35 Burst results for "Blah"

Work in a Heel, Get Real

The Fashademix Podcast

02:17 min | 2 d ago

Work in a Heel, Get Real

"I found an article about a woman in two thousand fifteen who was actually sent home from work without pay after she refused to wear high heels and this received loads of media coverage around it and this woman essentially started an online petition which overtime gained a hundred and fifty thousand signatures to make it illegal for women to have to wear high heels in the workplace. The government actually rejected any recommendations that would require this legal change and they placed emphasis on the existing law saying that it was sufficient enough to protect women who are subjected to discrimination against the dress code blah blah blah of in two thousand and eighteen. The government equalities office published new guidance on dress codes for employees and employers as well as job applicants saying that the guidance is cleared that address code that makes significant more demands of female employees than if they're male colleagues will be unlawful and i think that's where we are at in today's society is that equality thing and i was thinking about this and i was thinking asking staff to a makeup isn't as bad as asking people to wear heels however the more i think about it the more think it's on par with each other because if you've got a perfect complexion and you'll graced with perfect skin and you don't need to wear makeup not me then it's not me i have to travel on but or if you have acne and you want to keep your paws as clear as possible. Why should people dictate to you on your apparent saying you know saying that. I don't think a uniform. This is a bad thing. Like i don't think a uniform is a bad thing. But i think there needs to be boundaries like if some days i don't because i'm trying to look after my skin a bit better if i if i were into work my boss said you have to wear more make up you have to wear heels. Well why what. If i've got a foot problem or trying a skin condition or all these things. Why do we have to be dictated this way but then it got me thinking god where where does it stop. So we couldn't and we wouldn't lecture in trainers and a hoodie

Government Equalities Office
Jason Harris on the June 2021 Trailers

Piecing It Together Podcast

02:00 min | Last week

Jason Harris on the June 2021 Trailers

"Jason harris is back with us to look at some more trailers for the month of june. Jason how's it going a fun you do not know how that messes up the compressor when it's trying to figure out levels and all that and do my job for me but i i love you so it's okay jews to talk dark okay so as we've been doing the last few months before we get into this month trailers let's take a quick look back at the month of may and which the movies that we cover that we actually got a chance to see and i will say that This is i think the most that. I've actually gotten to see at any of these months. Recent memory so let's start off with mainstream. Did you ever get around to that. Never heard of it. Well i it's pretty. I don't know if i would call it good or bad but it's it's it's a very weird messy movie but Interesting to say the least. I go there. Oh wait for it. It didn't seem like wanting to go to this heaters for. Yeah that that is fair. Wrath of man guy ritchie. What did you think of that. I think you saw that right. Never heard of it. No i saw that one. It was completely blah and like you know. It wasn't horrible but it wasn't good and it was two hours and didn't have any style that you would expect from gingrich year and he's swagger that you would expect from jason nathanson. Yeah i was shocked that it was a guy ritchie movie like. I knew that obviously going in but like there's nothing that you know any of his hallmarks. None of them are there and it does feel like a direct to video version of a jason state. the movie. but that's about all i can really say for. It definitely wasn't too good. The paper tigers. I did not see. Did you see the never heard of it. No i didn't see

Jason Harris Jason Ritchie Jason Nathanson Gingrich
How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

Environment: NPR

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

"In the foothills of california's sierra nevada mountains sits rock haven. It's a small private holding a forest of cedar fir and pine trees and for years. It was a ticking fire time bomb as throughout the west natural fire had been suppressed for a century. We had it rough even six times as much fuel on the ground as the average for california where you could imagine. That's a tele of the stuff that can burn. Jennifer lives in the east bay. She's the fourth generation of her family to use a cabin near shaver lake and is part of the association that collectively owns the land. She and her husband worked hard to convince everyone else. They had to do something about fire risk. We've been talking for members for you know maybe almost twenty years but many of the families were reluctant a century ago. A lumber company cut most of the trees in the area. When the forest came back people loved the trees and wanted to protect them. The idea that it was good to cut crowded trees and set prescribed. Fires was a non-starter we had ruled in our association. With you better tree and you know tweezers take it and blah blah. but by twenty fourteen. There was a new threat during a punishing drought bark. Beetles began killing entire stands of trees making the fire risk. Even worse mu white finally convinced her neighbors to hire a forester julianne stewart. Told them taking action was urgent. So it was really neat process and kind of bringing dot group of people together to realize like we're on the precipice we have an emergency. Our trees are dying. We need to do something. People compromised and made a plan then came the question of money. We'd never would've been able to pay for it all of that. In a timely manner can run up to five thousand dollars an acre to clean up recover and maintain a forest. That would mean about a million dollars for rock

Rock Haven Sierra Nevada Mountains California Shaver Lake East Bay Mu White Jennifer Julianne Stewart
How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

Environment: NPR

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

"In the foothills of california's sierra nevada mountains sits rock haven. It's a small private holding a forest of cedar fir and pine trees and for years. It was a ticking fire time bomb as throughout the west natural fire had been suppressed for a century. We had it rough even six times as much fuel on the ground as the average for california where you could imagine. That's a tele of the stuff that can burn. Jennifer lives in the east bay. She's the fourth generation of her family to use a cabin near shaver lake and is part of the association that collectively owns the land. She and her husband worked hard to convince everyone else. They had to do something about fire risk. We've been talking for members for you know maybe almost twenty years but many of the families were reluctant a century ago. A lumber company cut most of the trees in the area. When the forest came back people loved the trees and wanted to protect them. The idea that it was good to cut crowded trees and set prescribed. Fires was a non-starter we had ruled in our association. With you better tree and you know tweezers take it and blah blah. but by twenty fourteen. There was a new threat during a punishing drought bark. Beetles began killing entire stands of trees making the fire risk. Even worse mu white finally convinced her neighbors to hire a forester julianne stewart. Told them taking action was urgent. So it was really neat process and kind of bringing dot group of people together to realize like we're on the precipice we have an emergency. Our trees are dying. We need to do something. People compromised and made a plan then came the question of money. We'd never would've been able to pay for it all of that. In a timely manner can run up to five thousand dollars an acre to clean up recover and maintain a forest. That would mean about a million dollars for rock

Rock Haven Sierra Nevada Mountains California Shaver Lake East Bay Mu White Jennifer Julianne Stewart
Best Tips for Finding Focus

A Slob Comes Clean

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Best Tips for Finding Focus

"Your i feel like i have turbo t pad lately. I mean accelerated intensified blah blah blah t pad to pad stands for time passage awareness disorder and. That is made up by me. But it's a real thing. And i've actually had people say. Oh it's called this in such such scientific way. Anyway i call it t pad It is just my reality. Like i have a hard time knowing how long it's been since i did something and so a lot of the things that i set up are either to let me know how long it spend since i cleaned the toilet or mops or whatever Those routines my my things that i talk about in how to manage your home without losing your mind. One of my books I i set those things up to fight my own t pad. I also eliminate decisions from the process because meaning things like daily routines. I call them. Pre made decisions they are. These are the things that i have to do. I have to do the dishes every single day. I don't get to reason if it needs to be done or not. Like because my t pad will flare. And i'll be like. Oh i did the dishes and yet it's actually been two or three days in whatever you know like i go. Nope dishes have to be done. So all these things that i have set up so many of them are specifically to just combat the reality of the fact that i suffer from time passage awareness disorder. But we're talking about time has awareness disorder turbo right now. I mean y'all twenty twenty has done an. I know it's twenty twenty one now. I don't know that. I knew that when i said the word. Twenty twenty two seconds ago but anyway has done a number on my pat. I mean it has accelerated it. It has turbo. Fight it i don. I am having such a hard time having any awareness of time

Interview With Kendra Scott, Entrepreneur, Founder of Kendra Scott Jewelry

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:06 min | Last month

Interview With Kendra Scott, Entrepreneur, Founder of Kendra Scott Jewelry

"We are so excited to have kendra scott joining us for skim. You've commencement which is also a live taping for our podcast skimmed from the couch. Kendra is the executive chairwoman lead designer and founder of the jewelry brand that bears her name kendra scott kendra built the company out of his spare bedroom in her house with a five hundred dollar investment. And now it's a billion dollar business. We should note. she's also a philanthropist. A professor at ut austin and you may have seen her recently as a guest shark on shark tank kendra. Thank you so much for being with us tonight. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you so much for having me. I'm so thrilled to be here and love everything that you all have done this year at skim us so so thrilled to be a part of it. Thank you can't dress so you become a very public person over these last decade or so. What is something that we cannot do. Go about you. I don't feel like a public person which is so weird. I don't know why. But i don't okay. Well thank you for telling me that. This is kind of news to me. I live in my little austin texas bubble. But i think he look like a lot of people. Don't know right. They see your this glamorous designer blah blah blah. I'm a mom i. I started this company with a newborn baby. I wanted to create a business that allowed me to do what i loved. Which was fashion design. I wanted to give back to my community after. I lost my stepfather to cancer. But i really wanted to also be a mom and be a present mom and create a company that hopefully someday would also allow other amazing moms to have a great career but could be a mom. So i'm a mom to three sons and a lot of people don't realize at because of that i've become kind of a tomboy i can throw a means spiral football. I can put a lego together in record time. I can't even tell you is one of those things where i just a mom i and two boys. It's always chaos at my house. But i kind of love it. I thrive off of.

Kendra Scott Kendra Scott Kendra Kendra Austin Texas Cancer Football
Dogecoin Is Pass, but Student Notes Are Big Business

Equity

01:04 min | Last month

Dogecoin Is Pass, but Student Notes Are Big Business

"This weekend elon. Musk failed to help doj points value after it fell sharply down his appearance on the snl program doj has since recovered some but the traders who were hoping for a free set of gains certainly got the opposite as far as the s. and l. at go cz. Do you need to watch it. The answer is no. I watch me last night and as long as it turns out does have many talents. Comedy is not one of them and that certainly showed up during the program the weekend update crew dig a couple of jokes and kind of alonzo. Expensive i was topical funny but the rest of it was pretty blah in by the doj coin is now there's a new thing other college shiba inu coin get another dog themed cryptocurrency and it is shooting much much much higher over the last day or so the reason for this is pretty clear if cryptos some of them are going to be stores of value instead of currencies or development platforms matters really is how much other folks value them and apparently there are a lot of people out there willing to wager that there are more folks like them willing to wager even more and thus she acquaint goes to the moon. There's an economic theory about all that it turns out

DOJ Elon Musk Alonzo
There’s a Name for the ‘Blah’ You’re Feeling

The Mom Room

02:19 min | Last month

There’s a Name for the ‘Blah’ You’re Feeling

"Many of you sent me this article that was written by adam grant so he is a organisational psychologists. He's often while i think a few times. He's been on armchair expert with docs record. Such great episodes highly recommend listening to them. He's such a great speaker but anyways he had this article in the new york times. That was all about languishing. And how so. Many of us are feeling this way. And he explains what exactly that is and some ways that you can get out of feeling that way. It's so funny to me. Because i often explain it as feeling blah because i don't know how else to verbalize it and that is literally in the title of this article. So it's called. there's a name for the blah. you're feeling it's called languishing. He describes it as being a dominant emotion of twenty twenty one. And it's interesting because they talk a lot about how when the pandemic i started and it was all over the news and we were on the super high alert mode. Almost like adrenalin was kicking in and we were like wiping down all our groceries and doing everything we could to you know. Follow the guidelines and stay safe and that has kind of worn off now and it's more so he describes it as dulling our motivation and focus. And it's not that were not staying safe now and we don't care about the guidelines it's more so that they have just become a regular part of our everyday life so we're not so much thinking about them anymore. It's just how we're living our life now like every time i get into the car. I'm using hand sanitizer without even thinking about it whereas before all these little changes to how we live our everyday life was a noticeable thing and it was a novel thing so we were constantly thinking about it and it was more of not exciting but it was just we were in that fighter flight mode and now it's just exactly what they describe it as it's very blah. It's interesting because they talk about how it can. Doll your motivation and your focus. And this languishing feeling makes it difficult to concentrate.

Adam Grant The New York Times
Go, Go, Real Estate: How To Master Your Social Media & Generate Organic Leads

Casandra Properties Real Estate Podcast

02:30 min | Last month

Go, Go, Real Estate: How To Master Your Social Media & Generate Organic Leads

"So my job is to make sure that you know my name on that gogo chick and then what i do. I sell real estate and that's two things. I need them to know. I need them to know my name and i need them to know what i do for a living they are. So that's what they struggled with with the properties account whereas that's the that's the company. That's the office. That's everything and that's where it becomes difficult to kind of try and finally got a personality for i would say as far as the asian school. That's what i've always tried to push as well as become the person behind you know the orange so you have to show with a person as though because again people do business people so James are you name and brand. Who's the head of cassandra properties. So i'm the head of cassandra properties. The namesake was mom. Mom started in one thousand nine hundred nine there. You go so one of the things you should. One of your first videos should be. Hey let me tell you about hundred properties. i know. I don't look like asandra because cassandra's my mom. So let me tell you how it started and then you just go into it so then now you can have the relationship with people. They're like. Oh i didn't know you're used to use cassandra. Oh my gosh. she's your mom. Had no idea blah blah blah. So you that's a conversation starter. So that's your opening again to them to see who you are and see into your world and then all you need to do is this. Is your office. This is my office right here. I cared that rego. And i need to do with Video when you guys have your lunch ins or one of your age is just sort formula and hours this month or when you just had thirty agents you never had thirty agents before whatever that is let the people get to. Noble cassandra properties is. That's where the organic leads. Come in one they're like. Oh my gosh. Jessica just bought a house from you. She's our neighbor. I had no idea. I would love to work with you to how much they turn. How south for curious. And then you're gonna be like oh blah blah blah. We just closed down. It was for twenty nine. She's like seriously she doesn't even have a basement. How much would mind worth well. Let me run contrary quick and it just goes on and on it's like a never ending the other awesome part is now you could create your hashtag. So you would create cassandra properties agents hashtags. And then all of your agents would have their accounts. Created with the cassandra properties hashtag agents hashtag all of those agents belong to your brokerage and then every time they go on. They spread the world about what they're doing. Because this going to have to be individual you cannot run your social media for

Cassandra Properties Cassandra Noble Cassandra Properties Rego James Jessica
Index Funds and Chill

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

01:46 min | Last month

Index Funds and Chill

"At the start of the pandemic every person on twitter with deming me slipping into those. Em's about hot stocks. They're like nicole. Should i buy xue. What are your thoughts on. Peleton net flicks is killing it right now with. Everyone stuck at home watching it. Should i buy their stock. To all of those folks who said it was their first time getting into investing is said hell to the no no investing in individual stocks and i repeated the title of this episode to them index funds and chill warren buffett. He has a very smart investor perhaps best of all time said the greatest investment americans can make is putting their money in low cost s and p five hundred index funds and when the greatest investor of all time speaks. We should seriously listen so. Let's unpack what he said. An index is a collection of different stocks by a certain set of parameters. So what does that mean when you hear the stock market report saying the dow is up blah blah blah the s. and p. Five hundred is down blah blah blah. The nasdaq is blah blah blah level. They're talking about the three main indexes the dow the s&p five hundred and the nasdaq now the dow jones industrial average or just the dow for example tracks the thirty biggest stocks in the united states including ones like apple and microsoft dizzy the s. and p. Five hundred is made up of recently five hundred and five stocks which is annoying to my organizational. Put it in a bento box praying. But i digress there. It's made up of different large cap. Companies or companies with a value of more than ten billion

Nicole Warren Buffett Twitter United States Apple Microsoft
Feel Empty (MM #3684)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Feel Empty (MM #3684)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation, there are some days that you wake up and you're kind of running on empty, you just feel empty. You just don't have anything else. You and it doesn't necessarily mean, you didn't get a good night's sleep, it doesn't mean you aren't well-rested. It just you feel blah, you feel yuck. And this time of year, with any seasonal allergies, we all have it. The other day, my wife had one of her days where she just didn't sleep well and woke up. And you can just tell she was feeling empty the entire day, slight headache and just the weather change that was going on and it was a bad day, but it's tough because you wish you could minimize those bad days because of my allergies over the years. I've talked about this before. I have numerous bad days a month and you can never tell when they're coming, you can go to bed, feeling good and wake up in the middle of the night feeling, okay? And then, two hours later when you get up for the day, you just feel awful and you don't feel like you have any thoughts and it comes and goes, but I guess it's just part of the human life cycle. I know everybody's body makeup is slightly different. So what works for one doesn't work for another and while that's not the answer, at least we're all dealing with in some way, shape, or form.

Kevin Nation Headache
Feel Empty (MM #3684)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Feel Empty (MM #3684)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation, there are some days that you wake up and you're kind of running on empty, you just feel empty. You just don't have anything else. You and it doesn't necessarily mean, you didn't get a good night's sleep, it doesn't mean you aren't well-rested. It just you feel blah, you feel yuck. And this time of year, with any seasonal allergies, we all have it. The other day, my wife had one of her days where she just didn't sleep well and woke up. And you can just tell she was feeling empty the entire day, slight headache and just the weather change that was going on and it was a bad day, but it's tough because you wish you could minimize those bad days because of my allergies over the years. I've talked about this before. I have numerous bad days a month and you can never tell when they're coming, you can go to bed, feeling good and wake up in the middle of the night feeling, okay? And then, two hours later when you get up for the day, you just feel awful and you don't feel like you have any thoughts and it comes and goes, but I guess it's just part of the human life cycle. I know everybody's body makeup is slightly different. So what works for one doesn't work for another and while that's not the answer, at least we're all dealing with in some way, shape, or form.

Kevin Nation Headache
A Review Of The New OnePlus 9 Phone

The Droid Life Show

02:50 min | 2 months ago

A Review Of The New OnePlus 9 Phone

"Okay so One plus announced the phones. This week they've been teasing these for a long time. I mean one plus the king of not spending a dollar on advertising and just using the power of their voice on the internet to To let you know about everything so the one nine series is the oneplus nine. The oneplus nine pro. You guys know that For for prices we have seven twenty nine starting price for the oneplus nine and then it tops out at eight twenty nine hundred bucks more That gets you eight gig ram and one hundred twenty gigs storage at seven twenty nine and then for another hundred bucks you could ask for more gig rams so twelve gram double the storage certificate six for the nine pro. Which is this guy starts at nine sixty nine. And that's also the eight gig one twenty eight gig combo and then this model i actually have is fully specked out so another hundred bucks which takes us over the thousand dollar price point to one thousand sixty nine twelve gig to fifty six storage. It's kind of what they've done for a couple years so it makes sense but we are at another increase the The eight pro last year started eight ninety nine and then topped out. I think right at ninety nine ninety nine I can't remember offhand with the eight price. Was the april five ninety nine. Six hundred ninety six ninety nine seven ninety nine have been six nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine. Yeah because we're up to seventy nine so kind of a thirty dollar increase in a seventy dollar look. They packed a lot of specs. And we'll get to that so anyway if you want the top of the line one plus nine pro we are whoa well over a thousand but were over thousand bucks now so were ridiculous as far as specs go you know oneplus. Didn't really hold back. They kind of gave us everything and everything you would expect from a modern phone. You know they they haven't done headphone jacks for awhile. And s d cards i. I don't know that they've ever really done those in there. Really cheap phone so i. I'm not gonna waste time complaining about those. But they added the newest of the new. Obviously the cameras going to be a big focus with the with the hassle blah partnership But like this nine pro has hd one hundred twenty hertz. tim's lower lesser of a phone much Ten eighty p but also still hundred twenty hertz. They both have staff in eight eighty eight. I talked about the ram and storage configurations On the camera this has a quad camera. Yours has triple camera. Believe so the big thing. There is the hospital vlade partnership so. This camera is the sony. I m x seven eight nine. Which most people doesn't mean anything. But it's just sort of the newest sony sensor. They said they they developed it in custom with with sony. And so you've got that. And then it has a fifty megapixel wide angle lens.

Rams TIM Sony
OnePlus enters the SmartWatch market

The Vergecast

01:32 min | 2 months ago

OnePlus enters the SmartWatch market

"The oneplus watch hundred fifty nine bucks I will just tell you. The verge cast listener between us. Friends asked what the operating system was. All we know is that it's an rt os. It's a real time operating system. God that's what we know Which is not wear less which is generally thought of as a positive. It looks like the spitting image of one of the roundup of watches. Yeah i'm sure it's basically running the same operating system so it's kind of like a fitbit operating system it should last about two weeks It's got a bunch of like it's got a blood oxygen sensor and a step counter and gps and blah blah blah. All of which are going to be like in one plus health app. I don't know if it will connect to google fit yet or not. i'm thinking i think it'll be fine. No but you should not expect third party apps support you should not expect an ecosystem around it I'm glad only cost one hundred and sixty bucks because that is right now like a unless you really really really want it. Spending more than two hundred bucks on a smartwatch for android is rough right. It looks nice. It looks fine. I'll give it that it's fully an appliance like it's think of it as an appliance. You don't care. Hopefully what operating system. Your washing machine runs if it has an operating system right. It might some of them. Do you. don't really care what operating system you're like you know. Echo has not really right so like that. It's going to do some stuff but it's going to do the stuff that it does when you open the box and set it up for the first time and never anything more than that stuff.

Google
How Your Parental Programming Affects You Now

A New Direction

05:48 min | 2 months ago

How Your Parental Programming Affects You Now

"Dude. This is powerful. Because i never i never had just you know i think we kind of get into denial that. Our parents don't have much to do with what what's going on in my life. Now you're exactly exactly where and so then we get into this denial thing. And then you start to realize it's ted. I had this conversation with my wife. I said i did this exercise. I want to tell you this wert right from this exercise and i was. I was really blown away because they didn't. I didn't really see because what we'll tell. Tell people what gets revealed as you go through this exercise. Well thing is the book in the program are basically like me holding up a mere for you to look in a mere to look deep inside you to see who what you are and why so. The origin challenge is critical because once we get to be eighteen and twenty one and cetera. Thank okay. we're free from our parents. This is you said jay and they have nothing to do with our lives. No they have everything to do with your lives because of that very powerful origin programming. So you look at the positive and negative traits of your father of your mother. Then you look at their relationships to understand your relationships origin programming. And then you look at your similarities and differences to that origin programming. And all of a sudden you'll come across these things where you've been wondering why in god's name did i say that. Why did i do that Over sudden it becomes apparent. Because i was programmed for the first eighteen years of my life to define success this way. Well there really doesn't work for me anymore. So the first the first step in doing your adult reprogramming is to understand an own. Your origin programming both in terms of traits triggers emotions. How you define success what you consider to be a good relationship etc across the board so once you understand no. That origin programming without being judgmental. Because guess what yes that programming was done by your parents. And your coaches teachers. But they're not the ones that are responsible for changing it. If you don't like it today you are the one responsible for changing. So how how do you know you need to change something unless you understand from whence it comes you know. I have to be honest with you as i did. This search in myself. And i came up with a number of things that revealed to me why i have the certain habits that i don't i don't like but clearly i don't i i don't i hate. I don't hate them enough that i want to get rid of them and and part of it. Is this programming. You know from being a kid. And then i came across the same discovery that you did you say in this chapter that you discovered in your challenge your origin challenge that it was a lot of pain. Shame guilt abandonment. The trail self betrayal distrust. Self reliance passion courage strength determination result. There's good and bad exactly right exactly. And what's interesting about the whole origin. Programming thing is what was good and worked for you in certain situations just like strengths often become your weaknesses in your current situation. Those things may no longer work for you. Therefore they are bad need to be reprogrammed so you know life. Ebbs and flows always being conscious of that origin. Programming or training is very important i i. It's critical. Because i. I have to tell you something this seriously when i say that i discovered things i was like. Oh my gosh. I'm i was like. I can't believe i can't believe that's exactly what happened right. And then here's the other piece and and you kind of alluded to this too right so you start to see things that happen in your origin piece and then there was a point where it got a little mad i got. I got a little mad at my parents right. And then but then there can point was hold on. Okay okay. maybe they gave me this and maybe a mad at them for that. But the truth matters i got it. Forgive them because. I know that they weren't trying to do anything intentionally. They were just doing exactly and the next point becomes is okay so like in my case. My reliance on me myself and i and my co dependency and my My desire to prove everybody. That told me i couldn't do something or have anything bad to say about me. You know the proverbial b word all You know that really is what took away my career reputation. Fifty million in my net worth blah blah blah. But when you really ask yourself. The question did that programming. Take that away or did my failure to understand own and revise that programming. Take it

JAY
OnePlus 9 Pro Phone Review

All About Android

07:36 min | 2 months ago

OnePlus 9 Pro Phone Review

"So there was some big Hardware news today. Maybe you heard of it. If you're fans of one plus then you probably saw that the company held a livestream this morning and then shortly after the embargoes lifted and reviews were aplenty the oneplus nine and the oneplus nine pro wrong article okay. Plus nine won't buzz nine pro on house this morning. That's does because i didn't put an article in there burks. Donald the worry about him Were announced this morning. You don't need to put an article in there. Because i have them there they are. That's right this right. Here is one plus nine in. I think they call it a matte. Black does a color. Although it's not very mad i was gonna ask. Does it have did you. Keep the protector on there. Because it looks real shiny to me is look mad at all. No it's not matt actually. It's very very shiny in fact both of these are very very shiny. So that's the nine and then a slightly larger nine pro like super glass. You know what i mean. It's like error basically But it's got a got a little kind of like haziness up the top that gets to completely cleared out the bottom but You know. I colors What's the other one is like a do. They call it an arctic green or something like that. I can't remember the name of the third color but it's kind of more similar to here. Hold on. I think i have a more similar to the oneplus. Eight pro this. I would call matt right like this is kind of like a hazy sort of not glassy reflective thing but just really disappointed by. I'm sorry i. I don't mean to be hard to please but i'm disappointed by the black and silver of it all like what is this is like some sort of ball where i'm like put on a fancy gown only wear like black or silver. Are i mean you still. You still have your color options. Vic the oneplus maper wave like whereas the vapor way. Where's the beautiful -til back sometimes. Save these things for later. You know how oneplus roles they come out with their colors in there and then a little bit later they come out with their special edition. Vapor waves now. They did last year. I'm just saying sometimes they do Bites What you will notice with the oneplus nine nine pro. If you look hard enough. And i don't know that i've got this on auto focus so i'm just gonna keep right here but Basically this little branding in the camera bump which says hostile blog. I saying that right And so basically oneplus has a has a partnership with hossa blonde. The camera company. That is a highly respected. Although we should definitely point out the fact that hasselblad was also the big camera partnership that motorola had for a moto. Maude that did not actually take very good pictures. So the question was once we started hearing kind of the news about oneplus and blah. Having a partnership. Is this a branding play. Or is the cameras hardware actually amazing here which is definitely the focus. That really seems to be the focus. This time around the oneplus eight year. You may remember at least eight pro. it it did well improving upping oneplus game when it came to the camera and it looks like with the nine. They're looking to do the same thing here. I've had these phones For about a week and a half now although. I've only really used the nine pro with any regularity. I haven't like lived with the oneplus nine Camera hardware is very similar between the two. But i've i've leaned into the camera on the nine pro. I'm actually doing a comparison for hands on tack. That will go live tomorrow between shots on the eight pro and shots on the nine pro to kinda show. You did one. Plus actually upgrade here But know feel free and show some shots. Hokey stay on this one for a second because this one kind of bothers me. This is the main rear facing camera. I don't know that anyone else would notice this. Because you don't know my daughter and my wife the way i do but their heads look stretched totally noticed that actually. It looks like your daughter's flat look like cardboard out to that. This was done with main camera. This was not the winding lens. I'm used to seeing that kind of tearing that smearing on wide angle shots. But not the main and i realized what it is because this was like within. The first couple of days of having the camera was like okay. What is that if all of my main shots are going to do. This is going to bug the heck out of me and realize what it is the main lens does not have optical image stabilization. And so if you are even moving your hand the slightest when you take these shots you end up with really Erotic images and that. I see that as a big bummer. Because it actually did kind of rear. Its ugly head to me multiple times. Where i thought i was still but it wasn't quite still enough then. I looked at the shot later. I was like okay. That's just a little too blurry for my liking. The actually end up getting better shots out of the uae than you do with the main But yeah i mean. I mean considering that it's a wide right so you get that wide effect but the i just enjoy the shots from the live more than i do the main and a lot of the shots that i took those very dark outsize store. That's that's frustrating. It out the person who uses that you know it's going to distort the images. They take that they want us to. I'm sorry usa. The angle has the optical image civilization. Yeah yeah the wide has optical image stabilization to my understanding. The main does not at main absolutely does not and yeah so i got arenas on on really yellow. Yeah maybe maybe fact. Check that for me. While i walk through a few these eligible here but yeah i know for a fact. The main does not. I'm pretty pretty confident. The why does. But i could be wrong That shot that you were just looking at that. Was low light. Low light in the back yard near dr not quite dark and it was fine like lobe light performance on some of my shots were were fine. Nothing like screaming amazing. You know what i mean. you know again low light. I don't know. I feel like that could be better right by. I don't know This those two shots are interesting because one is the rear. This is the front facing and it shows you the differences in color balanced detection between the two cameras There's just i don't know like a time and time again as i'm kind of going through and taking pictures and comparing and everything it's like the images like i'm really curious to compare between the eight pro and the nine pro because i haven't actually done the side by sides yet for tomorrow's review. I'm doing that After the show actually. But i'm really interested to compare. Because like i'm kind of guessing guessing without comparing at this point that images are relatively similar between the two and if so then what is the hasselblad partnership actually mean

Matt Burks Donald Trump Hossa Hasselblad Maude VIC Motorola UAE USA
A Positive Attention Economy with Adam Helfgott from MadNetwork

Bitcoin Radio

09:43 min | 3 months ago

A Positive Attention Economy with Adam Helfgott from MadNetwork

"Adam much joining us. Thank you so much for having me really excited. Approach me too and so for those viewers who might not be familiar with who you are. You want to get a little background of who you are. And how you got into blockchain short You know. I'm a kind of serial entrepreneur. Built the built sold a bunch of companies in the regular internet land I company was a god put summer camps online back in nineteen ninety nine and then you know how to fashion startup thousand six but in in Right around when bitcoin came out i saw early. Read at posts and whatnot and Was fascinated by it and I read all the posted. All this stuff. And i didn't quite running a business at the time and quite have the energy to really put up minor unfortunately back back in the early but You know kind of kept tabs on on the project that was declined back in the day and slowly got more and more into it. Invested saul invested sold but started getting really into technology and seeing what the technology can do right around the time of the cerium. Ico where i started doing some consulting work for other blockchain projects that were commercial. Land trying to do concept's flory be credit card companies and things like that helping. I'm a product guy build technology. I really know how to make products for the enterprise and helping you know various early projects and companies apply. What i know into what they know and make things it might might start in in crypto. Just have a firm belief that you know. Blockchain's are as important as Intervention as like the transistor was And like the same gonna take a long time for that kind of integrated change society but the cooler and more fun stuff that exists after. It'll happen so i find it interesting. Because i speak a lot of people in these conferences and it seems that this is a pretty common background people who are serial entrepreneurs who who were involved in the early adoption of the internet days building things on the internet and it seems a lot of those people people are now also in our building on blockchain and has been endless. Powerless draw between the two in terms of growth in the early days and adoption and the protocol layers. And this and that Do you find you mentioned you compared to two transistors And that's more of a tradition obviously a hardware but that that spawned obviously the computer age. And it's interesting you go back that far. I mean most people. I find compared to the internet. Why why did you feel Why do you view it as transistor and as the comparison for that more so than kind of this connective technology of internet. Yeah a question. So so the way. I look at it is the transistor was like the beginning of no allowing like automation With with basically build like to restart replacing humans with technology. Old computers were like rooms of people that had different that like that. There is like a person that they said caters. The here's the problem. We're trying to solve when break it down and give it to like this department. Solve this equation is that and then the output will come out some consolidation. That was a computer is a bunch of people and the same way. Like what we can do with blockchain's which is automated trust transactions and Whole slew of other types of automation. It's foundational piece in like beasley humans to do more Now that's how. I view it in that way there. So you know. Pcp is a layer on top of what transit software blocked our software. But it's cryptography itself as math and it's kinda you it's it's hardware you mentioned early on in this conversation that you're the product guy and i think that's a very product Answer very product focus. Answer now i think it's very fitting unique perspective on this industry and obvious technology because i mostly You know talking to the dreamers. But it's nice talking to the doer. You know definitely get that. You're the founder of the man network of. You're wearing any matt hive sweating to break down a bit. What is the madden network. Yes so so mad network is kind of like the is like the way i vision products and companies and things like that is like You know if. I'm going to be successful at something i need to kind of hold onto it kinda. Pull myself into it and the team into it. Right and ran network is a envisioning how organizations interact with each other in a in a high speed trusted way so You know the the way My my co-founder. Tom and i look at it. Is that that the advertising industry kind of paid for the internet to be built. You know google and facebook and all that kind of stuff like that like what we have now. The internet was largely the infrastructure built out because it was commercially viable to do that. Other months the government's they only go so far. And we kind of see it the same way for for blockchain right so. The advertising industry is kind of decentralized in the business version right. You're a media channel tons of other media channels. They're not. We're not all own jet by one company off the author interact with each other in pseudo trusted ways or else it all falls apart right and so you come up with all these standards in ways and you know in television sign affidavits and we go to court semi like a testings and so all that can be done with cryptography. We save a lot of times. They a lot of money. Smaller media channels can make more money. Less money goes to the intermediaries all the blockchain promises that we seen over. The past bunch of years is cut out the intermediaries and blah blah blah. We need we need application need actual place. That would actually happen. We saw. I've is a commercial entity that you know builds. Enterprise software for advertising. Mad network is the underpinnings of a new way to transfer to do that. Business and the goal is to kind of like overtime a bridge. Those together you know and and not just build something and hope people adopt it but actually build product enterprises that happens to us. Blockchain's yen this problem with this problem that you're providing solution to isn't at the forefront of most people's minds you know the the the average consumer or consumer of media isn't noticing this issue. This is more if you have a media company this. This is something that having behind the scenes behind the screen even like kind of break it down for viewers people who've never even thought of this issue because you're provided a novel solution to its gonna break a little bit of what was the old way of doing business here and the ad network in house different now because blocked not different yet It's starting to be There's an immense amount of momentum about you know close to like three to four hundred billion dollars of a mental every year that powers the existing wet right and so the existing way is basically people trusting each other and we all here especially the united states with our president. That's very concerned with ratings. Waiting is right and what a rating is is how much viewership a media channel gets right and so who and is this one application but something. I think that the person has not totally indoctrinated in the media. Space with understand that you know who makes the ratings and and so you know in the united states abroad. There's a company called called nielsen in that. Probably a lot of people have heard of that. Creates these These ratings at site. How many people are watching in the way that they do that is that they have panel of fifty thousand people or so states that are nielsen homes. All that data goes to nielsen. They crunch it and they say you know this show and this station had this much viewership and what that really means is that now. what the charge that advertising. That's why like the super bowl is like so expensive. The eighty five percent of watching super bowl and probably globally as well And so but now we're and that was a model built in the nineteen fifties. That worked really really well when there's like six media channels are less four really now that we have like thousands and thousands If there isn't a very simple if there isn't a way to price your media properly you need to like hand over your keys to like the kingdom to accompany that would like one of the major social networks are one of the major search engines companies like that. That can do that for you. And they'll happily do that for you. And taking a thirty to seventy percent of your revenue as well in order to like.

Blockchain Matt Hive Saul Adam Mad Network Beasley TOM Facebook Google Government United States Super Bowl Nielsen
EU Clears Microsoft Bethesda Acquisition

Nerd On! The Podcast

02:39 min | 3 months ago

EU Clears Microsoft Bethesda Acquisition

"September it was announced that microsoft had made a deal to buy Cinemax which is the parent company above bethesda and the european commission at has to go through a whole approval process. Basically to make sure it's like fair trade and blah blah blah. And this past week. The european commission approved the seven point. Five billion dollar acquisition of cinemax the parent company of the festa stating the commission concluded that the proposed acquisition would raise no competition concerns given the combined entities limited market position upstream and the presence of strong downstream competitors in the distribution of video games. Your so microsoft will now have a whopping twenty three first party studios with the addition of bethesda and its sub studios including arcane machine games. Ide- software and tango game works but wait. there's more. oh my gosh on march eleventh. I'm not happy about this but on march eleventh at the joins xbox which you can watch on youtube. A roundtable thing with phil. Spencer and a lot of other bigwigs at xbox Phil spencer confirmed that all future bethesda titles will be exclusive to platforms that house. Xbox game pass so xbox one xbox series x xbox series s and p c course. I know this is i missed mr let's blitz mr. Let's promote cross platformer. You don't even play these games. He he did go on to say that this does not include Previous obligations contractual obligations like death loop but Yeah so there's that well there's that so For i'm excited for bethesda to be under a banner like microsoft just. They've kind of explained the positive. The positives of what that that does for them the kind of resources that they have available to them 'cause i mean at the end of the day like bethesda we know them. They have big games but they're not actually a huge huge company so having somebody like microsoft that is a huge company. Supporting them is is it is. There is a positive

Bethesda Cinemax European Commission Microsoft Festa Phil Spencer Spencer Phil Youtube
"blah" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"blah" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"I don't know man I'll see on Sunday the Jew who gets to close the act because they are such divas it's you goes to synagogue and he finds a rabbi and let's be honest he's a bit hysterical and he finds somebody ready? I'm having a crisis. What do I do? I don't know who to speak to. I don't know where to go. I don't know what to do because because I look back on my life and I see my family. I built this beautiful family. I'm so proud of my children. They're so good. They're so hard working there so thoughtful full so kind I look at my career and I'm so proud of myself because I built it for nothing and I made need enough to be able to take care of my parents and they're proud of me and I'm proud of my children. I feel like I'm part of a trajectory and my wife all my gut thirty years thirty years of a beautiful marriage. And let me tell you. It hasn't always been easy but still I realized a couple months ago. Yeah I'm GonNa die and I'm horrified by that because when I was young I thought well that means I will go to meet a sham and Blah up a lot but then I was like oh wait. That's stupid. That's really dumb. I tried to think about then. It doesn't make any sense so I became a scholar and I thought really hard and I studied the Torah study. The TALMUD and I'm like I'm going to figure out a way to get back to being the person and I was when I could believe that was part of a bigger thing and I can't do it has lost my faith what do I do and the rabbi goes. You believed in God as an adult..

Blah
"blah" Discussed on Windows Weekly

Windows Weekly

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"blah" Discussed on Windows Weekly

"To an arm bought that envy x two hoping I want that Battery Life I want twenty two hours of battery life I like the little the little pin cash so cute I do too but you know you got to remember that's like a carpenter's pencil so it's flat and it's might be slow of that Samsung that's like the Samsung note or the Samsung stylists in their chromebooks they're they're they have flat thing it's worth it though because the magnets doesn't work and falls off all the time and if you lose the Penance like over one hundred dollars anytime you lose a pet owners the pen now I ordered a surface laptop three today uh well to test I'm guessing I won't like it but you know what they aren't GonNa give me one because they know I'm not GonNa like it so what are you going to do don't like you sell it back what do you do return thirty days of returns though Lisa keep saying why do we buy all his stuff why don't you just do that and I said when I feel guilty I'll take good care of it I mean no and it's immediate service laptop was only slightly scratched so you're getting a surface laptop three I'm GonNa yeah next at says next Tuesday I should get it to get sandstone like the sandstone thirteen inch which I think you're gonNA keep it you didn't get out Kara no no STA little mini no better have a windows machine I could go and get it Oh God please down that won't work saying the problem with the arm stuff it's it's only running a limited subset of windows apps it has to be what thirty two bit and thirty two bit desktop you know exit eighty six apps but the yes so there's that and it's like a patentability issue there but also remember that includes a lot of drivers actually includes all drivers so X86 drivers are not going to work either and that's that's in some ways the bigger problem depending on what you need to use it when he or could oh sandstone I think I'll get him a laptop Metal a core I seven Hobart blue comes alcon Tara it that's platinum Oh no there's a platinum without with I think black is without and sandstone ordered it now it lifting Tuesday just in time for next week's when weekly right Hey Mike I should probably ask him what he's not much new coming November each's will be on big yeah new.

Samsung Kara Lisa thirty two bit one hundred dollars twenty two hours thirty days
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"Affordable housing new an additional extra on top of existing housing stock, and Microsoft is throwing money at this. And it may or may not work. But it's maybe what the try. Yeah. I mean, I think what I've been reading there's consensus that it will help and Seattle has a problem, and it doesn't need help. But I think in the bigger picture. It's like maybe Seattle in Washington state need to get off their their tissues. And actually solve this problem in a bigger way. For example, the state has no state income tax. They could charge a little income tax. They could get more money than Microsoft is giving and looked to more holistic solutions. Well, the big the big way to solve this doesn't solve the problem. One of the big ways you address this problem is just through zoning that you up zone large chunks of your city for multifamily high-density, housing densification, and one of the facts, that's always and everywhere. True about housing, basically is the rich people wind up spending, you know, many more square feet per person. They they buy space for themselves compared to four people more crowded. And so if us own. A city for high-density and lots of people per square foot, then that's going to help in terms of bringing the working classes back into the city centre. And I think this is a good idea for many reasons, obviously think ethically. He would like to have more housing for more people. But also there are many many studies that show that if we could actually have enough housing to support the number of people who want to move to a lot of these centers of wealth, it would really help with GDP growth potential with Braddock dividend growth. So I think that this isn't just like a kind of, you know, liberal fantasy thing like I think from from almost any side. This makes a lot of sense. I said Seattle is the eighth largest city, but the eighteenth largest Seattle's the eighteenth largest was amazing homeless. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. It's like the Sommese how many cities in America bigger than Seattle in Nashville. Right. But the home I mean, third largest national has better weather than Seattle. Yeah. It's actually strange, but national does not have an out of control property market in Seattle is one of those cities where housing is just become unaffordable and everywhere that you find on the foldable housing. You also find very convoluted zoning laws in building restrictions which prevent developers from just throwing up the amount of building that the market is Monday. And I really think this conversation about housing go back to my point about the tax thing really goes back to our first conversation, which is that Seattle in Washington state seems to sort of abdicated its role in this. And now Microsoft is filling filling the void. But it's not it's not going to be enough. I just feel like that's Campi said kind of enough that this isn't a problem that the private sector can solve. That's that's the the. I mean, I think the private sector can do a lot. Yes. I do think that the private sector left to its own devices will almost invariably wind up by building luxury high end housing rub than more low end foldable housing. That's just it just seems to be where all of the economic incentives us, you do want the government to come in and encourage investment in a foldable housing in particular because. Building a bunch of expensive apartments will it might the margin like reduce the growth of property prices. But it's not really going. It's not going to make the city more vulnerable for normal people. And also if you look right now, I mean, you have land costs are higher. Labor costs are higher materials costs are higher and also the value of tax credits, which is actually how Ford housing is is actually financed. Traditionally are worth less now because of the tax cuts. So we really do need to do things to actually incentivize people because it's not gonna make a lot of sense otherwise for people to build this type of house. Oh is the is the great free markets here. What's your idea if it was the best way to incentivize the building of low income housing? I am not a policy experts. I'm probably not going to be able to come up with an excellent answer to this on the spot..

Seattle Microsoft Washington Campi America Ford Nashville
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"Hundred four Equatorial Guinea joined in nineteen eighty five Guinea Bissau joined in nineteen Ninety-seven. So like, it's a two way flow the thing which fascinates me. The most about this is that the one thing everyone used to say about the yearo like why introducing the euro and having a single currency in Europe. And is is it will make trading much easier. You don't need to worry about currency FX stuff. And there's absolutely no evidence that having fourteen countries all having same currency has actually improved trade between those countries or trade between those countries in Europe. To in fact, there's quite the opposite. I mean trade between countries is actually an issue throughout Africa, regardless of this. But if you actually look I mean, if you look at exports to Europe in terms of the percentage that these countries were say twenty years ago, and has now they're actually quite less and part of the reason for that is because when you had a really really strong euro like in the two thousands that really hurt a lot of these countries because it made their exports less competitive. And so they were replaced by experts of countries with with less valuable currency like, I don't know China, so or even of African countries. Yes. So overall, it's not been good for these countries. It's a mix. It depends. What you're talking about? Because you could say quote of law has done fairly. Okay. The question is really like there are two questions. One is. Who has benefited? And I think that an right that it's mostly the elites who have benefited from this. But then the other question is what's the alternative? And if the alternative is a Kronius central Bank, which you know steals a whole bunch of money for itself and misery. It's the population through infl- hyperinflation. That's not obviously better. Well, overall. There's more stability this way. Perhaps I would say that I agree that I don't think that it makes sense to just like in one day like, okay, new currency. But I do think you could start to have transitional measures like say instead of being pegged just to the euro be paid to basket of currency. So then you're not as affected by the movement of just one currency gives you a little bit more flexibility in monetary policy. You could reduce the power that the French currently have like officials have to be on the boards of the central banks and all of these countries. I think that those are. Measures. You get also the the use of FX reserves. That's another issue because right now, you just FX reserves sitting in France that could probably be used a little bit more efficiently in these countries. So so, yeah, I think the one thing which makes eminent sense to me is the countries concerned should own on monetary policy. They shouldn't be outsourcing it to fronts. They decisions about the value of the CFO Frank, and what it's pegged to should be made in Africa by Africans rather than in Paris by French treasury officials, and I just like last I thought it was somewhat ironic that you have this argument between France and Italy about policy towards Africa. And like nobody's asking anyone in Africa. What they think it's really patronizing. Well, Well, I mean. I mean. I mean the bunch of like local African finance ministers. Well, asked about this, and they will generally defend that montre regime like they all have every country in the currency union has the right to leave it at any time. And so the fact that they don't leave is some kind of evidence that they don't want to leave. Sleigh money sponsored this week by blink. Which is the most effective tool ever devised forgetting through that massive pile of books that you really want to read than you feel like you really should read any you kind of know that you on ever going to get around to reading you read the books, basically the same way that you listen to slate money into just like a podcast. It's an app on your phone. You can fit sweetie books into.

Europe Africa Guinea Bissau Kronius central Bank France China Paris CFO Frank Italy twenty years one day
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"But while we're on the topic of international colonialism. Let's talk about that. Well, we were talking about, but the benign form of Marshall plan colonialism what you just export your economic model to Japan and Germany, and then they thrive. This was also I think end of may be perhaps somewhere in the mind of the French when they decolonized Africa and left most of that former colonies with the French Frank or the CFA Frank because it became after the war. And now, we le- thanks to some Italian politician. The CFO Frank is being blamed for migration and all manner of ills and a it's in the news, which is great because the FA Frank is really weird and wonderful monkey kind of thing. And we've never talked about it on slate on this gives us the opportunity to talk about it, Anna, why is it in the news? So the deputy prime minister of Italy came out and was saying it was attacking France Macron and saying, well, then Gration problem is really because of poverty and Africa, which is being caused by French currency policies. And so you shouldn't. Complain that we won't allow these boats dock in Italy, it's all your fault. And while though, although he is completely wrong about this being the cause of migration from Africa. He's not wrong that the CFO Frank is a very dubious thing. I mean, it is very. Controversial. Currency regime because on the one hand you can make the argument. And okay, so slow down and say what the the first thing is it's like fifteen countries something different. Okay. So yeah. There are fourteen countries. There's it's eight and five and you have in west Africa, and you have central Africa the thing, which I love about this. It's the most fringe thing ever is there's a west African Frank. There's a central African favoring and they're worth exactly the same. Then not interchangeable on this like, yes, actually weight. And can we also say I think it's fourteen minutes eight and six sorry 'cause I used the wrong numbers. So just make sure I might I people don't think I can't come to fourteen so because people will write in and say Anna can't count fourteen. So yes, now, although actually the lack of inter convertibility is one of the many problems with this currency regime. So on the one hand, you can make the argument, and there is some evidence that actually has a lot. Evidence that it has kept inflation down unsurprisingly. So yeah, just to rewind a little bit. Again. What what the Frank is basically tool intents and purposes, the currency in most of west and central Africa, basically, all of Frank Afon Africa is the Frank or now the euro and much like if you go to Ecuador or believes it's the dollar, you know, they don't have that own currencies pegged to a big major international currency out of the aero, and they have no control over their own monetary policy. They just have to let the European Central Bank. Do what it's going to do. Yeah. And this is actually a problem because they doubly don't have control of their amount of things on the one hand, you have a number of countries that have are actually at different stages of development and a very different economies based on resources and other things. So just and then they probably shouldn't have the same monetary policy. And then you tack on the fact that they're essentially being hemmed in by the monetary policy of the European Central Bank like. That doesn't make a tremendous amount of sense. Because does it make sense for developing nations to be having the same concerns as France and Germany so this goes back, but this is this is known as dollarize ation as well. Like, you know, I'm old enough to remember when Argentina was pegged one to one for the dollar. You know, Ecuador has gone so far as to basically, give up a domestic currency entirely and just us dollars in Brazil two to one to the door. And all of these things are basically it they come out of desperation a lot of time. Like if you have a history of hyper inflation, and you don't trust your own currency. Then you're like, okay, we can't be trusted with our own currency. We're just going to use someone else's because we know that the euro is stable easing euros. They're using CFA Franks, which there's some debts. Well, it's a little interesting. We basically the difference between the CFO Franken the yearo is the the French rather than the Europeans..

Frank Africa CFO European Central Bank Frank Afon Africa France Macron Italy Anna Ecuador west Africa Germany CFA Franks Japan prime minister France Franken Brazil Argentina one hand
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"I could perhaps try to use it to actually effectively help the poorest people in the world or I can pay in taxes. So it can be redistributed to upper class old people, which is what is currently happening. So I think this is my only critique sometimes when we start to talk about redistribution. I as I said, I am not calling for low tax rates on the wealthy. I think like, you know, I'm not. So what do you think we open will marginal tax rate on incomes of ten million dollars should be? I see this is where I think just like plugging a number and saying it like anything else. It depends. I mean, I think I I think we could probably go a little higher than we are. Now, I think you could probably around like closer to fifty percent. And I actually in baker's. I'm like, I'm not I'm not I'm not someone who's saying that we shouldn't try to have more tax revenue and from people who in many ways, probably. Can't afford it. My issue though, on the other side is that it's okay. But then how is the government actually using that money? And I think this is an area where sometimes on the left. There's this idea that we going to have this perfect technocratic government that's going to be able to use all this money very efficiently. I don't think we have a tremendous amount of evidence that that would be the case, I think the government's especially the US government in recent decades has done extraordinarily bad job of spending money on the poor largely because people don't vote, and so they get ignored in fiscal policy. And that's Fred full. And that's another flipside green you deal, which we will talk about in some coming episode of slate money. Slate money is sponsored by transfer wise, which is the way you transcend money flim country to country and from county to county while being able to sleep well at night without having to worry that you'll being ripped off by hidden fees without having to be concerned, the old Bank will pay pal or anyone else is using an exchange rate. That is just ripping you off. And you'll never know about it with transfer wise, they build that entire business on completely transparent and incredibly competitive exchange rates completely transparent vs, and basically whatever the amount of money is you wanna send to any other country in the world ring in from any other country in the world, the final amount that ends up at the destination is going to be higher with transfer wise, then with just about any other tool. Don't take my word for it. They have four million customers and ask saving. Millions of.

US baker Fred ten million dollars fifty percent
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"It was about how this all this talk. It's not about bashing billionaires billionaires or good or bad. It's about living in a more equitable society. But the point I wanted to get to about that column as they had this really I thought interesting example of how the US used to lead the world when it came to this kind of progressive taxation is Felix mention it used to the rate used to be ninety percent at one point seventy percent marginal tax rate and some people say will during that period. The US was like the most powerful country in the world yada, yada, yada. But getting to my point stay with me, the US helped rebuild Japan after World War Two in Japan, kind of modeled on the United States, and they did the same high tax rate for their super rich people, and they prospered, and then Zach minutes is really Wilno duckman inside size them point to Russia, which we helped. Build in the early nineties after communism went away, and blah, blah, blah, and they again model themselves on American had low tax rates on the rich people. And then look what happened there bad things plutocrats rushed into all the money. I thought it was an interesting argument. Development of the United States in the second half of the nineteenth century. It was probably the period, we you had the greatest amount of wealth creation and improvement people's lives in almost history. And we essentially had no income tax. I'm not arguing for that. I'm just saying didn't have any any social welfare. Ended with the great depression. The wait a second. Let's let's just be clear that industrial revolution. Although yes, it was very important that we did have a pushback later to try to get more safeties and a little bit like labor protections and more of a safety net. And I'm not disagreeing with the fact that we should perhaps have additional taxation in ways that we can then use that money more effectively. I'm not saying that that inherently is a horrible idea. I I just think that a lot of discussion around this like we can say, blah, blah, blah throughout like massive parts of history. But actually, those the, blah, blah, blah's matter of Dumont and saying these really do matter Emily is saying this very important, which is have -solutely possible. And if you look at the United States or Japan or Germany in the postwar era in, you know, fifties and sixties when there was astonishing growth and wealth creation. There's absolutely no sense in which that kind of growth and wealth creation needs to create a large number of billion. That's it just didn't during those years, and it doesn't create a large amount of inequality doesn't need. It's not like any kind of economic growth has to include begin as otherwise, it doesn't look we have account, for example. And it's a pulse, Ivanka, for example. And it is always associated with high levels of marginal tax Asian, and that's useful correlation to bear in mind. I was thinking to Jack Bogle who we discussed last week who could have been a billionaire, but was not a billionaire and was perfectly fine. He was very rich. You did. Well, it did welfare his investors like downside to him. Not being a billionaire. Don't see an upside anyone. Let's just talk about the billionaires in Davos in particular, most of whom have signed this glorious thing called the giving ledge. Where they going around saying that they're going to give away fifty nineteen ninety-five percent of their wealth. Like, okay, they you go if you're happy giving away that much of your money. Why are you not happy? Because if I not a billionaire, probably billionaire, certainly, but if you're saying, well, I have a tremendous amount of wealth. Well, what can I do?.

United States Japan Jack Bogle Felix Dumont Zach Ivanka Russia Emily Germany fifty nineteen ninety-five per seventy percent ninety percent
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"And I think a lot of people see this as it's a signal. It's a starting point. No one thinks that just doing the seventy percent marginal tax rate is gonna cut it. There are other measures. You can take that might be more effective like instead of getting rid of the wealth tax could be raised for example, instead of remaining Harrison the inheritance tax. Yes. Sorry, the inheritance. The death tax could be raised. You could raise the limit of payroll taxes, high income earners don't pay payroll taxes, the most regrettable they stop at a certain level. And the level is is making Finley those you'll know paying the level two hundred thousand actually. I think actually would be an I think it would actually be extremely effective way of taxing high income earners more effective than AOC's idea, although less rhetorically powerful, I think what's really interesting now is this turn that Felix was talking about which is that people are sort of fed up with what is a lie and the lies that if you raise taxes on high income earners. It's going to hurt all of us. And that's just that's not true. I mean, I to a certain extent agree with you to a certain extent. And wait and one last thing the US has gone so far in the other direction lowering taxes on high income earners and companies so low that liked to say like, well, we don't know we take it up to I we could be like Sweden like we are not in that place. Like, we're so far off from the from the Gerard de produce leaving that it's it's laughable too. I think to bring it up as even a plausible argument, the argument, we should be having is what's the most. Active way to reduce inequality in the United States, which has gotten out of control and has really destabilized the country, not only in the United States. But also in the world since you know, this is in the context of Davos, we have, you know, the annual exam report which for the past two years has been really good came out and talked about how the world's billionaires, you know, an extra. What nine billion nine trillion dollars go at it to their wealth in one year, they were adding wealth at the rate of two and a half billion dollars a day, and they don't need that wealth. And there's a bunch of people on the planet who do and so clearly and plus inequality just enough itself is a bad thing. And so you need some kind of mechanism for redistribution. I mean, I don't doesn't believe inequality as bad, but there's a whole bunch of evidence shows that I don't believe that inequality is my point is I don't think inequality is inherently bad. I think inequality to a certain level can be bad in a quality is actually just part of a vibrant capitalist system, you need inequality. Now when you have so much concentration of wealth that you actually have people who can alter policy and protect protect their market shared engaging crony capitalism. Yes, that's a problem. Yes. That is currently problem and one of the I mean, one of the reasons I like, the idea of wealth tax is that it really does is kind of. Agnostic as to how you made your money. And it's just like, well, if you will that rich, and this is something which AFC was saying on Mudan Luther King day. It's not the billionaires a bad people is just the the any kind of system which allows any one individual to accumulate that level of wealth is a broken system. And what you wanna do is intervene in that system to try and redistribute some level. Well, I I disagree a little bit with the idea that if you have extremely wealthy people that in itself is a horrible thing. I don't think there's much evidence for that is only love. Well, if you actually look number of countries that you know, they were they were very equal pretty much everyone was poor. And then well, guess what? Would you have tremendous economic development you end up creating billionaires. Yes. But you also end up creating a lot of welfare people. That's not wealth is just like one small thing that we're all taking part of you know, what was really interesting on Zuck men. And so. Says who are like the most cited liberal economists behind this idea of the wealth tax and they're advising Elizabeth Warren. They had a column in the in the New York Times that I thought was really good..

United States AOC Harrison Elizabeth Warren Zuck New York Times Finley Felix AFC Sweden nine billion nine trillion dol billion dollars seventy percent two years one year
"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Slate Money

"I am very happy this week because I am not in Davos right now, I get to hang out in the wom- studio in Brooklyn and not have to slap all the way to Switzerland. And so for the first time in a long time, we are doing a Davos episode without anyone in Davos, which makes it great for us to take a step back and say, the most important person in Davos is Alexandria, ocasio Kotas who isn't even there. I'm kind of into this like you'll she's having more impact on Davos than just about anyone the person, I should say who is having the most impact in Davos is probably that evil Bolsonaro guy from Brazil. And so it's another good reason to not be there. You don't need to wind up inadvertently getting. Having lunch with herbals narrow with you know, if you'll Tim cook, or such should we pull back and just say, we're talking about the World Economic Forum, which happens every year, Davos, Switzerland to Felix Huston most famous people in the world that the most famous than most powerful and leading people like the CEO of the biggest companies in the world who would be Tim cook and touching the who get invited to sit at the top table by Klaus Schwab who runs the entire thing when I n fist and who's lobs softball questions both narrow and who tells him about how he's transforming the future of Brazil, and they all have to just kind of sit there and great and pretend that he's not a fascist and this year like last year, Donald Trump went, but this year, fewer US people were there. The US people were there so ball scenario and Russian peeps. And Saudi Arabian peeps. Sort of had the head the presence this year, the run of the place had the run of the place serving. Macron in may a buzz about with domestic it's really kind of a terrible signal. Ballista vos. Yeah. Like letting the real dictators plutocrats, just run wild, basically, Switzerland. And meanwhile, the. Agenda is being set not atop a Swiss ALP. But rather in congress with one? Member of a house and one of the Senate, we have Alexandria Oko. Quotas in house saying, hey, why not have a seventy percent marginal tax rate on incomes over ten million dollars? We have Liz with Warren in the Senate saying why not have a two percent wealth tax on wealth over fifty million dollars. And maybe even three percent of billion dollars, and all of this would actually be the first policies that I can remember which would take a real stab addressing what the World Economic Forum has always said is the number one one of the top issues facing the welded. She's inequality would they? Well, wouldn't they I would argue that these policies all come from academic theory? There's one particular paper, this diamond deci as report that all these people are referencing and arguing that like look we have proof that. You know, this is the optimal tax rate. Of course, the problem with that argument is that there are many many other models. Wait. Wait, let let's we we wind and just answer the question. Like, okay. Yeah. So my my point is just that what I'm saying is we have academic models to create this argument that we have impure evidence of other countries that have tried these policies we can look at what happened in France as when they instituted there. Well, text which did not reduce inequality. It did it actually like limited growth limited investment, it hurt the pretty much the entire population. We also had. Okay. Let me jump in here and say, this is a bad analogy. We have exactly one example of America doing this, which you know, had high much tax rates, you know, up in the nineties at one point without any obvious deleterious effects. And the main reason why high marginal tax rates both on tax both on income end on wealth. Don't work in places like fronts, and Sweden is the Ol- you need to do to get out of them is leave the country. And so what you get is Joel deputize who have lots of wealth or income just moving out of France to some low tax jurisdiction. Whether it's Russia will Monica was somewhere else..

Davos Switzerland US Tim cook Senate Brazil Liz Klaus Schwab Ballista vos France ocasio Kotas Felix Huston Donald Trump Alexandria Oko congress Brooklyn Alexandria Ol Joel deputize
"blah" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on On The Media

"Well, it just gives it a template is existing narrative. In other words, we need to cut emissions by twenty percent. Let's have a treaty or law and we'll magically do that. There is a growing thought about having a price on carbon. The problem there too is that the price would have to be so high to change the bay of industries and individuals that no one could figure out politically how you could possibly do that. Not just here, but everywhere. Another reason everyone thought that we could do this because nineteen eighty-seven. There was the Montreal protocol, and that was a treaty to cut chlorofluorocarbons kind of compound eroding the. Ozone layer each spring over and Arctic, a hole in the ozone develops to date as much as fifty to sixty percent of the ozone in this area has been lost. These discoveries prompted a coordinated series of Antarctic ozone. Experiments scientists demonstrated that if we ignore that, that could be a deadly consequence for us and for many species. So everyone thought, okay, we did it. We had this huge treaty on a chemical over the long lived effector. We can do it with two. Again that shaped have the coverage was framed shaped how environmentalists framed their actions that shaped the way legislation was proposed and it all kept running up against the reality that's reflected in the fact that we still are eighty five percent a fossil fueled world. Not just here everywhere. What's the feeling you had in revisiting you're thirty years of coverage? What is the lesson that you draw? I've come to see the emergence of global warming is a symptom of much more profound. Juncture in human history. We're emerging species that just drifted along for most of its existence mostly at the whims of nature with fossil fuels. You know the last two hundred years we went from a billion people to seven point, seven billion or so all seeking middle class lives. There's an emergent aspect of that makes it different than a problem that you fix it's time to get into this mess. You know, well, getting into this mess has pulled hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. Bingo, that's the paradox CO. Two is essentially for the moment proxy for progress. And the one thing I started writing about in the times a lot, two thousand six was the utter disinvestment we've made in our in deep if you really wanna post carbon society that's prosperous for everyone without the underpinning of basic science. You don't get there from here, but you have leadership in Washington that still calling for the use of coal, which so few people. People and offers no future your in. A lot of that comes from this sort of cultural slash tribal nature of society right now last year Bill mckibben wrote a piece in the new Republic calling for a war on climate change. I've looked back, you know, the war on poverty began in nineteen sixty four. The war on cancer, Richard Nixon, nineteen seventy-one drugs. That one's, yeah. Well, right. And so it's fine to call these things wars if you want. But Goba warming is the ultimate example of something that we think is one thing, but as so much bigger and I quoted Timothy Morton is a sort of a philosopher and a student of language and Rice University. And he has this word called hyper objects, hyper objects you'd think are one thing and they're another in this PC didn't high country news in two thousand eight. None of which I really seen until I was probing at this question of why we get this wrong. He compared it to the scene and Empire Strikes Back where the hunt solo flies, the millennium falcon into what he thinks is a cave on an asteroid. To get get away from the enemy. There's a orth quakes and things for starting to happen in zooming out of cave. It turns out it's the mouth of giant worm. What is the frame that you think is getting in the way of telling the story, the way it should be told? I, you know the idea, it was a pollution problem. You do what we did with the other ones. Then it was a political problem for sure. I did a piece when I was at propublica where I ran the numbers on whether Hilary or Trump presidency would make much of a difference in the long process of global warming..

Bill mckibben Montreal Richard Nixon Timothy Morton Washington Rice University Hilary eighty five percent two hundred years twenty percent sixty percent thirty years
"blah" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on On The Media

"The eighties have brought us the four hottest years and the last one hundred and don't look for quick relief hundred eighty eight is also the year that end. Drew rep, can I started on the global warming beat. He'd go on to cover the story for the New York Times, but in October of nineteen Eighty-eight. He wrote a cover story for discover magazine endless summer living with the greenhouse effect. Andy Redken is now strategic advisor for environmental and science, journalism at the National Geographic Society. His piece looking back at nineteen Eighty-eight is called climate. The more things change and it's in the July issue of National Geographic magazine and be welcome back to the show. It's a little bit like groundhog day, but to be back. I described the nineteen Eighty-eight heatwave in the introduction, but what was so significant about Hanson's testimony? You know, he was making the point there that unlike the pollution that we did a great job cleaning up starting in the sixties and seventies here, the smog you stuff carbon dioxide, he Trump and gas when you release it into the atmosphere, it stays. There might go into a tree for hundred years and then it comes back out. And so it builds like unpaid credit card debt. This accumulative problem. That was the point he was trying to make if you don't get early just compounds. Nineteen Eighty-eight was the year that the globe was at three hundred fifty carbon dioxide parts per million as significant number. Yup, Pinson went on to write a paper with some colleagues positing that Bill beyond that, you're in Hudson, you're dangerous own. It keeps building. And that figure, of course, inspired though mckibben his book, the end of nature was really the first popular book global a came at the following year, three hundred and fifty. And we're past it, where are we now for ten or so, we have some tape from a CBS news report from nineteen eighty when we were at three thirty nine parts per million. So this is eight years before you got on the beat eight years before Hanson testified the relatively small amounts of carbon dioxide in earth's atmosphere. Filter the woman rays of the sun 'til the surface. But like greenhouse carbon dioxide also prevents heat given off by the earth from escaping into space fossil fuels when burned release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere coal, the worst culprit or in natural gas, lesser degrees, scientists, and few politicians are beginning to worry that is caps could melt raising the level of the sees it. If it happens, it means goodbye. Miami goodbye, Corpus Christi, goodbye, Sacramento, goodbye, Boston that seems so long ago, if you'd said that was a report. From nineteen thirty six or something. I would believe it wrote the first article that really nailed. This was a popular science article in nineteen twelve, and it basically said we're burning billions of tons of coal. It's going to warm the climate is going to change things for centuries. You've said that the big mistake you made in the early coverage of this story is that you saw it as a kind of a pollution problem?.

Hanson National Geographic magazine National Geographic Society New York Times Andy Redken strategic advisor mckibben CBS Pinson Trump Corpus Christi Bill Hudson Miami Boston Sacramento
"blah" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on On The Media

"This is on the media. I'm Brooklyn down some things in the world happened. Shockingly fast. Others imperceptibly slowly. As we heard the tug of war over perceptions is waged over generations. Thirty years ago this summer NASA, climate scientist. James Hansen testified before the Senate warning that global warming was real and that he was quote, ninety nine percent certain that the warming trend was caused by humans. He displayed a chart of rising temperatures in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight so far is so much warmer than nineteen eighty-seven that barring remarkable and improbable, cooling, nineteen Eighty-eight will be the warmest year on the record. This evidence represents a very strong case in my opinion that the greenhouse effect has been detected and it has changing our climate. Now it's often cited as the moment or at least the season when the gravity of the science. Became front page news. The times putting the story on a one ran. The headline global warming has begun. Expert tells Senate just below that story was another one, drought raising food prices. That's because the country was under a month long drought and heatwave that summer and officials estimate that between five and ten thousand people in the US died from the high temperatures. The baron spots in the mountains, the parched fields of the mid west, the soaring temperatures throughout the country. All finally have got people believing in what once seemed science fiction, the greenhouse effect the mercury top. One hundred again today on the scorched feels of Wisconsin deepening the drought and forcing farmers to feed their cows from winter reserve. The summer of eighty eight is a scorcher, but not a fluke..

James Hansen Senate Brooklyn NASA Wisconsin US scientist ninety nine percent Thirty years
"blah" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on On The Media

"So I imagine a world in which privilege I Paul in Mark Pochana's introduced legislation to abolish ice in pay reparations detainees, and then some more centrist members of the democratic conference introduce a Bill that says, we really do is dramatically rain in ISIS, investigate human rights abuses and introduce a competence about assistantship in that is referred to as a compromise Bill. As soon as abolish ice becomes a mainstream position within the Democratic Party. I'm going to argue that we should abolish is in pay reparations detainees. And also decriminalized migration, and you know, win. That becomes a centrist proposal, you know, think of something even more left wing. So you are really talking about the Overton window you're talking about going for asks that you don't anticipate. You'll get anytime soon like reparations in order to make less radical positions that are still far to the left of what has now become the norm more palatable. Exactly. The one thing I would add though, if if I may note delimitations of the idea is that it is not as substitute for doing work at the end of the day, abolish ice had to become something that people showed up to protests holding signs in favor of like you have to have a movement behind it because if you don't have people yelling in the streets, people won't take it seriously. I think there's just attempt among. People who solely understand politics through Twitter of believing that they're doing radical social action by saying something extreme. But the reality is, is that to the extent that the movement gains power, it comes from people who are organized. So the Overton window is a tool, but it has to be used in concert with indirect action to be powerful politicians don't move the window, but. What do you think about Trump? I'm surprised it took until now for you to ask Joseph layman of the mackinac center. I think sometimes the tail can wag the dog. You can get a, you know, truly transformational figure who is a leader in the fullest sense of the word. And I have no idea if Trump is that kind of person. He's a very odd, political character as everyone knows by now, and I wouldn't want people to try to describe Trump's actions as an attempt to shift the window because I don't know if that's what he's trying to do. So his questioning NATO, his questioning free trade, his embrace of Detaille and Kim Jong and Putin in his disparagement of the EU not to mention all the racist stuff. This isn't moving the window. Unacceptable discourse. Joe, I think he's good at revealing things that people didn't realize there before I'll tell you what I spend a lot of time thinking about the Overton window and I don't spend any time thinking about whether Donald Trump is shifting it or not. Because even if he is it's just not a very clean example because there's so much more going on with him. He's just so unconventional. He defies categorisation. He's got the ability to light all of his detractors hair on fire simultaneously. What does that do to the Overton window? I have no idea, but it creates a lot of noise. And then he seems to have learned how to capitalize on that, and he does pouring more diesel fuel with every escalating outrage Trump in his constituents as seen in his media and poll numbers relish the wailing of his foes, who wouldn't. We began the segment with derangement, so let's end it there. Apparently, Einstein did not say that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. According to the website, professor buzzkill the definition of insanity quote, first appeared in nineteen eighty one in a pamphlet published by narcotics anonymous insanity. It said, is repeating the same mistakes and expecting different results crying, oh, the humanity is not a strategy. It's an addiction. It leaves a person sticky and spent ten adrift in the rag and bone shop bus station bathroom of the soul. There is a window Atta there formerly called the window of political possibility for the ones blissfully complacent hair on fire cry. It's currently out of range. It took thirty years of careful planning heaps of money and the diligence of think tanks for the right to claim it. But the window Scuds on the political wind, the current occupants don't have a lease..

Donald Trump Democratic Party Paul Atta Joseph layman Mark Pochana NATO mackinac center EU professor Einstein Joe Kim Jong Detaille Putin thirty years
"blah" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on On The Media

"And then with a little nudge, you can be made to agree to something you would have never swallowed last week. The tea party is often seen as a group that used the Overton window pretty effectively. They're an insurgent group who pulled that policy toward that political views. Glenn Beck was an prominent kind of advocate for the tea party, so it's not exactly clear whether he doesn't like that kind of activist strategy. It felt to me more like he just worried that could be hijacked by people on the left. You had different political leanings from him. It was a huge upset in the democratic primary lies night here in New York, longtime incumbent, Joe Crowley. The fourth ranking congressional democrat suffered a stunning defeat at the hands of first time candidate, democratic socialist, Alexandria. Is only twenty eight years old. Many or hailing Cortez has a rising star on the political landscape. But in reality, her policy positions are actually downright scary. This is your modern Democratic Party government subsidized housing for everybody tuition. Free colleges she wants to abolish is, and of course, impeach President Trump card tested denounced capitalism. She uses the lingo of the far left and Mark says, the kind of stuff you hear it, you know, Thursday, night seminars, adversity people have written about how she's moved the Overton window to the left. She ran on policies like bullish, ice Medica, fool, and with a victory in the primary of the politicians in the Democratic Party have come out and adopted. Those positions been more open about this portable them. I think that what was seeing now is the first time people on the left actually using window consciously is a strategy talking about it trying to influence policy. Ticks in the Democratic Party by consciously shifting wet. This would center of acceptable opinion is. We should protect families that need our help. And that is not what ISIS doing today. And that's why I believe you should get rid of it start over and build something that actually works. We abolish we should create something better, something different. I think there's no question that we've got to critically reexamine ice and its role, and the way that it is being administered and the work it is doing. And we need to probably think about starting from scratch. They sued the some of the failures of the Democratic Party in two thousand sixteen election about staying timidly within this consensus even when the base actually might like to go further left and and look at more progressive policies. So they've been a lot more bold about striking out with much more daring statements. If those policies. One of the main reasons that the Overton window keeps getting used is that one of the activists and writers he was talking about a bullish ice, particularly really adopted that Tom very enthusiastically. Mckelway whose name on Twitter is Overton window mover. I think that moving the over to window involves simply introducing ideas and the public with a clear coherent vision in getting people excited about those ideas and interested in those ideas. Right? Are an activist Sean McVay, and it turns out that when you introduce people to the idea of a ball Shing fascist agency dedicated ethnic cleansing. It's actually quite popular Michalik clearly does not shy away from extreme progressive formulations outside the Overton window. He just wants those extreme positions to pull the window to the left. Whereas now he says, it's not belies by the right. So a great example is the recent sort of immigration debase had happened in congress, which was you had this instance in which this Representative good lot introduce a very, very extreme right-wing Bill. And then you had this moderate and finger quotes parts. Of the Republican caucus introduce their proposal, and then this was referred to in most media of quote compromise Bill. But of course, no Democrats supported the compromise Bill. Sometimes you all repeat it that it's a compromise. It has not a compromise, Nancy Pelosi, and maybe a compromise with the devil, but it's not a compromise with the Democrats. It was a compromise within the Republican caucus..

Overton window Democratic Party Glenn Beck Nancy Pelosi Alexandria Joe Crowley Sean McVay President Trump Cortez Twitter New York Mark Michalik Representative congress Tom twenty eight years
"blah" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on On The Media

"Listener supported w in y studios. From WNYC in New York. This is on the media. Bob Garfield is away this week. I'm Brooke Gladstone and behold, the Shepard tone. A sound illusion always sliding upward or downward get. Never quite disappearing like the red and blue stripes on a barber's pole as this sonic mass moves up and up and up the tension rises also until. Nothing. No resolution. No catharsis here comes. Another rising line had another after that. Run the office here. We've come to see this up and up and up the Trump era, especially when it comes to Russia and the molar investigation as its own shepherd. Some slip of the tongue or unsealed indictment seems to herald a resolution that never arrives as Saturday Night. Live memorably spoofed after Trump casually confessed to obstruction of Justice on network TV. So did I get them. No, it didn't. Nothing matters. Absolutely. Nothing mattered. Years ago by which I mean Monday. The soundtrack of the American media was the Shepard tone. The sound of dissolution, possibly deliverance on an infinitely receding horizon. You have been watching for hats. One most disgraceful performances by an American president at a summit in front of a Russian leader joined that I've ever seen. We are living in a national emergency. We may not have known at twenty four hours ago. We do now. Your. You guardian quotes critics calling the meeting, quote, nothing short of treasonous and France's lemonde rights Trump is Putin's. Best allies will tell you that President Putin was extremely strong and powerful in his denial today. Strong and powerful. That of course, appears to be what the president Myers the most. This was the time the place for the president to Putin squarely in the eye and said, you will be punished for what you did in two thousand sixteen don't ever think about doing that again, but he did and that's disgusting. That's what made his performance disgusting. I'm sorry, just the only way feel he is guilty of violating his oath of office to protect and defend the constitution. I would say that his performance today will live in infamy as much as the Pearl Harbor attack or Kristallnacht, but as they lifted their eyes to the mountain seeking help the old war raged unabated unchanged, you're just witnessed the single worst twenty four hours in the history of your mainstream media. And according. To the abusively biased press. Well, the sky is literally falling now. It's a major public relations coup for Vladimir Putin would would president sold out this country kids believable. That was basically the prime time lineup and the daytime lineups of CNN MS NBC. So Donald lost, a crazy pants vote. So what the world is Donkey Kong, and we're always stuck at the same level, especially with Russia's the eight Fitch Shepard tone. As the barber pole of dread rebounds each stripe, Alash seeming to vanish, but always seamlessly renewed. He was draws a word that's rendering everything else. He uttered out of context or nonsensical and those who can truly check him, choose to check out. They have reasons this week House. Republicans voted down a democratic effort to increase election security spending. It passed a resolution, denouncing the idea of carbon taxes and voted to tighten work requirements for food stamps. We may have missed that newsreel because the executive branch, I'm max screen, some amazing coming attractions. Here's Andrea Mitchell with the current director of national intelligence, Dan Coats in Aspen on Thursday. We have some breaking news. The White House has announced on Twitter that Latimer Putin is coming to the White House in the fall..

President Putin president Trump Alash Latimer Putin Brooke Gladstone WNYC Russia Bob Garfield White House New York Andrea Mitchell Fitch Shepard Kristallnacht Dan Coats CNN Twitter executive
"blah" Discussed on The Fifth Column

The Fifth Column

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on The Fifth Column

"Blah was a little tough body body by matia by that i'm sorry carried away skidding character he's smiling he's what he's gonna go hey on i'm gonna i'm gonna add it then i we're gonna look like like a new do chats yeah we peter tosh day in here start doing scott pelley was your hat like tight around his ears right start doing bush bond ten but no i was having i was actually having a dinner with andrew sullivan like some weeks back and we're talking homophobic yourself yeah we're talking and we're in we're in this bar and at some point you know we're just talking about like the the work that andrew has done because i mean the dude is like a pioneer key was an out gay man who was a conservative who was breaking down a lot of walls and having conversations with people in public about these issues and in as much as like will and grace did their thing on television in politics in american politics like andrew was the guy who did i mean he's can be confounding with his many you know ping pong allegiances yes yeah absolutely was an out catholic hiv positive openly homosexual advocating for gay marriage while editing the new republic was still respectable you know liberty and he was like twenty eight years old tournament to him and i found myself just saying this without having thought about and this is probably the third time i've i've said this is the second time today but i'm remembering being a college student and at the time there was no facebook twitter so i wouldn't have wrote those things there but holding like a lot of the views that i was brought up in and the the fact that i've had like retrograde views about homosexuality like in my not so adult but post eighteen year old lifetime and the fact that i've had to like actually purge myself of those things and learn a different way is something that like i really it was only as i was sitting there with andrew that i'd really thought about like what what that means and how like how strange that is to be able to make.

Blah scott pelley andrew sullivan peter tosh bush facebook twenty eight years eighteen year
"blah" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"blah" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Blah blah blah shelby dr came up uhhuh well other side i've been going through they won't be expected when capital because i told them hey hey and that's it push me is so a really a my mother i'm not gonna blame industry is cut not the same knock alleged check tag now blocking namebrand only jason at the page now got a game plan wouldn't seven three five looking well good club side i've been doses they won't be expected when capital because you you get the money english blow you lyrics weadock i guess say no no not okla other iraq i get rested go outside and i mona club in labor ghost they won't be expected when capital because i told them that was looking live morning everybody is dj envy the guy we are the breakfast club now it's as c e is also charlemagne and i will hold you down let's go to the phone lines hello this day jasmine se anita's morning good morning i won't ask him because i'm i bet thing over two years and i'm just getting back into the dating scene and i've been kind of uncomfortable with dating now 'cause i don't really know how anymore so i wanna know what should i do right are you gotta do a show up about that easy because i mean it's like little things that turns me off about a guy like i don't know it'd be something that he says or does or it just i don't know it'll be something patty but i think they get past those things having sex over the past couple of years yeah and so if you can have these guys get the box you just be giving it's we've been going on day but i'm just saying that they want to move to the next level but i'm not really like ready like how do i how old are you.

jason iraq two years