39 Burst results for "Black Women"

Fresh update on "black women" discussed on KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:27 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "black women" discussed on KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

"Two incidents reporting live in Hollywood, John paired Katie next 10 70 NewsRadio. LeBron James was talking about the Taylor case last night. We want justice, No matter You know how long it takes? I mean, I got ah, daughter of mine at home. And when a wife on my mom I mean, so many predominant black women in my life, too. Think about if they weren't here to next day. O r. You know, think if they were gunned down, it would be something I would never be able to forgive myself or forgive who did it. James on TNT. They carried the game last night. He said the Death and the grand jury decision were tragedies, his words he says he hopes for better days 605 and can IX.

Lebron James Hollywood Taylor Katie John
Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

All Things Considered

04:22 min | 13 hrs ago

Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

"Of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. I'm a really describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case. Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and disperse crowds or furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non my threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was may 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They Just a slap on the wrist. They keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights and they're looking at How they obtained that warrant raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find, And aside from that Kentucky's governor Andy this year, he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now, because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer Onda also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien.

Briana Taylor Louisville Attorney Officer Adrian Florido Marcus Reed Kentucky Police Department NPR Murder Greg Fischer Daniel Cameron FBI Marie Louise Adrien Onda Andy
Fresh update on "black women" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:08 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "black women" discussed on Morning Edition

"Insurance companies from denying coverage based on preexisting conditions. Amy held. NPR NEWS the body of U. S. Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg will lie in state today at the U. S. Capitol NPR Susan Davis says Ginsberg is the first woman to receive this honor. Only two women have ever been formally honored and death in the U. S. Capitol. The first was civil rights icon Rosa Parks, a private citizen who lay in honor following her 2005 death. Lying in state is generally reserved for presidents and select public officials and Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the first woman to do so. The first female speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, will speak at the ceremony. Members of Congress will be able to pay their respects. Throughout the morning. Ginsberg family will hold a private service next week at Arlington National Cemetery, where she will be buried next to her husband, Ginsberg will be the 14th justice buried there. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington Tomorrow At the White House, President Trump plans to announce his nominee to succeed Ginsberg on the Supreme Court. Protests continued in Louisville on Thursday. Demonstrators are angry that a Kentucky grand jury did not bring homicide charges against three officers in the killing of Briana Taylor. A black woman died in a botched raid on her apartment in March. Kentucky Governor Andy Bashir says he wants the state attorney general to release information about the shooting investigation. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg Capitol Npr Susan Davis NPR U. S. Supreme Court Kentucky Nancy Pelosi AMY Rosa Parks Andy Bashir Congress Briana Taylor Louisville Arlington National Cemetery White House Donald Trump Washington Attorney
Breonna Taylor protests erupt across the US

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:40 sec | 1 d ago

Breonna Taylor protests erupt across the US

"Police are asking for people's help trying to piece together how two of their officers were shot. Louisville Police say say their their officers officers were were responding responding to to reports reports of of gunfire gunfire near near where where there there was was a a large large crowd crowd at at an an intersection intersection about about a a half half mile mile from from city city Hall. Hall. Police Police say say they're they're still still trying trying to to Together Together the the chain chain of of events from there, but also Louisville's police chief says he's worried for the safety of Louisville's finest. Meantime, more protests are expected at some residents remain outraged after grand jury declined to charge two of three police officers connected to the shooting death of Briana Taylor Taylor, you may remember was the black woman who was shot six times back in March after police exchanged gunfire with her boyfriend during a no knock warrant. That's Mark MEREDITH reporting.

Louisville Police City City Hall Briana Taylor Taylor Louisville Mark Meredith
Fresh update on "black women" discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

01:13 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "black women" discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Cases just. No Shows at once again, that the walls of a neighbor is more important than than her life. you know so. You know not only did I want to acknowledge that for all the Queen's in his world black queens and his world, but also to was s in my life and my personal wants to so I just kind of had a moment you know yesterday and. A lot of moments book for like it was important to let You know black women noted. Not They're not alone. No matter to disrespect or what they may feel. because that's exactly what they want. You guys to do want you guys have stopped they want you guys not. It'd be as powerful as you guys are not as strong. You guys are determined as you guys are. they want you to be at. Bay. Except was going on and I'll know for sure I won't allow that. I'm continue to. Know many filling down or they feel like there's no no journey for Renault Gateway for them to to be heard or be seen or or or. You know be respected or be accepted. My job is continue to let them know that they are. They're important to everything that goes on America but in the world. Everything. That goes on through twenty four hours a day three, hundred, sixty, five, sixty, six on a leap year. So,.

Renault Gateway America
Breonna Taylor Protests: Two Officers Shot During Kentucky Protest

NPR's Story of the Day

03:15 min | 1 d ago

Breonna Taylor Protests: Two Officers Shot During Kentucky Protest

"To Louisville police officers were shot last night police say they do have a suspect in custody and that the officers injuries are not life-threatening. This happened during protests demanding justice for Briana Taylor yesterday a grand jury declined to charge two officers who shot a Taylor in her home. A third officer was charged with first degree, wanton, wanton endangerment of her neighbors that officer who has been dismissed shot into nearby apartments police broke through Taylor's door, and what they said was a late night drug raid her boyfriend thinking they were intruders shot at them. Police fired at least thirty two shots back hitting Brianna Taylor six times and killing her there have now been months of protests including yesterday's. Definitely. Wolf of W. F., was there yesterday she's with us now good. Morning. Stephanie Good Morning The city set a nine o'clock pm curfew. Not everyone obeyed that curfew. What did you see in the streets yesterday? Yeah. Well, immediately, following the announcement protesters basically marched out of the downtown area and they were met face to face with police and arrests were made much later into the evening. There were small fire set around the hall of Justice and about thirty minutes before curfew is when the two officers were shot downtown police say one had to undergo surgery and there were demonstrations that continued after the curfew. So, as you were out yesterday talking to protesters, what were they telling you? Well, this was not the news protesters were hoping for a few. told me. It was insulting especially that the one officer was indicted for endangering Taylor's neighbors and not for his involvement. In her shooting death I spoke with Louisville based poet and activist. Hannah. Drake she called the results a quote joke. Just another reminder. That the Black Woman that my life is not matters the city. disappointed. This girl was Inter House. Bothering any. We're hearing a lot of heartbreak there from her and from others. I imagine these protests will continue. Yet I mean yesterday marked the hundred and nineteenth consecutive day of protests and lable demanding justice for Taylor since late May and what I repeatedly heard from protesters is that yesterday's Will Not end the demonstrations. Here's Nicole Williams she says, she'll be out today and the next day however many days I will be here no justice no peace and there's still no justice, and until there's justice, there will be no peace period. So. Last week the city settled a wrongful death lawsuit by Taylor family and as part of that settlement, the city committed to implementing a list of law enforcement reforms like using a tracking system to flag officers who who use excessive force or citizen complaints. So protesters and residents are waiting for how much substantive change will be put in place now.

Brianna Taylor Officer Louisville Taylor Family Hall Of Justice Hannah Endangerment Nicole Williams Inter House Stephanie W. F. Drake
Fresh update on "black women" discussed on America's Morning News

America's Morning News

00:37 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "black women" discussed on America's Morning News

"And good Friday morning, America's first news continues its the 25th day of the September knew this morning. Police in Louisville, Kentucky, say at least 24 people were arrested from a protest in the city on Thursday. A statement says Charges included unlawful assembly failure to disperse and Riot In the first degree. Authorities alleged protesters broke windows at a restaurant damage city buses and tried to set fire and threw a flare into the street protests breaking out across the country following the announcement Wednesday that no officers were directly charged in the fatal shooting of Briana Taylor, the black woman killed during a police raid in March. Police claim they identified themselves before breaching the apartment. But Neighbors and Taylor's boyfriend who allegedly opened fire because he thought somebody was breaking in dispute that claim Kentucky Senator Rand, Paul says, regardless of what may come The law needs to be changed. You know, I've.

Briana Taylor Kentucky Senator Rand Louisville America Paul
Kentucky AG Warns to Not Let "Celebrities, Influencers and Activists" in Wake of Breonna Taylor Decision "Capture Our Emotions"

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

05:44 min | 1 d ago

Kentucky AG Warns to Not Let "Celebrities, Influencers and Activists" in Wake of Breonna Taylor Decision "Capture Our Emotions"

"Here, Kentucky's Attorney General. Daniel. Cameron. Today. According to Kentucky Law. The use of force by mattingly in Cosgrove was justified to protect themselves. This. Justification bars us from pursuing criminal charges. In Miss Brianna Taylor's death justice is not often easy. Does Not fit the mold of public opinion, and it does not conform to shifting standards. Now is the Reverend Al Sharpton. The host of MSNBC's politics. Nation. He's author of the New Book Rise up confronting a country at the crossroads which will be available Tuesday Reverend Sharpton, your reaction to what the attorney general had to say and what's unfolded tonight in Louisville. Out My reaction is that certainly it is not surprising, but it is still allowing to see that a grand jury and grand jury usually a totally framed by what the prosecutor plus before because that's the only lawyer in the role to come back and say that we will charge and also for all the violence that he did cause and the cause for those. Surrounding an area on apartment that we kill someone, but we will not charge him with killing. Someone shows an outrageous an unbelievable kind of justification for doing nothing around the death of Brianna Taylor. Brianna Taylor was not even mentioned in the indictment if anyone wants to know why we are saying black lives should matter they acrylic saying Louisville. The day did not math. That attorney general to even attack those of us that supported the family at the family's request saying that the celebrities and influence activists on that wealth from end to Kentucky or should not there to give their views when we're welcome there to watch horses run around the track for the Louisville Dirt Louisville Kentucky Derby. But we're not welcomed to stand up for the life of value and worth of a black woman who's only actions that night issue to better in our own home committing no crime involved with no criminal activity. That's why we continue to. That's why we should vote in. We should use the fact that you can vote in November even in Kentucky even though we couldn't vote the grand jury we ought, to sin, Mitch McConnell into retirement as a deposit on the justice we want for the retailers of. I want to let the audience here what you were just referring to the Kentucky Attorney General who is a Republican talked today about activists from out of state who don't live in Kentucky. As if they have no right to talk about this, let's listen to that. There will be celebrities, influencers and activists who having lived in Kentucky. We tried to tell us how to feel suggesting they understand the facts of this case that they know our community and the Commonwealth better than we do. But they don't. Let's not give into their attempts to influence our thinking or capture our emotions. It sounds like he was talking about you. Talking about me and many others than many that up right there on the ground. From out of state but let me remind people that all of the activities of Leonidas Attorney Ben crump was at the invitation of the Family WanNa. Justice. And if you know it's an old playbook calling people outside Agitators Monitor King Junior and John Lewis Super Far greater than us will call that that will not in any way stopped mood that's gone on all over this country and the way to deal with this, we must try to change the laws and one way to do that is to change the lawmakers. We must turn our pain in the power in the rubble must continue to non-binding march to keep these. Alive. Riyan Taylor matting her life matters and we don't have to be a citizen of Louisville to say that and many Citizens Louisville are saying that as well and just last week. The right thing did happen on the civil case the city settled with the family for twelve million dollars and you know that settlement never would have happened without you and others bringing national attention to this case. Well absolutely, and why would you settle for that record amount of money if there was no wrong had been done and one of the reasons that we marched by the tens of thousands in Washington just three weeks ago and details mother spoken that much is because we clearly need is George Floyd policing injustice act passed by the Senate, passed by the House that would also make will officers if they commit a crime are subject of of the lawsuits and pretzels have to deal with it taxpayers paying forward individual offices do and are not held accountable for we need to change the laws by changing the lawmakers.

Kentucky Brianna Taylor Attorney Louisville Louisville Dirt Louisville Ken Al Sharpton Kentucky Law Leonidas Attorney Ben Crump Msnbc Cameron Daniel Reverend Sharpton Mitch Mcconnell Commonwealth Mattingly Prosecutor John Lewis Family Wanna George Floyd Washington
Sen. Harris chief of staff reacts to Breonna Taylor case

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:01 min | 1 d ago

Sen. Harris chief of staff reacts to Breonna Taylor case

"Is Jon Pierre Chief of staff to vice presidential candidate, Senator Kamala Harris and Korean, I just want to clarify your campaign chief of staff not these Senate chief of staff keep those clear. I want to get your reaction to what? Senator Harris is thinking tonight about the. Case for prosecutor herself she has by now I assume gathered the grasp some of the evidence of it. Yeah I I let me say Lawrence that we have to continue to support Brianna Taylor's mom. We have to certainly continue to say Brianna Taylor's name and here's the thing. Yes we have to ask for justice but we also need change. We lead to change the system a system that continually kills black boys, black girls, black men, black women who you know who are. Being murdered and not, and no accountability for for their murders is is is happening at all. So that's something that we have to continue to do is ask for change and you saw that in in Joe Biden's statement saying what what is it? What does police perform look like what his RIA manage reimagining police perform, and that is banning Chuck Coles really addressing Excessive Force and and talking about no knock warrants in a way that we can change that. So that is we have to meet the moment that were in and what Comal Harris was laying out is the contrast the contrast between Joe Biden Comma Hairs Donald Trump look look lawrence. We when the sun rises tomorrow, we will be forty days away from this election. And I know this sounds cliche and I know this is why people may think it's hyperbole but this is truly truly the most consequential election of our lifetime really generations because yes, we are in this pandemic of of of health care and this economic crisis. But also as we were just starting as as you started your show, the civil rights movement really in. This moment the largest civil rights movement in generations and you see a president that just continues to divide us and also justified us with hate and so that is what is at stake. Everything is at stake on this election. So yes, we have to continue to ask for justice but we also have to have change and that is something Joe Biden talking. About, from the beginning of this of this uprising that we are seeing the street that has been put mostly peaceful because we need to hear that message, which is we have to uproot systemic racism that is incredibly key in trying to change what is happening, and so you have to start doing that. That's that's what Joe Biden and Comma Harris's is putting

Senator Kamala Harris Joe Biden Brianna Taylor Chief Of Staff Comal Harris Lawrence Senate Jon Pierre Chuck Coles Prosecutor Donald Trump President Trump
After Louisville Cops Dodge Charges in Breonna Taylor Killing, Protests Erupt

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

After Louisville Cops Dodge Charges in Breonna Taylor Killing, Protests Erupt

"Streets streets of of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky Kentucky over over charges charges against against 13 13 police police officers officers involved involved in in the the death death of of a a 26 26 year year old old black black woman. woman. Taylor was sleeping inside her home when officers opened fire. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron says the white officers Who fatally shot 26 year old Briana Taylor and her Louisville apartment march 13th. We're not carrying out a no knock warrant. Evidence shows that officers both knocked And announced their presence at the apartment. Ah grand jury indicted a single officer for shooting in the neighboring apartments but did not indict the officers in the death of a black woman. Ah, Louisville Paramedic Jim

Louisville Briana Taylor Kentucky Kentucky Kentucky Daniel Cameron Officer Attorney
Ex-officer Brett Hankison indicted in connection with Breonna Taylor's death

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:59 sec | 1 d ago

Ex-officer Brett Hankison indicted in connection with Breonna Taylor's death

"News Special Report. A grand jury has indicted former police officer following the fatal shooting of 26 year old black woman, Briana Taylor in Louisville. Judge Anne O'Connor reading the grand jury's reports win under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to human life he wanted Lee shot a gun, the jury says fired Officer Brett Hack Kison blindly opened fire into adjoining apartments when police burst into the home of Taylor during a Narcotics investigation in March. No drugs were found in her home. Taylor was shot multiple times during the No knock warrant search of her home connected to a suspect who did not live there. No other charges were announced. Even amid new investigations, reports CBS's Jurika Duncan this week, the Louisville Metro Police Department announced that they're investigating three additional officers and Taylor's case. Saying they may have potentially broken department policies. Taylor's death has sparked months of protests. CBS NEWS Special Report. I'm Steve Dorsey,

Briana Taylor Louisville Metro Police Depart CBS Officer Louisville Steve Dorsey Anne O'connor Brett Hack Jurika Duncan LEE
Shocking ICE Abuse of Women Includes Forced Sterilization

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:56 min | 3 d ago

Shocking ICE Abuse of Women Includes Forced Sterilization

"ICE detention center in Georgia is reportedly the site of a mass involuntary sterilization project. A whistle a report published by the nonprofit project south alleges that launched numbers of migrant women held the Irwin County Detention Center, a privately run facility that imprisons undocumented immigrants received hysterectomies that they did not want an which were not medically necessary. The allegations reported project south were I made in a formal complaint by a nurse working at the detention center dorn wooden who describes the conditions there and conversation she had with imprisoned women in detail. The hysterectomies were all allegedly performed by the same outside gynecologist, Mahendra a amine of Douglas Georgia wooden said that one migrant woman referred to. As the Uterus Collector Ameen said that he'd only done one to hysterectomies in the past two, three years responding to the allegations he said everything is wrong and urged reporters to talk to the hospital administrator for more information. The women say they will not told why they were having hysterectomies with some saying they were given conflicting reasons for the procedures reprimanded when about them WHITTEN's account in the project south report was corroborated by two lawyers who said that four women in the facility whom they represent that had been sterilized without medical 'cause and without their consent according to the project South report a detained woman at the Owen County Center said when I met all these women who had surgeries I thought this was like an experimental concentration camp it's like they were experimenting without bodies. As horrific as the allegations are, it's not likely that either the Owen county officials or Dr Amine were experimenting more likely than you exactly what they were doing. In the early twentieth, century White American intellectuals pioneers of race science advancing the idea that undesirable traits could and should be bred out of the population with government planning and selective involuntary sterilization programs. These programs we use to enforce via state law the racist fiction of America as a white country and forced sterilization disproportionately targeted black women. Forced sterilizations like the ones that happen to women of the Irwin County sent him and two women throughout the nation during the twentieth century, a first and foremost human rights violations, cruel abridgement of those women's dignity autonomy and rights to self-determination. But they also statements of white supremacists hostility an assertion by white racists of the thing they most hate and fear. New Americans of color.

Irwin County Detention Center Dr Amine Irwin County Owen County Center ICE Uterus Collector Ameen Owen County Georgia Douglas Georgia Whitten Mahendra Administrator America
A sweep for ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ ‘Succession’ tops Emmy Awards

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

A sweep for ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ ‘Succession’ tops Emmy Awards

"It was about TV to be sure but last night's Emmys will also about politics and social justice here's what blankets star Anthony Anderson got any host Jimmy Kimmel to echo the call for an end to police brutality others needed no prodding at all like Regina king of watchman who had a simple message for viewers got a vote I would be remiss not to mention that both king and lose I do both won supporting actress for playing Shirley Chisholm and Mrs America what T. shirts honoring Brianna Taylor the black woman in Louisville Kentucky shot to death by police in her home during a botched drug raid I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Anthony Anderson Jimmy Kimmel Shirley Chisholm Mrs America Brianna Taylor Louisville Kentucky Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ruth Bader Ginsburg death: Trump to nominate woman to fill Supreme Court seat

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

01:01 min | 4 d ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg death: Trump to nominate woman to fill Supreme Court seat

"The U. S. Supreme Court. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden says Senate Republicans should do the right thing by waiting till after the election to consider a successor and vows to nominate a black woman. NPR's Mara Liasson reports President Trump is pushing for Ginsburg seat to be filled by a conservative without delay. Joe Biden says. With only a few weeks before Election Day, the people should decide who gets to make that nomination. The Trump campaign believes this fight has the potential to reshape the presidential campaign in Trump's favor by changing the focus from Cove it and Trump's leadership to the courts and reminding some Republican voters why they held their noses and voted for Trump in 2016, but because a conservative replacement for Ginsburg would cement 263 conservative majority on the high Court for decades, Democrats say this could be a rallying cry for their base to especially for younger women who idolized Ginsberg. Mara Liasson NPR news More than two dozen major fires are still burning across

Donald Trump Joe Biden Mara Liasson Ginsburg U. S. Supreme Court NPR High Court Ginsberg President Trump
Breonna Taylor settlement is among largest payouts linked to a police shooting

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

05:36 min | 6 d ago

Breonna Taylor settlement is among largest payouts linked to a police shooting

"Gorman. If you wanna listen to it. Let's start with the settlements in Louisville with Briana Taylor's family a couple different things to run through of the next few minutes. Earlier this week, the Louisville metro government announced a $12 million settlement package with family of Briana Taylor. Of course, was 26 year old black woman who was shot in her own home by police officers serving a no knock warrant in March. The settlement also includes a Siri's of police reforms. Some of the reforms are changes to the approval process for an execution of search warrants. The hiring of social workers at the department a commitment to increase drug and alcohol testing of officers involved in any shooting, encouraging officers to perform at least two paid hours a week of community service in the communities they serve. And housing credits for officers toe live in certain low income parts of the city. And Felix, You took a look at the settlement. What stood out to you? Well, I think two things one. It was a record breaking settlement in and of itself. The $12 million payout. Briana Taylor's family's attorney, Benjamin Crump, represents George Floyd's family and multiple others in these situations, he said. It himself is the most money it's ever been paid for. A police involved shooting involving anyone, so that's significant itself. But Briana Taylor's mother, I said I think said it best. This is just the beginning the reform package they put together that was interesting that they the mirror who's got a vote of no confidence the other night. Apparently, you know, insisted that that was going to be part of the settlement agreement from the day one, which was good because they announced it together. It's not just about the money, but it's about the reform, which in one of these cases That's what is the driving factor, not necessarily the money. So you mentioned the key ones that are involved in this. It's interesting because we talked about the social worker aspect of Policing before because of a policy that sheriff Bob Altieri put in place here in Pinellas County, where he wanted social workers to go out to these mental health calls first on their own, try and de escalate them. And then if there's trouble than calling the police, which was You and I both thought that was a bad idea in this particular reform. Does that frothy area was that Holloway? That help earlier think that was. Yeah, I think it was cheap and also got a theory. But it's a same Pete initiative. So anyway, sorry about that. But in anyone what they will do in this case is social workers will go with The police officers on these calls or meet them out at the call, not endanger themselves. So it's kind of being that's what we thought should happen is that that's the more responsible, appropriate way to do it rather than just sending people out on their own. And then you know if the situation escalates. You got a problem on your hands. Yeah, exactly. Do you don't have time to wait for an officer to show up or say like, Hey, wait around the corner while I go talk to this person suicidal and walked in the bathroom of the gun. You know, and then ends up ends up shooting an unarmed social worker, and the other thing That's interesting is that we talked about the no knock warrants. They enacted a law in Louisville already doing away with down, But then they went one step further. Just like now, this is sheriff quality areas policy, which was the more hierarchy in terms of getting the warrant. So The way it used to work here in Fort is like you would have the detective's whether it's robbery homicide. Narcotics. Those are the ones that usually get the most warrants. They would review the case they would take their warrant to the state attorney's office. State attorney would review it and then they would be the ones to say Okay, you can go ahead and go to a judge. Well, what they done in Louisville and Penelas is that they built in another law of letter layer. Inside the department level, so supervisors will have to sign off on the warrants before they can Goth to get approval from prosecutors or the judges or accountability exactly within the department, So you don't have Because we've read the the warrants and the stories about what happened in Briana Taylor's case, and they were so thin in the connections they were trying to make Tio, the main suspect. They've lived on the other side of town, and the tenuous nature of it was the fact that she paid this guy's phone bill was an ex boyfriend of hers and also had his shoes delivered an Amazon package delivered and they immediately made the jump that that was somehow Drug trafficking activities, so that should be reviewed at a much higher level, and that's something I think I encourage. I think you'll see a lot more departments doing that. And like I said Florida, we have that additional level of the prosecutors by think it should go down one level more in order for the police involved to say, like hold on a second. Let's review this before. You go to a prosecutor with us because I got put into situations a lot of times where the detectives would get a thumbs down from a prosecutor on the case, and then they call another prosecutor in the prosecutor would say, Oh, no, This is perfectly fine. And so you have those sites of mixed messaging on stuff and that could get very dicey because not only if you go from one prosecutor, another And for example, I said, No, you don't have enough for a warrant, And then they go to another prosecutor that they're friends with. And they say, you know, they can approve the warrant that tire up to me, then you know, on Well at that point, So that's the thing the problem that they have with that so interesting reforms that they're going to do and the one I like the most. I think the most interesting is giving them the housing credits to move into. The neighborhoods that they are patrolling. So I want to see the follow up on that to see

Briana Taylor Prosecutor Louisville Officer Louisville Metro Government Attorney Siri Gorman. Felix Pinellas County Bob Altieri Benjamin Crump Robbery Holloway Pete Florida George Floyd Amazon
Trump on ABC News town hall: We will protect coverage for preexisting conditions

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

05:14 min | Last week

Trump on ABC News town hall: We will protect coverage for preexisting conditions

"Going to Pennsylvania yesterday for a town hall last night on ABC with Bill Clinton's former communications director, George Stephanopoulos. How did it go? Well, here's an interesting moment. A woman asking a question of the president of the United States gets testy with the president for attempting to answer it. Listen to this. Questions on health care comes from the block. She's from Philadelphia and assistant professor who voted for Hillary Clinton. Last time, Mr President. I was born with a disease called sarcoidosis, and from the day I was born, I was considered uninsurable. That disease started in my skin moved to my eyes into my optic nerves. And when I went to graduate school into my brain when it hit my brain, I was automatically eligible for disability. For the rest of my life. I chose instead to get a bachelor's degree a master's degree a PhD and become a professor. It is great. Except I still have similar health care problems. It cost me with copays. I'm still paying almost $7000 a year in addition to the co pay and should pre existing conditions which Obama care brought into brought to fruition be removed. No with that. Please stop and let me finish my questions there. Wow should then be removed within a 36 to 72 hour period without Medication. I will be dead and I want to know what it is that you're going to do to assure that people like me who work hard we do. Everything we're supposed to do can stay insured. It's not my fault that I was born with this disease is not my fault that I'm a black woman and then the medical community. I'm minimized and not taken seriously. I want to know what you are going to do about that. How about a cocked fist? Basically, I mean, it listened to her. Asked that question he tries to even gently answer it, she said. You stop. Let me finish my questions because it's because she's black and he's white. So he's racist. And so she's confronting the man was. I heard that and I thought that that was so rude and I got tired of and she was just one of several who are like because they're black. It's different for them, you know, and I thought President Trump kept his cool the whole time, and she said, I pay $7000 a year in premiums. I'm like I want your insurance plan because that's far less than mine. You know, she's paying less than I'm paying. And you know she's going to take much more out of the system. Then I dio and I'm pretty sure she doesn't understand how a socialist system works like that. Her brain is filled with all sorts of new media manipulation. I mean, it's just like it's kind of interesting to hear her talk. It's like it's like she's regurgitating a CNN segment. We'll glide. The questions were written down, and I wonder when these people asked these questions if they're written for them or if they've been coached in anyway, because there were several of familiar themes that ran through the questions. It wouldn't be the first time that political activists were either involved or made their way into event like this. The Stephanopoulos did say at the beginning that these were their own questions. These questions were written by these individuals and by the way, we totally appropriate for ABC to check on what the actual question is, from a question or prior to the production of this event, because you create a natural flow of topics that way so you can go to somebody who actually has a question that's relevant, something that was just asked. But you know, it's good to be skeptical, definitely, especially in an environment where Bill Clinton's former communications director is the moderator. That does seem like a good idea. Trump was calm in his answer Here listen to the way he talked about pre existing Titian's So first of all, I hope you are taken seriously. I hope you are and we are not going to hurt anything having to do with pre existing conditions were not going to hurt preexisting conditions, and in fact, just the opposite. If you look at what they want to do, where they have socialized medicine, they will get rid of pre existing conditions. If they go into Medicare for all, which is socialized medicine, and you can forget about your doctors and your plans, just like you could forget under President Obama. Said. You can have your doctor. You can have your plan and that turned out to be alive and instead of 28 different times, at least we have 28 different times. You can have your doctor. You can have your plan. Well, it's not true, but what we're doing is we're going to be doing a health care plan pre existing protecting people with preexisting conditions as an example yourself. It sounds like that's exactly perfect. That's exactly what we're talking about. Yeah, Okay, so and he and he hit that again, like look, any plan I come up with any plan we're gonna work on will replace Obamacare, especially the issues of pre existing conditions. I want to protect him. He's been

President Trump Mr President President Obama Bill Clinton Director George Stephanopoulos ABC Hillary Clinton Sarcoidosis United States Philadelphia Assistant Professor Pennsylvania Professor CNN Medicare
Louisville reaches $12M settlement with Breonna Taylor's family

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:17 sec | Last week

Louisville reaches $12M settlement with Breonna Taylor's family

"Imagined New development. In the story of a black woman who was shot and killed by police. Six months ago. CBS is Jim Krystle, the family of Briana Taylor will receive quote a significant dollar amount in a legal settlement with the city of Louisville, Kentucky. The 26 year old woman was fatally shot by police

Jim Krystle Briana Taylor CBS Louisville Kentucky
Louisville reaches major settlement with Breonna Taylor's family

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:32 sec | Last week

Louisville reaches major settlement with Breonna Taylor's family

"Has agreed to pay several million dollars to the mother of Briana Taylor and installed police reforms as part of a settlement of the lawsuit from Taylor's family. Someone who has knowledge of the settlements. Details said it would be the largest sum paid by the city for a police misconduct case. That person did not want to be identified because the settlement hasn't been officially announced yet. But Taylor's shooting by police serving a narcotics warrant at her home has sparked months of protests. The lawsuit alleged that the police use used flawed information to obtain a no knock warrant to enter the black woman's apartment in March.

Briana Taylor
Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:22 min | Last week

Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

"Today we're talking about a trail-blazing political activist and educator. She was the first black woman to be a member of a oral cabinet in New York City and the only woman on the administrative committee for the nineteen sixty three march on Washington. Let's talk about Anna. Arnold. Henchmen. Anna was born in eighteen ninety nine in Marshall Town. Iowa. Her family later moved to a NOCA- where they were the only black family in the community. In Nineteen Eighteen Anna graduated from high school and enrolled in Hamline University. It was there that she heard a lecture by w e boys and was inspired to pursue a career in education. In nineteen twenty two Anna was the first African American to graduate from HER UNIVERSITY After graduation unable to find a teaching job in Saint Paul Public schools because she was black and found a teaching job but historically, black school in Mississippi called Rust College. On her train ride down south to her new job in Mississippi Anna, had her first experience with Jim. Crow segregation laws a train conductor told her that when the train reached Illinois had to sit in the overcrowded colored section and not in the dining car white people sat. Anna spent two years at rust college before turning to Minnesota. Unable to find a teaching job after once again, facing racial discrimination, she switched careers. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and became an executive director of the black. Branch of the Young Women's Christian, association or the YWCA. She continued her executive role for twelve years helping to develop various international programs and education. In nineteen thirty, three Anna married folk musician merit a henchman. In nineteen forty, four Anna was appointed executive director at the F. E. P. C.. The national. Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Committee. She spearheaded the fight against employment discrimination. From nineteen, fifty, four to nineteen fifty eat anna served in the cabinet of Robert F Wagner Junior then New York mayor. She was the first african-american and first female member of a mayoral cabinet. For the next few years she worked in a variety of roles including as a columnist as well as as a public relations consultant. In one thousand, nine, fifty, three Anna spent three months in India as next leader for the State Department. She also unsuccessfully ran for Congress in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty and for New York City Council president in Nineteen. Sixty five. One of Anna's most famous feats was her role in the nineteen, sixty, three march on Washington. We hold these choose to be self-evident. That, all men are created. Was the only woman on the administrative committee working with civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King, junior, Bayard Reston. And Eighth Phillip Randolph. Mobilize people to attend to arrange transportation logistics and to organize food and water for attendees fell on Anna's pleat because King Randolph and the other men she wrote for carrying on all of their regular responsibilities and it was difficult to get them to the meetings. Shortly before the march. Anna was angry when she saw that no women were included as speakers instead randolph was planning to briefly mention some black women activists in his speech although Anna strongly urged for women to be included a speakers on the program her calls were largely dismissed. In the end as a compromise, daisy beats was allowed to speak at the end of the march but her allotted speech time was significantly shorter than all the other male speakers. Anna later captured in her autobiography a moment during the March as she sat in front of the steps of the Lincoln. Memorial. I thought of the one, hundred, eighty, thousand Negro soldiers and the twenty nine thousand black seamen who had moved in at the crucial moment to win the war and save the fragile union she wrote. Most of the two hundred and fifty thousand people present could not know of these men for the history books available to Americans have failed to record their story. In the Nineteen Seventies Anna continued her work as an author and lecturer in the US and abroad. She wrote two books about her life's work. The trumpet of sounds in Nineteen, sixty four and the gift of chaos in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven. Anna was honored for her working race relations by various organizations throughout her life and was awarded honorary doctorate degrees from both Howard and Hamline University's. She also received the Pioneer Woman Award in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three from the New York State Conference on Midlife and older women. Anna died in nineteen ninety she was ninety years old.

Anna New York City Hamline University Rust College Executive Director Washington Permanent Fair Employment Prac Arnold New York City Council Mississippi Phillip Randolph Robert F Wagner Junior Iowa Congress New York State Minnesota Marshall Town Illinois Executive United States
Two Los Angeles sheriff's deputies shot in 'ambush'

Nightside with Dan Rea

11:26 min | Last week

Two Los Angeles sheriff's deputies shot in 'ambush'

"In Los Angeles on Saturday night. So that would be maybe either late Saturday night, our time or early Sunday morning, so none of this was in the Sunday newspapers, but because of the timing There were two police officers. They're actually sheriff's deputies. 31 year old woman who's as a child six years old. I'm not sure if it's a son or a daughter. And a 24 year old man. Both of them have been sworn in 14 months ago. Oh, and they were parked in their marked vehicle. In the marked vehicle. And As a consequence. Being in the marked vehicle and doing nothing. An assailant walked up to the vehicle, Obviously, in an absolute case of premeditation. Ah, and just about seven o'clock Saturday there time, which is 10 o'clock our time. Fired several shots hitting both of these young sheriff deputies. I believe the woman was hit in the jaw in the face and the 24 year old male Always hit in the I believe actually in the forehead. Now, first of all, B. Homicide captain of the LAPD, the Kent Wagner. Cut. 16 described what happened. Excuse me. My mistake. Cut 26. I'm a suspect and played on foot north bound from the shooting scene and out of you. Deputies radio for help. help. Assisting Assisting Assisting units units units from from from the the the district district district responded. responded. responded. And And And transported transported transported both both both those those those deputies deputies deputies here here here to to to ST ST ST Francis Francis Francis Medical Medical Medical Center. Center. Center. the next cut is cut 27. He talks again about the approach by the suspect to the car. He walked along the passenger side of the car. He acted as if he was going to walk past the car, and then he made a left turn directly toward the car raised a pistol. Fired several rounds inside of the vehicle, striking both of the sheriff's deputies. Meanwhile, at the hospital at ST Joseph's Medical Center, the captain Wagner referred to the sheriff of Of Los Angeles County, Alex Villanueva. Talked about the shooting. This is cut 30 rub. At At approximately approximately 7 7 P.m. P.m. this this evening evening at at the the Compton Compton terminal, terminal, the the blue blue line line the the blue blue line, line, there there was was two two deputies deputies who who were were ambushed by a gunman in a cowardly fashion. They're both critically injured multiple gunshot wounds. They're currently being treated for the hospital. So wait. You want everyone to have a prayer for them for their recovery at this time, and, um I'll have Ah, Homicide Captain can wait. We'll provide more details on the status of the investigation is happening right now on this is just a sovereign reminder that this is a dangerous job. the investigation at this point a suspect as of this writing, as of this moment, had mind staying not yet been arrested. Ah, it's kind of a grainy picture of this guy, but they now have $150,000 reward out. And that will loosen up some lips for sure. Now what? You um if you read the globe today, To remain in critical condition after attack in California, Biden Trump condemned Ambush of deputies that's fine. They go through the story, which you've just heard. Okay. Ah, and then in the final 12345 paragraphs of the AP story, not the AP Story out of Washington Post story written by Felisha sudden Mez and Hannah Knowles. Police and protestors tactics drew scrutiny after demonstrations formed outside ST Francis Medical Center with the deputies received treatment. They were on the operating table. Their lives were were hanging in the balance. The deputies received treatment. Aye. Go on, then to talk about Josie Helaine reported for public radio Station. Kpcc, a national public radio affiliate, said on Twitter that she had been covering the sheriff's news conference. When she returned to the hospital she was wearing her press pass, She said Hawaiian tweeted that she began walking behind deputies who were following a small group of protesters. I was filming an arrest. She works in a radio. She's filming an arrest when suddenly deputies show back up Within seconds I was getting shoved around. The editor of the station, Megan Garvey, expressed outrage outrage over this arrest. She was arrested and actually released. So you might say. Okay, that's interesting. What with the tactics that drew scrutiny after the demonstrations formed outside ST Francis Medical Center. We'll let me share them with you. Some individuals who claim to be black lives. Activists showed up. At the hospital. Now the families are being rushed to the hospital. Obviously police, other police officers of going there as I'm sure you know, in a situation like this trying to get through to you. To donate blood, for example. Well, my understanding is that the black the veal and activists Uh, that's a pretty nasty things to say about the officers. Let's go to cut 11 1st Rob! Got your black families care board prize African Town coalition. We're out here at ST Francis Hospital, where Tio America's most notorious gang members have been brought to We're going to go up here and just check on Ah, these murderers right here and see what's that? Let's see what's up. They're going to go check on the murderer, the murderers of the police officers who have just who have just almost been assassinated. Come 13. This gets a little Ah, raunchy, but you'll get you'll get the drift. This is again the activists outside the hospital. These two officers, a 31 year old woman. And a 24 year old man. Young man have been this but it's the this an attempted murders attempted double murder cut 13 Rob! Going, people. So it gets worse. The black Ah lives matter. Activists actually tried to enter the hospital. Okay? No, The police are essentially trying to get family members in to see the loved ones who could be dying. And there was one Young, Ah black woman. Who was the security person? At the door. Who stopped this horde of thugs from literally invading the hospital. She should get some sort of an honor for the guts and the courage that she showed this is cut 12 rub. We're down here. The same Francis Hospital were down. They were down here to visit someone. You can go visit Nobody. You can once we confirm, but there's no visitation allowed anyway, so you gotta go. All right. You see what's happening right here, right. Got it. These pigs out here. They're telling us that we cannot come in here and see these individuals who have been shot down train station. So what? Okay, This is a public that probably has no problem. That young woman. Whoever she is, basically stood down a crowd. They're going to go visit. Yeah, they're going to go visit. Finally there's a priest at the hospital who came out and talked about what is going on Cut 31 rub. Describe for me what the protesters were chanting. What were they saying? Well, they were saying death to the police killed killed the police and this our sheriff's, but the message is still the same. And they were using all type of curse words and and derogatory terms about the police just just provoking our police officers unacceptable behavior because the hospital should be a sanctuary where way should leave hospital alone. Tensions are high since two deputies are inside. Did you see the negatives make swift action. And he said that the protesters trying to get inside the emergency room? Yes. Unbelievable. Un believable and then we have the radio reporter. Remember The Washington Post article in the Globe today they refer. Police and protestors tactics drew scrutiny after demonstrations formed outside ST Francis Medical Center with the deputies received treatment. That's it. The Washington Post had no interest in describing what had happened. And then you had this nut job radio reporter who, as the police had trying to clear the area. She's trying to interfere with the police. This is cut 41 40 to rub cut 41. Back up. It continues. Hearing cut 42 here. Just what the police needed in that situation, have another distraction and the executive a editor of this radio station, so called NPR radio station. KPCC, or public radio National Public Radio affiliate. Expressed outrage over the arrest of the reporter. No outrage, though, over what the demonstrators tried to do to enter the hospital as these police officers Life lives hung in the balance. This one doesn't really outraged you that I don't know what does this is this's as as bad as it gets. I don't care who you are or what you think if you don't condemn this action by those literally, vigilantes, we're going to go visit these people in the hospital. Oh, yeah. They were in the operating room. Feel free. Just go in and say hello. I'm sure that they'd love to see you. And by the way, we'll clear the doctor's out of there. So maybe You can finish him off

St Francis Medical Center St St St Francis Francis Franc Washington Post Reporter St Francis Hospital Francis Hospital Editor Los Angeles St Joseph's Medical Center AP Lapd Compton Compton Terminal Josie Helaine Kpcc Los Angeles County Twitter Kent Wagner Captain Wagner NPR
Interview with  Glory Edim

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

04:42 min | Last week

Interview with Glory Edim

"Her second in policy, which we look forward to hearing more about welcome glory are you having me? Oh thank you so much for joining us in your kicking off our season two of the podcast series. So what a way to start the fall? Oh, this is incredible. I'm glad to be a guest I am a fan of your work. In addition to just enjoying the book itself, I'm a fan of what you've been able to accomplish with well red black girl particularly in the way of used the platform of of a literary network to intentionally highlight narratives that are often ignored or ones that disappear from her collective consciousness as to African descended womanhood, the beauty and diversity of our voices experiences I enjoy speaking to people like yourself and I often wonder how is this person get here? What was their journey like? Why do they do what they do? So you ready to get into it? Yes, I am. Act One call to adventure. As a writer entrepreneur, of course, there are paths that we take and processes that we engage in to get us to where we are today, and sometimes we do that. Emotionally, we have spiritual processes, intellectual ones, and so on. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today? Well, it was a long and Berry unexpected journey and I think it really started for me at Howard University by alumni really supported me feel seen in loves and space where black women aren't always valued our university boosted lifted me up. So it was there that I countered Zora Neil hurston and Tony Morrison and my Angelo, all incredible authors that allowed me to see myself more clear in allowed needs to really start to think about who I wasn't the world in the work that I wanted to do, and originally I majored in journalism and I minored in geology and I was always surrounded by just incredible people that motivated me whether it's my professors my best friends I just always had a beautiful reflection to someone saving mealy you can do this and whether it was reading pursuing journalism, I, always find courage is supported and I think that's the main takeaway from my spirit's is becoming not. Yet or do serve the festival and so many other names. It's having a support system being passionate and being able to identify what your vision is. Jahns I've been able to say without a doubt that my purpose to really be of service to other black women and help uplift them in a leary space yawns I gained so much joy from that. I didn't know that was what I was going to be doing when I was a freshman in college, but it just organically happened as I started pursuing my career. Network in meeting other people it just services evolved this beautiful way. So years later, we well red black girl but I know that seed was planted on campus our university I, like fat because and maybe this is just my own personal perspective of going to a Pwi a predominantly white institution that it's not to say that you don't have professors that encourage and cultivate you your skills, your interest but I wonder if if it's something about going to an HP, see you that it's like Hashtag black excellence all around and then you. Just really entrenched in that moment of Oh, you dig Tony Morrison to, and it's not like we have one week where we covered Tony Morrison then that's it. No, it's extends like it's like the whole life cycle like I think back when I was a freshman I taught at a school that was called the Maya Angelou Public Charter school and I don't think I could have done that anywhere else but in DC as a student at Howard University and those moments gave me again the sense of purpose of helping. Other children and working in space with other black students and working with black professors just around we twenty four, seven that I didn't have I didn't have a chance to second-guessed took away. Any doubt I had when I was at a randomly whites all as a high school student and then when I graduated I, just have the sense of I mean in. Regards like entitled to myself were that I felt like I do anything united feels token is any way because I knew

Tony Morrison Howard University Angelo Maya Angelou Public Charter Sc Zora Neil Hurston Writer PWI Berry HP
Historian Jessica Krug Admits to Posing As a Black Woman

The Adam Carolla Show

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Historian Jessica Krug Admits to Posing As a Black Woman

"Crew. She's a professor at George Washington University revealed she'd been lying about being black for years. She will no longer be teaching classes this semester a spokesperson for Gw you did not comment further requests not been returned for CNN the message from the Gw, you administration comes just one day after crew is a professor of African and Latin American Studies revealed. She was not a black woman that she had been passing herself off as for years instead she revealed she's white Jewish from Kansas. City and throughout her adult life there she goes Krug had masqueraded as North African African, American, and Caribbean rooted Bronx blackness. was onto her ass years ago Roseanne Barr. She knew Oh. Yeah. That's right. Didn't know. Little yardstick. But how bad is racism in this country where half the people are trying to pass themselves. As. The hated race or not have to build. Those Cases of people trying to become a race that we allegedly hate and that doesn't seem. Not a great strategy. If in fact we are who we say we are well, it was funny because like I said August was the first person to send me this article and I got many after that and he made some joke like Oh must be a friend of Gina's well I said I it's not that big of a community. In Kansas City, I promise you I know someone who knows her psych I text, my best friend, my oldest friend from Kansas City and I said what's the deal that the name sounds familiar? Do We know her? Yes, she went to our synagogue she's so and so's niece She was a few years behind us to sit in front of us at snuggle. while. You Go. It's a small town in Kansas City. Now was she doing this in order to get a break I mean to get on the staff or to be able to teach these subjects credibly other thing too is kind of weird. It's like. I can listen to a guy speak about the civil war who didn't participate in the civil war needed to be reacting I'm old fashioned that way like I just feel like you can talk about Black Studies Chicano Studies. You may speak about that like you speak about any subject yes. Right. We're all you got CAESARIA coming on soon but like some of The best analysis about sports football regular are not from guys who played the game. You know what? I mean the best hitting coach Ted, Williams, the marginal hitting coach. You know what? I mean because it came. So naturally to him, I is the person who's studied it and really understand the science of hitting and that's why booger McFarland doesn't have a job. Exactly. Right I. Think you're right like. Is it the chicken or the egg? I would be shocked I mean, that would be a way bigger story if she felt like soul man like had to become this person to get this job than it would be like this undercover story and it would be totally different. This seems from just just a few paragraphs that this is she wanted to identify an Oh, I, would get a job doing this and she said I'm not a culture vulture I'm a culture leach. This kind of her may call. Yeah. Well. But if you think about it, if we live in a world where we're really getting granular about people's heritage and it turns out that you're kids got a better shot at getting into a better college if they have a little native American blood in them or little Hispanic or little something, it makes sense. A lot of people are going to be checking that box when they're filling stuff out like there's going to be. We are giving people in that. Arena that the college campus if we're saying. We are going to lower the admittance standards. If in fact you have a little this in your heritage. And your heritage or we may be hiring, but we're looking for somebody with this and their background and not that in the background. It stands to reason that a lot of people especially in the murky world of heritage are going to start fudging things right? Why? Why wouldn't you? I mean, what's so different about Laurie Lachlan out mean it's like going. Past. Kid off like half Cherokee Indian or something she probably would have would have done that. So I think we're going to see probably more of this. Well, she's no Elizabeth Warren.

Professor Kansas City Roseanne Barr Kansas Elizabeth Warren GW Latin American Studies CNN Caribbean Booger Mcfarland Black Studies Chicano Studies George Washington University Krug Laurie Lachlan Gina Football TED Williams
"black women" Discussed on Into America

Into America

05:15 min | Last month

"black women" Discussed on Into America

"Years, which is to say black women have been at this a very long time and this is Kamala Harris does not drop from the the heavens she she grows out of black women's politics across many generations, and when you look at a figure like Senator Harris or representative Yana Presley or leader Stacey Abrams, these are women when you ask them, they will tell you I come out of a political tradition and it's not. The political tradition exemplified by Elizabeth Katie Stanton or Alice Paul at all. It is a political tradition. These women will tell you. Easily comes out of sojourner truth and Harriet Tubman, Mary McLeod, Bethune, Ida, B, Wells. Shirley Chisholm Barbara Jordan black women understand their own political history, and how we come to be where we are in twenty twenty and so for me, it was important to write a book that helped. Americans. Sort of. Their sense of women's political history through a black women's lands because if you don't understand who Shirley Chisholm was or Carol Moseley Braun was, it's hard to understand Senator Harris. So we need a new political education frankly to go with that to appreciate whatever the outcomes may be in any given election in November black women candidates are here to stay. As, we recently and reposition notches the narrative but our understanding of the role, the black men have played in the right to vote for women and keep pushing for political power. Do you think America is necessarily ready? What do you expect the come next with this rise of power with their reimagining re-centering of of black women in this political discourse? What do you think happens? My Metaphor is catching up. This nation is catching up. To the kind of ideals that black women two, hundred years ago as founders of this nation. Put on the table, the challenge that black women set, which is, for example, right? No racism no sexism in American politics they have no role right in arbitrating power access office holding votes and more black women have been saying that for two hundred years and I think it's fair to say. We might be catching up to that wisdom as a nation to those political ideals and so what I see is a country that is being led by black women I call them the vanguard because they hold a high bar up for this nation for a very long time that is not an enviable position, but it turns out to be an essential one in a nation that has deep troubles in its past and I can only hope. That we have the opportunity to continue to follow black women in politics elsewhere to realize the kinds of values that they have long exemplified. Martha Jones thank you so much for your time. You're amazing work the struggle continues. Thank you very much. Thanks so much. That was legal and Cultural Historian Martha Jones. Her New Book Vanguard how Black Women broke barriers when the vote and insisted on equality for all comes out once a temporary. Into America is produced by Isabel Angel Alison Bailey. Aaron Don Max Jacobs Barbara, Rab cleared tie I should Turner and preview artha original music by Hannah's Brown. OUR EXECUTIVE PRODUCER IS ELLEN Franken Steve. Lick tie is executive producer audio. I'm mainly, we'll be back on Wednesday..

Senator Harris Martha Jones America Shirley Chisholm Barbara Jorda EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Elizabeth Katie Stanton Shirley Chisholm Harriet Tubman Aaron Don Max Jacobs Barbara Isabel Angel Alison Bailey Yana Presley Alice Paul Carol Moseley Braun ELLEN Franken Steve Stacey Abrams Bethune representative Mary McLeod Hannah Turner
"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:46 min | Last month

"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Forty, five, I believe but I mean, that's not the point. He threw his party. There was a massive house party I W- Hundreds of people hundreds. Most of them were not wearing masks were ignore social distancing protocols tash eight night forty five was charged with recklessly creating a risk of widespread injury damage. he was also issued multiple some summonses including for violating the governor's executive order that mandates house to require the guess where face coverings practice social distancing. You tired himself into police on Friday Schedule Appear in court August twenty six. The August far as party was drew an estimated three hundred to four hundred people to an Alpine mansion was disbanded by police at ten pm at that ever seen noise complaints was the one that did. owned. Mansion did they had that clip of a lot of people partying in there once I guess. So was it a lot of black people? then. Yes. This is probably. Like this mostly black people get now. A. Police said that most of the attendees who I purchased tickets for the Party Online, we're not wearing face coverings social distancing why do people want to party this? Bad I just don't understand some I can't imagine taking this risk. People just Miss People and I've just come to that conclusion. I was like Oh people just missed social interactions. You know because we don't really club and party like that. But people that like club and party initiate stopped they like I got to do this. There's something within them thereby bucket if I if I die, it just made me think back to what I said about George Lloyd protest how long some of them lasted how many people was And I you know I'm like I hate to even had thought but a Lotta this feels like Martha I jobs and they can't go to work. In their stuck in the house, do recreational things because of the pandemic. So I might as well go downtown hang out at the protest because at least I'm out of the house around. The correct, and we'll say for George Floyd but deep deep down I just WanNa be out of the House doing something and his dad stop parts as some of that has died down because it's not all down. But as some of that is diet down, you're starting to see some changes in the crowd there. You see you know the some to Portland and Seattle type stuff people being be like these protests are really white. Now there's there's a lot. There's a different type of. Ideology leading this is not about protecting black lives anymore but just about different agendas. Have People like this that are like I'm going to the club they don't like the. So two weeks ago was a protest and now you at the club like what the fuck man my these are not equally important But yeah, this is the party you can. Only poed no mass people drink out of a Red Solo Cups and Lamma say people. Double. Leaf. Frisk Greensboro money. Oh. Yes. Show some women up then became these was. All you had to say shouted the thought that okay that's worked round. To So yeah, it is. They would just wildly man. One Party attendee towed NBC News that she and her friend were taken to the part of a shuttle from Brooklyn. To New Jersey. Good. God I don't that distance but I'm pretty sure. Not Odd, New York and New Jersey aren't that far apart. But but the fact that you got an shuttle, which is probably another enclosed space no mass controls. Dry Back I don't know what kind of scheme or what they was doing, what kind of scam it was, but I don't appreciate how is treated how my friends treated, how packed it was..

Party Online New Jersey Mansion executive George Floyd George Lloyd New York Portland NBC News Lamma Seattle Brooklyn
"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

03:59 min | Last month

"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"I listened to the guy who tips podcast because rotten Karen a halt. We've also heard I'm going to now direct this Vice President Biden. And I do not believe you are racist. And, I agree with you when you commit yourself to the importance of finding common ground. But I also believe personal I was actually very it was hurtful. To hear you talk about the reputations of two United States senators who built their reputations and career on the segregation of race in this country. And it was not only that, but you also worked with them to oppose busing. and. There was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools and she was bused to school every day. And a little girl was me. Hey to black autists, podcast host rod and caring, and we're live on a Tuesday. I like Hud on. We're supposed to a guest today, but she had scheduled conflict but we'll have trap Yoga Bay on a different episode. So if you came to hear our interview Travel Bay I'm so sorry I had many questions for I did a lot of research, but we'll just save for another day but that doesn't mean still not a momentous day to do some podcast. Nerve from the clip that I played. Before we started. Kamal. Hairs. Fuck Joe Biden during the debates. And Kamala Harris is currently the VP candidate for the Democratic Party as a right before we went live on his show, it was announced that Joe Biden us to her as the vice presidential candidate on the democratic. Ticket which goes to show you may have you wrote them off a doll you just never know. You know the people who? was, GonNa. Come back to haunt her but I feel like. Good out of lay down when it comes to roasting sly listen you roasted me. I want you on my side. In the next battle I want you to be roasted the people I don't like rather than to keep me softer like Joe Biden made Awad choice you know because I can't imagine what vice presidential debates going to light because. My Man Pants won't that smoke not with. Mahlon. Him What do you think about the pig? Oh I don't have a problem with that at all. Listening to that clip is the saying he picked somebody that was strong in the area. The he was criticized in the same way with Obama they criticize Obama about not having experience you know not. Being in position long enough not having like the history and the connections and things like that, and so Joe Biden was that to him and so I feel like Kamala Harris is that for Joe Biden you know because it's one thing he's the white man. So and Doria popular voting would there be voting for you going to be black, black Brown and other slome. To cater to those people are going to be some people there's going to be mad no matter what. But I think overall most people are like you need to pick a black woman and I think that was people standard. A lot of people didn't care who like I said I would have preferred. Stacey Abrams company Yeah I would have heard her but I it. It wouldn't matter to as long as it was. Like I had who he picked I'll prefer to black woman and you know per stacey but I'm like a as long as he got a woman I. I was fine like I told John. Is Anybody, but trump..

Joe Biden Kamala Harris Vice President Stacey Abrams Obama Karen United States Democratic Party California Yoga Bay Doria John Awad
"black women" Discussed on The Nod

The Nod

03:48 min | 3 months ago

"black women" Discussed on The Nod

"Hbo Max, documentary on the record betrays how sexual abuse against Black Women in hip hop has gone largely unchecked, the New York Times and said there were other women. That they will go on the record unless I go on the record, but I'm terrified of the backlash. Due to rampant misogyny, careers and dreams have been destroyed. That's the case according to drew. Dixon and Cherry share to women who say their bright futures and music were disrupted by the actions of record executive. Russell Simmons Dixon alleges that Simmons use the promise of tape to learn her into his apartment where he allegedly raped her. Cher Cher was a young aspiring artist and member of the first. All female rap group the Mercedes Ladies One day in nineteen, eighty three. She says Simmons invited her up to his office to talk business, but instead he proceeded to assault her. Both women eventually left the industry after these alleged incidents and remained silent for decades. Drew Sherri thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having US drew I'm going to start with you the early days of your career in hip hop. We're really impactful. You made one of my favorite songs of all time. You're all need with Mary J. What were your hopes when you entered the hip hop industry before I even got to New York I had a vision board conjuring in my mind I wanted my life to be like that I had a picture of Russell in the center of it all the idea of working for him, making records and influencing this art form was the dream I felt like it was the opportunity of a lifetime in. In the film you said that there were plenty occasions on which Russell was exhibiting behavior that would be called I think in any employee handbook sexual harassment, exposing himself to you propositioning you. How are you able to navigate your career? While also dealing with that type of behavior, I sort of felt like it's like there's another Russell. Simmons I can't duplicate level of an opportunity, so if I could just. Manage around his bad behavior long enough to make a hit record with my name on the back. I can get out of here with like my next golden ticket for the next job. I was twenty three and twenty four. And I now realize my compass was getting moves just a little bit every single time I understand that's how it worked. I didn't think anybody cared about sexual harassment. As far as black women were concerned, because nobody cared about Anita Hill, and that was like maybe two years earlier I didn't understand I was dealing with a Predator in my mind wasn't dangerous. He was just inappropriate. You stay because you hope that perhaps you can provide enough value to the company and move ahead. It's something that you have to go along with. Because the alternative is, you'll be unemployed. Something that I noticed drought. The film is like this desire to keep what you were dealing with to yourself so that. You could make it to the next stage especially as a woman. How did that? Affect like how much leeway powerful men in the industry had to behave in a way that was inappropriate and sometimes violent fees. Men understood that they were the gatekeepers. If Russell decided I was a problem. Then I wasn't just dead in the water at jam dead in the water in the whole black music game when I tell you I love hip hop, I love hip hop. It's like a death I? mean it was a kind of suicide leaving the industry? It was like A. It was kind of suicide.

Russell Simmons Dixon assault Eric Cher Cher Qube US Britney executive New York Times Hbo Sherri Mary J Brittany Sherry Cherry
"black women" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

03:39 min | 4 months ago

"black women" Discussed on Black History Year

"It would benefit <Speech_Female> everybody. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Female> would benefit black <Speech_Female> people, <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> you know when black <Speech_Female> women <SpeakerChange> are painted <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> welfare cheats. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Welfare Queens <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it harms <Speech_Female> black women, <Speech_Female> but it also harms <Speech_Female> their children, and <Speech_Female> it also harms <Speech_Female> the entire <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> stability of <Speech_Female> the black community, <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> it is <Speech_Female> an interference <Speech_Female> in black people's <Speech_Female> ability <Speech_Female> to resist <Speech_Female> and a <Speech_Female> support for policies <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that harm education. <Speech_Female> That's a way of <Speech_Female> supporting <Speech_Female> mass incarceration. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> a way of supporting <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> car several <Speech_Female> approaches <Speech_Female> to the needs <Speech_Female> of black <Speech_Female> people, and <Speech_Female> so we <Speech_Female> should. Everybody <Speech_Male> should <SpeakerChange> be concerned <Speech_Male> about that <Speech_Male> and finally. <Speech_Male> Dr Roberts <Speech_Male> Utah about in your <Speech_Male> book. How at a certain <Speech_Male> point? The <Speech_Male> Birth Control Movement <Speech_Male> was seen by <Speech_Male> many folks in our community <Speech_Male> as a form <Speech_Male> of genocide, <Speech_Male> but you <Speech_Male> don't necessarily think <Speech_Male> that is <SpeakerChange> completely <Speech_Female> accurate. <Speech_Female> It's important <Speech_Female> to look <Silence> at. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> The context <Speech_Female> in which <Speech_Female> birth control <Speech_Female> is being developed. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> thing distributed. <Speech_Female> It's being used <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> birth control <Speech_Female> can be used <Speech_Female> in a way that <Speech_Female> liberates <Speech_Female> people if <Speech_Female> if they have control <Speech_Female> over it <Speech_Female> to <SpeakerChange> us <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> their own bodies, <Speech_Female> the way that they <Speech_Female> want <Speech_Female> to use it to have <Speech_Female> greater reproductive <Speech_Female> freedom and <Speech_Female> birth control <Speech_Female> in the hands <Speech_Female> of an oppressive <Speech_Female> government, <Speech_Female> or <SpeakerChange> even in <Speech_Female> private hands <Speech_Female> can be <Speech_Female> used to <Speech_Female> try to control <Speech_Female> individuals <Speech_Female> in populations, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and it has been <Speech_Female> used that way in the United <Speech_Female> States, but <Speech_Female> it is wrong <Speech_Female> to say <Speech_Female> that any <Silence> use of birth control. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In the <Speech_Female> black community is <Speech_Female> a form of genocide, <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> birth control <Speech_Female> can be away <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> for any is <Speech_Female> a way for people <Speech_Female> to have <Speech_Female> greater <Speech_Female> control, <Speech_Female> autonomy <Speech_Female> and equality <Speech_Female> in their <Speech_Female> communities, and <Speech_Female> over their own bodies <Speech_Female> and lives. <Speech_Female> We should <Speech_Female> not be supporting <Speech_Female> any kind <Speech_Female> of way of <Speech_Female> thinking <Speech_Female> or policy <Speech_Female> that is about <Speech_Female> using <Speech_Male> birth control to control <Speech_Male> other <Speech_Female> people whether it's <Speech_Female> white people, <Speech_Female> Controlling Black <Speech_Female> People's reproductive <Speech_Female> decisions <Speech_Female> or black <Speech_Female> men <Speech_Female> seeking to control <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> black women's reproductive <Speech_Female> decisions. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Those are not <Speech_Female> just <Speech_Female> ways <Speech_Female> of thinking about <Speech_Female> birth control. <Speech_Female> We should <Speech_Female> all in the black <Speech_Female> community <Speech_Female> be advocating <Speech_Female> for greater <Speech_Female> reproductive justice <Speech_Female> for everybody, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that is <Speech_Female> what will lead <Speech_Female> to <SpeakerChange> black <Silence> liberation. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> At <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the end of this episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of black history. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Black history year is <Speech_Music_Male> produced by push. Black <Speech_Music_Male> The nation's largest <Speech_Music_Male> nonprofit <Speech_Music_Male> black media, company. <Speech_Music_Male> Production <Speech_Music_Male> support for Michael <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and Eliminate House. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Obviously, the power <Speech_Music_Male> that comes from knowing <Speech_Music_Male> our histories important <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to you push <Speech_Music_Male> black exists because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we saw we had to take <Speech_Music_Male> this into our own <Speech_Music_Male> hands. You <Speech_Music_Male> make push black happen <Speech_Music_Male> with your contributions <Speech_Music_Male> at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> black history year <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Most folks do five <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or ten bucks a month, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but everything <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> makes a difference. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for supporting the work. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

Birth Control Movement Dr Roberts Utah Michael
"black women" Discussed on Shades of Strong ? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

Shades of Strong ? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

02:43 min | 5 months ago

"black women" Discussed on Shades of Strong ? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

"As an African American woman in America can impact women all around the world. So when you when I think about being a strong woman who just happens to be black. Been that doesn't exclude my sisters who are strong women who just happened to be. Latina. You don't mean in any in that. Also lets them know. Hey as strong women. I'm no better than you because I'm strong and I'm black you know and then also to go into jabbing said like growing up. I remember looking at women in my family and seeing them taping seeing them you know take infidelity and you and I can remember being taken and looking at my aunt find out that her husband was being unfaithful and not say a word and I remember thinking. I'm never going to be like that. But all of the family were saying. Oh wow she's so strong in. My mind is a ten year old girl on my desk. Not Strong that strong but all being silence right but if this weird thing because like on admiral saying to like I grew up thinking that strength means that I forgive will hurt me because that's what I saw and I'm still facing the implications of that in my life so I think that for me if they're so important for me to separate that and say hey listen you are a strong woman you just happen to be black because it's so many we can even talk about like going back slavery you know in how the black woman was forced to watch her husband be so it had shortage so and then she told you can take it. Because you're strong but I I just think it's so d. and we can kind of go go all day talking about this but I honestly feel that the world has said. Let's just put everything on these black because they can take and I honestly just feel like we. We have to stop that. And I think we're doing a great job just discussing it and bringing these things and also letting around the world know that we feed them to and we feed their strength and we've seen their abuse that they take you know we fi you let. Tina's we see you of India. Who can't even speak up and say what they're thinking you know. What I'm saying is such a big picture of it as a strong woman. And it's a need. That just has so much more impact. I also think that this whole strong black woman stereotype has like even kind of got into the field because if you have to separate for Black Women. We have the highest rate childbirth. I mean you saw what happened to.

Black Women America Tina India
"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

14:13 min | 5 months ago

"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"You be like I want to do these days with my body that does not include. Y'All motherfuckers everybody. Lose their goddamn minds right and some of it you know even to the point where. I think it's a societal issue. 'cause it's internalized like other black women other black women like the same thing owners you ever fucking no But the thing I was GonNa say is that's why I believe that. Their ideas of freedom always shock. Everybody you know it's always a fucking everybody is not a black woman right. 'cause one nobody reads black women stuff like other black women my but like you don't really see people Towel black women as scholars in and as people who like a radical thinkers that. We need to read. That just pushed us not as shit available but we get watched in history right and like if anyone's reading is probably other black women and and of that is not going to be all right. It's going to be some and you don't really see that like Admission of expertise like Oh. Yeah we should be thinking about. What do you think we should do like you? Don't see that out there. And I think that's why their ideas of freedom our so our so fucking shocking everybody. So revolutionary cause. Noah's considered them being their own. So patsy Seem to be the one that shot. I forget her name but whatever lies the the the white lady she seem what shocked at Patsy then even her husband like she did not find. Bob. I'm Bob I'm going to burn our house down to even be all like out. She was like Oh Nigga. That's what they do. You'RE A lady. You're supposed to be like me. You're supposed to feel with me. You know and I feel like I'll often that happens too often. That happens the other way when his interracial black man black women dynamics because dense like you'll black you're supposed to one. Wow why not get paid the same as me? You want freedom shed not. He's also won't the things. I lacked person as a man right this whole thing of not wanting to have keys. Use oppose our on as the main right. Like what are you know? You gotTA gotTa won't life the Vision Life the Way I vision it and I think that's why you know lack with ours. Kinda have no intellectual home or no intellectual allies. I'll put it that way in general because like I said everything they've conceive they had to conceive away out of multiple traps. I've had the dream my way out of a box and so none of y'all solutions are addressing things I want right and also a lot of times When it comes to black women. We are innovative because we almost have to be because a lot of black women make a lot of money on Shit did. Kinda shocked people there but I had this black woman become a billionaire and quote unquote all. She did was make a headscarf motherfuckers. Nobody else was making a head scarf. They wouldn't fucking put in my edges out. You know like I saw in. Y'All did not serve me so a Lotta Times. Black women end up making money off of other black women because we say we see the we see the lack of things like in Another they will be with us now before we came around all these makeup company. Fucking ever always been around. Didn't give a fuck about nobody black or brown oil by no. They didn't hear okay. Rhonda come around and she kicked down the Dogo. I'm makeup everybody now all of a sudden everybody because the thing is they quote unquote Hatay Color Lines. You know we got the the Latifah quing collection notice though which is fought. You still didn't serve everybody. You still serve the only. A limited selection are a lot of women that wear makeup. Look I had to lean two and three colors together to get the color to match my skin like I'm an extra money. Doing extra work gave up all makeup. Because y'all didn't serve Me Rana comes in and she's Thursday by now all of a sudden everybody wants to hop in and and and follow her leave but it took a black woman going a I see. There's a need out there. 'cause you know. Pretty Serena ran into the same problem. Her makeup artist people ran into the same problem and it was like. I'm going to serve to serve these going to preserve over serve and the thing is when we are over so we will spend our money but you got over servers In order for us to spend our money. Yeah I think Yeah that that lane is always left open. Because WHO'S GONNA BE? The Person. Net CONSIDERS THE BLACK WOMAN. And in that case that's about her to serving other like people that are like but it opens up until Elaine of light. She didn't just my only make black makeup palace. She didn't only make brow only for Brown people like she actually just like not a full line and I'm including more. And then of course all these other brands went and tried to copy her afterwards but the point being that lane was left open for how long been around forever like it was left open until twenty sixteen twenty eighteen. Or Whatever. The fuck let like. That's insane when you think about it but the people that come up with solutions in this country are never thinking of black women anyway no not think about unease. I body Body type are hair. Our skin like things that directly impact us we always find ways to get around it Because we have to but we will love even to down put into this other products out there. That would actually simplify alive. It just hadn't been made or innovative. She had an pretty sure. It's done black woman. They're gonNA be shocked going to be on the Forbes. Top One hundred fifty lists soon one hundred listen for for coming out of the quote unquote blue for Super Server market. That everybody else fucking ignored. Yeah and if you you know us even crazier about that The the products that white women were in charge of for Black Women's beauty was all started. It was all stuff today. Assume black women wanted which was to look like white women right. Ri- ri- right. 'cause I and I think the first time Want us to go into the mall and I wanted to get my face done at one of the counters. I haven't done this in years and by the time that woman did my makeup is like the fuck is this. I was five shaves to like. You don't know what you're doing and and and it's very very Frustrating because I don't want to like a white woman I won't allow me. I'm Brown like me and that's like you say it's hard for other people to to think that black women won't be black you know because everybody quote unquote runs away from being black but what happens to black. She just wanted to be goddamn black. I don't WanNa be I WANNA be black. Not even I don't even think is like we thought you wanted to like everybody wants to run away from being black Dave really think I'm the ideal and as a white woman. This is what everyone wants to be. You know what I mean like what did why would it. The no match their doctors canton then they will be dark. We know beauty is defined as light. We know we know. Beauty is the finest straight hair we know. Beauty is defined as thinly thinner lips. Or whatever the fuck and it's and it's so wild to think like how they've turned beauty into looking darker bigger fuller. Lives you know. Even taking black women's hair styles they've turned beauty ended at but there for for black women. They assume beauty is to try to look like a white woman for so long anyway But then all these people came along and star celebrated the Black Women. And now yeah. The Myth is dead To that extent ally that even black women in their natural hair light that evolution revolution. Whatever you WANNA call it like even that is a slap in the face to what we were told you know. Black women was supposed to want. That's true it ended. It is Kinda like a wave because I know that there are some people that have always been natural and there was also a ways. You know the seventies right you know and Black Revolution stuff. There was a lot of natural hair. Where and then froze and all that type of stuff too right and so you know and and this this is quote unquote a wave. And I think some people do going to stick with it. I know I am And I think that is just a shocking. How everything about US? That white women understood threatened by. Because when you're talking about how why does this then even consider nude nude nude quote unquote in you? Dam is normally skin tone but latins you skimped on a lot of times you'll nude is five chase to light know what happened to a brown or beige nude you know and it wasn't until a few years ago. They got new that actually match our skin tone. You Know Shit like that. And this and it can be very frustrating irritating. And it's still shocking. Today how white women. Just those shocked and appalled and and just don't know how to handle those when we speak up and opinions because truth be told. They never considered us why because they never had.

Black Women Brown Bob Patsy Me Rana US Ri- ri Noah Rhonda Forbes Serena Elaine Dave
"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

11:58 min | 5 months ago

"black women" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"I listened to the Black Guy who tips podcast because rod and Karen Black Women's political engagement and participation after the war provided one kind of evidence of the different ambitions notions of citizenship on the part of black and white women their politics worried their employers. Some white women employers fire black women who spoke openly of politics and especially of support for the Republican Party side. No bacterium party was like Democrats. Mary pringle even direct her service to boycott radical nigger purveyors of meat into city. Police were an inevitable part of every aspect of the relations between white and black women. Gertrude Thomas Former slaves and the female get dirty. Thomas is former slaves and the female service. She higher after the war gave her several lessons on the subjects of gender roles and gender relations lessons. That left no doubt that black women understanding of such matters. Different fundamentally from our own in a diary entry on October twenty second eighteen sixty eight. She wrote their white. Southerners must avoid politics at in focus on family survival. A few days later politics intruded directly into her life when Dinah host today political meeting in her room at least two of the several men in attendance were known to be active Republican Partisans. Thomas learned of the meeting of the alleged plans to burn her home and others in the neighborhood from a black teenager and from her husband who had adopted the habit of sneaking under the caverns of black people at night in order to eavesdrop on their conversations following the meeting. Donna's Diners Bob. A former slave. Sit for Thomas Husband who he learned how to accuse use him and his wife conspiring to burn. Thomas's House Gertrude. Thomas way in place of her husband. Thomas Trusted Patsy. Bob's wife who was one of the first laser father had given her and the only one of her former house slaves who had remained at the end of the war. I took a sleet and I'll talk with them awhile. Thomas wrote tell them there why people will anxious to avoid a difficulty but that if forced to if they would fight and fight wail that I did not feel an easy and without hesitation patsy without hesitation patsy steak position on opposing ground. Thomas Remember her saying well. I won't be. I WanNa be where BOB is. If there was going to be a fight she let times know that neither was she anxious and that they would be enemies to each patsies. Comment unnerved Thomas. If Passy was willing to take up arms she was not. I DO NOT WISH TO BE MR T. Is She retorted for our would want him to be in the fight? When Bob Joke perhaps reply that mystery would be a good soldier herself? Thomas Vlade I would not be a good soldier Bob but I cannot imagine myself as being a coward. So essentially hey we'll get to the blackouts. His podcast requires a black autists. Levers five star reviews feedback. Show we're GONNA get to all your favorite five star reviews your comments your emails voicemails artist of the day care and I'm here to Cairn is here as well. Sorry about that. You good but I wanted to talk and I started talking. Try to get to the point where you go ahead and say what you had to save exodus from out of the House of bondage the transformation of the plantation household about. I've only glimpsed care. What would you? Say? I'm sorry. Yes that's a mass. That is a God. Damn this you know you threaten people talk about. I'm big and bad and I'm on wavered but you know you expect your book and that was like Oh okay like yeah we all WanNa fight. We wouldn't take arms and she's not really willing to take on she just talking. I like how in her mind. The idea of the white race fighting the white southern race fighting was was still her man right. It wasn't her herself the idea but for Patsy and Bob. They was like a we initiate together. So we'll have to us. We've always been in it together. We nugget bugging is going to be us like not not not like she was. She hit that like our. Bob is so bothers shit. I'm initiate with them like she. She was like no if I were MR T. Going to be out there fighting in on I'll be back home. You know making out pork or whatever the fuck we make for rations time. But I'm definitely not trying to fight with him and we're black women had really. We've never had the choice. We've never been protected but I've been in. General have never been protected. There's been no such thing as the protection of a black woman and putting a black woman on a pedestal. And she's the love of the earth and all that stuff in general it. It just has not been that way and in other thing is this is right after the civil war. Black people openly talking to a white woman about going to war Abou- We'll burn your fucking house down like this is like this is not like you know. This is not that that stereotype that we were taught about our ancestors and how Dasa our they were. They got ran out of everywhere. Guys OS is day deterrent. Other cheek like now. They was very the burn. Shit down like To get what they needed to get that equality right in in the thing is it's it's hard to understand that the truth be told any form of progressive ideals or anything that push things forward guzman some kind of violence and people don't WanNa accept that balance comes with the territory balanced. Does you know that's something that a lot of people including myself sometimes underestimate sometimes. How much balanced actually comes with these things? A lot of times people have these ideas and these thoughts. These excise these you know half. Luton political words and Shit like that but you know if you want these changes sometimes it has to come to a balanced and valid comes in different forms but it has to be a form of a altercation. People won't sheet to change without altercation and that's impossible. The other thing too is she really felt in at the end of the day as a white woman. Me and Patsy are both women and so she wants a Sushi. What black women want is to be me. They WANNA be a white woman and so her mind. She was thinking like what that will be the common denominator. That's the common bond me and Patsy. You know like she said the only slave that stayed after all the slaves leading all this shit so everyone was free. He's still stuck around so so her whole thing was like. Nah This is like me. Going to talk to my. I wouldn't say sister almost like a pet or something. Almost you know in a weird way Something between the sister and I expect you to be loyal right. And when she got hit with daylight no like and. I don't even envision my role as you know sitting in the house doing the doing like life hasn't even afforded me and I don't even see that as something covey you know so like I feel like that's a big thing and that was a big sense of betrayal and hurt for White Women. After the civil war was how much black women simply did not look up to them like they did not see them as these The white white men sold them. They did not see that. You know what I'm saying as like well white black white women are Genteel Blah Blah Blah ladies and southern bales and. It's like black. Women did not see any of that. She 'cause I've changed our dirty draws its there is no you know two balloons off that rose you you know. I know you're vicious. I know you beat me. I know you punishing. I know you look the other way when I gave right and shit like that so now we not in this together all no. I don't want your life right right. And and the thing is there is a difference and you know in this amazing how in today's time people do not I think people understand they. I guess they they don't understand because it's not here but owning somebody is the thing like you own your dog. Dyke you can control your dog. And that's what human beings were doing doing other human beings. They was controlling them telling them what to do when to do it where to do it. And they had no recourse to object. They couldn't say no. I don't want to do that if you did him. And Death and so you know. She thought bad. Ho Word was going to be sufficient enough in her word in the quote unquote altercation was going to be enough to place. Fear in them and it was like the fuck. You're not a God. Damn thing to me are they also Wouldn't it cost specifically to Black Women They have always dreamed of freedom in ways that did not exist. And that right you know. Annetta something that nobody really can relate to in general not. I should say nobody. I'm sure there's other marginalize things but after like black women within the Americans have always had to envision things that just simply were not there they will not to be modeled after things that whiteness. I'd done because they know more than anybody. How much of a trap in allusion of freedom to actually is I you know and I think because they have been kind of Pardon my You know I don't mean this derogatorily to black man or whatever but because they've been kind of Burdened saddled attached to anchor to black men. Right there's a level of empathy concern that they can't escape whether they you know. I think there are some people that kind of e I mean. We see it a lot of times. It's very performance but there's like A. There's clearly a filling of radical. Like I don't really talk with black men as a as a way to shake off the the feeling of obligation like you have to. It's like I I want to let you know that I don't you know I I'm on the shit and I'm not GonNa let Y'all pull me down Blah Blah Blah. You know I understand that but I feel like in a way. It's almost inescapable because these your father's these are your sons and in America doesn't really allow a black woman to to do like certain black men where they can like turn on the community never looked back like that like prospered right. Yes but still not be like harangued for truly. That never happens with black women like if you if you like even if you just if people find out like a black woman has a a non black Love people will be like I don't know about that you know as opposed to and I'm not saying that never happens a black man but the general feeling of difference that lack of respect that you need to prove yourself shit is constant you know And like me a face that to To some extent because the patriarchy is more like well a black man decided to take care of someone else was harming that he just he decided to love on how you GonNa Challenge that as opposed to you. Let Take Care of you. There's not a black man. You Suppose Oh belong to us that Patriarchy so at ownership thing particularly black women everybody wants a fucking own your body the white man wants to own your by the white woman wants to own you by the black mammals on your body everybody wants to fucking on your body and when.

Gertrude Thomas Thomas Trusted Patsy Bob Joke Thomas Husband Dinah White Women Republican Party Thomas Vlade Mary pringle rod Passy Donna MR T. America guzman Dyke covey
"black women" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

07:18 min | 8 months ago

"black women" Discussed on Post Reports

"I'm Sarah Kaplan and I'm a science reporter at the Washington Post. The news that I write about can feel far away and long ago sometimes. It's literally both things but I think fat it helps us understand our place in the universe. It broadens our sense of wonder it expands our curiosity and those are qualities that you carry sorry with you into the rest of your day. The journalism I do depends on subscribers to the Washington. Post become one today at post reports dot com slash subscribe from the newsroom of the Washington. Post I there is the mayor wrestling with the Washington Post. Doc- order pick your brain on. This is post report Martine powers. It's Friday January seventeenth today understanding the politics surrounding black women's here and the real story three of two popes. This is my official public revealing. I've only been bald and the privacy of mile in the company of close friends on Thursday afternoon. There is video posted online. It was from the roots and online magazine for black people and it was a video of congresswoman I honor Presley talking about her hair congresswoman I on a Presley and this is a word about why my black hair story is both personal and political congresswoman Presley. Has Our picture an autoimmune disease that causes hairless and this video is so stunning because near the end. She appears completely bolt without south the week that she's been wearing in public for the last few months in the fall when I was getting my here re twist. It is the first time I was made aware that I had some patches from there it accelerated very quickly. But what I found most profound about this video is the way that Presley addresses the politics of her hair something that she became even more aware of when she stopped wearing street and started wearing interests so we started out. As a transitional hairstyle ultimately became a statement and something that I was very intentional about and I was very aware this hairstyle could be would be filtered and interpreted by some as has a political statement. That was Militant or people said people think you're angry and I said well they already think that uh Other black women have gotten push back after trying to wear their hair more natural role. It's even become a workplace discrimination issue. A couple of years ago I was at a gala. That's Menda hearts and I'm the author of the memo. Oh women of color need to notice secure seat at the table. I'm also a founder of the memo. LLC A career Development Company that helps advance women of color in the workplace at this gala. Back in two thousand Seventeen Mendham met a white woman who said that she was having trouble finding women of color to recruit for a corporate board because of some of the Labor that she was using a figured. You know what I'm going to see where this conversation could go. I WANNA see she'll be honest with me and I asked her if she had to African American women and one having natural hair in one having a pony tail pull back in her responsibilities. I would push for the wound. The clean cut hair the ponytail. Because that's what the board would want to see. oftentimes were met with that bias in the workplace and I was one of the only ones and most of my career in the workplace in so I never even push the envelope in wore my hair any different than straight down or pulled back. Because I didn't even I WANNA be met with that type of discrimination something that I already knew but it still paying me here. That oftentimes as women of Color Black women particularly we are being vetted based on our hair which should should not be that way. We're already having these conscious. Bias is put on us about the work you might be able to do despite despite what hair we show up as so it's really unfortunate. It was the first time that it had been said so blatantly. In that way I felt sad I felt felt like I knew what she was going to say. But I was hoping that she'd proved me wrong. I suggested writing about this when New York became the second state actually to pass a law. Aw that explicitly bans race-based hair discrimination California's the first laws long-overdue privilege of this moment is opportunity suited for California to leave the country to like this and encourage others. Say My name is Jenna McGregor and I write about the workplace and Corporate Management for the Post Business Section. This is the impression I get from my family member especially older family members where it's the understanding. was that if you wanted to be a black person working in a corporate setting in circumstances where you were having being very serious meetings with white people on the regular like you just needed to have straight hair and you just have straight hair or relaxed hair or at least braids in a way that like wasn't intimidating to white people and that there wasn't like an attempt to assert natural hair in those settings until more recently and and so. I think it's interesting that that there has been this kind of empowerment through the natural hair movement to say well you can wear your hair like this in all settings. I heard that over and over again many of the women. I talked to described offhand comments or things that their white colleagues said that showed showed a lack of understanding but many of them said that it was a senior black woman at the law firm that they worked at who took them aside. And said you shouldn't shouldn't you should make sure you straighten your hair. Their mother or their grandmother who counseled them for a long time to make sure they straightened their hair for a job interview. Oh there's a a narrative that has existed for a long time and there's a pressure to conform to not take a risk that unfortunately has existed for for a long time so I spoke with Lori. THARP SR WHO's a professor at Temple University who has written a book about the history of black hair in America black people in in the United States have consistently been discriminated against because of their hairstyle. The hair has always been used as a marker of inferiority and it has always Am used as that part of the body that can be manipulated. And if you WANNA think of it as the part of the body that has to assimilate to European and beauty standards and that is for both men and women. She's able to really clearly articulate the different chapter so to speak of the natural hair.

Presley Washington Post Washington autoimmune disease California Sarah Kaplan reporter Martine Seventeen Mendham New York official career Development Company Lori United States founder online magazine Jenna McGregor THARP America
"black women" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

11:20 min | 9 months ago

"black women" Discussed on Post Reports

"What's notable is that Gillary Jemison and Wilkinson have all found success in publishing industry? That gets a lot of criticism for its lack of diversity. Both in the authors that they publish and also in their own staff publishing is still a business that is owned by white men and you know the people at the top right then in two thousand eighteen survey of the top romance publishers. Only seven point seven percent of books written by people people of color another reason survey. The publishing industry found that eighty two percent of the editorial staff with white for the longest time throughout my childhood. We're really only like four writers of color chip delany Octavia Butler Nello Hopkinson and Steven Barnes. But everyone would sort of bring out those four renames whenever you wanted to try and point out that you know. There's there's a little bit of a gap here. Between what the reader shipper what society looks like and what the ridership excite site and. So you know when you've got such a small number of people in when you've got gatekeepers within the genre actually actively working to try try and keep those tiny group of people from growing a more even trying to keep them from expressing themselves clearly. That's a big part of the problem. I think publishing has always had this idea that like black. People don't read books and the black people don't buy books and that therefore what's the point Wayne of putting out books that are geared towards step right but I think black people have always known that we read a lot of books and we also by a lot of books. That's why for a long time. The we that many writers of color were able to make a name for themselves was by self publishing and this was especially true for Romance. Writers Romance has always been diverse verse. I think it's only that recently big publishing has started to catch up with that right and so it's been really wonderful to see at least East a little bit. That big publishing is starting to catch up to how diverse romance can be that. There's an audience for it. Now is exciting for me. That people are like oh I do. I do want to explore new world and in the movies that I watch in the books that I read. Yeah that that is one of the best one of the best things about writing right now in two thousand nineteen. Do you feel like there still is a AH resistance to widening representation among publishers among gatekeepers publishing. I think we need to just kind of it. Always remember that this is about sales and this is about a product right and you know and for me it is art. I did take. I took a very very long. Maybe seven years writing this book so it means a lot to me but I always knew that it was going to be an object that was going to be placed position somewhere in a market. It and I think that there is right now. People look at products created by people of Color. And they say I think we can sell list now. I think that I think we can sell it and that is a complicated thing. That's a complicated way to feel because as you know when you're like oh well. This person thinks they can sell it now because of a trend. You know what happens when when you're no longer on trend that's a scary thing when your identity. It feels like it's a part of a trend but I think that those things are built into built into like our economic system do you. I feel like there has been a moment to celebrate that were that it is still a struggle against the tide. You know we've made the start of progress gay Black Panther but that's one movie you know. We've got several decades of film history that We're going to have to Work against before we start to approach anywhere near parody let alone Actual equity so no. I don't believe we've reached a point where we can celebrate. I think we've reached a point where they're actually enough of us to have a conversation without getting drowned out. That's a long way from celebration. There's a lot of discussion discussion of the fact that you know there's a big difference between diversity and Decolonization and diversity is a great thing thing. it's just that it's sort of superficial you get enough people in the room. Who Look you know? Sound like. They're all from different backgrounds and so forth but if the people who are taking up all the air in that room are still the same old folks and if the conversation is still centered on those folks if all of the Heroes Look like those folks and so forth then it doesn't matter what kind of diversity you've gotten the room because it's not real practical diversity. I'm so the way to kind of addressed. The issue is not just to look at physically who is in the room but also to try. And make sure sure you're you're not following the same patterns and not a replicating the same power structures that have caused the problem in the first place. N K Jemison is the author of several novels including broken Earth Trilogy. Lorne Wilkinson's debut novel American spy Jasmine Galleries. Newest novel is called the Wedding Party and now one more thing. You can't talk about black women. Writers without talking about Tony Morrison. She died in August at the age of eighty eight. Here's is how we remembered her. Then when I was eighth grade I discovered a book on my mom's shelf it was called Soula and when I read it completely changed the way I thought about myself. And my place in the world it was about loneliness and connection and women coming into their own and discovering the power of their own minds and it was about being black twenty Morrison. I was the author of that book and many others the Bluest eye eleven song of Solomon so the opening essay in the source of suffer guard. It's called parallel and it was about the dangers of censorship and the dangers of artists are silenced instance. She writes that quote certain kinds of trauma visited on people's are so deep so cruel that unlike money unlike vengeance even unlike justice or or fights where the goodwill of others only writers can translate such trauma and turn sorrow into meaning sharpening the moral imagination. A writer's life and work Are Not a gift to mankind. They are it's necessity. I'm below capacity. I'm a writer and occasional contributor to the Washington Post Book World. Why I think Tony Morrison has been a mythical figure in American literature for a long time I mean? She won the Nobel Prize in literature and was the first African American woman to do so. Her the novels grappled with the entire range of history of the black experience in this country but beyond that about women about love about family about home and so she took this sort of very specific experience of mce that she had and found a way to write in a way that spoke to global audiences and earned her highest. The highest award in literature generally speaking women's work has been Reduced to regional or merely or or People compliment ethnic writers by saying or implying that they are as good as mainstream writers and whereas I understood the compliment. I thought it would be better for me. At least in late sixties and early seventies to establish once and for all that all three of those things play. I'm black I have a woman and I'm a writer and they go together. Tony Morrison gave her Nobel lecture in December nineteen ninety-three we he di that may be for meaning of life. But we do. That may be the mayor. Tony Morrison also always talked about how important it is to to sort of be very critical about the language that we read the language that we read in the media the language that were here. In our societies the words that people use to be very awake to them to automatic looting of language can be recognized by the tendency of its users to forego its new on complex doc midwife hurry properties for menace and subjugation oppressive language it does more than represent violence it is violence does more than represent the limits of knowledge coach. It Yemen's knowledge sexist language racist language theistic language all typical of the policing languages of mastery and cannot do not permit Mitt new knowledge or encourage the mutual exchange idea. I think reading her again and instead of having come back to her work in this decade of my life. I'm just reminded that yes. She has something to say to all of us. And you know I'm not a black woman but I certainly feel that her art allows you to inhabit that subjectivity. To to see what that experience of the world is like. Hi can that's the extraordinary power of her work. And that's why I think so many people are paying tribute to her because her work Transcended any narrow narrow categories that it may have been placed in so many of the things that she has been grappling with her work. Her entire career are the exact same questions that we're talking about right now. AMERICAN IDENTITY RACISM REPRESENTATION WHITE SUPREMACY GENDER POLITICS Self regard and I think that idea really has stayed with me that in the face of sort of dehumanisation degradation a culture. That doesn't see you. That renders you invisible commits violence against who you are as a person as a as an individual as a citizen. What does it mean to have self regard? What does it mean to have the confidence and the pride and the power to make art and to express your view of the world? So that for me feels so urgent to any of us who are living in America today especially those of us. Who are maybe people of Color or people who have immigrant backgrounds? You are constantly surrounded by this language of who who belongs. And who doesn't and I think Tony Morrison offers a lot of answers to a lot of those questions. The Law Qureshi is a contributor to the Washington Post.

Tony Morrison writer Lorne Wilkinson Washington Post Octavia Butler Nello Hopkinson Gillary Jemison Nobel Prize Steven Barnes Solomon Wayne America Law Qureshi Wedding Party Yemen Jasmine Galleries Mitt
"black women" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:33 min | 9 months ago

"black women" Discussed on Post Reports

"MSN is an author of gritted my teeth while in established professional professional writer went on a ten minute tirade at me. Basically as a proxy for all black people just for mentioning underrepresentation in the sciences in two thousand Eighteen Jamison spoke okay at the Hugo award ceremony kept writing. Even though my first novel the killing moon was initially rejected on the assumption that only black people would ever possibly want to read the work of a black writer. Her jemison is the first black woman ever to win the Hugo Award for science fiction writing in two thousand eighteen. She was actually winning for the third time for the final installment in her broken earth trilogy. I have raised my voice to talk back over fellow panelists who tried to talk over me about my own damn life I have fought. Let myself in the little voice inside me that constantly still whispers that I should just keep my head down and shut up and let the real writers talk. Jemison in is one of the few black female writers whose had enormous success in the literary genre dominated by white men. I was very good at writing. Straight white male all characters Even though I am not myself straight white died because I'd read almost nothing but that even like words used to describe skin color. Were not a thing that I'd have a lot of exposure to but Jameson realized that she wanted to change that. The thing that I wanted to do that I wasn't seeing in a lot of my own fiction though is just simply showing people like me as actually having a future because that was the thing that science fiction and fantasy generally was not doing you know I would read these these stories set. You know five thousand years in the future whatever and everybody was wider. Everybody sounded like there were from Iowa. Or whatever in you know just made you wonder what the hell happened. The broken earth trilogy is a fantasy set on a future. Earth suffering offering through a climate catastrophe. Her main protagonist is a middle-aged woman of color and seeing a character like that in the center of this big other-worldly worldly narrative feels revolutionary. Not just in Saifi but also in other genres my name is Lauren Wilkinson. I am the author of American spy. Wilkinson's debut novel came out this year. The American spy in the title is a black woman. Marie Mitchell who becomes an intelligence officer in the nineteen eighties. I read a lot of La Carre spy who came in from the cold. You know the bond books for sure were very a prominent so they look very very white and male which didn't make sense to Wilkinson because the whole point of being a spy is the having the ability to blend in and to code switch when necessary. Okay so let's say that you are like a CIA officer. You are undercover probably You know if you walk into a room and everyone's like Oh that's James Bond or that's that's five and who's GonNa tell you any secrets he'd be terrible at your job also because so much of especially how you describe being spy is basically a form of passing ray that you are in in a situation where you are trying to blend in among people but always extremely concerned that you're going to be kind of found out and that's a potentially dangerous. If you're found out I mean and that's for me. The parallel of racial passing in the Twentieth Century Early Twentieth Century. In this country. How dangerous it was but Saifi and spy novels are not the only genres that have been historically dominated by white? Writers maims Jasmine Gallery. And I'm a romance writer it. It feels like it's been a it's been a really hard few years to be In America and I want to put more joy out there in the world for for us I know a lot of women who have gotten their happy endings. I know a lot of black women who fell in love. Who Have you know had like wonderful love stories? I want to tell those stories to the world and so she did in her debut novel. The wedding date Alexa Monroe is the chief of staff to the me or Berkeley. She is sort of a short plus is black woman and one of the reasons that she is very surprised that this man asked her her to be his date to the wedding is that he is you know a tall attractive white doctor from Los Angeles. Why wasn't important for you to you? Have a black woman represented in the wedding date as as the court character. If I was going to do this like I wanted to write a book about someone who reflected the things that I knew someone who reflected like the world and the good and the bad things that I have lived through and the people I know we've lived through and and it just felt important to me to to write a character like Alexa. I mean for me. This is a spy book but it's secretly just. It's not to talk about a black feelings for three hundred pages you know so. I assume that it's women who maybe this book will resonate most Smith particularly if they've ever tried to navigate the professional lives and the kind of being told directly and indirectly that they're reaching reaching beyond where they're supposed to feel a lot of women can identify with that And particularly women women of Color. I don't think that I'm trying to represent anyone in particular killer but I think that if black women read it and didn't like it. That would be the group that I would be most upset that I let down down but what I think is so important about what you're doing is that it has the sense of familiarity with like with structural oppression and with the ways in which the themes of being and other now in the world today are also applicable in the future than a lot of science fiction stories. You know the way that they choose to engage with it is by. Having aliens be oppressed robots be oppressed or something like that and meanwhile the humans and the story are still all white people from Iowa so you know what it comes down to. Is that the the writers of these sort of strange looking oppression. Stories one to engage with the subject matter but they're still uncomfortable themselves around actual living people of color or actual living people from diverse backgrounds. That are not there's Su- in a lot of cases. They are trying to tackle a subject and allegory. Worry that they're not comfortable dealing with in reality and not willing to actually engage with it in the on the level that it kind of needs to be and they're not willing to engage with the people who were most affected by it and so you know kind of making the the robots be oppressed or the aliens be oppressed as sort of a cop out in a lot of cases for Jasmine Gillary. What makes her novels feel? Fresh and relevant is somewhat of the opposite the fact that at least when it comes to romance structural oppression. Doesn't you have to be front and center in the lives of black women. Well what I think is really interesting about the wedding. Date in particular is is the fact that it depicts an interracial relationship nations ship. But it doesn't do it in a way that makes that the core of the narrative and I just think it's really cool the way that your book talks about the fact that this is an interracial romance and addresses it doesn't completely gloss over it but it's not like a core conflict right. I mean I think that was something that was really important to me while in writing it is that I didn't want you know. I wanted race to be talked about in the book because races something that I think. Normal people of of color talk about in their daily lives all the time but not in a consistent oppressive way right it is something that You know something comes up. You mentioned it and then briefly talk about it and move on and talk about other things. And that's how I wanted the conversations about race to be in this book and I absolutely didn't want like their core conflicts to be to be about you know. Oh no I am black or white. What are we going to do like think? I don't think that that is I mean. I know a lot of people who have been in interracial relationships and have been myself that is never the core conflict..

Lauren Wilkinson Iowa writer officer Hugo Award jemison Jamison MSN Jemison CIA Alexa Jasmine Gallery La Carre Los Angeles Jameson Saifi Alexa Monroe James Bond
"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

33:27 min | 1 year ago

"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

"So is mighty black parents typically they can name like their whole life girl listen I have worked with people who told well and you know I I wish I wish Black Panther have been out so actually have started barking at his ass like I wish I wish I wish I had barked at him in that moment Oh but hey options you know how I keep my counts well hey if you learn nothing from this podcast start a Accu- savings account today so they can always tell these companies fuck you I'm out and not feel the way about it real please do that but just like I wanted to start crying being because what am I supposed to do like how is that actionable and the thing is I have been trying so hard to get dude to like me and it's so sad how much energy I wasted and how my I could have been focusing on my work load that was so busy catering to this little ego with his short ass that I got to the point where my I wasn't doing my best work because I was so busy worried about what you thought about me because it matters so fucking much because I was trying to get back mounted because the conversations that happen in the calibration I don't think people would admit to them coming down to like ability conversations but oftentimes they are because how many times have we seen people who have not delivered results or mediocre result the best they still get promoted and get it sometimes you could just be put on a dog of business been there and there's no matter where you come from you could be beyond yourself be Jesus like you're probably not going to turn it around I get that but in general some people I don't have a track record of results results but yet still they still keep climbing the corporate ladder like how does that work because they managed us and that I think is the key to likeability is that you create this image they hear this amazing jason and then once you do that with the right person you get an opportunity like a work related opportunity a special project for the president or you know something that stretches you and then that person likes you so much they make sure that you knock that project out the part so it's not like Oh do special projects and and then you'll get promoted and I'm GonNa leave you to your own devices oh no no now that person has put their name on the line to get you the special project so now they're invested so they're gonNa make sure that you don't fail I'm curious beliefs there like what do you think it is that these people who get kinda assured through corporate like what are they doing like what's the what's the difference they do or is it I mean let's be provocative is that they're the right way to get these opportunities like what is it that's what if I like it to be a cop out right bike day we know is when we still get done regardless with all the a strike against listen so something that I think we had talked about before when look at people like take it back to elementary school teacher when you are even like K. through twelve when you inch who'd you eat lunch with the same people every day right and did those people look you for the most part yeah yeah and for me I feel like I'm a bit of a out liar because and some people can probably relate as I was the smart black kid at my school so I made friends with the people who were in my class but doesn't particularly close I don't think with anybody and I just was I was always around and I had like tour three like really close friends and they didn't necessarily look like me but there was just this way we related teach other like we really got each other and so we were friends and they liked me for exactly who I was and I liked them for exactly who they were but outside of that I wasn't really checking for new friends and I was cool with shoe but you didn't get in my circle oh so scenes that corporate America is just a grownup playground pretty much grown up lunchroom right it that white people don't like this because then they they can't see themselves in us for me it's like the nuance between likeability and relate ability in for me the crux of it I think is really more of a related the issue 'cause you Kinda have a straight up buffoon to be unlikable on the surface right like if you're going through the office punching people out probably not like general most of us not all but both can be cordial enough right to navigate office in the water cooler and be decent human being on another course you get people who just act full there's nothing we can do about that but it's that next level like I can remember any well of course there's haters right of course people didn't like me but in general if you pull people I would say yeah yeah I like tiffany but and what they say I can relate to her and I can be her in XYZ roles maybe not and so for me as I prepared a pitch to go back into corporate how do I.

"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

"You're saying this project because I thought if we could just get you guys to see us and no worse and not no then come and be like oh I don't know such and such such and such doesn't have visible 'cause that was the big feedback that a lot of the the diverse talent was getting oh people just don't know who you war now you over there busting your ass every guy down yup man the worst day for Corporate Americans all corporate Americans was when planes Wifi to do this powerpoint and I'm a bigger person right so like I already don't really have adequate room in economy and so Oh I've got my laptop I got it at angles so tight and this woman is sitting in front of me and she just leans her ask all the way back no no that is the worst on my like my laptop closed on my fingers uh-huh now it's just like Lord help me Oh yes I had to politely Ma'am Ma'am Ski.

Ski
"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

17:31 min | 1 year ago

"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

"Host the NBA you ever know and I'm here to help us survive and thrive in corporate America but giving you the truth and being as love Mayans -iety about corporate there today we're going to talk about the reason why you get promoted or the reason why you don't get it promoted it all comes down to one thing likeability do they invite you do they not like and that's how they decide whether you get promoted as as then ain't that out approach so today I brought there might be school busty because I felt like needed somebody to pressure test this concept and I do have tiffany samuels on the line tiffany alone old thank you for coming back on the show thank you for having me I really enjoyed our conversation just bear during our little souls to the whole wide Internet the other day Ansell the Internet the Internet's Yes yes yeah I was GonNa do this as a solo episode and I was just going to rant and rave and be mad of myself then the needed somebody that could give me some perspective because this whole idea makes me so angry because I feel like there's been so many times that people like to me at were but it wasn't like the right people liked me and so I was doing my research about this whole idea of likeability and what I came up with with that there are so many articles and so many books about how to be more likable work and I was just like this circuits because everything was either about how do you change your behavior so like you know how to look people in the eye and be engaged when they talk in you know all these things that you have to spin mental energy to think about so people can be comfortable with you and like you so that you'll increase you're like ability and it talked about that was one article from them use that talked about like ten instant ways to be more likable and it was the links to more articles that talked about the fifty million the things that you should be thinking about and doing so then more people would like you so I just got overwhelmed with that but then there was this Wall Street Journal article titled While Likeability Matters More work now this article was more talking about being unlikable via video conferencing and by social media but some of this rain true oh I thought about how important it is and like a job interview to be likeable and this likeability factor and like people are actually studying this and it's so just makes me feel icky because I bust my ass and I work hard and if you don't like me to whatever degree that warrants promotion or raise his or accolades or what have you then it doesn't matter how much work I do yo ass just don't like me oh you know we hear time and time again that as black women or any non majority group Ray that you do often times have to work spices hard working hard and getting your job done and hit your numbers and knocking it out the park that way I feel like for a that's just table and so you'd have to deal with this intangible factor of likability so excited talk about his day and I hope that I learned from you 'cause I can't say I've mastered it but I do know that it's important because I actually had the opportunity to sit in on calibrations and you hear this language that couched in things like oh well you know I'm not sure about this person I don't know if they're good bit or I don't know the.

NBA America
"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"black women" Discussed on Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

"Hey guys it's fully shah I just want to take a few minutes before we start this show give you a quick update about what's going on with me so if you haven't already heard I'm back in corporate the needed a J O b because you know this entrepreneurial thing he is gonNA keep it real but it's week three when you will be hearing this right now I'm in the middle of week two recording this and it has been win but things are going great my boss is definitely a Hannah we love him she definitely is amazing I'm having a great time learning lots of new things people are really nice people act like they care about each other like it's a breath of fresh air ear and so I'm trying to use everything I've learned about over the course of these last two years and all the reason the job done creating this podcast to help me manage my own career so let's see if I can follow a my own Guy move ice now because I have been super busy I haven't been able to talk to Y'all there may be some emails having got to respond to doesn't mean I'm not GonNa get to it I just moved across the country and start a new job so I hope you guys can give me some grace here with me I'm going to respond to your email I promise you have not gone unnoticed I just have been super super busy trying to get my whole life together and with that said over the course of the next couple of weeks maybe a couple times a couple of weeks we'll see I will be replaying re mixes of season two episodes the most listened to and downloaded episodes some of you guys are new podcast probably haven't had a chance to hear these the great thing is my editor Chris is going to make be episodes amaze ball and Dan because last season I was editing myself charm if you go back and listen to him you detail so with no further do here is the most played episode that I have ever had is pretty amazing 'cause it's with my be school bff tiffany and we're talking about likability now the titles episode is Fuck Your Likability I'll be my black ass off but even after I've done in this episode what I learned is that I need to figure out how to be my best and most positive authentic so and that will actually get me further than anything else but this is a great conversation a lot to think about as far as how you you show up in the workplace we talk about related ability likability my angst with the how I grapple with this whole idea of higher Mr into itself when I can't be my black ass off at work so it's a fun episode I go back and listen to periodically just for it's and giggles I hope you enjoy all of Chris sound design it should be amazing so if you love it the email me at ask a trillion Ba dot com let me know if you liked this episode which like about it if you like any of the episodes would you like about them are welcome any feedback critique criticism just don't curse me out yeah that's all I guys have a great week remember you are awesome forget what anybody says you rock are you gotTa do is do you best Cathal I'm doing I'm doing my best and let God take care to arrest so until next week hopefully next week will be a new episode and not a remix episode we'll see don't hold me to it by love you guys thank you for listening to the show now let's start this remix.

two years
"black women" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"black women" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"This show the secret is a black woman is about peeling back the layers other black woman we know and admire to figure out how to live our best lives is this spot for us to we get real about what it means to be black to be woman and to survive in the chaos that is america. We're going to be talking about love that money work and everything in between everything. I'm charlotte. I'm an immigrant. I was born in in haiti and i may look like i've got together but i'm mostly making it until i make it. I love your description of yourself. I would say that you are a boss. You're open. You're honest assure communicator. You're one of those people i know and you work so hard. You're an inspiration lauren. Okay can describe you. You're the best funny your exuberance. You're like full of life your a weirdo. Your loved the ancestors a weirdo in the best possible we're here. Oh i love. That's my love language. That is yeah. I mean i feel like we said a lot of words words but i don't understand what the secret life shit is. Should we give them like a little. You expect like pop culture. I feel feel like breeds insecurity in women and it props up as people who are allowed to cheat and never trust him ever because there's no way he's not cheating on you you like what do you want from me like imposing. Is he good relationship good or is it bad like i don't get what anybody wants from us. It's like i don't know like i met this constant like inner war with myself of like you do too much and you don't do enough op. You're never supposed to hate your blessings. Exactly like this thing is the worst is blessing the worst blessing not a curse with this blessing. Sing is a lesson. The secret lives of black women comes out july twenty could subscribe now singer apple podcasts or wherever you listen..

haiti america apple
"black women" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"black women" Discussed on 1A

"A stacy abrams and elena who is running for governor right now if she wins she said to be the first black woman to be governor in in the united states so i think instead of talking about all the ways oprah can't run for president i honestly feel like we need as many people as possible though in their hats in the ring and if that's over i'm not mad at it because this is a woman who was mentor by maya angelou okay so i know she can learn there's also sean were the fact that oprah currently does not reflect experiences of a lot of black women today and maybe that's part of what made the oprah 2020 thing feel a little remote can you talk a little bit about what you found in your report the status of black women in the united states that paints a picture of of what of what's happening today with black woman across the country what did your is there anything in the research the popped out at you that surprised you yeah we found i think that surprise is taking it in its entirety so you know basically what we found we looked at the status of black women across political engagement economic earnings employment poverty health and criminal justice violence a we looked in a number of different areas and one of the things we saw across across areas was one black women were really striving for example black women had some of the highest again as we've been talking about participation in voting political participation participation in their communities black women had the highest labour force participation rate along with multiracial women than any other group of women black women were starting there the increase in their rate of starting businesses was just phenomenal so again black women are.

stacy abrams united states president maya angelou oprah elena