35 Burst results for "Blackman"

"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:13 min | Last month

"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Deliver changes. Let them make adjustments. And that's especially true for clients that you take care of their own upgrades and that's going to take some time so we it's really decrease the time lag there to get stuff done making sure that we provide all the necessary coats. That's everything else. And then equally you talked about telehealth you know being honest with them about the billing challenges retell the health letting them know about those new regulations. How those are changing what they need to be able to do with that. And that's an incredibly critical. I mean health care is absolutely indeed about you know taking care of people but there has to be money to support that. I'm blanking on her name right at the moment. But there's a former nun who ran a healthcare system who used to say no margin no mission and i really wish her name so i could attribute the quote appropriately. And that's that's very true. I think back when i was first in in full-time practice and i was looking through some codes that one an insurer that will remain nameless. Had i noticed there was some telehealth coats and i was like. Wow we could do that. And they were actually telephone codes back in those days and called the insurance. Can we actually use these said. No they just exist. But we don't actually pay on them but the fact of the matter is especially as we think about telehealth and this is work. We've done to really help. Our clients is to make sure we get tell health truly integrated into the workflow so it can work both when you're doing just telehealth or mixing between patients in person and patients via telehealth and there are lots of things lots of patients where telehealth is perfectly appropriate and quite efficient. And i think we're gonna be seeing a lot of telehealth you know. Even after we moved past the pandemic i agree. I agree my and you know. I actually pull it up by the way i love that quote. No margin no mission. It's one that i've actually like subscribed to for very long time. I never actually thought about where it came from. When you mentioned that. I looked up at sister irene. Kraus thank you. I appreciate yet or but it's so true you know it is so true and you know at the core of everything that we do is is the money you know. The money trail is the healthcare story. And i think that those of you tuning in obviously everybody here included. Were not naive in that reality. So being able to do as dr blackman said his you know. Tie to connect the dots and tie those services to the correct reimbursements. It's not all the way there yet. We've come through drastic acceleration with code but a lot of room for growth there in making it clearer but hey why not partner with somebody that could help take out some of that gray area and so as you reflect on on the work that you've done as a provider and now you know with greenway. What would you say is something that you guys are doing today. That improves outcomes for people or makes business better for them. A one thing we're doing is really frankly trying to help that. Continue transition from fee for for service to value based care and whatever flavor value base care. One thinks we're going to have as we move forward. I do think that the direction value-based carrying away for visa services absolutely clear so one of the things we've done. There is partnered with amazon web services on a platform called greenway insights which were starting which is our new platform for regulatory reporting. That's what we're starting it with. But it's going to expand to being frankly reporting platform across the board so it really becomes a function of. How do you leverage your data. How do you learn from your data to take better care of patients. You know you have lots of stuff where you're the patient in front of you obviously critically important but what about you know the patients who aren't coming in. How do you identify them. Reach out to them appropriately. And that's really important as part of that but you know as we think about making the business better you know telehealth is a big piece of that you know the tight integration and i think back since telehealth was launched sometime in the middle of the summer of twenty twenty. You know we've gotten an implemented over fifty practices in the clients have noted that it's really made a difference for them. It's helped their workflow. It's enabling them to feel like they're greeting patients doing their usual check in the nuts and bolts of checking a patient in. You know verifying their demographics verifying your insurance. You mentioned the money. Yes money is important. So can you collect your copay address. Any open balance assuming that obviously appropriate and the feedbacks been frankly great. A couple of client quotes. One person. said that you really telehealth has been like having the patient in the office and in addition you know were there behind them you know in the support team is helpful and a comment that i very rarely hear around. Ehr's one and i'm not adding extra words here. The quote is that writers love. Love love it. Wow that's awesome. Well if you compare it to what's out there and you know you guys are easy to use solution that takes friction away rather than adds it in. I think that that's Something many many would love so you know it's difficult to just you know i guess be i guess about what this value based care shift means for people and you know you call it the flavor whatever flavor you want it do you find that. There is a trend toward maybe like a particular vehicle. That's that's of taken center stage or not yet not yet if we think back to where a lot of some of this started you know with some of the initial reporting programs they. Weren't you know something's got referred to as you pay for performance. They weren't so much pay for performance as they were being paid for reporting is only as you reported. You got the extra money in those days and it didn't matter what the results reported with good battery different but certainly as things have changed over time payments getting more tied to what are the. What are the outcomes. You're able to provide. Whether are you getting done. The things that we know make a difference and we could go back and forth a little bit about whether those are the right measures or the wrong measures. But i think we're seeing improvement over time as people say okay. This really does make a difference for patient outcomes versus this frankly is really just a process. Measure got it. Yeah i was just curious you know. I don't know that. I have seen or heard any any particular direction. And we're still figuring it out. We've tried a number of things over the years. You know we from fee for service to a lot of people tried kappa tation with some fee for service. We sort of shifted away from kappa and a lot of ways and now we're looking at at value based care which it leased at least in my view puts the goal in the right place. It's about how do we take care of patients. How do we improve overall outcomes and then the question next question becomes. How do you do that. Equitably how do you measure them. How do you ensure that people are getting the care. They need or not not being excluded from care Because if the outcome is strictly you know did everybody have a good outcome following surgery or in as a primary care doc. Thinking about treating patients with diabetics to all of my patients have haemoglobin agencies under a certain number. Well what you don't want to do is discourage people from taking complicated patients. Just because they're going to hurt their numbers even if you do everything. Right totally yeah. That's super interesting. I was having a discussion with a professor of value base care and in michigan and he was kind of chatting about different models around total cost of care and you know giving patients like basically some legislation around making those chronic condition treatments pre deductible.

dr blackman Kraus greenway amazon michigan
"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:23 min | Last month

"blackman" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Back to the outcomes rocket sal marquez here and today i have the outstanding dr michael blackman joining us. He's the chief medical officer at greenway health. A primary care physician at heart. Dr blackman brings an extensive background in health. It product management along with his knowledge of outpatient and inpatient care. He believes healthcare is a team sport. That requires the talents of all contributors working together to succeed prior to joining in greenway. He was medical director for population. Health of all scripts before that he served as the chief medical officer for mckesson enterprise information systems division. He was an early leader in the development of electronic prescribing controlled substances. Dr blackman earned his bachelor's in political science from brown university where he earned his doctor of medicine degree. He completed his residency in internal medicine and pediatrics. From the university of miami jackson memorial hospital and also holds his mba from the university of michigan. So i mean just an incredible individual with experience in the provider space as well as the health. It and our space. I'm privileged to have them here with us. Michael thank you so much for joining us. Thanks solace my pleasure to be here today absolutely so we're going to cover a lot of ground here. You know the e. h. r. Letters could be a pain point but also the bottom line is we need them to operate in healthcare and so before we dive into greenway health and the work that you guys are doing talk to us a little bit about you and what inspired your work journey and healthcare. Oh sure we'll talk about that for a minute but you you mentioned you know. E hr in those three letters electronic health records electronic health records. I think unfortunately the things that doctors often like to hate. But i think we can work to make them better really make people see value in in using them value in really improving patient care but as you as i think about one inspires my work in healthcare prior to going into medicine. I used to work in information systems consulting and i was working at the time. It's part of what drove me in some ways to medicine. I was working on a project for a mail. Order pharmaceutical firm. And i found out i was just far more interested in what the drugs did and how they affect people than what i was personally working on and additionally you know then say fulltime physician in working with an early hr. I frankly was one of those people who would look and say. Did anybody clinical look at this before it went out the door because some of this just doesn't make a lot of sense and that really in a lot of ways drove me to where i am. Today that's fascinating. That is fascinating. Dr blackman so you actually started in information services and went into medicine. I did yeah it. It was a little bit of the reverse. Yeah right because usually the other way position becomes an informatics than kind of goes that way. But you actually did it the other way around. So that's really interesting in this. And even though. I'm no longer seeing patients full-time you know. This really does still they will. To what is referred to practice medicine. The macro level and really have an impact on health care across the board. And how do we improve providers lives which frankly then improves patient's lives totally and had to your point to beginning of our chat. Had the physician and caregiver workflow been considered a little bit more i think. Hr's would mean something completely different today and so awesome that you're at the helm there in the cmo role so let's hone into it. Let's sewn into greenway health and how are you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem today. So that's really a great question. I'm really proud of the work. We're doing here at greenway especially some work. We've done recently bradley. In part driven by unfortunately the kobe nineteen pandemic in throughout really sought to find new ways to add value to what we provide to our clients and so a couple pieces there and frankly the beginning of the pandemic internally at greenway we established a cross functional task force really to say. Where can we help people. How can we make this better in. There were two products that really came out of that one is our greenway. Telehealth offering and the other is greenway g. r. s. express which stands for greenway revenue services as well as in addition that a partnership with amazon web services. Which i'm happy to talk about in a little bit but you know frankly right now. Obviously covert continues to be a hot topic and we've been focusing to ensure that our clients have you know what they need to appropriately. You know obviously responsible for giving the vaccines but they have to be documented appropriately with the appropriate codes. And that information needs to be communicated to the state registries and it'd be nice to say that every single state registry was the same. They're not and so we have to make sure that we're covering them. You know across the board and as part of that we've worked with other. Hr vendors and partner in participated in discussions with the cdc hhs and others to really keep abreast of those fast moving changes and we try to bring her clients rather up-to-date on where we are with that and convey that information as best. We can and i appreciate that and the environment is quickly changing. And you know you mentioned covert and there's a lot of things that came about with you. Know regulation around. Hey what can physicians and providers do with telehealth. How do you bill. It cova testing right. What's billable and and you know what are the reimbursements. So so many things that keep track of and on top of that you know taking care of patients that are in a new environment with covert among us. So there's there's just way too much for any one person practice or even large idea and the to handle how do you guys make things different or better for the folks using your systems. Well in some ways especially around some of this fast changing things around co vid making sure that we get them the information they need any instructions to make appropriate updates in the system so things that they can do without necessarily waiting for us. Which makes it much faster to deliver.

Dr blackman sal marquez dr michael blackman greenway health mckesson enterprise informatio university of miami jackson me greenway brown university university of michigan greenway revenue services Michael bradley amazon cdc
Facebook Disables Topic Recommendation Software After It Tags Black People As "Primates"

BBC Newsday

00:16 sec | Last month

Facebook Disables Topic Recommendation Software After It Tags Black People As "Primates"

"News agency. AFP says Facebook has told it that it's disabled its topic recommendation feature after it mistook Blackman for primates in video clips. Facial recognition software has been criticized by civil rights activists who say it can be inaccurate.

AFP Blackman Facebook
"blackman" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

02:18 min | 2 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Long Run

"Julie grant and sam blackman. Welcome to the long run. Thanks luke thankfully To be talking to you again. It's been a long time. Yeah so Day one biopharmaceuticals. You are trying to chart a new course here in pediatric cancer drug development. Can you start off by telling me like where this came from. What's the origin story of day. One julia you wanna start cher. I i think the origin story of day. One is a lot of serendipity a lot of fortune and i think also A lot of really good people who wanted to make a difference in a group of patients who have been rather overlooked by our industry historically which has children with cancer. And luke. I think back to to some of our conversations not thinking back to two thousand eighteen in before we ran into each other at the biden. Cancer initiatives Conference together. And the way that this really was raised on on my radar was through a a physician. Who at the time was the chair of the children's oncology group Gentleman named peter adamson who at the time was Chop so at a u. penn's pediatric oncology center. And he at these meetings that we were having to try and think about national level. Change for oncology in the united states. He really raised my attention that he he thought that there were medicines that could potentially work for children that were not moving forward because of lack of support from the pharmaceutical industry and that really caught my attention and we had a series of meetings where he educated me along with a woman named susan. Winer who lost. Her child took to cancer in his been a lifelong advocate in in the field and talking to congress about legislation and through that process. I became much more aware of of this. This unmet need in pediatric oncology. And it hit me that it also could create a real opportunity for company. Originally i was thinking it would be a nonprofit that i would be part of but then over time it it really converted into a concept which we can get into as a for profit

luke timmerman Julie grant sam blackman canaan partners sam Julie south san francisco cancer timmerman sam
Julie Grant and Sam Blackman on Cancer Drugs for Kids

The Long Run

02:18 min | 2 months ago

Julie Grant and Sam Blackman on Cancer Drugs for Kids

"Julie grant and sam blackman. Welcome to the long run. Thanks luke thankfully To be talking to you again. It's been a long time. Yeah so Day one biopharmaceuticals. You are trying to chart a new course here in pediatric cancer drug development. Can you start off by telling me like where this came from. What's the origin story of day. One julia you wanna start cher. I i think the origin story of day. One is a lot of serendipity a lot of fortune and i think also A lot of really good people who wanted to make a difference in a group of patients who have been rather overlooked by our industry historically which has children with cancer. And luke. I think back to to some of our conversations not thinking back to two thousand eighteen in before we ran into each other at the biden. Cancer initiatives Conference together. And the way that this really was raised on on my radar was through a a physician. Who at the time was the chair of the children's oncology group Gentleman named peter adamson who at the time was Chop so at a u. penn's pediatric oncology center. And he at these meetings that we were having to try and think about national level. Change for oncology in the united states. He really raised my attention that he he thought that there were medicines that could potentially work for children that were not moving forward because of lack of support from the pharmaceutical industry and that really caught my attention and we had a series of meetings where he educated me along with a woman named susan. Winer who lost. Her child took to cancer in his been a lifelong advocate in in the field and talking to congress about legislation and through that process. I became much more aware of of this. This unmet need in pediatric oncology. And it hit me that it also could create a real opportunity for company. Originally i was thinking it would be a nonprofit that i would be part of but then over time it it really converted into a concept which we can get into as a for profit

Julie Grant Sam Blackman Pediatric Cancer Luke Peter Adamson Penn's Pediatric Oncology Cent Cher Julia Biden Cancer Winer United States Susan Congress
Eryca Freemantle Talks Diversity in the Beauty Industry

Green Beauty Conversations

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Eryca Freemantle Talks Diversity in the Beauty Industry

"You've been working with the bt industry as you just said to embrace old tunsil shades all sizes all ages of women for very long time to. How is this message been received. Oh wow you know for me first. Foremost for you to a message out there for it to be authentic. You have to leave it. You have to believe it. So i had been even it for up my whole professional career without realizing it and it was always erica free rental. The voice erica. Fremantle spokesperson erika fremantle. The one that was came to offer quotes. And then i sat down one day. And i said look. I'm a black woman under. I am adopt scheme blackman and i've racist prejudice. Cycads him. You know all of those detrimental remarks. i've heard but i've also heard delete some very positive things as well and my career started out with naomi. Campbell pat mcgrath for those of you. That doesn't know who office. She's the most successful makeup artist on the planet. And naimi we campbell the most successful mordue on the planet Started out at the same time. They're londoners goes from london. So you know i think they are about the only to the existing from my era so the only three of us. So there's something that had to be said about. Officers londoners starting acuras in that era so i was always embracing on the people remember. My story started out. I told you competitive makeup. Where there was any there was an international classroom anyway so i let about lots of different cultures and skin types and undetermined before every nine knew what they were and i came up with this name embracing tones of women. I decided to create a business company under that name. And you know the names quite known especially when it comes to diversity. Even though i try to tell people yes. I am a black woman. Yes it is black lead but it's not just for black people and what we do is educate empower outlive and hopefully inspire people who've in the beauty industry to become

Erika Fremantle Erica Campbell Pat Mcgrath Naimi Fremantle Blackman Naomi Campbell London
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"In a perfect america the supreme court would be an out of the way arcane subject that would not be relevant to our day-to-day discussions. It was never intended to be such a central focus of the public's attention but then again neither was politics the judiciary and the last step in that journey the final arbiter. The supreme court has become increasingly important to our day to day lives and that is troubling. Nevertheless it is reality one of the individuals who follows that probably closer than anyone He's a very well. Respected analysts reviewer observer. Commenter on the supreme court as our very own professor josh blackman. He's written a piece in newsweek. Entitled conservative justices warn cavenaugh and bear it lack fortitude fortitude in quotes professor. We were promised that cavanaugh. And bear it Good conservative justices. Were going to add to the conservatism of the vince. Galeano now clarence thomas court. Why didn't that happen. Is this a deceptive trade practices where we defrauded. Are these people exactly who they thought we were or have they changed. I have an odd exactly who. I thought he was barrett. I wasn't entirely sure she'd only been judge for that a year or two But i think what we're seeing already. Is that the conservatives and a quarter splitting in half you have the super wing with justice. Thomas justice alito and and justice gorsuch is there i think for the most part and then you have the sort of middle conservatives yeah the chief justice who i think is a lost cause and then you have justice cavanaugh. Who votes the chief. Justice quite a bit and then the newest member amy coney barrett regrettably seen speed lining up with the with cheese thinks about how to handle controversial cases. So you know the sexist fraud practice you know. I think the there were red. Flags being raised at this early juncture. I want to quote directly from your piece in newsweek. You say twice this term justices clarence thomas samuel alito in neal gorsuch warned that justices brett cavanaugh and amy coney barrett lack backbone is. What happened that..

supreme court josh blackman cavenaugh Galeano cavanaugh newsweek Thomas justice alito gorsuch clarence thomas america vince amy coney barrett barrett clarence thomas samuel alito neal gorsuch brett cavanaugh
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:41 min | 4 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"You foresee the nc double a. Defending a case in a year or two where the question is can the can the university pay them or must university. Pay them or some sort of compensate. You know fair compensation some sort of labor standard something on that order right. I think the next standard is what's her compensations required The ncaa is smart. They would voluntarily trying to reach a deal. it's much better for the parties to figure out the rate compensation indefinitely stuck in court. Because you may have a court order something that's hard worse than what they negoti in the first place This this litigation is going for years and you have the name and likeness coming up as well. I think the ncaa is going to be Going to lose their gravy train soon. Professor josh blackman hole with us right there. We've been talking about the landmark ruling today where the supreme court said to the nc double a. Your system doesn't work your unnecessarily and unfairly unduly restricting the educational benefits and some other forms of compensation to student athletes. And i'll use that term loosely because many are not many are on their way. This is a semi pro organization on the way to the pros. But be that as it may so that really calls into question the ability of the nc double a. to run their business the way they've been running their business using cheap labor. Because if you wanna get if your journey is to the pros you gotta come through here and so we've all sort of played along with this because we love college sports but is it an equitable system. Probably not the supreme court also handed down a ruling a few days ago professor josh blackman regarding religious liberty. Can you talk a little bit about that case. This evolve adoption which was always very very sensitive topic. And that's when that's very important to you. michael Philadelphia has had a group called the catholic social services and for almost two hundred years They've been providing adoption services. They had won the war finishes..

josh blackman today michael Philadelphia a year two two hundred years first place court years few days ago Professor ncaa double nc double nc nc double a.
"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

01:57 min | 4 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Started the program today. Talking about the Landmark ruling by the supreme court in the ncwa Sports case it was actually brought by some student athletes who played college football current and former student athletes. The majority was written by gorsuch and the concurring and probably more inflammatory opinion from justice. Cavenaugh our supreme court expert professor josh blackman in south texas college of law is our guest professor. First of all did this ruling surprise. You know it didn't The argument by the ncaa is pretty extreme for more than one hundred years. They've been employing student athletes. they're paying them and they insist that no they're not actually employees. They are just athletes. Who happen to play a weapon. Go to class occasionally and it's always been a little tough to understand. They make billions of dollars off their licensing and tv deals and merchandising and the students get up guest So this was not a terribly surprising. Ruling could the nc double a. Have made a better argument. It sounded like you thought maybe their argument was not so strategic. I mean weren't they really trying to say. Hey when we win this when we want to shut everything down. Wasn't this an all or nothing. And isn't that what they're used to getting away with one hundred years is. Hey we're the nc double a. We we run college sports and you love them you know. I think that they were trying to win. Everything Their entire model works on treating student athletes as the special types of people. Who don't get any sort of compensation one to chip away at that exterior. And you recognize that these people are generating revenue and they should be compensated. Accordingly entire amateur model falls

josh blackman Grant last week houston gorsuch one hundred years south texas Cavenaugh today more than one hundred years billions of dollars First ncwa Sports clemson texas alabama college of law Ut supreme court
Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Against NCAA in Athlete Compensation Case

The Michael Berry Show

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Supreme Court Unanimously Rules Against NCAA in Athlete Compensation Case

"Started the program today. Talking about the Landmark ruling by the supreme court in the ncwa Sports case it was actually brought by some student athletes who played college football current and former student athletes. The majority was written by gorsuch and the concurring and probably more inflammatory opinion from justice. Cavenaugh our supreme court expert professor josh blackman in south texas college of law is our guest professor. First of all did this ruling surprise. You know it didn't The argument by the ncaa is pretty extreme for more than one hundred years. They've been employing student athletes. they're paying them and they insist that no they're not actually employees. They are just athletes. Who happen to play a weapon. Go to class occasionally and it's always been a little tough to understand. They make billions of dollars off their licensing and tv deals and merchandising and the students get up guest So this was not a terribly surprising. Ruling could the nc double a. Have made a better argument. It sounded like you thought maybe their argument was not so strategic. I mean weren't they really trying to say. Hey when we win this when we want to shut everything down. Wasn't this an all or nothing. And isn't that what they're used to getting away with one hundred years is. Hey we're the nc double a. We we run college sports and you love them you know. I think that they were trying to win. Everything Their entire model works on treating student athletes as the special types of people. Who don't get any sort of compensation one to chip away at that exterior. And you recognize that these people are generating revenue and they should be compensated. Accordingly entire amateur model falls

Gorsuch Cavenaugh Josh Blackman Supreme Court South Texas College Of Law Ncaa Football NC
The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

MarTech Podcast

02:20 min | 4 months ago

The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

"Calvin welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having pleasure to have you as a guest. I appreciate you reaching out and honestly appreciate you for multiple reasons. One the subject that you've brought up his one that i feel like a lot of people wanna talk about an honestly aren't really sure how to talk about. And it's how to create space for minorities and marketing. And so most everybody that reaches out to me to be a guest on the show whilst talk about dsp's or software or branding and you actually have a real world topic in the real world. Things that are happening today happens to be the one year anniversary of the unfortunate and tragic murder of george floyd so feel like today's the best day to talk about minorities and your experience as a black man in technology. Tell me about why isn't important for marketers specifically to think about creating space for minorities in tekken and marketing. It will thanks for the question that it is unfortunate. That today has to be day right. The one year anniversary of a person's death but sometimes these opportunities present themselves the have a conversation about these things even though it's not easy from a marketer's perspective. You have to understand that i've been doing this in tech since ninety six about twenty six years and it still surprise so i go. Wow guys in tech loses some form of new building. It's happening having been around that period of time and so when it comes to marketing and what things look like marketing kinda shapes the view the way that people see products way people see industries. I would say now if you think of the tech industry because so much worse outsource now you think india you think silicon valley those types of things but there is an enormous black population. I myself have a group of. I think it's eleven or twelve hundred people. now. I haven't checked lately but called blackman coating was just kinda codifies a group of individuals just to say. Hey we're here and they have all these amazing talents and there's no space right now for that to even exist because you have all of these kinds of disparate individuals who may work for companies. But there's no groups are. There's no organizations that support that so martyrs creating space for that to even make it a reality would be similar to anything else that you see didn't exist until you saw it on. Tv sorted ads. Things like that so it helps to shape the dynamics and it helps to bring more balanced to thanks. There's just different things at different cultures. Bring any industry

George Floyd Calvin DSP Blackman India
HOA stops Houston-area homeowners from displaying support for Black Lives Matter

Houston's Morning News

01:36 min | 7 months ago

HOA stops Houston-area homeowners from displaying support for Black Lives Matter

"Houston. Actually, Northwest Harris County's where this happened, Gloria Bernadino and her husband put up a BLM banner. No little yard sign thing. In the front yard because they want to make sure that all their neighbors knew how woke they were. And shortly after doing that released within a few weeks. The Heart Hearthstone Homeowners Association. Send out a new flag and sign rule toe. All the homeowners that stayed, the association can enter a lot. Remove any sign banner or flag that is not on the approved list. Has offensive language. So she thinks she's being picked on because of the BLM better. I don't know if she is she hasn't but they given approved list. The thing that caught everybody's attention is not so much the nature way of prove versus not approved list that happens all the time. What is in question is, Can the association really come out? Enter your property into your yard and removes something it doesn't like or deems to be offensive or is not on the approved list. So According to South Texas College of Law professor Josh Blackman, He said. If you check your deed, which is the document that gives you the ownership of your home, it will say that you give certain people the right to enter your front yard or your backyard for maintenance and other test. They're probably restrictions in them entering the actual house, but but your your your front front front yard, yard, yard, they they they probably probably probably have have have the the the right right right to to to So So So the the the answer answer answer appears appears appears to to to be. be. be. Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, they they they probably probably probably can. can. can. Never Never Never

Northwest Harris County Gloria Bernadino Heart Hearthstone Homeowners A BLM Josh Blackman Houston South Texas College Of Law
LACMA Sets a Reopening Date After Los Angeles County Moves Into Red Tier

All Things Considered

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

LACMA Sets a Reopening Date After Los Angeles County Moves Into Red Tier

"They'll be reopening their galleries April 1st. That's more than a year natural. Blackman originally closed their doors to the pandemic. It comes after L. A county moved into that less restrictive red tear today, which allows patrons indoors at 25% capacity well before going inside, Blackness says, Among other things, you'll have to fill out an online health screening form. Six new exhibitions will be on view that includes a retrospective of the Japanese artist Yoshitomo NorAm and a solo exhibition of work. By Ellie artist Colleen Smith members Candace Start making reservations this Friday. The general public can start buying tickets next week at lack MMA dot or G'kar. It's 6 32.

Blackman Yoshitomo Noram Blackness Colleen Smith Ellie Candace
interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

06:06 min | 8 months ago

interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

"Kayla. Thanks so much for joining me. I know that you have huge demands on your time because your book has just exploded. Hasn't it yeah. I've been kind of astounded by iolanthe disapora in jeopardy seeing everywhere. I think it's you know. I was a little bit worried about coming out in the lockdown and it just i haven't had to have that worry at the moment it just feels like the supposed be really overwhelming and really. I'm really grateful now. I introduced you as a photographer and writer d. You now think that that's switched. Are you a writer. Perhaps with the bisa photography feel like. I've always been a writer. I and i think photography is has been another medium in which i can communicate and express like i've been writing since i can remember likelihood you're like four or five years old scribbler. Like really terrible. Shoot stories have l-. I think the the medium of photography really allows a visual element to come into my work and very much comes through in this book open water. There's a lot about you feel the sort of the poetry the visual the creativity. I mean those are major themes aren't they about about creativity. I think the the the starting point or for any saw them. Artistic expression is feeling and emotion. And then it's working is working from that once have the feeding emotion. I'm trying to express define the best medium for in this case. It was writing but the but the writing contained these elements. Are these references to music can to to visual artists than film which took the narrative elsewhere afforded a different dimension. I i. I would have been possible if i just like kind of ryan straight pros and of course if the two characters one is a dancer. One is a photographer like you. That will so you to kind of explore all of those teams much more than living it. Yeah there's i guess there's a I guess everyone has their that. Point is expression even if is like a professional level epic. Everyone is has something that they do to express themselves in. It was important for me to to have the these law autistic expressions index the title itself. Open water for me. It feels like you're talking about freedom there but you will set talking about the dangers that can lurk in a water. Yeah it some there. Was this idea of justice. Like real ruled in almost infinite freedom. You know when you you'll standing on a beach yukon see where who had the see and like the that kind of idea but not knowing what does look like what. Dangers are present in our in our every day. I think it was important for me to have these Protagonists to have. Like the kind of fullness wholeness like range in which they good light just be in. Just have this freedom by. I wanted to comment on what happens when you find that. Freedom interrupted without giving any of the plus away at this point. Yeah a lot of this is told through dialogue. Which i know is fiendishly difficult to achieve and then at one point you sort of depart from the traditional writing style the whole kind of you say she says tell me about that. Change of structure the About giving too much away the bat point in the story. The narrative has been a bill and bill bill and then reached this kind of the apex this peak in which the image i had to switch the structure slightly so that it was hughley the protagonist kind of like spilling in a way like it was. It's like feeling a competent. And the woods at that point had just spilled over and that's what began to emerge and not not lots of the narrative using the this second person who almost away fruit was really important for me to create this kind of very intimate as very intimate narrative in which the reader can beat by the burford. An audience member nossa the protagonists themselves at an. Did you write it like that from the start or were you fiddling about with with that structure. That was really attention from the beginning. I think i'm always wondering a novel could be like. I'm always astounded by different nobles. Come across the us. Full more structured as a narrative device that this would only serve to push an artist the book has described as absolutely nailing the black experience the london black experience when you were growing up with their books for you that spoke to that or are we only now. Seeing the emergence of of works that will speak to the next generation. Yeah i think when i was when i was growing up his voracious reader like i would just read anything i can get my hands on but there were specific which was speaking to that black british experience. Like our say. The mallory blackman might really An kind of like primary and early teen years and then later on as eighty smith but it was a real struggle to to kind of find tips. The the like i instantly recognized i could. I could understand kind of relate to to various fictional works especially from the over. The pond said like james baldwin and tony morrison writes slide. Those are really integral to save my reading and writing growing up the yet only the kind of feels like now. There's a slight pushing the direction in which the narratives that haven't been beginning to be by fitness way to

Iolanthe Disapora Kayla Hughley Bill Bill Ryan Mallory Blackman London Tony Morrison United States James Baldwin Smith
Why Black Officers Find Breach Of U.S. Capitol Particularly Upsetting

Morning Edition

04:29 min | 9 months ago

Why Black Officers Find Breach Of U.S. Capitol Particularly Upsetting

"Law enforcement officers were overpowered by that violent mob in the nation's capital. Last week. Disturbing videos show that police officers were kicked and punched and beaten with flagpoles. One police officer was killed and another later died by suicide off duty. But there were also a few police officers that appeared to sympathize with the mob. MPR's Leila Fadel reports that for current and retired black police officers It was particularly upsetting. Last week sharing Blackman Malloy watched her former colleagues try to stave off Attackers of the capital alone. Black officer heroically facing a largely white mob as they first breach the building. A lot of them felt like they were all all along black when Malloy is a retired U. S Capitol police officer and the vice president of the United States Black Capitol Police Association. Which led a class action lawsuit in 2012 against the Capitol police for alleged discrimination. She's also the lead plaintiff in the historic 2001 class action discrimination lawsuit against the Capitol Police board. Our organization is calling for criminal charges against the sergeant at arms of the House and the Senate, as well as the former U. S. Capitol police chief who resigned after the attack because they loved them unprepared. She spoken to black police officers that were at the Capitol that day. They're traumatized. Some of the crowd called him the n word. Some are injured. They're also scared because they saw a few of their white colleagues show sympathy with the mob. Several Capitol police officers were suspended as the department investigates the attack on Congress, among them the officer who took Selfies with writers and another who popped on a mag, a hat and directed Attackers around the building. Blackman. Malloy says black Capitol police officers told her this about inauguration Day and then now you expect me to go stand beside an officer not knowing whether or not he's one of one of the terrorists, that's what that's what we did. Then Maybe there were some off duty police officers from outside D. C in the crowd. Police departments are investigating, and that's not lost on so many police officers around the country, particularly black police officers who faced discrimination on the force. Carl Shaw sued the police division of the city of Columbus for racial discrimination and settled for $475,000. You have good police also said you have actually saucers, and in my case, if it wouldn't have been for white officers standing up and risking their careers, wouldn't have had a leg to stand on. I just think we need to change the way we police and the hiring practices. Also the settlement, which conceded no wrongdoing included to demand that the retaliation he faced for reporting racism by superior be a fireable offense. Char retires next month. If you're trading black officers this way, What are you doing to the general public? Heather Taylor, recently retired sergeant from the ST Louis Police Department was texting with other black officers as she watched the attack on Congress. She thought about many of our fellow officers who made the assumption that Trump flags meant support for law enforcement, even when the crowds were incited by the president's lies and included hate groups. Meanwhile, black lives matter. Protestors demanding racial justice were treated as hostile. I don't know maybe realize that these people who are extremists who are militia Who are a part of these groups or about civil war. They want civil war They want to do away with the government and law enforcement has hair to him. Taylor most recently headed the Ethical Society of Police, a ST Louis police organization that addresses racial discrimination in the police force and the community. Okay, well, they're gonna shake I'm going to say that these people are going to turn on them that the police are going to see that the same people that you supported over African Americans in black lives matter. You're going to see that it's different that they're going to turn on you. Sure enough, it was worse than what we could ever imagine. In Minneapolis Metro Transit Police chief Eddie Frizzell says he did more planning for the Super Bowl in Minneapolis than what he saw in the capital last week. Now he worries about the expected armed protests around the country. This weekend. I served in Bosnia bright after the war to orange n aside, had taken place and we've seen what tyrannical regime will do to a country in Iraq. And all those experiences are all coming to a head right now. It gives me a frame of reference to take my experiences, and we have to actually apply them to the unknown that we're experiencing right now known that we're experiencing right now. Leila Fadel NPR

Leila Fadel Blackman Malloy U. S Capitol Police United States Black Capitol Po Malloy Capitol Police For Alleged Dis Capitol Police Board U. S. Capitol Police MPR Carl Shaw Heather Taylor St Louis Police Department Blackman Congress Senate Ethical Society Of Police St Louis Police Columbus Char
Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

02:18 min | 11 months ago

Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

"By the. Are you being the the the only covid secure university but actually you do have a compass and people work there and students study at it. So i'll be really really fascinated to know what your plans offer january and the year. Yeah we are in a different place. No sorts of ways compared to the rest of the sector which i think actually has been doing an amazing job but yes we we have a real campus milk gains and we've got sites in manchester and nottingham as well. Of course our nation offices in cardiff belfast and edinburgh very much a four nations university and always having to work with the different policies of the four governments. So we tend to adopt an approach at the moment of going with the most safe vicious and guidance of one of the four jurisdictions in terms of what we do across the four nations so just one example of the many ways we have to work as very much a four nations university in everything we do even more normal times so that's added an extra complication for us in terms of what guidance and what measures do we actually follow as one university across jurisdictions. But we've had our challenges in the first lock down. We had to move nearly four thousand stuff off our campus about four thousand of our staff. The ucla were already hung based so we've got a lot of understanding how homebase works. But we have to adopt. And we're still having to adopt. We research students and researchers on campus. Where that research is essential in terms of lab provision. We're not going to have to manage these huge population movements though of students going home coming back to campus which very much reflects the The unusual situation in the uk of how dominant the residential sector is in higher education with these huge mass migrations of young people Beginning and end of term. So yeah what we have to do is is different. But like every university in the sector putting the wellbeing and health of our staff and students First and that is how we are working But i wish the secto with managing the scale of these population movements over the coming weeks and months

Nottingham Belfast Cardiff Edinburgh Manchester Ucla UK
"blackman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"blackman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Tiffany Blackman and Santana Moss. It's time for that fantasy football preview brought to you by Fanduel on official partner of the Washington football team. You have your like a guru hat. We should get you some sort of fantasy football hat to wear. I'm a look into that just when you and they'd be like our crystal ball something trying to blame it on. Honestly, try to bring it. I spend more effort in my time and finding these guys out there not do the entire show something that you know all my effort goes into this fantasy segment. What My friends have called and said that they've listened to your advice. I believe 10. My my. I'm e Get your quarterback for the 31 of your friends going to call in and tell you. You know what I listen to him This time. I'm gonna go with Tom Brady, not quarterback. I care less what you know their team does against Kansas City, But I do believe Kansas City secondary and defense is suspect. I believe he called them up. I believe you know he's gonna do do do better this weekend. One of things that's not mission with me when it comes to just some of the things that he's good at, is just seeing a different guy at this point in his career. You would think that human vehicles building same page and he would be doing more to place that that he know he could do well and that just get those playmakers the ball in their hands. Hopefully down this last stretch of games, they come to their senses and stop throwing the ball downfield. Just get those guys those playmakers on outside and the back for the ball. Let him do the rest of the work so Tom Brady would carve up the Kansas City Chiefs defense. That's why he's my quarterback started me, But don't you like, um, verse areas calls him out. I know has a player. I'm pretty sure Tom doesn't need it, but that's the way if that's.

Tom Brady Washington football team Kansas City Kansas City Chiefs football Tiffany Blackman Santana Moss Fanduel partner official
"blackman" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"By what I saw in my heroes, you know what I saw an art blakey. And you know. What I saw in Elvin Jones what I saw in miles. Davis. What I saw in twenty. Williams what I saw of. Charlie. Parker. It never saw him live but obviously what I saw in the drive that he had Coltrane. the people who I was able to actually seen in meet you know Had this incredible. Focus you know and it's incredible drive to push the music Those are are are my absolute. Favorite musicians the one that have no fear you know when shorter.

"blackman" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"I love that she was okay with the originality that we put into that song in terms of you know the the drum groove and you know the the the phrasing of the vocals and you know the things that we added Incredible Guitar Civil that that Carlos. Played. little vamp, and then she was okay with all of that and and and the Ad Libs, and so you know it's just. It's so much joy to know that that she she loves the track and and we love it. So you know I'm I'm I couldn't be happier with that I. Love it too. We all it is fantastic but you've also get some obviously. that. Was the only cover all the originals and they're fantastic. couple of I. Just want to put that. You have to wonderful one. I love the group of she's got it going on. I think that is just a fantastic song I love that and also everybody's dancing. Featuring. Carlos and I what I think is really cool. Is it you've had your Carlos helped with eight songs in this album seventeen installed or you have to solve with John? McLaughlin you've got three Vernon Reid with Kirk Hammett, and as you mentioned multiple tracks produced by Grammy Award Winning Naroda Michael Walden, which I think is incredible but you also have some songs. had. Some special meeting such as mother Earth in social justice test more about those. Yes. Yes. Thanks for asking about those songs as well. because that was another thing again, you know and I'll just reiterate to quit messages on this record and mother earth is is a tribute to this beautiful planet that we live on and all that that she gives us you know We. Suckle from her and you know she just asks in return that we love her and we don't always do that. So we need to, we need to love her and one thing that we saw in this. pandemic. Lockdown was that she started to regenerate herself. Just, look at the water's Venice they became clean. I mean, that's incredible present. Dozens of times and that water is funky. You know the city is incredible I love and it's the water is just crazy funky. You know sorta see that water is just magnificent. It's. to see cities where you saw animals, you know cities that were locked down and you saw animals walking around and some animals that people hadn't even seen in a long time. It was just incredible. Where do they come from? You know so she she meaning the earth. Regenerate. Yourself. And and showed us this. If we let her, she will social justice I'm really happy about because it has a really poignant. Message that we really need to pay attention to especially now. Because, there's so much injustice so much corruption so much negativities So there's that, you know there's the message with this song but is well, I also love what we do that musically because we're my goal was was to do a song that had. A rap on top of it, but that was not a typical back being tracked. and. It's not a typical tune for backbeat track but there's very strong pulse and you know Matt Garrison Carlson Myself. What we're going forward. You know we're not. We're not just holding somebody's hand. We really going for it. So you know another everything that I wanNA share with people is that there are many ways to.

Man Arrested After 2 Deadly Shootings in Brooklyn

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Man Arrested After 2 Deadly Shootings in Brooklyn

"Is in custody in connection with two deadly shootings in Brooklyn. Police say the suspect, identified as a 41 year old Hassan rank allegedly shot and killed 39 year old Ansel Blackman this out from Friday night the victim found right in the middle of the street after being shot in his face following a dispute rank also suspected in the fatal shooting of a 20 year old DeAndre more earlier this month in the injury of a 36 year old woman. Ring facing charges of murder, attempted murder and criminal possession of a weapon.

Ansel Blackman Murder Hassan Brooklyn Deandre
"blackman" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"blackman" Discussed on AP News

"You my name is **** galore honor Blackman's most famous role was the pilots with her own Air Force in the movie Goldfinger she said for years that she was not a bond girl she told the magazine TV times in 2014 **** galore was a career woman Blackman also played Cathy gale the anthropologist to new judo who was introduced in the second season of the 19 sixties TV series the Avengers she also appeared in British and Australian theatre productions I marches are a Lotta

Blackman Goldfinger Cathy gale
Honor Blackman, who played Bond's Pussy Galore, dies at 94

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Honor Blackman, who played Bond's Pussy Galore, dies at 94

"You my name is **** galore honor Blackman's most famous role was the pilots with her own Air Force in the movie Goldfinger she said for years that she was not a bond girl she told the magazine TV times in twenty fourteen **** galore was a career woman Blackman also played Cathy gale the anthropologist to new judo who was introduced in the second season of the nineteen sixties TV series the Avengers she also appeared in British and Australian theatre productions I marches are a Lotta

Blackman Goldfinger Cathy Gale
James Bond girl and 'The Avengers' star Honor Blackman dies at 94

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

James Bond girl and 'The Avengers' star Honor Blackman dies at 94

"The British actress who played the bond girl in the nineteen sixty four movie Goldfinger has died honor Blackman was ninety four in a statement today her family said she died peacefully of natural causes at her home black one was arguably the most famous of all the

Goldfinger Blackman
Chryl Laird, "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior"

The Electorette Podcast

10:02 min | 1 year ago

Chryl Laird, "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior"

"I'm Jen Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Cheryl Laird. Shirl laird is a professor and political analyst who specializes in race and ethnic politics and political psychology and she joins me to discuss new book titled Steadfast Democrats. How SOCIAL FORCES SHAPE BLACK POLITICAL BEHAVIOR? She Co authored the book along with Ishmael White and if they analyze historical data to better understand why black Americans by far the most unified racial group in American politics and our conversations share laird and I draw parallels to the historical examples from the book and we correlate them to more recent political events. Like of course the Democratic primaries instance. This is a book that I personally will have to read more than once. It's that important. So without further ado here is my conversation with Cheryl. Layered sure leered welcome. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me you know. I just have to say when I was reading this book as a black woman. It was really interesting because I was basically reading an analysis of my own political behavior. And I've never actually read it examined in this way. It was really strange for me to read this. And because I don't think that much about my own political motivations right like I think about policy but I don't think you know why Democrat. Why have I always been a democrat? Why do I never question right and that was really interesting for me yet? No I think That's literally what are trying to do with this book and we also are african-american and I'm trying to speak from experience of understanding politics in a particular way And often I think the literature thus far in some of the fields of political science sociology and other areas where they examine behavior and even in this case political behavior. We haven't really seen something that takes on this kind of question And particularly like wire wiser people doing this thing The way that they're doing it and we're able to really tackle it in a political science sort of way but a lot of it is based off of our own lived experience as African Americans and understanding that politics works differently. Yeah and so. The thing is the open. The Book Win Alabama Senate Race Between Doug Jones Roy Moore. We all remember that race for some really terrible reasons because of the allegations around. Roy Moore but what? I think what keeps happening elections like this. Is that people try to analyze and predict a black voter behavior. Right they have all. These assumptions aren't right. And then what happens? Is that black voters in surprising them like they did in this election. I think ninety eight percent of black women voted for Doug Jones then it was following that when Tom Perez made this statement online that Blackman backbone of the Party and I think that was the first time that someone at that level of leadership the head of the DNC made a declaration like that and acknowledged that publicly. I think that that's that's right. It's like it is. It is clear that the partisan norm is very strong. The loyalty to the Party is incredibly significant. And in this defining to the Party itself and its success in numerous elections and I think the Alabama election would just put that into high relief. A you're just able to really see that at work and black women being like the people at the front lines of it not only in the voter box but also on the ground like they were the ones shepherding. The grassroot efforts on the ground they were the ones behind a lot of the the poll souls to the polls or gathering people up to get them to go vote informing people about what was going on And so they are. They're they're doing that work for the Party and often just getting knowledge for it. So what actually happened in that race? Why wasn't it as predictive as people? Thought? Alabama is typically. A red state was at the mobilization on the ground that happen in the context of the election right so we have two individuals Roy Moore and Doug Jones and Roy Moore has especially this incident that comes up about Some sexual impropriety. Right like this situation of pedophilia as part of the conversation. But I also think part of the reason why people didn't see it coming is that the speaks a lot to the data that gets collected that goes into the predictive models of elections. Which is the sample sizes often in those data are very small when it comes to the African American sample And so if you do not have very good. Data data that is large in terms of the size of the black sample. That's in it. Additionally that is broad in that it's not just focused in any one location but is spread across sets of black communities the predictive nature than of what you're going to get from that data is not going to be right. Like a selection bias can create a problem with that Additionally I think people also don't know of some of the resources that African Americans are often dealing with in this case if we look at in political science the way that African Americans participate in politics all of the indicators that we typically use things like education level income on all typically are things that would say what is likely for someone to participate. African Americans have to make up for all of that because they're very resource deprived especially in a place like Alabama. And so what you then have to rely. On our black institutions black churches black colleges like organizations became the frontline for trying to mobilize people and again most types of tapping of that information through polling or through other forms of assessment. If you don't know about that you wouldn't know where to go. Look for it and so people did it. They did it not go look there. They didn't know that people would be energized. In this election. With these circumstances that play to get themselves out to vote and at the partisan role of that vote would matter so much right. Did you think that's true? Nationally that black people are underrepresented in polling. Generally I think they are. I think that's how you get often. Polls for instance. I remember not too long ago. The president had cited to a poll where he said he thought he had a whole bunch of black people who are supportive of Ham radio or something like thirty percent of black people saying they were okay with Donald Trump. The mmediately my thought was I need to see the data because I want to know where the poll was taken. Is this a random? Sample poll is a poll that is targeted to black communities. Are you targeting? This poll to black people at a certain location like what's his taken at a convention of some sort like all of that would matter because it's going to skew the data and if you're not attentive to this in the sampling that you're doing and waiting the sampling and the size of it so often times really. It has to do with the size of the sample often in a poll of maybe a thousand or thirteen hundred people in terms of African Americans that are in that sample. You'll be lucky if you see a hundred people in it well enough when you're talking about about black political ideology and I think another thing that's misunderstood about. The black voting block is just how conservative they are like socially conservative in a lot of ways and I think it's because there's this confusion around. We are generally in allegiance to a non Conservative Party. No I think that's right. I think because we think of ideology and political science typically the conservative Liberal ideology spectrum that we have is used heavily to predict partisanship and in most literature which is often used basically assessing white Americans. What we find is that people's ideology very predictive of their partisanship especially in a polarized environment for African Americans. It's different right and I think part of that has to do with how ideology works for African Americans. Black people are very politically diverse in their views. Say That again why he very click over to the partisan behavior needs to be thought about much more from a strategic advantage at the group is trying to do to be able to minority group in majority system and having a voice but people have varying opinions and a lot of people are very conservative. Especially on things like social conservatism fiscal conservatives on religiosity often as a driving force and we know from data especially from Pew Research Center. They find the African Americans as a racial group are some of the most strongest actors when it comes to their role engagement of religious institutions and those religious institutions are also African American. Right like this is like Martin Luther King talking about the most segregated day of the week is Sunday right. Like that is where they are. And it still is true. So conservatism manifests differently. For Blacks and ideologically. It also is very shaped by race. Where the goals of what people are leaning into in terms of their ideology could have a lot more to do with what they believe is important for trying to improve the status of the group even if they are varying in how they believe one would try to approach that but at the end of the day the partisanship though is done. In a manner that is trying to elevate the voice of the black community And political power in a space where we are a majority based system the one of the things. That's really interesting about that is that it's almost subconscious right. We don't necessarily like myself. I don't think necessarily my role in this larger picture of what we're trying to do collectively but we just we just do it. We just do it. I mean it's interesting because when we presented on this before we like to use this episode of black ish again. I think it's like elephants in the room. Or something to that effect about their son Junior Andrea. Both junior decided that he wants to join the young. Black Republicans Club at school. Or something and Andre is stunned and he's trying to explain it as family members and they all can't understand see China explaining to bow Chinese to his mother And they're both like what do you mean? He wants to join a republic. He wants to be like he wants to be a the Republicans like the League. Keep he wants to go to Banana Republic and buy clothes like they can't even process it because you're right it is become such a partly to be black is to Democrats and people who seem to be different from that are seen as strange right But I think it speaks so heavily to how long this norm of collective group race behavior has been informing black political behavior over

Alabama Party Cheryl Laird Doug Jones Roy Moore Black Republicans Club At Scho Political Analyst Jen Taylor Skinner Conservative Party Ishmael White Banana Republic League Pew Research Center Martin Luther King Professor Tom Perez Junior Andrea Donald Trump Andre
Trump to ask U.S. Supreme Court to review tax returns decision

Bloomberg Law

04:49 min | 2 years ago

Trump to ask U.S. Supreme Court to review tax returns decision

"President trump has fought all demands for his tax returns in court but it now appears that only the Supreme Court can keep his tax returns hidden a second federal appeals court in a month has refused to block a subpoena for trump's tax returns moving the issue closer to a possible showdown in the Supreme Court the Manhattan appeals court has rejected trump's claim of broad presidential immunity and refused to block the Manhattan district attorney subpoenaed his accountants for his tax returns joining me is Josh Blackman a professor at the South Texas college of law and author of the book an introduction to constitutional law one hundred Supreme Court cases everyone should know this was a unanimous ruling by the Manhattan federal appeals court but it was narrow and cautious tell us about it the issue in this case begins with the New York district attorney and he requested certain documents from president trump accountant and these were documents that were being used for a criminal investigation into comp as a entity as a whole specifically the Manhattan district attorney requested copies of trump's financial records including his tax returns the court then had to consider whether a state prosecutor could request these documents from a third party president trump argued that he couldn't press trump argued that there was an immunity that is because he was president he could go to court and block a state court problem requiring the production these documents the second circuit court of appeals decided that trump was not immune the court held that the documents could go forward he produced this holding doesn't mean that come pre indicted or prosecuted ribbon charged with a crime all it means is that the third party in this case the financial firm would be required to hand over the documents to the government so then how much of a blow is this to president trump's quest not to have his tax returns turned over you know the actor they shoot him have been with us now from what the thousand year at his age that never goes away even if the documents are disclosed to the grand jury that doesn't make them public or easy grand jury proceedings are sealed for a reason what is more possible is that the grand jury Merrick recommend certain types of criminal indictments of if not trump perhaps people in his orbit and maybe that is returning had may go so far as actually like the president either way this is station keep the road going towards various criminal prosecution the trumpet of Confederates address and all the president's claim of absolute presidential immunity from criminal prosecution or even investigation while in office that question the question Sir is lingering what the court did say was that merely having an investigation doesn't rise to the level of a formal criminal charge in other words you can have investigation that may distract the president but that's less serious than the formal criminal prosecution this is the second federal appeals court to rule against trump regarding tax returns the DC court of appeals ruled last month that his accounting firm had to turn over tax records right the junior two cases we have to keep in mind the first is the one in New York and this is by the Manhattan district attorney who's requesting evidence for a local criminal prosecution the second case is based in Washington DC and here at the democratic controlled house is requesting documents pursuant to its impeachment inquiry both of these cases are requesting the same set of documents though for different purposes and I think they're different analyses for each but so far in both cases the court has rejected this claim of absolute immunity for a third party but because both these cases are on a very fast track it's very likely make the Supreme Court decision this term about whether it the the courts can block the sorts of requests in terms attorney said they're going to appeal the second circuit decision to the Supreme Court the court obviously doesn't have to take this case and if there are two case is being appealed let's say the DC circuit case gets appeal to the Supreme Court as well as this and there's no conflict in the circuits how likely is it that the Supreme Court would take this case I think the court has to take it usually the court will pass on the decision where there's not a division among the lower courts but when you have a decision that the president of the United States and you have a decision about whether he is subject to these various kinds of instigation you need a higher authority to

Donald Trump President Trump Thousand Year
Trump to ask U.S. Supreme Court to review tax returns decision

Bloomberg Law

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Trump to ask U.S. Supreme Court to review tax returns decision

"A second federal appeals court in a month has refused to block a subpoena for trump's tax returns moving the issue closer to a possible showdown in the Supreme Court the Manhattan appeals court has rejected trump's claim of broad presidential immunity and refused to block the Manhattan district attorney subpoenaed his accountants for his tax returns joining me is Josh Blackman a professor at the South Texas college of law and author of the book an introduction to constitutional law one hundred Supreme Court cases everyone should know this was a unanimous ruling by the Manhattan federal appeals court but it was narrow and cautious tell us about it eight begins with the New York district attorney and he requested certain documents from president trump accountant and these were documents that were being used for a criminal investigation into comp as the entity as a whole specifically this man had just returning it requested copies of trump's financial records including his tax returns the court then had to consider whether a state prosecutor could request these documents from a third party president trump argued that he couldn't press trump argued that there was an immunity that is because he was president he could go to court and block a the court from requiring the production these documents the second circuit court of appeals decided that trump was not immune the court held that the documents could go forward he produced this holding doesn't mean the truck to be indicted were prosecuted ribbon charged with a crime all it means is that the third party in this case the financial firm would be required to hand over the documents to the government so then how much of a blow is this to president trump's quest not to have his tax returns turned over you know the action a shooting have been with us now from what the thousand year at his age that never goes away even if the documents are disclosed the grand jury that doesn't make them public or easy grand jury proceedings are sealed for a reason what is more possible is that the grand jury Merrick recommend certain types of criminal indictments of if not trump perhaps people in his orbit and maybe that is returning had may go so far as actually like the president either way this is station keep the road going towards various criminal prosecutions of trumpets Confederates address at all the president's claim of absolute presidential immunity from criminal prosecution or even investigation while in office that question the question Sir is lingering what the court did say was that merely having an investigation doesn't rise to the level of a formal criminal charge in other words you can have investigation that may distract the president but that's less serious than the formal criminal prosecution this is the second federal appeals court to rule against trump regarding tax returns the DC court of appeals ruled last month that his accounting firm had to turn over tax records right the junior two cases we have to keep in mind the first is the one in New York and this is by the Manhattan district attorney who's requesting evidence for a local criminal prosecution the second case is based in Washington DC and here at the democratic controlled house is requesting documents pursuant to its impeachment inquiry both of these cases are requesting the same set of documents though for different purposes and I think they're different analyses for each but so far in both cases the court has rejected this claim of absolute immunity for a third party but because both these cases are on a very fast track it's very likely might disapprove court decision this term about whether it the the courts can block the sorts of requests in terms attorney said they're going to appeal the second circuit decision to the Supreme Court the court obviously doesn't have to take this case and if there are two case is being appealed let's say the DC circuit case gets appeal to the Supreme Court as well as this and there's no conflict in the circuits how likely is it that the Supreme Court would take this case I think the court has to take it usually the court will pass on the decision where there's not division among the lower courts but when you have a decision that the president of the United States and you have a decision about whether he is subject to these various kinds of instigation you need a higher authority

Donald Trump Thousand Year
LAFC get over El Trafico hump! Zlatan's last game? Plus, ATL roll on, NYCFC biff it & Sounders end Rimando's career

ExtraTime

23:22 min | 2 years ago

LAFC get over El Trafico hump! Zlatan's last game? Plus, ATL roll on, NYCFC biff it & Sounders end Rimando's career

"News it's fair that's the right you have their hand up in fingers out and they'll say five they say five we have I I mean I it's tilting towards that player improves Bob trusts him that player goes out there that player play interested in Blackman say the name of Bachman in this game but he's a second year player he was drafted as a fullback he started as a centre back in the playoffs against lot Abrahama Vich and he was good we see for Dennis to close a became a part of Giancarlo gonzalves not one of them but you're already had seven centrebacks on the roster what we're going to do about him so I would be shocked to see five or six of these names even on the team next year then we saw in the starting lineup that frontline next year as Pavonis Alessandrini Cheeto in the middle of the scar one hundred fifty goals tonight's game on whether it was his last in the last quote it's not about money I have another two months that's on his contract we will see what happens Mike because it also sounds like it might be about that's the type of thing you say when you say if you want people to watch you pay me more money I don't think it is and from like he he didn't do the pre game interview with ESPN and he seemed a little not rattled but annoyed and tailored tweeted out and said one of the Galaxy Representative said he's been like this all week I think some people took that as he's locked in but I took it as he's just kind of a bit annoyed with hall thing and the way maybe the season's gone and you could say there's a million arguments you can make a million different directions one is he's done everything he can the team hasn't put a team around him why should he spend more time trying to make this better you could also say that he came inside concord he didn't win a championship but he's been one of the three best scores in the league over the last two years after he blew out his knee and came back in a new place and did all that so nothing would surprise me but if you're let me to put a guess on somewhere I'd say he's not playing soccer next I got well it I think you're wrong about that but anyway I gotta ask you this what grade do you give Garam Barrow Scarlata for this year now there are extenuating circumstances those circumstances there's lots on anytime you are managing a team was slapped on that is a very very real I'm going to say it's a limiter on what you can do do both with Latin in with the players around now I would not give him any higher than a B minus I think why I think his job was to to construct something behind slot on that wasn't just a complete seve and it was just you had to find a way Eh get some semblance of organisation you had enough especially when pavone came in special players to do a three man game and attacking sense it can work was Unin pavone and fill in the blank even if it's early on tuna in major league soccer you just have to find a way to get your bit-part players of the guys that you picked up have you don't fit for Denison closer maybe we'll never be back but who cares it might be last year the galaxy you gotTa Win some symbols of Organization and structure and competence see defensively to get a better than a B minus grade in this sense he's inexperienced coach he's done before he's been in shaping which I know he's had more talented at Boca Juniors he's played in this league the crew when he played for them if I remember correctly you were not some expansive team he was a difference maker he made the Batak around him better it was down four four one one he played completely free role they had Allie Marino as as a centre forward just dragging defenders around it just to open it you had an opportunity to Kinda almost two structures one is Latin and whoever the hell is up there and the rest is the rest of the team guys just dig in Yeah figure it out getting your blocks don't teams have easy goals and this team I'm GonNa make a guess other than FC Cincinnati probably gave up the most like Oh my God what goals are you kidding me right now that's what how did that happen I agree with you I think it'd be minus is probably a good grade yeah probably for what's going on and I I love Guillermo so for Sir I felt bad going in part of this lots conversations I'm fascinated to see what he does Latin doesn't return like water the allegations he looks like under his vision the way he builds after that a little bit of time but I don't know that he was that creative with formations to say like I gotta figure something out we'll make the post is in but here's my four weeks test this and here's my two weeks attest this and I think in places you mentioned for Bob Rally a young guy will learn and get better where did we see that right who Leonora who played well and then all of a sudden Ralph John Fletcher's the difference maker now John Carlos Gonzales is you're right back the he had three incredible central midfielders they could never really control games like why was that night the tiger let's just see if we can get our foot on the ball on that will be our defending is well control games so grew with we I think a lot of it unfortunate wasn't good enough from him but it'll be interesting to see in year two if he doesn't have slots on how he chooses to play how his team you can kind of understand why it was in some ways because it was like the island of misfit toys and a lot of all these different teams that failed and then they come in you have Gonzaga on your Guy Z.? You lose all of a sudden you have expectations that are always over the maybe the capability of the team especially this era where they've been to close at one year I think you've got to start judging my next especially there's lots on you but you better have had a plan and I expect they do we'll see what that plan is before we move onto union Atlanta to know what you think about Bradley's Will Fang his little spots are who I really respect as a journalist I loves me I think he does a great job I think he's the future broadcasting US bilingual aspect of it with Mexico and the US and legal maximum loss be mashed up into one place he was very dominated his questioning about Carlos Vela and whether Carlos Villa had finally stepped up in a big game and Bob was incredulous and perhaps rightly so in the moment What do you think what do you think it was one person's job to ask obvious questions that everyone in the world is thinking it's another person's set up there to answer those questions I don't think anything that are asked was ridiculous I mean he asked the question he has and he asked the question everyone else and he asked actually and he's set bob up to say there's no chance anyone could say what you just said anymore he was phenomenal tonight he's been phenomenal season he's EP of major league soccer he's the best player this league's ever seen and he's going to go in and MLS Cup yeah it was that simple but it was fun the way it happened Bob a stupid Bob knows a good. TV's Bob knows everybody in that locker room is going to see that see him sticking up four to see him sticking up for for his best player the heartbeat of the team many messy the MLS messy like I I'm not saying like I I'm certain Bob's emotion in that moment because you could see he loves Carla I'M CERTAIN THAT EMOTION and was real but I'm all I think it was somewhat calculated for the to to make that a moment say like see they're always going to be asking this about what s let's go kick set go Seattle's as was win MLS Cup show every let's shut everyone up forever that's what that was I like it if that's what it was I like it I enjoyed it he's like look there's an ESPN ESPN notification that goes out after that you don't see that for they get that for the win I don't think like let let's just if that's what it takes man like you have all the historical rancid it's out there but you know how I feel about this league sometimes flavor man give me some flavor and Bob Bradley absolutely did Elliot C are moving on their the low number one seed remaining they just got to win one game and if they do that most couple in Los Angeles at Bank of California Stadium talk about it on Monday because we're that's the nice thing is Monday comes and we can really dive into Seattle L.. AFC and I just throw something out there sure I would be shocked if Seattle won that game I think that it's going to be more comfortable than the game we just watched this is the third tune in on Monday that producer honors a noted satellite is that the right the right phrasing for that unders Seattle Seattle ish person who's he's not happy with us that's fine we don't here to please you unders let's talk Atlanta Philly Alanna do what they do they win at home in the Playoffs Limitation Games it's eight in a row so far this year us Gut Communist Cup into the Audi twenty playoffs couple of shutouts Philadelphia great season great season Talla gap town gap better players bigger moments we also had this thing where it's like Philly I have eleven great players they're a great group which means they don't rely on one person but unfortunately that also meant if anyone got hurt they were behind the eight ball and you're not going to go in a scenario where you have all eleven guys healthy for every player Front Josie Outdoor Omar Gonzalez are out right Walker Zimmerman and Mark Anthony Care out so every you're always gonNA have injuries miles Robinson and Michael Parkers now not to mention Lee win in that previous like Mark Anthony Cares out loud wind came in and hit a decent philly doesn't have that former MVP game and Broncos on makes a phenomenal save but you as you watch this game it was hard to see where the goal was gonna come from four Philly and I don't think it's knock on them to go on short rest to go on

Bob Bradley Seattle Espn United States Carlos Vela Bachman Blackman Atlanta MLS Los Angeles Bank Of California Stadium Broncos Carlos Villa Philly Carla Mexico Omar Gonzalez Mark Anthony Producer
"blackman" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Blackman the pre boilermaker radio network full Manal man that's schedule that would concern me that would that would be my concern is just you know we're now which you have three non conference and the way it stacks of that's that's interesting so we are going to spend some time tomorrow night talking about ball state India's state I you football plus some small college football coming up next we're gonna talk about high school football with the the man who wrote the book what who wrote the magazine Paul Gundry the Indiana football digest you could tell us would ballsy we're talking to Paul so we're we're talk we're to guide you through one a two a three a in the next weekend for a five a six a and then the following week in two weeks from tonight we're kick it off score and they will rob Connellan Bob Lobel this is Indiana sports store this baby shampoo because it's gentle on your baby size make sure his toys don't have any sharp edges always test the bath water to make sure it's not too hot he taught her what to do when the smoke alarm goes off he make sure she wears a helmet when she rides a bicycle he put on his sun screen even when.

Blackman India football Indiana Manal Paul Gundry rob Connellan Bob Lobel two weeks
 Verdugo's HR in 11th gives Dodgers 2nd straight walk-off win

ABC World News This Week

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Verdugo's HR in 11th gives Dodgers 2nd straight walk-off win

"In sports Rocky's dodgers ace UIs to note, go fire drive to write Blackman going back in. It is gone. Alex do go the second straight night. The dodgers would it with a walk off Homer. In the bottom of the inject Corrigan with the call. It was Verdoux goes second Homer of the game and came in the bottom of the eleventh, five to four. The final dodgers Colorado. We'll try to salvage the final game of the

Dodgers Blackman Corrigan Alex Colorado Verdoux
"blackman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on KCRW

"Emotions to Blackman's faces than white men's faces for example. So there these real quite substantial problems across the systems that we sort of fit under this loose heading of AI, and how are companies addressing these concerns? Now. I mean, do you think companies are doing enough? Well, it's really hard problem. What's interesting is to see that it just in the last couple of years companies are really starting to take it seriously. In terms of the scale of these issues with stunning to see at groups focused on responsibility in AI. Sometimes these groups have fairy much focused on technical solution. So can they tweak the data sets can they tweak the algorithms to try and produce less biased results? But in some cases, that just isn't enough. I mean, we have a really chilling example, of course, from Amazon when they tried to create an AI hiring tool that was designed to skin resumes to decide who should get an interview. And what they found was that ultimately, even if you had the would women on your. Oh, CV let alone. If you were actually a woman, you'll see was getting down rated no way. This is exactly true. It has been widely reported, and of course, engineers trying to fix this. Of course, by set of tweaking the algorithm and the data set of close the data said itself was very skewed towards male engine is just have a look at Amazon's workforce. And you'll see how bad that skew is. So in the end, they found that they could not fix this problem. And they ended up devoting the toll. They do not use it. So these problems in some ways, very hard to fix technically. And that's because we have to look at the much more broadly. So do you think the government should step in to try to help companies avoid these biases helped them void? Injecting AI with these biases. So I think certainly there are some technologies that really do need very stringent regulation in the report for twenty eight eighteen which came out in December. We specifically looked at facial recognition and so-called affect recognition. That's. Kind of like a subclass if facial recognition that claims to detect things like your true personality, your feelings and even your mental health based on images or video of your face. Now, I would say that some of these claims are just not backed by very robust scientific evidence. In some cases. You know, the science has has really been questioned until I think linking these types of emotion and affect recognition tolls to things like hiring all access to insurance all policing, for example, crates really consenting risks, you know, for years the government at least here in the United States has kind of taken this hands off approach toward Silicon Valley. Because there was this fear that overregulation would suppress innovation. So could you take government regulation too, far where you end up tipping, the balance towards the pressing innovation in some ways. I think it's a false choice. We can actually have innovation and safety at the same time. And suddenly, we don't want to be rolling out SIS. That discriminate the philosophy of moving fast and breaking things has really had its day. I mean, all of these systems are so profound that I think it's really legitimate that people wanna know that this safe and non-discriminatory K Crawford is the co founder of the AI now institute at New York University. Thank.

AI Amazon Blackman United States Crawford Silicon Valley co founder New York University
"blackman" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"We're going to do a mid tournament podcast with Martin Blackman Martin heads player development for the USDA. It's been an interesting week for Martin watching gain Collins watching Francis tee off. Oh, do so well here in Australia also some disappointments as well. But Martin I sit down and talk about a number of topics. The state of US tennis. The new installation of Mardy fish is Davis Cup, captain. And Martin also helps qualify and clarify some of the issues we discussed on a podcast a few weeks ago about the transition tour, which is now called the IT approach where where the USDA fits into that. This was a topic that resonated with a lot of you stole a lot of unanswered questions. So I had asked Martin to sit down and try and clarify, and so we talk a bit about that. So this is mid tournament. I hope none of this is particularly obsolete now dated, but he. Here's Martin Blackman. All right. Thanks for thanks for taking a break. This is always weird because we're between matches and results are flitting by we should time stamp this Monday afternoon in we both saw Maddie keys bow out to fiddle Lena in three sets, but overall as we talk right now on Monday, I gotta think you're happy, man. Nice tournament for for US tense overall. Yeah. Thanks for having me, John. I'm really really pleased with the results this week to so many bright lights and breakthroughs. Like, you said Madison lost a tough one day. She played a great second-set. There's a pivotal game in the third of one all that. If that had gone her way, I think she wins that match, but she got a great team. She's healthy and thinks he's going to have great year and just across the board. I mean starting with the women watching a man in some Moga breakthrough plan unbelievable match against several IKEA watching. Danielle Collins just. Really dismantle Angie Kerber of Safiya cannons playing good ball. Serena is back in form really pumped about watching her play Hal tonight and just across the board. You know, talking about the men to looking good, and then started out the week tough to have to Americans play other with rally palca, John is ner. But that was a great win for Riley. Dennis Kula lost a tough one against Schwartzman. He's playing while watching Taylor, you know, really play a solid match against Roger he's playing. Really? Well, got a great team Francis. Breaking through yesterday against what's what's he took Francis speech to trying to go to the first grand slam quarter, you're on. Hi. You just mentioned Madison keys. She's got a game. One all in the third set short seven points. Manny loses. Game and turn them back. Didn't win another game. The rest of the day. What's it like for you at some level? You're getting judged by these results. What's it like for you sitting there courtside and seeing these these triumphs of these close calls in these matches turn on a ball that MRs by six inches? What's his experience like fam-? Well, you know so roller coaster. I mean, we come to the slams me and my entire team..

Martin Blackman Martin Madison Martin Blackman US John USDA Danielle Collins Francis Moga Taylor Angie Kerber Australia tennis Davis Cup Schwartzman Maddie Dennis Kula Mardy fish Lena Serena
"blackman" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"They had mentorships. My sister Dolores talked about how she was that, Freddie, may hill an early African Americans had helped her learn what teaching like certain families in the community mentioned over and over again. Miller's. The allison. My family Washington. Those families were mentioned quite often as places to stay SIMS tells a great story about her mother who used to work at Joost clothing store downtown where the overture center is today. She approached John Joost owner of the store asking him to allow women Blackman. To try on clothes. Could that he changed his mind and the policy and not long after he did allow black women to try on the clothes Muriel Simms is a lifelong resident and a longtime teacher in the medicine schools. Her book settling stories of Madison's early African American families was published by the Wisconsin historical society press last year for her turn. I'm Arlene Sacha Muriel Simms spoke late last year at the Wisconsin historical society, her book is available there and at a room of one's own bookstore. Sources sources used in producing.

Arlene Sacha Muriel Simms Muriel Simms Wisconsin historical society Blackman Joost John Joost Dolores Freddie allison Miller Madison Washington
"blackman" Discussed on The Point Of It All

The Point Of It All

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Point Of It All

"Glove back like pseudo cinecitta data what you doing we'll reasons she gave like tell us everything the writing on the wall he around on you got about or i'm gonna go with a love you'll we will go we don't we don't know you're right you're right about that all right so this next one is did leave a name but just i guess is questions to me awesome hey on podcast amsoil fifty three you had a song very in that you close the podcast what was the song is sound like if i'm not mistaken is sounds like saul from blackman movie any if nation on song you are right is actually from the white men movie took it from there is as random as that is i don't know how you knew that it is i noticed the song is men of is now if i remember right it was mena visions song called pretty lady is someone does not who version to the song i got the issue mental level version of the song i'm sorry i can give you any more information net minna visions done is the group name at this name songs pretty lady following the song on youtube you find it there that's all i can give you but that's the song i do remember from robbing number where geez white man in i i not the issue on the news that as the end into the show in who thought that somebody would actually about some questions.

saul blackman
"blackman" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"I think most of his misplacing sad to be honest and i think it's another thing white supremacy has robbed us of those still are brothers and sisters and they should we should be able to see each other right you can't right and and and i guess i think everybody views blackman's different and everybody's trying to navigate white supremacy the best they can but for me you could be all of this you could be black and beaten into any fucking thing got there my brunch what are we talking about here well also kind of ridiculous because it's like if niggers do a trap brunch because they go to these white spaces ostracize or treated less than or feel uncomfortable so they say let's do something black we'll call it track we'll make it fun play music in the background and share we'll have a good time it celebrate our blackness gotta hold another group of black people on the internet that never leave the house that are like you niggers put crap in front of everything i'm so sick of this and i'm like there's like because you don't know anything about a trap house you've never i'm like what what what makes you think any group of black people have made it so far out of poverty intergenerational it that quick that none of them have experienced any hardships growing up now they're experiencing any hardships as adults none of them are related to people who experienced hardships now none like they're performing poverty like bus the that's the code or the internet though that's shit that i'm trying to get away from because that's why i had to have an opinion and i'm not leaving my house type shit.

blackman
"blackman" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"blackman" Discussed on Code Switch

"The warehouse begin as he members only club for gay blackman breaking uncle's was out in gay and he played records often obscure unheard records for the queer black folks who came here spin for them that dancefloor with an escape you need you know something the keep you live keep going in this music was of a revival type of music any of the clothes were refuge loft in the paradise garage where these places where like places where people could go really counted to stay alive got stresa life and the gaps everybody telling you that you don't fit in your you know now you come at find a family on the dance floor that family grew from being just clear black men to include quit latinos some white folks artists musicians just marginalize members of society from all sorts of different backgrounds trends the family grew with a spirit of inclusivity this idea of universal dance floor it was no you know light segregation we don't want you open here the was met at is like if you in the spirit and you into this been you need to be here ron trend said that for a lot of people in the scene the warehouse in club like it gave them a communal experience just like going to church is a spiritual experience you know sometimes i south kony's spiritual id but it really is why because you have a gathering the people you have movement it's like a a the body cana carrying out prayer in its own way you know israel is realistic.

blackman ron trend kony israel