25 Burst results for "Black Trans Women"

New York Repeals 'Walking While Trans' Law

All Things Considered

04:16 min | 6 months ago

New York Repeals 'Walking While Trans' Law

"It's 2021. There's no reason that people should still be profiled and police based on how they look or dress this week, New York State repealed all love. It's commonly been called the walking while Trans Bam! And it is a decades old law that has allowed police to stop people in the street for loitering if they were suspected of prostitution, and many advocates and legislators say enforcement of that law has disproportionately affected women and especially transgender women of color. Women have been arrested simply for walking home for standing alone. Talking with friends. W my sees Emily Lang unpacked the news of the repeal and what it means for many transgender women in today's episode of Consider this a news podcast from NPR and W N. Y C. Is that conversation with Rebecca Ibarra? Emily activists have fought for years to repeal this 1976 anti loitering law. So what was their immediate reaction? Activists are definitely relieved. For many. It's hard for them to say that they're elated or happy because they're still so many different ways that black and brown trans women can be harassed under the law or by police. And I mean this is the third time since 2017 that a repeal proposal has had Momenta Min, the state Legislature. So a lot of people are mainly thing. Finally. Um, but for someone like T s candy, who I spoke with men, she's essentially been one of the main faces of this repeal. Candy says, you know, after running up and down the halls of Albany trying to get people to listen now eating my words that she feels like she's now eating her words. We need to clarify Emily that this repeal does not mean people will stop being arrested for engaging in prostitution that's still illegal, right prostitution is still illegal. However, the fact of the matter is that 19% of all trans people and 47% of black trans women have engaged in sex work. And that's according to the U. S Transgender survey, just due to discrimination that trans folks across the board face Sex work is a way to earn an income were as an alternative to relying on homeless shelters and food banks. So while lot of lawmakers who voted for the bill do not support decriminalizing sex work The majority of trans rights activists see this repeal as leading them towards decriminalization. So what, if anything happens to people who have been previously arrested under the law? So this bill Included the ceiling of prior convictions and why that's important is because someone charged with this violation has a criminal record that isn't sealed, and so it can impact their access to housing employment on been many cases, their immigration or asylum seeking process so Norma Oh, Torrio is with make the road New York, and she's a trans right activists and immigrant before the vote. She was speaking at a rally about how being arrested under this statute impacted her ability to apply for residency in the U. S. The visa was arrested in Pacifica. Those can tango, no empathy doctor never off the narrow, which, after two years she still hasn't been able to gain So ceiling could help many people with their immigration status. Leslie what is New York's track record so far protecting the trans community and in that context How big of a change is this? Actually, So In recent years, groups have managed to secure support from Governor Cuomo and passing the Gender expression Nondiscrimination act also known as agenda, which tremendous the human rights law to prohibit discrimination based on gender, identity or expression. They've gotten him to ban conversion therapy on minors. But when the walking while Trans Coalition speaks to a new era, the majority of folks are referring to their fight to de criminalize sex work, which in Albany, there may not be the same support that there was around this repeal, so to be interesting to see how lawmakers respond. That's W and my seat producer Emily Lang talking to Rebecca Ibarra.

Emily Lang Rebecca Ibarra Momenta Min Emily New York NPR Norma Oh Torrio Albany U. S. The Visa Candy U. Governor Cuomo Pacifica Leslie Trans Coalition
"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

"It immediately produces depression and a whole host of other things that people have to deal with so that's one level secondly you then as a result of this face extreme hostility from the world. If every way that you can imagine one out of three trans people who have jobs leave them every year because of on the job discrimination and harassment tracks are afraid to go to the doctors because of past horrible experiences with Healthcare professionals. We mentioned the police. We not to mention schools which are a tremendous bought a breeding ground for transphobia and trans hatred two quarts to housing discrimination. We know that the Trump Administration for example last week brought back housing protections for Trans people, you can buy and all of that and that's an extreme amount of pressure and you know suicide people who commit suicide it's not that they don't want to live. It's that they want the Pain to End and if there's something Many pain points that are being driven by the way that our society operates in every single way that pushes people to the brake. I just think that you know, so important because a lot of times I'll see these arguments in the news that try to use that as of the way to argue or why people should not transition rather than taking a step back and looking and saying well what kind of society have we create jobs and you know how might these forces that you know, we're supporting put people in a lot of pain. So everything is really important, especially when talking about gun violence as well. I agree. Absolutely. I think it's to this idea that there's again we're going back to like there's so many intersections of things happening. So, you know, for example, I think of just the sheer number of underage kids minors so team there lgbtq who are kicked out of their homes or who don't find that they have a safe space at home to go to and so then end up in really vulnerable positions because the people in the system That we're supposed to care for them actively are harming them. Right? That's right. That's right. I mean, I mean the the disaster that is trans teen homelessness is speak to that app is also one of the other fundamental failures and they're just so many points of hostility that trans people have to contend with and I think it's a to that end. I'm I feel like we've continued to ask you questions where there are no easy answers or at the very least quick answers and and this next one is is par for the course with that which is how do you feel that? The u.s. Is failing a trans woman specifically trans women of color. You know, what what are some of the things that we need to see change immediately. We need schools to be radically different and safer spaces for Trans people. We need the truck registration to say that trans people are protected by civil rights protections and regulations and schools. So that schools can be held accountable as safe spaces for Trans people that dog An immediate one when it comes to police violence. We need to repeal a lot of the tools that Police use to try to trans people so specifically loitering laws certain types of prostitution. And so this suspected prostitution thing is a problem in New York City. There's actually a law walking around walking around trans where police used during Los disproportionately targeted trans people as well. There's a to condom rule, whereas if police find two condoms on you they can arrest you on suspicion of sex work. So I think that that's a really important thing for us to shift and change we need to not only have equal access to housing and jobs, but I think that there needs to be some consideration ways to actually spur hiring I think the trans people honestly.

Trump Administration depression New York City Los
"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

04:06 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

"Or not capable or range that's transphobia and transphobia can raise to be active forms of discrimination and hatred which should be apparent. So there's a wide range of transfer with behavior and I mentioned some of those views because most people will say that they are uncomfortable with trash. And this way or that way and best friends will be because it's rooted in an irrational and I think we have to talk about the the role that that irrational fear plays, you know, we see a long want of hate crimes being conducted against the trans Community especially against trans women of color. We see high rates of police violence, you know, for example in the case of William Plunkett, which recently just had the news and I wonder if we can, you know discuss that that interplay a little bit. I think they did few drivers right of the violence and I mean and when you read the the home details of these cases, which I've read many of them they are horrific and they are brutal and it is clear that there is something other hear other in these cases then depriving someone of their life. We most recently learned for example, in terms of involving guns the to Puerto Rican trans women birth. Were shot and then burned in their car, right? It's those type of combinations. There was the same thing happened last year with a trans woman in Florida shot and burned in her car like the way in which these violent episodes happen are profound and deeply troubling and there are two drivers one is intimate partner violence. So people that know these women either have dated them or want to date them and there's some sort of refusal that can lead to violent and then of course the the state senate violence that you mentioned which overwhelmed only shows up in terms of brutality and incarceration in terms of the case that you're talking about with Lillian Polanco. She died in police custody due to negligence because again, they just didn't see her as a human being and even as they were taking her body out of the confined sell the secong. Guards were laughing and making fun of her and she was dead. And so it's this this brutality right from individuals and the state that's driving the the home and the reality for so many for so many black Trans women and we have to acknowledge that and on this larger point that you mentioned of hate crimes. We have to remember that every year since 2016 almost has set a new record for hate crimes in the United States that there's a steel rolling effect that is happening in terms of what's happening. And so therefore this personal violence this state center violence and the larger sort of policy and cultural violence that we have has led us to a very severe crisis for it and we're in June right? This is pride month. This is also where Juneteenth lands this is also right now a time where we're seeing massive protests with them. It's not her movement with people protesting police brutality. And I wonder if we can talk about how this intersection isn't new but it's sort of now coming to the Forefront of people's minds off. Yeah, I think that's right. And I think you know interestingly enough. I mean one thing it's also I think one of the reasons why we are where we are is because same thing, you know, which happens on on gun violence after the terrible massacre in Florida is that people can ignore something for for a long time but not forever. They're just they're just reaches a point where you've been hearing it, but you push it away. You've been hearing it. You've been pushing it away. You've been hearing it but you pushing when you move on and then there's just gets to acquire. You can't ignore it anymore. Its just too too apparent and.

William Plunkett Lillian Polanco Puerto Rican Florida senate United States
"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

02:58 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

"Well trans flash is a journalism and storytelling project which aims to Center the humanity of trans people through revealing and unveiling their narratives at a time of social backlash. We believe that finding ignorance is a key to keeping trans people alive. So as I tell everyone retail trans stories to say trans lives, you know, there's obviously been a long epidemic of violence, especially gun violence against the transgender community and it disproportionately impacts trans women of color specifically black women as we've seen just this week. We see over and over again women who've lost their lives and so I was wondering if you log Talk about that for a minute and how that plays into the work that train flashes doing. Yeah, the epidemic of violence and violence involving guns against transgender people is an epidemic and that's not hyperbole that is according to the American Medical Association which classified it as such and I don't think that people understand that the United States has the highest number of murders on record of trans people than any other planet on the country except for Brazil and Mexico and a nine out of ten of those who are murdered are black. And so we have an epidemic of violence against trans people and black Trans women in particular in this country. I literally on a planetary scale that's not surprising when you look at other indicators of violence and incarceration in the United States, but it is still astounding when you hear it off. And the work of trans last is to try to as much as possible to prevent our murders by getting people to see us as humans. You know, the more you examine eyes. Somewhat is the more that you can do harm and violence of it. It's an age-old understanding that we have about ourselves and a part of violence that is driven against black Trans women is that people don't see us as human and against trans people in general. And so consequently we Center our Humanity say you want people to understand that we have dreams that we have have Futures that we have a past that we have families that we have people that love us that we work. We took care of people all of the things that everyone else does because the more that we can do that the less people will harm us and it is an explicit drawing. I have to undermine that and we do that through telling the stories of actual trans people not only myself included but but many many others down and I think it is essential

Brady Peabody award Emmy Kelly Jones Iraq
Episode 73: Gun Violence and the Murder of Black Trans Women

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

02:58 min | 7 months ago

Episode 73: Gun Violence and the Murder of Black Trans Women

"Well trans flash is a journalism and storytelling project which aims to Center the humanity of trans people through revealing and unveiling their narratives at a time of social backlash. We believe that finding ignorance is a key to keeping trans people alive. So as I tell everyone retail trans stories to say trans lives, you know, there's obviously been a long epidemic of violence, especially gun violence against the transgender community and it disproportionately impacts trans women of color specifically black women as we've seen just this week. We see over and over again women who've lost their lives and so I was wondering if you log Talk about that for a minute and how that plays into the work that train flashes doing. Yeah, the epidemic of violence and violence involving guns against transgender people is an epidemic and that's not hyperbole that is according to the American Medical Association which classified it as such and I don't think that people understand that the United States has the highest number of murders on record of trans people than any other planet on the country except for Brazil and Mexico and a nine out of ten of those who are murdered are black. And so we have an epidemic of violence against trans people and black Trans women in particular in this country. I literally on a planetary scale that's not surprising when you look at other indicators of violence and incarceration in the United States, but it is still astounding when you hear it off. And the work of trans last is to try to as much as possible to prevent our murders by getting people to see us as humans. You know, the more you examine eyes. Somewhat is the more that you can do harm and violence of it. It's an age-old understanding that we have about ourselves and a part of violence that is driven against black Trans women is that people don't see us as human and against trans people in general. And so consequently we Center our Humanity say you want people to understand that we have dreams that we have have Futures that we have a past that we have families that we have people that love us that we work. We took care of people all of the things that everyone else does because the more that we can do that the less people will harm us and it is an explicit drawing. I have to undermine that and we do that through telling the stories of actual trans people not only myself included but but many many others down and I think it is essential

Brady Gun Violence Gun Violence Prevention Lgbtq Trans Trans Rights The Murder Of Black Trans Wome Transphobia Translash American Medical Association United States Brazil Mexico
"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

"You thank you thoughts and opinions shared on this podcast belongs solely to our guests and house and not necessarily Brady or Brady's Affiliates. Please note this podcast contains discussions of violence that some people may find disturbing. I find it disturbing too long. Welcome back everyone to Red Balloon Brady today. My co-host Kelly and I are joined by a margin Jones. She's an Emmy and Peabody award-winning journalist intersectional news producer chair of the first ever see you in high-level meeting on gender diversity creative trans slash and and so much more together. The three of us are discussing the tragic and often under-reported murder of black Trans women nearly three-fourths of transgender and gender-nonconforming Americans killed in the last three years were killed with a firearm yet rarely is this community included in conversations about gun violence prevention am hoping to change that by discussing the impact of gun violence on members of the trans Community then on our unbelievable about section we're talking about why there are so many stories people accidentally shooting themselves while going after Iraq has finally and our news wrap up were talking about the tragic ongoing realities of gun violence across the u.s. I.

Brady Peabody award Emmy Kelly Jones Iraq
"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

05:33 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Is

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Communities

Red Mountain Dominic Philadelphia
"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Might communities

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

05:51 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"Might

Brady Peabody award Emmy Kelly Jones Iraq
"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

05:32 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"I mean, I think that one of the things that we have to realize is that those people who really set up as a cultural system of racial prejudiced essentially from 1500 to 1750 kind of the founding years of that but first turned fifty years really knew what they were doing and they took him that's really enduring and so, you know, we have to just remember that well, I guess to to Pivot a little bit back to the position that sort of gun violence in place and all of this is that you know, we do see that when we have transgender or gender-nonconforming victims of homicide 60% of them involve of their murders off. All the gun and to me part of that is because I feel like a gun is a really easy thing to let to.

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"Like if why communities were black communities where we would have gun control laws fifteen years ago and we could do something else but it's also the case that on this particular moment that a lot of white people turn out to these protests Nationwide and it was the first time that so many white people had contact with the police and they were shocked by what they saw and not realized that go through their own experience and what they could see on on television that black people weren't making it up. And if this is the way that police were comporting themselves during the day off their cameras and children and babies and you name it. What would you imagine is the case if it's at night no cameras in a poor neighborhood where nobody looking and I think that that Gap has close to people and we know that there is a problem that we just can't ignore him and honestly, you know, those are just the names that we know that's just the data that we have bulbs. There's so many people who unfortunately are killed or who passed away who are mixed gendered or who we just never hear about. I mean, that's the that's a really strong point to remember is that you know, we always say suck at these are the cases that we know about. I'm on the board of the anti-violence project and we talked about all the time how we go back know over the course of the year and find people who are trans who were murdered or who died to the police violence, but didn't know because they rely on news reports and people are often miss gendered. So I think that what we know is just the beginning of the problem and yet I mean, there's a tremendous amount of violence against transfer. I mean one Dominic tells who's one of the people whose death was announced on Friday right before this big March off. The other is Red Mountain was dismembered and thrown in a river in Philadelphia. I think that the the violence is so acute that what we know about is absinthe. We only the the beginning thank you for flagging the role that the humanization plays in violence against trans people. Obviously that's also a difficult though as a member of the community to both be confronting and combating that while also having two in a way defend your own Humanity. So, how do you deal with that? Yeah, no doubt it is of course hard because every time these murders happen, I think that we all feel but then I also feel you know, we feel powerless that what we're doing isn't enough money. It's not making a difference. I mean, I don't have to tell you this. I'm sure that with respect to gun violence. This is a very familiar sentiment but this idea that whatever you're doing inside a map is not working people some combination of your either not doing it well enough for people don't care, you know, it's it's all of that and I think that those are natural feelings for us to have you know, and that's nice. The violence is designed to do right the violence is actually designed for you to lose. Hope.

Red Mountain Dominic Philadelphia
"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"Might look because I think it's important for all of us to know she might not be out on the street protesting but you can still be contributing to A system that human icicle. I think a couple of things I mean, there's so many ways in which it manifests. There's a full range of them off. Of course, the behaviors are subtle and extreme it would be like saying what are some of the signs of racism we literally, you know, there are books and seminars on that. So I think it's this it's a similar Way range quite frankly. I think it's important for us to realize that transfer via is an irrational fear or hatred of people who are transgendered pretty straightforward dead. And I think it's really important because the fear plays into that because that can be more of a subtle sorts of things. And so if you believe that trans women are women that's transphobia wage. For example, to be honest. You may not believe it so but it is if you think that you would be nervous using a bathroom with someone who is trans and that someone who is trans would not be using a bathroom. Well, I tell you two things I'd say one you you definitely have done already and just didn't know it and secondly that's transphobia. If you believe that trans people somehow are not are imbalanced.

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

2020 in Review Playlist

05:49 min | 7 months ago

"black trans women" Discussed on 2020 in Review Playlist

"Belongs solely to our guests and hosts and not necessarily Brady or Brady's Affiliates. Please note this podcast contains discussions of violence that some people may find disturbing. I find it disturbing too long. Welcome back everyone to Red Balloon Brady today. My co-host Kelly and I are joined by a margin Jones. She's an Emmy and Peabody award-winning journalist intersectional news producer chair of the first ever see you in high-level meeting on gender diversity creative trans slash and and so much more together. The three of us are discussing the tragic and often under-reported murder of black Trans women nearly three-fourths of transgender and gender-nonconforming Americans killed in the last three years were killed with a firearm yet rarely is this community included in conversations about gun violence prevention am hoping to change that by discussing the impact of gun violence on members of the trans Community then on our unbelievable about section we're talking about why there are so many stories people accidentally shooting themselves while going after Iraq has finally and our news wrap up were talking about the tragic ongoing realities of gun violence across the u.s. I.

Brady Peabody award Emmy Kelly Jones Iraq
Report renews call for decriminalizing sex work in Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Report renews call for decriminalizing sex work in Washington DC

"A senior associate at Georgetown's O'Neill Institute of National Global Health, saying the big takeaway from their report is decriminalizing sex work would improve the health and safety those who are doing it to survive to meet a cute folks, particularly trans women. Specifically, black Trans women go into sex work, really, to just meet the basic needs So too, you know, earn a living because they're often shut out from employment opportunities because of anti trans discrimination, Lando So says there's a need to address housing and improved access to medical care and HIV programs. Land is also calling on the D. C council to consider the matter of de criminalizing again after the council failed last year to take a vote on a bill Ken Duffy w T O P NEWS Big six Veterans

Georgetown's O'neill Institute Lando D. C Council HIV Ken Duffy
Protests continue in Portland after more than 100 consecutive days

Pacifica Evening News

04:51 min | 11 months ago

Protests continue in Portland after more than 100 consecutive days

"Marked 100 Days and nights of Black Lives matter. Protests in Portland, Oregon. They began after the police killing of George Floyd on May 25th despite an uptick in police, violence and right wing militia groups confronting protesters in Portland. The demonstrators are determined to continue. Katya face Perrin Smith attended a solidarity building event in Portland this weekend. Any B way Got B. We got Jobe at Len's Park in southeast Portland on Saturday afternoon. Several 100 people showed up for community gathering with speeches, songs, inspiration and sharing resource is What's this? It's one of more than a dozen events across the city this weekend to mark 100 consecutive days and nights of protests for black lives matter. Regina rages, an organizer and emcee of the day's programme. And this right here. This isn't antiracist active, Resist states by being here today you are saying that you are anti racist I A is with P d X Black youth movement, which was formed in the aftermath of the police killing of George Floyd. And has led many of the Portland marches. It's coming out of a place of exhaustion. We're tired. Honestly tired. We've been fighting our whole lives and we have to continue to fight. I told you guys are stories. And it's hurting us. You know, it's Harding. Us. We just constantly have to relive it every single day. She asked the crowd to take a look at her attire. She's just come from basketball practice, wearing shorts and sandals and her hair pulled back. She's not just an angry black woman, she says. She's also a high school student and an athlete. But woman have always always been taught that we had the fight hard so hard we had to put in those countless hours. We have the practice harder than a white girl. We had to work so much harder. And why is that? It's because America has normalized normalized it. We've normalized little black girls being in these streets finding for their lives. But we haven't normalized black girls being doctors. Black girls being principles like girl be a teacher's why black women and especially protecting black trans women, was a major topic of discussion at the rally. Protesters say their demands haven't changed throughout the 100 days. They want to end anti black racism and police brutality and to defund police budgets to reinvest in community services. What's changed is the increased use of force by police against protesters. Did. Eisen, artist and organizer with black lives matter. He was one of many protesters arrested by federal agents last month process within an hour. I got tackled arrested. Realized they cut my finger over. Ask them why they arrested me. They would not answer. Why? Why just full ignore sitting in the back of the car, and I could feel my back of my shirt getting wet from blood. I can't look at this. Please, just fully ignore me. He said he was detained for about two hours, interrogated and photographed. Finally, they let him go. But he was given no documentation or court date, he said. It was only later speaking with a legal support team. He realized he was kidnapped. She realized Wow, you were actually Tell. I said that to say That is an important piece of this revolution. That's what we're dealing with right now. Making just rolled to the street, snatch people up and hold them hostage for however long that is very scary. Problem with doing the next day he quit his job at T Mobile to join the protest full time. On Friday night, Organ State troopers returned to the front lines of the Portland demonstrations, and, along with police arrested 27 protesters, according to the Oregonian. A viral photo from that night shows a woman beaten by police and blood dripping down her face as she's carried away by officers in riot gear. The Trump Administration has deputized the state troopers as federal agents, which means protesters could now face federal charges. The protesters charged that law enforcement has reacted disproportionately giving a pass to right wing militia while cracking down harshly against black lives matter. Demonstrators.

Portland George Floyd Oregon Jobe Len's Park Harding Basketball T Mobile Katya Trump Administration Regina Perrin Smith America Eisen Legal Support
"black trans women" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"black trans women" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Mr Jones why Black Trans Women are essential to our future. by Mr Jones Mr Jones is a journalist and the creator of the Multimedia Platform Trans Lash media. Trans people are not new. We've always been here as long as there's been recorded human history we have always existed, but we've been written out of the human story and when you come from a community that is without a full range of possibility models, it raises the question in. As well as others of whether or not you deserve rights or a place in society because everything generally in society fails black. Trans Women. That's how we get to epidemic levels of violence, mass levels of unemployment and a lack of education for us. For Years Trans people have been marginalized within movements because of the idea that anything not accessible to mainstream society is damaging to the prospect of black liberation. But we've learned from history that this incremental approach has been a failure because when not everyone has the same rights, the rights of everyone are actually incredibly fragile in the words of Martin Luther King No one is. Free until we are all free, so there cannot be black lives matter without the centering of black trans. Women. Because if we're able to secure the rights for the most marginalized, then everyone is going to have rights. What we're proposing in this latest Biella moment is a we imagination and an expansion of blackness and fundamental understanding that we're all going or none of us is. Black Trans Women are essential to creating the future because when everything fails you, you're more clearly able to re imagine what it would look like if things worked, this is why Black Trans women are in many cases the most visionary and progressive leaders within social justice movements as a leader of the stonewall uprising. Marsha p Johnson understood the link between black civil rights women's rights, Gay Rights and Trans Rights and was crucial in the. Struggle for liberation of all of them now, Black Trans. Women are leaders of radical efforts including Tony Michelle Williams in Atlanta, who's helping to reimagined how we imagine a world without incarceration in field steward who's fighting food insecurity and Mickey be at the transgender law center, who's Coordinating Project reimagining Black Trans Liberation, and life across every spectrum, and there are countless others doing the same across the country in every way that you can think of. The future is trans because the ways we've gone about organizing human life have changed in really fundamental ways transpeople just through our existence show the power and the resilience of change and possibility of how we can do things. Differently we are creating future less defined by gender roles and defined more by what we can create than what we can destroy, and because we've already had to do this work, we are essential to building this future. The events of the past couple months have created new space for us but the key thing to remember is that in the long fight for civil rights in the US, no one moment is ever definitive as important as this shift and recognition of Black Trans. Women that started to take place has been. We have an incredibly long way to go..

Trans Women Mr Jones Martin Luther King US Marsha p Johnson Atlanta Tony Michelle Williams Mickey
Justice for Breonna Taylor with Andrea J Ritchie

The Nod

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Justice for Breonna Taylor with Andrea J Ritchie

"March thirteen, twenty twenty Briana was shot and killed by police in Louisville Kentucky. In what's been described as a botched raid officers barged into Taylor's apartment under a no knock warrant and fired multiple rounds. No drugs were found the no knock warrant in question was actually for Taylor's ex boyfriend and his friends who live miles away. It had already been detained by the time. Please enter Taylor's home. As maddening as honest death is most Americans hadn't even heard of it until nearly three months later as the national unrest around the deaths of Egmont arbitrary and George Floyd's began to unfold. What all the stories of those killed and brutalized by police are important. Brianna isn't the first black woman to have hers reduced to a footnote in the larger narrative. Why are the guests of black women at the hands of police received so much differently, and what can we do to change that? Today to help us understand. We're joined by Andrea J, reaching the author of invisible, no more police violence against black women and women of color. Andrea Richie thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me, so let's jump right into it and start with your book invisible. No more. Can you tell us a bit about it and like what inspired you to write this? One inspire me to write invisible. No more was the work that I've been doing for the past couple of decades, documenting or around litigating around advocating around and just generally Around black women girls, Queer and Trans People's experiences, policing and wanting to provide some context for the individual cases that we were hearing about so for instance thinking about Brianna Taylor. If you looked invisible, no more you learn that. Unfortunately she's far from the first black woman who was killed in a no knock drug raid. You bring up Taylor and I know there's definitely this feeling when I look at her case. In the cases of other black women would been killed at the hands of police. It seems like they don't get as much attention as the cases of black man who had been killed by the police. But the thing you point out your book is that that's not a feeling that that is reality. He talked to us a bit about that pattern. Yeah I think the title of the book is both a statement of fact, a demand an aspiration, right? It's a statement of fact that hosts Sandra. Bland black women's experiences of policing are no longer invisible. In the way they were pre twenty fifteen often say that before twenty fifty nine. I feel like I'd be talking underwater constantly about violence against women and girls, and it just wasn't landing, and then all of a sudden in two thousand fifteen. It's like my. My head popped above water, and suddenly there was also a lot of other voices speaking in same same thing, so in that sense. We're at an unprecedented level visibility of black women's experiences of policing. I would say that's true for Briana Taylor. There's a way in which we still have a long way to go for black women's experiences to be at the center of our consciousness around this issue to be informed by Black Women's experiences. That's the next step we have to move past visibility to action. Why do you think there's been such a difference between the reception? Of Brianna? Taylor versus Church Floyd. Our understanding of police violence is definitely shaped to the experiences, a black man who are assumed to be straight and not Trans Right. That's the story of state violence that we hear that with the media reproduces that we produce the telling stories to each other in such a way that even when black women's experiences happen in broad daylight on camera in the same way, the happened for George Floyd. Are Invisible in some way when you look at the incident report for Briana. Taylor's killing. It says no one was injured. And that's just an extreme example of how invisible violence against black women is. Here's a black woman who died in a hail of bullets blood out in her own bed in her own home where she was sleeping. Police report says no one was hurt the last reason i. think it's invisible is because. If as a society, we had to contend with state violence against black women that's informed by both anti blackness and gender violence right beside more than we would have to contend with anti black women violence in our communities. Contend again with the fact that this nation is built on violence against black women's bodies and black and Trans bodies and we're not ready to do that. You know there's this theory, though I think we've all heard that part of the reason why there's such a big difference between the response to be honest anthem response to George. Is that free? Honest wasn't caught on camera quick. Do you think about that I unfortunately point people to a lot of videotape? Black women dying on camera to police Natasha McKenna is a ten minute video of her being. tased to death by police there's. Video of Doina Johnson, a Black Trans woman, being brutally beaten in the police precinct that did not inspire an uprising in the same way that Rodney. King stood. They don't WanNa. Keep repeating kind of the the degree of violence, but what I want to say is that there's no shortage of videotaped evidence of police violence against black women I don't. Think that's. The entirety of the story is something. They also feels especially Kinda unique about Brianna Taylor's case is that it's almost become this this inescapable meam as of late like people I've seen weird social media posts like even sometimes dance challenges like it. It's kind of taken on a life of its own ultimately is that type of attention is? Is that helpful or harmful? I think that it recreates some of the narratives that produce the death of black women. I think it's recreating the notion. The objectification of black women that in this case Brianna Taylor story is an opportunity to make. A clever pun or acute mean and we've lost spree on his humanity in that. We've lost the fact that she was a sister. She was a daughter. She was an emt. She was someone who was full of joy of laughter jokes the life of the party she was. Multidimensional Person Right and I think we just need to be careful that we're not turning visibility in the way that black women have been made visible in ways that are harmful produce more violence.

Black Women Brianna Taylor Briana Taylor George Floyd Louisville Kentucky Andrea Richie Andrea J Church Floyd Sandra Wanna Doina Johnson King Natasha Mckenna Rodney
Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

LGBTQ&A

05:06 min | 1 year ago

Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

"I wanted to talk to you today because we're about to hear an interview with Sam Feder the director of the new. Disclosure and you are one of the associate producers on the movie. You're also the associate director of transgender representation at glad, and maybe most importantly you're my friend and I've heard you talk about this movie for maybe like two years, so tell me why has movie meant so much to you? I think working at glad and understanding the significance of representation, having an ability to conceptualize our history in terms of TV and film representation is crucial for the majority of the public everything. People have come to know about this community has been informed by TV and film, and so if we have no historical context or Lens to look through to understand how these images have contributed to our cultural understanding, than we don't fully understand the power of media and the power of storytelling and begun Netflix's not best case scenario, right? It doesn't get much better in terms of visibility, but I think. What our film also proposes to say is that visibility is only a means to an end it has to lead to material and real world cultural change so in that way it is critical and granted that in in different countries there are different cultural contexts, different legal systems, but for the first time in many cases I think a lot of people are getting to hear from transpeople ourselves about the media that we have grown up on in addition to the rest of the world. In you know one of those people. We see a lot as Laverne Cox and you know she she's a star. We see her red carpets and I think it's really easy for people who are not as familiar with the Trans Experience to see someone like her, and not not know that for someone in her identity group of Black Trans Woman that it can be a really dangerous world to live in, and in that sense like there's real urgency with this movie. Yeah, absolutely I mean, and it's also about the paradox of visibility, so the more that we are known the more that we are seen. The more likely that people may be enraged by our existence, and so we always have to sort of toe the line and understand that again. Visibility is not the end goal. Representation is not the end goal, but it helps us to get to a place of cultural understanding and acceptance, so that people can live their lives as they are safely with the paradox of visibility I think it's. It's such a nuance conversation to talk about, but do you think I'm wrong in I? Don't WanNa just I don't accept the violence, obviously for anybody in or out of our community, but do you think I'm wrong to think that all of the issues that come the visibility? Those are necessary hurdles that we have to deal with comes with visibility in there. There's no way around that. I disagree in some ways because I think when visibility is tied to responsible, accurate and authentic storytelling. Then we can actually counter. Cultural Backlash that is often tied to stories about us that don't involve us. The disability community coined this phrase that I use all the time. There can be nothing about us without us, and historically all the stories that have been told about transgender people have not actually involved us and so I don't believe that it's pure in black and white. That's such a good point, so you're saying and rightfully so that we are seeing issues. Come out of all this increased visibility, because the representation has been poor, it's been bad I mean when you watch disclosure, you will see a hundred plus years of what I would argue as misrepresentation. I really now that I've started really thinking about and looking critically at this history, most of it has been misrepresentation and inaccurately reflecting who trans people are who this community? Community is and also only focusing on the extremes of our experiences, whether it's Trans people only dying, and only being the victims of violence or only being on red carpets, and only being celebrated to the extremes, because there's a spectrum of experiences and I think when we're, we talk about representation, we want a the richness and the depth, and as Richard, said what we need is more so that when those clumsy or trope ish or stereotypical or shared representations show up. They're not the only thing we have to rely on not only for the public to see and understand who we are for. We ourselves as Trans people to see and understand who we

Laverne Cox Associate Director Sam Feder Netflix Director Richard
"black trans women" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"black trans women" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"Want to be done. T! How accepted have you felt as an Lgbtq a person in the black community? Does it feel like you're kind of straddling two worlds at once sometimes, or do you feel mostly welcome? Well, My position is different as a transgender man. As a translator May. People don't necessarily read me as transgender which offers me a level of autonomy and safety that sometimes translated. Don't get in. oftentimes that is because what happens is we are more inclined to investigate community and investigating women in a way that we don't do with me. We're always looking for the performance of immunity where we're looking at data, masking person is just lead a masculine I so don't have to deal with the Mata scrutiny but I will say this. I'm very cautious about win in where I disclosed it transfers. in that is unfortunately it's not just in the black community, but just in the world general generally have to be very cautious about who, until I trans and at the same time issue is showing up for Trans People. Particularly Black Trans Women. See violence happening when a hero by language it figuring out how to intervene as stated when I need you. To expand on that question a little bit when you say you have to be mindful about how you present yourself in the world, how much of that if any has to do with the kinds of stereotypes and expectations and images that black men, regardless of their gender identity face from the wider society? I mean I have to be mindful to an extent as a gay black man about how I present myself. But I know, I can pass like if I never told anybody I was gay. They would never ask so for me. The narrative is different I'm guessing than it is for you. I think it's. Also similarities because when it gets down to his idea that as a black meaning the world you can only look to ways right where we really only looked one way only hyper masculine, and that's only allowed to have a couple of emotions where they just be like unless anger and anything outside of that little call your masculinity in your manhood, and when that starts to happen, that's when people get by. People feel threatened by you presenting yourself as a different type of man as you being a man who is who is proud of his softness or his gentle mist, his emotions. Threatened by that in this violence house people so that's what I say I have to be cautious about how I present myself sometimes, yes, it is formative. 'cause I do have to put form cities around certain people in order to preserve life in the answer is yes. Angelica I. See you nodding to that. What's on your mind with regards to that? Well like teak, said and I. Thank you for having me on your end. Just be providing the space. Because as I'm looking at the panel here like these are all my friends. These are all people that I know and have been in the movement with. Um and so these are the voices that people should be hearing from what I'm thinking about is as a black trans, woman. Who has gained a certain level of privilege with my access to Hollywood and being on television There have come certain privileges with that, but we have come to understand that my privileges whatever they may be will not protect me because when I am out on the streets. I have had moments where I am. Being, like takes surveillance, my feminity, and the performance of it is being surveillance as I walk into the corner store, or as walked down the sidewalk through a group of black men who go from cat, calling me to examining my feminity, just a little bit closer, and in saying wait a minute. That's a man and all the sudden. My heart rate goes up, and I'm not sure if those are the last words that I'm going to hear. And can we just be clear? and. I. WanNa come to you? Can we just be clear for people who are watching this? You know the person on the left of your screen is a trans woman. There's any. The, that you identify people based on how they identify themselves. That's why it's called. I then entity. It's Al. Asi, mind, and self. So can we just nail down for everybody, please? This has been a public service announcement. It's fair to say that. Many black households tend to be more socially conservative at least when it comes to issues of lgbtq acceptance. How much do you think these current social movements are influencing that? What happens with the people that we have the closest to? It's interesting. I think that in many ways we forget the. Clearness, and therefore we sort of erase the facts that That Black Trans Nece has existed for far longer than we've had language for it. So I guess that my reaction to that is that perhaps we're expanding the narrative of what family looks like when it comes to blackness both including chosen family as well as including biological family, but also recognizing right that. In the black means that I've operated in the black community I've seen this always that that person that aunty that uncle that sign one whether it'd be like the head of you know ahead of the head of the music director at the church. You know there's always someone who's in the community who's got just like a little extra in the tank are little. Whatever words that we use, and so I think there is an indigene Eddie to clearness and blackness that we're not quite ready to talk about yet but it has always been there and. So I think in that way I do understand that there is a narrative about the conservative nature of black households, but I think it's also important to recognize that we've been hearing from much longer time that we're ready to talk about. Catching. On the the whole idea of like a black families beam, you know socially conservative, or what have you I just want to point out that I think that this is rooted again in white supremacy and to call. The roots what they are because i. know that what's really happening is at so many mothers and fathers are so concerned about their black child safety. SIS were trans. That's why every black child gets a talking to about how to survive in America. What not to do how to dress how to talk all of these different things and that? Extends to the LGBTQ community. They tell us. Why would you want to put one more layer of oppression or one more difficult thing to get into this world? Don't you know how the world is going to treat you when they don't understand it? At home is the first place where you can model showing love or your lgbtq child. For those who are watching who were still kind of new to these issues I should note Angelica use the term assists or trans before an to gender CIS. SISTER IF YOU'RE A biological sex at birth and your gender identity today match I was born male identifies a man. So I am six gender man. Just fly councilmember Jenkins. I'D BE REMISS IF I didn't ask you about that. Supreme Court Decision on employment discrimination. The court used a strict reading of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four. It was kind of a conservative sort of jurisprudence and justice. Neal Gorsuch, who is a trump appointee wrote the opinion. How big a deal is that ruling in your view? How far does that take us? You mentioned earlier that you think. We still need an employment nondiscrimination act in addition to this ruling. Think it's it's a huge. Step. Writing. Because what it says is the law. Is is the law regardless of. Religious aliens or conservative leanings. They are interpreting the nineteen succeed or civil rights law as it is written in, so that does give some. Confidence in in the the Supreme Court in the in laws that. Govern our society,.

Black Trans Women Trans People Supreme Court Angelica I. Mata Hollywood director councilmember Jenkins America Eddie Neal Gorsuch
"black trans women" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"black trans women" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Want to be done. T how accepted have you felt as an Lgbtq a person in the black community? Does it feel like you're kind of straddling two worlds at once sometimes, or do you feel mostly welcome? Well. My my position is different as a transgender man. As a translator May. People don't necessarily read me as transgender which offers me a level of autonomy and safety that sometimes translated. Don't get in. oftentimes that is because what happens is we are more inclined to investigate community and investigating women in a way that we don't do with me. We're always looking for the performance of immunity where we're looking at data, masking person is just lead a masculine I so don't have to deal with the Mata scrutiny, but I will say this I'm very cautious about win in where I disclosed it transfers. in that is unfortunately it's not just in the black community, but just in general generally have to be very cautious about who, until I trans and at the same time issue is showing up for Trans. People particularly Black Trans Women. See violence happening when a hero by language it figuring out how to be as stated when I need you. To expand on that question a little bit when you say you have to be mindful about how you present yourself in the world, how much of that if any has to do with the kinds of stereotypes and expectations and images that black men, regardless of their gender identity face from the wider society I mean I have to be mindful to an extent as a gay black man about how I present myself, but I know I can pass like. If I never told anybody I was gay. They would never ask so for me. The narrative is different. I'm guessing than it is for you. I think it's. Also similarities because when it gets down to his idea that as a black meaning the world, you can only look to ways right where we really only looked one way only hyper masculine, and that's only allowed to have a couple of emotions where they just be like unless anger and anything outside of that little call your masculinity in your manhood, and when that starts to happen, that's when people get by. People feel threatened by you presenting yourself as a different type of man as you being a man who is who is proud of his softness or his gentle mist, his emotions. Threatened by that. In this violence house people so that's what I say I have to be cautious about how I present myself sometimes. Yes, it is formative 'cause I do have to put form cities around certain people in order to preserve life in the answer is yes. Angelica I. See you nodding to that. What's on your mind with regards to that? Well, like teak, said and I thank you for having me on your end. Just be providing the space because as I'm looking at the panel here like these are all my friends. These are all people that I know and have been in the movement with. And so these are the voices that people should be hearing from what I'm thinking about is as a black trans woman. Who has gained a certain level of privilege with my access to Hollywood and being on television There have come certain privileges with that, but we have come to understand that my privileges whatever they may be will not protect me because when I am out on the streets, I have had moments where I am. Being like takes surveillance, my femininity, and the performance of it is being surveillance, as I walk into the corner store, or as walked down the sidewalk through a group of black men who go from cat, calling me to examining my feminity, just a little bit closer and in saying wait a minute. That's a man and all the sudden. My heart rate goes up and I'm not sure if those are the last words that I'm going to hear. And, can we just be clear? and. I. WanNa come to you. Can we just be clear for people who are watching this? You know the person on the left of your screen is a trans woman. There's any. The that you identify people based on how they identify themselves. That's why it's called I then entity. It's Al Asi mind and self. So can we just nail down for everybody, please? This has been a public service announcement. Say that. Many black households tend to be more socially conservative at least when it comes to issues of lgbtq acceptance. How much do you think these current social movements are influencing that? What happens with the people that we have the closest to? It's interesting. I think that in many ways we forget the. Clearness and therefore we sort of erase the facts that That Black Trans Nece has existed for far longer than we've had language for it. So I guess that my reaction to that is that perhaps we're expanding the narrative of what family looks like when it comes to blackness both including chosen family as well as including biological family, but also recognizing right that. In the black means that I've operated in the black community. I've seen this always that that person that Auntie that uncle that sign one whether it'd be like the head of you know ahead of the head of the music director at the church. You know there's always someone who's in the community who's got just like a little extra in the tank are little. Whatever words that we use and so I think there is an indigene Eddie to clearness and blackness that we're not quite ready to talk about yet but it has always been there and. So I think in that way I do understand that there is a narrative about the conservative nature of black households but I think it's also important to recognize that. We've been hearing from much longer time that we're ready to talk about. Catching. On the the whole idea of like a black families beam, you know socially conservative, or what have you I just want to point out that I think that this is rooted again in white supremacy and to call. The roots what they are because I know that what's really happening is at so many mothers and fathers are so concerned about their black child. Safety Cysts were trans. That's why every black child gets a talking to about how to survive in America. What not to do how to dress how to talk all of these different things and that? Extends to the Lgbtq community they tell us. Why would you want to put one more layer of oppression or one more difficult thing to get into this world? Don't you know how the world is going to treat you when they don't understand it? At home is the first place where you can model showing love or your LGBTQ. Child For, those who are watching who were still kind of new to these issues I should note Angelica use. The term assists or trans before an to gender, CIS. SISTER IF YOU'RE A biological sex at birth and your gender identity today match I was born male identifies a man. So I am six gender man just fly councilmember Jenkins I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you about that Supreme Court, Decision on employment discrimination the court used a strict reading of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four. It was kind of a conservative sort of jurisprudence and justice. Neal Gorsuch, who is a trump appointee wrote the opinion. How big a deal is that ruling in your view? How far does that take us? You mentioned earlier that you think. We still need an employment nondiscrimination act in addition to this ruling. It's. A huge. Step. Writing on because what it says is the law. Is is the law regardless of. Religious Aliens or Conservative leanings? Are Interpreting the nineteen succeed or civil rights law as it is written, and so that does give some. Cabins in in the the Supreme Court in the in laws that. Govern our society,.

Black Trans Women Angelica I. Supreme Court Mata Al Asi Hollywood Auntie America Neal Gorsuch Eddie director Jenkins
"black trans women" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"black trans women" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"This system continues to benefit and continues to drive on our division and I think that's another reason why all black lives matter is so important, because of the way that the most marginalized black community have been left out of that. Even though it's all our movement, we would have a pride months to celebrate if it were not for Black Trans Women. We owe it to the Trans Community to demand better for them. Last year might have been the University of Stonewall by this first year I think we're just really fighting for rates and a whole new way, and includes for our trains and Black Trans verse. He needs to be seen. Our messaging needs to be expressed for so long foundation of all of these celebrations in all of these intersections probably going to forget about Black Trans. Women are. We going to forget about non binary folks. We cannot. Keep. The message. Take Black Trans Women. Trans, women Queer, black. Lives are worthy of respect. Queer black lives are into being loved. Queer, black lives are to be protected. And I hope that we remember that this month and forever. Welcome back to pride and protest. It used to be when we did a program like this. We assumed our audience to mostly be straight white people who needed a fair amount of hand holding today. We're probably talking to straight.

Black Trans Women Trans Community University of Stonewall
'All Black Lives Matter'

Nancy

02:54 min | 1 year ago

'All Black Lives Matter'

"And also beyond black. Trans Women being excluded from the conversation. We've also seen trans men like Tony mcdade be excluded as well he was a trans man shot by police in Tallahassee last month, and some people have been fighting to have. His name honored at protests as well for people who don't get why he should be included. What what do you say to them? THEM WHY is it important that Tony's name be included if the Senate Trans, humanity and Trans lives right and I think the say people want answers from the Tallahassee Police on Tony. mcdaid on who they say was armed. They say was this who they say was that, but they're not really a lot of reports about what happened. It's only the what the police are saying. Happens. And then then a lot of people are also talking about. She's not a victim of police violence, but Nina pop who is them a most recent I'm Black Trans Woman. Who was stabbed? Then Roll Missouri in early. May so I think that the those that push. To include their names? Is Just Center Trans. People and Trans. Lives and black lives in this moment, and there was even a march the other day that Senate on stonewall where a group of activists did a march that was explicitly devoted to him. In the midst of the protests for George Void so i. think that's what that's about. What would a truly inclusive black lives matter movement? Look like to you. I! Think truly was the black lives. Matter would look like the movement that the three original founders had envisaged right, and we should say three founders you referencing. Are Patrisse cullors Alicia? Garza, and ultimately that's right. The irony is that two out of three of the founders of all living, and then two hundred or three. R LGBTQ and they when they started were deliberately creating a movement that was intersectional, and which is committed to fighting transphobia. It's actually one of their stated principles, but the problem. Is that because Blm? For sorts of reasons that makes sense. It's not a hierarchical organization. It's decentralized one through decentralisation that means that the local group of people who ever decide to pull themselves together and declare themselves the Ambi- Ellen RBM. and. That means that you can end up. Not Trying to end up. Hating the existing biographies as they exist, and so, that's what I think happened. I don't think that it's a straying of. I think that it's just a structural thing and and the decision to create a decentralized organization which means that those values that are held at the top. Don't fall down all the way to the bottom because it's not a top down organization, so it really do think that that's part of

Tallahassee Police Tony Mcdade Senate Tony. Mcdaid Tallahassee Ambi- Ellen Rbm. R Lgbtq George Void Garza Alicia BLM Missouri Nina Stonewall
Black Trans Lives Matter

Nancy

06:39 min | 1 year ago

Black Trans Lives Matter

"Have you gone to? Protests? Recently if you have. What have you seen I have not gone this year for a couple of reasons covid. I personally am very uncomfortable. Going out in the midst of the crisis. I don't WanNa. Be Quite honestly black and sick and Trans in a hospital with Kobe. I? Just don't want to put myself in that position. That's not wise. It's not a wise thing to do given the hostility of our medical system to transpeople given the hostility of our medical system to black people. It's just not a good trick. And for that same reason, being black and trends, and by chance woman. I don't want to have an experience with the cars for will state. That is to say that I don't want to have. Anything to do with. The the cars roll system because of its harsh, disproportionate and unfair and dehumanizing treatment of Trans People. I think thirdly you know there's a real question that I've been wrestling with that I wrote about recently. in a much larger sense of whether or not Black Trans Women in particular should show up. In this moment, shouting black lives matter when in so many ways we understand that within the black community. Our lives are treated as if they don't matter. And as if they're undisposable. And there are so many ways in which the grief and the frustration and the sheer rage that people feel. which people feeling now around the death of George Foy which are totally fair know. I felt last year when there was a string of murders of Black Trans Women, last June and into July in particular, they started in May. and it was a really dark painful time, and I remember going to protest at that time for those women who died and were murdered and wondering where everybody else was. And, so I kind of feel that everybody else gets shop in this moment, right that there really valid reasons why, as a by transforming I am not out on the street and is very valid. There's so many other people that are showing up in this moment which I wholeheartedly support. Yeah, when and part of what you wrote about in that piece that you're referencing is This video that emerged of the Trans woman named IANNA DR being attacked convenience store by a group of black men I guess the first question is were? Where were you when you first saw the video? And what was your reaction was at home. I was at home and I. Think i. read the description of what happened. And then I saw maybe five or seven I didn't see very much of it because. It's really hard to watch what I saw shocks me, and then I learned a little bit more on just through some things on my feet that it was in Minneapolis. And that really struck me. Write that on the first day of pride. Month was the day that she was beaten. Minneapolis Saint Paul. Where those very same people are out in the streets, have been out in the streets or are supportive of people on the streets, demanding black lives matter demanding that they be seen as human beings. could engage in amassed humanization of someone else. Who is back at the time without a second thought was. Deeply, enraging to me. Deeply, fattening and terribly shocking. And when I decided that I wanted to write something about it. I went online and I actually found the entire. There's an entire twenty minute clip of the entire. Affair as it were, and there was a carnival like fear before they decided to beat her up, they actually had cornered her essentially in the convenience store, and like literally a carnival atmosphere, both inside the convenience store in the parking lot after they were done taunting her for twenty minutes and like. There was something about it and that moment where she was not treated as a human being. And that really got to me. You wrote in your piece that. Recounting xactly, what happened to Yana in the video is important. And allow discussion about how much should describe violent incidents like these where it can be triggering for people. So. I guess my question is. Why do you think it's important to really talk about what happened in detail? I think the part of the video that often gets displayed is the last part of. The beating rights of the beating actually starts in the back of the store, and then they can move in a semi circle to the front, and that front part where she's bent over and people are are on her is what's been getting played online, but the entire thing that leads up to that I think underscores the depravity of the entire event, and that depravity is really important to understand because it underscores the way in which. Black Trans. People are seen. and. We collectively as people right as humans have to reckon with that depravity. We have to see it. We have to acknowledge it, and we had to ask really hard questions of ourselves about how and why and we can't prioritize the death of black men, and at the same time ignore an even encourage the death of black. Trans Women and somehow believe that we're going to build a just society for everyone yeah. I. Mean You know we're? We're in this sort of extraordinary moment. Where more people than ever are open to the conversation about police brutality against black people and also just general inequality that exists for black people in this country What do you think the barriers are to making sure that violence against Trans Women of Color is included in that conversation. Yeah, I think the barrier is people saying human beings rather than freaks or objects of entertainment or

Black Trans Women Trans People Trans Women Minneapolis Wanna George Foy Kobe Xactly
"black trans women" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"black trans women" Discussed on Revision Path

"Everywhere. I know everybody loves Pov- now and that's fantastic as far as media representation but they're still like we can't call it done. We can't call that especially when somebody Black Trans women are still suffering violence leaving losing their lives so American woman is still ongoing. It is now year three and it's actually on hiatus while I'm working on other things but American woman has has reached the milestone but it was very affirming to actually get that mounted as an exhibition finally and it was a fantastic turn out we had a big panel and artists Park and party around the exhibition. Pinch actually was not a solo exhibition there were two other artists name Martha Riyal and Kenneth Neely who were a part of that exhibition as well and it was it was a beautiful experience but I still need to get their documentary done and I still actually would love to solar show for American woman somewhere but finding a venue that actually has honestly enough room to present it in the way that I want because the Portuguese I really big. They're like six feet feet by four feet. They're all huge. There's like sixty of them and they'll be about seventy when I'm done circling around Chicago and then there's somewhere where I need to actually be able to screen the documentary so I think honestly the American woman I consider it in some ways my magnum opus but I don't want to call it back and I'm still pretty young and I don't WanNa say like Oh. This is the best thing I'll ever do. It is one of the most important things I'll ever do but it's it's still ongoing absolutely right. Now I remember I think this was maybe like early twenty eighteen or so c._N._N.. Had mentioned some news about they were coming out with a series. That was obviously very similar to yours. Yours <unk> also titled American Women. You remember that Oh yeah absolutely I do because I was really upset about it. Actually I heard about that on New Year's Day of a two thousand eighteen it was like packed twitter notifications base but people were calling me like. Did you know well really they. Were like did you know C._N._N.. Stole your project to which I was like what why let me go online and see what the hell is going on. It was very similar except of course it was populated by mainly white women. I think the only black women in it were able to do Vernon Isa Ray and the focus of it was extremely similar to my project is not the exact same Brooke Baldwin. I think her name is is the C._N._N.. New newscaster who worked on that she actually named Toronto Burke in the metoo movement or one of the infractions for her doing her series which was interesting 'cause Toronto Berg the founder of the B._B._C. Movement is in my American woman series so mainly <hes> I didn't have an issue with someone else you know exploring and talking to American woman around what is your experience Eh one in America today right. That's an ongoing conversation that I didn't start that she didn't start they is just an ongoing thing but what was just frustrating about it was that it was named the exact thing as as my project I and it's funny 'cause people more for like while you're not the first either actually I am. I the first person to ever have a theory called America Woman that Explores Women's relationship with America. It just happens that my project REC centers black women completely so you may think that I'm doing like the so called black version of something that already happened but actually I did not I I researched whether I had an original idea and in original title for months and months and months before I actually went for it because I wanted to make sure I wasn't stepping on anybody else and so I wanted to make sure I wouldn't have a have a trademark or copyright issue. The only things that were actually literally called American woman were theory of like workout videos WanNa say kind of V._H._S. thing that had they had long since abandoned their copyrights and there is a magazine called American Women Magazine so after my project a good year and a half after my project came C._N._N.'s.

American Women Magazine America Martha Riyal twitter Vernon Isa Ray Brooke Baldwin Chicago Toronto Burke Kenneth Neely Toronto Berg founder C._N._N. four feet six feet