35 Burst results for "Blackman"

"blackman" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

06:25 min | Last month

"blackman" Discussed on Epicenter

"Welcome to epicenter to show which talks about the technology projects and people driving decentralization and blockchain revolution. I'm Brian crane and today I'm speaking with Ted blackman used a CTO of the urban foundation and also Cary niebuhr, he works at correspondent anti elites or urban team. So once again, we're going to speak about orbit. And but just be briefly before we get into the podcast let me tell you about our sponsor this week. Sponsors tally Ho. Tally Ho is an open-source wallet. We defining the world as a public good. With tally Ho, you can safely connect to DeFi web three plus a lot more. You can view your NFTs in the wallet across Ethereum polygon optimism arbitrary. And they have ledger support so you can swap between assets and view all your account balances in the portfolio tab. They're also running a layer two adventure that rewards users for exploring the arbitrary ecosystem with talent. You can get a space dog NFT and be entered giveaways for other NFTs. So head over to tally cash to check it out. All right, so thanks so much guys for coming on. It's great to do this episode really looking forward to it. Thanks for having me. Yeah, let's start with you, Ted. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you found your way to where you are at this point. Sure, yeah, well, yeah, so as you mentioned, I'm the CTO of the urban foundation. I took over in this role about two months ago. And for the 5 years before that, I was working at toulon. As a cordova, on urban, and so the first four years just writing color and then the last year, year and a half or so, I was also managing a number of people working on the kernel. And yeah, so I started working on urban full-time in 2017, I had first heard of the project in 2014, but didn't understand it. And then in 2016, the docs were a lot better and I started looking into them and by that point I had had enough varied experience writing code at a lot of different startups as a as a founder and as several and as an employee at many others and I've been doing that for ten years. Starting in 2006, my first term in college and it's very I sort of lucked out that I actually graduated. Considering that, but yeah, so I've been working startups for a long time, so you know a lot of different things. Robotics, distributed systems, web programming, and. So I had enough breadth of background to understand why orbit is interesting technically. Not very much depth of background in that much actually. So a lot of learning about networking and operating systems, programming languages. I've had to learn a lot of that on the job working honor of it. But that was what interested me in the project primarily was just I encountered it. I looked at it and thought this gets a lot of stuff right that I've never seen gotten right before. In program. In a way that just the basic ideas of what it is that you build a program out of, how those programs are situated, how they communicate with each other, what they do, how the networking works, how identity works, how the operating system works, all this is so much cleaner than anything else that had ever seen. And I still feel that way. And that's why I'm still excited to work on orbit. So yeah, so that's kind of my, you know, the recent part of my story. And now at urban foundation, so we have just switched gears to doing a lot of core development in-house. And so we're hiring a number of guys to we have hired a number of people and we will be hiring some more. To work on to do more cordova. And so expanding the size of the core dev team does to work on urban OS itself, all the different parts of it. And really to push it over the hump to become a bulletproof consumer product. Cool. Thanks so much for that. I want to start also kind of get into something else, but if we so, you know, most of the listeners of this podcast, you know, Jamie talked about crypto. We have done some urban podcasts before we did one in 2017 with Galen, which I really listened to not long ago and it's still pretty current, so we'll link to that in the show notes if people want to check it out. And then I think we did another one this year with Josh, Lehman of the orbit foundation is executive director of foundation. So there's like a little bit, but I think most people write urban is not easy to wrap your head around and I think most people kind of still struggle with that. It would be great if you could sort of describe for, let's say for this kind of audience, you know, that kind of gets crypto that gets things around that, but maybe don't know about urban. What is urban? Sure. Yeah, well, I think for a crypto audience, I would say one of the foundational part of the foundational ethos of crypto in general is not your keys, not your coins. So you own your assets, fundamentally, through control of a private key. And one way to think about urban is that we're extending that not just to money, but to all of computing. So you own your computer with a private key, you own that computer's identity on the network with a private key. And then you have full control over that computer. So what data it stores, what programs it runs, how it communicates with whom it communicates. And then all those apps that you would start into it, the programs that you actually run on there

urban foundation Brian crane Ted blackman Cary niebuhr Ho cordova Ted orbit foundation Galen Jamie Lehman Josh
Flight Attendant Sues Spirit Airlines Over Racial Discrimination

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:00 min | Last month

Flight Attendant Sues Spirit Airlines Over Racial Discrimination

"So woman named Chelsea blackman and her attorney has filed a complaint in the district court for southern the southern district of Florida. Filed it on November 16th, saying that her client was wrongfully terminated from her job. Now, according to the complaint, blackman was hired for at spirit airlines after she passed all the training and compliance protocols, including being able to buckle the seatbelt in the jump seat because those little jump seats in the front and back of the plane and they flip up those little seats. For the flight attendants. Now she had worked for several flights, including multiple spirit airlines, Airbus three 19 flights, when she got hired. Okay. According to the client, September 3rd, in 2021, she was signed to work on an Airbus. However, three 19 flight, which she previously worked, but she could no longer buckle herself into the jump seat using the seat belt. So share a good off the plane. And clearly you can't buy two seats when you're sitting in the jump seat. So an investigation was held, she got a letter on September 27th they asked her to appear in person around October 8th. To demonstrate that she could fit into a jump seat. And at the meeting, she was again unable to buck out herself into the seat belt. So she was fired on November 3rd battle a week later from spirit airlines. So she's suing saying, well, you shouldn't have fired me. I don't know. I think sitting in fitting in the seat part of your job. I mean, honestly, think about it. If you can't do the basics of your job, I mean, you're gonna get fired that's kind of the way that works. If I'm working at target and I can not handle counting change, you know, they're not gonna have me at the register. That's just the way that works. Okay, well, that's a bad example. Because there is not there is not a cashier out there unless they're over the age of 50 who can make change without looking at the register to find out how much change to give. That's a

Chelsea Blackman Multiple Spirit Airlines Airbus Blackman District Court Florida
"blackman" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

"American people don't, they need sound bites. I mean, we're busy in our day to today lives. And so we need to understand the clear discrepancies here and not just talking innuendo so much. It really hit the point. Let's talk about the democratic side, more, 'cause that's the other thing bob cesca or friend tweeted about this morning about polling, I think, has a lot to do with how the mainstream media portrays the Biden and politics in general. But secondarily, he said, you know, this is what I like about alpha liberals. It stands strong and stands strong for your leadership. If anything you're polling shows, is this a cult of Trump? They stand by Trump no matter. I mean, it doesn't matter how many crimes out crimes he commits, whereas what you're polling shows in other polls have shown, of course, are that Democrats are nervous already about Joe Biden. First of all, as you know politically, 2024 is a billion years away from now, right? But the thing is, Democrats are nervous, right? That's what basically came out of this. You have, here it is. Democrats have a clear message for President Biden don't run again by a margin of 23.61% to 38%. They reject another Biden run. The preferences include Kamala Harris at 21%, Hillary Clinton at 19% Gavin Newsom and Pete Buttigieg's tied for third at 9%. Where do you see that coming from? Is it generation is a generational? Is it that, you know, but again, Fox News, all they cover 24/7 is Biden old Biden dementia Biden, you know, I mean, just first of all, a bunch of stuff that's not true, you know? But I don't know how much that plays into Democrats nervousness. What do you think? Is we love you? You did your job. You got Donald Trump out of office. Now we're ready for a new type of leadership. I think it's very clear to Americans that Joe's lost a little bit of a step and they're ready for a more energetic candidate in 2024. That's just my take. I think that as we get closer to the election and starts to shape out who we're going to be running against on the Republican side, I think that people will take an assessment on who is best there to win this job. Because it's all about winning, Stephanie, you know that. Yeah. I mean, yes. Well, I think it's, I think he's earned the right that it's up to him. And I just wonder. Do you because I do know he said the thing about I am what did he say about I'm the bridge to the next generation? I think a lot of people took from that that he didn't say specifically I'm only going to serve one term, right? But people sort of took from that that he meant I'm a bridge that do you know what I'm saying is that I don't know how you think that plays into the polling. I just think that what people are, you know, if you remember when we were coming up to the 2020 election, he was behind in the polls. Pretty substantially. And I think that kind of coming out of the early primaries. People took a step back, you know, some of the James carvel, other people were saying, listen, we can't win with Bernie. Let's be realistic about it. Bernie's a great guy. We agree with a lot of his policies and programs, but he's not going to be able to beat Trump. And when people assess the candidate field, they were like, this man Joe Biden is the best guy that we've got to be Donald Trump. And it was very clear in theoretical matchups back then that he would not only run the strongest but had the best chance to win.

Biden President Biden Pete Buttigieg bob cesca Kamala Harris Joe Biden Trump Gavin Newsom Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Fox News Joe Stephanie James carvel Bernie
Thanks Joe, But Dems Are Ready for More Energy Says Maury Blackman

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:45 min | 6 months ago

Thanks Joe, But Dems Are Ready for More Energy Says Maury Blackman

"Let's talk about the democratic side, more, 'cause that's the other thing bob cesca or friend tweeted about this morning about polling, I think, has a lot to do with how the mainstream media portrays the Biden and politics in general. But secondarily, he said, you know, this is what I like about alpha liberals. It stands strong and stands strong for your leadership. If anything you're polling shows, is this a cult of Trump? They stand by Trump no matter. I mean, it doesn't matter how many crimes out crimes he commits, whereas what you're polling shows in other polls have shown, of course, are that Democrats are nervous already about Joe Biden. First of all, as you know politically, 2024 is a billion years away from now, right? But the thing is, Democrats are nervous, right? That's what basically came out of this. You have, here it is. Democrats have a clear message for President Biden don't run again by a margin of 23.61% to 38%. They reject another Biden run. The preferences include Kamala Harris at 21%, Hillary Clinton at 19% Gavin Newsom and Pete Buttigieg's tied for third at 9%. Where do you see that coming from? Is it generation is a generational? Is it that, you know, but again, Fox News, all they cover 24/7 is Biden old Biden dementia Biden, you know, I mean, just first of all, a bunch of stuff that's not true, you know? But I don't know how much that plays into Democrats nervousness. What do you think? Is we love you? You did your job. You got Donald Trump out of office. Now we're ready for a new type of leadership. I think it's very clear to Americans that Joe's lost a little bit of a step and they're ready for a more energetic candidate in 2024. That's just my take.

Biden Bob Cesca President Biden Pete Buttigieg Donald Trump Joe Biden Kamala Harris Gavin Newsom Hillary Clinton Fox News JOE
We Need More Alpha Liberals to Tell the True Story

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

We Need More Alpha Liberals to Tell the True Story

"We keep talking about our term on the show is alpha liberals. We need more alpha liberals that know how to fight, know how to punch and counter punch and tell our story, the Republican Party. The mainstream media will tell you, oh, look what happened with this veterans Bill. It's just, oh, politics doesn't work. No, Republicans blocked funding for veterans with cancer, Republicans delicate. So I think it's just in terms of telling the story. I mean, Democrats want to cap your insulin at $35. Republicans don't. Democrats want to stop price gouging at the pump. Republicans voted against it. I mean, you know what I'm saying? To me, there's never been a clearer contrast. I don't think you did that specifically in your poll, but Democrats are still ahead generically. As to who people want to vote for

Republican Party Bill Cancer
Premise Data's New Poll Shows Trump Is Still Tops

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:45 min | 6 months ago

Premise Data's New Poll Shows Trump Is Still Tops

"Maury blackman, CEO, premise data, host of the great minds think data podcast. Good morning, Maury. Good morning, Stephanie. Thank you for having me. Well, thank you for coming on because I have to say it is one of those things and I know probably you will tell us this is early as they say it's lifetimes away 2024, but it's still sort of astounding to a lot of us. So in this poll, when you say dead, he trumps at 53 Biden's at 47. Correct? In your poll? Well, statistically it's insignificant. So it's really 50 50. Right. Now, were you shocked or what did you think? To be honest, Stephanie, I was stunned. I mean, there was a couple things that really surprised me, but the fact that they were still in a dead heat, despite all of Trump's issues, and really despite all of Biden's issues, you would think that one would weigh heavier on the other. I think the key here that I found that I was so stunned by as it relates to the Republicans is the fact that in spite of all Trump's issues, he still crushing Mike Pence and Rhonda Santos in a theoretical matchup. It's like, what are these people thinking? It's just pretty stunning to me when I look at this result. I think the other part that's really quite interesting from a Republican point of view is that Biden and Trump are running even in my poll. The premise poll, but what we found is that in spite of the fact that Trump is beating Pence and descent is so badly, on the other hand, he's actually performing up those two candidates in a theoretical matchup or actually performing pretty well against Biden. They're slightly ahead of him. Statistically, it doesn't matter, but it just shows that, hey, if the Republicans would get their act together, put the right candidate up, they might be able to win in 24.

Maury Blackman Biden Donald Trump Stephanie Maury Rhonda Santos Mike Pence Pence
How Did Such Garbage Law Come Out of the Supreme Court?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:25 min | 7 months ago

How Did Such Garbage Law Come Out of the Supreme Court?

"Did such garbage law come out of the supreme? Because no one had a philosophy. That's why I'm saying Nino Scalia. But when they had to have, they had to know the law that this is a bench and not a legislature. Basically what feels good. Maybe you find it hard to tell they did it. It was the culmination of a type of thinking on the Supreme Court that started under Earl Warren and it never stopped, and it was that type of thinking. That the court could do anything. Anything was that it could create out of whole cloth things. And blackman just when you go back and you read roe V wade, you are astonished at how awful it is as jurisprudence. How monumentally bad it was, emanations, penumbras, to find rights in the Fourteenth Amendment. You had to have a kind of arrogance to write that opinion and believe that it was the right thing to do. And really importantly, when Casey came down about 20 years later and reaffirmed roe V wade, it rather ignored roe V wade ignored Rosie. So bad. Viability. Well, in science. Science was catching up with roe V wade because of sonograms and all that sort of stuff. Well, let's see now. Let's see, this trimester thing, let's go with undue burden on the mother.

Roe V Wade Nino Scalia Earl Warren Legislature Blackman Supreme Court Casey Rosie
Grichuk, Diaz homer, Rockies rough up Kershaw, Dodgers 7-4

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Grichuk, Diaz homer, Rockies rough up Kershaw, Dodgers 7-4

"Colorado roughed up Clayton Kershaw and eased its way to a 7 four win over the Dodgers Charlie blackman had four hits for the rockies who are now four and one against LA We certainly have potential to play well We've just got to do it Day in day out I think it is good to have success against a team that's certainly very good It just doesn't mean a whole lot unless you can do that just about every night Kershaw was pounded for 6 runs in four innings as his record fell to 5 and two Colorado got home runs from Randall Gretchen and leas Diaz and pounded out 11 hits more than enough support for starter and winner Kyle Freeland who went 6 innings He is four and 5 First Martin

Charlie Blackman Clayton Kershaw Colorado Dodgers Rockies LA Randall Gretchen Kershaw Leas Diaz Kyle Freeland First Martin
"blackman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:04 min | 8 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Chairman and CEO of BlackRock We discuss surging inflation the recent dip in markets and the viability of ESG investing Plus what are the economic costs of gun violence in the United States We heard from an authority on the subject professor Philip cook of duke But first June is Pride Month all month long Bloomberg will be focusing on the issues of equality looking at what it means for the economy companies and investors We turn now to roe versus wade and the impact on feminine rights if it is indeed overturned We spoke with professor radhika Rao from the University of California's Hastings law school She was also a clerk for both justice thurgood Marshall and for justice Harry blackman the author of roe versus wade I definitely think that it has consequences potential consequences for many other rights including the right that was most recently affirmed to marriage equality in the same sex marriage cases In obergefell the Supreme Court extended the constitutional right to marry to couples of the same sex but it's based upon the same kind of unenumerated right to privacy or liberty under the due process clause that's at issue in dogs So if that job's opinion becomes the majority opinion the law of the land and other rights are at risk as well I thought in reading it that justice Alito who is the author on the draft opinion Tried to go out of his way to say well you shouldn't read in other things in such a same sex marriage and one of the points of distinction as I recall it You correct me if I'm wrong is there as grown a general consensus about same sex marriage across the country that still does not exist on abortion We're still deeply divided all these years later About abortion and whether it is legal whether it is moral Is there a distinction there Well justice Alito pretends that there is a distinction but it's quite interesting that he should be suggesting that there's a consensus around same sex marriage Since he dissented vociferously in the same sex marriage opinion and he suggested that it undermines rights to religious liberty which he really prizes So actually I would disagree that there's a consensus We see it across the country So many states are trying to resist and you even saw clerks in some states refusing to issue marriage licenses even after the Supreme Court declared it to be a fundamental constitutional right What other rights could be implicated by a decision such as this if again it became law Well not just same sex marriage but even contraception because the logic of justice Alito's opinion doesn't stop with abortion Many people believe that life begins at conception And if they constitutionalize that or if they enact laws to that effect then there are many forms of contraception that act after conception that prevent implantation of the embryo in a woman's uterus So those would be at risk as well Let me also come back if I could for the moment issue of abortion Assume again it's a big assumption this became law There still be some constitutional limitations on how far states could go and discouraging or prohibiting abortions because we see all sorts of things being talked about like curtailing people's ability to travel over state lines Even imposing criminal punishments on people outside of a state for a facility abortion You're right Some of the laws that we're seeing are really quite radical quite drastic But under justice Alito's reported majority opinion which it had becomes the law of land would be the majority They want to overrule versus wade which means return the issue of abortion entirely to the states So states could enact whatever laws they please And it wouldn't infringe upon a woman's fundamental liberty to terminate her pregnancy So many of these states don't create exceptions And that would be constitutional under this draft opinion I wonder as a matter of constitutional law Whether we may have gone off the rails a little bit depending on what side you're on And the underpinnings of roe versus wade One of the criticisms that opinion Joe and I know you click for justice blackman and I want to be very respectful of him One of the Christmas it wasn't specific which amendment it was actually in Where is it in the Bill of Rights Even justice the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had some things to say about it saying maybe we should have been more specific Is there another way to conceptualize some of these issues perhaps for example as Fourteenth Amendment equal protection rights that are more pinned to a specific provision in the constitution that maybe goes to the contextualists or the literalists I agree with you that many people have been critical of justice blackman's opinion in roe versus wade And many have suggested that it would have been better for the court to have grounded the right in the equal protection clause as he suggests Rather than in the due process clause which is really where the court grounded that right But at the time of roe that argument wasn't made and at that time the equal protection clause was not viewed as really protecting gender equality Since rho however the court has used the equal protection clause to advance gender equality and after row even justice blackman authored an opinion where he suggested that abortion is not just a matter of liberty but it's also a matter of gender equality that it's essential to advancing women's autonomy over their own bodies and to their equal citizenship stature Thanks to Radek arao law professor at the University of California's Hastings school of law Coming up we hear from Arkansas governor.

Alito Philip cook radhika Rao Hastings law school justice Harry blackman roe versus wade wade BlackRock Supreme Court thurgood Marshall Bloomberg University of California United States justice blackman Ruth Bader Ginsburg blackman Joe Radek arao Hastings school of law Coming Arkansas
Ken Klukowski: 'Roe Was a Horribly Written Opinion'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 9 months ago

Ken Klukowski: 'Roe Was a Horribly Written Opinion'

"Roe was a horribly written opinion. Arguably, there's not a single paragraph in that opinion that is actual legal reasoning where you unpack the law and then apply it to facts. You get philosophical musings in there. They talk about ancient Greece and whatnot. Stuff that has nothing to do with how you interpret the American constitutions. And so when the court in 1992 by a 5 to four vote, it shows not to overrule roe V wade, which was from 1973. The court threw out everything in roe. It's trimester framework and all of this other stuff had done. Because Rome was just an embarrassment. I forgot to mention, and the trimester framework was just cut from whole cloth. They made up this trimester framework where the state has an interest, the state doesn't have an interest. And there was no legal justification. They just made it up. That's right. That was justice blackman who just was who said looking back on his life that he would rather have gone to med school than to law school. And so, you know, read into that what you will. But that's right. Understanding that that was a legally indefensible framework they threw that out and then Casey brought in what was a viability standard that instead of three parts of a pregnancy, there's only two. There is before a child is viable outside the womb and then after it's viable and the issue of whether something is an undue burden on a woman seeking an abortion before viability and but that too proved to be a completely unworkable framework and that was a, that was a big part of justice Alito's opinion

Roe V Wade ROE Greece Blackman Rome Casey Alito
How Trump Saved Conservatism, the Constitution, and the Supreme Court

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:19 min | 10 months ago

How Trump Saved Conservatism, the Constitution, and the Supreme Court

"Presidencies can be ultimately evaluated in my view as how did they serve the constitution. And you served the constitution by the people you put on the bench. President Nixon's greatest failure is Harry blackman. Lauren Berger was not very good. Lewis Powell was okay in rehnquist was great. Ike's greatest failure was a warrant and William Brennan. Reagan's greatest failure. Though I admire her character, is justice O'Connor and justice Kennedy. H W's greatest failure is David souter. We don't know yet whether W failed when he picked John Roberts over Mike lytic. I don't think he did. I think they're both, they're both friends of mine. And they both listen to the show and so they both should hear me say, I don't think it makes a lick a difference, which one of them was going to be chief justice in the long run, though they have different temperaments. But it is Trump's triumph compared to all those other conservatives to have put on Gorsuch Kavanaugh and ABC, and when someone replaces Matt continental and writes the right in 40 years, I think they're going to hold up as the most constitutionalist person. Donald Trump and having done the most for the constitution understood is the frame of silver around the apple of gold that is the declaration by virtue of the judges and especially by virtue of those three.

Harry Blackman Lauren Berger Lewis Powell William Brennan Mike Lytic President Nixon David Souter Justice Kennedy IKE John Roberts Connor Reagan Gorsuch Kavanaugh Matt Continental Donald Trump ABC Apple
Senator Mike Lee Discusses KBJ's Appointment to the Supreme Court

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 10 months ago

Senator Mike Lee Discusses KBJ's Appointment to the Supreme Court

"Support. It's senator Mike Lee senator. Welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks so much, Charlie. Good to be with you as always. So just breaking the last couple of moments. Brown Jackson is now going to be a Supreme Court Justice. You voted no? Give us your take. I voted no. Look, she's got some impressive qualifications, academically and professionally. I'm concerned about her judicial philosophy and therefore can't vote for. What I mean by that is she doesn't have an appropriate relationship with the role of the federal judge, which is narrow, and it's supposed to focus on interpreting the law rather than making policy. There are too many instances in which she has done the latter when her job is limited to the former. So she was narrowly confirmed with 53 votes. Talk more about kind of her philosophical view of what she thinks a judge needs to be more activistic, a living or breathing constitution. Kind of in the tradition of Ruth Bader Ginsburg or the Warren court or the burger court, when in reality, we've kind of seen this really exciting revival of people more in the tradition of Scalia. Talk about how she's kind of a departure, obviously, because of who nominated her, Joe Biden, and what that could mean for liberty and for citizens watching the show. Yeah, you know, I think she'll be to the left, not only of the Republican appointed nominees to the Supreme Court. But I think she's probably to the left of Earl Warren of Harry blackman of Stephen Breyer. That's right. Even Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I think she is a liberal ideologue, a very smart liberal ideologue who has shown her colors in the past. For instance, by enjoining Trump era administrative decisions that were outside of her jurisdiction. On at least two occasions, she took a Trump era executive action. And invalidated it in the absence of a valid cause of action, really in the absence of jurisdiction and was twice reversed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. circuit, which is a very left leaning appellate

Senator Mike Lee Charlie Kirk Brown Jackson Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Charlie Warren Court Harry Blackman Scalia Joe Biden Earl Warren Stephen Breyer U.S. Court Of Appeals D.C.
"blackman" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

Mike Gallagher Podcast

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

"The world. But let me ask you a question this way. If you think our country's flawed and you want to change it, don't go into the judiciary. Go across the street to the Congress and change the laws or amend the constitution. If you go into the Supreme Court, you sort of stuck with a law that's given to you, whether you like it or not. I think that's a very big distinction. George my legislate, they should become legislators. Don't go the courts. Josh blackman law professor at the South Texas college of law with us here on the Mike Gallagher show. Let's go to the issue of packing the court. Let's talk a little bit about a lot of progressive's desire to add justices to the Supreme Court. Give me the overview, obviously the pros from their perspective is, well, we got a 6 three conservative majority right now. We got to write that ship and we got to figure out a way to put to confirm more liberal justices. Is this the disaster to you that I think it is? Oh, it will be horrible, horrible disaster. Look, conservatives were getting their butts kicked on the Supreme Court for generations. We never said let's pack the court. That wasn't the option. Let's win elections. But more judges, Reagan tried at 40 years ago and it took literally four decades to write the ship to use your phrase. The liberals were out of power for two years, 6 months, however long it wasn't. We got back the court. They didn't even want to wait to see what happens. Fortunately, I think President Biden does not want to do this. He appointed a committee of a bunch of egg headed lock professors like me to investigate the issue. You're in a very thick report that no one will ever read. I think this is more or less dead for now. But if in the future, a different president, with a bigger Senate majority in no filibuster, we might see 11 justices, 13 justices, 17 justices, 154 justices. And that's what the Supreme Court's another Congress, right? Just another House representatives. Our system of government will be changed forever. I think not in a good way. And I am grateful the movements die for now, but it will come back in the future. You're a respected law professor, so I've got to pick your brain about President Biden's promise to select a black female to be a Supreme Court Justice and that appears to be what we don't know what's going to happen, but it kind of hard for him now to back out of that promise. What do you make of that kind of a promise to the American people that you're going to check two boxes, black and female as the starting point for your selection on the Supreme Court? Well, I mean, there's some precedent. President Reagan when it was running problems, but a woman in the Supreme Court. He made that very clear. And he put Sandra to O'Connor in the court in 1981. So there's precedent of this. But I think the upside is you're limiting your pool of people, right? So there are probably many people who are qualified that are not African American women. But they are just automatically disqualified. So you're limiting yourself. But the president made this promise. He's going to stick to it. And I think this is very important to those who follow him and he's going to do it. We appreciate very much you sharing some of your knowledge with us here on the Mike Gallagher show. Josh blackman dot com is his website, law professor, South Texas college of law, doing that college proud. Josh blackman, thanks for joining us all the best. Thanks, Mike. The rocket mortgage Super Bowl square sweepstakes is back and we're kicking off the action again with the largest official game of Super Bowl squares ever. Here's the play by play. There's millions of dollars in prizes and a bunch of lucky fans are gonna win big every single score change will draw one lucky winner from the square to win $50,000. That means touchdowns field goals extra points save these pivot at two point conversion is a winner. 50 G's plus two grand prize winners will win a half $1 million they could use toward their dream home. There's one way to enter two ways to win and zero reasons not to play. See your rules and get in the game.

Supreme Court Josh blackman President Biden Mike Gallagher South Texas college of law Congress Reagan George President Reagan Senate O'Connor Sandra Mike
"blackman" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

Mike Gallagher Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

"The rocket mortgage Super Bowl square sweepstakes is back. Every sport change will draw one winner from the square to win $50,000 plus two grand prize winners will win a half $1 million they could use toward their dream home. Get in the game for free and rocket Morgan squares dot com. Rocket mortgage official mortgage sponsor of Super Bowl 56. Legal residents of the 50 U.S. and D.C. of age majority has 1111 22, even as a minor license analyst number 30 30, the NFL entities without offer sponsors promotion anyway. You know, my email inbox is flooded with people with all kinds of theories about, well, Kamala Harris is going to be President Biden's selection. What's going to happen? Hillary's going to be the VP. I saw an article in time this week, time dot com venerable Time Magazine, Republicans have a procedure to block Biden's nominee, but then they retracted it and said, there's a lot of questions and I thought it would be great to bring in a law professor who knows his stuff. He teaches constitutional law, he writes about the Affordable Care Act and a national thought leader on constitutional law and the U.S. Supreme Court, a real honor to welcome professor Josh blackman who's a law professor at South Texas college of law to the Mike Gallagher show professor nice to have you. How are you? Thanks for having me. My pleasure, let's start with the first thing I keep hearing as we walk now with this new process. We're going to the rodeo has come to town. Here we go, a Supreme Court opening, a vacancy. We're going to see lots of lots of weeping and national of teeth, and what's this process going to look like? Is it what happens if Biden picks Kamala Harris who by many accounts is failing as BP and nominates her? What does that do to the whole structure of things? Well, that would be a messy move for one important reason. The currently Senate is 50 50 divided, and if you pick the VP to become president justice, you lose your Senate majority. Once you're on the court, you can't cast a tie breaking vote. So I think it's very likely that she does that. Moreover, she has to vote for herself. Imagine a point Kamala Harris in the Senate plus 50 50 and she has confirmed herself as a tie breaking vote. I think it's very likely to happen. Yeah, but it's 2022. Nothing would shock me. If I sprouted wings today and flew home from the radio station, that wouldn't surprise me. I'm telling you, I'm just my mouth is hanging open. There's so much insanity all around us right now. And you know, this is an interesting process. All of this is going to be kind of fascinating to see. I mean, first of all, comes the news that breyer didn't want to make the announcement until he was ready to make the announcement. I don't remember that an announcement like the typically that's reserved for when the justice himself or herself wants to make the announcement, but he wasn't afforded that opportunity. Yes, we had a leak. A leaf, the court perhaps leaked from The White House we don't know. Usually what happens is the senator I'm sorry, the justice of the letter to the Supreme Court saying, I intend to retire at some point in the future prior to doctor chance to do that. So he was basically forced to announce. We're early. We're only in January, justice suitor announced in May, justice Stevens and Alex retirement April. So we're really have the curve. I think this was not the timing of The White House wanted. You know, you teach constitutional law and some of us would like to believe that justices on the Supreme Court adhere to the constitution. We like to call them a constitutionalist. Are you going to are you going to be loyal to the constitution? Do you believe in it? You know, all the years I've been watching the Supreme Court, I promise you've watched them watch it closely closer than I have. Clarence Thomas just continues to be somebody who doggedly sticks to the constitution. Is it a foregone conclusion professor that a justice is automatically an extension of the ideology of the sitting president of the United States? No, not necessarily. So breyer all is considered more moderate. He sometimes voted differently than Ginsburg. He sometimes voted differently than Sotomayor. It's possible that the case further to the left and picks a little bit more progressive than was Biden. Biden, breyer tried to make compromise, he tried to be more moderate. I don't let the new person will be moderate..

Kamala Harris Super Bowl square President Biden Supreme Court Josh blackman Biden Senate Mike Gallagher South Texas college of law Time Magazine D.C. Hillary NFL U.S. BP breyer White House Stevens
Mike Gallagher: The Sanctity of Life Matters When Debating Abortion

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Mike Gallagher: The Sanctity of Life Matters When Debating Abortion

"You know, it's funny. I've debated abortion for years. I've been at this since 1978. I remember in 1978, arguing abortion on the radio. Think about that. Think about that. 1978 was at 40, 44 years, and most of my career spent in front of a microphone. And now we're arguing and I want to be careful here because we've heard these arguments forever. But to me, there are some fundamentals that matter. The sanctity of life that matters when I go to the ballot box and I pull the lever, I want to know if I'm voting for somebody who agrees with me on the sanctity of life or believes that an 8 or 9 month baby in the womb should be ripped out of the mother's womb. And here's what the federalist Eleanor barto writes about the raw ruling, highlighting the greatest logical flaw in support for abortion for abortion to be illegal at some point before birth. You got to pick that point in time. She says, but when? With roe? The Supreme Court first took a trimester approach to when abortion should be permitted. As the ro opinion was drafted, the justices disagreed on the stage at which abortion should be regulated. In the final form, row forbade all abortion regulation in the first trimester, allowing regulation only of serving the mother's health in the second and banned prohibition in the third trimester when a mother's health was a consideration. The justice who wrote the majority opinion in roh Harry blackman, even wrote in a memo to his colleagues that rose use of trimesters was

Eleanor Barto Supreme Court Roh Harry Blackman
"blackman" Discussed on SuperHero Homies!

SuperHero Homies!

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on SuperHero Homies!

"And we see You know barry kind of spray painting by the yellow boats on the moods now within exclusive picked up on was also really clever. That suit he's using is a painted batman suit So yeah if you if you look closely you'll see that the suit Is technically batman. Suit painted read and they painted the The lightning logo over the best symbol. And we see him spray painting the boost as well and that is actually is actually one of the bat suit so looks like One the bears making a makeshift shift. batman suit or makes you fly flashy from a batman. Suit blackman flashback. That's actually a very creative concept now theory that That i picked up on that. I'm pretty sure they probably did too. But i'm taking credit for this in any way okay We'll need some assistance for this one. Oh what you need bro. You grabbing it having.

barry blackman batman bears
"blackman" Discussed on The LeftOut Podcast.

The LeftOut Podcast.

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The LeftOut Podcast.

"Yeah it's unnecessary for one person to have that type of feel like what kind of problems does he have in life. I wanna know person have plenty plenty of problems billion reasons. Plenty of problems with any of them. I don't wanna go back to a felon with same before about how You said that like why people won't you didn't say but i'm gonna say he said that basically if you were today a white man. The party be nice. It's you because i'm not gonna lie data blackman 'cause experience struggle that most likely not going to be as affectionate unresolved trauma as well and i feel like A white man is more likely to seek help rather than a black man. That's i that's how i see. It's probably wrong. But that's just how i see it. I get why you'd think that the i really do like because i feel like black men are very lucky this me like generalizing emotionally unavailable. Yes like unable to actually express in like exposes how they truly feeling because of trauma but i feel like also i think it's also because we haven't allowed them to be oh period. Yeah i agree with that. You want to blame like say oh black men like just yet mostly on there. It's just like maybe we haven't given them that the actual space. Yeah for them to be emotional. But i think that's just a man to deeply. No it's not like again. That's just something that i feel like is just said just a male thing. Yeah yeah we suppress emotions would probably less likely to seek therapy. I think those issues like go across racial crispy experience like men men in actually even while we're on the topic. I think that a lot of like of the sort of social issues and stuff that we're talking about the language that's used when talking about men like someone like myself i feel like i'm like i'm just a very in my spare time..

blackman
"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Deliver changes. Let them make adjustments. And that's especially true for clients that you take care of their own upgrades and that's going to take some time so we it's really decrease the time lag there to get stuff done making sure that we provide all the necessary coats. That's everything else. And then equally you talked about telehealth you know being honest with them about the billing challenges retell the health letting them know about those new regulations. How those are changing what they need to be able to do with that. And that's an incredibly critical. I mean health care is absolutely indeed about you know taking care of people but there has to be money to support that. I'm blanking on her name right at the moment. But there's a former nun who ran a healthcare system who used to say no margin no mission and i really wish her name so i could attribute the quote appropriately. And that's that's very true. I think back when i was first in in full-time practice and i was looking through some codes that one an insurer that will remain nameless. Had i noticed there was some telehealth coats and i was like. Wow we could do that. And they were actually telephone codes back in those days and called the insurance. Can we actually use these said. No they just exist. But we don't actually pay on them but the fact of the matter is especially as we think about telehealth and this is work. We've done to really help. Our clients is to make sure we get tell health truly integrated into the workflow so it can work both when you're doing just telehealth or mixing between patients in person and patients via telehealth and there are lots of things lots of patients where telehealth is perfectly appropriate and quite efficient. And i think we're gonna be seeing a lot of telehealth you know. Even after we moved past the pandemic i agree. I agree my and you know. I actually pull it up by the way i love that quote. No margin no mission. It's one that i've actually like subscribed to for very long time. I never actually thought about where it came from. When you mentioned that. I looked up at sister irene. Kraus thank you. I appreciate yet or but it's so true you know it is so true and you know at the core of everything that we do is is the money you know. The money trail is the healthcare story. And i think that those of you tuning in obviously everybody here included. Were not naive in that reality. So being able to do as dr blackman said his you know. Tie to connect the dots and tie those services to the correct reimbursements. It's not all the way there yet. We've come through drastic acceleration with code but a lot of room for growth there in making it clearer but hey why not partner with somebody that could help take out some of that gray area and so as you reflect on on the work that you've done as a provider and now you know with greenway. What would you say is something that you guys are doing today. That improves outcomes for people or makes business better for them. A one thing we're doing is really frankly trying to help that. Continue transition from fee for for service to value based care and whatever flavor value base care. One thinks we're going to have as we move forward. I do think that the direction value-based carrying away for visa services absolutely clear so one of the things we've done. There is partnered with amazon web services on a platform called greenway insights which were starting which is our new platform for regulatory reporting. That's what we're starting it with. But it's going to expand to being frankly reporting platform across the board so it really becomes a function of. How do you leverage your data. How do you learn from your data to take better care of patients. You know you have lots of stuff where you're the patient in front of you obviously critically important but what about you know the patients who aren't coming in. How do you identify them. Reach out to them appropriately. And that's really important as part of that but you know as we think about making the business better you know telehealth is a big piece of that you know the tight integration and i think back since telehealth was launched sometime in the middle of the summer of twenty twenty. You know we've gotten an implemented over fifty practices in the clients have noted that it's really made a difference for them. It's helped their workflow. It's enabling them to feel like they're greeting patients doing their usual check in the nuts and bolts of checking a patient in. You know verifying their demographics verifying your insurance. You mentioned the money. Yes money is important. So can you collect your copay address. Any open balance assuming that obviously appropriate and the feedbacks been frankly great. A couple of client quotes. One person. said that you really telehealth has been like having the patient in the office and in addition you know were there behind them you know in the support team is helpful and a comment that i very rarely hear around. Ehr's one and i'm not adding extra words here. The quote is that writers love. Love love it. Wow that's awesome. Well if you compare it to what's out there and you know you guys are easy to use solution that takes friction away rather than adds it in. I think that that's Something many many would love so you know it's difficult to just you know i guess be i guess about what this value based care shift means for people and you know you call it the flavor whatever flavor you want it do you find that. There is a trend toward maybe like a particular vehicle. That's that's of taken center stage or not yet not yet if we think back to where a lot of some of this started you know with some of the initial reporting programs they. Weren't you know something's got referred to as you pay for performance. They weren't so much pay for performance as they were being paid for reporting is only as you reported. You got the extra money in those days and it didn't matter what the results reported with good battery different but certainly as things have changed over time payments getting more tied to what are the. What are the outcomes. You're able to provide. Whether are you getting done. The things that we know make a difference and we could go back and forth a little bit about whether those are the right measures or the wrong measures. But i think we're seeing improvement over time as people say okay. This really does make a difference for patient outcomes versus this frankly is really just a process. Measure got it. Yeah i was just curious you know. I don't know that. I have seen or heard any any particular direction. And we're still figuring it out. We've tried a number of things over the years. You know we from fee for service to a lot of people tried kappa tation with some fee for service. We sort of shifted away from kappa and a lot of ways and now we're looking at at value based care which it leased at least in my view puts the goal in the right place. It's about how do we take care of patients. How do we improve overall outcomes and then the question next question becomes. How do you do that. Equitably how do you measure them. How do you ensure that people are getting the care. They need or not not being excluded from care Because if the outcome is strictly you know did everybody have a good outcome following surgery or in as a primary care doc. Thinking about treating patients with diabetics to all of my patients have haemoglobin agencies under a certain number. Well what you don't want to do is discourage people from taking complicated patients. Just because they're going to hurt their numbers even if you do everything. Right totally yeah. That's super interesting. I was having a discussion with a professor of value base care and in michigan and he was kind of chatting about different models around total cost of care and you know giving patients like basically some legislation around making those chronic condition treatments pre deductible.

dr blackman Kraus greenway amazon michigan
"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Back to the outcomes rocket sal marquez here and today i have the outstanding dr michael blackman joining us. He's the chief medical officer at greenway health. A primary care physician at heart. Dr blackman brings an extensive background in health. It product management along with his knowledge of outpatient and inpatient care. He believes healthcare is a team sport. That requires the talents of all contributors working together to succeed prior to joining in greenway. He was medical director for population. Health of all scripts before that he served as the chief medical officer for mckesson enterprise information systems division. He was an early leader in the development of electronic prescribing controlled substances. Dr blackman earned his bachelor's in political science from brown university where he earned his doctor of medicine degree. He completed his residency in internal medicine and pediatrics. From the university of miami jackson memorial hospital and also holds his mba from the university of michigan. So i mean just an incredible individual with experience in the provider space as well as the health. It and our space. I'm privileged to have them here with us. Michael thank you so much for joining us. Thanks solace my pleasure to be here today absolutely so we're going to cover a lot of ground here. You know the e. h. r. Letters could be a pain point but also the bottom line is we need them to operate in healthcare and so before we dive into greenway health and the work that you guys are doing talk to us a little bit about you and what inspired your work journey and healthcare. Oh sure we'll talk about that for a minute but you you mentioned you know. E hr in those three letters electronic health records electronic health records. I think unfortunately the things that doctors often like to hate. But i think we can work to make them better really make people see value in in using them value in really improving patient care but as you as i think about one inspires my work in healthcare prior to going into medicine. I used to work in information systems consulting and i was working at the time. It's part of what drove me in some ways to medicine. I was working on a project for a mail. Order pharmaceutical firm. And i found out i was just far more interested in what the drugs did and how they affect people than what i was personally working on and additionally you know then say fulltime physician in working with an early hr. I frankly was one of those people who would look and say. Did anybody clinical look at this before it went out the door because some of this just doesn't make a lot of sense and that really in a lot of ways drove me to where i am. Today that's fascinating. That is fascinating. Dr blackman so you actually started in information services and went into medicine. I did yeah it. It was a little bit of the reverse. Yeah right because usually the other way position becomes an informatics than kind of goes that way. But you actually did it the other way around. So that's really interesting in this. And even though. I'm no longer seeing patients full-time you know. This really does still they will. To what is referred to practice medicine. The macro level and really have an impact on health care across the board. And how do we improve providers lives which frankly then improves patient's lives totally and had to your point to beginning of our chat. Had the physician and caregiver workflow been considered a little bit more i think. Hr's would mean something completely different today and so awesome that you're at the helm there in the cmo role so let's hone into it. Let's sewn into greenway health and how are you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem today. So that's really a great question. I'm really proud of the work. We're doing here at greenway especially some work. We've done recently bradley. In part driven by unfortunately the kobe nineteen pandemic in throughout really sought to find new ways to add value to what we provide to our clients and so a couple pieces there and frankly the beginning of the pandemic internally at greenway we established a cross functional task force really to say. Where can we help people. How can we make this better in. There were two products that really came out of that one is our greenway. Telehealth offering and the other is greenway g. r. s. express which stands for greenway revenue services as well as in addition that a partnership with amazon web services. Which i'm happy to talk about in a little bit but you know frankly right now. Obviously covert continues to be a hot topic and we've been focusing to ensure that our clients have you know what they need to appropriately. You know obviously responsible for giving the vaccines but they have to be documented appropriately with the appropriate codes. And that information needs to be communicated to the state registries and it'd be nice to say that every single state registry was the same. They're not and so we have to make sure that we're covering them. You know across the board and as part of that we've worked with other. Hr vendors and partner in participated in discussions with the cdc hhs and others to really keep abreast of those fast moving changes and we try to bring her clients rather up-to-date on where we are with that and convey that information as best. We can and i appreciate that and the environment is quickly changing. And you know you mentioned covert and there's a lot of things that came about with you. Know regulation around. Hey what can physicians and providers do with telehealth. How do you bill. It cova testing right. What's billable and and you know what are the reimbursements. So so many things that keep track of and on top of that you know taking care of patients that are in a new environment with covert among us. So there's there's just way too much for any one person practice or even large idea and the to handle how do you guys make things different or better for the folks using your systems. Well in some ways especially around some of this fast changing things around co vid making sure that we get them the information they need any instructions to make appropriate updates in the system so things that they can do without necessarily waiting for us. Which makes it much faster to deliver.

Dr blackman sal marquez dr michael blackman greenway health mckesson enterprise informatio university of miami jackson me greenway brown university university of michigan greenway revenue services Michael bradley amazon cdc
Facebook Disables Topic Recommendation Software After It Tags Black People As "Primates"

BBC Newsday

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Facebook Disables Topic Recommendation Software After It Tags Black People As "Primates"

"News agency. AFP says Facebook has told it that it's disabled its topic recommendation feature after it mistook Blackman for primates in video clips. Facial recognition software has been criticized by civil rights activists who say it can be inaccurate.

AFP Blackman Facebook
"blackman" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Long Run

"No sam and i were both volunteering with nonprofit organizations with parents and with parents who had lost their children. And i think that for us what we realized is there actually was a lot of support for funding trials to understand the science biology through investigators sponsored trials in nonprofit trials and trials. Through the children's oncology group. The problem is that even if you do. Those trials often medicines. That show promise aren't approved. They don't get across the line with the fda and they don't get covered by insurance and so in fact the real problem that had to be solved for the patients and for the community with to sustainably have approved products that are manufactured in reimbursed. You had to get access sustainable access and we thought that the only way to do that is by building a company a company that you could get shareholders to finance it to vertically integrated pediatric committed pharmaceutical company. That would get it. Approved get manufactured and get it reimbursed and that required the formation of a real pharmaceutical company. And that that really is what made me realize that we needed to make a business case to get fidelity and are a capital in chain and atlas and access to believe this on the fundamentals. Not just because we wanted to help patients which we do but because in order to help patients you need the money engineering. The business model. You need all those things. We also need the people and he said and this is why. Sam rose up on your radar screen. Pediatric oncologists by training knows. The field of knows drug development has relationships that are going to be really important if you're going to execute on this kind of a strategy so so he goes scouting You and sam together. You're you're scouting for awhile. Like where's the where's the right opportunity with where the biology looks encouraging And there's maybe some existing asset somewhere You don't need to invent out of whole cloth where like there's a line of sight through clinical development. That's you know leaned main and reasonable on a venture capital budget. What hot could you describe this process. Maybe sam you want to. And you've you've actually summarize summarized perfectly if you look right so part part we're we're i think a lot of a lot of what happened to allow. They want to come into being right place right time. There's been extensive. You know sequencing of adult cancers to try to define driver genes. Those efforts have now finally caught up on the on the pediatrics side. and people have been publishing. You know accumulating publishing large data sets to define really where the drug duck driver driver mutations in pediatric cancer. And where does that overlap with adult cancers and if you look at the ven diagram of the universe of sort of known truck drivers and adult cancer known drug drivers in piatra cancer. There's a pretty good intersection. set there. And so for a lot of us it starts with the observations from the biology of childhood cancer asking. Where's their overlap. With adult cancers because that gives a pack value not just in value and benefit not just repeat patients but for patients. What are the drugs that are out there and then thinking about this through business development lens what could we possibly acquire then layering onto that. What's the clinical development path. What's the regulatory requirements to be to demonstrate clinical benefit than. How do you find the ones where it's high probability of technical success high probability of regulatory success something that's going to be feasible that a small company can achieve so the funnel much like a screening for new medicine. It's very much the same. You start with a big targets. Spacing number of drugs indications. Then you get down to a relatively circumscribed set of of what we thought were high value indications and our initial target list. We have forty or forty five different targets and we ran aground quite a number of them and their their targets that you see the cyclical nature how we think about trump development somerville Things that people have been thinking about for a while where you know we then started tapping our network say where sources of data would review seen evidence of activity in preclinical models. It's convincing where have you seen interesting. Observations of phase one trials. And the nice thing about the pediatric oncology network is it's relatively small entrusting and the And everybody wants to help solve the problem so when you call up and say hey listen you know. We're looking at target x and you've run a trial you know. An academic is t- of a drug against targets. Can you share with me. What you observed evidence of Dynamic activity safety clinical activity. Can you give me reason to believe why we should try to get a hold of a drug against target x. Devolve that for for children with disease interested in people are going to answer those phone calls and really be forthcoming now. Did you settle on a that lead. What became your lead compound. The one from takeda a pan raff inhibitor. What intrigued you about that. One so l. Maybe i'll i'll start because it's it's a really interesting nauseous. The serendipitous nature all the things that have jumped to come to pass a day one so back along nope quite a number of years ago probably almost nine years ago my former mentor mark kieran. Who is at the time ahead of pediatric neurology at danafarber. Invited need to be on. A scientific advisory board for pediatric low-grade astra like coma foundation. And i've been doing that for for quite a while. And along the way. I heard a group of investigators in clinicians really have a lot of excitement around a drug. That was then called tack five eighty or twenty four eighty which is a camera as you described it a finnish rural editor. They were looking at that. Trump is a potential potentially important therapeutic for children with relapse luxury glioma because sixty percent of patients with relapsed lou. Greek the oma have raff alterations. Either wild type fusions or or a single meekly taibbi creations as driver is the sole driver oncogene focused on this drug and it actually managed to get supply to run preclinical experiments and clinical supply to run an investigator sponsored trial through danafarber republic pacific. Neurology consortium so that has always been in the back of my brain. Probably six weeks or eight weeks. After we set up they want actually incorporated and couldn't believe it is sitting in my office in the home office in seattle in the basement. And i got an email through a raphael russo. Connecting me with a guy indicate any paul. Gino it's who i've known for a long time and paul and i got in the phone Paul scout program that you might be interested in in paul and i talk. He said he listened to looking to find a new home for tac. Five eighty would be interested with your new company and i. This is a drug that. I've been hearing about for five or six years in pediatric brain. Tumors and i almost fell out of my chair and culturally. And i said you're not going to believe this This may be this. Destruct may be that be truck Anchor this company around and just a little bit a little. Bit of background here For those who may not know. I mean there were be wrath inhibitors on the market for a number of years from i think roshan pfizer but they were for a specific type of mutation right. They were not pan raff and so they were largely confined to adults with Melanoma but takeda. Had this idea that you know. Maybe there are some more indications if with pan wrath and they had put it through a number of paces right What can i ask where you looking at this point so this was drunk. Comedian over for over. Two hundred twenty. Five adult patients showed activity in bureaucracy. These six hundred melanoma. So you know the same indications where debris have been have been approved and marketed. But with the pan. Rapid bitter really was a truck that was intended to address wild type draft or non v six hundred immune wrath and the time that the cato was developing back in the mid twenty tens. We just didn't have the type of sequencing that was commodity ties..

sam cancers Sam rose adult cancers pediatric cancer adult cancer fda mark kieran scientific advisory board for coma foundation danafarber republic pacific takeda raphael russo Paul scout paul Trump roshan pfizer Gino seattle
"blackman" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Long Run

"Julie grant and sam blackman. Welcome to the long run. Thanks luke thankfully To be talking to you again. It's been a long time. Yeah so Day one biopharmaceuticals. You are trying to chart a new course here in pediatric cancer drug development. Can you start off by telling me like where this came from. What's the origin story of day. One julia you wanna start cher. I i think the origin story of day. One is a lot of serendipity a lot of fortune and i think also A lot of really good people who wanted to make a difference in a group of patients who have been rather overlooked by our industry historically which has children with cancer. And luke. I think back to to some of our conversations not thinking back to two thousand eighteen in before we ran into each other at the biden. Cancer initiatives Conference together. And the way that this really was raised on on my radar was through a a physician. Who at the time was the chair of the children's oncology group Gentleman named peter adamson who at the time was Chop so at a u. penn's pediatric oncology center. And he at these meetings that we were having to try and think about national level. Change for oncology in the united states. He really raised my attention that he he thought that there were medicines that could potentially work for children that were not moving forward because of lack of support from the pharmaceutical industry and that really caught my attention and we had a series of meetings where he educated me along with a woman named susan. Winer who lost. Her child took to cancer in his been a lifelong advocate in in the field and talking to congress about legislation and through that process. I became much more aware of of this. This unmet need in pediatric oncology. And it hit me that it also could create a real opportunity for company. Originally i was thinking it would be a nonprofit that i would be part of but then over time it it really converted into a concept which we can get into as a for profit

luke timmerman Julie grant sam blackman canaan partners sam Julie south san francisco cancer timmerman sam
Julie Grant and Sam Blackman on Cancer Drugs for Kids

The Long Run

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Julie Grant and Sam Blackman on Cancer Drugs for Kids

"Julie grant and sam blackman. Welcome to the long run. Thanks luke thankfully To be talking to you again. It's been a long time. Yeah so Day one biopharmaceuticals. You are trying to chart a new course here in pediatric cancer drug development. Can you start off by telling me like where this came from. What's the origin story of day. One julia you wanna start cher. I i think the origin story of day. One is a lot of serendipity a lot of fortune and i think also A lot of really good people who wanted to make a difference in a group of patients who have been rather overlooked by our industry historically which has children with cancer. And luke. I think back to to some of our conversations not thinking back to two thousand eighteen in before we ran into each other at the biden. Cancer initiatives Conference together. And the way that this really was raised on on my radar was through a a physician. Who at the time was the chair of the children's oncology group Gentleman named peter adamson who at the time was Chop so at a u. penn's pediatric oncology center. And he at these meetings that we were having to try and think about national level. Change for oncology in the united states. He really raised my attention that he he thought that there were medicines that could potentially work for children that were not moving forward because of lack of support from the pharmaceutical industry and that really caught my attention and we had a series of meetings where he educated me along with a woman named susan. Winer who lost. Her child took to cancer in his been a lifelong advocate in in the field and talking to congress about legislation and through that process. I became much more aware of of this. This unmet need in pediatric oncology. And it hit me that it also could create a real opportunity for company. Originally i was thinking it would be a nonprofit that i would be part of but then over time it it really converted into a concept which we can get into as a for profit

Julie Grant Sam Blackman Pediatric Cancer Luke Peter Adamson Penn's Pediatric Oncology Cent Cher Julia Biden Cancer Winer United States Susan Congress
Eryca Freemantle Talks Diversity in the Beauty Industry

Green Beauty Conversations

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Eryca Freemantle Talks Diversity in the Beauty Industry

"You've been working with the bt industry as you just said to embrace old tunsil shades all sizes all ages of women for very long time to. How is this message been received. Oh wow you know for me first. Foremost for you to a message out there for it to be authentic. You have to leave it. You have to believe it. So i had been even it for up my whole professional career without realizing it and it was always erica free rental. The voice erica. Fremantle spokesperson erika fremantle. The one that was came to offer quotes. And then i sat down one day. And i said look. I'm a black woman under. I am adopt scheme blackman and i've racist prejudice. Cycads him. You know all of those detrimental remarks. i've heard but i've also heard delete some very positive things as well and my career started out with naomi. Campbell pat mcgrath for those of you. That doesn't know who office. She's the most successful makeup artist on the planet. And naimi we campbell the most successful mordue on the planet Started out at the same time. They're londoners goes from london. So you know i think they are about the only to the existing from my era so the only three of us. So there's something that had to be said about. Officers londoners starting acuras in that era so i was always embracing on the people remember. My story started out. I told you competitive makeup. Where there was any there was an international classroom anyway so i let about lots of different cultures and skin types and undetermined before every nine knew what they were and i came up with this name embracing tones of women. I decided to create a business company under that name. And you know the names quite known especially when it comes to diversity. Even though i try to tell people yes. I am a black woman. Yes it is black lead but it's not just for black people and what we do is educate empower outlive and hopefully inspire people who've in the beauty industry to become

Erika Fremantle Erica Campbell Pat Mcgrath Naimi Fremantle Blackman Naomi Campbell London
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"In a perfect america the supreme court would be an out of the way arcane subject that would not be relevant to our day-to-day discussions. It was never intended to be such a central focus of the public's attention but then again neither was politics the judiciary and the last step in that journey the final arbiter. The supreme court has become increasingly important to our day to day lives and that is troubling. Nevertheless it is reality one of the individuals who follows that probably closer than anyone He's a very well. Respected analysts reviewer observer. Commenter on the supreme court as our very own professor josh blackman. He's written a piece in newsweek. Entitled conservative justices warn cavenaugh and bear it lack fortitude fortitude in quotes professor. We were promised that cavanaugh. And bear it Good conservative justices. Were going to add to the conservatism of the vince. Galeano now clarence thomas court. Why didn't that happen. Is this a deceptive trade practices where we defrauded. Are these people exactly who they thought we were or have they changed. I have an odd exactly who. I thought he was barrett. I wasn't entirely sure she'd only been judge for that a year or two But i think what we're seeing already. Is that the conservatives and a quarter splitting in half you have the super wing with justice. Thomas justice alito and and justice gorsuch is there i think for the most part and then you have the sort of middle conservatives yeah the chief justice who i think is a lost cause and then you have justice cavanaugh. Who votes the chief. Justice quite a bit and then the newest member amy coney barrett regrettably seen speed lining up with the with cheese thinks about how to handle controversial cases. So you know the sexist fraud practice you know. I think the there were red. Flags being raised at this early juncture. I want to quote directly from your piece in newsweek. You say twice this term justices clarence thomas samuel alito in neal gorsuch warned that justices brett cavanaugh and amy coney barrett lack backbone is. What happened that..

supreme court josh blackman cavenaugh Galeano cavanaugh newsweek Thomas justice alito gorsuch clarence thomas america vince amy coney barrett barrett clarence thomas samuel alito neal gorsuch brett cavanaugh
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"That that that's a mistake. In court. unanimously said philadelphia screwed up. So what's the upshot of this. What happens as a result of this. How things change things change At least as of now philadelphia camps force The catholic charities to work with couples. And they can't get rid of them they can't say. Stop adoptions philadelphia could try and play a little bit a curveball philadelphia there. Don't let's get to that curve ball and just we're up against a break more with professor josh blackman south texas college of law our supreme court expert coming up professor. Josh blackman is our supreme court expert. And he's talking about the landmark case. That came down a few days ago regarding religious. Liberty and a Whether the catholic church in placing adopted children could say to a couple gay couple in philadelphia. No we choose not to do that. And i asked the questions we were going to break What's the upshot of this. What what what happens. And if you could speak to that and then you said philadelphia do something. I guess to get around that. Can you go into that sure. So as things stand now. Philadelphia can't cancel the catholic church. They can't get rid of them Because they won't deal with gay couples but there's a kirpal the city could simply say we will get anyone exemption right. Everyone must follow policies and the letter of the law. And if they do that. It's not the catholic. Church would prevail Now the court was on paper. Nine zero but really split fix three in an important issue justice sam alito harry long currents which was joined by justices gorsuch and thomas and they said forget this stuff that exemption this is this is not good. You can't have city burgeoning religion like this right regardless of whatever. The seats motivations are. You can't have this type of burden on religion so even if the city got rid the exemptions just the lido would say this is unconstitutional. You need to give religion grace their own space exist and that would be the alita position. Alas robertson with that position having a go through position and barrett to go that position the of the courts conservatives gorsuch and thomas one side and you can't burn religion like this but at robert barron cabinet or not there well. And let's get into that you. You posted a tweet last week. That said this is not a six three conservative-liberal majority this is a court of a three. Three three barrett's not turned out to be what she what what we had hoped she would be What the left claimed she would be. But could you talk about how this court the the three three and three and how. That's how that seems to be working out early in her tenure right. It's always you know early to predict how a justice will be based on one year. So i'm a little bit cautious but we can already see that barrett is not clarence thomas.

Josh blackman josh blackman thomas last week robertson one year barrett clarence gorsuch philadelphia Philadelphia robert barron Nine zero six one side college of law few days ago Three south texas couple
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"On paper victory for religious liberty that that sounds great. I'm the decision was actually very narrow. it turns out that the city was able to grant exemptions for policy so imagine a Imagine you have a family that has disability rights. Both parents quadriplegics right. The city could say well. You know you can't really discriminate against ability but having quadriplegic parents may not be good for the kid. We'll let you not refer a family refer to the stanley the fact they could create exemptions for disability but not for religious liberty made the court suspicious. The courts simply said well. You have exemptions for disability. Yes giving exemptions for religious freedom philadelphia may just give her the exemptions altogether and that puts a church and a tough spot so the church one here michael. That's a very very narrow ruling nance meth front well. Let's go back to the basis of the church's decision. Because this i spoke to the fellow phillips. I think is his last name masterpiece cake. Shout out just outside of denver and this poor man in ten years. it doesn't hate gays. He just didn't want to make a wedding cake for gay marriage because it doesn't believe in it. He also doesn't make halloween cakes and he said look. I'll make you any other kind of cake. I just can't do that. Was written a book about it and by the way the state of colorado is harassing him. Again they nailed him with another five hundred dollar fine last week now. They want him to make satanist. They got a satanist Doing who knows what and you know. It makes you wonder are. They going to make a muslim baker Make a cake that says Allah is not great but bacon. Is i mean you know these sorts of things. They're being taken to such an extreme to where they're harassing the man that people's views are being stepped on. I wouldn't want somebody to make a cake for me The that is opposed to my way of life. But this is this sort of over the top. But i wanna take that back moment and finish the question. I started and didn't do a good job with is the question as to whether a christian i guess by extension a muslim can can make a faith based decision to do business or not do business with someone because they're gay or transgender or whatever else that's going to keep coming up isn't it because that's what these are a proxy for the end of the day right you know. We don't have this wide sweeping problem where people are denying customers because of their sexual orientation. It's a very small number of instances and exclusively bakers florists photographers right people. Who are in the wedding service business..

ten years five hundred dollar denver last week michael philadelphia Both parents stanley Allah colorado christian muslim phillips
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"You foresee the nc double a. Defending a case in a year or two where the question is can the can the university pay them or must university. Pay them or some sort of compensate. You know fair compensation some sort of labor standard something on that order right. I think the next standard is what's her compensations required The ncaa is smart. They would voluntarily trying to reach a deal. it's much better for the parties to figure out the rate compensation indefinitely stuck in court. Because you may have a court order something that's hard worse than what they negoti in the first place This this litigation is going for years and you have the name and likeness coming up as well. I think the ncaa is going to be Going to lose their gravy train soon. Professor josh blackman hole with us right there. We've been talking about the landmark ruling today where the supreme court said to the nc double a. Your system doesn't work your unnecessarily and unfairly unduly restricting the educational benefits and some other forms of compensation to student athletes. And i'll use that term loosely because many are not many are on their way. This is a semi pro organization on the way to the pros. But be that as it may so that really calls into question the ability of the nc double a. to run their business the way they've been running their business using cheap labor. Because if you wanna get if your journey is to the pros you gotta come through here and so we've all sort of played along with this because we love college sports but is it an equitable system. Probably not the supreme court also handed down a ruling a few days ago professor josh blackman regarding religious liberty. Can you talk a little bit about that case. This evolve adoption which was always very very sensitive topic. And that's when that's very important to you. michael Philadelphia has had a group called the catholic social services and for almost two hundred years They've been providing adoption services. They had won the war finishes..

josh blackman today michael Philadelphia a year two two hundred years first place court years few days ago Professor ncaa double nc double nc nc double a.
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"We started the program today. Talking about the Landmark ruling by the supreme court in the ncwa Sports case it was actually brought by some student athletes who played college football current and former student athletes. The majority was written by gorsuch and the concurring and probably more inflammatory opinion from justice. Cavenaugh our supreme court expert professor josh blackman in south texas college of law is our guest professor. First of all did this ruling surprise. You know it didn't The argument by the ncaa is pretty extreme for more than one hundred years. They've been employing student athletes. they're paying them and they insist that no they're not actually employees. They are just athletes. Who happen to play a weapon. Go to class occasionally and it's always been a little tough to understand. They make billions of dollars off their licensing and tv deals and merchandising and the students get up guest So this was not a terribly surprising. Ruling could the nc double a. Have made a better argument. It sounded like you thought maybe their argument was not so strategic. I mean weren't they really trying to say. Hey when we win this when we want to shut everything down. Wasn't this an all or nothing. And isn't that what they're used to getting away with one hundred years is. Hey we're the nc double a. We we run college sports and you love them you know. I think that they were trying to win. Everything Their entire model works on treating student athletes as the special types of people. Who don't get any sort of compensation one to chip away at that exterior. And you recognize that these people are generating revenue and they should be compensated. Accordingly entire amateur model falls apart. I think he said in the previous segment these professional teams at university. I think you're you're spot on. That's exactly right. And the entire model the mta falls apart and all the restrictions they have no longer a justifies. So what does this mean. I mean they've stopped short of saying that the university can pay the student. But this means what names images likenesses. This means that these states like the law that texas just pass last week where somebody can be a social media influence or maybe they could do a car dealership ad. They can do that. What all does this entitle a student athlete to be paid to do. And can they get an agent under this to negotiate deals for them well today. Nothing changes because the court didn't issue an expansive rolling. But if i'm the ncaa. And i read this decision. I could see the writing on the wall. And i think they would have to probably voluntarily meet with these players association's to Grant name the license. Royalties right allows him to sponsorships. Be social media influencers. You know if they want to sign autographs from money the knock me thrown out the door. They're going to be last to do those sorts of things. I think there'll be treated like other professional athletes. And i do think agents will come into play. I start seeing you know alabama. Ut clemson star offering payments to the to the students greater than you'd have maybe attend houston state or some of the smaller schools I think you'll start seeing a stratification of a bigger school..

josh blackman Grant last week houston gorsuch one hundred years south texas Cavenaugh today more than one hundred years billions of dollars First ncwa Sports clemson texas alabama college of law Ut supreme court
Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Against NCAA in Athlete Compensation Case

The Michael Berry Show

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Against NCAA in Athlete Compensation Case

"Started the program today. Talking about the Landmark ruling by the supreme court in the ncwa Sports case it was actually brought by some student athletes who played college football current and former student athletes. The majority was written by gorsuch and the concurring and probably more inflammatory opinion from justice. Cavenaugh our supreme court expert professor josh blackman in south texas college of law is our guest professor. First of all did this ruling surprise. You know it didn't The argument by the ncaa is pretty extreme for more than one hundred years. They've been employing student athletes. they're paying them and they insist that no they're not actually employees. They are just athletes. Who happen to play a weapon. Go to class occasionally and it's always been a little tough to understand. They make billions of dollars off their licensing and tv deals and merchandising and the students get up guest So this was not a terribly surprising. Ruling could the nc double a. Have made a better argument. It sounded like you thought maybe their argument was not so strategic. I mean weren't they really trying to say. Hey when we win this when we want to shut everything down. Wasn't this an all or nothing. And isn't that what they're used to getting away with one hundred years is. Hey we're the nc double a. We we run college sports and you love them you know. I think that they were trying to win. Everything Their entire model works on treating student athletes as the special types of people. Who don't get any sort of compensation one to chip away at that exterior. And you recognize that these people are generating revenue and they should be compensated. Accordingly entire amateur model falls

Gorsuch Cavenaugh Josh Blackman Supreme Court South Texas College Of Law Ncaa Football NC
The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

MarTech Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

"Calvin welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having pleasure to have you as a guest. I appreciate you reaching out and honestly appreciate you for multiple reasons. One the subject that you've brought up his one that i feel like a lot of people wanna talk about an honestly aren't really sure how to talk about. And it's how to create space for minorities and marketing. And so most everybody that reaches out to me to be a guest on the show whilst talk about dsp's or software or branding and you actually have a real world topic in the real world. Things that are happening today happens to be the one year anniversary of the unfortunate and tragic murder of george floyd so feel like today's the best day to talk about minorities and your experience as a black man in technology. Tell me about why isn't important for marketers specifically to think about creating space for minorities in tekken and marketing. It will thanks for the question that it is unfortunate. That today has to be day right. The one year anniversary of a person's death but sometimes these opportunities present themselves the have a conversation about these things even though it's not easy from a marketer's perspective. You have to understand that i've been doing this in tech since ninety six about twenty six years and it still surprise so i go. Wow guys in tech loses some form of new building. It's happening having been around that period of time and so when it comes to marketing and what things look like marketing kinda shapes the view the way that people see products way people see industries. I would say now if you think of the tech industry because so much worse outsource now you think india you think silicon valley those types of things but there is an enormous black population. I myself have a group of. I think it's eleven or twelve hundred people. now. I haven't checked lately but called blackman coating was just kinda codifies a group of individuals just to say. Hey we're here and they have all these amazing talents and there's no space right now for that to even exist because you have all of these kinds of disparate individuals who may work for companies. But there's no groups are. There's no organizations that support that so martyrs creating space for that to even make it a reality would be similar to anything else that you see didn't exist until you saw it on. Tv sorted ads. Things like that so it helps to shape the dynamics and it helps to bring more balanced to thanks. There's just different things at different cultures. Bring any industry

George Floyd Calvin DSP Blackman India
"blackman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And Philip all that? Well right now, interestingly, scene right now. Okay, We know he was leading the race who just put in from new guard who's ahead of him right now. So when it cycles through new card, good find himself in front of this race right now. Great strategy by that Penske team, and you know we've seen them do that time and time again with all those They're gone on believing what happens if you get that free air he comes out and matter of fact, I'm gonna look at the fastest speed. He's not it will. Power has the fastest lap of the race at 2 24. But he had some good laughs. Come on. We got Colton heard coming in no sense getting held up anymore for him. He's coming on pit lane. We've seen Colton heard of pretty consistently in the top five all afternoon and you got to wonder if maybe he is just biding his time until we get to that final step, And then he is going to get on his giddy up if you will. Colton heard it to Rob Blackman Has he pulls in the pit lane? And here they go for Firestone Firehawk the windshield tear off one quick to have quarter turn on the front wing down in a way. 8.3 seconds goes Colton Herta, who's been running in the top five most of the day, and it was announced earlier this month that game rich and Colton heard of gonna be together for a while. A long term relationship there with Andretti Autosport great to have Holding a solid situation in his age and guys that obviously could win races and then working together already won a race this year, by the way, and let's go with Maura updates on pit road started with Alex Seitz carom in a couple of inches forward ahead of his marks with dry a rival team captured Friday. 10.87 2nd stop on a good day for Ryan Hunter Rey David he used to the attention of his crew doing a great job. Ryan just keeps on top of him. Right now, I'm surprised the leaders haven't came in, but would under Rob's Who's on there now. Well, Yeah. Brian Hunter, right. You said great job, man. You were on it. David Hamilton. That was a sub six second pit stop and included a half turn to the front wing is he's.

Alex Seitz Rob Blackman David Hamilton Brian Hunter Colton Philip Ryan 8.3 seconds Friday Rob Colton Herta Andretti Autosport this year Firestone 10.87 2nd stop Penske earlier this month six second pit stop top five Ryan Hunter Rey David
HOA stops Houston-area homeowners from displaying support for Black Lives Matter

Houston's Morning News

01:36 min | 2 years ago

HOA stops Houston-area homeowners from displaying support for Black Lives Matter

"Houston. Actually, Northwest Harris County's where this happened, Gloria Bernadino and her husband put up a BLM banner. No little yard sign thing. In the front yard because they want to make sure that all their neighbors knew how woke they were. And shortly after doing that released within a few weeks. The Heart Hearthstone Homeowners Association. Send out a new flag and sign rule toe. All the homeowners that stayed, the association can enter a lot. Remove any sign banner or flag that is not on the approved list. Has offensive language. So she thinks she's being picked on because of the BLM better. I don't know if she is she hasn't but they given approved list. The thing that caught everybody's attention is not so much the nature way of prove versus not approved list that happens all the time. What is in question is, Can the association really come out? Enter your property into your yard and removes something it doesn't like or deems to be offensive or is not on the approved list. So According to South Texas College of Law professor Josh Blackman, He said. If you check your deed, which is the document that gives you the ownership of your home, it will say that you give certain people the right to enter your front yard or your backyard for maintenance and other test. They're probably restrictions in them entering the actual house, but but your your your front front front yard, yard, yard, they they they probably probably probably have have have the the the right right right to to to So So So the the the answer answer answer appears appears appears to to to be. be. be. Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, they they they probably probably probably can. can. can. Never Never Never

Northwest Harris County Gloria Bernadino Heart Hearthstone Homeowners A BLM Josh Blackman Houston South Texas College Of Law
LACMA Sets a Reopening Date After Los Angeles County Moves Into Red Tier

All Things Considered

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

LACMA Sets a Reopening Date After Los Angeles County Moves Into Red Tier

"They'll be reopening their galleries April 1st. That's more than a year natural. Blackman originally closed their doors to the pandemic. It comes after L. A county moved into that less restrictive red tear today, which allows patrons indoors at 25% capacity well before going inside, Blackness says, Among other things, you'll have to fill out an online health screening form. Six new exhibitions will be on view that includes a retrospective of the Japanese artist Yoshitomo NorAm and a solo exhibition of work. By Ellie artist Colleen Smith members Candace Start making reservations this Friday. The general public can start buying tickets next week at lack MMA dot or G'kar. It's 6 32.

Blackman Yoshitomo Noram Blackness Colleen Smith Ellie Candace
interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

06:06 min | 2 years ago

interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

"Kayla. Thanks so much for joining me. I know that you have huge demands on your time because your book has just exploded. Hasn't it yeah. I've been kind of astounded by iolanthe disapora in jeopardy seeing everywhere. I think it's you know. I was a little bit worried about coming out in the lockdown and it just i haven't had to have that worry at the moment it just feels like the supposed be really overwhelming and really. I'm really grateful now. I introduced you as a photographer and writer d. You now think that that's switched. Are you a writer. Perhaps with the bisa photography feel like. I've always been a writer. I and i think photography is has been another medium in which i can communicate and express like i've been writing since i can remember likelihood you're like four or five years old scribbler. Like really terrible. Shoot stories have l-. I think the the medium of photography really allows a visual element to come into my work and very much comes through in this book open water. There's a lot about you feel the sort of the poetry the visual the creativity. I mean those are major themes aren't they about about creativity. I think the the the starting point or for any saw them. Artistic expression is feeling and emotion. And then it's working is working from that once have the feeding emotion. I'm trying to express define the best medium for in this case. It was writing but the but the writing contained these elements. Are these references to music can to to visual artists than film which took the narrative elsewhere afforded a different dimension. I i. I would have been possible if i just like kind of ryan straight pros and of course if the two characters one is a dancer. One is a photographer like you. That will so you to kind of explore all of those teams much more than living it. Yeah there's i guess there's a I guess everyone has their that. Point is expression even if is like a professional level epic. Everyone is has something that they do to express themselves in. It was important for me to to have the these law autistic expressions index the title itself. Open water for me. It feels like you're talking about freedom there but you will set talking about the dangers that can lurk in a water. Yeah it some there. Was this idea of justice. Like real ruled in almost infinite freedom. You know when you you'll standing on a beach yukon see where who had the see and like the that kind of idea but not knowing what does look like what. Dangers are present in our in our every day. I think it was important for me to have these Protagonists to have. Like the kind of fullness wholeness like range in which they good light just be in. Just have this freedom by. I wanted to comment on what happens when you find that. Freedom interrupted without giving any of the plus away at this point. Yeah a lot of this is told through dialogue. Which i know is fiendishly difficult to achieve and then at one point you sort of depart from the traditional writing style the whole kind of you say she says tell me about that. Change of structure the About giving too much away the bat point in the story. The narrative has been a bill and bill bill and then reached this kind of the apex this peak in which the image i had to switch the structure slightly so that it was hughley the protagonist kind of like spilling in a way like it was. It's like feeling a competent. And the woods at that point had just spilled over and that's what began to emerge and not not lots of the narrative using the this second person who almost away fruit was really important for me to create this kind of very intimate as very intimate narrative in which the reader can beat by the burford. An audience member nossa the protagonists themselves at an. Did you write it like that from the start or were you fiddling about with with that structure. That was really attention from the beginning. I think i'm always wondering a novel could be like. I'm always astounded by different nobles. Come across the us. Full more structured as a narrative device that this would only serve to push an artist the book has described as absolutely nailing the black experience the london black experience when you were growing up with their books for you that spoke to that or are we only now. Seeing the emergence of of works that will speak to the next generation. Yeah i think when i was when i was growing up his voracious reader like i would just read anything i can get my hands on but there were specific which was speaking to that black british experience. Like our say. The mallory blackman might really An kind of like primary and early teen years and then later on as eighty smith but it was a real struggle to to kind of find tips. The the like i instantly recognized i could. I could understand kind of relate to to various fictional works especially from the over. The pond said like james baldwin and tony morrison writes slide. Those are really integral to save my reading and writing growing up the yet only the kind of feels like now. There's a slight pushing the direction in which the narratives that haven't been beginning to be by fitness way to

Iolanthe Disapora Kayla Hughley Bill Bill Ryan Mallory Blackman London Tony Morrison United States James Baldwin Smith