan Branford
"blakey" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Pretty swanky nightclub Hey you know as soon as like this make ten you come from as a matter I was just listening to that song it just happens to me a lot to me later that he Chromeo like to keep away from snap out of it all right I'm sorry Blake he he wanted excitement you get a chance to see however the first make it threw a fit when you find out who I really was it was awesome to be black and now I'm gonna give you some real exciting and put another heist tomorrow thank and the heat is on me you're gonna drive like get away car I'm good to drive our get away car I right if you say so Blakey that's what I do say you still Love Me Blanco lay off that fed up with you put the car in front of the bank and I'll take with me and go win yes the cashier gets picked up right away wait for the sailing you didn't reach quite enough grab a delegate that okay shut up okay she had never mind here and get that done got it okay then come on and if anyone tries to stop us when we get outside.

Blakey Blake
"blakey" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"blakey" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"And do some really interesting things with that. Tom's you're listening to it. And you're listening so intently to what they doing with the Chin if a get started off of God was come rainy. Come Sean until I brought it back to just kind of traditional rendition over just for a little bit. Just so immersed in the provision of the changes. I roll on that I forgot the lyrics. Got What shooter was but I was just kind of diving deeply into the wider will passing it between each other and the way everybody was adding to it in kind of making it more than some of the parts. That's a chain. That's very very near and dear to my heart. I I heard it. I guess in the early eighties when it was played over the opening credits. If Scorsese film the King of comedy the right chows version. So that's a song that I've loved for whatever. It is thirty six thirty seven years and so two kit this version which is necessarily but certainly make tempo version of a lot more swinging vision. When I heard this took me off guard I gotta say just from the outset as well Even though I've been a longtime blackie feigned I had like a three CD anthology on blue note of Blakey's work on blue note so I didn't actually have this album until he said to me. I'd like to talk about this on this show so it was interesting because he all those teams played as a unit as it was intended to be heard yet. Look I really dug that tune as well and it was interesting to sort of have two different mindset. Approach listening to it after knowing episode many years as this fantastic ray Charles ballot and. I'm sure it's been done hundreds of times by other musicians in equally interesting ways. Yeah and the Nice thing about getting the album now is is that ultimate. Take on Monin as well. Right editors extra track to it so just seeing the way they did differently. The second time was kind of interesting..

Blakey blackie Monin Tom Scorsese Sean ray Charles
"blakey" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"blakey" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Relishing circling away looking around place the girl suing you mentioned to me for the Michigan the feds are showing this year a propensity to go to that now and the snake in behind great to see a DVD player the for the phone great pastor Blakey bird your stock funds men in the valley view on there for large cultural so three nothing on the form four goals thirty for the for the shots on goal Michigan firmly control this form for certainly seem to play missions favors law the good skaters out there use that extra room it makes good was Vic Fazio for the face off when it was great the faceoff circle last year here's a shot and it's the only bank now the nice manic passed on at five known face off the first period that's something on my kind of mission right there very few respondents kind of an undercover game changer star with pockets full just chasing around my passing up with the black and he tries to go to the goals and he was knocked down and the answers come back the other way will resume a great job though of forcing the player at the blue line and they have not been able to penetrate the mystery of the fence now look Martin center controls that puck goes in the Michigan bench but I don't think they saw it white continued Alec mark will a player they had like past yeah looking for a pass on the line change actually as the all the.

Michigan Vic Fazio Martin center Alec mark Blakey
"blakey" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:41 min | 2 years ago

"blakey" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"For the next couple hours Blakey J. Heris bestselling author of cultural wars Sega Nintendo won the battle that defined a generation which is currently being adapted for television by the legendary entertainment company with producers Seth Rogan. Evan Goldberg and Scott Rudin here is has written for E. S. P. N. the I. G. N. Fast Company filmon the AV club and appears regularly on Paul shears how did this get made his podcast and his latest book is called the history of the future and it's got rave reviews Blake welcome to the program first time gastrite. George thank you for having me on hopefully this will be the first of many appearances on the program let's hope so I mean your excel you know I hope you have to bring the fight at thirteen bad luck I guess I've already crossed over into the next. hopefully we'll get up to. maybe back listening to you and W. O. ours are giant of Philly at New York City which beams all over the east coast right now tell us a little bit about the history of the future we're going to dive into a talking about some specific people but give me an overall view. so this in the future it's about the you know the subtitles oculus Facebook in the quest for virtual reality but from my perspective and you know what the listeners are very familiar with virtual reality or don't know the first thing about it that's okay because I always want everything I write to be you know acceptable to anybody I was right with my grandmother in mind and what really appealed to me about the story was just a you know I set up to tell a story sort of checking on the state of the American dream circa twenty twelve twenty fourteen and and you know it for me the story was about this nineteen year old kid named Palmer Luckey who was at the time living in a trailer in Long Beach California he was obsessed with virtual reality which was technology that was essentially like you know treated like a punch line like flying cars and jet packs the thing that was supposed to happen the sci fi tropes that never really did but Palmer was obsessed with it he had gotten honest trailer to basically be this mad scientist later and he was building all these headsets and he ended up building a prototype headset that was much better and much cheaper than everything else out in the world and then within that you know start a company called oculus less than two years later they sold the Facebook for about three million dollars and then a couple years after that he got fired for reasons that have nothing to do with virtual reality and really change my book and was really trust strange but you know he he's one fascinating brilliant guy and his quest to resurrect virtual reality was was really what drew me and this idea of trying to bring back up I thought to be lost technology and you know see see how the American dream is doing at this point in time there was a lot of controversy over his dismissal some say it was because of his supporter from Donald Trump at the time Facebook denies it says has nothing to do with his politics but they never really cited a reason why they let him down but they did by his business and apparently he made about seven hundred million dollars under the deal what do you think. it is very well you know not right now he's only twenty five years old it's really amazing I remember the first time that I met him after I was given access and I he's he we always sort of storyteller out and he said you know I I don't know if I'm going to give you all the stories and I said okay I'll try to get them as I don't give them but you mind my asking why not and he said well you know and I will write a book myself when I'm much older and I say like. you know we're like thirty when I'm really really old right. but he's kinda needling me a bit he's a he's a very charismatic guy but I'll tell you one thing that you know I find you know but I think that most readers will find Palmer endearing and find what happened to him inspiring from Facebook to be a real travesty but you know he's one of those people that has it has barely changed since since the money he certainly hasn't changed in terms of lifestyle he's you know whenever I go out to sea and we usually McDonalds and other fast foods he he he said he told me that you know the only like this really changes that if he's you know he's building products in inventing things and you know now held by the two thousand dollar part instead of trying to craft one at home it is not the trailer go anymore his he. these are not only bought a nice house for himself in in southern California but also bought one for his parents so he's a good sign yeah I was like this really changed I'm sure we'll get into all that but it it's just crazy to think where you started this kid with a dream focused on this technology that you know I'm thirty six years old and and I remember when I was growing up if you had pulled me aside in the mid nineties when I was you know a young teenager and said you know how how big a part of the future is virtual reality can be as they used to be huge and you know lawn mower managers come out at the mall they had all these B. R. installations and it seems like a really big deal this thing that was about to happen and it just didn't yeah he just faded away and then I guess it's storming back and we're gonna talk about how Facebook value this company that two plus billion dollars for crying out loud yeah we are you was he generating a lot of revenue at the time. no I mean essentially Kickstarter was was there first way to generate money and and you know they obviously had crowd funding you know the crowd funding sites so money was coming in but it was essentially just a way for people to buy a prototype headset of the oculus rift three dollars and they sold out I think the select two thousand on the Kickstarter they they ended up raising a few million of the man of selling ten thousand but through their website but you know they weren't certainly they they weren't ringing in the revenues along the lines of what Facebook for three billion dollar price and that yes you know there's there's the first chapter of the book starts with the day of the acquisition I was able to get access to like a pirate never before seen video of mark Zuckerberg addressing the team and and he explains why he wanted to acquire them in part of the reason was that he felt like he had missed out on mobile maybe is because Facebook you know didn't really start to feel that. too late but you know there was this big computing platform shift in the early loss to mobile market like he missed out on it and he wanted to be early to the next computer shift and on the one hand I would say that's pretty smart on the other hand it might say well you're living your fear of missing out guide you too much but but the most important hand I would say oh man if this book is it is still clutching the flag in the whole new platform what is that mean for us given what we know about Facebook and and some of the stuff that I am covered in my book about people scary in oculus have anything proprietary that Facebook wanted. it's a great question because the answer is not really I think so it's been around since the sixties and a lot of the stuff that you know the patents have have laughed so wasn't so much like there is you know the secret formula they said they couldn't they almost you know only oculus could put out except that you know a big part of this business even though it's not only a hardware business selling headset so it was really their software prowess and having people like Michael a brash and John Carmack who are legends in the video game space but it wasn't surprising price to pay for a company with with with not much I. D. hold on for second Blake were at the top by the bottom of the hour break here will come back in a moment and also find out why they think virtual reality is in an eighty billion dollar industry I'll get your take on that too when we come back join the coast to coast AM Facebook page with thousands of members it's great for show updates and connecting with other fans.

Seth Rogan Blakey J. Heris Evan Goldberg I. G. N. Fast Company Scott Rudin Blake George Paul E. S. P. N. seven hundred million dollars eighty billion dollar three million dollars three billion dollar two thousand dollar twenty five years thirty six years billion dollars nineteen year three dollars two years
Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

"Two. This episode of studio. Three sixty is brought to you by the relentless, which is a new podcast from slate studios and century twenty one real estate. The relentless is about extrordinary people and mindsets. And behaviors that drive them to achieve inspiring things. Join host and doctor of clinical psychology, Julie Gerner she talks to business leaders across industries about what sets them apart and how they view success differently. You'll hear about what they've learned from their successes and failures and how they're continuing to evolve. Listen and subscribe to the relentless today wherever you get your podcasts. This is new three sixteen. I'm courteous. I'm Josh Allen Gonzalez from studio. Three sixty. We're back with another installment of this woman's work. A series of stories from classic Elba, Sundays and studio. Three. Sixty classic album. Sundays is a program of community listening events, founded by Coline, Cosmo Murphy, where fans listened to essential albums uninterrupted on state of the art sound systems for this woman's work were highlighting classic albums by female artists women who have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time lady sings the blues by jazz singer, Billie holiday. It was released in nineteen fifty six to coincide with her autobiography of the same name by this point in her career when she was just in her early forties. Holiday's voice was sounding fragile and warn the toll of a life marked by hardship and addiction. Although the more energetic sound of her earlier records is muted here, holiday still delivers wise and moving performances in this collection of emotional, jazz tunes, many of the songs here became synonymous with her unique sound and persona. Here's colleen. Billie holiday remains one of the greatest jazz, voices of all time and is still easily recognizable to music fans from all generations. She's got them. The musicians and clubs of New York City were integral to the development of jazz in the nineteen forties. Bebop was born in the Big Apple with artists like Charlie Parker bologna, smoke and Dizzy, Gillespie. The nineteen fifties saw the development of hard bop with Sonny Rollins and our Blakey the cool jazz of miles Davis and later, the free jazz of Ornette Coleman, and later John Coltrane explored in downtown, Manhattan venues, like the five spot. But vocal innovator and world-famous Billie holiday with unable to perform these notable. Jaaz clubs in the nineteen fifties as her cabaret card had been revoked due to narcotics charges. So instead, she brought jazz to the mainstream by performing it a major concert venue Carnegie Hall in nineteen fifty six. Nothing. On nothing. She wants said of her style. If I'm going to sing like someone else, then I don't need to sing at all in nineteen fifty eight Frank Sinatra told ebony magazine with few exceptions, every major pop singer in the US during her generation has been touched in some way by her genius. It is Billie holiday who was and still remains the greatest single musical influence on me. She also had a profound impact on contemporary artists, including Jose James, a singer, who is beautifully bridge, the world of jazz, and hip hop for over a decade since the release of his debut album, the dreamer. Ver- dream. Series. In two thousand fifteen chamber quarter tribute album to Billie holiday covering his favorite songs on the album yesterday. I had the blues the music of Billie holiday for the legendary blue note records. When I phoned Billie holiday, it really matched. My teenage angst in a deep way, not in a superficial way. You know, not in like, I'm a loner and against the world. But she showed me that there was a way to feel pain and to transform it into art. You don't have to know anything about our life to feel the kind of pain and tragedy that embodies her music. Holy likewise, British singer. Actress and former cabaret act. Paloma faith rates lady day as one of the most influential artists in her own upbringing on always dry bridge, and this will work out, but lately Acton, just no go. Maybe we'll Noel. Maybe we're not. We got us to relate. How Billy was a unifying force at one of my classic album. Sunday's events might mother and father is taste was always really convicting just the hell relationship, but. But. But this is the one person I listen to in both households. I would say that for me that she was the holy grail of how I wanted to be able to sing. I didn't realize as the young person so of trying to copies the econ- thing that entail sim batches happy. The show mother spray. Track to love. Nah.

Billie Holiday Blakey Slate Studios Julie Gerner Josh Allen Gonzalez New York City Carnegie Hall Elba Frank Sinatra Jose James Ebony Magazine Sonny Rollins Cosmo Murphy Coline Pain United States Ornette Coleman
"blakey" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

The Next Best Thing

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"blakey" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

"Henry at Heathrow airport in London in March nineteen sixty nine after negotiating to avoid a potential death sentence. James Earl Ray pleads guilty to murder and receives a ninety nine year sentence. But soon Ray will recant claiming his attorney coerced him to confess. Rather than signaling the end of the investigation raise capture and corporation Markelle beginning from there, the true story of the Martin Luther King assassination has always seen just beyond reach a story with too many questions and too few answers the physical evidence dislike overwhelming that James already kill Dr Martin Luth. That's not the issue. The real question is was it. Somebody else involved in the mid seventies. G Robert Blakey was the director of the Cornell institute on organized crime. He had worked and Robert Kennedy's Justice department. Blakey doubts that Ray was capable of masterminding king's assassination. He's a petty criminal convicted of robbery not terribly smart one one robbery where he dropped his wallet. How did this seemingly inept criminal managed to evade a worldwide manhunt for two months Ray traveled to Atlanta, Canada England. Portugal and finally back to England before he was gone. And what had motivated Ray to kill the civil rights leader. Why did he do it? That's a crucial question a lot of people tag James over as racist. But he had not acted consistent with being racist up until the point. It's not an adequate explanation. Nineteen seventy seven the house of representatives convenes the select committee on a nation's g Robert Blakey is appointed chief counsel. We did really what the F B. I didn't do we made an effort to see if there was a conspiracy involved the committee. Here's from hundreds of witnesses among the most anticipated is James Earl Ray himself. I did not shoot Martin Luther King junior. And if I would have had a large representing me, I could've out offer conclusive proof in sport of denial. The first theory is that he was set up by some dude named Rahul this in my opinion is crazy..

James Earl Ray Martin Luther King G Robert Blakey Heathrow airport Canada England robbery Robert Kennedy Henry Dr Martin Luth murder Rahul London Markelle Portugal attorney Cornell institute Atlanta Justice department chief counsel
Gerald is straight up and he had a small as wide as Nichols loan.

Story Time

05:35 min | 3 years ago

Gerald is straight up and he had a small as wide as Nichols loan.

Huey Gerald Gerald Harris Bodo Huey Gerald Box Gerald Picton New Zealand Simon Su Bodo New Zealand Bill Dart Nichols Toyota CDS Nigel Blakey Josh Hugo Joseph Warders Island