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Ubuntu Podcast

01:14 min | 4 d ago

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"Then you move automatically onto whatever the H H will be right. Interesting on, we'll have a link to the video where you. I guess where you're typing commands in and. STUFF IN A. Code editor I imagine. Yes, it was that, but what's what's pretty great now? Is they sort of? A core group of people that keep coming back to my live streams to basically pair program with me over the Internet. I think that's cooled Yo community multi. More, group of Friend Group of friends now I think I'll Blair. But they're very good at spotting my typos and mistakes so. There's of its virtual pair programming. It's quite nice to get an immediate feedback car on what's working. What's? I remember when I watched one of your videos an icee. You'd made a mistake. Tell them you completely ignore me for about half until enough people that can play. Oh have I well. The problem is is that it's really difficult to like right stout code stuff and keep an eye on the chat and also. I turn off all of the other messaging clients when I'm doing this, so is the. Don't go off so I didn't see your yourself. I believe.

Friend Group Editor
Cam Gets Signed

NFL Live

04:39 min | Last week

Cam Gets Signed

"Well there was big news coming last night. Courtesy of our Adam Schefter and Chris Mortensen former MVP cam. Newton is a free agent. No more instead Newton is heading to new. England to join forces with bill, Belichick and follow in the footsteps of another MVP Tom Brady. And Cam Newton's cryptic fashion. He had this to say the instagram. I'm excited because I know what right now all praise to God dropping contact tomorrow. I hope you're ready Hashtag. Let's go pat. And so now we know, and we'll start with Adam Schefter, and our health hall of Famer. Steve Young One one. Just tell us how we got here. How did this deal get done? Listen I think it took Cam Newton a little bit of time to recognize that there was not a thirty plus million dollar a year job on the market when you released two weeks into the free agent signing period not only that there's not an obvious starting job that's out there, and so the longer this went on, and the less he heard from teams, and there really was nobody that he heard from the more he recognized that he had to find the right spot. And if you're going to find the right spot, there's nothing wrong with taking new. England Riga tour with Bill Belichick and Josh mcdaniels, and the new quarterbacks coach Jed fish in an offense. That obviously is going. Going to be trying to replace Tom Brady where you're competing with the guy like Jarret, Stidham hasn't proven that he can play yet in the NFL and so cam. Newton goes to New England on a one year deal where he gets to reestablishes value show that he's healthy, and over the shoulder and foot injuries that he has been dealing with the last two years, and this is the the place that he now tries to relaunch his NFL career at the age of thirty one, which should be most quarterbacks, the prime of their career, no question and Adam. How likely is it that this is in effect? A one year auditioned for Cam to be with the Patriots beyond this season. Wendy what I would say is this if Cam Newton plays well, the Patriots obviously would be interested in resigning him, and if not, they have the ability to move on from him. It depends on how the year goes. It's difficult to forecast that right now. All we know is that the Patriots signed a former. Most Valuable Player who won that award in two thousand fifteen, who has tremendous ability who goes into this offense, and now we'll have to learn it, which is not going to be an easy task in a shortened off season for put as the ability to be dominant quarterback. If he can pick up that system if he plays that way, you would think that no one would not let him out. Out, the door, but again there's a whole year. They WANNA see Newton. They WANNA see them. They want to see a year goes to. It's truly to say that just yet well. Yeah, I mean a lot can happen in a year. We've all we've all seen that in Steve. How do you like the fit between cam? Newton and what he brings on the field and the New England patriots. When healthy. Rusted Cam Newton mean it's like. Manna from heaven right I mean in many ways I, think Josh, mcdaniel and Bill Belichick sitting around a lot of times. Saying. Could you imagine what we could do with this guy or that? Guys? They play these players. Run the League, and they see them in places where I'm sure they say because they're supreme of conference. Not Hubris just supreme confidence that if we could get a hold of him what we could do with him, and we can really expend on what you're seeing around the league. What we can do is special, and so I'm sure they're saying this about. If Cam comes in his foot is okay. Because we know the arm is all right, we should. We saw that early last year before. So. We know that he's healthy. If his what is good and he can move, you've got. Hungry. Sophisticated and the type caliber Blair in New England, where you have bill and Josh saying you can't imagine what we're GonNa, do with this kid and so I think that's I. think that's the conversation. That's happening right now. New England, Steve. Look it's anybody's guess at this point, but you. You have an opinion very qualified one. What do you believe the likelihood? Is that Cam Newton? Is the Patriots Starting Quarterback Week One? Again if healthy, if he can move around, I can't imagine them with his talent level, and what they think they can do them again. It becomes a you know it's a proof point for what they're out to show their out to show that we can do special things with special players, and so it's it becomes A. A right of passage to be in New England, and that we can take somebody, and we can show you amazing things that can be done and they've done that with flair after play after player so Cam Newton and healthy can move around. I. It's GonNa be, too. It's like a gravitational force when it's to special to be able to show what they can do with a great Cam Newton. Yeah,

Cam Newton New England Patriots Bill Belichick Adam Schefter Josh Mcdaniels CAM Tom Brady Steve Young England New England MVP Chris Mortensen Riga NFL League Foot Injuries Jed Fish Wendy
Chicago's International College of Surgeons sells historical Lake Shore Drive mansion

WBBM Evening News

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Chicago's International College of Surgeons sells historical Lake Shore Drive mansion

"Hour a friend she shan't toll inspired mansion on lake shore drive finally has a buyer the international college of surgeons been trying for five years to sell its four story mansion at fifteen sixty north lake shore drive built in nineteen sixteen for Edward T. and ruby McCormick Blair and all by the college it's nineteen forty seven the first asking price was seventy million dollars in twenty fifteen but it's going to gradually drop ever since eleven million down to the current six million or it's been since last summer ten bedrooms twelve thousand square feet millwork marble staircases and elevator the twenty forty square foot coach house it's only one of seven mansions still on lake shore drive Tribune reports under contract the buyer and final price so far I've known Pat Cassidy newsradio one oh five point nine

Edward T. Mccormick Blair North Lake Pat Cassidy
As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

"Hundreds of factories, refineries, farms and mines across the country say they cannot comply with environmental regulations because of the pandemic. This is according to an NPR review of hundreds of state environmental records. Those records show that companies have asked for a wide range of special permission during this pandemic including things like delaying checking for leaks in storage tanks and measuring pollution from smokestacks and pure science reporter Rebecca Hersher is here to talk about this, Becky, hi, there. Okay, so industry is saying there's a pandemic. We need some special allowances here. What exactly are we talking about? Well, it's a real drag. Some of the issues are relatively minor like submitting an annual report late, but I also found a fair number of substantial requests, mostly from industries that release a lot of pollution like landfills have been asking states to relax pollution monitoring rules hog farms have asked for permission to house extra animals, because meatpacking plants per temporary closed and oil and gas companies ask for states back off and enforcement of a wide range of environmental regulations. I mean, be understand why an oil or gas company has trouble being able to check for pollution because of a pandemic. Well there are a couple of reasons. Navy furloughs get in the way like if employees who usually right in filed pollution appurtenant working because of the pandemic, another reason the companies gave is that a lot of pollution monitoring is done by outside contractors and they were trying to limit people coming onto facilities because of the virus. We know these details, though because a small number of states make them public, but another problem here is that no one is systematically keeping track of these types of nationwide requests. no-one keeps an eye on. Who On these industries and with? They're asking for right now. Why is that? Well in March? The Environmental Protection Agency the EPA put out a pandemic policy that said companies don't need to warn federal regulators if they feel like the pandemic interfering with routine pollution, monitoring or testing instead, they said states could keep track of that information if they choose to. The EPA says, this is out, works it partners with states, and that is how a lot of environmental regulation. Regulation works although former EPA officials say this policy gives industries a lot of leeway now some states are doing this kind of tracking, but I've found that most kids don't publish any information about which companies say. The pandemic is getting in the way, and that means most Americans who live near factories refineries farms. They have no way to know whether the pandemic is causing extra pollution. I mean that kind of uncertainty is is a big problem for for people who live near these sorts of facilities I would imagine. Especially for people who live downstream or down wind of facilities that have have violated environmental laws in the past on a found a fair number of examples like this, so for example there's a minor Indiana in early April, the mine said it was releasing wastewater with high levels of ammonia and small particles, because they were cleaning buildings with a lot of bleach to kill the virus that same mino ins repeatedly violated the clean water act passed by releasing water with two small particles in it and I talked to a local resident who lives downstream. He was really frustrated. John Blair. The air pollution is visible. The water pollution is less visible and you know I mean almost anything could be blamed on the virus I suppose. Now. The state told the mind to stop releasing water with titles, Manja and many of the requests I looked at were denied, but the only reason we know about that interaction is because Indiana published a publicly in most states are not doing which means most Americans are in the dark. Pure science reporter Rebecca Hersher. Becky thanks for that reporting. Thanks so

EPA Rebecca Hersher Becky Reporter Indiana Environmental Protection Agenc NPR Navy Manja John Blair
Christo, artist known for massive, fleeting displays, dies

Morning Edition

02:24 min | Last month

Christo, artist known for massive, fleeting displays, dies

"The artist Christo has died Christo and his wife is on cloud were ambitious with their public art projects they built these massive installations that were both adored and also despised Cristo died of natural causes at his home in New York City yesterday he was eighty four years old here's NPR's Elizabeth Blair artist Christo yep a chaff was born in Bulgaria his father was a chemist and businessman who worked in textiles Cristo met John Clyde in Paris in nineteen fifty eight they were big dreamers who often needed years to get permission to build their projects they wrapped urban landmarks in fabrics like the pun nerf in Paris they scattered brightly colored umbrellas across valleys in Japan in California they surrounded islands in Biscayne Bay in floating pink fabric John Clyde died in two thousand nine at an event marking the opening of the gates in two thousand five she explains their artistic vision we wish to create are works of art of Chilean beauty and each one is a child of ours and we wish to create them in total freedom to maintain that freedom crystalline Sean Claude finance their projects with their own money off and spending millions of dollars Christopher said the funds came from sales of his early works to collectors and museums lots of people objected to their enormous installations on public land either because they didn't understand them or worried about damage to the environment one example an installation that called for draping panels of fabric above sections of the Arkansas River a group that successfully opposed the project it called itself a brewer or rags over the Arkansas River one of its members Ellen potter talked to NPR in twenty twelve I don't particularly considered an art project this is a construction project in in my view but Cristo embraced the detractors all that is part of the one who flocked to the work of art in well everything people who dislike or like the project they're part of the work of art Christo and Jeanne Claude wanted their art to transform the environment they worked on whether it was a single building islands or entire just as they wrote that even after the art is gone we see and perceive the whole environment with new eyes and a new consciousness

Christo Cristo New York City NPR Bulgaria John Clyde Paris Japan California Biscayne Bay Christopher Arkansas River Ellen Potter Jeanne Claude Elizabeth Blair Sean Claude
Christo, Artist Who Brought ‘The Gates’ To New York's Central Park, Dies At 84

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | Last month

Christo, Artist Who Brought ‘The Gates’ To New York's Central Park, Dies At 84

"The artist Christo has died Christo and his late wife John Claude were known for creating vast outdoor artworks like the gates in Central Park his office says he died of natural causes at his home in New York City he was eighty four and peers Elizabeth Blair has more the gates were seventy five hundred panels made of orange fabric wasted on poles that meander through Central Park crystal when his wife John Claude it dreamed big they wrap to Germany's rush tag in silver fabric and surrounded islands in Biscayne Bay in floating pink material crystal you have a chance was born into an industrialist family in Bulgaria he and his wife John Clyde is spend their own money building their public art from sales of Christie's early work people didn't always like their flashy installations but crystal and John Claude it believe their outdoor sculptures helped people look at the environment in a new

Christo John Claude Central Park New York City Elizabeth Blair Germany Biscayne Bay Bulgaria John Clyde Christie
Why Actress Lisa Vidal Believes "I'm here because this was supposed to happen."

Latina to Latina

05:09 min | Last month

Why Actress Lisa Vidal Believes "I'm here because this was supposed to happen."

"You. Grew up acting. When did you know that this was for you? I knew from a very early age that I loved to perform. I was always singing because I'm a singer. I always had music on the radio. That was my first love. Actually I also used to watch lot of television because you know. We lived in the Bronx and Spanish Harlem, so my mother was not like letting us out some. certain times the neighborhood. We get tricky, so she was like no in my out. Or whatever and so I, watch them on television. That was my friend. I watched movies girl, so I used to I was so pulled in by movies, and then I have my my aunt, my the-they who? Is such a hero in my life. She was always taking us to movies. Song Forget. UH, she said, drop us off at the movie theater me and my presence, and she'll be like I'll be back five PM to pick you up that she felt bad for us. Abuse stuck in us from weren't allowed to hang outside. So, we would be at the movie theater. Day those days you go from one theater to one movie to another you know at then I saw funny girl, my my my d. c., funny girl and I just fell in love with Barbara streisand and how she was singing and acting. And that was it. That was it I knew I wanted to do. What do you mark as your big break? You know what my big break was a film that I did all I like him. that was my big because I like it like that and I think there was a big break for all of us in that gnome, it was a small film that became like a cult film that became huge, and so I pretty much soon after that I got signed a deal to Aden, C., which led to my semen Silbert show that was my i. like big, lead role on a network primetime television show that Steven Spielberg for. Do you Steven Spielberg Rating? You Fan Fan Mail. Did that's surreal, please? I? Thought they sent it to the wrong guy This must be a somebody else. I couldn't believe it. I mean I still have it up on. My Wall is one of my proudest moments, and I always. Love Steven Spielberg Right, but I thought it was interesting to that when you got that spinoff. And you were really going to be carrying a pilot that there was a little piece of you that worried. Can I carry this pilot? Right like that is a different level of pressure to be like this show will succeed or fail, and you're not like the fourth or fifth person down in the credits it is you. Well Yeah I mean they brought Blair underwood in and our characters just exploded on the show. You know we became a hot. Partnership shelves some Cups Yeah you know I think. I. Think when you go from a guest star. else doing these kinds of roles or even a recurring character writing comes in now. Maybe you do three episodes. Maybe you do five episodes whatever? When you come to the place of a lead. And they're they're absolutely is a whole new level of responsibility, and absolutely without a doubt there is that you know that little bit of light on my Gosh when I do this, but. That's when you. Really embrace you towns, and and recognize the you are and say. Yes I can do this. Yes, this belongs to me on here. Because this was supposed to happen and it's it's a battle right because we had that little devil on one side, a little angel on the other who they talk into each year, and so we consist. That's why that's why training is so important. That's why understanding the process of creating a character be prepared preparation. Discipline Professionalism. All of that comes into play. So that, you're standing on solid ground and you have foundation when you come into that position, you know what you're doing. I was looking through your IMDB. Have you ever played a non Latina character? I have there been a few of those roles were actually white. Jane. That was written white. Gabrielle and I have the same representation, and they sent me the script and I got a meeting with Martin Brock. Akil and she was like I know Lisa's work. And we sat down for three hours and talked about Cara and. She's like I want you to be my car. It also shows you the value of having a person of color. Be The other person on the other side of that table. Right like the heels would get that absolute asks. They are so fro. You know black and Brown. Absolute.

Steven Spielberg Barbara Streisand Gabrielle Cara Harlem Blair Underwood Aden Brown Imdb Jane Martin Brock Akil Lisa
Microsoft shows lots of Series X games

Gaming Ride Home

04:02 min | 2 months ago

Microsoft shows lots of Series X games

"Microsoft reveals eight new xbox series X. Games shows assassin's creed game play and more Microsoft. Basically announced eight new games confirmed a few previously announced games. Were coming to xbox and we finally got to see genuine xbox series game. Play this morning and it was exciting but it was also a little underwhelming for a few reasons. None of the Games shown were xbox series x exclusives but rather what was shown were games that are going to release for Xbox one that will be enhanced for xbox series x they all looked great but not revolutionary but that also might just be a product of the generation. Were in now. The graphical leaps are getting smaller and smaller with the big enhancements more being related things like load times and frame rates which are hard to show on a livestream but there was still lots of excitement to be had the first game show which is now historically officially the first series x. Gameplay ever seen was for a game called bright memory infinite. It's basically a stylish action first person shooter that is supposedly being developed by a single person. A short demo for the game exists on steam and it has been making waves based on how impressive it is. It's exciting to learn that it will be coming to console at some point. Every new console needs a racing game and dirt five was shown next. There's really not a lot to say about it other than it looks. Great and dirt is a well regarded series. Things got really really weird and gross from there on with scorn which looks like an HR giger painting come to life. It was horrifying and gross and creepy. And I have no idea what the game play is like but I WANNA learn more. It looks insane. Publisher deep silver and developer fish. Labs the studio that poured saints row. The third to switch announced an impressive. Space shooter called a chorus rise as one. There was a lot of high-speed spaceflight which looked pretty cool. Ea confirmed madden. Twenty one is coming to series acts and showed a little game play it looked like the last madden which is to say it looked very good game play for vampire the masquerade bloodlines to was then shown and kept the creepy. Gross train. Going by having a man presumably vampire dancing around in a family home around a Christmas tree with the family strung up from the ceiling. Gameplay looks interesting all kinds of leaving from buildings and stuff like that call of the sea made me think of the witness a little which could totally be inaccurate by the time it releases but you play as a woman exploring island and solving puzzles. I don't have much to go on but it honestly looked like a game. The ascent is a twin stick shooter that takes place in a dense cyberpunk world. It looks like it might have some RPG stuff in there too. It reminded me a lot of ruin from Reichen Games which is also a twin stick game that takes place in a dense cyberpunk world to the point that while streaming the conference with Min. Max I said this must be a ruin or sequel which it wasn't but you know. Hey sometimes I'm wrong about things. Like when the medium was shown from Bluer team the studio behind observer the two layers of fear. Games and Blair witch. I really thought it was a silent hill game because of the trailer soundtrack and it seemed to show a world shifting between normal and a scary hellish version. Which is a very silent hill thing. It's not a silent hill. Game THE MEDIUM BUT SILENT. Hill's composer is involved so I am not a crazy person

Reichen Games Microsoft Hill EA MAX Publisher Blair Developer
Boris Johnson returns to work

Monocle 24: The Globalist

12:32 min | 2 months ago

Boris Johnson returns to work

"Now we begin the show here. In Britain. Boris Johnson has returned to work after recovering from cove nineteen. The British. Prime Minister's illness was severe enough to send him to intensive care for several days. A personal experience that he likes to being physically assaulted by an unexpected. An invisible mugger. Joining me now is Carol. Walker is a political analyst and former BBC political correspondent Carol. What else was Johnson keen to emphasize in his first speech since his return to work? Well I think the big point that he was making was that he was back in control fully recovered and I think he was trying very hard to convey the sense of figure and vm optimism which has always been such a big part of his character and his leadership but he also I think trod very difficult line because I think whilst he was trying to convey a sense of optimism a sense that this huge effort that everyone has put in in order to stick to those very tight restrictions at staying at home to try to prevent the spread of the corona virus. He also I think wanted to try to lower expectations about when and by how much those restrictions might be lifted so he made the point very strongly that the British people should be praised and thanked for their efforts but he was insisting that if the restrictions were lifted too soon than that would reach a second peak and that would cause further damage to people's lives but also to the economy which of course is suffering enormous damage through the lockdown. Well also joining us on the line is Lance Price. He's the former director of communications at number ten Downing Street. When Tony Blair was Prime Minister Lance? Obviously there'll be a huge amount of meetings. We know that that Cobra's already taken place with Johnson. What do you believe the government will be discussing know? What will the approach very much now looking to what Boris Johnson yesterday described the second phase of the crisis and and in many ways. That's the most difficult for ministers to deal with. We know that Boris Johnson was reluctant at the outset to impose a tough lockdown restrictions. But he saw the lights. If you like and and eventually did that. But it's it's much harder to stop to lift those restrictions and it is imposed them in the first place. Because you have to decide when and where you could modify the restrictions and that's going to be the central parts of discussion between ministers in the coming days and we're told an announcement some sort expected before the end of the week. So do you look at certain sectors of the economy that businesses? That were allowed to reopen. Or do you look at certain sectors of the population and say that's an age perhaps though geographically people can Stop to Mingle goal go out more and have more social interactions of one sort or another. I do you do that then. You have the really difficult job of selling that to the to the population at laws. Because if we're all following the same rules that's one thing if there's some rules for some people and different bills for others. It's much much harder self administered Carol. There's been a lot of criticism that the government really isn't sharing any of this information not enough information with the Public Johnson to talk about transparency. Do you think that we will begin to see more of the workings in the science that these decisions will be based on what I think? They will certainly try to make an effort to show that that is what they are doing. I think what we've seen over the last almost four weeks since Boris Johnson has been ill and recovering is the slight sense of vacuum and a government that was reluctant to show even the sorts of changes that it was thinking about for fear that the public would get carried away launch latch onto that and that the number of deaths in the number of infections would not then start to come round. It was interesting that Boris Johnson yesterday made the point that he was going to bring in the new labor leaders. A Kiss Donna and other political leaders I think that is important for the government because it wants to try to bind in potential opposition to the changes because as long says this is going to be very very difficult were already seeing a some signs of real resentment for example amongst the over seventy been told that they're going to have to be shielded that they brought to stay at home. There are of course some over seventy year olds who are incredibly. Fit Run marathons and so on and feel this all patry decision to say to older people. You are at risk you must stay at home is simply not fair and many of them we know are also missing contact with close members of their family that may be one of the areas where the government will try tentatively to try to ease the restrictions somewhat. But I think that point that Lance was making about the public is a very important one. I think the government really wants to try to take the public with it. The danger is if you start trying to say certain. Sections of the population can Now have greater freedom to do some of the things that they enjoy doing to make contact with other family members to go back to work and so on whereas other members of the population were you. Divide that by age or by geographical location cannot have those restrictions lifted lifted. I think that is very very difficult to sell. And that is why it looks to me. More likely that they will look at areas of the economy businesses. And so on and look which of those can be allowed to reopen. Whilst retaining the social distancing measures in order to try to at least contain any increase in those figures on infections sadly death lance is the opposition Labor Party under the new leadership of Sakir Stammer on the same page as the government. Well they all in the sense of backing the government's restrictions and instructions to the public but they have been putting pressure kissed on the right from day one of his leadership. Say there's been saying to the Prime Minister and two other ministers that you've got to be much more open with the public about your thinking. So he called on his first day for an exit strategy and he won't he's had the public deserve to be treated like grownups on that we should be told what the possible routes out of. This might be so that we can have a grown up discussion about that. I and I think the Labour leader has made it clear that he's going to give constructive oppositions he's not going to oppose parole position's sake but he does know that at the end of all. They are going to be very very difficult. Questions for the government to onset of ministers to answer whether it's on the provisional protective equipment so testing and all the rest of this and and he's not abdicate the role of opposition in order to get finished as a a a free ride in even in the depths of crisis A meanwhile the the daily corona virus briefings continue but with a slightly different formats. Carola government's not taking questions from the public will make a difference. Well I think this is part of that effort to try to show that they are transparent this effort to try to show that they really want to take the public along with them as this virus continues and as the restrictions look likely to continue in some form or another for many months to yesterday. We had the first of questions which are submitted by the public of course. Thousands were submitted and there was an independent polling order organization brought in to choose which question would be selected. We heard from one a citizen in skipped in Yorkshire. Who was asking when she'd be able to see her grandchildren again. And I think that although this was an important gesture towards allowing the public some sense that they're having a say in all this it has to be said that none of those present were able to give her any kind of clear ideas to win. That would happen. The scientists world saying well it slightly depends on the fingers. It's slightly depends on a when those infection rate start. Continue to come down. The government was saying well. We are looking at this in the round. We don't want to take risks with the population hancock. The Health Secretary was insisting that he didn't want to take risks with people's lives and yes I think it's important for the government to be seen to be listening to what the people are saying but the crunch point is going to come when it comes out with those decisions to what if anything is going to change and we see the response to that I mean because he made a handcart made a great point yesterday of saying that they don't see questions before they're actually asked them during the the briefing live. It would seem to me. That might make more sense for them to have an idea of what the questions were so they would have the answers. Yeah perhaps they might have been able to give linen skipped in a bit clearer answer to her question but I think they're trying to make the point that they already unprepared to take on an address any of the questions that people have now. There is a sense that this is a gesture. One question Once a day two a government minister the particularly government minister who is holding that news conference Easily of course a very limited say in what is happening. But I think this is part of them trying to show that they're open trying to demonstrate the transparency which Boris Johnson was very keen to talk about. And what you've seen is as launch was mentioning this pressure on the government to show the sorts of things it's talking about people have drawn comparisons with Nichola Sturgeon Scotland's first minister who put out a document about the government's approach. When you look through it to be perfectly honest didn't say a great deal more than the sort of information that we've got in the five tests which the government has in the covering the whole of the UK has set out which are getting guide it when it decides water win restrictions can be lifted but she had made the point of bringing out a lengthy document talking about various options. And I'm sure that that is the sort of thing that we certainly will see As we go through this we we know. Boris Johnson is chairing unimportant cabinet meeting on Thursday. We know Thursday is also very important date when the government has said that it hopes to hit one hundred thousand tests a day for frontline workers. Those are all being targeted front line workers. At the moment even yesterday was still many tens of thousands of that but I think what we get towards the end of the week the government will want to at least signal where it intends to go next in as we continue to where it tends to go next in terms of exactly which restrictions are going to be lifted. Who's going to be allowed to have those greater freedoms but I think that they will stress out all of this that if those infection rates start to climb up again then there is always the risk that the restrictions will simply have to be reimposed and overriding all of this. That is something that the government does not want to do lance just finally very quickly from you. How much other businesses being done? Brexit Brexit is still carrying on. Of course there's the real question about whether or not at the end of the period should be extended because can you deal with two major disruptions to the economy at one time but the government sticking to their line that they are going into. We'll transition has come to an end at the end of this year. Of course there is a whole boss range of other business which is still very home and sometimes the news but I wonder what would have been that bulletin. If you haven't been to the virus there's no still happening. Thanks very much. Indeed that was launched price and Carol

Government Boris Johnson Prime Minister Lance Carol Prime Minister Carola Government Lance Price Britain BBC Director Of Communications Walker Political Analyst Tony Blair Brexit Brexit Cobra Yorkshire Donna Labor Party Sakir Stammer
Batouly Camara: Awakening in purpose

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

11:17 min | 3 months ago

Batouly Camara: Awakening in purpose

"A young athlete. I would say the bars set pretty high. The first time I ever saw women play Played on old boy. Seen when I start playing basketball I was introduced to the game by woman but the first game I ever went to the WNBA GAME. Sounds like me so it was like Here in our from probably one hour thing and all girl play Basketball Naseen. Hulo Professional League ignorance is bliss so I would say it was definitely suggests reach my potential. I don't think I ever really said I saw WNBA. I loved it but I think it was to work to kind of reach mile potential with my biggest goal. At that moment I started ages twelve to two things on that day for you said the retail potential. You know so at eight to twelve. What did that look real? Potential potential. Just Matt being at the peak of of my career because when I went to the game what I loved the most was the diversity I saw a core and how every body and just being a young inquisitive curious kid I went from seeing Kia Vaughn. Who's like six five to like? Leilani Melanie Mitchell. Like you know five six. And she's fine with two nasty and I'm like they're not the same but they've all kind of reached their potential in some way. Some regard are now that I'm older Still playing still working on their craft. But at that moment it wasn't about comparison is about personal growth. But once you reach your personal growth you can then get to. The highest level is a lot so when you have the game like I want to be on that day I wanNA share the court in. I WANNA know papillon whatever may be. How do you think I'm GonNa go achieving that it was just this sense of actually had a podcast with my coach? Taught me how to make like a a layup as you say you just have this kind of hunger about you and again. It was just as curiosity. I didn't know I didn't know any of those players didn't know anyone at that level but I just remember how much it it bugged me inside. We know nights where would turn. And I didn't know who go to our coaches at that point in a you in Eugene was so far away but they really allow me to focus on day to day. So that's why did I focused on the day to day and just really just trying to put in as much work as I can control. Though I've learned from like the guests every on that lobby will have today on idolized. You know that might become emulate their game. You Watch like I WANNA learn their moves. It was definitely I say growing up Having older brother the account and learn about the men's game so my brother loved Hakeem he always talked about him. Entering accused dream. You know growing up in a Muslim household. You know the keenest fate than what he stood for. That was initial draw but as I became more fan in sunny if it works that he accused Work in all the grades he's taught than us aren't look more about women in my more and I just remember watching 'em in the final four in little wayne was on the sideline and it was kind of this weird thing where I just loved jives and she just seemed like she's having so much fun with it. Saudi young age I WANNA. I played really admired economy. Idle and at. What point did you think like you? I'm pretty good at this ball like I can. May I have a channel teaching my potential never after like it's definitely a journey but I would say probably junior year high school? I remember walking into? We have open gym. You know humor coaches come in at that point. I was out of okay you know. Tunisia was okay. And we walk in and we have over. I want to say twenty five college coaches and these are just hide the coaches so he has stanford that day Yukon. We had Kentucky all in this building and it was about five of my teammates. Three of us. Who ARE REALLY GOING TAB? The one and so it was kind of surreal feeling as a young kid but one that didn't take lightly. I was nervous. You know I wanted to be good. You WanNa why to perform It was kind of in that moment whereas like all Kayla avalon way to go. But we're taking baby steps now to what kept you grounded Theme like Kentucky is the part that really ongoing even kill. What kind of help you day. You know that it always more than technology do more. I would definitely say the people. I was surrounded by they even from a young age like for example when I was fourteen. That's what I went to Blair Academy and that's Kinda where really developed my skills who I am was a person and one of my teammates. Her name is bridget and a net. Infamy this core group seniors who just had great might. You were now walking into the gym and for me. I was a freshman. I was good. You not do it I wanNA and they shut it down. Bridget graduated top of her class at West. Point so talk about someone with discipline and so she was just very adamant about the process and they will get every day for six. Am workouts on. Like talk to me if I did it and say you know you need to be there so constantly always telling me you've never arrived at his journey and my mentor. The same way. Schnee saying you know you've never robbed it journey in their quick to say you know this which means getting better on With celebrate knee. But also telling me what I need to do better. You never arrive there. The journey That deep at the can take value from two. You know just that you can always return another level. He Never GonNa GonNa read them mountaintop. Yes absolutely yeah so when Tom Day. Chew that college could you? You know you were a one Top Not by one or two on the team so they wanna give you ever that. That's really what you're like number two I in the shooting school you know. How did you go about that first? Half that it was an interesting process and to me. The recruiting process started off trae stressful. You have all these great schools you know. I used to just pray guy. God is Doin' in options. The options were there so I was super fortunate to have that because I would live in. I was in the same room with somebody who didn't even know if they're going to get a scholarship. So that can be Ground level headed but I did enjoy the process because I was thankful for thankful to get to know coaches so pretty early on. I create a pros and cons. I created questions. I asked each coach. How far wants to go? If distance even mattered if conference matter at the time. That didn't matter to me. And so from the merits my top five. It's my top two which was Kentucky and Uconn and I remember taking a visit early in Yukon and then taking a visit to Kentucky about may NFL. At that time I was exhausted. I my one official visit but I was exhausted with the process house. Like I'm completely over. This and I may great connections with Girls Kentucky with the coaching staff Mafia comfortable. So at that point and not sadness so that way you kind of felt the exact same way you can. I guess it was there in front of me if fell right at the moment and so cast okay. I'm going into my senior year of a you and I didn't want to have to choose a wine to be solidified before seeing junior year because at the time that's when they first changed a rule so I wanted to be committed by senior year I was died. I didn't want the pressure anymore and committed end so that was an interesting process so again now the pros and cons list talking to coaches distance cannot into consideration. The one came down that pros and cons What kind of look like for me. Family is everything and people say that lightly but I wanted somewhere where I was going to be there for four years and my biggest fear was transferred out one life. I wanted to make the perfect decision. I wanted a place where players came back growing up A lot of places and I've learned I've learned now what it really means to come back in Soviet with access comeback. Why they don't why they do. Because you can be on the team with twelve people in. Everyone has drastically different experiences. But I really wanted somewhere where a majority of the players came back. I wanted a place with rich history. Not just a yeah. We're GONNA Iran this conference but rich like Deep Kentucky history. You know I love that you call history at WanNa tradition. I felt that was important. Especially after coming for Blair Academy being able to see a loan to connect with them. I love that that was huge to me player development players who play like me who look like me And how they developed over time and again just that relationship piece so two that to me again with academics being able to holistic route players. Who actually talked about being a person versus those who actually developed in the curriculum. They had in place. So were you reading a book to your team. And where were they nurturing their growth from outside of school so different things than to Alone could it wasn't just people based on the name of the school. It was like there was office behind how you're going to fit in how you going to be able to enjoy love the that freshman year at. Kentucky. How'd you describe that? Chapter title that chapter. It is so funny. You know the theme for that summer I remember our first conditional gap the code saying arson conditioning coach. He said we're GONNA name this summer. It's GonNa be expect. The unexpected now is the name of the summer so you know it was crazy. Be expect the unexpected it. So that's exactly what I was saying encompassing of my time I could learn so much as a great people. A tough conference plane. Sec everyday eating there is nothing like your freshman year. There is nothing like I'm always in pain. There's nothing you can get shake off the grind on schoolwork at feels never ending the season that feels never ending but also opening up in exploring new party. Yourself INAU May. I didn't know I had an emmy. I knocking show up in that moment. So deftly wasn't adjustment but it was incredibly awakening experience the same beliefs

Kentucky Blair Academy Wnba Leilani Melanie Mitchell Basketball Wanna Kia Vaughn Yukon Professional League Matt Bridget Tunisia Eugene Arson Hakeem Kayla Avalon Tom Day Schnee Work Stanford
Trump extends federal social-distancing guidelines to April 30 after floating Easter deadline

Orlando's News at Noon

01:59 min | 3 months ago

Trump extends federal social-distancing guidelines to April 30 after floating Easter deadline

"D. B. O. president trump last night extending the federal social distancing guidelines to April thirtieth now's going deaf because we want you to understand the stories we're talking about life to our Washington bureau reporter Blair Miller and president trump last night players saying that he we extend that to a nationwide social distancing guideline for another thirty days bottom line is this is going to be a long drawn out battle it's a battle that we're going to win eventually but it's it's going to be extended some exactly talk about that thirty days Scott is this that could be the minimum he was saying at least another month and perhaps until June really trying to keep in the window open on that the president said that the peak of the death rate the virus should be around Easter when we talk about these numbers it's important talk about important keep the context but still when you hear someone numbers ever thrown out yesterday and this morning it is surprising because the present knowledge at the White House that if the U. S. and keep the number of deaths between a hundred thousand and two hundred thousand in the feds will done a good job and the reason why he's saying that is because there been some estimates out there that by the end of the summer as many as two million Americans could die from that so you know it the numbers are just so surprising despite the kind of perspective you look at it it's just a lot of people that are so impacted in so many ways right now so we we all love dates we all loved deadlines right we we all live according to deadlines and yet with this thing bad I mean it's it's very very difficult it's a moving target isn't it exactly and and I think every Monday I try to think back where were we a week ago and for the past month every week we have seen substantial growth as far as how this kind of unfolds and it really started when we saw when we you and I were talking about the stock market a couple weeks ago today we saw the stock market take such a hit and every week we've seen so many different things happening we've covered a lot of ground and so much is this happening over the span of just a week so the state can

Blair Miller Scott President Trump White House D. B. O. Washington Reporter
Nancy Pelosi Just Released Her Own Coronavirus Bill. It Is Much Bigger Than Trump’s.

Orlando's Morning News

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Nancy Pelosi Just Released Her Own Coronavirus Bill. It Is Much Bigger Than Trump’s.

"I was just reading it what is in the speaker's bill Nancy Pelosi's bill here and her the bill that she is proposing for stimulant the economic stimulus has wind and solar tax credits and it has a reduction in airline emissions so so a an economic stimulus is going to force the airlines to reduce their emissions the airlines that are already struggling increase leverage for labor unions in speaker Pelosi's relief bill eliminate U. S. postal service dept what that is in speaker Pelosi's bill same day voter registration is in speaker Pelosi's bill N. thirty five million dollars to the Kennedy center is in speaker Pelosi's bill yeah there's also a lot of money for the national endowment of the arts I think three hundred million for that yeah I I a black could make this a clean bill is that too much to ask for a clean bill something that just helps the economy and is not everything else lumped in with and that's why it when I was talking to Blair Blair Miller earlier and I said Hey you know we were talking about trillions of dollars you don't wanna rush that through because it gets stuck with all kinds of pork and and fraud and waste and abuse and everything else like that I am now you know as we drill down a little further when they try to rush things through without giving it consideration that's when you don't catch things like what's actually in the bill you'll recall it was speaker Pelosi who it infamously once said you have to read the bill to find out what's in it

Bill Nancy Pelosi Stimulant Kennedy Center Fraud U. S. Blair Blair Miller
"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

03:21 min | 3 months ago

"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"<Music> a <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> completely made up. <Speech_Female> There's not one <Speech_Female> word <Speech_Female> in the whole song and you know <Speech_Female> what the Song Steal <Speech_Female> Goals. <Speech_Female> It's a <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> but <Laughter> but <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> no words. No words <Speech_Female> is really really good. Though <Speech_Female> other amazing <Speech_Female> soundtracks include <Speech_Female> but not limited <Speech_Female> to Romeo <Speech_Female> must die. The <Speech_Female> nutty Professor <Speech_Female> Rush Hour <Speech_Female> Love Jones <Speech_Female> now <Speech_Female> exceptions to this <Speech_Female> rule include <Speech_Female> brown sugar. <Speech_Female> That came out in two thousand <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> There's the Lion King <Speech_Female> Soundtrack may by king <Speech_Female> beyond say herself. <Speech_Female> Because I mean <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> afrobeat Blue <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Ivy <Speech_Female> and the Black <Speech_Female> Panther soundtrack <Speech_Female> by Kendrick Lamar. <Speech_Female> If there's one <Speech_Female> I'm missing that also <Speech_Female> is an exception to the <Speech_Female> rule please <Speech_Female> by all means <Speech_Female> tweet me <Speech_Female> educate me. I'm <Speech_Female> always learn but <Speech_Female> until then <Speech_Female> I'm going to assume that I'm a <Speech_Female> thousand percent correct <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and movie soundtracks <Speech_Female> from the year. <Speech_Female> Two Thousand and earlier. <Speech_Female> These flowers <Speech_Female> are for <Speech_Music_Female> you. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Honorable Mention <Speech_Female> goes to the old brother where <Speech_Female> art and forrest gump <Speech_Female> soundtracks though <Speech_Female> white great movies <Speech_Female> great <SpeakerChange> soundtracks <Speech_Music_Female> both Tracy approved. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Congratulations <Speech_Female> to you <Speech_Female> friends and <Speech_Female> family. You did <Speech_Female> it. We made it to <Speech_Female> the end of another amazing <Speech_Music_Female> interview. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I talked <Speech_Female> to Blair underwood immense <Speech_Female> wild. A still <Speech_Female> cannot believe it. Here's <Speech_Female> a fun thing that you should <Speech_Female> do right now. Godia <Speech_Female> Internet machines <Speech_Music_Female> go to YouTube <Speech_Music_Female> dot com <Speech_Music_Female> that org <Speech_Music_Female> that edge you <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> etcetera etcetera <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> go to Youtube and <Speech_Music_Female> look up. <Speech_Female> Blair underwood <Speech_Music_Female> in Donahue <Speech_Female> what you will find <Speech_Female> is a clip <Speech_Female> of Blair <Speech_Female> underwood on the Donahue <Speech_Female> show talking <Speech_Music_Female> about. Whether or not <Speech_Music_Female> Jesus was <Speech_Music_Female> black <Speech_Music_Female> first of all he <Speech_Music_Female> was missy <Speech_Music_Female> which actually <Speech_Music_Female> kind of appreciate <Speech_Music_Female> in second <Speech_Female> of all. He's so <Speech_Music_Female> smart <Speech_Female> and he just <Speech_Female> looked so just <Speech_Female> delectable why he's <Speech_Female> dropping all these <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> gyms and all <SpeakerChange> the I need. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The audience dislike <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> yes chat. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> generally how I feel <Speech_Music_Female> about Blair underwood Citiz- <Speech_Female> day. So watch <Speech_Female> it. It's it's a fun <Speech_Female> little piece of nostalgia. <Speech_Female> This <Speech_Female> show is a production of <Speech_Female> pot street studios <Speech_Female> in partnership with <Speech_Music_Female> Net flicks and strong <Speech_Music_Female> black lead. <Speech_Female> Executive Producers <Speech_Female> Are Max Linski <Speech_Music_Female> Genoa Berman <Speech_Music_Female> Jasmine <Speech_Music_Female> Lawson and a guarantee <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> our lead producer <Speech_Music_Female> is Josh Gwynne <Speech_Music_Female> production <Speech_Female> by gestured our engineer <Speech_Music_Female> Anderson with additional <Speech_Music_Female> production. <Speech_Music_Female> Support by Cindy. <Speech_Female> Okay <Speech_Female> and Alexis more. <Speech_Female> Our Music <Speech_Female> is Via deejay <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Don Wheel Aka <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the hardest working. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Dj in the PODCASTS <Speech_Female> business. You can <Speech_Female> follow him on twitter and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the socials <SpeakerChange> at Don <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> will. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I have been your host once <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> again Tracy Clayton <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and you can find me <Speech_Music_Female> on the socials <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> especially instagram. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> At Bergamot. Poverty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> comes say <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> hey. I get lonely <Speech_Female> very easily. <Speech_Music_Female> You don't want that on your <Speech_Music_Female> conscience guys <Speech_Music_Female> really. Don't <Speech_Female> make sure to follow the <Speech_Female> show on the socials <Speech_Female> at strong lead. <Speech_Female> And if you enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> what you heard <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> please share <Speech_Music_Female> the joy in the laughed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> about telling your friends <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Family <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Church congregations <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that also. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Don't forget to rate <Speech_Music_Female> in subscribe to strongly <Speech_Music_Female> legends on Apple <Speech_Music_Female> PODCASTS. 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"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

02:52 min | 3 months ago

"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"Okay. Everybody pop quiz. What do all of these movies have in common? You listening okay. Number One. The bodyguard number two the produce wife number three Purple Ring Number four waiting to exhale number five. Mo Money Number six boomerang. Have you thought about it as it times up there are all examples of what? I'm giving flowers to this week in the part of the show that we call Tracy's flowers. Oh my gosh. I can't believe it's time for traces flowers again. This is what they fired. Shell MEDAC. That wasn't mean somebody in the stands. Just rockets rock is in the stands so if you have not figured it out by now this week my flowers go to a drum roll please. It turns out that all twenty of the top highest grossing movie soundtracks of all time were made before the year. Two thousand that is mathematical proof friends and family that soundtracks today our trash in listen. I Dunno math. I understand that math though. They're terrible now. When is the last time that you heard a bomb ass movie soundtrack? Go ahead thing about it. Eggs Agley has been exactly forever. I love movie. Soundtracks specifically from the pre two thousand era because they gave us so much. They were pretty much compilation albums that featured all of our favor artists. That were out of the time right. For example the moment soundtrack gave us a duet by Janet Jackson. A Luther Vandross black song in the world does Wanna say them. Purple Rain gave us Purple Rain. Which you should know the boomerang. Soundtrack gave us so much. Amazing Vintage Toni. Braxton like Pixie cut toni. Braxton Lake just on the scene Toni Braxton like love. Shoulda brought you home last night. Toni Braxton plus end of the road by the boys to men. Do you remember that Song? It was everywhere it was on this soundtrack also pm. Don's die without you. Also on that soundtrack I could go on and on about this. And if you don't mind I think I will. Because Whitney shout out to the absolute undisputed Queen of the movie soundtrack the late Great Nippy. Houston who gave us the preacher's wife the bodyguard and of course waiting to exile. Can I get a shoop shoop okay? So let's talk about what was on this soundtrack. You got exile the shoop shoop song which is really fun to say aretha. Talking about a role is still a rose which it is. And there's that song that Sean pay more may singing in a completely made up language.

Toni Braxton Braxton Lake Luther Vandross Janet Jackson aretha Tracy Houston Sean Whitney Don Pixie Wan
"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

10:15 min | 3 months ago

"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"Do where I'm going to end up is based on this. I believe this already preordained. So have to listen to that. Inner Voice and not give that power over to somebody. Who's getting a paycheck to produce a product? But that's not easily done all the time I I recognize that. Yeah speaking of college. You went to visit Harvard Law. I think prepping for your role on La Law and a little Birdie told me that you met a young man who went on to become the first black president of the United States. How in the world that happen while I was in my first Season Valley Law and my character when he came on the show. He was from Harvard Law School in his backstory and he was editor of the Harvard Law Review in his backstory so the Harvard Law Harvard Law. School invited a couple of producers and myself to come speak to the law school. And I I did not even remember meeting him at the time and we went out to dinner that night. With a group of students and Alan Dershowitz which is Ironic And it wasn't until he ran for president where he did an interview and he mentioned that they would call him my character on campus and the Communists did so. Did you meet Rapporte? All men big ears at tall has the same great as reinforce seen him since then in a saw him was actually campaign for him was at at the White House at their first state dinner and it was just. It was a mind blowing moments. You talk about continuity and evolution Dec- to see this African American family in this this museum I e the White House That slaves enslaved Africans built And to see them as a first family this was like their first two months in the White House so it was just wild and You know Harkening back to when I first met him to see where he is now and he was of course the actual editor of the Harvard law right and the first black president. No salesmen wild. Yeah Wow typically I would I would ask you what Barack Obama smells like Book that That's why I'm just like I don't. I don't know that you know I think he smells like freedom and reparations. Just Awesome Okay. So we must talk about your work in when they I'm just glad that she exists. I'm so glad she's you know a really really am One of the things that I thought when I heard about this project I I was really excited but I was also like you know this is heavy you know and I mean like life is heavy. Sure but like it just seems like we're at a place in society where like everything's on fire and like you know trauma is just like front and center and so many stories. Was it ever like draining for you to like kind of exist inside this movie in this completely unjust case? Oh sure sure You Know I. It's your points. We'll take it when you say it's heavy and so many people have said. I wanted to watch it or haven't I haven't seen all four episodes four hours I started wash. It was just too heavy and you know my retorted that is these guys their lives altered and they did years in prison. You know if you're interested you know maybe we can give them at least four hours of a time but yeah it was but you know it's whenever you create anything of art performing art with its film television stage When it's heavy especially you have to have that release val and I would tell you. This was shooting because of Asia's direction in her spirit. Everybody wanted to really bring their a game But also you know you work hard and you play hard. So there's a lot of laughter on that said we'll leave him that because we knew we felt like we were doing something that was necessary and timely and relevant Tell me about some of the stories and stuff that would happen on that. Do you have a favorite memory from making the movie favorite memory? I think I don't know Bro. Funny member necessarily but just watching. These young cow walked on the set. The first day in and I I was blown away at how young these guys were guys. They were fourteen fifteen. Sixteen so one of the actors was actually fourteen. I think fifteen one was twenty one playing younger but but you forget that they were. They were babies as a parent. Now I look at these babies So I think that's what stuck out with anything but also then watching these kids come there as just professional active slamming Take after take this putting it in getting it in doing the work honest and raw So that's that's that's inspiring to me to watch these. These young kids do that thing. I'm always very taken by the roles that you take and another project that you worked. Last year was dear. White People Another net flicks Netflix series. My last bar products with Netflix. Oh Yeah How's about that? I don't want to spoil it too much. Who Haven't seen it but your character is a professor college. Campus gets swept up in some me too ish type stuff With a student a white student so given our current political landscape like these conversations that people are having right now like the abuse of power of minute who are in charge and the metoo movement and then like matters of race. You know. Black lives matters a thing What was it like to portray someone in the middle of a fictionalized account of something? That's really going on right now. vet'll ballard wasn't executive producer on the show that time just in. Siemian created the show and she was a friend and she had dinner together. our families in she said. Would you come on show as well what will I I? Yeah 'cause he's a friend And she told me what the character was about so to answer your question in terms of the Hashtag metoo movement of it all I asked. I quite like getting in the middle of telling relevant stories. Part of my love of what I do is to entertain. But if you can provoke thought and stimulate thought and change and be a part of that conversation because we haven't had that conversation a lot in our community you know there's there's the bill cosby of it all and in this and that was really kind of the broad stroke template of this character because this character that play. Professor Brown was beloved by all the students and he was a hero to the students. What do we do in our communities? Specifically when our heroes fall that was the impetus of this of the storyline So to to be a part of telling that story from creatives sampling. I love being a part of that and the reason I love it is because it's it's necessary that we have these conversations with the guards specifically specificity of who we are and what that means to us. Why sometimes it's harder for us because we don't have we we don't have as many heroes as we probably should have needed to have someone. One of US falls alike cosby. What do we do with that? What are we put that whom we look to look within ourselves to look to other people look to our parents ourselves as leaders in our community or our homes families So I love being a part of those conversations so to portray you know he would probably now. I mean it's been also veit spoiler. I don't mind playing bad guys officer guy as my body works a lot of good ten years but some people see you always play. The bad guy for is more interesting to play. Because because there's a mystique good guys you know you know what you're gonNA get bad guys. You don't don't always know so I love that so this would be considered a quote unquote bad guys. Let's get under the layers. That's what I enjoy doing. Covert let's mine. What's underneath that find out? Why do people actively that's why I always have to explain to people why I'm so interested in serial killers and they're always like you know what we could have been talking about the whole I'm have a morbid fascination with what goes wrong in a brain right. How how does one? How does one get to the point? Where you've got like body parts in your freezer circular just caused with Sean Connery. And Laurence Fishburne Adheres Scarlett Johansson at ten years old. Wow but but yeah. That exploration was Was was crazy but what. Yeah what what wrong you have. Another upcoming Netflix. Mini series about the life of a one madame CJ Walker Is a period piece. I love period and I feel like there are not enough black wins. I don't know if that's true. That's probably true but it's happening more and more because of Netflix and streaming services What are you most excited for people to see in this? Many call man Octavia Spencer for once. She added C. J. Walker Academy Award Winning Octavius Academy Award winning. Indeed Tiffany Haddish is in it as well. She plays her daughter And Garrett Morris and Bill Bellamy You know what I'm most excited for people to see the story itself It's called self-made. They have newtown now but self made the lifetime or legacy of inspired by Madame. Cj Walker But you know this. This was a woman for those who don't know who was the first self made female millionaire in our country that black about the first female self-made millionaire another what she did not inherited she worked for. She built it and she did that by creating black hair care products for for African American women at the time on this early nineteen hundred. She died in Nineteen Nineteen So this this was extra. She live right next door to John. John Rockfeller so she was balling out of control.

Harvard Law Netflix madame CJ Walker president United States Harvard Law Review White House Season Valley Law La Law John Rockfeller editor Barack Obama bill cosby Alan Dershowitz Octavia Spencer Tiffany Haddish cosby C. J. Walker Academy
"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

Strong Black Legends

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"blair" Discussed on Strong Black Legends

"Black Film and Television brought to you by Netflix and strong weck lead each week. We talk with the folks that paved the way for us to imagine what was possible. Both on and offscreen. I'm your host Tracy Clayton Aka young whomever Mcgaugh my mix tape entitled. Why am I doing this? Drop in at some point. Maybe I'll now let's just see what happens. Let's talk so at the top of every show. I like to practice name the kind of parent that one day with Mike to be in. That is the kind that you'll that their kids about have don't know nothing about their favorite things so I know you know about Blair underwood but what's I know about Blair underwood you owe Blair underwood light of my life. Fire of my Loins Ladies and Gentlemen Friends and family in this episode. We are talking to none other than the beautifully faced and beautifully talented. Blair underwood himself. That's right yeah. He did not actually get hot GRITS HIS VASE IN AT ONE. Tyler Perry Movie. He was just acting an act. Hor Acts but seriously folks whether you know Blair from your most recent net flicks marathon or from your Mama's VHS tapes of La Law. You already know that Blair underwood has been Hollywood royalty for a minute. I still can't believe it but I got a chance to sit down with the man himself the same end that we have all dreamed about in our lives at one point or another for sure. We talked about him growing up as a military brat. We talked about that role of his own. Sex and the city That role and how he met a certain president of the United States early on in his career wonder who that could be. You will definitely WanNa hear that story because it's a good one so sit back relax and take in this conversation with the also lovely Blair underwood..

Blair underwood Netflix Tracy Clayton Tyler Perry United States president Mike La Law
The Perfect Time To Buy?

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

08:35 min | 3 months ago

The Perfect Time To Buy?

"Thing that was interesting before we got to complete isolation people were asking me when we were doing the social distancing phase of all. This right people were asking me. Hey are you know is it okay to continue to fly or you still flying and the truth of the matter was I? I was not right. I'm often in rental airplanes and most of the the flying schools near me shut down and I didn't want to be that close to people you know I like. I said I'm committed to stopping the transmission here but I do have a lot of friends that own airplanes and I did not see anything wrong with that right if you can leave Your House. Go to your garage. Get in your car. Drive by yourself to a hangar. Open the hangar door and get in an airplane without touching anybody you can't be more socially distant than cruising around at five thousand feet by yourself right so I thought if you own an airplane going flying was a great thing to do and you know. It's an interesting time to think about that because owning an airplane is not as far away from reality as many people think. Sometimes I'll mention in passing that I'm thinking about buying airplane and people kind of their eyes get wide like whoa really. You know you must be doing really well and you know the reality is you can get into an airplane that works for you for not a crazy amount of money. I mean you can sure spend a lot if you have it. You can spend up to one hundred million dollars if you have it but you can also get into an airplane for as little as fifteen or twenty thousand dollars if depending on what you're looking for and if you're willing to have partners so that is kind of where where I am. I'm on the fence. You know I fly my family to palm springs from San Francisco. Probably four or five times. Maybe six times a year and I'm on the fence you know. At what point do I want to own an airplane of rent one and I noticed that a friend of mine and a great pilot designated Pilot Examiner Flight Instructor? Jason Blair had recently authored. Two books on this topic and I reached out directly to Jason to see if we could have a phone call and discuss some of these questions. But yeah man. I'm really curious and I'm sure we can get into the details of the two books that you defend and they actually did arrive. So thank you for sending them over excellent. Very glad you got. Oh Yeah I haven't I haven't taken to deep dive on them and I figured I would start just by asking that question you know how like right. Now I'm renting I take my family to Palm Springs. Eighty maybe I don't know five times a year six times a year or something like that and you know I'm always asking myself. How much do I have to spend on renting before it makes sense to buy? And does it ever the short answer? I'm GonNa tell you is it will almost never make logical financial sense to buy you know what if. I said you know she's a how can I financially justify going golfing and whacking a little ball? Around a course and hitting the GO-TO for whole we'd sound like we're crazy right But the answer to that I like doing it and it's it's mine and I you know why. Do you buy your own clubs instead of rent because you want them yours and that's fine and that's a that's a decision you can come to with owning an airplane and there's nothing wrong with that because there's there's a lot of intrinsic things that come with you know. My airplane is in my hangar. It set up how I wanted to be you know and and okay so is it a thousand dollars more years than I would spend on renting. Maybe but you're also probably a lot more likely to engage in. Go flying in your own airplane. Then if you're fighting on that rental scheduled trying to get an airplane Airplanes broken if it's being used in training and inter starting to find a lot of places that rent airplanes and are heavily involved in training. They really don't even allow their aircraft out torrential anymore outside of the training environment because they they need to keep that training going I tell people that owning an airplane is an experience. You're buying an experience. It might be a little bit more than renting. But you're buying the experience of the airplane being there when you want it of Bringing you know your dogs along if you want to you or or you know going away and deciding while you're gone you're gonNA stay an extra two weeks you know. These are things that that you can't do as a renter. So you're definitely buying experience when you buy an airplane. Yeah and being an I totally get that by the way and I. I love arguing For buying experience But being that you think of it that way what would you say to somebody who says I'm planning on buying an airplane and putting it on the flight line at least back to offset my ownership costs and that's a good question to actually address it in the buying book you know what are some things you can do to allay that cost of of your airplane or the things you can consider and that's something that some people do you know if you want an airplane fly forty or fifty hours a year But you do want that aircraft to help allay its own costs You know you're GONNA hire insurance costs you'RE GONNA have. I remains cost. You're going to go through. Engine hours faster But it does. If you can find the right leasing back deal helped to cut. Some of those operational cost the biggest one. That's going to help. Cut are the the overhead pieces. You know having your own hangar If you can get them to do the insurance things like that if they have their own maintenance they're gonNA probably be doing it not at a profit level and this is where the negotiation comes in But it does come with some downsides to and that is your airplane may not always be available when you want it You may not equipped and have the exact airplane you want if it was ears because you may choose to get a different airplane because it fits better in the flight training environment Or adjust is going to take a beating too. I mean there's there's some truth in that we don't treat the airplane like it's our own. I mean the airplane I gotTa Out of today is a beautiful three forty and the owner of it is a great friend of mine. happens to be out of town. Another friend of his was looking for a boat and they got the call. He's on vacation. Can you find my buddy up there today and you know? I know Sunday when he gets back from his trip. He's going to go out to that. Airplane even wipe the bugs off. He's probably gonNA treat the boots because it's it's his and he treats it that way and you know. I don't know many renters that are going to do that. Your airplane Jason's absolutely right here. We don't treat rental aircraft the same. I mean we have a joke in our flying club. That one we're headed home. We're going to set quote rental power. Which means like a needle off the red line right? We're worried about babying the engine. We're not flying around sixty five percent of power. We are flying at maximum forward speed because we are being billed on the Hobbs meter. And the hobbs meters turning on time. So that's a very important thing to consider right and I sort of you know. I've experienced horror stories that way. You don't want example as a early on like really thousands and one of my students bought See WanNA clips and not a Qatar. But you know like a phrase he died in a DA twenty right. Put you on the flight line. He's doing real well with it. Because it's this fancy new glass playing. He actually had ten thousand dollars in profit from renting the aircraft until one of the student pirates engaged the starter motor while the prop was spinning and held it down to be burnt completely. Burned out the starter and sap through all the ten thousand dollars by the time it was done and all things are placed and the you know the reduced revenue from so I always tell people honestly like I tell them what you said. I say you're buying an experience and honestly I steer them away from that. I say if you WANNA cut costs get a partner. Get Two partners three partners. You know whatever. That's the writing important piece here that I think that people don't think about you know there's a lot of us out here that want to get into airplanes and so a lot of people that actually have airplanes underutilized them because they don't even have friends that fly. I mean my God I part of me can't understand that. I don't think I have friends that are pilots. I think that's probably a self selection issue But you know when people buy an airplane and they don't you know their family or friends. Don't enjoy it with them You know a partnership is a great option and some of the alternatives to ownership. You know renting like you've mentioned certainly one. You can lease airplanes right. You could lease an airplane from somebody else and dry lease if they're under utilizing You know person for their aircraft they might WANNA dry lease at it. And it's not a prophet thing but people do that. You might be able to partnership there's a lot of great clubs out there Interestingly enough you could even borrow them I mean. Sometimes there are people that you get a good friend who got an airplane. He's like dude. Just fly it At least it doesn't sit there then right. I've had that numbers of times. I got four or five airplanes that You know friends and customers in mind that are like have you ever borrow my airplane. Just go take it now. Obviously don't abuse that But there are times that that's been a thing and When it really comes down to though I think the best advice I can give somebody. Who's thinking about buying an airplane is don't over by an airplane

Jason Blair Partner Your House Pilot Examiner Flight Instruct Palm Springs San Francisco Qatar
Trump considering declaring state of emergency over virus outbreak

Orlando's News at Noon

01:26 min | 4 months ago

Trump considering declaring state of emergency over virus outbreak

"Guns on the Congress is very close to reaching a deal with the trump administration on the economic package meant to fight the fallout from this outbreak house speaker Nancy Pelosi says both sides are resolved much of the differences but as you mention the payroll tax cut sounds like there is anything that can down the road a little bit not sure if we'll get word on that today or not they're expecting about the house today so could then go on to the Senate the recess for the Senate was canceled for next week so that they can take up this legislation close he says the multi billion dollar relief package includes free from the virus testing for everyone who needs the test as the president he is expecting a news conference here this afternoon around three o'clock is what we're hearing and there are some reports out there that he plans to declare a national emergency today to allow more direct leaflets for response to Crowder Barris yeah well I I know that the president will hold a news conference later on this afternoon at three o'clock we of course we'll take it live right here on news ninety six point five W. DB there's a lot of chatter out there Blair about the president possibly the Celtics declaring a national emergency as early as today no Bernie Sanders and Chuck Schumer have urged the president to do so are you hearing anything on that front today exactly we're seeing some of the reports out there of some of the same thing and what that would do Scott as a sensor allow more direct relief to the response of this that maybe we testing it may just be overseeing from state to state a number of states have declared states of emergency and some of that is trickling in and so a national emergency circle B.

Congress Nancy Pelosi Senate President Trump Crowder Barris Blair Celtics Bernie Sanders Chuck Schumer Scott
Trumps signs emergency coronavirus spending package

Orlando's News at Noon

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Trumps signs emergency coronavirus spending package

"Noon will president trump before he headed to Tennessee late this morning signing into law on emergency funding package to combat corona virus we go in depth because we want you to get the stories we're telling you about life to our Washington bureau reporter Blair Miller and the president Blair signing that eight point three billion dollar funding package do we know any of the details about the new law yet yes yeah we're learning a lot more about this bill that was passed through Congress with bipartisan support it includes more than three billion dollars and vaccine research more than two billion dollars for prevention this total spending packages you mentioned is for eight point three billion dollars in that far exceeds what the White House initially proposed last week they were asking for a little more than two

Tennessee Blair Miller Congress White House President Trump Washington Reporter
The Dismantled Ferry Kalakala Still Has Stories to Tell

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:06 min | 4 months ago

The Dismantled Ferry Kalakala Still Has Stories to Tell

"I'm continuing my investigation into the world. So the paranormal metaphysical working with the idea. That goes whether we see them or psychic. Senses them are made up of energy and we'll be monitoring or following along the oldest active paranormal investigation team and the Washington State Ghosts Society to see what they have to say about an investigation into a ghostly or angry spirit will the story starts out with the fairy. It was the fastest ferry. Impute sound making eight round trips routine. Bremerton and Seattle every day at a brisk eighteen knots. It had room for a hundred and ten autos on her car. The remaining decks had room for two thousand passengers there were shower facilities for shipyard workers returning home a lunch counter. Three Observation Rooms Sun deck and Ladies Lounge. It became a hot nightspot lunch counter catered parties. The observation decks became ballroom. Sadly Nineteen Forty Adelaide. Bebr committed suicide in the ladies Lounes. She lost her father to suicide followed by the death of her brother. She was twenty nine years old and still unmarried in the Ladies Lounge. She committed suicide by shooting herself. Well that was one thousand nine hundred forty one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. The Kala Kala retired from service. A move to the Washington State Ferries Repair Facility in Eagle Harbor. A year later she was sold to a seafood processing company and towed to Alaska to work as a crab Cannery Kala was beached in Kodiak in nineteen seventy and use their to process shrimp. Finally she was moored and would spent her final years listing until one thousand nine hundred seventy five waiting to be scrapped but in two thousand and two the oldest active paranormal investigation team and the Washington State Ghost society toured the Kala Kala with the owner. Some of the sensitives in the grew felt drawn to the Ladies Lounge and a female psyche detected the spirit of a woman who did not like men other. Investigators brought devices that measured electromagnetic energy which detected energy readings in the Ladies Lounge. The investigators set up motion detection sensors and energy detectors connected to a computer that recorded all of the readings at the same time they left the lounge and investigated other locations on the ferry where they got more energy readings that coincided with the presence of that sad female spirit spoke of the beginning of this podcast when the psychic detected the spirit the meters around her went off as technicians move forward. The energy went down. The psychic moved following the spirit. The energy readings rose the psychic suggested that the skirt moved away because technicians were men and she did not them nearby when they returned to the Ladies Lounge. They had a surprising result. The motion detectors work by emitting level. Noises bounced off the walls if someone stepped in front of the Mirror the signal bounce back too soon telling the computer. Something has stepped inside the room. The motion detectors spiked several times while the investigators were away. Oddly the computer indicated one of the sounds took too long to bounce back from the wall. The only way this could have happened was if the walls of the caller caller had moved further away from the sensor. Ross Allison one of the ghost hunters speculated that the sound emitted by the sensor may have travelled out to the wall and back but pass through something that was not solid some form of energy. Unfortunately the team was not able to return for more investigations today. The Kala Kala is just a memory but one wonders if perhaps the ghost of Adelaide bebr might not have stepped off the old ferry that graving dock on the Blair waterway just before she was scrapped.

Kala Kala Ladies Lounge Cannery Kala Washington State Ghosts Societ Washington State Ferries Repai Washington State Ghost Society Bebr Bremerton Adelaide Ross Allison Alaska Eagle Harbor Seattle Lounes Kodiak
Jack Welch, GE's legendary CEO, has died at 84

Marketplace

02:27 min | 4 months ago

Jack Welch, GE's legendary CEO, has died at 84

"Jack Welch died yesterday the long time chairman and CEO of General Electric one of most celebrated executives of his day was eighty four years old the legacy well sleeves is complicated it will be debated and case study to four years in particular the way he changed what American companies do profits above all shareholder value first in line marketplaces Katong has them General Electric once upon a time explicitly serve many masters workers research labs and last of all shareholders that's according to company documents in the fifties by nineteen eighty one in came a new boss Jack Welch he slashed underperforming divisions and workers he spoke at MIT in two thousand six you bring a man you say look this isn't working you're in the bottom ten United again in my money here let's over the next year get your move on my then cutting costs and pleasing shareholders was in vogue in Wall Street and work for G. its stock way out perform the market during the Welsh decades of the eighties and nineties Nicholas Heymann is long time G. analyst at William Blair she had no problem redefining the landscape and what would work and in that sense standout became kind of the Paul Bunyan of shareholder value creation shareholder value often came at a cost to workers it undid the post war corporate social contract says Rick warts but not the Drucker institute his book is the end of loyalty G. and vaporized about a hundred and seventy thousand jobs under Welsh up until that time only the term downsizing it really entered the American vernacular yet these kind of huge mass layoffs were still seen as pretty scandalous when will step down in two thousand one jeep your allied heavily on its finance arm GE capital which will build up and when the financial crisis came years later the company got hit hard law professor Margaret Blair at Vanderbilt's is that's when we'll just tone seem to change as the company got into trouble he conceded that maximizing share value is not always the smartest thing to do D. adage suggests that he changed his mind over time he must have begun to see if there were big problems in the underlying business well she may have been on to something today leading groups including the business roundtable blackrock and the Davos World Economic Forum are rethinking the shareholders first model in its

Paul Bunyan Professor Blackrock Vanderbilt Margaret Blair Ge Capital Drucker Institute Rick Warts Jack Welch William Blair Analyst Nicholas Heymann MIT Katong General Electric Chairman And Ceo
'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

People of the Pod

13:03 min | 4 months ago

'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

"In an unhealthy society? That has problems. They say who did this to us? And the Jews are always candidate. That's columnist George will who's featured in a new documentary on anti-semitism out in theaters across the country on Friday with us in the studio to discuss that film is its creator. Andrew Goldberg in two thousand nine. Andrew focused his lens on the resurgence of Anti Jewish hatred around the world and in mainstream media but after the two thousand sixteen election and the CHARLOTTESVILLE rally where protesters proclaimed the Jews will not replace us. Goldberg felt compelled to return to the topic for an even deeper exploration in viral for mutations of anti-semitism Goldberg travels through four countries. The United States Great Britain France and Hungary to speak firsthand with victims witnesses anti-semites an high profile figures including bill. Clinton Tony Blair Deborah Lipstadt and AJC Europe director. Simone Rodin Benkin in Pittsburgh. He examined the far right ideas that led to the attack on the tree of life synagogue in Hungary he looks at the Anti Immigration. Anti George Soros anti-jewish propaganda promoted by the government and in the UK. He explores the pain caused by the Anti Zionist messages from the UK's Labor Party the film also explores the repeated violence against Jews in France carried out by Islamists Andrew. Welcome glad to be here. Thank you so thank you for making this documentary and I'm curious. Can you kind of take our audience back to the original conception of it and how it evolved over time since I believe some events actually transpired in the making of the documentary will shortly after the election? We noticed there was sort of an uptick in anti Semitic incidents around the country. There were series a bomb threats which we know turned out to be bogus but those caught. Everyone's attention and suddenly everyone was noticing things and shortly after that a lot of tombstones were desecrated several different cemeteries and then the sort of global eyeballs started to notice these things talk about them more in the press and online and we immediately thought we should make a film about antisemitism and we didn't know what it would look like or what it would be. I think our initial thoughts were that would be about the United States but as we did more and more research and we knew this was a global issue. We knew it was happening in other countries. But as you unpack these things you realize that. There's an urgency to a lot of these stories and so we decided to really expanded and to look at four different situations. Those would be the far right in the United States. The far left in England in Hungary where the prime minister has launched a massive PR campaign against a Jewish philanthropist and in France where Islamist have been killing Jews in various terror attacks and other violent attacks against Jews to the tune of what unofficial numbers seemed to be more than three thousand a year. Now you've been making documentaries and doing journalism for twenty years As have I and I was a religion reporter for fifteen years in Chicago and I will tell you when I came here. I was stunned by just how much people hate. Jews. And I'm curious you I. I mentioned this to a former colleague at the Tribune recently and his response. He's in his eighties. He said we'll of course you grew up at a different time You know it's no surprise to me but yeah of course you didn't realize I'm just curious if this was a real shock to your system as you were doing the reporting the idea that Jews are hated was never foreign to me. I mean keep in mind. I'm fifty one and so I grew up where the Holocaust was not that far off. I mean I was raised in the seventies so I guess it was still thirty years old but it was not as it is now sixty plus years old where the next generation of people don't even know it was there Growing UP IN CHICAGO BEING JEWISH WAS It was not something to be celebrated at least among my friends and among my peers. I was made fun of for it a few times. It wasn't I didn't grow up in the midst of it but the Holocaust was connected to us in a way that it was very very real and so for that reason I understood that Jews were absolutely despised and I started making films in my first film that had anything to do with Jewish subjects was around two thousand and two or so and you know it was about Eastern European Jewish life before the war. So we're talking about you. Know all black and white footage of shuttles of Warsaw of what we might call the Yiddish world and that whole world is utterly destroyed in Eastern Europe and in Europe and in Russia and that made it pretty easy to see and in doing that film I started to learn about it. I automate fillmore at antisemitism in the media in the Middle East at one point and you realize that it is it is widespread. There's Anti Semitism where there are Jews. There's antisemitism where there are not Jews. There's Anti Semitism among people who are friends with Jews so my awareness of this has grown so in other words you entered into this project knowing there was a history of this but you had never seen it kind of in the current context as well. I had not seen it the way I see it now. I when I made a film in two thousand seven on antisemitism in the in the in the arab-islamic world per particularly North Africa and the Middle East I didn't focus that much on Europe and the US at the time antisemitism in the US was a very minor issue compared to what it is now. I don't want to say it was minor because there were plenty of people experiencing antisemitism but we didn't have it to the magnitude and we didn't have the Internet the way we do now but I knew that it was alive and well in the Middle East and that was surprising to see just how deep it is just how woven into the fabric of conversation and media it is. I was interviewing some kids in Egypt on the street and I said to them what are Jews they said User Satan Jews are evil. Juice should die. I said what if a Jewish kid was walking right here across the street and got hit by a car. They said we would call an ambulance. These two ideas existed right next to each other. And that's what's so interesting. One is in the abstract one is in the day to day Would you say that abstract versus day day is what's also infecting Western Europe United States? This wave of anti-semitism that we're seeing or is it. Is it very different? I think they crossover so for example. In Hungary there's virtually no violence against Jews In Hungary a survey showed that forty percent. Forty two percent of Hungarians held at least one or more anti Semitic views. Does that mean that? The people by larger anti-semites probably not but it means that the numbers are higher. Those numbers were higher than they were anywhere else in Europe or give or take a country. How many countries are there in Europe? A lot right so but there's no violence against Jews physical violence. That's what I mean physical violence against Jews but those lines do tend to cross over at points and so the fear is that it can translate these nationalist movement so in Hungary just to give some context the government has launched a huge campaign against George. Soros it's on Mute right now. It's not running right now but it ran not too long ago during the European Union elections. It came back up again. I asked one of the spokespeople of Hungary will come back and he told me that it would come back in a very consistent way so the whole idea that the Hungarian government has put forth. Is that this Jewish billionaire. George Soros is out to flood the nation with Muslim immigrants and since Muslim immigrants in the eyes of the Hungarian government are bad. You the Hungarian citizen the White Christian Hungarian citizen are in danger. And you're in danger because of a Jew. So here's these people are all worked up about a Jew who actually isn't doing anything like this but yet at the same time they're not vandalizing. All the Jewish shops are not beating Jews. And what have you? Although there's I've heard some rumblings that a little of that has happened so we'll have to see but I'm no expert on the data right. Well I think that's the argument. I mean argument. Deborah Lipstadt makes in the film. For example it starts with words it starts with comments and then does eventually escalate. That's the danger of not addressing it nipping in the bud. When you see. I think that's here right so I think that in America we've seen rage on the Internet translate into violence than I think you know the hatred in Hungary is really a government media campaign which took place on TV on the radio on the Internet. But also on billboards outside it was like an all encompassing life. You would drive down the street and you'd be bombarded with it here This antisemitism isn't billboards. I mean there's we'd see them occasionally but it's all on the Internet and people get the Internet sort of like you and your computer. You Lock yourself in this little space and then you start to get worked up and you start to hate and so we see that. Not all but many of these. Violent attacks in the United States are people who sort of incubated these ideas on the Internet. You raise a good point billboards in Hungary that was the been the vehicle of communication there for that. Soros campaign but I'm curious what about social media. What about the comments in violence on social media is it just as rampant in places like Hungary as it is here we'll so the makeup and the nature of the of the campaign in Hungary? We didn't break down so I don't know what percentage of it certainly on social media and not only was it on social media is a place where people can share about it right so in addition to whatever the government put on social media because the government had all these different forms they had radio they had. Tv They billboards aid magazines. It's social media mailings mailing mailing which is in the film How much of their media mix was the Internet? I don't know but if you're a person with anti Semitic views you can't do anything with billboard but some people did right hateful messages on billboards with magic markers in pain. They actually vandalize them. But by and large the billboards are you don't interact with them in the billboard. Don't post against back and forth a TV commercial. You don't respond to that. The Internet is where everybody took their hatred in their dislike of George Soros and they brought it to the Internet. And I think that's a place where you would see a lot more of this. Anti Jewish rhetoric the Internet is where it becomes the People's action not the government right. You have obsession in the film that talks about the brief history of blaming Jews. And you talk about the films that you've done in the past and the history of this but one critique of the film that I've read is that doesn't include enough historical context now I hear this critique all the time as a journalist you only have so much space or time right to address the whole of a situation but I'm curious what your thoughts are on whether to include more history or trajectory. The history of antisemitism is extremely complex. It grows out of misinterpretations if that's a word of people misinterpreted biblical scripture. It's changed and it's more throughout the centuries throughout Europe. If you WANNA talk about how it's been a part of the story of Christianity knew very thorny and complicated history which takes a long time to get in and out of now take that for a minute and think about. We have limited shelf space in our movie. I always say to people in movies not a casserole but take that from it in a notice that in the film we have that history. We have extensive history of the civil rights movement in the United States with history of the entire Orban's campaign and where that came from in Hungary in Oregon was we talk all about a migration and the history of colonialism in France as to give the backbone of that in England we talk about the Labor Party going all the way back to two thousand and eight. What we don't do is this deep analysis of Christian history but my response is also this. If I make a film about racism in about how African Americans are being shot in the street by police. Do I need to tell you? The history of why blacks are disliked by racists in this country. If I talk about misogyny do I need to tell you? The history of why people are misogynists to me and the same goes for LGBTQ. Americans no one's asking why. Why do I need to get into the fact of why Trans People are being murdered? Right now are being beaten up. I don't need to analyze that. Well that too comes from the Bible. Right hatred of homophobia grows right out of scripture. But I don't need to give that analysis so it's a it. We talk about double standards and antisemitism and I don't want to say this is anti Semitism but it's almost a reflex that people feel like anything has to do with Jews. With antisemitism with Israel has to be held to some type of second order of scrutiny and I found that a little bit frustrating. There've been some debates on college campuses about whether or not Jewish students who are pro. Israel can join feminist marches. Lgbtq right marches. You other causes. They feel excluded from those causes because of their Zionist positions and so. That's where intersection. -ality has come up a lot in conversations here is how do you address that exclusion? Even though it's very different causes communities have gotten together and there has not been room for the Jewish issue of antisemitism has four complicated reasons not been welcome into that crew. Because many in this left is idea. Do not like how they don't like what's going on with the Arab Israeli conflict let's not even parse the Israeli conflict. Unfortunate part of this. Is that a Jewish students who have nothing to do with Israel who are oblivious to Israel are still being singled out now. It's very dangerous to to assume. Length phrases like colleges are a battleground. We visited colleges as we spoke to a lot of students. It's a very complicated and mixed bag. But there's no doubt that on some college campuses and we don't have hard data on how or where or what we have a lot of anecdotes. We have a lot of very upset parents. We have a lot of very upset students. But what that actually translates into numbers. We don't know what we do know. Is that Jewish? Students are being asked to somehow be called to task for what Israel is said to be

Hungary United States George Soros Europe Government Semitism France Andrew Goldberg Middle East Chicago Israel Labor Party UK Simone Rodin Benkin Tribune Pittsburgh England Ajc Europe
"blair" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

11:28 min | 4 months ago

"blair" Discussed on Talking Politics

"What you just said kind of circular sort of had there been some kind of alliance. I wouldn't be able to fight that war. Which would have preserved aligns but there wasn't an alliance which meant he with his parliamentary majority. Could fight that will which makes healing that rift much much harder and we're still know far enough on from that. I think for any Liberal Democrats and like you say that bit of the Labor Party that considers blade the enemy could ally with Liberal Democrats on their mutual hatred of the Iraq Project. And that's no plas- in mind at all by progressive. It is interesting if you look at the history of this is is that foreign policy questions on questions of the Union as well Ongoing features of the complicated relationship not only between the Liberals on the Labor Party historically but between the Liberals and the Conservative Party as well. I mean if you're about to begin. The the end of the nineteenth century the beginning of the Twentieth Century. In you say well how do you get to a Liberal Party that is willing to offer that corporation we Labor that it did in one thousand nine hundred six? The necessary condition of that is that a significant part of the Liberal Party has gone off to the Conservatives over the question of home rule. How'd you then end up with somebody like Churchill in that? Radical Liberal government is because of the Conservatives profound disagreements about the free-trade question how is it the liberals blow apart during the first world war? It's over the questions about how the war should be prosecuted so actually faultlines around Britain's external in Tation to the rest of the world as well as the multinational state United Kingdom is fairly fundamental questions. That any of these coalitions have got provide some kind of coherent answer to you. Didn't mention the Greens. I didn't think that he in the speech. Nine hundred so there is a possibility that what we're seeing a shift in British European politics again. It really depends on the electoral system that that could be swayed the younger vectors for him. If they were given a free choice many more would vote green and that must be. Puff is progressive aligns and yet the. Green Party is much closer to the Kuban wing of Labor. I mean there's another possible rift opening up here on the progressive side is one of the reasons why. I think black has a case. He should be very careful if your labor about proportional representation because you could open the door not this label them governing coalition for Tennessee but a big labor green rift opening up nothing without addressing that. This still looks like it's is either coming from ten fifteen years ago or it's it's wishful in the context of now. I mean if you look at the problems of the center-left parties facing in Europe the German Social Democrats for example in a pretty significant part of their problem is the competition that now exists for the same kind of young middle class voters that they relied on in the past now. Voting for the the Green Party in that sense is it looks like the German Social Democrats have been displaced as the second party in in German politics by the Greens are now at the moment. Labor doesn't have that problem of pretty significant competition to its green left. Absolutely would I think under a system of proportional representation on the other bit just briefly because it's too big to discuss at length what it would be to re imagine an economy and a form of government that was suited to the Middle Part of the twentieth century and wasn't a relic of the Middle Part of the twentieth century. So sent let politicians have been saying this for about twenty years more since they noticed that there was a digital revolution. They were going to have to come up with an account with a future which recognized the changing character work of labor of sharing of ownership. So on there's nothing in bless speech to flesh it out. I'm sure probably he could summon up some think tanks to come up with some ideas still seems to me that the most interesting versions of those visions of the future are coming from the of the Labor Party. He doesn't like I mean I think. Pull MASON IN POST. Capitalism has a much more interesting account of what a future economy and future form of politics might look like from the point of view. The problem with it I think is not necessarily some of the core ideas but it seems completely wishful about the basic politics of winning and holding power but then goes back to his earlier argument. I mean it seems to me like he's going around in circles here. He wants both a conventional account of how a party like the party that he led governs with a majority of very twentieth century idea and ideas that are suited for the middle of the twenty first century. And I think you've got if you're GONNA do the second you gotta give up on the. I don't think he's if you're a Blairite April air follower. You have to accept that you can't have it both ways. You can't want it to be nineteen ninety-seven again with a philosophy seat for twenty twenty seven. I think twenty twenty seven. If it's new is really new. Yeah I mean I agree entirely. I mean I think this goes back in some sense to the way in which Blair fetish is is really newness. I think one of the things that was to me striking about the speech when he's talking about the future is how we really frames. That almost entirely in terms of Technology Carlson. It is not the respect. The white heat the technological revolution continental whether the Brexit was entirely missing from the the speech but it any substantial discussion of it. I mean that is a a future that has to now be worked out in quite literally. The United Kingdom is ripped up its previous constitutional relationship with the European Union with profound consequences for its own constitution. It's about changes economic relationship with the European Union. And it's doing so in a completely different geopolitical world than the one in which Blair became prime minister and these demands of the future. Knew that is new but this is not something that he's got anything to say about. Now I think in part by is because in some sense. This is past coming back. Is the past constitution coming back at something about pass? Geopolitical competition coming back is the question of basically having to reconsider. Fundamental trade relationships are coming back and then not the conduct questions the blaze mind I think is attracted to. He's attracted to the idea of the radical transformation of the president by these big forces. That mean that nothing is ever like. It was before at the same time though as you say being trapped in a narrative of well we can go back to me as prime minister and understand how I became the successful prime minister. I have that still has supposedly has guidance for the party. Despite the fact that on this the fundamental big future question for Britain is Britain over the next decade is how to reconfigure. Its its place in the world and its domestic politics relation to Brexit Blair. Entirely bet on the wrong outcome. I don't mean that any sense of the it was wrong to want to stay in the European Union but he he gambled that he in some sense he could stop the off after I after it happened and he was utterly defeated. The he doesn't seem to have anything to say about what the future of political response the low parties should be to. This changed political world. Maybe I'm saying the same thing but when I read the speech it says a new kind of government in a new kind of economy. It doesn't say it's not like how speech anyway. What the relationship is between the two? Does the new kind of economy generate new forms of government to new forms of government generate a new kind of economy and my feeling is that he still assumes the government. Leads on this. Somehow that you're somehow going to get a government that reconfigures the economy in a way that makes it Farah for the kind of people that Labor exist to protect but it never explains how the two and it's going to be a messy relationship. Connect to each other and I had the same thought which is Nebraska is. The thing is actually driving a really fundamental question about how the economy relates to form the government and have forms of government can account reconfigure the economy and in some senses camp. I mean that's the other thing that has to be some skepticism here about whether you can just do it. I mean it's it's fine to want to do it but is it really the case in the digital age? The government can reconfigure the economy. But the test is not GONNA BE BLAST. Test is going to be brexit and that she was seeing. I mean that's the way to talk about the other side of politics on. We seeing version of that argument being played. I inside the Conservative Party. Right now. This question. Let's don't make it a little bit. Cummings but this question about whether government really can drive the reconfiguration of the economy or whether the government actually is at the mercy of forces. It can't control basic real question of politics. We're seeing it. We're GONNA learn things about that but it's not going to be blessed lesson now. They clearly two aspects to these kind of dilemmas of the the government. Conservative government faces. The first is a domestic won't because this conservative leadership is taken the view not least because of the electoral geography behind his electoral victory. That some fairly fundamental things about the way in which the British domestic economy works of the change. They hoped that they can use the power. The state to change the regional distributional outcomes not the way that the British economy has worked for the last at least the last thirty years if perhaps no longer includes pushing innovation or not. Just redistribution is. It hasn't Blair Elementary. Which is if we all moving into this. Brave new world of the win is going to be the people who are technologically most nimble. Let's do it out of the North Midland. But it's also obviously. I'm a question in relation to the British Labour markets as well by ending freedom of movement in relation to the citizens and controlling. Who can come in an economic sense to work in the British economy? But it's how to do this at the same time as reconfiguring Britain's economic position in the world and DC's coming to you know obvious tension with each other so if you say well what is it that the government wants it would like judging from the species at least that that it makes it would like eleven upper gender home to use its terms and it wants a global free trade agenda abroad and the way in which I work in the long term at least is is that Bush is going to be have a more adaptable economy and is going to be able to offer some leadership on the trade questions..

Labor Party Liberal Party Brexit Blair Britain Conservative Party Twentieth Century European Union prime minister Green Party Liberal government Greens Kuban wing of Labor Iraq Union Europe Blair Elementary Blairite April United Kingdom
"blair" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

11:42 min | 4 months ago

"blair" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Hello my name's David Runciman and this is talking politics. We're going to get back to talking about British politics today from Blair to Johnson to Brexit. I'm beyond talking. Politics is brought to you in partnership with the London. Review of books and the now has a beautiful new website. Tomorrow mark its fortieth anniversary. Jus- go to alabi DOT CO dot U. K. And you will discover a treasure trove of articles from the last forty years and all the latest writing including Adam shots on the death of Cellini. If you take out a subscription you will get all this and so much more. The print magazine the alabi APP and unlimited access to that archive all for just one pound issue to subscribe visit. Alabi dot me food slashed. Today it is me and Helen. We're in a slightly different location so there might be a bit of background noise. We apologize for that. We've been talking about Europe for a few weeks but British politics has been moving on and we're going to cover a few things starting with the speech that Tony Blair gave last week to celebrate the hundred and twentieth birthday of Labor Party. I believe the birthday is today that they were recording. It was a typical Tony Blair speech and it was really annoying and it was also quite interesting and he said that the Labor Party needs to do three things. If it's going to get back in the game the one goal the coverage was it needs to not go down the cul de sac of identity politics so we are not going to get on the cul de sac. Talking about Tony Blair on identity politics. We're GONNA talk about the other two which didn't get nearly as much coverage. She said the other two things that Labor needs to do Get back into some kind of progressive liberal coalition. The black project has always been to some extent to reunite the Liberal Party and the Labour Party and for our American listeners. We have to be clear here. That liberal doesn't mean US liberal. It means the British Liberal Party by chance. Yesterday I bumped in someone in the street who happened to be listening to our Mike League Naughty episode an American who stopped me and said how can you call him liberal? And he's not for Bernie. I'm I didn't know where to start except to say he's Canadian. Liberal means so many different things in different places the Liberal Progressive Alliance here does not mean Bernie and then the other thing. Blessed Labor needs to do which people in labor and indeed in search democratic parties around the Western World. Been saying for about twenty years is workout opposable account of the future which takes account of the fact that the nature of labor is changing. We are entering the age digital automation and Labor. Needs a story about the future of work and that means a new story about the economy. A news story about the nature of government. All of these things have to be completely reconfigured and this was an implicit criticism of the leadership candidates. All of them. I think they weren't looking for that progressive alliance and they weren't telling a story about a feature. Helen do you buy it? Well I think that depends which aspect to this that we're talking about if we start with the first issue bless plea for there to be cooperation between Labour and the Liberal Democrat so he did sort of touch some conditions in to that in terms of the Liberal Democrats being serious it wasn't just a plea labor as he sees it to be serious. I think several things struck me about it. The first is that Blair has always been alone in this obviously but very keen on this language of being progressive in some sense that doesn't actually differentiate him from people much further to the left within the Labour Party and all of the leadership candidates totally comfortable in the language of progressivism. It's just they don't like the joining with the Democrats. Are we read the speech again this morning? And it's pretty difficult to work out. What Blair actually means by progressive? I mean in some sense. I think that which is quite common with him. It is it means newness because it means the future is the other bit visual of something. That's new against something that's all. I mean that's sort of central the whole idea of in presenting his new labour. And he always you know in his heyday like to identify Labor with future conservatives with the with the past but clearly there are plenty of people who think that being progressive means a lot more than simply being in favor of what's new against what's owed and not really interested in disentangling giving any specific meaning really to his idea of being progressive is but the second thing about it is that it's really strange history. I think that that he's telling because in his version of history that there's some sort of birth defects is the phrase that you use. It goes wrong right at the beginning because labor in the liberals should be the same party at the beginning of the twentieth century on. They they come apart and that this is the ongoing tragedy of the centre-left and progressive politics and by the reason why the Conservatives keep winning election absolutely hot from him no Labour leader. Living Labour leader has managed to but really talking about such a short period of time. I think where you could say that there is this almost mythical liberal labour cooperation which is around the time when liberals were in power and when they were landslide victory. We'd Labor's help all effectively part at the Times. Help nine hundred ninety six. I think about forty eight seats where the Liberals are stand in one thousand nine hundred six and that is a reforming liberal government. Passes some of the early welfare state legislation but that Liberal Party I mean can say several things about it first of all. It's it's going to come apart in the end just like the previous version of liberalism. The Liberal Party did over home rule. It's going to come over the first world war you could also say that the two most consequential people in that liberal government turn out to be Lou. George who in the end when faced with a choice is going to take his version of the liberals into a coalition with the Conservatives as outlast the first world war Winston Churchill who's obviously not some emblem of progressive progressive politics. So you've got a pretty small period of time in which you can say that this sort of mythical corporation that is what is necessary actually is on. It doesn't last. It makes me think of the fact that many people in the Labour party believed that stories being repeated because Nick Clegg given the choice also showed that he was more comfortable forming a government with the Conservatives them with the Labor Party and that as they say it. Betrayal will take a long time to unwind itself. I think Blair also thinks the other missed moment was nineteen ninety-seven. There's always a story. That's told about him that he was completely prepared. In government with a sort of smallish majority to reach out to the Liberal Democrats and then the British people selfishly gave him an absolutely massive majority and say the moment was passed and I think he still believes that he missed a moment. Now and then. There's the question that I was thinking about. Whenever these things it's an alliance or coalition but what's the former politics will cement it. We talked about this. A few weeks ago Blah ninety-seven made a very good case against proportional representation. Which is one route? Great it one of the presiding stories of politics is the idea. There is this anti-tory alliance but it needs a different voting systems. Come to the fore. The other option is the nineteen ninety-six gas which is deals between seats across seas. We just had an election that shows what incredibly fragile thing is the frustration. I have with the Blair account and it connects to the other point about reimagining the economy for the digital age and reimagining. What government would look like? It never reimagined the political system itself. It's always has to be Kinda pass through a very very conventional account of what the goal of politics is which is for political parties under this political system to win power. And we've got one hundred plus years of history showing that doesn't work in the direction of these kinds of alliances and yet he's not because nothing in there about how you'd hold it together. Yeah I think you can also say. Is that what we seen since the one thousand nine hundred eighty s is when you do get a period and I would say that that runs from nine hundred ninety two actually through to probably to two thousand and ten where you do get some tacit corporation between Labor and the Democrat. Voters basically a tactical voting in ways. That make it difficult for the conservative. So that I say it begins in ninety two because you've got much reduced conservative majority of pretty much the same share of the vote in Nineteen ninety-two. It's dependent on the low party being led by somebody like tiny black so if you get the conditions that have quite a lot of Liberal Democrat Labour Corporation than you have a Labor Party. That doesn't actually need the Liberal Democrats not to any considerable extent as soon as you have an election like the ones in two thousand fifteen and two thousand and nineteen where you have very considerable skepticism from potential anti-tory voters about the Labour leader. Whether that's because the significantly far to the left like Corbin or because of the Scottish nationalist issue like in two thousand fifteen with Ed milliband you actually make per difficult for quite a number of potential debris Democrat voters to vote Liberal Democrat because faced with a choice between Labour leader on the conservative state. They go with conservatives. I think that that goes back to the fact that if you look at what happened then to the Liberal Party after the first World War once he starts having these very heavy electoral defeats if you look in the in the nineteen twenties when it makes some recovery particularly in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine does so by taking votes away conservatives and not by taking votes away from the Labor Party so the idea that nobody can compete for itself and then offer corporation to liberal voters whether the old liberal voters all only put Democrat voters ignores the fine that the liberals and the Liberal Democrats have got complicated relationship with the Conservative Party and indeed with potential conservative voters. Another thing that's true. Is that the great wedge in this Mythical Progressive Liberal coalition was the one that Blair introduced by fighting the Iraq war. That's what broke it. So you said this period from ninety two to two thousand and ten but there is this huge dividing line in that period which is two thousand and three which both reinvigorates a Liberal Democrats missiles create this narrative. That's still playing out in the Labor Party about betrayal and what went wrong and is another version..

Liberal Democrats Tony Blair Liberal Party Labor Labor Party British Liberal Party Labour Party Liberal Progressive Alliance Conservative Party Helen Labour Corporation the Times David Runciman Labour cul de sac London print magazine Europe
"blair" Discussed on The Dish With Trish

The Dish With Trish

09:41 min | 4 months ago

"blair" Discussed on The Dish With Trish

"Fan a true crime? Then you've got to check out the court junkie podcast. Imagine being wrongfully convicted for a crime. You didn't commit or imagine your child's killer still on the loose even there's enough evidence for an arrest the court junkie podcast shines a light on the injustices our judicial system by delving into court documents attending trials and interviewing those closest to these cases. Be sure to subscribe on spotify. Podcast one apple podcasts. And many other podcasts. So you can get new episodes. Every week not brief years handling a gay icon without having to be so activists. How did you have you gone to the The Britney art thing no have you okay but like you can't the free movement. That's what see I went. Because he invited me opening nights or go to it and I hadn't really thought through and then after a does like I wonder how much she was involved where this is really her consensual type situation. I'm like she hasn't Gone Gone Gone. She's being held captive with her conservative. Yeah serve a tour ship. This is going to be a whole. Britney thing now. Everyone's coming because I could cry. I Love Brittany. There was two separate divisions of my life. It's like as a kid. It was like Britney Spears like I grew up in it was like people magazine Brittany industrial the show and then once they hit like thirteen fourteen. It was like a Gaga has everything I love Gaga as still up Brittany but like Britney hold such a place in my heart and the Holford anything like so tragic like and you don't know exactly how much of it destroyed much isn't but there's nothing you know his true that it's like grow. I know I know things you can never talk about it like you know behind the kill talking about it. Sometimes because that that's how crazy and hardcore it is and I know you told me after the bottom. Yeah I can tell you own. Maybe I get bogged. You don't have to tell me. Every young people listen everywhere even heard. There's everyone listening to it's like so it's also scary and conspiracy theorist but it's like it's real man it's a real thing and it's very God. I'm so sorry. No it was not a church stop. I'm so sorry it's gender neutral use. I was like dude like that's what I was saying. Okay Oh my God I have. A friend called me due to cancel. I can't up one of those people that go back into a video you can. You call me kicked me again. That's the bucks dot com projecting. Sorry know it's it's real. What are we talking about bringing bugged to? That's real. That is actually really not because like so I got inside. People know where I let people come to the front people drive out. It wouldn't take much and you don't WanNa say wouldn't take much for like someone to find out which apartment I've been in the building and then put something put a camera like. Oh it's easier than that. They can bug your car easily like you know so like even like like outside the in your complex. That's why I moved on my complex. Bugs like he was so scary. Oh Yeah Makarios booked for years and I didn't WanNa Bucko There was a thing with a guy like I never talked about this either but there was something like a politician that like. I was like dating briefly here. He's a California politician. Not like a big enough trump or something like that. You fucked trump too shabby all the way I would probably honestly I mean. I don't know anything. I don't know anything about politics so I don't know about them. Does he like Maryland? Ask you know what I mean. You have a little scandal. Hits your biggest scandal that you've been in my biggest people who say to block face with dark makeup. No not even make up it. Was You know the boss? Your face masks from Sephora. Oh my God these people tweet the picture on there like Oh Blairite musician. I'm like Oh my God psycho people say that about me my videos I see so tan and I have like the tennis and like your remember that era. Yeah I love. I still love Tampa. It's awful for you but Kathy will say crazy shit that you spray foam yes. It's coming off now but I actually embracing illness to now. Like I'm saying I go. I maybe I just have like during the mcaa vibe literally just meet you know He. He thought he was transgender. To did you ever read about that. But doesn't surprise me. A lot of these like rockers. Especially from that era. It's like they have like feminine haircuts. They're kind of feminine away their voice as and they were like this is the pays me. Well he actually thought he was. When I was a kid. Everyone said he was a girl he goes so for me. I was wrong he goes. I literally thought I was for a very long time. And he never really been talking about he just recently. I didn't know that either and I was like this is why Phil Can. Actually he'd literally transgender. I remember growing up and like I used to be a fan. I mean it's still NFL. Star I remember seeing mice based like feels like a whole different era the whole different world like different universe but I remember being like someday he's GonNa Transition. I remember saying that you're saying keep like hot considered it when he was younger. Yeah he's clearly going to write and I respect that I respect people who like let themselves be feminine or Masculine Women. Without having to feel the need to transition to right. Well I guess that's where it confuses me when is it considered trans like why we're so many straight people or gay people offended when it wasn't even about their culture or their people get. Trans people being offended but the funny thing is not very many people were there was a couple Trans youtubers. I came from but you didn't even. I didn't come for you very hard. I would just more so it was more so like a like A. I don't get it and more so like I like her but I don't get this type of thing like you can watch it. Wasn't that bad. You have to allow enough room in your mind for the possibility that maybe it is really how they're feeling right. He's not really. And then you're an asshole if you do come at them and she's not actual. Yeah and I feel like there's no way to convince you only know obviously people in my life like even wanted you to call me. I was like I was balling. I'm like I don't know like this was maybe mistake but this is how I feel. I don't know does you saw you feel things getting out getting money. And she's like she's like no she does. She does youtube but she doesn't do like she used to. I think just like one every couple and she doesn't she's not I wouldn't either if I I would. I would for fine. I wouldn't grind like Ryan. Yeah Oh yeah. We're like on all the time. Erlich pay Nina Video Anita well. She's not. I never really considered her too much of a trans activist. I mean I guess I guess she is. She doesn't talk about it a lot more. So just like socialite right like when I met her like we I went to. I was Jaclyn actually and we went to her table at the Abbey or something and like she was like dancing on the people like Paris. Hilton thing. Yeah okay so that's because I never. I don't know what activists conflict I don't know all that is. I feel like in Africa. Someone who tries to change things right and bring awareness to certain things and I feel like she doesn't. I'm anxious. I don't know I'm so bad I love. Gd I know she's like icon Erica. She was one of the first youtubers to trout. I watched her before I like. I remember watching. Her transition in her movie came out after a transition but before that I watch videos so she's one of the lake the Trans. Oh Yeah Oh my God. It wasn't that I mean I remember your maybe you remember. Do you remember like I really like your like Greg and so when that happened. What was shook? That's what I'm saying like nothing surprised me you know. Now I feel like it's so easy easy but it's a lot easier for people to come out. 'cause it's I mean. Some people can sit like accuse me of drain because it was tricky. Because it's trying to eat but I'm like a lot of people are talking about it more than anything. I think it had a discussion about it. I think a lot more people bringing awareness to transgender. And you know what I will say. I don't feel bad for making video. Kept it up. Because so many people came to me and said they felt some more ways and had some more stories. I was like okay. Well at least opening dialogue of gender fluidity and stuff like that I don't really consider myself gender fluid but that's a different thing. Now I think in your case is more like I said earlier. Not TO REHASH. But it's more of just like it's an ranges like mine was about transition then girls is like it's there but it's not like Shit. I have to go into US. Astronaut Condition Right now. We'll yeah that's like what was it. Like girlfriend. Said he like makes people transition because his his girlfriend transition did not like going by name and stuff. Like will the child's going to prison though? Actually I don't I'm I don't really understand what he did. That was illegal. He moved an underage girl into his home Who was having family issues and then had sex with her underage the second she turned eighteen. He groomed her from the age of fifteen eighteen. And then the second year in the house right. I have never talked with us because like too much like I. I watched it. And he's like a relevant. He's he's relevant but in a bad way. You know what I mean like. I'm just like the hoping he scares me. I don't think I've ever been scared of somebody like scares me. I don't know we never knew my win But Jacqueline Glenn She j- you know her. She hated me at the beginning of my omega. Because she's like atheists and used to make a lot of Christian content. Yeah she came from me. I feel like she controls. Do I mean I like her now? She knows the game. Yeah her a little expert from that doesn't like a native American. He said I was his dream girl like a couple of years ago and it was me dressed as Gerard Way and I was like oh it's social repose. He's like my dream girl and it was like Nina suit and tie with my thank. You cheated on her awful. Wait really you know any of this. I knew he lived in like bump up Virginia and she lived there with him and I was like. Oh a weird fucking scenario. When I met her they were dating and I saw him like in full costume. Bitcoin and I was like. That's Oh lucky hot. No I think he's not as we have different things..

Britney Spears Nina spotify apple Gerard Way Maryland Tampa Africa youtube US Brittany industrial tennis Phil Can Sephora Jacqueline Glenn Gaga Kathy California Masculine Women
"blair" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:31 min | 4 months ago

"blair" Discussed on The Current

"That this is winding down right away. And I think there will be a time difference between when the government says we've run out of time and then when something actually happens so I think we we are days away still from a solution but I would also say that. The lack of patience is not just from premiers. Not just from Canadians. It's also from inside the Prime Minister's own caucus. He certainly heard from all of them on Wednesday real concerns about how this get solved a lot of anxiety around that and trying to reflect back some of the concerns of Canadian so the pressure on him is really coming from everywhere and the government still believes as you heard there from Minister Blair that the way out of this is to talk although that move of the RCMP again. Symbolically is is really significant if they can actually if they can actually convinced the wet. Sowetan of that too. This is a minority government and the pressure comes not just from premieres across the country from the opposition as well have listened to what Andrew Scheer leader of the Conservative Party said yesterday and question period these anti-free-market anti energy activists have nothing to do with reconciliation. It is completely in just for up to fifteen hundred people to have to go without a paycheck because some people are breaking the law. Andrew Scheer has used the word week a number of times to describe the prime minister. How I mean. That's a loaded word. Obviously this is a political issue in a minority government but how damaging is all of this to Justin Trudeau? Well it's obviously a test of leadership and it's a test of leadership for prime minister that has now been tested on three major crises in the past two months they he is convening the incident response. Group this group of ministers and officials that he gets around the table. He's doing that this morning to discuss the downing of the plane in Iran Corona virus. And this I mean that's all still happening and it's all happened within two months there. There's a lot going on here. And there's certainly a test of of how he's government response to this and him in particular but I would say that this one is probably more directly related to him or closer to him because it is an issue that that he has talked about so much that he feels so strongly about which is reconciliation and trying to fix things with the indigenous peoples of this country. So there's a I think a recognition that if this doesn't go right if they can't get this to where they want it to be through talk and dialogue than there are some questions about what that means for the overall agenda reconciliation and I'm not suggesting it's dead or or anything like that or they can't proceed with other things that they're doing important things that they're doing but but I do think that the goodwill of Canadians and indigenous people might run out this opportunity because it is an opportunity in some ways doesn't actually bear fruit and that is something that the prime minister will wear. If this can't be solved proper given that are you surprised that he hasn't made an effort to go to northern BC and meet with hereditary chiefs directly. And I don't know whether that invitation would be extended but but he's he's had ministers outs delegated to deal with this people. Say this is so important to you. Why aren't you taking this on? Well listen I mean sure absurd something that they've talked about and they've considered for now they're leaving it with the ministers and I think the reason for that is is pretty simple if we get into a place where the prime minister is going off around the country. Every time there is a protest or a blockade around a project That certainly sends a signal about how you get his attention and how you potentially deal with projects like this you know. Tm X. is purchased and cleared but there are many first nations for of them anyway. That are against that project if they see that this is effective in some way. What's happening here? Who's to say that they won't try same thing and get the prime minister's attention that way they're they're making a decision on oil sense it probably the end of next week so you have to be careful. I think how you leverage the prime minister's own credibility and capital here But is it possible that at some point that becomes needed? Perhaps but I think that. That's that's not the first consideration Fischler. Rosie thank you thanks. Rosemary Barton the CBS's chief political correspondent. She spoke with us from Ottawa. For more CBC PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Andrew Scheer Minister Blair RCMP Conservative Party Rosemary Barton Ottawa Rosie CBS Iran BC
"blair" Discussed on The Current

The Current

08:42 min | 4 months ago

"blair" Discussed on The Current

"Resolve it peacefully. And we've been supporting the efforts of the police. Ultimately they still have the the jurisdictional responsibility to enforce that injunction. And bring those barricades down. Everybody's been working hard to do that. Peaceably as possible. I think the the the steps taken by the RCMP. Today's ago are very significant and do create a set of circumstances that allow for peaceful resolution of this matter. But if the barricades need if the barricades don't come down what will you do? Well I think we will always consider the first of all our commitment to reconciliation and to address the underlying concerns and injustices that need to be addressed in that agenda will remain. We'll continue our commitment to continue to work on those those issues but we have tried very hard over the past two weeks to bring about the conditions that will allow for a peaceful resolution of these blockages ultimately if if that fails that the police have other resources available to them at their options in the use of of of of their legal authorities to remove those barricades I understand that the police have been you know. Patient and working hard themselves to try to resolve this peaceably. Will you send a deadline? If for the the barricades to be removed and I will tell you the urgency of getting this done. I'm strongly of the belief this needs to happen quickly and and and I believe barricades should come down. So why would you so? Would you set a deadline for the barricades to be down? The difficulty of setting deadlines is is is deadlines. Aren't necessarily how help wanted in a in a negotiation. I think everyone who is involved in this discussion has to understand that. There is an urgency to a peaceful resolution but it has to happen very quickly. The impact of these packages unacceptable Canadians. It's impacting innocent cages across the country. And it needs to inform both sides discussions. We understand that. Some of the many of the concerns that have been raised by the people of. What's The wet end on the blockades? We've tried in. I think the PF demonstrated a very professional approach to helping to resolve the issues in dispute but there is an urgency to to to resolving this as quickly as possible and the remaining case are unacceptable and need to come down and the remaining seconds that we have people outside of Edmonton showed up in pickup trucks and brought the Bra blockades down themselves. Are you concerned that there will be more of that sort of activity? I'm always concerned about an escalating tension and confrontation at at these sites and again. I know the goal of the police and certainly the goal of our government is to bring this about bring about a peaceful resolution of of this dispute to end those blockades to get the trains moving again and then to continuing our commitment to work with indigenous communities to address issues of reconciliation. That's the way we're committed to all of those things and mostly we're committed to a peaceful resolution of this matter but we've got to get those trains moving. Canadians are depending on bill. Blair good to speak with you. Thank you bill Blair. Administer public safety and emergency preparedness Rosemary. Barton the one Saturday morning in June. Nineteen ninety nine. Fifteen Year Olds Menia. Non Devel- disappeared in never came home. No one has ever been charged with her murder but there was a suspect never command like him. I'm Michelle Shepherd this season on uncover. I don't recall making that Com. That's fine if you don't recall it but I'm telling you that's what you told me. Uncover Sherman available now wherever you get your podcast. Abc's chief political correspondent. She's been listening in Rosemead wanting to you. What do you make of what you just heard from? Bill Blair the public safety minister a couple of things. Strike me there. I think there was a small shift in language. Both from Minister Blair and from other ministers that we've been hearing for from over the past twelve hours or so when he said the time has come for the barricades to come down That's a very different kind of statement than what we were hearing much earlier this week which was really just a call for patients although that that continues and and it seems to me that that shift in language we should probably read that as to your point of is there a deadline as as we are coming to the end of what the government has a deadline because they certainly have one minister. Miller has said that and others. They're not going to talk about it publicly because to to Minister Blair's point. That probably won't help negotiations but they certainly know that we are in the last days of this in terms of trying to talk it through what that means in terms of how the actually solve it. I'm not sure but I would say that they that they know that this is coming to ahead. Is that happening now because the RCMP has offered to withdraw from territory. Yeah I mean I think that was a significant move. The government sees it as such and now they hope that the wet Sowetan see it as such and more importantly frankly that the Mohawk community sees it that way you know that that has become sort of the flashpoint and obviously the biggest issue the blockade that has to come down right away. It's clear that the issues around what's happening on the wet. Sowetan territory are not going to solved this week or next week. These are much longer bigger longstanding issues so the priority for the government is to get the blockade down if they can or if they feel that if they can suggest that they have complied or answered one of the Web's weapons demands or conditions There's a hope that the Mohawk will see that and that they will be able to then pull away the Wetzel wet. And there's a few of those chiefs there today. They're meeting with the Mohawks near my last night and this meeting. I mean although all sides are saying it's really just a meaning of to give. Thanks I think the hope is that it's much more than that that that becomes a way for the two sides these two first nations to discuss how to deescalate this and for the Mohawks to say we've done. We've done a good job raising awareness and now we can let this go. That would be hope. I think one of the reasons why there might be that change in tone is because the prime minister is facing heat from premiers and territorial leaders over how he's handled this. There was a conference call last night. How did that go yeah so he? He spoke with him last night after they all convened the day before and expressed a lot of frustration. Some coming from quarters that you would expect people that don't love the Prime Minister Anyway. But the premiums and the premiums Berta last night's call from what we understand went fine. I would say but that the premier's did again talk about running out of patience and I would say one premier in particular has become problematic. And that's that's the premier of Quebec Hospital. Go who yesterday not only wanted that injunction to happen. Those injunctions were issued in Ceylon Bio to get the blockade. Remove there but made it very clear that he's quite happy for the police for the Celtics Quebec to come in and enforce that injunction. Let's have a listen. Well let's have listen. Here's what I said yesterday about. What's going on along Montreal south shore? We hope to have a peaceful solution but right now this blockade is illegal. It as a major impact on our economy on life of people Right now some people are losing their job. So it's about time. We have a plan to make sure that the laws are respected. Rosemary Barton how does that complicate? What the Prime Minister and government are trying to do. Well I mean it's the exact thing that everyone else is trying to avoid and I. It's a curious position from premier in a province. That is all too familiar with blockades and injunctions and calling the police and things going wrong happened in one thousand nine hundred for seventy eight days and police officer was killed. So it's a little curious that the premier seems so quick to go to that solution particularly given that blockade has not even been very long. I think I don't think there's any one. Certainly no one that I've spoken to that thinks that escalation will result in something good there too many historical examples of how these things have sort of spun out of. Control that said everyone is aware of the The real impact starting to be felt whether it be the layoffs or the people who can't get products and goods and the fact that this is probably going on a little too long that said I don't. I don't think.

Minister Blair Prime Minister RCMP Rosemary Barton bill Blair prime minister Wetzel wet Abc Michelle Shepherd Rosemead murder Edmonton Montreal Quebec Hospital Sherman officer Miller Ceylon Bio Berta
"blair" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

Yes, Girl!

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"blair" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

"Life in New Orleans. So I have made a very special guest joins me day. Hi, Tiffany, acetate, our producer. Be very shy. You guys would be best producer in the world. She said passage she helps all this goodness happened behind the scenes. She is the reason that Corey ni- politic either every week. And you know, she's the one you kind of here, like in the background. We're like what's with that? And with this intivists, always there, helping us both talent like everything guys. She's always laughing in the background. So today, I was like Corey is my here. You're not gonna have me talking to myself tip tickets Aguirre's tips, here. We're going to, you know easier and slowly not too much KiKi behavior. Girl. Hey, how are you? Good. How are you? Trying. All right. But let me not embarrassed if any further you guys, we have a very good show for you. It's a tree a real tree. Blair Underwood is here. Icon layer again, Lehrer Underwood is here. Y'all gorgeous ladies. You're welcome. Fellas this still much to learn. But ladies again, you are welcome. Ted was he not just everything all kinds of goodness. Gorgeous kind, smart funny. Great sense of humor. He still looks thirty serious like what happened? He and Angela Bassett just need to quit. This is starting to get like I'm starting to be like you guys are about I just. just haven't the formula. That's it. That's all I want. I don't ask for much. I would go to the jungle and get the formula myself and the share it. We just need a map. Mike X makes us back guy. No. But seriously Blair, Underwood, his starring in or he plays in one of the episodes in when they see us, which is Eva do grenades, brand new four part mini series on Netflix out today. It is very powerful. If you guys haven't heard about it is documenting the story of the central park five who we now call the exonerating five. Yeah. Which, I mean, most black people know this story, it's a horrific story happen to these young men. They spent how many years thirty no almost twenty years, some of them. So the own the sixteen year old spent nearly twelve years in jail, and then the other one spent over a decade. So finally did not commit as young kids. They were teenagers limit happen wrongly accused because of their race because they win the wrong. As at the wrong time. And we know the story and we also know that the current president of the United States took out a full page ad asking that. They try for their crimes was what did he ask? What the death penalty ask for New York to bring back the death penalty just to penalize these men? You guys I don't get me started. It's the heartbreak Israel, the hurt Israel. But as usual are able to Rene is telling very important story and using her art to help heal we're all going to be tuning into when they see us, you'll hear the interview Corey saw the documentaries, and she is like it's heavy you're going to really want to settle into to fear. She's saying, yeah, she said you're going to want to, like blackout sometime over the entire weekend. Absolutely. Just take it all in. No. But sadly, Blair Underwood comes in. And he inquiry really talk about the power of the film. I can't wait to see. I wanted to wait. Sometimes I'd like to wait and you know, we get a chance to see things in advance. Yeah. But I like to experience them when everybody else does. I cannot.

producer Lehrer Underwood Corey Angela Bassett New Orleans Ted Netflix Blair United States New York Mike X Rene president Israel Aguirre Eva sixteen year twelve years twenty years
"blair" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Was on a business call for work and this is gonna work to do something in a partner they're called and was like oh and by the way blair you're doing so great on this call without your ritalin because i tweeted about running out of my ruin description oh my god and i was like okay so i know that you know that i tweeted about running on my relative prescription but this is work like i felt so dragged why so i think that like those older generation person i think that it's a mix like my mom calling the rock haw and then the rock responding i'm like okay so that means they're friends because when you can video your friends in real life that's what we learned it so i'm like okay so this is very i was like sorry mr the rock my mom didn't mean to tag you could i ask you i want to go back just a moment because i feel like you might have something helpful to say in this for me i i don't think i will ever be faith was a really important part of my life the faith community that i grew up in was really important part of my life but i don't know that i will ever be able to be a part of another faith community because i am so mad at the humans that have created systems around these are these are essentially faith is ideas that people shared with each other about what we're all doing here that's the whole point of it right and those ideas are collected its collective wisdom of human wisdom and that is so valuable right because we only have like however many years we have on this planet so we should learn from the people who left something behind we should try to get a head start and read the things that people thought before we will always do better when we like share yeah and gather knowledge but i'm so mad at the manipulation of like it or the how faiths by into power structure that i can't abide like i don't think even something that was not the catholic church like a some a christian faith that was really welcoming to queer folks or really did a lot of like racial justice or like buddhism or something like that that when folks are more new agey they're like i practiced buddhism because there's not problem is there isn't a q even buddhists persecute folks but i totally hear you like what do you do with that you personally with any anger it's val unless it's like random racial anger that you're like you know no no unless it's random racial and then you should go fuck yourself okay sure okay yes but i think that with any anger it's necessary for you to allow yourself to feel it and to understand where it's coming from and why it's there so you seem to understand where the you know the anger is coming from and so i think it's really valid and i think for me the way i do everything and it's because my mom like studied social work and psychology and my dad's mental health but anytime i was like mad at anything at school they would be like well what was their point of view what did they go through that day why did they say that and i'd be like why are we sympathizing with the person who was a dick to me today mom and she's like because it makes you more compassionate person and i do that now like it helps me a lot with when i deal with trolls and stuff but as far as like a religious institution i was really mad at christianity for a long time that's actually why i stopped being a christian because i was learning about this you know a grew up with the sense of like a black radical christian tradition and then i went to louisiana where there's a lot of white christian racists and i'm trying to figure her out how are they parsing this idea that like martin luther king found justice from christianity but you're using christianity to say that black people deserve to be enslaved and so like it also became even more complex and i'm going to these black churches in louisiana and seeing a picture of white jesus and i'm thinking about like there was a sermon about police brutality and how we have to be compassionate to our oppressors and i just couldn't get that image out of my mind like a group of black people and then white jesus and then.

partner blair
"blair" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on RobinLynne

"The blair iran two the in the performed there the two ubuntu two two two two eight.

blair iran
"blair" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Beck bennett it's like yannon blades okay blair yeah blair blair is man's name not a great man's name venues blair underwood yup and they had vigili cut out every piece of this did it old school style and i appreciate it that so barely blood hey also next i maybe blair america i don't know khan blair blair budd blair plain exclamation point all right we are you've got the end so how about kong blair give credit to the what's your name sir it's still stop her film shoot i went out there and i don't understand what's happening in my eyes went to the largest thing and the person holding the largest inc said you got to take it and i reflexively went okay yeah this is why people play a lot of mind games with my guess what is that thing say on it it's it's it's a beautifully crafted poster for meet the robinson's from nick and sarah that that was both nick and sarah who did that and say what it says on the back i don't see that yeah we say what about this it this very packs snacks on it then you can have the snacks saw the snacks you want them yeah you can have those that's paola yeah they call that yeah i might have those snacks all right so now i just i just keep this near me put it on the ground okay do i need something with that to keep this perfect right there okay you guys are doing great.

Beck blair blair robinson nick sarah
"blair" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Blair whoa the who in oman hello the new law dji gene and the way the no one the la two ew the here's the big joe yurum spectacular rush go back to february bali seventeen joe was still working with us in a lady name natalie one thousand dollars that a find somebody who needs one thousand dollars give someone who listens.

Blair oman natalie one thousand dollars
"blair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Laura and now from the university of chicago institute of politics in cnn the axe files with your host david axelrod tony blair burst on the scene in the 1990s as the leader of new labour the labour party in britain and led the labour party to victory in 1997 after which he served ten very consequential years as prime minister of great britain during those years he help modernize a social safety network propelled britain's economy forward and then ultimately ran into significant opposition for his close relationship with george w bush and alliance over the iraq war i sat down in london last week with tony blair to talk about today's political environment and the future under brexit tony blair it's great great to be with you here in london you know you are a globally known person but a lot of people who listen to this podcast certainly in america are not all that familiar with your personal story in in in preparing and know you've written autobiography and so on in preparing for this i was struck by some things in your in your biography particularly how you grew up because you had a very sort of interesting childhood that changed very dramatically and i just wanted to ask you about the about your folks yes i was brought up actually in a in a very conservative household by my father was a member of the conservative party my my father come from very poor background himself he was a foster child in a pool potted glasgow.

Laura labour party prime minister britain london tony blair america foster child glasgow university of chicago institut cnn david axelrod george w bush iraq
"blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Affidavit

Pop Culture Affidavit

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Affidavit

"No it yeah there's nothing wrong with their it's just waged are criticizing it online all level that basically you're saying it select because you didn't like it 'cause you're not into it is basically taking away you know the people that are into it i just think that there is something it if you're indo horror films go stories you're probably appreciate the spill a lot more than if you're not basically yeah and this can segue into we're gonna talk a little bit about the sequels now i know that you haven't seen other thurman i'm actually going to talk about that one really really believe briefly but uh because it's not really were watching but that last year it really is let's take it was either 2015 in 2016 early 2016 uh the movie blair which came out third in eastern simply a quote series of blair which films um it had been made under a fake title called the woods and it wasn't until a panel at san diego comecon when they showed the sizzle real trailer whatever the theory actually revealed that this view was a third blair which movie it's a found footage filmed that is essentially an and before we were on eric i i basically said it's the highlight its highlander the final dimension wary is essentially a rehash of the entire first film except the conceit is that the the main character drags his friends along um his girlfriend's documentary filmmaker and he's looking he's heather donahue's younger brother he's looking for her.

thurman blair heather donahue san diego
"blair" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"blair" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Um somehow have a connected story over a bunch of different bodies and types i'm not sure how that would work my my my friend pitch by fam fiction would be a scientists assent through time tracked down sam beckett has a new machine to let him jump from time to time under his own control but maybe not be with obscene choices at which body goes into the cops a comedy can ensue and that we he's a search miss a manhunt through time would be my with my fan fiction but otherwise yeah it's such a great pd con that's a great comfort food you know what you're going to get you to episode concept that um i'm not a show and we looks like but same time i'm alba quantum leap out happily washable and last up a movie that could become a tv series apparently a blair witch tv show is in the works but doing needed then yeah so there's another question it may be a unanswerable at this point but uh on the diminishing returns podcast the blair witch project codirector eduardo sanchez said that there have actually been some rumblings about a possible blair which tv show that may you know sort of revitalize the franchise in ah in td form i his coats are for us it's a very natural thing to go and say hey list you afraican blair which show and you can say it's from the original creators and we can bring in a whole bunch of interesting directors to direct episodes and the podcast hosts said would you see that as an anthology thing with prequel episodes are would all be found footage and he responded well you know i can't really discuss i think that the idea of a blair rich in theology has always been very just a really interesting thing you're close you're in the ballpark you know i think it might be one of those things that might be the more you think about it you're like that might be perfect a tv show you know so we'll see what happens but i think that's the next big thing for blair which probably tv so he also clarifies that lionsgate.

sam beckett eduardo sanchez blair lionsgate codirector