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Netflix CEO to donate $120M to historically black colleges

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Netflix CEO to donate $120M to historically black colleges

"Netflix co founder and CEO reed Hastings and his wife Patty Quillin are donating one hundred twenty million dollars toward historically black colleges and universities it's the largest single individual gift in support of historically black schools Hastings tells CBS this morning he hopes that donation will spur others to donate the same way we realized that if we really want us to order the H. B. C. use the right way we should dig deeper and so that's where you know Patty and I wanted to really Copenhagen really started the ball rolling the money will be divided between the United Negro college fund Spelman college and Morehouse College Hastings has a history of supporting educational clauses including charter schools in twenty sixteen he launched a one hundred million dollar education fun beginning with

Netflix Patty Quillin Hastings CBS B. C. Spelman College Morehouse College Hastings Co Founder CEO Reed Hastings Copenhagen United Negro College
6 officers charged after 2 students pulled from car at protest

Glenn Beck

00:16 sec | Last month

6 officers charged after 2 students pulled from car at protest

"The officers were filmed in downtown Atlanta breaking windows of the vehicle yanking a woman out of the car and teasing a man the two the two victims were later identified as college students at Spelman and Morehouse both historically black schools and were returning from a protest calling for an end to police

Atlanta Spelman Morehouse
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 5 months ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"black school" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:43 min | 6 months ago

"black school" Discussed on WRVA

"Circles we are in fact the ma and all the places in South America with the water skiing sure people Adam about a card with the sun do any of these areas and and and and miracles we Amir the virgin Mary appeared to the still little Fatimah have family ties to the crops and that also I understand that in some of the crop circles metal you know they went in there with the metal detectors and they found the gold silver you know like the black school metals in inside the crop circles that the that will be covered in some of the crop circles in England this is so they're such a mystery was now about these crop circles and and I know that there are people who own marks are going in making humans are making the circles for the I believe that is the number of circles that are being made by humans this doesn't explain the old Walmart but not memorable crop circles I think these these things are actually being created ordinances attendance at the mansion all you know activity that's going on it so it's a form of communications and I think I think it may call back even to the you know and VS one beyond Lancey and so were were on the planet in the Pacific Ocean and some of the discoveries that are going on in in in in Antarctica which are.

South America Mary Fatimah England Walmart Lancey Pacific Ocean Antarctica Adam Amir black school
Black school officer was fired for repeating racial slur used by black student

WBBM Programming

00:24 sec | 9 months ago

Black school officer was fired for repeating racial slur used by black student

"A black security guard at a Wisconsin high school says he was fired after student used a racial slur against him and he repeated the word when he told the teenager not to use it the state journal reports Marlon Anderson says he was just trying to defend himself after disruptive student a least a number of obscenities but Madison school district officials this week said they have zero tolerance for employees saying any racial slurs Anderson says he plans

Wisconsin High School Marlon Anderson State Journal Madison School District
"black school" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:07 min | 11 months ago

"black school" Discussed on PRI's The World

"U._s. Diplomats and elected officials for years still when she was asked to help with house speaker nancy pelosi and the black caucus visit. She was surprised i just i couldn't believe she was coming. I wouldn't call it mitigation but it's just an acknowledgement. Yes this did happen and you're not crazy for thinking that this this awful thing happen. It did happen. People had seemed to deny the slave trade happened her whole life. The focus had always been on moving on. Maybe because it had to be mona grew up in segregated arkansas. She remembers her parents whispering about lynchings in the kitchen early in the mornings thinking she couldn't couldn't hear in sixth grade though she learned that there was another place where people who looked like her lived in pride not fear some visitors from tanzania. Tanzania came to her nearly all black school. This was like wow meeting. The tween to us mona's been drawn to africa ever since that day unless african americans you know something is missing and you wanna be united with it. If you have any level of awareness about your own identity where you came from you would have to start asking those questions mona something of an expert on this. She owns a tourism business for african americans traveling to ghana some african americans they have a different mindset about africa and and they think there is a much deeper brotherhood than what i think but we all have a right to handle this own way and she seen many times how powerful the experience can be people standing in the same place as their last ancestor to leave this continent. You just don't know what's going to happen once. They commotion off. We've had people mental breaks. It's tough history to confront but if you're going to acknowledge that it's been four hundred years since the first africans were forced to leave africa and arrived enslaved in america that brings up an obvious follow up question four hundred years ago. How did it start so we're gonna come back to mona but i i went to see a local historian. Who's also a former mayor of across nuts tissue people around here affectionately call him uncle nat. I asked him to go back to win. The transatlantic slave trade began uncle net explains that leaders in this region had a lot of gold and word got back to the europeans begins in the fourteen hundreds. The portuguese showed up here with guns pointed guns but guns with a hell of a difference there was already a domestic slave trade when they arrived uncle that says although slavery didn't mean what it came to mean in america enslaved people had some rights and opportunities still oh the system whereas the piano saw it and so that we can try these people in our lands in the new world but uncle nat says says the europeans weren't going out and capturing africans they couldn't they got sick and died from illnesses like malaria so some african ethnic groups went into business warring with other groups so they could capture prisoners. They sold as slaves to the europeans uncle. Nat says they were organized. Unintentional about it to pursue slavery successfully you need highly organized group because somebody has to lead an army there somebody somebody has to transport them to the selling centers auditing keep you an island into they don't revolt and then sell hello anyone could be captured and taken eventually the portuguese were replaced by the dutch than the british ghana then around the world came the abolitionist abolitionist movement the french revolution and increasing revolts by enslaved people all spreading ideas about equality and humanity when disturbed it was abolished. It was a result of long negotiations with slave owners e. europe. I swear i was live on its here. The big slaveholding nations also demanded payments..

mona europeans africa nancy pelosi nat ghana tanzania america e. europe arkansas malaria four hundred years
"black school" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"black school" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Or it's right if you want to know what to do maybe it's a bad back or mad BO and you just don't know where to go what to do where to turn to get re advice or advice is available to you right here right now here's a number in the program eight eight eight five five three seven two six two one triple eight fifty five doctor Bob that during the break we had somebody call to the show asking a question who is on a cell phone and had to go related to what it what does it mean when I have a black stool it's not normal to have a black school by the way and when you see changes in your school like that a or even a renal redness of the in the stool unless you've eaten a lot of beats lately or drink the juice should be read either but black stools main big problems usually and usually we think of black stool indicating that there's bleeding going on somewhere in the upper GI system maybe the stomach and by the time it moves all the way from the blade from the stomach to the other end to the rectal area it's oxidizing the heme of the iron in the blood is oxidizing a course that's part of the reason why the stool turns black and less you're taking ton of activated charcoal which I can't imagine any other reason why the stool would turn black and it indicates that there's a bleed going on up top and you should absolutely check into your personal doctor getting an appointment to find out where the source of that is and if you're taking anything this person who called in just a moment ago and asked my producer to have me discuss this if you're taking any kind of end said nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs aspirin or naproxen which is under the brand label a leave or ibuprofen under the brand label Motrin or other pain killing drugs or other drugs for that matter if you're on any kind of prescription drugs there could be some form of irritation gas strictly where your stomach lining shedding or bleeding and that blood is making its way to the other end and the coloration change goes from red to black as it oxidizes that is a serious problem and you should not under the five dangerous words whoever you are they called in on this maybe it will go away you should seek out a medical diagnostic evaluation as soon as possible that's a serious problem that you have on the horizon you should do something about it meanwhile evaluate whether you're taking one of these medications that can cause bleeding even if you're saying yourself while I only take a you know a baby aspirin or I take a half of an aspirin well the year it you're only bleeding half as much then as a full one because any aspirin causes bleeding small amounts or a big **** burned larger amounts sometimes up to it you know it a sixteenth or an eight or a quarter of a teaspoon depending on what drugs and how much and how often you're taking it check with your pharmacist check with your doctor that's a serious problem right and I hope I answered that question for you and I'm not meaning to scare you the black schools are absolutely abnormal like I said unless you're taking tons of activated charcoal most people don't and if it's you're seeing red in the stool that could be a bleed in the lower digestive tract maybe in the colon and that is also a serious problem could be a hammer writer terror Fisher or something else like that caused by constipation or strain or whatever it may be that over time can also cause you as the other can be anemic and create other problems for you get.

"black school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"black school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"I would bet it both of these schools, you're dealing with particularly in the predominantly black school district or area of a of a school district. You're probably dealing with black teachers and black principals who are doing most of the suspending. Got to figure out something else in grades will continue to go down spiraling downward. Let's see the bill's author previously talked about the need for building onto this highly. Subjective category. Kids are sent to an empty home with no supervision tonight valuable instructions Ivor anything see my idea was always in school suspension. But just one kid to a room not a room where you go goof around with friends, you put you put them in a room. You know, this sounds mean, but maybe about the size of a cell not a big room the size of a small bedroom. It's got a desk in there a desk clock in your books. That's what you get a desk clock and your books, and that's where you spend your school day. It's not much fun. You're not home in an empty house. It's not like, you're unsupervised. We have some sort of supervisors sitting outside these realms. But I would I put about ten of them in every school cinder block, walls, not bars like a jail cinder block walls, solid steel door. Like we have right here. And. That's where you hang out with all you have is your the only thing you can look at the clock or your books, you're going to be bored. Sooner or later, you've got gotta look at the book. Some would go it solitary confinement and say that I'm in the end with all that what I'm talking about. But I'll bet it would work button. But you Daniel. But never really in the crowd that would work pretty simply. All right. Well, we've got eight forty seven close to eight forty eight. So we'd better get a pause better. Check traffic..

predominantly black school dis Ivor Daniel
"black school" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"black school" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"So I like my skin for that reason what you'd like your skin when you love your. Skin. It's your skin. There's nothing to love about that. Even look at all. I love myself. I love my hair. I love my skin. My hair has served me. Well, I'm not an Donna of a man. So any luck? I've had and picking up the ladies I can probably attribute to my to my locks. That's my really probably my main physical gift. I don't love my hair. What do you love your hair? What what what the left does is? It is idolatry. It makes ideals at of meaningless things, and it perverts therefore, not just religion. Not just really what we talk about with idolatry. But therefore culture and therefore politics don't love your skin. Don't love your hair. Don't love yourself. When you love yourself. There's this whole movement. Now, the self the self esteem movement is what birthday, but it's the self love movement, the self care movement, and the reason that people are drawn to this is is because of a God shaped hole in your heart. I hate to use what has become a cliche, but it's because people long naturally for the transcendental for the Mets. A physical for the divine. We realized to use technical terms that in this world. Everything is contingent things decay things die nothing enduring and lasting in our physical world. And so we long for metaphysical things we longed for God, we long for the unmoved mover who is not contingent. Who is the creator of the universe? That's what we long for all of human history. Every culture every civilization has longed for that. That's a part of our human nature, and what what either of people who are trying to play. And deceive you or very ignorant people do is that they try to replace that transcendental longing with physical things they say instead of turning that love that you should have four God for the metaphysical. You should turn that in on yourself. But that is the sin of pride. I mean that is why pride is the Queen of all sins. That's why Satan falls like lightning from heaven because of the sin of pride. This is why the image that John Milton gives us. Satan is that Satan births from his own pride from his own nor schism from his own head he births sin, and then he has an incestuous relation with his Norse cystic daughter sin and that creates death. This is the image. This is what pride does it's for all of the history of our civilization. We talk about pride is the Queen of all sins that we now have pride parades not just for gay pride, but for all other sorts of pride. We now have the self love the self care self love self care, pride or as they manifest themselves in our culture, a terrible terrible thing. Don't do it. If you try to just love yourself as the be all and end, all you will hate yourself, and you will hate the world, and you'll be very miserable. If you try to be proud, you will be very miserable because pride go with before destruction and haughty spirit before a fall. These are not just words scribbled by some very old Jews this eternal and enduring wisdom this. Is why by the way, the people who engage in this race, hustling, why the people who engage in this self segregation or miserable. It's white their politics has become course and miserable. And they screech and they scream and they yell out and they wear Similac row of genitalia on their heads. It's why the left can't laugh anymore. It's white has no humor. It's because essentially there is a sin of pride that they are embracing. It's very bad. We should tell them not to do this. We should tell them that. They can't segregate themselves that they can't go off. And I'm not just talking about a black school. I'm talking about the situation that occurs threat all of our culture through these constantly dividing disparate intersectional groups, tell them no sorry ain't gonna happen. Your the color of your skin doesn't make you special. You in yourself or not perfect. You're not. You're not totally perfected. You're not utterly deserving of love. You are deflected and you therefore..

Mets Donna John Milton black school Milton
"black school" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"black school" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The building a fifty three hundred black schools across the south. There was a black monthly magazine called emerge. And it's now defunct had one issue where they ask. Various groups to respond to the following assertions. Do blacks complain about racism too, much, do black stick to themselves to black prefer welfare black less ambitious and so forth. In every case Jews were the least likely of any group, including blacks to answer true to any of those statements. Between the mid eighties and early nineties, Israel, airlifted twenty thousand black Ethiopian Jews who were suffering persecution and famine in Africa. During the nineteen sixties while many white northerners worked as freedom fighters. Those whites who went to Mississippi in sixty four to register blacks to vote three quarters of them, which us. Unlike virtually every other group in America. The more affluent one gets the more one likely to vote Republican not so with juice. The wealthier Jews. Are they? I still stay in the Democratic Party. They don't affect the Republican party the way everybody else does when they get more and more affluent. Jack Greenberg was a Jewish lawyer who worked very closely with Thurgood Marshall to help the strategy that was successful in getting the unanimous Brown v board of education case. By the way, when he check Greenberg trying to teach a course in civil rights at Harvard law student protested, arguing that only a black man should teach. That course. Thirty percent of American Muslims today are black and many of them have embraced the religion in order to reject western civilization. Western culture, western religion. I have a very good friend who changed his name and embraced Islam for that reason. And when I told him that Muslim slave traders were involved in the slave trade centuries before white. European slavers were and remain in the business much longer after white European stopped. He called me a liar. I told them to read conquest and cultures the book by Thomas soul. Here's what he wrote quote by the time the Europeans discovered the western hemisphere at the end of the fifteenth century Muslim merchants already dominated the slave trade in west Africa. If they did in east Africa and North Africa, the Islamic Jihad to the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries credit new Muslim states in west Africa, which in turn enslaved on a larger scale altogether between sixteen fifty and eighteen fifty five million slaves were shipped from west Africa alone. And while slavery ended in the west in some Islamic countries in Africa in the Middle East. Slavery lasted even longer Saudi Arabia Mauritania and sedan continued to host lays on past the middle of the twentieth century to Thomas soul. Conquest and cultures. Check it out. Larryelder throughout this holiday season. Larry is ringing the bell for the Salvation Army. Go to larryelder dot com and online red kettle banner. Go directly the team helter dot ORG..

west Africa black monthly magazine Jack Greenberg America Africa Thurgood Marshall Thomas east Africa Republican party Democratic Party North Africa Israel Middle East Mississippi Salvation Army Saudi Arabia Larry Brown Mauritania
"black school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Set the scene for those of you who, don't who haven't heard the the peace This all black school district it's unaccredited and it triggers a law that allows those kids to go to a nearby white district and that district. Cannot turn them away it has, to take them so of course the families who, moved to a white town for, a reason are not happy about these kids coming, in they hold a town hall meeting in the gym and there's a young lady I'm I was following Normandy named Maria who went to that meeting with her. Mom and intended to testify at the meeting until she hears all of these. Terrible things that these parents are saying about her and other kids like her and she loses her nerve so the. Audio. Of that tape we actually got from the local public radio station who was there covering the meeting Parents new media was there in the fact that they were willing to say these things about kids knowing that media was there tells you I. Guess how deep their feelings were, about this and that is the scene is I, mean it sounds like a mob You're and I have to think the producer Hannah Jaffe. Wall who was smart enough to know not to tell us that Mario was in the room, until you got a chance to hear, all of these white parents saying all these terrible, things and then we let you. Know that, she's there listening to this And I kept hearing over and over again from people that they felt it sounded like it was something coming from one thousand nine hundred eighty three thousand nine hundred eighty four. But the crazy thing is when we were working on that tees I was sitting in meetings just. Like that in New York for my daughter's school was also was Supposed, to have been being forcibly integrated by the in hearing white New Yorkers in Brooklyn were, extremely? Liberal saying the, exact types of things because people tend to think of Missouri is the south right it was a it was a, slave state had jury segregation and so why parents. Would come up to me after that and say I can't believe how backwards they are down there Now I can't wait thrive story about y'all There's another scene to that's I think as heartbreaking which is when you're talking with the head, of the school district and Michael Brown school. That's, actually my favorite part of the peace yeah and it's set of he's listing. All these things that they want. To do they're going to. Revitalize the school they're going to do this they're going to do that and you, just turn to him. And you go like I've heard it, before it's not gonna work and he says I know like the thing is You cannot take a school this entire school district had a ninety, five percent poverty rate. It was the poorest, most segregated school, district in the state of Missouri And, somehow think that this. Poor entirely black school district in town that had no tax base whatsoever Was going to bet if you just did a couple reforms is going to suddenly turn itself around Everyone knows that, that's a, fallacy there's not a single school district and. I asked him this and. I tell him, you know he's telling me we're going to do. This we're, going to do that and I'm like you know, that this is, not going, to work it's no there's no school district that's ever turned it around and he says you're right it's never been done Which tells us that we have just accepted that for these kids they will not, get an education and he knows that and..

black school district Michael Brown school Missouri Maria Normandy Hannah Jaffe Wall Mario producer New York Brooklyn five percent
"black school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Set the scene for those of you who, don't who haven't heard the the peace This all black school district it's unaccredited and it triggers a law that allows those kids to go to a nearby, white district and that. District cannot turn them away it, has to take them so of course the families, who moved to a white town, for a reason are not happy about these kids, come in they hold a town hall meeting in the gym and there's a young lady I was following from Normandy named Maria who went to that meeting with. Her mom and intended to testify at the meeting until she hears all of. These terrible things that these parents are saying about her and other kids like her in she loses her nerve so the? Audio. Of that tape we actually got from the local public radio station who was there covering the meeting Parents new media was there in the fact that they were willing to say these things about kids knowing that, media was there tells. You how deep their feelings were, about this and that is the scene is I, mean it sounds like a mob You're and I have to think the producer Hannah Jaffe wall who. Was smart enough to know not to tell us that Mario was in the Rome until you, got a chance to hear all of these white parents saying all these terrible, things and then we let you. Know that, she's there listening to this And I kept hearing over and over again from people that they felt it sounded like it was something coming from one thousand nine hundred eighty three or nineteen fifty four. But the crazy thing is when we were working on that piece I was sitting in meetings just. Like that in New York for my daughter's school was also was Supposed to, have been being forcibly integrated by the delete and hearing white New Yorkers in Brooklyn or, streaming? Liberal saying the, exact types of things because people tend to think of Missouri is the south right it was a it was a slave, state had the jury segregation and so why parents. Would come up to me after that and say I can't believe how backwards they are down there Now I can't wait to story about y'all There's another scene to I think as heartbreaking which is when you're talking with the head, of the school district and Michael Brown school. That's. Actually my favorite part of the peace yeah Because he's listing all these things that they. Want to do they're, going to revitalize, the school they're going to do this they're going to, do that, and you just turn to him when you go like I've heard it before it's not gonna work, and he says I know like the thing. Is You cannot take a school the entire school district had a nine five percent poverty rate. It was the poorest, most segregated school, district in the state of Missouri And somehow, think that this poor. Entirely black school district in a town that had no tax base whatsoever Was going to that if you just did a couple reforms going to suddenly turn itself around Everyone knows that that's, a fallacy, there's not a single school district and I. Asked him this and I. Tell him you, know he's telling me we're going to do this. We're going, to do that and I'm like you know that, this is not, going to, work it's no there's no school district that's ever turned it around and he says you're right it's never been done Which tells us that we have disaffected that for these kids they will not, get an education and he knows.

black school district Michael Brown school Missouri Normandy Maria Hannah Jaffe producer Rome Mario New York Brooklyn nine five percent
"black school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The scene for those of you who don't who haven't heard the the peace this all black school district it's unaccredited and it triggers a law that allows those kids to go to a nearby white district and that district cannot turn them away it has to take them so of course the families who moved to a white town for a reason are not happy about these kids coming in they hold a town hall meeting in the gym and there's a young lady i'm i was following from normandy name maria who went to that meeting with her mom and intended to testify at the meeting until she hears all of these terrible things that these parents are saying about her and other kids like her and she loses her nerve so the audio of that tape we actually got from the local public radio station who was there covering the meeting parents new media was there in the fact that they were willing to say these things about kids knowing that media was there tells you how the their feelings were about this and that is the scene is i mean it sounds like a mob you're and i have to think the producer hannah jaffe wall who was smart enough to know not to tell us that mario was in the rome until you got a chance to hear all of these white parents saying all these terrible things and then we let you know that she's there listening to this and i kept hearing over and over again from people that they felt it sounded like it was something coming from nineteen fifty three or nineteen fifty four but the crazy thing is when we were working on that piece i was sitting in meetings just like that in new york for my daughter's school was also was supposed to have been being forcibly integrated by the do we into hearing white new yorkers in brooklyn are extremely liberal saying the exact types of things because people tend to think of missouri is the south right it was a it was a slave state had to jury segregation and so why parents would come up to me after that and say i can't believe how backwards they are down there now i can't wait thrive story about y'all there's another scene to that's i think as heartbreaking which is when you're talking with the head of the school district in michael brown school that's actually my favorite part of the peace yeah it's set of he's listing all these things they want to do they're going to revitalize the school they're going to do this they're going to do that and you turn to him and you go like i've heard all this before it's not gonna work and he says i know right like the thing is you cannot take a school the entire school district had a nine five percent poverty rate it was the poorest most segregated school district in the state of missouri and somehow think that this poor entirely black school district in a town that had no tax base whatsoever was going to bet if you just did a couple reforms it's going to suddenly turn itself around everyone knows that that's a fallacy there's not a single school district and i asked him this and i tell him you know he's telling me we're going to do this we're going to do that and i might you know that this is not going to work it's no there's no school district that's ever turned it around and he says you're right it's never been done which tells us that.

black school district nine five percent
"black school" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"They're black what that'll mean anything so that means you have more likely have like a little bit of everybody that's thrown in there like if you go to harvard for example you're gonna have far more people have similar background not just race but like very particular to the background what have what type school they went to type of money their parents had all of that stuff we got a much broader range of that over at age you cultural because of what is it tracked and is not it's not really that will defined in their way so like aids about like marching bands a homecoming and all that stuff whatever and you know that's a matter of tastes like his everybody digs nobody's always argument against we we we used to play like we played i forget what team we played it was it was a it was an hp would they had they were known for for the black school and there bam just so much better so why does the difference bouncing today songs we wanna fill band today's on we need to get get twice schools and black schools at every level and i have no explanation as to why it is cool kids go into the black school bad cool kids do not go to school bed the bad camp like the american pie type situation is not that way in abc bad hp as we see you bad is totally different animal i don't know why it turns out that way and that's the look that stuff is cool and it's great to have and you don't feel like somebody's doing you a favor when they play the songs that you like it to parties stuff like that but like for me really functionally i think academe is a college are not totally overrated but i think you'll social development and growing into the person that you go and b is most important and i think it's very you're very for your.

hp black school harvard
"black school" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Listen it's not without laughs and certainly if you're fat of the actress probably gonna want to check it out it's also not very long you know you're not going in for vendors at city warriors spending an entire day by the way just the concept is it's two fathers come together for their children's wedding and then you know clash and get together and have hijinks others hijinks might be here in jake's a write off so yeah it's fine there is a show i love with glenn howard ten from always sunny in philadelphia it's called the ap bio and patton oswald is the principal on this show he does a great job and i'm very much into and i'm kinda surprised alex inc featuring zach braff who used to be in scrubs which never watched a second of scrubs he's very likable he's a podcast or who quits his radio job like we have bill and goes on to podcast to try and make money at two very good shows that i'm enjoying you should talk to one of our writers here decided named josh sora catch he has a huge fan of those shares raining about them whenever he can for ap bio we actually put up something about the young cast on the show which fields i agree they're they're wonderful you know usually you feel like young actors are a little too precocious or they hate them normally there is good as glenn howard jason and patton oswald's on the show and get so much to do it so much fun it reminds me of the kids that were in jack black school of row although better.

jake patton oswald principal zach braff jack black school glenn howard philadelphia alex josh sora ap
"black school" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"Had in lap pinon some of the same kinds of of of gear in anything that the trojans had but there was never any any a paper trail about dollars looking back do either of you think how did we not realize that the should have been integrated that we should have had one team representing our school that the status quo was untenable and and how important when brown v board was passed by the supreme court when the ruling came down how did you put that into your own historical experiences one of the things that really grabbed me was that all of our even when we had larson the after the football games or activities after the track game or any of those things all of the social activities were still separate now again that i think came down from that start of whatever that rambler thing was social activity i'm sure that as a mood forward into their little varsity as and activities they remained socially separate but the the you know it's only after the fact that you look at these things when i look at by forty nine and you will we'll annual book i can see that even the basketball team for instance the basketball players the white basketball players all were individually photographed the ramblers were autographed as a team the same way with all of the social activities that went on into school but i think to say that that that caused a problem at the time i don't believe it did that was just the way it was and that's the way that we accepted and went along with things and you know my three years at the guys school whereas great as i think that could have been if i'd have been on all black school.

black school brown larson football basketball three years
"black school" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"To go in and support the black alumni the black schools m i sacrificed a lot you know uh to pay that type of money in to pay her loans in style for her to go through these schools who support our people in you go there it's so disappointing because of money that they get there not put it to use for the students these dorms are horrible uh compared to any other schools you know especially bt and schools you know largest house schools it is for as far as dorms in the cover up and this stuff that these kids have to go through and they don't have the support of our people to help these kids who these colleges uh they got a struggle you know to get through and they don't have the support of the long night of these schools to help these kids breakthrough and stood it's almost against the kids in a penalizing the kids with these old fashioned rules that they have you know in kicking them out left in life like it's nothing it's like we supposed to be there to help these children learn and help them grown in helped him become leaders in our communities and i like i said you know all this stuff they cover up in i know that they do because like i said i worked at michigan state university out with their is the glad i was on scholarship uh and i worked there afterwards it i know how these universities cover stuff that's why i chose the black colleges for my daughters to go to reconcile blacks black students can you know dealing with issues are predominantly white institutions and universities uh but they they go to a black institution and they're dealing with the same issues and even more than where can they turn wicket black students go mm see that's the thing we need to support our black students been stood we have a lot of people that works at these universities and and and colleges that almost wiping against the kids and they do anything to cover up for these universities even sexual assault different things and in all kinds of programmes you know to.

bt michigan state university assault
"black school" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"It still not be racist then you see them fan landlines oil turnaround here because i've won ara armed speaking of food let's move on no my argument a simple like if an all black school says this is our black history month meal and put it out there i don't think you have any complaints i don't think he would yep view would because you perpetuating stereotype okay i don't the n award is awful but we always here we can say that you can't okay but the to me the in were still awful but they get a pass on it anytime we perpetuated of a stereo type of of one group of people is probably not a euro scare white man right now not look as you yourself to eat a plate full ribs and corn bread in mecca cheese looked at me think i'm afraid it free to eat a platelike then though i get either meal without fantastic now collard greens i'm not all in on but the ribs in the corn bread in the mac and cheese the red crew laid the watermelon flavored watered i mean i have flavor water all day here i bring the packets in that put an end my water it's fantastic but you're right the branding from the all not all white but predominantly y university as the black history month meal makes this racist i'm just questioning if it were in all black school and they marketed it as their black history month meal with any body of said anything yes i think that's a fair questions about out lewis said something richer speaking of other foodrelated items here buzzfeed dot com they put the study out every single year of each state's most popular food okay now the state of illinois is deep dish pizza because chicago style deep dish pizza that they're kind of deal for the second year in a row indiana was awarded the tenderloin sandwich i'm good with that yeah absolutely should we can own the tenderloin in the serb part of the the country right i mean it's it's kind of that's our signature are switchable hill now the the big the question i have always halves where's the best place to get a 100 one i'm not a big fan of like the.

black school lewis illinois indiana mecca chicago
"black school" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"black school" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The court of appeal may say hey you're or you're looking at this and we're looking at same thing and we see very differently from you congress has not authorized he if he's in violation he's inviolate he can't say congress may one day authorize it and therefore i am never able to deal with it we naturally with the judge he say so i see some weak spots on this mellon i see some soft spots on this mellon that may get the court of appeal the to bite however i would say the chances of this one of being reversed on appeal ursula i think the court of appeals going to go for one of those arguments the court appeals he's going to say this no remedy that we can fashion without intervening skin said is so intrusively into business dealings of donald trump i mean the the court of appeal could easily say this business of had he fashioned a remedy and i don't see i can fashion rimi that's a really should win litigation it's a real issue when the school bus in cases were gone crazy in the 1960s ebony allow the parents were switched telling federal judges what what would who were you who are here to be plotting out the the maps of the bus routes to empty great the schools in this area judy thank you are to get down to that level of detail were you take away from the school district the busing plan and you some unelected federal judge your now telling my kid that he's gotta go across town to go to a black school the question of fashioning a remedy and whether that it's within the courts power to fashion an effective remedy is a really big deal in the law we don't see it very often but this case you're presented it and the judge went for one triple eight three two one six thousand one.

congress donald trump black school one day
"black school" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"black school" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Power structure in this city is determined to close down black schools they are determined to to to marginalize the political space of black people and those of us on the left those of us who claimed to be progressive we understand that if we cannot protect the interests of the people who have helped lead the way for social justice in this country if we're not committed to transforming those spaces in resisting the power structure the interest of corporations to marginalize two two to destabilise communities black communities in particular we're not serious and so today's discussion is going to emerge the discussion of black political power and brown political power and i'm sure people that are aware of this and i have a dynamic guest is going to join this today justice and poverty are central to what i believe it needs to to to take place which is a multi racial coca coal listen and as black and brown people suffer at the hands of the growing police state and the disinvestment in public services as these dynamics continue to plague both communities a coalition is necessary because the same power structure that brutalizing is black bodies and its own film these are the same political structures that have been sent into brown communities to to harass and to destroy into disrupt the families that are looking to build a real life here in chicago and the united states canada coalition emerge out of common struggles and interest that can ultimately defeat systemic racism that's the big question are there examples of how black and brown folks have served in work together to advance common interests kim black and brown people fight a common enemy or will the enemy of both divide them and the reason why raise these questions the lines are available to you seven seven three seven six 392 78 because it was the first daily amid administration that new the threat of such a coalition he quickly moved to repress this coalition as the chicago police department played a part in shutting down the breakfast programmes putting pressure.

social justice public services chicago united states chicago police department canada kim black
"black school" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"black school" Discussed on Revisionist History

"That was a policy in the school board he can do nothing about it you know he could no way he could not enroll lending in that school without their pre all the black families got the same answer your child is not welcome so the local in aa cp chapter sued the school board alva brown's name was put first brown versus to peak abortive education it was bundled with a number of other desegregation cases from all around the country more than two hundred plaintiffs in all when all the way to the supreme court and on may seventeenth nineteen fifty four in one of the most famous legal decisions in american history the court ruled in oliver brown's favor the practice of educating black and white school children separately was ruled unconstitutional grid worker you're not a look deeply you're an out rewarded laudable lying work were killed foot or road want them all the problem i love or on not second glare thirdly here a third regurgitation good big conflict than any longer with the law of the country i'm guessing you were taught about the brown decision in school or of watched a documentary on it it's a milestone but at the same time it's a strange case you could fill an auditorium with all the scholars who have a coralie brown i mean just go back and read it it's supposed to be a ruling in favor of oliver in lille the brown and families of two peca but the court actually says something entirely different from what the black people of to pico were saying i wear q veil school period of the firm bring your way through eight listen again to leila brown's interview with the kansas state historical society on several occasions leila is asked about monroe the black school that her daughter been attending leila grew up in topeka she went to monroe's well and leila brown makes it very clear that she loved monroe run all of this wonderful i think nearly work for a had it not been throw this.

oliver brown regurgitation lille leila brown kansas topeka monroe aa cp alva brown pico black school