22 Burst results for "Black Power Movement"

"black power movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:32 min | 7 months ago

"black power movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The late 19 sixties by these UC Berkeley activists, who are also inspired by the Black Power movement, and The Vietnam War protest movement, and that part of history can also just motivate Asians, You know that we don't come from a model minority. History, but I love that is, ah, lot of that. It is a race, you know, And I think it's what people don't know about Model minority is that it's very much An engineered stereotype. This is the thing you blew my mind when you wrote that explain that for our listeners. Okay, so from the Chinese Exclusion Act 1 18 eighties was the first race based immigration ban that outlaw Chinese people from coming into the US that had a lot to do with economic anxiety because white people thought Chinese people were taking their jobs, so they banter knees from coming into that country. That damned expanded to all of Asia, you know, and then expanded to Africa and Latin America, and only a sliver of northern Europeans were really allowed into the U. S. So, basically what it Woz was segregation on a global scale so that the U. S would remain 80% White and the 20% were like black and other minorities. 1965. There was an act called the Heart Seller Law. This was a law passed by Lyndon Johnson, which actually lifted that immigration ban right? And the reason why he had that lifted that And in the first place was part of it was because of the civil rights movement. It was because the Jim Crow laws and all of that was embarrassing for American public image. But even after they lifted that ban, there was still just a quota of Asians who could get it. And the quota was Asians who were it was like the smartest of the East agents were engineers, doctors. So it wasn't like so they do this minority group that is incredibly successful, but that's already it's successful. So they were already these immigrants were already successful. By the time they came into the U. S. But the American myth is that Oh, wait, Look at these immigrants. They're successful, and then they go to like and then to black and brown people. They're like, Why can't you be successful? Like eight? These Asian immigrants and like Well, that doctor was already a doctor. By the time he came into the U. S. Yeah, well, and this is just the like. This is the insidious nous of white supremacy. It's not just in your face racism. It is this cunning in which one group was put up against another. Yeah. Wow. The dominant white power structure gets to laugh at all of us like it is. It is crafty and sneaky. Yeah, yeah, it is. It is very sneaky, and it's still and it's hard to I don't know. It's hard to break down, but we're trying. I guess we got to. We have to. Yeah. You know, there was a time in your career that you wrote about when you didn't want to write about race. And now you really do what changed? I always actually I Could say my poetry books all have to do with race. But the way I doubt with it was not autobiographical. It was more surreal, more fantastical I always use even though I was a poet. I always use sort of These fictional personas, but I think it was when I became a mother. You know, I had my daughter was in 2014. E think that was a real pivotal moment. You know where I thought I'm in a position of authority. I'll have to be a role model to my daughter and You know, when I found out that I was going to have a girl? I was scared. I have to say because I had a I had a childhood. A bad childhood right about Yeah, I think some of it. Yeah, but some of it at all, but on and I was like, I don't You know, when I was very, very insecure, you know, and it took me a long time to get over my insecurities. And I was like, I don't want my daughter to feel that way. I want her to be confident. I want her to feel comfortable in her skin. And so I was nervous for her and And I think that was what sort of motivated me to write this book in a way that was actually very personal, autobiographical and vulnerable. I've never written a book like that before, And it was quite scary For that reason I looked. I hope so. Thank you. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders coming up more with author Kathy Park Hong Stay with us. Peter Sagal on this week's Wait, Wait. We meet a master of disguise and disguised master actor, Plus Christine Baranski croons five seconds of San Time. Join us for the news quiz from NPR. Wait, wait. Don't tell me coming up at 11 o'clock this morning. You can catch the program. Wait, wait. Don't tell me 10 o'clock Sunday mornings. On KQED Public radio, where support comes from the San Francisco Museum of Modern.

Asia Christine Baranski US Lyndon Johnson Black Power movement NPR Berkeley Heart Seller Law Africa Jim Crow San Time Peter Sagal KQED Sam Sanders Latin America San Francisco Museum of Modern Kathy Park Hong Stay
"black power movement" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

05:06 min | 10 months ago

"black power movement" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"You can be persecuted in various ways ostracized from your community. No one wants to be called racist and Americans of all people they don't like racism. We despised that we find it repugnant and we don't want to be called racist and we know there's there's real punishment for that and of course, whatever racism means that's an interesting question that. The, right needs to get clear on everything's being called racist this point. So. So you know we were afraid of being called racist. So, what does the Olympic we'll blacklist matter comes in. And they of course, the name itself right is Genius I. Are you against Black Lives? Do you think black lives don't matter of course? Not We're Americans. We think we're all created equal all lives matter. So therefore, black lives would be part of that. But what they do with the name itself, and then with their tactics is say, well, here's the problem. It's not just one or two people being racist it's whole system that's racist and if that's true, then that system has to change and they do this with the language of the Civil Rights Movement. But of course, the problem is they do not believe in the. Principles that the civil rights movement as elucidated in Martin Luther King's famous speeches. For instance You know everyone's mind they don't believe in that at all they they have a a racial is view of justice. They want law take race into account. They don't want equality under the law Their policies are very much about re undermining the system as it exists and People. people roll their eyes. When you say it, I don't know why they're actual children of the of the Marxist of the sixties and Seventies. Airs the Black Power Movement and what they want is is really a kind of wild and Kooky racial version of of Marxism Communism. And they they don't make no bones about this and yet we're we're supposed to cower in fear because we don't want to be called racist by them and you see this especially, I have to say with politicians politicians who should know better on the right who are very quiet throughout the events of the summer because they were unwilling to come. Out and say, of course I believe that black lives matter because I believe that all lives matter because American but this organization black lives matter is a different thing and in fact, they believe in some evil ideas that the rest of us don't believe.

Civil Rights Movement Black Power Movement Martin Luther King
"black power movement" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"black power movement" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"A part of. This white noise that. That lease folks is blank right it's not Doesn't force them to do much. I'm sorry. No No. Don't apologize I mean. There's something in that emotion that you're expressing just the the literal feelings that that are bubbling up that like come through in. So many a Baldwin's writings, right? Like he he had so much emotion packed into. What he was saying because of the things he was seeing Ray and He was angry. and I wonder what you make of. What you make of that anger and How it related to the country's anger I mean was he channeling it? You know in an interview in nineteen, Sixty, eight in esquire. The reporter is asking him. How do we get black people to cool it? He says, is not for them to get. It's not for us to co- is she dying? But Archie the ones dying he responds now we're just the ones dime the fastest. Reported quite get what he was saying. we tend to think of the Black Power Movement and the civil rights movement as if they were wholly separate. As. If The people who inhabit black power who advocated for Black Power Warrant, at some point risking their lives just a few years earlier engaged in nonviolent protests itself. So the Carmichael was one of the most brilliant ought nonviolent or was in the movement. What happened to our? Right John Lewis wasn't just simply this.

Black Power Movement Ray Baldwin Archie John Lewis esquire Carmichael reporter
"black power movement" Discussed on The Dignified Bastard

The Dignified Bastard

05:46 min | 11 months ago

"black power movement" Discussed on The Dignified Bastard

"I was a kid I was like. Dude, you know. Everything about that movie is so unique to that movie. You did what I'm saying like they're never be to book with as a movie they won't. They're never be able to do that. How dare them? Even who I've been weather makes it up in Hollywood. Should be slapped across the face by every. Be Actress Actors, out. No but seriously. In preparation you know Prince gave you him. In all of his corks, his crazy quirks he gave all of that. You know. And there was no reservation about it gave it all up freely. Freely man. In and just let me just be careful with saying you know. Okay. Thank freely be own person be unilateral what they you is as opposed to you know. Comment you know. Ideologies or whatever. You know. Be You. You know. But no like. What I want to say, you know to to people who? You know. Might Find Fault with that. And say that will you know everything? She had limits of course because you don't want somebody. Be You know quote unquote independent free thinker, Blah Blah Blah, Blah Blah whatever, and they're behaving in a manner where they're putting somebody engage. You know already messed with somebody kids no no I'm not I'm definitely I'm definitely not on the side of that. As far as you know, the the free thinking independently type deals going on. No Sir. You know. Saying as long as the people are a asset to our community. And as. You know. That that is then and only then the. You know. Those detrimental folks. Can't can't do to can't do too much that can't do any of that actually. Can do any of that. Because that's how you build a community. You know. Behavior. that. There's going to be A A sore spot for the community has to be it has to be gone. Be Gone. Like I said. In regards to banking. Freely. Whatever You know short for our community in this is been. A struggle because like I said, we've been shown how to even see ourselves. You know. So. A lot of people always say. Well you know Our or life. Imitates Art. And then you know other people I know are actually imitates lying. You know it's it. Of course, it can be both ways. You know in this dualistic Reality that we live in. You know. We make what's popular to them around to is she? No so We forget about the. We forget about the the. Power we have. You know as far as numbers Sir. You know. Won't be all rally behind something. You know. We rally behind something. Will Be. We get a bunch of us going in the right direction or you know in a certain direction. You know we were forced to be reckoned with. You know I e the civil rights movement, I, e, the Black Power Movement, I e the. Black Nationalist Party. When we start going aiming. Star going together..

Prince Hollywood Black Power Movement Nationalist Party
"black power movement" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on The Daily

"So quite literally. There's a straight line between the seen. What happened on that bridge? And something John Lewis News would be so powerful, the concept of nonviolent suffering and the legislative remedy back in Washington, that resulted. Yes, because the world has seen this happen, right? Yeah I. Think so, but also you know you begin to see you know. The sort of apex of this method really is sixty, five sixty six, and at some point then. John is replaced in the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee Presidency by certainly Carmichael. Of fiery orator and one of the primary of the Black Power Movement. That was more consistent. With the emerging radicalism of the time. And, that was the movement that you felt a part of. This when we came into the story you. On some level you and your cohort must have thought that this approach. The John Lewis Approach had limitations given that by the time you were a teenager or maybe even entering your early twenties, there was this new philosophy taking hold of of a more elbows out less restrained. Approach so, so how do you think about that well? You know it's interesting, and I do think about. What had happened really is. Every, generation until advocates itself. Thanks it's experiences unique. So. We thought we were unique. You know my cousins and I and we had our big meetings. We have press conferences and you know. You have a different rhetorical stance. But in the end. The tools were exactly the same. The tools were the sin of the administration build. The tool was the sit in in the street that ran through campus. The to was building takeover. These were the same tools man. We had bigger hair. Right and you picture, absolutely please do. I could head? But, if you look back on the tools with a saying. It was a it was a foundation that had already been built. Even if you didn't see it that way at the time, even if you didn't know it, you know what I'm saying gave you didn't know. I keep going back to this point. Earlier in the story when they were doing the freedom rides in nineteen, sixty one, they had a big Chinese dinner in Washington that people were going on these freedom rods and a lot of people road. There will wills because they thought they'd be killed, but she has to be killed and never come back. and they refer to the meal Chinese restaurant as the Last Supper. So these people were willing to put their lives on. The line were willing to accept. The possibility that they would be killed in the pursuit of justice, and that that dead bodies laying out in public would be. Part of a sacrifice that would advance the cause of justice. At. Profound So with all that in mind Brad income. How are you thinking about John Lewis has legacy at this as we talk in the middle of yet another critical moment in this movement, and when the work is still understood to be very unfinished. You know John Lewis in. Waning days of his life was. Heartened overjoyed to see the global protests that unfolded. After killing Mr, floyd? He talked about it. As part of the extension of his work in one of the things, he said essentially paraphrasing, he said things a box now. He said there's no going back from this. In, what about the principles of his life? How are you thinking about? Those in this moment. Well I think that. Is You see? His point of view was born out. The other day, The New York Times had a story. In which it had sixty four examples. Trivial examples of police brutalizing peaceful demonstrators. Right now, what is that? What that is. Is What John was talking about he was talking about. This kind of injustice perpetrated on people who did not deserve it. Did Not warrant that kind of treatment. And also we've been seeing. In this unfolding of the floyd protests. In a repeated theme with new stories. White suburbanites? Middle class white people. WHO! Supported the police unquestioningly. Right, They have changed their minds. Berle, persuasive thing is seeing people walking around on the street. Signs unarmed, not doing anything untoward and be. Brutalized, that turns out to be the most persuasive thing for society, and for the people to whom it is happening. They'll resist. Resist how. This. Other words we are again. Seeing this idea of the beloved community playing out the Gandhian Philosophy, biblical approach the described. It's where it's working. It's painfully working again. Yes, it's painful. Lord knows it is the same, but. He, abuse! Of the people in Public People's constitutional rights. You know through violent spy. Police organizations as broad rippling consequences is having broad rippling consequences. It's beyond the people. Will you beat up now? Don't have confidence in the police. and John saw..

John Lewis Black Power Movement floyd Washington Carmichael Lord Brad Berle The New York Times
"black power movement" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Tom Timing. The black power movement ahead so much potential on energie. The civil rights movement led to the Civil Rights Act the Voting Rights Act. How do we had? We learned from those movements to make sure what we're doing. Today's successful. I think what we learn is that we need multiple kinds of leadership. And they all help us. I was a girl during the civil rights movement, and I knew it was important, and my parents were certainly very much embracing of it, but I came out of college into the Black Power Movement, and it energizes me in a way that the civil rights movement had not. There was an edge to it. There was an anger about it. There was A. A stance of real respect. And ownership and confidence, which is was much more consistent with how I thought we ought to be in the world. And there was. I'M NOT GONNA. Take it anymore about it. and there was a rejection in some ways of nonviolence as a way to express the confidence that people were feeling. All of it was important. The civil rights movement was important. The violent aspect of it was important. The black power was important. The race fist is important that some people are willing to put their lives on the line. That's important to change doesn't just happen. It takes strategy. It takes commitment it takes organizing. It takes being willing to raise a fist. It takes people who are willing to put their bodies on the line. It takes people who are willing to insult in scream, and it also takes people who willing to compromise. Compromise a little bit into into draw. People in who you think could never be drawn in, and we just have to accept it all. That needs to happen, and you can't orchestrate it. I mean the people who want change now aren't going to just turn around and start singing. The praises for people who said I've got patience and I can wake the change in twenty years the anger. All of that is part of what happens, and if you have a place where you can plug in plug.

Black Power Movement Tom Timing
Fuelling Change

PODSHIP EARTH

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Fuelling Change

"From the moment that I came out of college and I came out of college into the Black, power movement. I knew that I wanted to devote my life to try to advance racial justice. Achieve Racial Justice and I've had a lot of different opportunities to do that. So my whole adult life has been devoted to this, but it's only been in recent years that I have come to the conclusion that so many of the systems and attitudes that hold us back as a nation in terms of being able to be fully inclusive. We're never set up for that goal and reform efforts two years ago, policy link had one of its summits, and the theme was our power, our future, our nation. We were trying to make the point in two thousand eighteen. Really did have the power to try to achieve what we wanted. That the future will be determined by what happens to the very people who are being left behind and that we need to stop standing on the side of the nation. Mentally thinking about what it needs to do NCI. Selves as leaders to do it. And my opening talk was called radical imagination fueling change, and really was trying to set a tone that says. It is within our imaginations to visualize what it is. We need and we need to use that as our North Star. So that even if we're just doing reform efforts, we know that the reform is not winning. It has to be a step in the direction of annual star. and to turn things upside down in terms of how we think about change. Standing that we will not achieve health through the provision of healthcare. It's essential but insufficient. We need healthy communities. We need healthy environments. We need access to food. We need incomes that allow people to be able to live with dignity to understand. Providing healthcare doesn't achieve wellbeing. That, we can't solve our housing problems just by building more housing. We need to rethink housing because we have a Lotta. Empty housing around with the structure of how we think about housing allows for Empty Housing and homelessness to exist side by side. We need to begin to think of housing as a human right, and also lifted up the notion that we cannot arrest ourselves to safety that police are not what we need to build safe communities. We need to think about getting rid of police and asking ourselves. What do we need for the safety that we? We want. It takes trust it takes familiarity. It takes a whole lot of things that have nothing to do with policing in so back in two thousand eighteen I never expected this. Those ideas would now be and center so when we started the podcast a year ago, little less, we just picked up on those things that we were moving forward, and it has been really interesting to find the advocates all across the country, and to tell their stories, and to lift up their solutions, and now seeing them out there on the streets of the nation leading change. It's amazing to see. That transformation and maybe kind of recount. The the history of why do we have police I think we'll take? Police grinded just saying we're not GONNA arrest our way to safety. Why do we even have a police force? When I decided to do the podcast on police abolition? Educate myself and what I discovered. Is that police in the south started to catch runaway slaves? That's how they developed. Developed that police in the northeast started to hold down the demands and activities of labor in the southwest. It was the Texas Rangers Oh, and we know what they were doing. And yet we have taken these systems that were all about contain and control, and we tried to turn it into the mechanism, but community safety and wellbeing, and it's ridiculous. What we really need to ask is what. What do we want and then think about who can do it? We know that we have a mental health problem that keeps presenting itself to the police over half of the police killings in the nation or of people who have mental health problems, and yet we're not turn to mental health professionals to deal with that, which trained police how to respond when there's a mental health emergency and. And then not getting it obviously that we know that young people don't have enough to do, and we give police money for things like midnight, basketball and other kind of sports programs for young people, and yet we have neighborhood associations. We have boys and girls clubs. We have organizations that are there to engage young people who are strapped for resources and going out of business every day. When we think about domestic violence, a lot of domestic violence requires a number of mentions that have nothing to do with policing and so moving from understanding. Why did this institution develop in the first place to asking? Is this the institution for the goals that we now in modern day see that we need and thinking about using our budgets so that we are really as municipalities and other regions investing the resources where they really you're gonNA. Make the difference that lead to wellbeing that to safety,

Texas Rangers Basketball North Star NCI
"black power movement" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The class of two thousand, twenty, nearly three point, seven million high school graduates are stepping out into the world and into a workforce, educational and political landscapes that are utterly different than they were just three months ago, so this hour on point we'll be talking to members of the High School Class of two thousand twenty about what it feels like to go through a momentous life transition in a country that is also experiencing a transformation as well. And with us to help guide. The way is sandy banks. She is a columnist at the Los Angeles Times. We talked with her last week and wanted to have her back because as both a columnist Anna mother, she's shared a lot of wisdom with young people so Sandy. Welcome back to the program. Thank you very much. So your first thoughts from her for high school grads for the high school class of two. Thousand Twenty. First thoughts I can't imagine being in their shoes honestly when I think back to my graduation, our kids registration and all of the rituals that are associated with it in how much you invest in those rituals and. That seems to me in can't wait to hear from the students, but it seems that loss rituals is really important, even something as simple as senior ditch day. You know you cannot senior ditch day when you're at home. Anyway, the prom the walking across the stage and it happened so abruptly. Nobody got to plan for it, so I can just imagine that that they're feeling a sense of loss in a sense of uncertainty, inner sense of being cheated. and. It's really gratifying to hear all these words of encouragement for people who are saying look forward. Look at how well you're prepared to go into this world. But I I have to think it must be like really scary world now Mary unpredictable. So. I have a nephew who's graduating, and he has so look forward that into Morehouse, and he's lived all of his life. His parents are Stanford professors. He's lived all his life in this. Cocoon in Palo Alto. He's been just so thrilled. It couldn't wait to head on. And now instead he'll be probably taking a gap year. which you know, a lot of kids are because they're not sure if the school's going to be. Just, online and online is these graduates. No is no substitute for being on a campus with your peers in your friends and your teachers, so I. Just you know my heart breaks for them and I do think that there will be some positives to come out of this and I want to talk about those today when. I'd like to hear from STU, yeah. We've we and we will from quite a few of them in in just a moment, but Sandy. I was thinking about how when I graduated from High School in. Nineteen Ninety, Blah Blah Blah Blah. It seemed like I looking back. I was so blissfully and fortunately naive right. It was a relatively effortless transition for me. There was a far less aware then I would say most, if not all of young people are today about the challenges and the complexities of the world I was stepping into because I don't think it was as challenging and complex, so in terms of the the good things that that might happen in this world of Of Pain actually is I. Wonder if if kids are stepping out in kids, kids if teens are stepping out into the world. In a sense. More resilient or better prepared to handle all. That's going to be thrown at them. I think you're right I think they've had to build resiliency just through these last few months. Yes, and when I think back to my graduation, mind was in seventy bubble the. It was. Kind of the height of the Black Power Movement, I was a black student of black school and I remember. We couldn't wait to get to college because that's when you could get involved. You couldn't do much cold student, but the college campuses were all washing protests, and we were looking forward to getting there joining that, but these students have seen this happening in the streets, and in their neighborhoods and their schools, and so I think they do. They are much more sophisticated about this. We were at graduation and I think they'll find ways to contribute into to be part of this changes. It's going on invoice. That'll be probably more satisfying and more More. Consequential than it was when we were in school, so yeah, you're right I. think that there's a there are. Good things we will benefit from them in ways that we might not have right and also at the same time, not to be naive about the scale of the challenges that these young people are going to be facing, but let's hear from them, so joining us now from Hazleton Pennsylvania is Rafael. Is graduating from Washington, Heights Expeditionary Learning School in New York. City is the president student government there and he plans to attend saint. Lawrence University in new. York Rafael Welcome to point. Thank you, thank you, hello, everyone and congratulations hearty congratulations to you. What are the past couple of months? Though been like in your senior year of high. School. Well, to be honest. They definitely been rough whether it's academic. Packing up at just the current events right now are just something you know. It's been difficult to work through, but it's definitely been an obstacle that I'm sure everybody's pushing through right now. Now Are you going to have an in person or virtual graduation?.

High School Class Sandy High School Los Angeles Times black school Anna mother Heights Expeditionary Learning Palo Alto Morehouse Black Power Movement Stanford Mary Lawrence University York Hazleton Pennsylvania president Washington New York
"black power movement" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"An anthropologist Ruth Benedict. Who wrote a book Race Science and society, and she defined racism as the unproven biological superiority group over another, but what was happening with Ruth Benedict in some of her colleagues who were challenging Eugenicist at time eugenicist. who were saying that you know black people, I wish people are talion people people. All these non-anglo-saxon riots were genetically inferior. They were also making a case or believing that. were. Distinctions in cultural hierarchies, so in other words they were rejecting notions of biological hierarchy. But accepting that certain racial groups cultures were inferior that there wasn't such thing a civilized people, and then they're also beliefs that certain racial groups were behaviorally Syria. Can I ask you really quick how it? Behavioral differences differ from. Cultural differences yeah, sure I mean that's a great question. So groups sort of practice, culture and humans, practice behavior, and so what I mean by humans, practice behavior. SCHUMAN's loves, but depending on your culture. You'RE GONNA. Love Different, and so love looks differently. You know based on different cultures, but it's still love is so what happens is every one of us sort of says that I'm going to assess love from my cultural standards in another culture is in loving the way that I am or my group is than they are inferior. Or medically every group is going to even fewer to your own. And I think it's critical for us to think about behavior in the same way we think about biology would pretty much all the same biologically and behavioral, but there are cultural differences, but we should be willing and able to recognize that difference and basically level that difference and so that's not what Ruth Benedict in. Some of her colleagues were doing they were not. Leveling. Difference, and and it wasn't until really the sixties. By the Black Power Movement and the Brown power, movement you have black people. Saying things like black is beautiful, and you know White America. Stopped trying to get us to simulate into your culture or cultures, just as valuable as yours that people started rejecting those anthropologists who were saying you know what the only form of racism is when we speak about genetic I.

Ruth Benedict Black Power Movement Eugenicist Syria SCHUMAN
"black power movement" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"An anthropologist Ruth Benedict. Who wrote a book race? Science and society and she defined racism as the unproven biological superiority, one group over another, but what was happening with Ruth Benedict in some of her colleagues, who were challenging, eugenicist time eugenicist. who were saying that you know black people? I wish people are talion people people. All these non-anglo-saxon riots were genetically inferior. They were also making a case or believing that. There were. Distinctions in cultural hierarchies, so in other words they were rejecting notions of biological hierarchy, but accepting that certain racial groups cultures were inferior that there wasn't such thing a civilized people, and then they're also beliefs that certain racial groups were behaviorally Syria. Can I ask you really quick how it? Behavioral differences differ from. Cultural differences. Yeah, sure I mean that's a great question. So groups sort of practice, culture and humans, practice behavior, and so what I mean by humans, practice behavior. SCHUMAN's loves but depending on your culture. You'RE GONNA love different, and so love looks differently. You know based on different cultures, but it's still love is so what happens is every one of us. Sort of says that I'm going to assess love from my cultural standards in another culture is in loving the way that I am or my group is than they are inferior. Or, medically, every group is going to even fewer to your own. And I think it's critical for us to think about behavior in the same way we think about biology would pretty much all the same biologically and behavioral, but there are cultural differences, but we should be willing and able to recognize that difference and basically level that difference, and so that's not what Ruth Benedict in. Some of our colleagues were doing. They were not. Leveling cultural difference, and and it wasn't until really the sixties. By the Black Power Movement and the Brown Power Movement you have black people. Saying things like black is beautiful and you know White America. Stopped trying to get us to simulate into your culture or cultures, just as valuable as yours that people started rejecting those anthropologists who were saying you know what the only form of racism is when we speak about genetic I.

Ruth Benedict Black Power Movement Syria Brown Power Movement SCHUMAN eugenicist.
A conversation about race, privilege and making space

Unreserved

05:33 min | 1 year ago

A conversation about race, privilege and making space

"Watch a dot. Say Nin, hello, and welcome this unreserved on CBC Radio One I'm Rosanna dare child. In October of two thousand and eighteen I moderated, a panel called inside outside at six degrees held at the art gallery of Ontario. It's an event that invites authors, academics, politicians, and big thinkers together to discuss pressing issues. And Right, now there is one issue that has captured the world's attention. The death of George Floyd a forty six year, old, black man and in Minneapolis police officer now charged with second degree murder. His death was witnessed around the world and sparked support for the black lives matter movement with protests from Merika to Australia. We are at a turning point in our history, so we thought it was a perfect time to revisit this conversation. Today on unreserved. We're talking about power, privilege and asking. How willing are we to make meaningful change? Joining me on stage, our Alexis McGill Johnson of the perception institute. Is Your allure author speaker and Internet yeller not to know bed. National Inuit leader and president of new tap read Cana Tommy and Sassy assassin professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Okay so I'm afternoon. We're going to have a conversation around place. Power Privilege, who hasn't who doesn't and perhaps more importantly how we are shifting to create new spaces. I want to start with of course are beautiful panelists here? I want to ask you first of all to tell US share with us. Where you come from because as my elders teach, you cannot know where you're going until you know where you've come from. or at least that's what my mother would say when she sent me to the store. my first question to each of the panelists are what is the place that you come from? Perhaps we'll start with me. Thank you very much I guess I'm still trying to figure that one out. I. I thought I came from Canada. I was the young person and I'm not quite sure if that's the right. Way To think about where I'm from now. Nuts. which is. A region in new one of our four regions northern Labrador and we very recently got self-government, two thousand and five. But I grew up. There I also grew up in the United States I I grew up. Kind of between a lot of different worlds so I, Can i? Also say that I'm a global citizen as well so I am the national leader I am in Okinawa proud indigenous person. But it doesn't. Then, take back any of the other parts of me, that exist as well and I'm I'm comfortable insertive in that space, and I think that is sometimes confusing to the rest of the world that I have not indigenous ancestry as well that my mother is none dishes. That's fine and getting the acceptance from. Canada and North America that I can be indigenous, but I can also have non indigenous parts. That is a part of this power dynamic that I hope that we can discuss this afternoon about assertiveness in. Indigenous. Without the. The qualifiers that indigenous people put on us. And if we don't fit into those myriad of boxes than we somehow lose all of our rights altogether. And we will get into that because that is an interesting place of privilege to. TRY TO KICK doors. Down into so that we're GONNA. Wait to Alexa. So, we're my from. Kind of like to say I'm from a period of time. I was I was born in Nineteen, seventy two, which is important to me as a social identity really. but it's important for me. Because it was, it was halfway I was born kind of right in the middle of a post wave, second wave, feminism, and the Black Power Movement and my parents, both particularly my mother lived at the intersection of both of those movements growing up. She was incredibly active as a woman is. She, she had US marching in in our Shakey's an Afro puffs as as children I'm pretty sure I learned the words to. We shall overcome before I learned the US pledge of allegiance. My choice of professional careers always been trying to to understand interrogate these these. Frameworks power and Privilege Ed. I studied political science. Which I think is a study of power. But have found myself now consistently in these rooms, as one of few one of only, if not the only woman woman of Color, and so I've been this bridge I think kind of connecting. Connecting the dots in a lot of different iterations from a cultural perspective where I've worked with a number of artists and democratic organizations, organizing young people to the current work that we do have perception which is around translating the science of our brains and bodies understand difference in how we connect to each other in those ways.

United States Canada CBC George Floyd Shakey Black Power Movement Minneapolis Ontario Second Degree Murder Alexis Mcgill Johnson Australia Alexa Perception Institute Officer North America National Inuit Labrador Okinawa Columbia University Professor Of Sociology
"black power movement" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on In The Thick

"And what they're doing is organizing to pay restaurants for bulk mail orders and then they take those orders and coordinate to donate the food to essential workers across the city particularly medical workers and this is the kind of response and I'm seeing a lot across the country in my reporting is folks are not waiting for local action. They're not waiting for official response. You know some states you do see a lot of support from the governor from the mayor other other states is just complete crickets but whatever the case communities know what they need yeah and as long as there are people willing to step up say look. Let's just figure out what we need here. And whether that is in direct response to fear racism or it's just taking care of your people that work is always happening and it's happening now more than ever and that I think is just a real source of strength and another example that we can follow as an alternative to what we're hearing from the top. Yeah so we did talk about this. At the beginning of the show you know. The importance of acknowledging that Asian American is a broad term represents dozens of different ethnic identities languages and walks of life. But you know activists and academics. They trace the origins of the term to nineteen sixty eight a historic year in the world. Where students at CAL Berkeley there? You Go Jayme. We're inspired by the Black Power Movement. And it's a real protest against the Vietnam War movement like this. It seems so important right to join the Justice League Justice League and Organiz to protect our communities. So WanNA bring one example of an elected official Congresswoman Grace Meng who is the first Asian American to represent New York in the House of Representatives up. That's what's up her home. Borough of Queens has been hit especially hard by the virus but also had to contend with the discrimination that continues so in early May she introduced legislation to provide greater federal oversight over the hate crimes related to cove nineteen and she participated in. Nbc News Townhall and said this and another way that we can combat. This discrimination is to continue to reach out into build the coalitions that our communities have been building. is sponsored a resolution off condemning anti Asian sentiments on during this virus and I WANNA commend chairwoman. Too because within days she reached out to the chairs of the other caucuses the Blackhawks Hispanic caucus on worked with Chairman Hooking Jeffries of our entire Democratic Caucus and put together a press conference so we could show that our communities are mutually supporting each other standing up for each other and condemning. Hate so Erica for community. That has sometimes unfairly been painted. As an I hate to over generalize this but as keeping its head down right you know the model minority. Say say at be the model minority. Don't speak up like you have it. Good yeah do you think like? We're witnessing a little bit of a political awakening. What does it mean right when it comes down to coalition building with other groups? Which is what representative. Mang was talking about. Yeah that's great question and you know. Another part of the diversity of Asian America is generational right so my family goes back to eighteen fifty two and before one thousand nine hundred sixty five a us. Born Asian Americans were the majority of US Asian American population and now it's largely immigrant first generation so many may not have ever heard of the Third World Strikes Liberation Movement the started at SF state in Berkeley. They may not know about you. Know where this term Asian American came from. They may not know their history right like they may think that. This is the first time that we're going to need to you. Know to rise up. And that's unfortunate because we absolutely have to draw strength on where we came from. How previous generations cracked through that ceiling alongside African Americans indigenous peoples? Lgbtq LAT next you know. These are all bound together. And you know moving forward. This is not just an Asian American problem. This four Asian Americans. A phobia that hate crimes. That is what we may be focusing on but we have to understand that this is just the expression of white supremacy that the pandemic has played out for for our community for others. It's about disproportionately being unemployed. Health disparities that also impact Asian Americans as well right. But it's just that we have to see this all interconnected. We have to see how the Chinese virus the ask. China the rhetoric that is coming from the White House today. It's not only part of a longer history that's treated asian-americans as outsiders. That kind of rhetoric has the news to de-legitimize all peoples of color. I think about how last summer in talking about how president trump told Alexandria. Cousy Cortez Rashida by unimpressed. One hundred to go back. Go back and fix that. Help fix what whatever said the totally broken crime infested places. You know we're all being impacted. We're being impacted in sometimes similar ways sometimes in different ways so I hope that yes as there seems to be a new and energetic response that it both looks back for strength and also looks across and connects to other communities to be able to move forward together. Okay so let's move on to our final segment which we call Cova Kobe. So James I'm just wondering and you Erica to for you. What are moments of hope? What are things that you're holding onto from your own experience? That's helping you get through this really scary time. We'll start with you James so Asian Pacific American heritage month and I think for a lot of us when our communities are signed a month. Sometimes IT GETS. You know it's we feel you. You can feel like it's a routine some time you're used to hearing the voices the same themes and you're like man. Can we just break this conversation a little bit and just like? Let's diversify within while we have the spotlight and one thing that I feel very inspired by is what's happening because this Asian Pacific American heritage month is taking place during the pandemic during shelter in place. Everyone's taking their stuff online. And there's so many different kinds of townhall venues discussion panels meet up groups ways of supporting each other. That we're getting to see what other folks like ourselves or even folks who are very different with employees different circumstances in other neighborhoods across the country. What are they experiencing? What are they asking? What are they demanding right? And how do they live and that is to me? It is different. It's different than looking up to like kind of what the national message. It's getting a chance to look around. And then directly engaged with people from all over the country from different communities of color and then because it's all online make a lot of connections couldn't make before so that to me has just been very inspiring and give me a lot of hope because I know that nobody's alone and that we have a lot of tools and we have a lot of chances to work on things with our own hands with their own voices and that is just going to continue and it always has and we'll keep going Eric. Something that's bringing you joy. It's no mistake I think that not only. Has there been a lot more opportunities for conversation. Not only because of the pandemic and because it's seen a quote unquote are month but also because there are so many more Asian Americans in every aspect of society arts culture and politics something that you know again as a historian it just didn't exist before for generations Asian immigrants were barred by law from becoming naturalized citizens most. Asian immigrants couldn't become naturalized citizens until after World War Two. That's generations of of being able to being seats of power to have a voice to be at the table generations lost. And so now when I when I look around. Yeah there's a lot of repeat there's a lot of hey I never knew this before But there's also a lot of promise and energy and just commitment. I think I do to say a lot of new. Pbs asian-americans series premiered voices were so inspirational. They had to assert their rights. Railroad cannot have been built without Chinese me fought on the side of the United States. There's a shift in political power to do anything they wanted all help. Our city burned clearly trying to build a month for themselves. I grew up with the American dream. Young people to make change out bachelor people. Put your mind to it. They can win. It's the most comprehensive the first time that the broad history of Asian Americans has been shown on broadcast TV. It was a huge community celebration. Diverse stories told really really well intergenerational histories yet. I'm in it I was an adviser. It's great we love it. You gotta be proud proud celebrate. It's good we gotta we gotTA promote ourselves. Yeah gotTa do the Self Love Thing? Poc You gotTa love yourselves. Yo you know it's it's finally time. It's finally time and it's it's it feels like you're not just a single voice but there's there are people ahead of you. There's a lot of people behind you. There's a lot of people around you. Thank you so much. Eric Lee professor of history and Asian American studies at the University of Minnesota and James Boo Return guests. Show runner of the PODCAST. Self evident. Thank you so much for joining me on this episode of in the thick. Thank you thank you for having me. Money Rela phenomenal episode. That taught us so much was produced by York Foundation. Ignite fellow are Shahada. Remember go to Apple. Podcast is to rate and review us. It really helps. Also you can listen to us on Pandora spotify wherever you get your podcast. Follow us on twitter and on Instagram at in the show like us on facebook of your family and friends to listen in the biggest produced by Nicole Rothwell Noor Saudi and Harsher Honda. Engineers are Stephanie Abo- Julich Rousseau and Leah Shaw. Our digital editors lease new not the recording in New York by the music. You heard his courtesy of NAS. United Captain C C K records. Do Listener we so appreciate you. We love you. Thank you for listening. This does Chow.

James Boo New York US official Erica Eric Lee Black Power Movement Nbc Democratic Caucus Shahada Justice League Justice League Chairman Hooking Jeffries York Foundation Apple Cova Kobe Grace Meng twitter House of Representatives
"black power movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"black power movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"I just read an article yesterday. That was saying how bad people are resting during this pandemic and that rest and the hours of sleep and the quality of sleep is down. That's why I am grateful. Literally thankful to have a mattress from Helix. My wife and I both love our helix mattress and think that it has helped us get good sleep even during the pandemic and listen. I want you to give it a shot. Helixsleep built asleep. Quiz takes just two minutes to complete and they use the answers from their sleep quiz to match your body type and sleep references to the perfect mattress for you. Listen if you like a mattress. That's soft or firm. You sleep on your side or on your back on your stomach or you sleep kind of hot with Helix. There's a specific mattress for each in everybody's unique taste in. If you just go to helix sleep dot com slash breakdown. You can take their two minute sleep quiz. And they'll match to a customized mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life. They have a ten year warranty. And you get to try the mattress out for one hundred nights risk-free and they'll even pick it up for you if you don't love it but you're gonNA love it. Helix offering up to two hundred dollars off of all mattress orders just for our listeners. You have to go to helixsleep dot com slash breakdown. That's Helix H. E. L. I. X. SLEEP DOT com slash breakdown for up to two hundred dollars off the great up there. We don't talk so much about the KKK anymore and that's a good thing in some ways the KKK is no longer the preeminent racist organization in this country. It's not what it was during its height or peak other organizations and other really more mainstream ways to be an open bigot have replaced the KKK. But on this day April twenty fourth of eighteen. Sixty seven in Nashville Tennessee the KKK had their first public meeting all the way back in the shadows of the civil war just years after the abolition of plantation slavery. As we knew it obviously we could talk about the thirteenth fourteenth and fifteenth amendments. But what we saw is in the wake of this period that we call reconstruction we see. Racist organizations like the K. K. K. popped up and when they had their first meeting on April twenty four th on this day in eighteen sixty seven. They grew like wildfire from then on out and actually were a dominant terrorist terroristic force four arguably one hundred years after that from eighteen sixty seven all the way through the civil rights movement of the nineteen sixties the. Kkk was active and dangerous in threatening. They were responsible not just for thousands and thousands of lynchings across the country but they were responsible for intimidating people out of towns altogether out of regions altogether certainly out of leadership in politics but what we saw was when they were allowed to do what they did and they were indeed given protection you you you weren't seeing members of the KKK being prosecuted or held responsible for anything and because they were allowed to do what they did. It change not only the standard of living for African Americans in this country but it impacted policy it impacted. Laws impacted amendments and. I think not that we are in now the age of the KKK. Because we aren't but when you see public bigotry and I don't just mean somebody calling somebody else the N. Word. I'm talking about men and women that we know are bigots and racist and white supremacist. Rising as high as the Oval Office When we see open bigots in power across the country it impacts policy law. What you see is that we are in an age and I talk about this in my book. Make change where whenever you see a certain level of progress in whatever you WanNa think about the civil war in the thirteenth fourteenth and fifteenth amendments that was progress and when you have revolutionary progress there is always a pendulum swing back from the people who felt impacted in a negative way by that progress and as particularly southern White people felt impacted negatively impacted by the civil war by the end of Plantation Slavery by the Thirteenth Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. They responded and in my book. I talk about how we have other moments where they will always respond. We had the revolutionary moments of the civil rights movement the Black Power Movement. And what happened in response to that was mass incarceration? What happened in response to the Civil Rights Act? In the voting rights act of the nineteen sixties was mass incarceration. And then you go forward to this moment. That's revolutionary if not for its politics it's revolutionary for what it meant for the humanity of this country. We see the first black president elected and people responded in the pendulum swung all the way to Donald Trump. And here we are a man who's literally touting anti-malaria drugs suggesting that injecting yourself with disinfectant may kill the virus wanted. It would not if you just inject yourself with disinfectant. It would not kill the virus would kill you it would harm you. He would literally burn your insides. Up and the krona virus would still be there. It was a pendulum. Swing from a revolutionary moment. And and we're in that we are in the pendulum swing and in in my book. I call it the dip. We are in that dip in any of you who heard me speak publicly over the past six years. I've been teaching about the DIP All during this time but It was a painful powerful reminder for me to know that on this day April twenty fourth eighteen sixty seven. The Klan held their first public meeting. And that here. We are twenty twenty and white supremacy and white supremacist. Systems are still a problem for this country and for the world. That's why we do what we do to fight. Back against bigotry and white supremacy and oppression in every way that we can listen. I've gotTA run. We have some really really special things and I'm going to be talking about every day next week min of you. Who are listening to this. Podcast now. Already know what I'm talking about but it's a little secret for now right. GotTa run with a ton of work to do love. You appreciate you hope you safe. Take care of by breaking it down and bring them and bring the bring bringing in the book break break break..

Kkk Plantation Slavery Helix H. E. L. Helixsleep Nashville Klan Tennessee Donald Trump Black Power Movement K. K. K. president
Walter Rodney Was Way Ahead of His Time

This Day in History Class

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Walter Rodney Was Way Ahead of His Time

"Day was March twenty third nineteen forty two Guyanese historian and activist. Walter Rodney was born. He's remembered for his scholarship and activism concerning the working class and black people around the world. Rodney was born to Edward in Pauline Rodney in Georgetown British Guyana or Present Day Guyana British. Guyana was a colony that was part of the British West indies after World War. Two there were increasing demands for political independence in Guyana. The People's Progressive Party a left wing political party formed in the early nineteen fifties in the colony. Rodney's perspective developed in the midst of this rising anti colonial sentiment during that decade rotten distributed people's Progressive Party manifestos began attending Queens College. A high school in Guyana. There he edited the school's newspaper and participated in the debate society. He graduated in Nineteen Sixty and won a scholarship to the university. College of the West indies. He graduated with a degree in history in nineteen sixty three. He went on to attend the University of London where he got a doctorate in African history. His thesis was called a history of the Upper Guinea coast. Fifteen forty five to eighteen hundred in England. Rodney continued to recognize how scholarship divorced history from politics brought and he took a job as a lecturer in Tanzania but he left to teach at the University of the West indies in Jamaica there he taught African history highlighting the importance of Africa and Caribbean history and the impact of historical resistance against slavery and colonialism. He advocated for the Working Class and criticized the government's policies he gave lectures to marginalized groups in Jamaica and became a key figure in the black power movement after he went to the black riders conference in Montreal. In nineteen sixty eight Rodney was declared persona non grata by the Jamaican government and banned from returning to the country. People protested his banning but he continued to speak out on the repression of darker. Jamaicans he taught in Tanzania for a few years publishing his best known work. How Europe underdeveloped Africa but in one thousand nine hundred eighty four? He returned to Guyana which had gained independence in nineteen sixty six to take a position as a professor of history at the University of Guyana. Though his appointment to the university was revoked he stayed in Guyana and he became a leader of the working people. A political group formed in the nineteen seventies and opposition to the regime of Prime Minister Forbes Burnham Rodney gave lectures in Jamaica Europe and the US and he continued his vocal resistance to burn them as the government proceeded to sponsor police rates and beatings and July of Nineteen seventy-nine. He and seven other people were arrested after two government offices were burned down. He faced charges of arson but was acquitted though he and his peers faced persecution. He maintained his criticism of the government and the Constitution but on June thirteenth nineteen eighty. Rodney died in a bomb explosion. The bomb was allegedly given to him by someone and the guy in a defense force is suspected that the assassination was orchestrated by Burnham. Rodney was survived by his wife and three children. Some of his works were published

Forbes Burnham Rodney Guyana Jamaican Government West Indies University Of Guyana Jamaica Progressive Party Queens College Tanzania Africa Georgetown Upper Guinea University Of London England Europe University Of Jamaica Europe Caribbean Professor Of History
Dr. Aldon D. Morris Discuss History of Sociology Pertaining to Black America

In Black America

09:08 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Aldon D. Morris Discuss History of Sociology Pertaining to Black America

"John Leo Hinton Junior and welcome to another edition up in black miracle on news leaks program Doctor Alden. Moore's professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University and president elect of the American Sociological Issue Logical Association in Black America. Many of the early white sociologists were actually quite racist and they preached that that in in many ways that black people were inferior and therefore they deserve to be at the bottom of the society because of their meager talents and intellect. So they did not pay much attention to the horrific Jim Crow period period of slavery. And so on. And so what that means is that the factors like oppression and Discrimination and Terence fourth and not bigger into their now about why black people face so much why they were and why they were at the bottom of society and And and this might be interesting you but the first to sociology books were actually written all race actually written by two I believe they were white. Mississippi and established in one thousand nine hundred. Five small group led by Lester. Ward William Grand something to Franklin Jennings and Albion small at a meeting any of the American Economic Association. The American Sociological Association held his first meeting the following year in Providence Rhode Island the membership in in one thousand nine hundred sixty two at one hundred fifteen for the first several decades the activities of the society or sending on publishing a journal holding an annual annual meeting and performing various administrative functions. Such as record keeping sending out communications and so forth and forty nine the first executive executive officer was appointed on a part time basis and in one thousand nine hundred sixty three. The Association established permanent headquarters in Washington. DC since the organization was founded. There has only been three African American presidents PRYATTA. More selection. Dr Al and Moore's will be the one hundred twelfth president of the American Sociological Association. He was served one year as president-elect and then become president of the Association in August Twenty Twenty he has taught at northwestern university. Since one thousand nine hundred ninety eight I was born and raised and Wyler Mississippi. Then I left and when I was twelve thirteen years old to and moved to Chicago and has lived in Chicago most of my life. I'm currently in in Chicago. Oh went to school and Peoria Illinois then I don't Long Island New York first job with the University of Michigan which has stayed about eight years and then I moved to North Western University. And I've been there ever since came to North Western in nineteen eighty eight idea about your childhood. Oh my childhood well. I was born in Jim Crow Mississippi. And I remember that I was just a boy I was six years old. When Emmett till was lynched He was lynched only about twenty miles. From where we we live. live with my grandparents and it had a tremendous impact on me and my generation. Some of us now refer to it as the Emmett till generation and I I remember going to the Colored School Having to sit on the back of buses Drink from Colored Water Fountains and do be be insulted and all kinds of ways especially my grandparents Were very strong people and I as a boy. I didn't understand why they were being called a boy aunt. And all of this kind of stuff so I experienced Jim Crow Racism in the heart of the South and Rural Mississippi. And then of course we were my mother and her siblings. Almost all of them have been part of the great migration and so they always lived in Chicago. Saint Louis and Milwaukee Detroit other places and so I as a little boy. I thought that The North was really really the promised land that they were really gold streets and milk and honey and all of that and so I also knew that I was going to come to Chicago once my elderly grandparents. It's passed and when they did. I was shocked with a double dose of new racism the the northern version. And so I you know I went to finished elementary school in Chicago. A went to community college and Chicago worked in factories in Chicago and And experienced a great deal love Racism and so on and Chicago of course This was the early seventy they sixties. The civil rights movement was still going on on the black power movement in particular was raging and so Also would assist that. They're the change could happen because I wouldn't have those movements and when I saw on television what was happening in the civil rights movement and all I. I grew up with a lot of hope. I thought we were going to change this thing. I had no idea that we would be where we are here. In the twenty thirty first century now you grew up in Chicago doing the radio station. WBO winds high days and allies Mohammed. And Jesse Jackson Operation Pushing Russian mayor. Daley tell us about that experience. It was a very A very rich rich experience by the time I was in Chicago. UGH Oh well I. I witnessed these a lot of the civil rights movement. The march on Washington and The Birmingham confrontation on television. 'cause I was in Chicago. Oh I was deeply influenced by Martin Luther King Junior and And then of course here in Chicago Jesse Jackson was his protege and so ooh I participated in protests and marches and so on that involved him and many many others Chicago was a very very Rich kind of Environment Like now it has some of the best and the worst tendencies of America and I went to a predominantly Lee White High School Where we were not as like people like students we were not considered to be smart? We were not considered to be college materials and so we weren't prepared appeared to they. They did not teach us to be those things and But yes I mean on on. You could drive down one street and park in front of me. Elijah Muhammad's house and you can go on a little bit east and you'll be at Jesse Jackson's headquarters and and so you know operation breadbasket is getting all of that. I do vaguely remember when Dr King about the Movement to Chicago in nineteen sixty six and there were marches for fair a housing and there was some of the most racist outpouring that the nation has ever seen When in one of those margins Dr King was hit upside the head with a brick and he said Ed that you know? I've been in Birmingham and I've been Montgomery. I've been in Mississippi but I've never seen the kind of racism that I'm experiencing here in Chicago so it was a mixed bag growing up here. I mean on the one hand. It was a vibrant strong rich black community. You know we had ebony and jet and all of the Black businesses the one that we had so many movements going on and and leaders both young and old. I was in community college when Fred Hampton and Mark Clark where fascinated they were black panthers and And that was the first time I saw Jesse Jackson in person. He came to my community college. I'll southeast junior colleges. In the end he spoke to us and And and I was like wow man. This is one of the most powerful individualism was ever heard so I remain active on movements but also You know Had never no one in my immediate family. That never gone to college so I didn't have any plans to go to college and And then the Vietnam war start raging and and I was working in Spiegel's warehouse and And I knew I didn't want to go to Vietnam and I ended up going to a community. Unity College us. Because then you could get for with the ferment. Kept you out of the service for a little while so so I did that and that was. That was the very beginning. Some of my college experience I in fact With somewhat afraid to go to community college because you know Com being a first generation student. I thought that everybody was going to be so much smarter than me. And then I was GonNa say things get laughed at it and all of that but I I went on. There was still more appealing. Attractive to meet and go into Vietnam and so I went. I went to a community college and I started reading. Do Boards and Margaret Walker and David Walker Peel. And all that kind of

Chicago Mississippi Jesse Jackson Jim Crow North Western University American Sociological Associat American Sociological Issue Lo Jim Crow Mississippi President Trump Terence Birmingham Moore Black America John Leo Hinton American Economic Association August Twenty Twenty Unity College Lester
"black power movement" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:29 min | 2 years ago

"black power movement" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"We're struggling out of you have different segments of society. You have middle class African American America wealthy class after American poor absolute poor. I mean the list goes on and on but when Bill Clinton Pass the crime bill he was there a lot of Democrats Blackhawk right now he he he regrets signing off on that bill but the point is this biden has been around while all those things were going on here in our country so it's time for new new people new blood. That's all I'm saying get some new blood and they can be consultants to some of the new book about where they went wrong and help these people well. There's a whole anti establishment undertone undertone nationwide. I mean look Laurie Life. At once Chicago Against Toni preckwinkle. who was the machine candidate so it was on the Republican side and on the Democratic side we had Bernie we had all that and I don't think that they learned they're going to put up? Another establishment. Joe Invited up there. <hes> one of my favorite Comedians Eddie. Murphy has a standup joke where he said what have you done for me lately and what is Nancy Pelosi are Joe Biden done for us lately cancer by everybody cancers around question yeah well she. I would argue that you know. Obamacare was their health insurance listening right now table my question to you is you have been very critical of the role of the increasing role that gays and lesbians have in the Democratic Verdy the recent post on a lot of heat from us. I took a lot. He don't let me be clear. What are the people that are doing just so beyond the beltway? I'm glad to be on the show. I was raised at a managed to be with a woman. I'm talking about me yeah. That doesn't make me anti anything that you I want to make that clear. I'm not homophobe. I support all human beings. I just believe that L._G._B._T.. Community would have this is a sensitive topic. What happens is that? Everybody's wish dodgers Americans. There shouldn't be no separation <hes> we should just argument right now. You have over about forty different flavors for the L._G._B._T.. Q. Community and they're they're gaining more political power each and every day and that's okay. I have no problem with that but nobody will speak this way because people are scared to talk about this issue. I have gay friends. They know why stand I'm not anti okay I was just raised at a man should be with the woman. I want to just make it crystal clear. That doesn't mean I'm against anybody. I just have to say it this way because I'm passionate about it but the reality is this. I'm proud about advancement that the gay community is making with without a doubt but it's all political once again. There's political right now. It's more like a political base developing now. There's going to be stronger than any other political base in Chicago for a long time to car they flexing their muscle now more effectively and efficiently than the black humidity. That's my point yes they are and that allows people hijack the Black Power Movement for their own for their own progress and they own their own issues. I see that happening all the time. We're GONNA Pause one eight hundred seven two three eighty twenty one more and then we'll be back to Chicago. Thank for let's go to Kathleen. She's listening to ascend W C._T._O.. C._P._R.. Flagship Station in Chicago will go ahead Kathleen..

Joe Biden Chicago Bill Clinton Kathleen African American America Murphy Laurie Life Flagship Station Black Power Movement Nancy Pelosi Bernie Toni preckwinkle.
"black power movement" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"black power movement" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And welcome back Shaka in Oakland California my center name right yeah your standard just right and thank you okay what's on your mind we appreciate it but good question person that that grew out of the shuttle rights and black power movement and a man of color it's not it's not I don't feel safe with the Democrats I think the weight modern like the promised we're gonna stand up slaughterhouse the Democrats will catch you on the head before you go in and the Republicans will kick you in the **** one of them are going to stop you I mean neither one of them someone like what's the lady's name to black lady who was a prosecutor caller Harris come on your wrist background was strictly police I mean maybe the most of work to be gracious cop she might have tried to prosecute them but she was too much for the system as most of them all burning the only one that cap we could I mean ironically Bernie is a Jew but he won't yes Israel's behind I mean you know which I but look how Democrats turned on very they did a lot a little tricky stuff washer once woke on the one hand the you know the the flip side of that though lance's that is is that you know Bernie has not officially joined the Democratic Party so you know they could have locked him out and they didn't they could watch about twenty sixteen for the for that matter and they didn't so the the Democrats I think if you have given burning a hell of a lot of slack which is in my opinion a good thing you know I understand what you're saying but the problem with the third party when you have a first past the post winner take all system like we have and five other major democracies have in the world is that basically you can only have a two party system if you created a third party Shaka and you know got a whole bunch of people go on with it and they were all people who are inclined like you and I are to in in a solidly progressive direction and they voted for their candidate those are votes that are being essentially taken away from the Democratic Party which means you're gonna end up with a Republican which is why I keep saying in the song of we need to take over the Democratic Party the same way the billionaires took over the the Republican Party and the Democratic Party needs to be taken over by by we the people by genuine progressives so what you're saying is we much better we get this thing and I I guess again went to some extent yeah it's it's it's like it in the the time and effort and money and everything else I mean here's the Democratic Party it's literally you know a hundred million dollar corporation essentially it's a non profit and the doors are wide open they're saying anybody who comes in in fact in most parts of the country you can you can become a day person committee person with basically no effort at all they're looking for volunteers and in some cases it's even a paid position typically it's voluntary and those are the people who help determine who's going to be in the primary those are the people who write the platform for the party there is a I mean you know the party is not some monolithic thing I mean it seems that way from a distance but when you get inside it if if enough of us showed up at the democratic party's and took them over all these local parties and many of them have been taken over now I'd say probably a solidly a third of.

Oakland California hundred million dollar one hand
"black power movement" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"black power movement" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Huey Newton, Stokely Carmichael They had emerged going well beyond the pacifist techniques of the Reverend, Martin Luther King junior these people, were militant And. That militant posture of. The black power movement frightened a lot of white people, I know where of I speak I lived, through it I was nine years old when this is going on but still aware of, the tension that was Part, of this process it was a transitional process But Interestingly enough at that same time Motown music was evolving into music that was being embraced by African Americans and white Americans. Alike and during this, era Aretha Franklin was Motown's biggest star may maybe Diana Ross and the Supremes were right up. There but I think Aretha Franklin as a solo, artist Was. The big Kahuna of Motown in the late sixties Does she record. For Atlantic. Okay but still the point remains the same I didn't I didn't know that You know that's funny because there's some kind of Motown salute to. Her maybe Motown the. Label. But Motown as a style of music. Is really. What by references to The biggest star of the Motown style of music, was a wreath of, Franklin respect this r. e. s. p. c. t. p. e. t. t. Certainly maybe her most famous. Song I say a little prayer in sixty eight natural woman sixty eight since you've. Been gone which I think was sixty seven or sixty eight And there was another big one, I know this one was was nineteen sixty eight And I, wanted just play forty seconds of. It because it might have been in terms of The blues brothers movie when there are getting the band back together. This might have been if not my favorite scene in the top three in the entire movie but here's part of the soundtrack.

Motown Aretha Franklin Huey Newton Martin Luther King Stokely Carmichael Supremes Diana Ross r. e. s. p. c. forty seconds nine years
"black power movement" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"black power movement" Discussed on In Black America

"Hand, they did get out of hand. It wasn't ever clearly established that the invaders were responsible for the violence. What's was clearly establishes that a small number of youths broke away from the March and started breaking windows and looting stores, and the police investigated, and there were no charges brought against the invaders and they weren't able to clearly determine what the what role, the invaders headed in the right if any now when SEAL see and and Dr. king came to Memphis, a lot of his as were guests that because they were planning for the poor people's campaign and now it's being taken away from the the planning schedule, But Dr king thought that the poor people can't pain would have been assisted if they could have a peaceful March again in Memphis. That's right. Several of Dr. king's as were very much, opposed him going to Memphis. And that was one of the reasons they thought that it would distract him from poor people's campaign at a critical stage campaign with starting later in April Enron was maybe the most vehemently opposed to the idea. And he had another reason he, he was afraid that if Dr. king went to Memphis for one speech, which was the Dr. king's intention, he said, oh, I'll just go down there and I'll talk once and that'll be it. But Andrew Young said, well, you know, it's very likely it'll get one speech and then you'll feel like you're committed and you'll have to go back and give a second in. The second will lead to a third, and we're going to get bogged down there indefinitely and he said it'll be the equivalent of mission creep, which happens though to the military and and wars in the early stage of intervention voice and we, we can't afford mission creep either we, we need to be more strategic about the move. When you smoke with a number of Dr. king as and allies. What was it like going back down memory name? That's a good question. It was moving. I felt as though I had a sort of a front row seat on history, albeit decades later and to hear their stories and to see the the emotion that they still felt that much longer was was really quite as it was. It was really quite had quite an effect on me and and some of the stories were even though it had been that many years we're, we're still we're still very gripping in in and dramatic, and it just shows what an it just shows what an impact that experience must have had on those people. How was it that the black Power movement was playing heavy on Dr. king's mind during that period? Well, the black Power adva-. Kits were in a way they were defying the whole approach of Dr. king. They were national nationalist. They were a black nationalist meeting that they wanted to be apart from the white, the the white culture and the white, the white mainstream. They wanted to be separate in that sense. And Dr. came was very much integrationist. He was trying to bring people together, not separate them. The second is they weren't clearly disavowing violence. I mean, it was more about rhetoric than it was about acts for the like Power folks. They, they would say, well, we have to defend ourselves and if anyone attacks us, we're going to attack them back and and they were using some fiery language like that. So Dr. king didn't approve of them and they didn't approve of him. They thought that his approach to civil rights was ineffective that it wasn't aggressive enough. So this is an. Sense. This is a a, this is another message

Dr. king Memphis black Power movement Andrew Young
"black power movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 4 years ago

"black power movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yeah in our starspangled banner at halfmast shall wave over the death of freedom the home of the slave this tradition of rewriting the song waned by the 20th century right yeah so instead we see the voicing of dissent and new use acl forms one of the most powerful precedents for copper next protest is of course the black power sign being raised by tommie smith and john carlos in support of the black power movement during the playing of the anthem at the 1960 olympics and you know a year after that the most kind of powerful follow up to that is jimi hendrix's performance of the banner once the organizers in sixty nine and the founder raising the fist in 1968 the kneeling of capela neck these are so somber so much more so than rewriting the lyrics remember copper nick first started by sitting on the bench during the national anthem and that he and read spoke actually with a former green beret and talked about what the next step would be in terms of this protest and they decided to kneel and eric read says i remember thinking are posture was like a flag flown at halfmast to mark the tragedy i mean it's really a shame the way that the meeting is being distorted not only by the president but also by the way in which this issue around you know police violence against black communities has shifted towards being this kind of more general statement of solidarity on the part of the nfl capper nick was so explicit about searching for and shoes ing the most respectful gesture he could and the confusion over what he is protesting brings in you know the ageold confusion over the meaning of patriotism itself i mean i read his gesture as almost a prayerful effort to have america as represented by the anthem at the flag actually fulfill its promise in eating sixty one oliver wendell holmes senior added in additional verse to the end of.

tommie smith john carlos olympics jimi hendrix founder president nick america oliver wendell holmes eric nfl
"black power movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

12:29 min | 4 years ago

"black power movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Tupac Was A Leader Of The Black Power Movement

Truth Be Told

02:05 min | 4 years ago

Tupac Was A Leader Of The Black Power Movement