20 Episode results for "Black Panther party"

Black Agenda Radio - 11.18.19

Black Agenda Radio

56:52 min | 1 year ago

Black Agenda Radio - 11.18.19

"This is black agenda radio a weekly hour of African American political thought and action. They go to the Radio magazine. That brings you news. News commentary and analysis from a black left perspective. I'm Glenn Ford along with my co-host Nilly Bailey. Coming up the panic community has long been targeted by racists in the United States. But that doesn't mean that anti black racism isn't a problem among Hispanics on new article highlights the internationalist thinking of women in the Black Panther Party and the coup. ooh In Bolivia. The fingerprints of the United States are all over it but first supporters of the nation's best known political prisoner are gearing up for an important event December seventh and Philadelphia Fan Ross of international concern family and friends of Maria. From all explains a lot of significance is happening. That wasn't wasn't happening up until two thousand sixteen and just to present the context. What changed everything? Memento had been on death row as people no ooh and was removed back about two thousand eleven and at that time was sentenced to life in prison without parole meaning being having no chance of getting out so not the most optimistic picture but in two thousand sixteen. Something rather amazing happened. In a case brought by somebody in Philadelphia it's called Williams versus Pennsylvania. And this is somebody who was subjected subjected to would we considered constitutionally incorrect and he founded brought the case all the way up to the Supreme Court and and one and the issue was to make it simple English was essentially the conflict of interest involved in somebody who had been the DA in his case back when he was in State Court back when he was in the original trial stage and was convicted. And somebody WHO's in the. DA's as office named Ronald Casteel was involved in the case. Then Lo and behold Ronald Casteel becomes a Supreme Court justice in the state and gets to review Williams's case and likewise mumias same situation so when Williams got the right to appeal service Mooney is lawyers mmediately filed and he lo and behold also had its opportunity and the DA the Progressive Coast Progressive Progressive D. A. and he is progressive in certain ways. I give them credit for making it. Possible for the move folks to get out which they hadn't gotten out and over forty years and most of them are up now name is Larry Christner and he's been hailed by many especially in the liberal media as I appreciate and Blah Blah Blah Blah but the fact is when we saw him in court. I was horrified very quickly but a so called Progressive Asif. Da when he fought tooth and nail to deny that casteel that there was any conflict of interest because in fact Casteel was insisting that he had almost no involvement with Mumias case and that he should not be disqualified in other words and now mia back then then in the eighties later at least twice asked for Casteel to recuse himself. I myself was involved in street. Actions and petitions demanding that he recused himself. This is back in the nineties that I was doing that and he refused and said that he was not biased at all and that he could be objective checked etcetera etcetera. Well when they began looking at the records a couple of things happen something showed up that he had a particular interest as has when he was A. Da in making sure that people who had been convicted of killing a COP would be executed as quickly as possible and he targeted them. There was a memo that shows that he had done that so there was lots of debate the usual bs that goes on in the courts but the judge ruled that there in fact was prejudice. The judge is a black Leon. Tucker knocker impressive bearing in court and kind of impressive some of his rulings and ironically the judge was more radical Michael and more committed to justice than the DA which is not surprising given the positions in the system but he was not touted as he was a Republican and he was is providing more fairness in the case. Then Larry so as the case goes on the judge rules that they had a right to appeal and they was prejudiced in the case and so on and so on a few days after he rules it crasner signs signs and I remember I was fighting tooth and nail and supporting the arguments that Casteel had not incorrectly not recused himself from the case so crasnick business shows up in court and reports to the judge that he has found. Numerous boxes found them in a furniture. Storage Room with labels saying this was the case. This was about Mumia. Well these boxes then become subject to investigation. The judge gave the right to me as lawyers to look at what was in there. Well that turns out to have really change things dramatically because there are many more boxes and they haven't all been examined Eh just the four or five. That were examined at that time. Dramatically changed the situation boxes that changes the situation so dramatically. So what happened. Those boxes I people had been around since nineteen eighty two. So how come they would just discovered in in a furniture storage room so that in itself is significant that these were withheld. You're not supposed to withhold that that kind of information from the defense and especially what was in these boxes which turned out to be a letter from the T. witness who who claimed that he had seen Mumia kill faulkner being the officer who was killed a key witness and in the boxes is a letter from him and repeated requests from him that the prosecutor give him the money he promised to give him you know and obviously there. There's some discussion going on about what he could do. And would do in return for the money. I mean that wasn't explicitly stated like that. That certainly the implication was there and it looks significant and he also was the only one who he and one other witness. Show bear being the person who is communicating this this to the DA. Only these two had actually claimed that they saw mounier shoot the cup so it turns out number one that this guy show bear or had never been an pictures. There were seen photographs of the scene his car and he never show up there so that was already questionable. That came way back but now is this idea that he's been bribed to testify against Malaysia. So that's number one number. Two in nineteen eighty six supposedly important victory and so it was on paper on the issue of race was ruled on by the Supreme Court. It's called the Batson ruling and essentially it said that potential jurors could not be excluded based on race alone. Well you know a significant is that was in Philadelphia it was actually somebody in the. DA's office who trained young lawyers how to keep black people off the jury and especially young black men the it was okay to include older black women but still this rule is there and they found in these boxes that they will lots of notes that have been taken by the DA on the racial composition of the jury and tremendous focus son race which was again very very suspicious and then the third thing was that another witness who was in a case of prostitutes had been mm convicted and sentenced to very very heavy penalties. The evidence box suggested that she has also been bribed and her case was I watched very closely her case on these other issues that she was convicted of and that she was on trial that the case was being monitored not only monitored by them but they he was speaking to the judge and two lawyers in the case and so on clearly meddling in that case so these three items and then there's so how much more but these three are the ones that the movie is lawyers picked. I mean for example. The most famous one is a quote by the original judge. He was also the judge in the review of the case in the appeal. The famous Abbot. Sabo who was known to be an open racist a lifelong member of the fraternal of police. All kinds of involvements with right wing and very reactionary racist forces says he was overheard by very credible witness to say in a courtroom. Not In front of me and not one case was they've been in a courtroom speaking to another judge. I'm going to help them fried the and he used the N.. Word so that was appeal. Of course you know. And that's a big issue so that was rejected by in the appeal was rejected. The argument was well. Maybe it's not a nice thing to have said it wasn't really evidence of bias and so on and so on so there's a lot of other evidence like that but here's three items. Were actually in our hands. And in September of this year September seventeenth somewhat. What shocking to a lot of us? After what had shown up to now in court crasner has announced that he would not oppose getting this case. Review it again before a judge that he was not gonNA fight that so that was very surprising. Jumping ahead to. Oh yesterday Maureen Faulkner. WHO's the widow widow Parak- salons I mean? She plays the role. She's been remarried for a long long long time. And she's very close to return a lot of police and who uses whom and what is hard to exactly excess. But they sure in bed together she and the fraternal awfully so low behold crasner has just announced that he will not appeal. He will not stop this appeal from happening. So Maureen Faulkner about a month ago. I think she had already filed as a victim. She insisted that crasner was completely biased toward Mumia and should be removed from the case and she said things that were completely untrue. She listed rested people who are on his staff that had been leaders in the momentum movement which was completely not true and she tried to make it look like this was completely apparent apparent that there was a conflict of interest and he should be removed from the case. The judge ruled no. The judge rejected her so here it is a month or so so later. And she's filing again basically on the same argument but now she took it from Superior Court to Supreme Court and she she got more well known right wing lawyer who has a certain amount of prestige and those circles and so on and so on so she upped the level of struggle but basically basically with the same argument. So that's the latest thing that's happened in the case that we are awaiting from crasner to respond respond to all the arguments about the data that has come out and the information. That's come out. And our lawyers have filed papers and on December second he supposed to respond and December seven. Of course we have our event in Philadelphia. So that's kind of the politics and the legal state of case and I think that they are very nervous. That crasner is weakening in his alliance with the F. O. P. or his concessions and his fear of you know he tried to really present himself with us. They're very progressive. Da which is a a funny phrase anyway because at the has a hard time being aggressive and he was blasted he was invited to a conference at Yale. Radical radical lawyers. Da's or something like that and he was supposed to speak in the students on their own initiative. I mean we didn't even contact them about this. A group students love students. Said no way you know. He's not speaking given his lack of strong. Be You know on the case but also just that he's the DA. So I think that may have made crasner nervous because you know he cares about. His legacy has a history history of being a progressive defender. He's defended a lot of clients. He's done some good things. He's gotten rid of cash. Bail that you have to pay. Hey for a lot of people. He's definitely an improvement over previous. Da's but like I say when I was in courtroom and watched him fight tooth and nail for for the fact that Casteel did not need to recuse himself I was wondering what progressive means. Smell the contents of the boxes. The quality of those court rulings should have NOUMEA's supporters in high spirits on December seventh. Tell us about the event. We decided to to try to put Mumias case and the whole issue of political prisoners and the massive phenomenon of mass incarceration in the context of U. S. imperialism around the world. How does it fit in? When you're one of the speakers who's going to be addressing that you and MIA will be the main people people to give an analysis of how these to intertwine how what happens in this country is very much part uh of the strategy of US imperialism around the world that repression the white supremacy the attempt to destroy any any progressive movement mainly people of color but just labor unions? Someone someone in this country matches a lot of what the United States gets uh-huh governments around the world to do when I look at just what happened in Bolivia. What's happening in Ecuador was happening now? Jiri there's just so many issues issues and phenomena in the practice of US imperialism in these countries that you can understand easily apply not exactly the same thing but how the same goals are being sought basically for us imperialism to play a significant role and continue to have power A. and control over the world and its resources. They need a subservient cooperative populace and they needed around around the world and then he didn't United States. I'm just going to say that much. 'cause there's I'm sure there's a lot more that you're gonNA say and I'm really looking forward to what you enemy it will be saying on that day EH. Use Rise up against US empire so we are looking at youth in some of the demonstrations show a lot of young people whether you look Chile okay or Algieria the crowds you know. They have older people that a lot of young people were active. And we're going to be having representatives if some some of these countries speak they'll be breakout groups. They'll be a plenary where we'll have a legal update. We're hoping that the lawyer will come and give legal updates. Because because by then we'll have known what crasner has filed on December second and also it is not by chance that momentum movement it is focusing on US imperialism as you know has written a trilogy on US imperialism. Yeah it's called Murder Inc and its three parts yes. The third one is coming out in March. You know for people who've read Howard's awards in this some similarities and obviously the truth is the truth to a large extent so they overlap significantly but the tone of these is such a fighting tone. It's such a fighting tone. So where should everybody be trying to go on December seventh in Philadelphia. That'd be at a charter school. Apparently the progressive one mastery charter. Schools Shoemaker campus. The address is fifty three. Oh One media street. MEDA media street and they will be transportation coming from New York. If you're coming from New York City call to onto three three Oh eight oh two nine two one two three three. Oh eight oh two nine they will be collective travel and they'll be food music. It'll be a interesting day. They're wonderful people in the movement. It's multigenerational definitely multi not ethnic. And I invite everybody to come and I will be very happy to meet you all that was. Suzanne Bros of international concern concerned family and friends of a Samal Benjamin Young. It's an interesting young scholar. He's a professor in Cyber leadership and intelligence at Dakota State University and was awarded a doctoral degree from the. US Debut War College considering his background young has unconventional interests is doctoral. Studies centered on North Korea and he recently easily wrote an essay for Seoul. The critical journal of Black Politics Culture and society the essay was titled Imagining Being Revolutionary Feminism Communist Asia and the women of the Black Panther Party. My article really focuses on like three case. Hey Studies that is China Vietnam North Korea and those are the three communist Asian countries. The Black Panther Party woman really looked to as models of kind of rugged feminism and each of them kind of represented different models of feminism to Black Panther Party women in China they saw communist theory. Theory advances says of Woman Mao talked about how he wanted to elevate the service of women that they were going to hold up half the sky and in Vietnam they were confronting the US imperialism in their daily lives. So this image of a Vietnamese mother with a Kalashnikov and a baby on one hand. There's question cover on back. And then on the other hand they also have their revolutionary duty as mothers and then at North Korea which is actually what I got my PhD. In what is really my focus. Focus is in North Korea. The cleavers Catholic leave for an eldridge cleaver they found an ideology. North Korea called Suchet which really means radical article self reliance and keping cleaver really took from this to mean that the party was advancing. This theory of Self Defense Jiu J. really was something that that really correlated with their own theory and they were able to give basically name to what they've been advancing for awhile within the party. So that's basically how I rain my article. Yes and you seem to be saying that these panther women were using the examples of Vietnamese Korean Korean and Chinese Communist women in order to change the relationship that they had as women within the Panther Party. Hardy itself yeah. They really imagined them as basically being equals and within the Party itself there is a lot of There's a lot of patriarchy not a lot of oppression against women. So they also use this to basically change the culture within the Black Panther Party and so on one hand like the social revolutions revolutions and communist Asia really impractical in advance of women but then the Black Panther party women basically they use the theory. That was being advancing anthem. Communist Asia's away to basically kind of change the culture around women within the party. And so that's why I named by article imagining revolutionary feminism. So that's kind of how I wrapped around it and I. I really also use secondary sources from really a prominent Black Panther party scholars such as Robin farmer and I also use quite a bit of recent works by scholars focusing back printed party 'cause within academia there's actually been more of a Increased effort to look the Best Black Panther Party international network. And that's something that I find really interesting and these three Asian parties were very useful fool to the Panther party because they weren't white and the Soviet party being white was less useful in the panthers organizing. Yeah there was a really funny story. There was the Black Panther Party woman. I can't recall the name now. And but she was. There was actually like a party. The anti-imperialist and there's the Soviets and then there are Vietnamese women and it was the big buff Soviet looking men and the Black Panther Party. One basically say you know. Look at these men. They don't really do anything. But look at the Vietnamese woman. They are out there fighting for the struggle and so there's basically contrast between the Soviets is basically just being a new form of imperialism that basically it was like a white European colonialism. Just what the different name. The different facades but really who was advancing in the Global Revolution was communist Asia. And at the frontlines of it were the North Koreans the Chinese Vietnamese and they all represented kind of different vision. Asian of Socialist Madeiran. Well some of US noted at the time and at the time I was in the party that the party was so friendly. Langley towards or enamored of the Koreans because the Koreans were more welcoming to the Panther party than the Chinese had been. Yeah uh so. North Korea's really fascinating because on one hand nowadays. It's like a deeply nationalistic country. And it's really is very paranoid of foreigners but during the late nineteen sixties. North Korea is a bit different. It was quite internationalist and actually welcomed the Black Panther Party for example Kathleen in cleaver gave birth to her daughter and Pyongyang Maternity Hospital and it was even reported and one book that came Sung with actually named the Godfather of this child. I'm not sure how true that is. But basically the North Koreans they wanted to forge international networks with nonsense after around the world so they forged like kind international ties with the Puerto Rican Independence Party. They forge type the Black Panther party. The Irish Republican Movement so basically North Korea wanted to be the vanguard of world revolution. Yeah they were small country only about twenty four million but they sell themselves basically occupying niche because there are small countries that can never colonize tonight's another country so China's huge could theoretically colonized another country. which is what in my opinion? The People's Republic China's doing right now and Xinjiang and Tibet China's basically become a colonial country but North Korea can never do that. And I think a lot of these radical actors around the world notice that and they said okay. This is a genuine anti tally imperialist figure on the world stage. And that's what I think. What the lowering particularly to the Black Panther party well full of historical record in nineteen seventy China China as we now know was already getting feelers from the United States about recognizing Red China as they used to call it as has the China and that may have had something to do with the way the Chinese treated the overtures from the US Black Panther Party? Yeah there was one of the reasons why China was beginning to kind of fade within the consciousness of radical actors within the United States. Is that basically. The NEXANS meeting with Mao was really disenchanted. A lot of radicals around the world because China for a long period of time was going to be like the bastion of real revolution. I remember I was reading archival documents from just cleavers papers and he was just really disenchanted with China's moved to basically what he called kind of like a retreat eight from its Revolutionary Vanguard ISM and so a lot of times China was very pragmatic during mouth later years. I think that the opening with the United States is really directly sign of Soviet splits and the fact that that got quite hostile during the nineteen sixties and the US government was quite good at basically playing both sides of that conflict really exploiting that sweat and so basically. It's my opinion that actually North Korea took over the role of China is really being the leading figure within the Revolutionary Movement in Nineteen Seventies nineteen eighties. I I'm actually just finishing a book about North Korea's relations with a third world so I'll definitely have the future about this. You write that the Panther Women's lenses towards Communist Asia. We're not rose colored but rather with what do you mean. Yeah so the Black Panther Party. I think there's just so many misconceptions about the party in the United States. So you know whether it's like you you know you turn on Fox News. which is my opinion? Just horrible and now they portray the Black Panther party is being basically terrorists and they were just horrible figures. And that's not true but then sometimes when you go to the far left represents the Black Panther party is being physically this idealist party that whereas like no internal faction and they were really just trying to fight for like freedom and that is also some degree not true as well as in you know. The Black Panther Party is full of internal conflict. But at the core of the ideology the pact Panthers there were Marxist-lenin if you read the Black Panther Party newspaper they've really believe in communism. They believed that that was the way. To basically overturn the status. Quo Is in the United States. Basically really tried to improve the rights of African Americans and oppressed peoples within the United States. So that's why I stayed. There are red covers that they we saw communists Asia's allies because they Marxist Leninist and so there and they were non white Marxist Leninist and so they're kind of international solidarity that was forged between between the two sides that I think was genuine was really four over. This ideological bond and Panther women saw Korean women and especially Ashley Vietnamese women because they were engaged in direct combat with the United States as role models and as examples does and does examples. That could be used to change the way. The Panther Party operated. Yeah there's a lot of issues within the Black Panther Party ready when it came to the treatment of women there's been allegations of abuse of mistreatment and so the fact that Vietnamese women really leading the fight against the US imperialism in Southeast Asia was something that the Black Panther Party woman they strategically used as a device to combat oppression pressure within the Black Panther Party. And so I think that's one of the key things that I really try to get across in my article. Is that the Black Panther Party woman. They knew that there were issues. Within Asian Communist -ociety when it came to the surveillance state when it came to the police state there when it came to just general suppression like they weren't useful idiots so to speak but they basically used elements of communist Asian theory to basically in turn tried to change the political culture within the Black Panther Party. They started using communist Asia imagining them as revolutionary feminist models away to basically combat the patriarchy within the party but in the early early unconcerned. As I'm sure it's known by party was starting to be dismantled between internal issues but also a coin tell pro and basically the FBI becoming. I mean very intertwined with them party in destroying it from within were these panther women actually idealising these Asian Communist women in these Asian Communist parties. Yeah I I mean I think there is a degree to which they basically held them up the idealize their roles within society. I mean take for instance North Korea. I don't believe there's ever been a woman member and the North Korean bureau. The leading woman figure within the North Korean leadership it was almost always related to the Kim family leaders of North Korea. And so it's not like a North Korea some beacon feminism and the same can be said for China's that Maoz House wife was very important but it's only because she was miles wife and so he actually wanna walk like genuine feminism who is really helping to advance the revolution has has been There were women. Were really part of the the struggle there to combat the US presence on the ground whether it was helping to transfer supplies the hoochy trail or or weather with actually fighting on the battleground Vietnamese women were probably the most real in terms of their commitment to change within the country. I think think the Black Panther party ruined realize this but you couldn't ignore China's advancing role in the world and also the fact that North Korea had an ideology of Juche that that basically was very interrelated with what the Black Panthers owner method. Gino self defense and how important is the experience since and are the ratings of Black Panther women to the legacy of modern black feminism. Oh I think it's critically glee important. I think that when you look at the writing of like Panther Party women whether it's Chak or captain cleaver I think it really presents a different angle than and the writings of Black Panthers such as Newton or cleaver. I think they really tend to get at some of the issues within the party. They tend to also get at some of the the treatment of women and I think that they are very critical to the legacies of radical black feminism during late nineteen sixties and. There's been more and more work being done on black. I can't party woman which I think is good for the academic field of African American history. There's always been a movement I think within the African American freedom struggle to really really see themselves as part of an international network so whether it occurred black lives matter movement seeing themselves basically part of an international movement of Solidarity Solidarity with Palestinian struggle liberation struggle whether it's Puerto Rican independence. There's always been kind of African. American radicals have always basically go out this part of the international network. And I think that's really critically important that I think that's something that tends to be mixed with the mainstream media. Talk about the Black Panther Party. That was professor. Benjamin Young speaking from Dakota State University Hispanics surpass blacks as the largest minority in the the United States in the twenty first century but minority status doesn't necessarily mean that anti blackness. It's not a problem. Among long Spanish we spoke with John. Williams comrie a long time activist. Who Says Racial Justice and women's reproductive rights are closely related? Absolutely the reality is that these conversations are right not usually held in regard to talk about women they talk about gender. Waste ten block Mrs well and then when you add ethnicity to that in regards to so let's talk about Latina women in regards to blackness. These conversations are just very very rare. So I'm I'm glad that it's happening. I'm glad that we're having this conversation and I'm glad of that. It's also not woman identified. People that are doing it right now in this case so when we talk about how reproductive justice first of all. It's really important for me to acknowledge that the term was coined by group of black women. That we're really committed around reproductive justice and they recruited right a raw who a lot of people are now also red looks mighty natural that he is a Lotta people know us well. Basically around a conversation around population and development that was held in Cairo in Egypt and it was really around. Like how do we really center these things as a relate specifically to women of color and within that block woman because the issues that black woman were facing have been facing historically and continue to face are different in regards to reproductive the house which is determined that mostly and widely used. It's a different context altogether so reproductive justice really encompasses you know. There are different principles among among them the right to choose to have or not to have children and a lot of people just brushed that off as abortion right but it's beyond abortion it's around choosing to procreate choosing not to and the thought process that goes into that but then also choosing how we parent so the fact that as black people. We have social determinants of Health for example most women that choose to give birth that are black have emergency emergency section. We already know in the United States. Loch Lomond are dying really high numbers and there's data around that during childbirth. Our last week I went to the funeral of the daughter of a friend of mine that six days after birth to a healthy baby she died and we had to various thirty year old. So these are things that are not really being articulated or really spoken us when we talk about Reproductive Health and General for Reproductive Justice Greens and and that women of Color Block women are really facing within reproduction. Your colleague Dna Lugo Martinez has written that calling out anti blackness. In the Latino community means acknowledging that the Teaneck folks can be anti black and that they can perpetuate anti black racism. Well that's something that most black folks no. But is there resistance to the very I dea of of Anti Black Racism. NC blackness in the Latino community. Wow I can easily answer that as you know the the Zebra Abraham striped kind of thing and the reality is that the same colonial mentality the same racist mentality. The they seem capitalist mentality that exists within the United States exist throughout the world and Latin America is different so I always uh when people ask me all the time rain. It's not any question for me when people ask me. I always say you know you should really take a look at the president's you know from things simple as the president's throughout Latin America I mean who do we see because and most of the country with some few exceptions and those exceptions are are considered ultra-lax ultra-radical governments with the exceptions all. The president's throughout Latin America are white and not white in regards. Arthur like mixed race white like white appearing with Light Brown eyes. Green Eyes Blue Eyes blond hair brown hair straight so a replicate the same structures that exist here and just because Latin America has been a region where the racial dynamics have been different in regards to like things that such as I for example and quote unquote bettering the race. which is what it's known for the same same bracelet structures exist and when people migrate here? Then sometimes there's a little bit of Amnesia that happens with that right so when people that are appearing as you know in the dominant culture in countries back home back home for me in Panama and then they migrate here and suddenly they have become some people have colored. Just because you're from Latin America it doesn't mean about sentiments of disliking black people of calling us means of making sure that we're putting on a everything opportunity of not caring that were highly incarcerated not caring that we are Rian brutalized by the police in our home countries. Knock hearing all those things and suddenly here. It's like oh I don't really have to pay attention to back there but now exists here and it's a way for me to to be considered a person of color benefit from that but still practice my anti blackness and not having to really deal fat. So then there's a distancing between who they are fundamentally in regards to access privileges here in the United States and then who they don't WanNA WANNA be. which is this person that still doesn't associate with black people so doesn't look at things Bhai race even though it's very racially and so chooses to distance themselves from blackness and that is practising anti-black certainly the same power structure exists in Latin America? McConnell has in the United States the difference however is that it's not acknowledged that it is common throughout most of the classes to deny that this racial hierarchy exists absolutely. I've been saying that for many years and finally probably like twelve thirteen years. There's later we're having these conversations now if you look at leadership within the quote Unquote Immigrant Rights Movement. Most of those leaderships do not represent the racial dynamics or the racial differences throughout Latin America we see predominantly White Latinos in positions of power and because that's one palatable that's easier to deal with than have to really deal with the block. Let the person or an indigenous person or an Asian Latino person right it's more palatable to deal the White Latina and say that you have somebody that's of color but they're really not of color they're just ethnically there from America and they speak Spanish. A nice feel honestly believe that this is across the board so this is an left circles as well and to the right so I feel like when people take a stance to really uphold racial Justice Valley and only that I really examining what the president has been an practices. Have Been In regards to sued the Latino community where they have isolated marginalize black people from that a concrete example of how this translates to systemic and structure to systems and structures lectured is when we talk about Immigration and immigrant rights hating enters into the conversation gotti entering into the conversation that people that were displayed. Could've Huricane Mitch. These people never entered into the conversation. Why because they're really not considered part of the quote Unquote Immigrant Rights Movement? They're considered Oh there Haitians even though they share an island with the Mexican republic or at their special people there we got full news but they're completely invisible allies so we have the people like Deanna people like myself that then center these communities. They were seen as the bicycles we can now. We're bringing in race. When supposedly there is no race to be examined and because we're all from Latin American this of course many Latin Americans brought that racial divisiveness in with them? We think specifically of of many Miami Cubans who were white in Cuba and thought of themselves as white in Cuma and many left because of white supremacist reasons. So of course they would behave as racist when they hit Miami and currently I'm for an example of that our money you know and sadly and people like nest is social tool that has been used to really pit the people against each other throughout the region and the United States is well. The communication system has done a really good it's machinery rate. It's an improper Ganden machinery. That has done a good job of misinforming and unconsciously unconsciously educating people to turn against themselves ooh and to turn against black people so you see a lot of ad campaign to see commercials you see jobs and all that Kinda stuff that don't want black a lot of people to even exist so you see telephone commercials where a monkey is marrying like another person and as soon as they get like like that cellphone brand and they turned into a woman. But it's a black woman or you have like the Miami concepts still in many ads and novellas and all that kind of stuff and what the has done is that as people start getting access to these things. I'm talking about black. People Muscle speaking about indigenous people. I'm talking about any people in the region. One has access to these things with the message is clear that the worst thing to be is blocked so then imagine migrating our country like the United State. And then you see and you live through assault. You live through. I saw some black people specifically police brutality. You hear about Warren drug. Even though you don't really understand it and you really think that it's justified to have these things against black people because you have been taught all along your entire life life that the worst thing to be as people that we are undeserving us so many things. That's how anti blackness shows up within the Latino community just in it shows up among among members of the Latino Community who by any measure are black themselves exactly and then you have the other side of where people that are now. Becoming aware of their racial diversity within themselves are claiming blackness but claiming it in a way that is in authentic I would say claiming in a way that benefits them. Because it's something popular could be black. And Latino not no but not really claiming it in regard to uphold the people that are undeniably black people that have a block experience and their live bodies that are actually being targeted as black and let's really uphold those stories from a position of where all block but I lived experiences. Oriented are different so let me make sure that my brothers and sisters that have been living in their skin and their body their whole lives are acknowledged for for that and not me with the comes with being light skinned person and the hair and all those dynamics that come into it. Let me not just take on black mass or something. That's popular right now. I can run with it for a few years but when it comes time for either like moving up in class or moving up in jobs and all that kind of stuff. It's something I can also drop so there that conversation. That has happened too. Well in fact there's lots of unpredictable ambitious versus young black people who also take on a political blackness for a couple of years and then a walker and move on a walker in terms of the latest upsurge in political activity. That's gone under the heading of the black lives matter movement of mint. Were you satisfied or pleased with the level of Latin American involvement in this movement. Well I can't can't can't really you know I can't really speak directly to that but I can speak about the ripple effects that had throughout Latin America wanting something to know about black culture. African American culture here within the United States is that it is something that side of the region even even though a lot of the groups outside of the United States throughout Latin America and the Caribbean even though they're pretty well organized themselves they look towards. It's African American Black Liberation Movements and struggles as models that we can learn from. And when beat US mega import phone came out really provided them with platform where they could improve in their own organizing. You know I can speak about those. It was kind of the models and the ripple effects that have in the region. But I can't speak about the inclusion of inclusion within platform here just because I feel that that like myself that have been doing this work for a long time. Those of us that have been engaged in this. I engage age as a pan-african I don't necessarily engage with somebody. Just from Latin America engages the Pan African that has lived in Latin America that is from Latin America and and that speaks multiple languages and has all these different experiences but at the end of the day. I'm an African person. So my engagement. A lot of the political scene in the United States not necessarily Terry Black lives matter have been as a Pan African under you noting a more Pan African sentiments with Latinos beyond this order. You know yes. Just the fact that in Latin America the term afterwards and being African descended the common the common term that I use is to signify. We understand that we're not one country where in the sand that regionally really you know. In Latin America we have had similar experiences regardless of the country that were from now. It has become divisive in regards to African Americans and Africans descendants and the turn African descendant where there's an assertion the quarter who Americanise in this country by saying African American and I understand understand also the political components to that but in regards to building those bridges to join as regionally African descendants. That has been hard with what some of the brothers and sisters coming in that if they don't embrace that concept of it doesn't matter what country you're from but you're African descendants so in the context context lesson America you know. We can navigate from Venezuela to Brazil Colombia Cuba. And we're of course and the end is which means that we understand that we have Very similar lived experience and the politically economically socially culturally that just automatically unites us and we understand the histories. He's a little bit different from over here. But I would say outside the borders the concept of pan-africanism. It's more central than I feel like. In the United States United States dates has been hostile to the government of Bolivia. Ever since April Morales was elected as that country's first Meridian president this month right wing forces and the military staged a coup against President Morales forcing him into exile in Mexico on White woman. Politician from a minority party declared herself president almost immediately. The trump administration recognize his the coup government. which is no surprise to Alex? Main of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington the Relations between the two countries the between the two governments. I should say have been very bad for quite a long time and this stemmed from the US us through its diplomats and particularly through. Its ambassador that was in Bolivia at the time in two thousand and eight supporting violent protests again this took place in August September of two thousand eight when you had the ambassador who met with some of the hardline protest I leaders that were encouraging protests. That were also very racist and going after indigenous peoples and mass leaders and so on this led to a break in diplomatic addic- relations the US ambassador was kicked out of Bolivia and of course the US reciprocated. They haven't had ambassador level relations since then and of course in terms of its own domestic and foreign policies Bolivia's really gone in a different direction from that that the US government has. I just wanted to see and they did away with. US assistance to not be relying on that so USA. ID ended up leaving the country at the request of the Evan Morales government and then of course ever Morales was close to chop as then as well and other left-wing leaders in the region. And and so I think whether under the George W Bush administration or the Obama Administration the US government really saw the Bolivian government. I've ever morales breath. As an adversary in the region and sought to undermine ever morale is probably not as actively as the government Venezuela. But still I think fairly early actively certainly in multilateral settings but what's happened with these last elections is that you've had the Organization of American States there observing they've they've observed elections in Bolivia before there were no real issues but I think there was a sense of an opportunity now with these elections and the fact that there was some controversy zero the elections due to the fact that Ed Morales was standing for another term and the constitution allowed him to terms he was standing for a third term under this constitution. Of course that had been authorized in was legal because a court decision but ultimately you. I've had a sector of the population that was riled up about that and that was part of what was behind the protest movement so you already had a context of some social tension that was there that the US took advantage of and they did that in large part through the Organization of American States. And you saw a great deal of coordination between the Organization of American States like twirl mission statements and the statements of the Secretary General of the Organization of American States Lewis Lago and the statements and positions uh-huh coming from the State Department and the White House throughout this whole episode which shifted from there needs to be a runoff election to there needs to be completely lately new elections to supporting the forced resignation Under military pressure of ever morales to supporting a coup. So Oh you had the the. US and the Organization of American States. That were very much in line and of course the. US has an enormous influence within the Organization of American States and provides provides something like sixty percent of its funding not to mention the Organization of American States is located in the middle of Washington DC just next to the US State Department well and that brings us up to now where we have a indigenous protest protest by indigenous people against the coup in Bolivia and also as you noted attacks on moss representatives and serious unrest and we have also Janine on yes who was a lower level official. Now saying I'm the president now and the Associated Press has a headline saying Bolivia's declared interim president faces challenges not noting that declared by herself. You know and we're hearing from the State Department which just got through supporting the coup has a statement at least from one official saying we look forward to working with Janine. Yes that legal now. We have someone stepping forward. It sounds a AH Venezuela someone saying Oh you know what. Call me precedent now no. It's absolutely not legal. So you could consider that as sort of the second part of the Ku. The first it's part being the forced resignation under military pressure of the president and vice president and also other officials that were in the constitutional accession to be president. They were all under threat. They were being threatened personally or their families were being threatened and then they either left the country or went into hiding but at any rate that was a military coup right there and then when you had Shannon Anya who stepped up in the Senate and declared herself president that was also true. Do you had of course in the constitutional line of succession. The president of the Senate would eventually become president however she kanana's was not the president of the Senate. She belonged to the minority opposition party in the Senate and she took advantage of the fact that the legislators of both houses but including the Senate where not there were in hiding weren't able to assist in the discussion Russians so there was no quorum so she spoke before a plenary. That wasn't a quorum. It was it was not legal. You didn't have enough members of the Senate that were present and declared herself president of the Senate before then saying okay if I'm president of the Senate then that makes me president of the country and you know I think think what really made it clear what this was all about was when you had the military high command one of the officers in the military high command. who was the one who put the presidential sash around the body of Janine and yes in place of course of the outgoing president? Those are the sorts of things that the media has not described in what happened the very unconstitutional nature of this presidential succession. Most of the articles that we're seeing now coming from most of the media are just describing a genuine and yes as the interim president period and not even mentioning the fact that you know there might be some debate as to her. Our legitimacy is an interim president. And that's it for this edition of Black Agenda. Radio Radio suggested at Black Agenda Report Dot Com where you will find a new and provocative issue each Wednesday we stay. That's www dot black agenda report dot Com. It's the place for news commentary and analysis from the left on. Nellie Baillie along with my co blamed for our thanks to the good people at the progression radio the network.

Black Panther Party United States North Korea Panther Party China Philadelphia DA Bolivia Black Agenda Supreme Court Mumia US Black Panther Party Best Black Panther Party president Ronald Casteel Latin America Asia Williams comrie Supreme Court Memento
Judas and the Black Messiah, Episode 1: The Chairman

99% Invisible

36:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Judas and the Black Messiah, Episode 1: The Chairman

"Hi everybody this is roman mars. The following is a new podcast series. The ninety nine percent invisible team led by supervising producer. Christopher johnson produced with proximity media in partnership with warner brothers. It's a companion to the new film judas and the black messiah and it's unlike anything we've ever worked on and unlike any other movie podcast in scope and ambition. I'm so glad we're making in conjunction with such an important and truly excellent film. This is the first in a series of podcast that i've been cooking up with my friend. The filmmaker ryan kofler. Who is a huge podcasts fan. By the way it's literally the first thing we ever talked about when we met a couple of years ago. A different podcast series at the proximal. Nine teams have been kicking around. We'll tell stories based on proximity media film productions as well as audio first podcast originals. So give this listen. Watch the movie and go subscribe to the judas in the black messiah podcast and its own feet to hear the rest of the episodes over the next five weeks. And if you subscribe we'll get to produce a bunch more stuff together. Trust me you want that to happen. You were going to flip out the stuff that proximity has planned. Followed the link in the show notes to subscribe for you ll into episode one right now. Thanks heads up. This episode has some strong language. He is as open his concerto. Notices that we do this cham- free happened joni. The black panther party cubs cincinnati state. I maybe scenes. The three strike offended him while to an african tooth of being the son of champion. Free nicole and jerry and three fourteen finally my people i'm on it and humbled international champion. The black panther party cubs the organization that as we say not walking in his footsteps but the pat the paul steps a black panther party chairman. Fred hampton junior is based in chicago. As a working activists he travels almost constantly for protests rallies and speaking engagements in two thousand twelve. He was in northern california. Visiting a chapter of the black panther party cubs an organization. He founded to carry on the legacy. The black panther party chairman and the cubs are that nipsy. Hustle was performing in sacramento. We have the cost. We backstage pactel's and hustles backstage. Now i've seen from a distance ac- the necklace he has on in at the time. There was a big thing a artists and it changes they went. Jesus pendant kyw. Us on the so for held. My first don't and i've seen it manually. Is like the shaky around his task. So the nfl look closer. That's whoa that's malcolm x. Nipsy postcard size medallion depicting the golden sparkling malcolm this classic pose index finger press to his cheek contemplating signal to chairman junior that he wasn't talking to a typical rap. Superstar with typical tastes jewelry. Nancy hustle might be a fellow revolutionary. Are you familiar jim. Free at hampton and he's a champion free happening. Junior would have a man. Would i be if i knew him for. It happened to us. Hi i'm elvis mitchell. And this is the official podcast the film judas and the black messiah In this series. We're looking at the black messiah at the center of this film. The real story of fred hampton have to up that you. But you can't but when i leave you know my bad with last way out. Chairman fred hampton lissa black panther party in illinois until his life was cut short in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine. What made hampton so special that he was anointed as a leader at such a young age and then targeted in a federal assassination who go behind the scenes with the film's creators including directors. Shocker king and producer ryan kugler. Who wrote and directed the two thousand eighteen blockbuster black panther. I'll talk to co stars. Daniel columbia a keith. Stanfield and fish back also to real panthers who new chairman fred including his widow a coup and jerry and chairman. Fred hampton junior around here. We call chairman. He was born three weeks after the assassination and has spent his life protecting his father's legacy chairman. Junior was a cultural expert. Who consulted on judas in the black messiah. He's going to help set the record straight about the chicago. Panthers and chairman. Fred hampton senior in the film. We i see chairman seniors character when he's about twenty years old and moving at full speed. He's leaving the panthers illinois 'chapter he's also building chicago's original rainbow coalition a political alliance. Poor southern whites. Puerto ricans and black youth activists. Chairman at senior is a force but in this episode. Or i gonna take a step back and look at how fred hampton became chairman. Fred hampton's parents from louisiana. They moved north in the nineteen forties. Eventually settling in maywood on chicago's west side. Chiro freer was speaking but coming up is growing up and he came from with okay situation. We'll know ours situation and you know area. He grew up in maywood for working class families and we wear for his new petty bourgeois z. Fred was born in nineteen forty eight the youngest of three children even as a boy. He was fiercely protective was family and his community chairman. Junior tells the story of his father. Eleven or twelve years old. Leading protests. Complete with homemade. Picket signs recognizing the swimming pool with the black children are not able to go swimming and to see right across places such as male roles powerful you know the white twin wilson pool and the challenge that taken car boys and sticks and making these poses and we demand a swimming pool in and going around the police station in police on a tip gas canister out there and him. Taking a gas canister throwback inside the police station and even before he was even in school his brother who was older than him coming home and had been attacked white boys at the school. And you know. He took a wagon for the bottles and went over there. You know he dealt with it. Even high school proviso east countless cases. We speak for others. Fred hampton went to school that was surprising integrated in the sense of there. Were a lot of black and white students. There provides waist high school shock. A king directed co wrote and was a producer on judas in the black messiah but just because they were going to school together. Didn't they got along. There was a lot of fighting and fred. Hampton created an interracial coalition between black and white students to sort of address. A lot of the hostility in the five. Minute was going on. You got it on the radar of the fbi at a very young age. I believe his phone was when he was fourteen years old just because he was involved in politics incredibly early on. Fred wasn't just involved in his early teens. He was elected president the local. Naacp youth chapter as a high school student. He spearheaded if i to bring in more black teachers. He broke a meeting between the naacp and school administrators to address list of concerns including the way. Black students were disciplined. It was clear to everyone around him. That young fred hampton was a gifted leader. Think linen that say that would takes people. Twenty years learn ordinary times. They can learn in two years. In revolutionary times. People say well how was it. The fbi be tapping his telephone when he's fourteen. They recognize his organizing capabilities. We've taken the jimmy p from seven hundred seventy one time. It was fun. Can afford the luxury of procrastination. By the time. Fred hampton graduated high school in nineteen sixty six. There was a real sense of urgency in the air. Vietnam war was escalating so too were anti draft antiwar protests the struggles black empowerment. Were also intensifying in chicago. The black population has been rising steadily for almost six decades. Nearly one in three chicagoans was black and most of them were segregated into neighborhoods on the south or west side of the city urban renewal or james baldwin famously. Called removal devastated. Chicago's black belt. Slum lords the police and city leaders helped create and reinforce some of the worst slums in the country activist groups emerged to fight this and other anti-poverty anti-racists struggles throughout chicago for at hampton was coming into his own. As youth driven activists ferment was blooming. All this changed on april fourth nineteen sixty eight ladies and gentlemen. I have some very sad news for all of you. Martin luther king was shot and was killed tonight a method chicago detroit. Boston new york. The they're just a few of the cities in which the negro anguish over. Dr king's murder expressed itself in violent destruction. People to to the street. A lot of businesses were burnt. Things changed in terms of atmosphere. The political climate mckay more repressive. Billy brooks grew up in chicago and later became deputy minister of education for the illinois. Chapter of the black panther party after king was killed chain witnesses shift among his peers towards more radical activism. People became more assertive in terms of Organizing you gone into the height of known antiwar movement or the whole concept of anti imperialism anti capitalism. You know anti fascism was something that was really an focus is as a mass movement that was like spring and summer of sixty eight and that was fertile ground for our organization. Hit a back. that far. Bobby seale and he newton founded the black panther party for self defense in oakland california in one thousand nine hundred sixty six two years later. The party had expanded to five thousand members in forty nine chapters across the country for at hampton was still in the naacp. When i encountered the black panthers in nineteen sixty eight the panthers national leadership was already talking about the powerful charismatic. Young leader in chicago will get word. People will tell them. You need to check out his individually audio free. it happened. you'll serve recognized. Servants and lead us recognized leaders in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight. The party's national leadership. Reached out to fred hampton and asked him to join the black panthers preferred. I know for him specifically the assassination of more than the king and i think to some of his dissatisfaction with not feeling like he was able to have the impact he wanted with the end up lacey. Pe- i mean even at proviso eastbound at the things he was beating was the need for. There'll be that at lunch. Fred hampton along with another panel named bobby rush and several other party members formed the illinois chapter. They open their office in west chicago in november nineteen sixty eight and chairman. Fred hampton who just turned twenty. A few months earlier was quickly becoming one of the parties. Most prominent voices way. Everything was back in the hands of people choosing something else you ought deal. I'm already down away feeding in the mountain. I is surprising that when he heard the panthers galluci by like free breakfast programs he was like. I'm already thinking in this way. And so it was a natural fit for the way he was already progressing. The yeah it was a perfect place for him. That that kind of intersection for him for his activists band but why do you think he made that move into that kind of selflessness because us on this track to become probably part of that thriving successful chicago middle class which drew people to their from around the country. What pushing in that direction. Do you think of activism honestly. It really feels like he was kind of boring like that. That's the thing that's really crazy in my conversations with in junior he would be like you have to understand that he kinda came up. I was on so call bourgeois community and fatty some of his better things in life back people found it. A movie style. Leads not made a commitment to your myself. I wouldn't stop what i'm doing to. All those people are free. What what do you attribute to also told me my mother erica. Telling about impact of my great grandfather. Who i was fortunate to you know. See him my lifetime. Also of who was his grandfather taking him as a child around. And we wanna sean different trees and giving him the names of who was hauge. What particular trees and of her war stories of how he impacted champion for. I believe that he related to the black panther party. Because let's turn the using say church. Show calling the black panther party it fit for him. It was natural Against hoppy say like relationships they say. Oh this is this is it or it's cooking food. Say that that's the right season that's right this no more. Don't know cut the stovall connect willie free was black panther internally externally it was in and like many other panther leaders chairman senior was a constant target for law enforcement in the spring of sixty nine. He was convicted of robbing a good humor truck and handing out free ice cream. His sentence was to five years. He was released on bail later that summer. Just a couple of weeks before his twenty first birthday out in prison thinking about be taken against alabama body. I don't know why not scared and be out. I put your. And when i heard eight. People say that he had charisma. I was attracted to him because of his commitment his willingness to lead by example. He never topped about things that he hadn't done or was not in a process of doing a low germ-free. Cost love not only. He showed me but he showed other comrades. Show people in the community and to me. That's not charisma. That's commitment and he often spoke about having that commitment undying love for the people and all so outweigh gonna join the group of bobbly rush lizanne until i met for it. Jama fred not broken. Because that's how simple it was. You know he just showed that this is who i am swimming. I wanna do. You wanna do a win. Men were good to this day. Chairman had a magnetism about him and the chairman always showed respect. He always showed. Respect to people stand mckinney was a rank and file member. they'll annoy panthers. He was bobby russia's bodyguard he also worked security for huey. Newton co founder of the black panther party. I think the vehicle of the party was one thing but having a chairman that was so dynamic and so reachable to all people from all walks of life. I mean chairman could get out go into the pool halls anywhere. He went galvanize mesmerized. People so he he had that magnetism that drew you to him. In the key thing it was genuine you could feel that even broken hip you to a new free this program on the south side next week free big. There's a scene early on judas. Black messiah that really captures this chairman. Fred play daniel and several other black. Panthers go to a pool hall. Chairman moves easily through the crowd handing out flyers promoting. The panthers smile neither party as a mandate to feed every day that she play. The party believes in progress. And what many. I should have breath healthy being you have free education. Basically you know you look up. You don't say that scene is based on the scene. I read or heard about him going into a nightclub and Music and then getting up in talking to people and he spoke for a while. People didn't say all what are you doing. They listened than the body went back on the fact that he could stop a party and talk about ideas. Talk about duties activities actions at the panthers doing it locally in wanting to get people involved recruit essentially recruiting in the middle of a disco another feet of the illinois. Chapter was its ability to find common ground between chicago. St organizations the represented judas as a single fictional gang. Call the crowns in the film chairman. Fred senior hopes unite the crowns and the black panthers so he goes to visit their leader steel. Who's played by. Chris davis greg all re talk of the west side. You'll name could ringing out. Is your world brother steve. So what can i do for you. Well know what we can do for each other. Y'all do some great. Were mobilizing young brothers. South side but we national physician dedicated to the liberation for prestige. This nigger million dollars. They want is not just over. Berbice program these keys. We fuck the crown's feed more babies than general mills who you think employs a momma's netting. Well right on right on the question is can you do even more visible five thousand crowns chicago between your man pow and a pair of his political platform. You can heal this seating and if we take care of chicago. She gone in reality. Chairman and the panthers work with several organizations including the blackstone rangers and the black disciples. He knows street organizations already had a political basis system which is not the way that we've been taught gangs black gangs operate you know. They dislike us niggers in. Meanwhile they got stores. They like doing things so he's got street organizations. That are already thinking along. These he is coming. Along is is really. China organizing really gets in turn them socialist and then he's integrating across racial lines in chicago. Which is so deeply segregated. Bad faith black people right night and he'll been onto reactive reaction we to our people get the international both annual pal chairman. Fred lead chicago. Panthers pushed against the notoriously racist police department and he encouraged others to do the same police mono react to saying we've been through magnet shotguns. The people do anybody else and we know how to wore these frantic fascist off that we have to defend ourselves because only proper example of self defense in the proper example retaliation and by letting these people know that we move from basic laws that innovation. The goes down the press. People on the part of the oppressor is. It'd be reciprocal. In plain poll workers language. It takes two to tangle is soon these mother fuckers go wego chicago. Panthers also took on the city's leadership especially your richard j daley as the king. Chicago's democratic party. Mayor daley was the picture of a political boss. His infamous daily machine ruled every aspect of city governance and suppressed black political independence. Daily champion urban renewal. He claimed there are no ghettos in chicago. And he sanctioned they brought use of lethal force during the protests that followed. Dr king's assassination. Shoot to kill any it or anyone cocktail in their hand in chicago. Cute demeanor crippled. Anyone looting any stores in our city the panthers challenge the mayor's rain often simply stepping around the conventional party machine and taking their political message straight to the community. They were up in anti-daewoo across india. Campfires of conventional fighting across the confines of this is how you address this. You vote you you talk to this doesn a spokesperson for your leadership chamber free case. So he doesn't pay at the party. We're going to church. We're going to church. He going politicized people and you know that line in the movie where he's like we take chicago. Imagine not only big. but it's the midwest is the connection the everything so the danger i think in having someone that young in that powerful. He's young too so he's got years he has team he's doing eliciting he's got years ahead of him he's he's also starting to get the the biggest black middle class in the country. Yes under his me. That's the big thing too because as a young black middle class being educated who hearing him to. they're also not just young either. they're all. He's got the older folks. He's got white catholic priests engaged getting free milk from white businessman in grocery stores in action. Say yes let's say today because it's really illinois chap is donuts but he's is the combination of great structure organization in in credit leader. You know this represented the international threat to this system because people all over the world. We're talking about man who these cats on a platform. Politics don't saying it stand up and defending the people. It's not just fighting for their own personal survival. Stand up for the people. In the survey the people fat and programs for the people and not just give them a rhetoric. We always black pepper body that they can do it. They won't do. We might not be back. I might be. But when i leave you know masthead with last way though my live live release and you have to keep saying that i am the people. I'm not the pig and people are going to have a better. Where in response to the black panthers growing popularity in the us and globally. The fbi declared war on the organization but the panther party stood firm. Chairman fred hampton was an unapologetic socialist. He was clear eyed about the mission of the black panthers they were the vanguard party fighting to achieve with hampton call utopia a communist state and get their armed revolutionary struggle he was able to make revolutionary revolutionary principles very logical and he. He wasn't afraid like the necessity of violence. He had no fear in terms of talking about the reality of finished. So against fascism speaking of planning ryan kugler is one of the producers of judas and the black messiah he also spoke plenty about not fearing death because for people to be somebody gave him. The fear of death has to be preyed on me. You know he would say things if you afraid to die did think about me. They don't do no revenue act. Forget about me. I will not go work for like we always be if you make vivid at the age of twenty and i want to make that commitment on the call the revamped to young now live below what you did our if listen to that from the lens of pressure. That's a very terrifying. Dany sought that he made oppressors afraid. There's a true science name was effective that he was assassinated by the most powerful government on a plan that time. So think about you. Think about being you know so good at something that the most powerful government a word is like we have killed his in they do and challa snuffy everything about this partial only modi ice. How many 'cause i you go die. Relatives there in the international tasks trouble. I think they're still going to come whilst you heal from the People the whole purpose of the movies to humanize this individual and these people and the thing is you're trying to humanize someone who has superhuman. He like i believe that if we made a straight up story about them new in believe it he didn't sleep he chain smoked. He drake bottomless cups of coffee. He didn't addle nobility so that kill. Fbi director j edgar hoover wrote and nine hundred sixty eight that one of the goals of his counterintelligence program known as co intel pro was to prevent the rise of a messiah could unify and electrifies militant black nationalist movement nearly two years later on december four thousand nine hundred sixty nine before dawn more than a dozen law enforcement officers raided fred hampton's of west chicago apartment hampton was shot to death in his bed. He was twenty one years. Old black panther mark clark was also killed in the decades. Since hampton's death writers filmmakers in playwrights have all approached chairman junior and his mother a cohen jerry. Asking for their help with their blessing in telling the senior chairman story and for decades. They've declined so why now we'll be right back This podcast is brought to you. By warner brothers pictures judas and the blog messiah the golden globe but critics choice and sag award nominated film now playing in theaters and streaming exclusively on. Hbo max for thirty one days. It's time the world knows the truth about chairman. Fred hampton watch the film no his name shares legacy judas and the black messiah rated arm. Hi welcome back. This is the judas. Black messiah official podcast. I'm elvis mitchell ryan kugler and his wife and producing partner zinzi premiered his directorial debut fruitvale station at the two thousand thirteen sundance film festival. That's where they met shocking trapped by a blizzard. They all had dinner together. They talked and bonded. Been tight so no shocking. I had an he. We all had a chance to work together with his family and stuff. It became kind of a ritual like whenever we were in europe. We were stopped by his house. Checking in with mom and dad. Dinner in two thousand seventeen ryan. Since he took a break from their film black panther and went to visit chaka. He told the couple about a script he was working on. It was based on an idea that the comic duo lucas brothers had originally brought to shock up. The story of chairman. Fred hampton's assassination told from the perspective of william o'neil the car thief who infiltrated illinois chapter and helped the f. b. i. Plan hamptons murder ryan. Zinzi loved the idea. And once they finish a black panther they came aboard producers. got into developed. Me into that process. Shock was like. We're gonna do this. You have to meet with chairman's fan. We can't make this. What about the blessed novus fam- so ryan zinzi shock and producer. Charles king all went to chicago and try to do with other filmmakers at failed to pull off a they met with chairman for junior who now lives at the hampton house. His father's childhood home and we sat down to make. The film was really intimidating. He had a couple of four panthers air. Who knew father you know. This was the first of many negotiations with amps family. There were skeptical. It became ryan's job. Do most of the convincing for the beginning. He and fred junior and formed a bond so why he made several trips to charon's place in west chicago back. I'm thinking wash august. He didn't wanna do it. And we didn't want the experience to be invalidate man like somebody who's the wash them in the final like the family had like condemned pfleger reason. I was valid. So they kept negotiating. He talks to the filmmakers about their vision and he still was like. It was several sticking points that he was like. You guys can adjust this. I can't come on board for about a year and a half. It went like this. Fred junior several former panthers and his mother quinn jerry or mama kula pushing back on the film's title or how the panthers dressed or how much the panthers smoked at one point early in the process chairman. Fred whole ryan that they wanted to have a sit down with daniela. And dominik fish back the actors hoop plan because father and mother chaka king and producer charles gang came to the meeting was at the hampton house. Everyone gathered around a big table with a black and blue panther symbol in the center. I mean we look around a table for seven hours and daniel question well into the night chairman. Said i wanna go round the table and no i wanna you wanna do this movie. And he's start with you today. You know that. Oh and here's just kind of speaking to us about what's her intentions fourteen in his story. And what we stand for. You remember the night well. It was just chairman and macos just asking questions that really go to the core of the way we do what we do and not they end. Chairman was like the wanna take. Take the to a hood. You pick experts one. Google worst neighborhood of chicago. Because our dreary towns gonna be kinda hot and my recollection. I was like yo you told me. You told me what i need to go. And he was like. Yeah if you want to. If you're gonna pay the chairman of as cool. I respect that you know someone pulled up the west. Chicago neighborhood call k. Tom where just a couple of days earlier. Eleven people were shot and two were killed. It was late. It was past midnight. And i said okay. Let's go let's go right. They're going to continue. This meteorite their chairman daniel. Dominique and charles king all drove decay town. Chairman show them sidewalk memorials. He said had been defaced by the police for me. How i think gem was looking at me seeing how i was. I think that moment something shifted but for me was like i understood. I have fear in. Because i i understand the gravity of what i'm stepping into and the gravity of what that means to chairman and it's the least i could do how i saw it. I'm from the real world from the industry and understand that certain things you need to go through for someone to st. what you're about an unfil- that you are going to carry a man that means so much to them chairman. Freedom aku has tested daniel and dominique's intentions and they're metal and the family was impressed but the negotiations between the family in the filmmakers weren't over just yet in our next episode producer. Ryan kugler and chairman. Fred hampton junior. Talk about some of those sticking points early in production now how their friendship helped you chairman from just walking away and i'll talk to mother cooler chairman seniors widow about how they met and seeing the story brought to life in this film. This podcast is production of ninety nine percent invisible proximity media and warner brothers. The series is written by christopher. Johnson are supervising producer when mars is our editor. Our senior producer delaney hall. Everybody don is our associate producer special. Thanks also to producer image fitzgerald. Our music was composed by sean real. Graham has our fact checker. Bryce bonds mix engineer special. Thanks to leyla wills are sink producer in chicago. Some of the audio on this episode trailers from the film and the trailer for the murder of fred hampton to us courtesy of the chicago film archives footage from fred hampton like panthers in chicago is a copyrighted video freaks courtesy of video data bank at the school of the art institute of chicago. Thanks also the cbs news. And the apr guy for their footage. I'm your host elvis mitchell. See you next time. Radio to x.

Fred hampton panthers chicago black panther party illinois ryan kugler Chairman fred hampton cubs Fred elvis mitchell swimming ryan kofler maywood Martin luther king pactel Nancy hustle lissa black panther party Shocker king hampton Daniel columbia
Review: Judas and the Black Messiah Tells a Tragic, Real-Life Story of Revolution and Betrayal

TIME's Top Stories

06:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Review: Judas and the Black Messiah Tells a Tragic, Real-Life Story of Revolution and Betrayal

"Judas and the black messiah tells tragic real life story of revolution and betrayal by stephanie's accurate to tell the story at the heart of shock kings bracing and mournful picture judas in black messiah. You have to begin at the end on december fourth nineteen sixty nine illinois black panther leader. Fred hampton was killed along with another young panther activist. Mike clark in a predawn raid by chicago. Police law enforcement claimed that they faced a rain of gunfire as they approached the apartment. Where hampton clark and several other black panther party members were staying but subsequent investigation concluded that the police had fired roughly one hundred times and that nearly all of the shells and bullets recovered in the shootings. Aftermath had come from police. Weapons hampton was twenty one years old when he died shot in his sleep. There was evidence to that. The fbi had been tracking hampton ruthlessly. And that's the angle king explores here in judas in the black messiah daniel color. Julia plays hampton the charismatic chairman of the illinois. chapter of the black panther. Party la keith. Stanfield is william. O'neil a party. Member on the head of hampton security detail as. Well as an fbi informant judas. In the black messiah is a somewhat fictionalized version of fact the story of two men who were supposedly devoted to the same 'cause one that arose in response to the country's entrenched racism and who's urgency was intensified by the despair that followed the assassination of martin luther king junior but it's also a story about one man's betrayal of another a breach of loyalty that would destroy the lives of both men roughly twenty years apart. The story of their dual fates has a shakespearean ring to it and king leans into that sonorous cadences if the movie leaves you with justified rage at what happened to hampton. It also teases out complex feelings about what can happen to a man when he sells his soul for illusory riches corpses represent only one kind of death. The death of ideals can be just as sorrowful when we first meet him. Stanfield o.'neil is a wily car thief whose mo involves disguising himself as an fbi agent so he can drive off with the goods. The idea sounds preposterous. But it actually works until it doesn't o.'neil gets caught and the real fbi agent. Who interrogates him. Roy mitchell jesse. Plemmons is so impressed by his guns. Oh ingenuity that. He offers a deal instead of going to jail. O.'neil can work through his sentence by infiltrating the chicago black panther party. O'neill finds himself drawn to the party's goals and ideals. Even as he's dazzled by the prospect of living the high life represented by. Trappings like good cigars and find scotch that mitchell dangles before him as o'neill burrows deeper into his elicit work he also draws closer to hampton a figure whose rising and the party speeches are eloquent and galvanizing and he's easily earned. The loyalty of the group's members the panthers motivated to drastically change a system that had long kept them beaten down took their role as revolutionary seriously. They believed in arming themselves and they were willing to use violence if necessary king dramatizes some of that violence without necessarily condoning. It or romanticizing. It he also depicts instances of the police bathing and taunting members of the panthers and their community spoiling for a fight but if the panthers generally assumed an intimidating stance they also administered breakfast programs for kids and sought to improve education for young people as a means of empowerment. Hampton disavowed violence but judas and the black messiah puts more emphasis on his desire to improve the lives of the people in his community. He hopes to build the medical center. He brings together a multi-racial coalition that includes disenfranchise white people and local gang members who might otherwise be the panthers enemies and he falls in love with the young woman. Deborah johnson played by dominique fish. Back who not only sees poetry in him but also helps lighten his burden of self seriousness. Colo years portrayal of hampton has a capacious magnetism as if to capture not just the spirit of one man but also the potential that had already begun to bloom around him a future. He was ready to grow into this. Hampton is ever thoughtful given somewhat to brooding but mostly to action. He's cautious about his new friend and follower o.'neil but ends up being won over by him because stanfield plays him. O.'neil is a natural seducer smart seemingly sincere and just awkward enough to be endearing in one scene perched expertly between tents and funny several panthers momentarily suspect o'neill as a traitor challenge him to hot wire car as proof that he actually knows how to do it. He pulls it off but not without sweating and fumbling and this is where you see his true vulnerability. He's eager to pass any test of authenticity. The panthers may throw at him because he longs to truly be one of them even as he prepares to send the man he most respects down the river. If color julia is the backbone of judas and the black messiah stanfield. It's agonized soul. William o'neill wrote his own tragedy and stanfield breathes life into it here. A confused twisting spirit forever trapped in hell of its own making.

fbi neil hampton hampton clark Stanfield Julia plays hampton la keith panthers Fred hampton illinois hampton Mike clark Roy mitchell jesse Plemmons black panther party chicago black panther party Judas neill burrows stephanie neill
SYSK Selects: How The Black Panther Party Worked

Stuff You Should Know

1:11:50 hr | 9 months ago

SYSK Selects: How The Black Panther Party Worked

"Stuffy. She knows brought to you by square with everything that's going on. It's been a tough time for small businesses. If you run a business, square can help you adapt like with tools for selling online. You can up an online store with pickup delivery and shipping in just a few steps, and if you're selling person, square can help you accept contactless payments like apple. Pay All these tools work together. No matter where you're selling, see all the ways that square can help you get back to business by visiting square dot com slash. Go slash stuff. Hey everybody I want to talk to you about. Realtors fight for equality in the real estate market, which is extraordinarily important in building strong communities, which is another thing that realtor stand for they are our allies that reflect your values and experts in helping you choose the right house to call home. Not all real estate agents are realtors. Only realtors are members of the national. Association of Realtors and they abide by a code of ethics that promises honest treatment to everyone so when you're buying or selling your home, make sure your agent is a realtor. Hey everybody. It's me Josh and for this week's S. K. selects a chosen. How the Black Panther. Party worked and I think you probably know why did. I know a lot of people listen to stuff. You should know as an escape from the rest of the world from the terribleness of news and politics, and all of that stuff and we get that, and we're actually grateful that we can provide that kind of distraction for people under normal circumstances, but these aren't normal circumstances and right now is not a time to be distracted, and it's definitely not a time to be silent. And, so I hope that you will listen to this episode about the history of the struggle for civil rights in human rights that black people in America have undertake, and that helps you understand better, the struggle that's going on in America right now. And I know that a lot of people who listened to stuff. You should know. Don't necessarily agree with this politically. That's fine we get that. That's wonderful, too. But. We don't have to agree politically to agree that human rights matter for everybody and right now every single one of us every single one of you listening to my voice right? This moment has a once in a lifetime opportunity to do something about it to stand up in a use your voice to help other people be treated equally and make this country a better place. You can't argue with that. More people, having more human rights can only make America a better place. Just being a stuff you should know listener means that you love to learn well now as a really really good time to learn about what life has been like all of these years for people of Color in America. And I hope you will I hope you'll open your hearts and your minds to all the people who are trying to teach us right now. Thanks for listening and thanks for listening. Welcome stuff. You should know a production of iheartradio's how stuff works. Hey, and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Josh Clark in. There's Charles W Chuck Bryant. It's just the two of us. Know producer today we're producer free. Just the two of us we could make it if we try. Let's try chuck you and I. I think we're both pretty excited about this one. Yeah, this. This is going to be good when I love my history. As do you sure especially contemporary history and especially? History I didn't get taught in high school. I. Don't remember learning much about the Black Panthers now in high. None so Charles. You didn't know much about the Black Panthers. I didn't either a little bit. Yeah, I. I I guess we were probably in about the same the same boat you know I went to college. Yeah I don't recall learning much in college about them either but I I guess I mean I. Knew a little bit here. There are some of the highlights, but it was. It was in researching that I realized just how much. If you, if you don't actually go, research it just how? How completely wrong? A lot of this stuff is not just in detail, but in like overall tone. Does you know like you get the idea that The Black Panthers were nothing, but like racist terrorists who basically wanted to kill all whites and take over the white. House not true. No, no, not really in and after further digging, it turns out that. A lot of that image that that most people have today who don't really know much about the Black Panthers that idea comes from a misinformation and smear campaign carried out very purposefully by the FBI back in the sixties and seventies, yes, by Boy I mean. Let's just call him divisive that the risk of Smearing someone, but has there ever been more more divisive individual in this country? Perhaps well, who knows now, but J. Edgar Hoover. Yeah I mean my God FBI Director for life. I WanNa say we should do a podcast on him, but definitely be a two parter because he worked for one hundred and eighty seven years. Well. We I should say that smear campaign and there was a lot of other stuff to that campaign well beyond smearing but it had a name coin tell pro counterintelligence program, yeah, and that in and of itself deserves its own one or two parter episode to Yeah I mean at one point J. Edgar Hoover came out in the news and said that the Black Panther Party was the single greatest threat to the United States of America right and this was during the Vietnam War. I mean it. For, the uninformed like you, said people. Thought all right well, and it was not coincidentally from that point forward is when the cops really were like, are we? Can we truly don't have to even respect civil? Liberties at this point, right? We can go in and shoot people in their sleep. Right exactly and what's crazy. Chuck is when he said that it was less than three years after the the Black Panther party was formed. Yeah, so let's go back to the beginning. Actually we'll go back before even the founding of the Black Panthers is provide some context right. Yes, so this is the roughly the. Tail End of the Jim Crow era right right before right at the new deal era and If you're black in America, your experience whether it was in the south where it was just. Even more openly and overtly hostile. or in the cities of the north, you were probably. Just statistically speaking, it was likely that you were poor. That you. Probably had routine especially. If you're a black man. Black Man under a certain age that you were routinely mistreated, harassed beaten or possibly murdered by police and. There was a tremendous amount of racial tension and results right. Yeah, not just up. I mean we're talking pretty much any major city. And is but especially in the south in the south. Actually there was a guy whose name was Robert Williams and he was N. Double ACP leader in North Carolina and he wrote a book back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty five, and he called it. Negroes with guns, advocated blacks, arming themselves and carrying out violence in self defense in the face of this racial mistreatment, right, yeah, and he williams actually kind of codified or enshrine into book form this idea that was pretty predominant southern blacks. It was like look this. This is stuff real and we need to defend ourselves. And that ideas spread a little bit to the cities here there and it germinated in the minds of a lot of guys. A couple of college kids in Oakland named Bobby Seale and Huey Newton. Yes and they officially formed it was. Called? The Black Panther, party for self-defence, initially, it was eventually truncated in Oakland in nineteen, sixty, six and there. We'll we'll. We'll go through their because they had boy sort of a roller coaster ride of as far as. What they did as a group and as a party, but initially. Kind of the whole thing was self defense. We need to defend ourselves against police brutality, right and this nonviolent civil rights movement is is great. We Love Martin Luther King Junior and what he's doing, but it's going to slowly in the meantime we're getting beaten and killed in the streets by law enforcement so we need to do something. We need to be proactive and do something about that right exactly and Robert. Williams may have written the book, but that the the guys who formed the Black Panther seal in new. They weren't the first black rights group to advocate militancy. Although again you have to point out like they advocated violence and self defense, not a aggression right. Yeah, which is why they specifically chose the Black Panther as their I guess you'd say Mascot, but as their name mascot makes it sound like a baseball game or something but There's a quote here from Bobby. Seale Co founder. Founder and he said that he said you know the nature of a panther I looked it up. If you it into a corner that panthers, try move left or right to get you to get out of the way, but if you keep pushing back into that corner, sooner or later, that Panther is going to come out of that corner and try and wipe out who keeps oppressing in that corner. And that was sort of the idea like. Hey, listen, we're trying to sidestep. We're trying to do the right thing, but if you keep coming at us then we're going to defend ourselves. Yeah, exactly and. Again, they they weren't the first people to come up with this. And they looked around and kind of survey. The black rights movements that were around there were and they kind of said this one works a little bit, but that part of it doesn't work or this this one we we don't agree with, but it's a nice sentiment like the mlk. civil rights movement. They like. You said they said this isn't working. It's not happening fast enough, or it's not happening at all and some other groups and people like stokely Carmichael and h rap Brown who were the heads of the nonviolent student Coordinating Committee, where some of the first black leaders to publicly break with mlk's nonviolent theory and say no. We need to meet violence with violence Malcolm X. was another one and Malcolm X. Probably had the biggest influence on the Black Panther ideology than anybody else yet. He advocated black militancy. Included violence. He advocated black self sufficiency indignity. he didn't necessarily say You were only gonNA. With the help of other blacks, we need to exclude whites or other racists from our struggle, and the the Black Panthers is specifically Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. Really identified with that, and that was actually that became one of the hallmarks of the black panthers that they were willing to work with other like-minded groups regardless of race. So that was kind of a big one. That I wasn't aware of that I learned from this and then the the other aspect of Malcolm X. really formed like one of the foundation keystones the black. Panther ideology is that it wasn't race. That was the problem it was. Class they were basically avowed Marxists right that yeah, the central the central issue that created the struggle. was was class was capitalism, and that the white establishment and the police and the government were keepers of the capitalist structure, and that same capitalist structure was keeping the black, the black people in America down, and so to get to to rise up to become self sufficient to get that chance that they needed to grow in advance themselves. They had to get rid of the capital structure itself. Yeah, they were a very much into the socialist ideal and one of the first. First things they did was. They realized they needed sort of a an a foundation on which to build upon something easily digestible that people could could look at and could read and understand what they're all about so very smartly early on. They came up with a very specific What they call their ten point program what we want and what we believe and They wrote this out. We're GONNA read them in a second, but they wrote them out and then. Immediately print them on thousand sheets of paper, and set up an office and started passing these things around. This office was in Oakland. Which is where I think we already said where they founded. And You know they basically quit their jobs. Every member of the Black Panther party was a fulltime I guess you could say employee but full-time worker member. Yeah, member, yeah, and They gathered their paychecks few guys at the very beginning and rented an old shop, a storefront base and started handing out this ten point program. Yeah, they did and You to go over the program I, yeah, we might as well just go ahead and read all tin so everybody knows what we're talking about right. number one. We want freedom. We want power to determine the destiny of our black community. We believe that black people will not be free until we are able to determine our destiny. Yup, number two. We want full employment for people. We believe that the federal government is responsible and obligated to give every man employment or guaranteed income. We believe that if the White American businessmen will not give full employment than the means of production should be taken from the businessmen and place in the community so. So that the people of the community can organize and employ all of its people, and give it a high standard of living number three. We want an end to the robbery by the White Man of our black community We believe that this racist government has robbed us. And now we are demanding the overdue debt of forty acres and two mules number four. We want decent housing fit for shelter of human beings. We believe that if white landlords will not give decent housing door, black community than the housing and the land should be made into cooperative, so their community with government can build make decent housing for its people yet and this. That was a big one, and as you'll see a lot of what they were after was. Just like? The ability to live in a neighborhood where you could have a decent school in a decent place to live and a chance at work. Like, it was some radical thing that they were after. You know they just wanted the same opportunities. Basically, yeah, and I said earlier that if if you were living in your black and living in America in the sixties chases. Are you poor thirty two percent of all black people? All black people in the United States were living below the poverty line in Nineteen, sixty, six, seventy one percent of the poor living in metropolitan areas were black, and in nineteen sixty eight two thirds of the black population lived in ghettos. Well, so yeah a like. Of course it makes sense that their agenda is. We want to just get to get to basic normal and go from there. all right number. Five we want education for people that exposes the true nature of this decadent American society we want education that teaches us are true history and our role in present day society. number six. We all black men to be exempt from military service. This is a big one. We believe that black people should not be forced to fight in the military service to defend a racist government that does not protect us. We will not fight and kill other people of Color in the world who liked black people are being victimized by the white racist government of America. Yeah, and you know later on in their During the Vietnam, war they actually some of them traveled to Vietnam and Kind of common ground with the North Vietnamese. Right, it was very interesting. IS IT my turn? It is number seven. We want an immediate into police. Brutality and murder of black people pretty much speaks for itself. Yep but part of that was that they they they point out that the second amendment to the Constitution. Guaranteed the right to bear arms, and that's going to be a big big part of the Black Panther Party, they were. Credited historically as being basically the ones who pointed to the Second Amendment and said Hey, we were advocates of gun rights. Yeah we'll. We'll get to all that. It gets pretty juicy. Number Eight. We want freedom for all black men held in federal State County and city prisons in jails. They it says that they believe that all black people should be released from prison because they have not received a fair and impartial trial number nine. We want all black people when brought to trial to be tried in court. Jewelry of their peer group or people from their black communities as defined by the Constitution of the United States. Number ten. We want land, bread, housing, education, clothing, justice in peace, and as our major political objective united nations-supervised plebiscite to be held throughout the black colony, in which only black colonial subjects will be allowed to participate for the purpose of determining the will of black people as to their national destiny. They're basically saying we believe that black should. Have the power to separate from the United States from the white establishment and form their own self sufficient and respected self governing body basically right. So. They took these ten this ten point program. They founded a newspaper. Called the Black Panther and they sold that for twenty five cents. It got to be a very popular newspaper. had a really wide circulation, and it wasn't just You know black communities. There were there were all kinds of people reading this a newspaper, and it kind of aside from donations and stuff from various groups. It really kind of funded. The organization was assailed the paper, right and every single issue I. believe featured this ten point program on the inside cover. And quick shot out to the artwork of emory. Douglas If you've ever a saw, this great documentary called the Black Panthers Vanguard of a revolution I watched that, too, and this artwork from this you know artists and graphic designer. Emory Douglas. That was kind of the hallmark of the paper was just gorgeous, stuff, and I think he's one of those his sort of not been lost to history, but you know I had never heard of him before. I think he did it cover for one of the additions of native son. His I I was looking I was like that looks really familiar. Yeah, that's where I saw it before. It's really good stuff, yeah! So Chuck. We've got the ten point plan. And the the. Original headquarters in Oakland and all of a sudden the panthers start spreading like wildfire like their ideas, because the experience was so similar as far as poverty and being harassed and brutalized by police, and just generally being held down by the white establishment, since then experience was so similar throughout all the all the major cities, and even smaller cities in the United States yeah. The black, Panther, party spread pretty quick. And eventually they had something like five thousand members and remember that doesn't sound that much like that many people, but like you said to be a member. You're committed to the black. Panther Party twenty four seven. Yet you quit your job. You had to quit school and your your life was the Black Panther Party. Yeah, so the fact that they had five thousand people doing that around. The country is pretty nuts. They have many more supporters. And the Black Panther newspaper eventually grew to a circulation of about two hundred, fifty thousand. It's amazing. It really is and I guess we'll. We'll get back to their history after this. Hey everybody of you ever heard of June gloom. We don't understand the sun is out. Birds are chirping. There's all sorts of reasons to feel happy in June. That's right and I. Tell you another way to not be gloomy. Go to that mailbox and find delivery for me on these. I remember when I got that first pair they were so comfy, and then they got superfund with all these cool prints. I call him fundings at home me undies is June personified there irresistibly soft? They're sustainable and they even have a beautiful June offer for stuff. You should know listeners. That's right for any first time, purchasers you can get fifteen percent off and free shipping, and you gotta give the softness to try everyone. You have one hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed. Go to me, UNDIES DOT com slash stuff to get fifteen percent off your first order, free shipping and one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee. That's me undies dot com slash stuff. Career and Application Development GD means owning the opportunity to impact the preparation of our nation for the future join DDAT for challenging work that advances your career apply now at GD dot com slash careers GDI t is an equal opportunity employer disability veteran. Jaw! I? All right so if you want to start. If you WANNA start anything that you want to grow and be noticed then. It sounds kind of silly to talk about, but you need to be good at branding. Yeah. It's true and I don't know that they specifically thought about it as branding initially, but they quickly realized that the media really eight this stuff up when these black men in in leather, black leather car coats and black turtlenecks in black berets, donning shotguns with the you know. The ammunition draped around their shoulder. The press aided up it was it was a cool look and young black men wanted to look like this. black women started growing out Afros. I, it was all kind of sort sorta tied into the black is beautiful movement which was sort of just the notion of embrace your blackness? Don't try to fit in and look you know. Don't straighten your hair. Don't try and look like white people like where you're does shaky. grow your Afro Out. Be Proud of who you are as a black person. Embrace your roots, and the Black Panther Party was really tied into this, and it became a really big part of their branding recruitment. Yeah, if you were hip at this time like you were definitely hip to the Black Panther, look even if you haven't adopted at yourself, you're like there's a cool cat down the street with a bandolier of bullets in shock. So the panthers head the look, they had the offices now they had the newspaper and one of the first things they started doing even before they really started to spread, but those first. Panther members. Huey. Newton, Bobby Seale, and then a guy named Bobby Hutton. was there I recruit one of the first things they started doing was patrolling the neighborhoods of Oakland and looking for police who had stopped. Black motorists right. It was almost like a A. A Guardian Angels that protected citizens from cops. Right. That's a really good way to put it right so they would stand. There at a reasonable distance, and just openly an obviously observed traffic stop and they would shout you know at the cop anytime. He started violate the civil rights of the the black driver and they were armed. They were holding shotguns. oftentimes not necessarily pointed at the cops, but in that in that documentary. We mentioned they would talk about how like they would kind of bring. It is move it from side to side right Kinda shifting position, as did it slowly was aimed for a moment at the cop and the COP got the point like yeah I get it. You have alluded shock, and it's right there, and you could shoot me and some of the first Some of the first traffic stop monitoring. That happened. Just scare the bejesus out of the COPS. They'd never experienced anything like this. Before. All of a sudden, there were a group of young black men, standing there in blackberries, shades at night, holding shotguns trained on them from time to time and The cops actually responded in exactly the way the Black Panthers did they. They were much more hesitant to brutalize or violate civil rights of the drivers and a lot of times. They just get in their cars and leave especially if they were on patrol alone, yeah! So that was one of the huge early foundational hallmarks of of the Black Panther party that they were openly an armored Louis, protecting their fellow blacks from police brutality that was that was one of their major roles. Yeah, and the reason that they were allowed to have guns, because one of their one of their leaders eldridge cleaver. found in the. California, a lawbooks that. I mean they call it a loophole, but it wasn't really a loophole right there in black and white is you are allowed to carry a gun in public on public property as long as it's not concealed. Carry Law and so they were like all right well. We have these guns. It says right here we're allowed to. They would carry a gun in one hand a lot of time, and then this California legal handbook in the other, and they knew it by heart. They could quote exactly the code and you know obviously. The cops caught on the word got around what was going on and. It developed all the way to the California in General Assembly and when you see the documentary, it's it's amazing man, these these black, the Black Panther party marches. Through the building onto the floor of the California generalists, simply wielding shotguns loaded shotguns and you. You know you see all the obviously the white legislature to sitting there like what in the world is going on including Ronald Reagan well. Yeah, he was the governor, right and so Ronald Reagan was the governor the time and he is in that documentary quoted as saying like anybody who thinks you know carrying open loaded guns. In public is okay, is out of his mind, and ultimately signed a anti open carry law. That closed that loophole. Yeah, the MO I act right so Reagan signed some gun control legislation, big gun control legislation in an effort to curb those patrols by the Black Panthers, yeah not so obviously you hear. All Right Ronald Reagan does this you think where's the NRA? So I looked up I was like all right. What was just the climate of the time? Apparently in the late sixties are a I. It wasn't until the late seventies nineteen seventy seven. When a guy named. Carter took over the NRA is when they really stepped it up with the Second Amendment Rights. More strict version of the second amendment, right and so the NRA was silent and obviously Reagan being very tough on guns. He had I guess you could call it. A conversion in the nineteen eighties S as well And then he and the NRA teamed up together and started saying things like well. No, it's it's okay. You can totally have guns. Right, this also happened to coincide with the break up of the Black Panther Party. Yeah when they win, the NRA and Reagan change their stance on gun rights. Yes, one thing you said was that it was eldridge cleaver who noticed loophole? It was Huey Newton. He was the one who who really had that. MIND FOR LAW. eldridge cleaver was much more the militant revolutionary. Yeah, and he was already a bit of a darling in the intellectual circles for a book of essays he'd written in prison called soul on ice. And so he joined the Black Panther Party pretty early on as their minister of information in large part, their official spokesman, and he. Brought an air of real credibility and legitimacy and got a lot of left leaning intellectuals. And you know entertainment type like Brando was a big one who is in favor of party supporter, but they really started to pay attention to the Black Panthers. eldridge cleaver joined yeah in his wife. Kathleen cleaver was also one of the We might as well go and talk about women in the Black Panther Party You. Know like most organizations at the time that it was It was sort of from the top down down, a male driven organization and they did have Kathleen cleaver, and they had Elaine Brown, who also sort of one of the higher ups, but it was still an even they admit it was still somewhat of a chauvinistic organization and most of the women were didn't make it pass what they called the rank and file operating the nuts and. And Bolts Secretary or secretarial work, and just kind of making the thing go, so it was you know on one hand? They did give women some positions of power, but never kind of at the top. Well now there were i. mean like you said You name two of the big big exception to that rule, but they were big exceptions like Kathleen. Cleaver was the first. First woman, who was a member of the decision, making body and Elaine Brown took over as chair party chair like the top official after Huey Newton split for Cuba, nineteen seventy-three, but like you said most of the women in the Black Panther Party were rank and file, but it doesn't mean that gender roles were totally rigid in the party. Like for example you would just as often or frequently. Frequently see women out armed doing patrols of the neighborhood. Yeah, while men were the ones responsible for some of the survival programs, the community programs that we'll talk about. Yeah, well, Brown said they tried that in had minor successes was all right. Yeah in the documentary. She said that was sort of what she tried to do. Is Reverse some of the roles? And she said there was still. A sexist attitude, and which was a problem within the organization because. You can't be true community organization if you have that oppression going on within your own group in gender, since yeah, and especially if you know, women are the ones who are doing a lot of the actual work like something like fifty to seventy percent of Panther membership was female at one point, so yeah, you got to respect the people who are actually doing the work or else you got. an arrogance problem at the top. Yeah, and we should mention to that Kathleen. Cleaver is a professor. Right here in Atlanta at our own emory university. Law Professor Yeah Yeah. She went on to get a Lotta degree from Yale and After years of living in exile, which will get to? All right, so you mentioned the survival programs and If. You don't know what that you might be saying. What in the world is Josh talking about? They had their police brutality program. So that's kind of what made. The news was patrolling the streets with these guys keeping the cops and check, and by the way we should mention that they're the ones who came up with the term pigs as a derogatory term for police officers from their first appeared in their newspaper in it caught on pretty quick. Yeah, so that was that was kind of what they made the news for at first, but I think especially Huey. Newton realized early on that. They can make a real difference in the community if they get these social programs going that. You know they're not being taken. Care of their schools are bad. These kids don't have access to like good food, even and they. They read that you know science scientifically speaking that a good breakfast is has a big impact on how a child learns the day so they started this breakfast program where they would give I mean I. Think at one point. They were feeding like twenty thousand children free breakfasts around the country. To every day every day every morning, twenty thousand children around the country who otherwise would have gone to school, Hungry in St Hungary the whole day. Ate Breakfast because the black. Panther party fed them every day every school day around the country. That's insane. Yeah, they started medical clinics. Free clinics called the People's free medical, center they offered vaccines testing for diseases treated basic illnesses cancer screenings, basically the social services that White America fully enjoyed or I should say white America of a certain class fully enjoyed, and started offering up these programs, which kind of became one of the hallmarks of the party. Yeah, they weren't just this militant group. Trying to keep cops in check any longer. Than that was a huge huge I mean that was as big, if not bigger than their, their militant objectives is serving the community through the survival programs to right absolutely, and they funded these programs largely through donations which they would go out and solicit from the community around the city's right. Yeah, and apparently you at least didn't give something a few like no. I'm not giving you a dime. The Panthers would would out you in their newspaper and call for a boycott of your business that you know saying like your. These guys care so little that they won't even chip in dollar for kids to have a free breakfast, yeah! So they had like a real. They headed. A pretty serious organization going by this time that was directed again not just at patrolling, police and fighting police brutality, but also serving the community. Yeah, one of the things they did was they started the Oakland community school yeah, that was a lame Brown and kind her passion project, and it was, it was pretty much free to students, and they had had small classes. They taught poetry. They taught foreign language in current events. They taught Yoga like all these things that the black community had never. Had Access to black history is obviously a big part of it. They had Maya Angelou and Rosa Parks and other civil rights leaders come in and speak at the school, and it operated for nine nine years from seventy, three to eighty, two and cathy cleaver. Has this one great story that she told on CNN about? One young man who came to join the party because he wanted to get a gun and be on the patrol, they handed him a stack of books, and he looked at him, and said I thought you were going to army, and they said back to him I just did. Pretty good, yeah, she dropped the mic right after absolutely did, but I. mean that directly relates to I think point number five on the ten point agenda where it says that they want education for people that that teaches them about themselves that gives them a knowledge of self, said that if a man doesn't have knowledge of himself in his position in society in the world that he has little chance to relate to anything else. Yeah, which is. Exceptionally True Yeah. So, you've got all these programs. I think they had like sixty five programs what they called survival programs in place and it wasn't until apparently these programs. Were starting to really roll and get the attention of in support of a lot of people outside of the communities even that the FBI. Led by J, Edgar Hoover gave its full attention to the Black Panthers and they said about trying to destroy the Black Panther Party we yeah, I mean hoover. Ironically, these social programs are what scared him the most because he knew that that's how you're GONNA get. White Liberals on board on this 'cause. Yeah, which is exactly what happened? I mean like you said they weren't. They didn't shun the help of the white man by any means they like went arm-in-arm with these white lefties. basically watch documentaries. It looks like today. There's you know these college students with beards. Like modern hipsters, yeah, and worked arm-in-arm, and at one point they even got together. Who was the Appalachian Group the Young Patriots, yeah, it's just like you see this video of these black militants like given handshakes and hugs to these Appalachian White Appalachian. I mean rural. White, people. Who all seem like they were like. We have the same problems, and we can just get together, and it's just crazy especially in today's climate all these years later to see that happening back then yeah I, mean they were in favor of anybody regardless as long as they shared, you know kind of the same sentiments or the same struggle in one, thousand, nine, hundred seventy, he newton became the first black leader to ever publicly support gays and lesbians. Yeah, that was a huge deal to yeah absolutely. I mean the point was like you know. The the problem wasn't race the problem was this class struggling. You know everybody of a certain socioeconomic status or who is a worker. Yes, being held back, you know. So you were saying. Hoover was worried about those social programs. Yes, there's a quote from a letter that he wrote to an FBI agent who objected to targeting the survival programs as part of a coin. Tell Pro Yeah. Hoover said you. State in the bureau should not. Interfere in programs such as the breakfast for children, because it many prominent humanitarian, both why am black are interested in the program as well as churches which are actively supporting it? You obviously have missed the point and his point was that you don't leave those programs alone because they have support outside the community, you target them because they have support outside of the community that that was the real threat on me. More than black men patrolling the streets with shotguns, those that was a problem for local law enforcement, and the FBI was worried about it, but more the point they saw that as such A. Flash point a potential flashpoint that they could get the police to shoot and kill arm black men on the street with with. Impunity. That they could deal with that is what they understood was meeting violence with violence, what they didn't know how to deal with aside from completely subverting it and sabotaging was generating goodwill throughout the community through social programs was the real threat to hoover in. His is amazing so this point? The party at the top had gotten a little The foundation had gotten a little loose due to a couple of things going back in time a little bit a few years before Huey Newton was arrested and convicted of killing a police officer which It. On one hand, sort of removed one of the one of the pieces of the foundation which made a little bit weaker at the top on the other hand. It really got people around this Free Huey Newton campaign. Yeah, that was cleavers, phrase, Yeah Free Huey Yeah, and again the white liberals got on board, and it Kinda swept the nation that basically Huey Newton was involved in a shootout with the cops, and was they thought wrongfully imprisoned and kind of railroaded through the system and so in one sense it sort of galvanized the movement in another anytime one of the leaders. Is Operating out of jail. Then that's that's not good, and he wasn't the only one actually I think all three. Of the original Bobby Seale was in and out of jail, a couple of times and I think by this point to cleaver had fled the country to avoid jail, and ended up in Algeria. He did so back in nineteen sixty eight as part of a patrol cleaver and Bobby Hutton, who was the first recruit of the Black Panthers, and by this time was the treasurer of Oakland Chapter they were part of patrol that ended up. was pulled over by two cops, and those two cops ended up dead and everybody in the car. Car fled and Hutton and cleaver fled to a basement where they got in a shootout for ninety minutes with police. The police through in tear gas and tear gas exploded in the basement on fire. Yes, so eldridge cleaver and Bobby Hutton decided that they were going to surrender, so they came out with their hands up. unarmed, and the COP surrounded him and shot Hutton in the head executed him right there on the sidewalk. Yes, and cleaver was taken jail. You may bail and right when he may bell. He's like see you. Split he went to Cuba because Fidel Castro was a long time and big supporter of the black. Panther Party. Sure there's apparently still one of them Amada Sha. Secure I believe. Who is living still in exile in Cuba today, Who is Black Panther? Eldridge cleaver guests didn't like. The climate ended up with Kathleen cleaver in Algeria and formed the the international chapter of the Black Panther Party, and that's where they would receive dignitaries from the North Vietnamese government right from Cuba or any kind of left, leaning Revolutionary Group would come meet them there and that was enormous because all like. Basically no other black liberation or black rights movement group had genuine legitimate and national support. The Black Panthers did and in the eyes of the world that boosted their credibility just through the roof. Oh, yeah, all right so there's a bit of a I. Don't WanNa say power vacuum slight leadership back. Because of the the. top original founders being away from Oakland either jail or Algeria or in and out of jail and It could potentially been filled by young man out of Chicago Fred Hampton and we will get back to fred story right after this. Dog. You know just because you can boil. Water doesn't mean you should run a restaurant and the same logic goes for identity theft protection. You may be good monitoring your credit, but that doesn't make you an authority with data breaches that seem to happen more and more, your personal information could end up anywhere and with your breached information, criminals could commit identity theft, which is even more reason to use a pro yet. Because on your own, you could miss certain identity threats like somebody taking out a payday loan in your name or Or Selling Your Info on the dark web, and that's why lifelock sees a wide range of identity threats, no one can prevent all identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses, but if you end up with an identity theft issue, a dedicated specialists will work to fix it, so keep boiling order like a champ, but leave the identity theft protection lifelock join now and save up to twenty five percents off your first year. Go to lifelock dot com slash stuff. That's lifelock dot com slash stuff for twenty five percent off. Hey Everybody I. WanNa talk to you about your website. That doesn't look good, and that's hard to program, because squarespace does it better. Yeah, they do squarespace. Is this amazing magical tool? You can just basically go, do and all the sudden. You have a website to do whatever you want with. You can use it to sell stuff you can use it to tell your world about all the great thoughts you have, and now base also offers email campaign, so you can take your business embryo it up. Yeah, we use squarespace. Ourself are very popular, S. Y. S. K. Live website keeps track of all were comings and goings on Oliver live shows, and it's always a joy to go in. In there and update the squarespace site because it's so easy, and it always looks great, and it makes me feel smarter than I am. They offer customizable layouts, powerful editing mobile editing, not just for your website, but also for email campaigns to so go check it out. Go to squarespace dot com slash stuff today, so just go to squarespace dot com slash stuff today for a free trial when ready to launch, everyone, use the offer code stuff to save ten percent on your first purchase of a website or domain squarespace. Just go check it out. Jaw. All Right Fred Hampton by all accounts from this documentary in my research seem like he could have been the Bobby Kennedy. Of the Black Panther, party well put, he was vivacious, he was a great speaker. He was You know he would. He would give these speeches in Just galvanize people. He had a great personality and He was really getting kind of the movement back on track again in a big way when he was. Pretty much Pretty much when he was politically assassinated by the FBI Chicago Police Department. Yeah, he was executed for sure. So. What was the nineteen sixty nine year December? Fourth is when the raid went down. So it's something like four am sometime in the wee, hours of the cops kicked in the door, Fred Hampton's house or the house where he was staying and Ninety Bullets think I saw ninety also saw hundred ninety bullets were shot fired from the Chicago Police Department and one bullet was shot by the Black Panthers. That bullet was shot when the bodyguard to Fred Hampton, his name was Mark Clark, was shot and killed and drop the shotgun he was holding in. It went off. Yeah, and we should mention to. This was one of many many what they called. Raids after Hoover Ish issued that edict that they were the the largest and I'm sure there was an internal memo as well which we don't know about. But when he issued the edict that they were the most threatening group to the United, states democracy. It was pretty much open season, and they carried out these raids all over the country where essentially cops would just kick in doors, guns blazing. shoot I don't even ask questions. Yeah, but this was a little more even even worse. It was even more pronounced because this was targeted this. Yes. And it was targeted specifically for Fred. Hampton and it kind of falls in line with this part of CO Intel pro. Coin tell pro. This one of the the foundation of coin tell pro is that it sought to prevent the rise of a black. Messiah. That could consolidate. Yeah, the masses, and that was read Hampton right well. He definitely fell and that was so as mlk. So is Malcolm X. Right. Basically any black leader that was assassinated definitely fell within that so fred. Hampton did as well for sure, so he was assassinated. Not by the FBI by the Chicago PD, but the Chicago PD were able to carry out a targeted raid because the FBI had supplied them with a map drawn by one of their informants of the apartment. Fred Hampton was staying. Yeah, and it was under the guise of they have a stash of guns in there, which they did have a stash of guns and ammunition in there, and that was the excuse they used to go in and shoot him in bed while he slept. Yeah, and if you are questioning whether this was actually an attempt, Fred Fred Hampton's life. Life. Those ninety bullets that were fired most of them went into Fred, Hampton and three people who were sleeping in the same bed is Hampton where he was shot and killed We're not hit by bullets at all. Yeah, including his eight and a half months, pregnant girlfriend, yeah, who they grabbed by the hair and threw into the other room, tore her robe open and you know. The story of the COPS was was they knocked on? The door were denied entry than they open the door and there was a woman aiming shotgun at them On ballistics tests. They did everything and basically figured out. That was one hundred percent sham. All the bullets were were found realistically to have gone into the apartment, none going out of the apartment through the walls and you know in this documentary, they interview a few of the people that are in there and they were dislike. It was mass murderer. They basically just came in and shot the place up. they they examined the angle, the wound that showed that Hampton was lying on his back in bed from somebody standing above him and and nineteen seventy, a coroner's jury ruled the deaths justifiable Everyone got away with it, but the city eventually and the federal judge approved a one point, eight five million dollars settlement, but that wasn't until the nineties Yeah Oh. Yeah, thirteen years later, but the FBI A apparently, the agent who is handling the informant who produced the map was so pleased with the results that after the after the raid that resulted in Hampton's execution he. I Guess Male J. Edgar Hoover with the request for an extra three hundred dollars because he wanted to give the informant a bonus, yeah! One of the. Bigger black is on American history for sure one of the other black guys on the Chicago PD at this time was the one of these raids was on the breakfast for children program where the supplies for breakfast were burned. The place was set on fire by the COPS yeah. So I mean the Black Panthers are like open war. With the FBI and with the police department to the late sixties work Razi. You know yeah, in large part because of this. Yeah, I mean for sure. there was another big shootout, and this is all sort of coming to a head if it feels that way. That's exactly what's going on. In nineteen sixty nine, there was another big shootout, and this was major in I think it was in Los Angeles, wasn't it? Was it was the first time Swat team was ever used yeah, the employed the SWAT team, which was invented by the LAPD and two hundred L. Police and I think it was like six or eight Black Panther Party members were involved in a full-on. You know hour-long gunbattle just right there in the streets. So things are coming to ahead the Sort of the secret plan here by Hoover is working, which is. He wants to fracture the party from within. And so seeds of discontent and discord, so they had been through the years planting informants in the Black Panther. Party in the party, and they knew it. The Black Panthers did so a lot of distress. You know when you know like. Who can you trust a lot of this? This distress happens even among you know the higher ups that were formerly like a pretty strong union, right? And that happened for sure if the case of eldridge cleaver and he Newton when Huey Newton got out of jail, he was eventually freed, and it was a big deal, and they thought this was going to be sort of the the rebirth, the Black Panther Party in the wake of the death of Fred Hampton, but He came out of jail and he and cleaver sort of had different They always sort of had different priorities, but they managed to come together, but they were truly fractured at this point. Yeah. They were noon. Cleaver were like openly criticizing another with still exile, but cleaver had the entire New York. Chapter dedicated to and years prior the Black Panthers head foremost, called the Black Liberation Army yeah, but it was Army of defense until one thousand, nine, hundred seventy one win. I believe he was still in absentia, but l. eldridge cleaver, said Hey. We're GONNA. Take this from defensive to offensive in basically create. Create a new terrorist group out of the black liberation. Army and they started a campaign of violence against cops where they would ambush cops and just kill them. There wasn't any retaliation for police brutality. wasn't self defense like they were ambushing and killing cops, and it happened in cities around the country and the fracture between the Black Panthers, itself was so deep that cleavers faction and Newton's faction were assassinating one another taking out each other's people. So it was a big deal. In the Black Liberation Army officially split from the Black Panthers in Nineteen, seventy one, and of course at this point. Herbert Hoover sitting back in his chair like choking on a cigar from after right because this is exactly what he wanted. Was this infighting and So Newton gets out of jail. He's He's trying to get the social programs going again, but he also is Becomes addicted to drugs, and by all accounts is sort of losing his mind and become power hungry, and his sort of lost the original calling that he had and is gotten drunk with power, and was not functioning mentally like he should have been due to the drugs right, so it was, it was his big. Sort of the beginning of the flameout. Himself in the party. Yeah, for sure his downfall definitely. It didn't exactly mirror the party, but you know it was. It was a herald of one you know. One of the founders was totally losing his his marbles. Yeah, because he was addicted to heroin and cocaine, you know, and he actually had a very sad and He died during a drug deal on the street in nineteen, eighty nine. but he said that he was committing revolutionary suicide by being addicted to drugs, and basically killing himself that way, yeah! some of the other ones had not quite as tragic but strange, and it's like Eldridge cleaver right? Yeah! When he returned from Algeria with Kathleen, cleaver He became I think both of them might have become born again Christians. and. eldridge cleaver eventually became a registered Republican. Did Not. See that coming I did not either and I'm sure a lot of people didn't right, and then you know I mentioned the internal violence with one another right. Yeah, there was a big turning point as far as public sympathy went in nineteen, sixty nine think maybe yeah, nine, hundred, sixty nine. There was a guy named Alex Rakkli. Who is a member of? Of The New York chapter, and he was suspected to be an FBI informant and it still after all these years right never come to light whether he was or not, but the panthers had the idea that he was so they took him to the new haven chapter where he was tortured. They tied him up to a bed import boiling water on his body for days. And then eventually I guess he confessed. Although if you ever listener torture episode, Right False Kosher Yeah you you can get a false confession pretty easy if you torture somebody They took him out to the woods and shot him in the head and chest, and and left him and. He when his body was discovered, bobby had been in new haven speaking at Yale like just hours before the guy was killed, so got charged with the murder. this is one of the founders of the Black Panther, party on trial for murder and during this trial. which he was acquitted, but he the a lot of the infighting came out, and the panthers had managed to keep it out of the public eye, and under wraps for for you know to this point now. It came out in the trial, so people realize that there is a lot of schisms and fractures within the leadership itself. And they lost a lot of public sympathy when they found out that they would carry out. You know extra judicial justice on their own members. Yeah, and It just it was, it was a big thing. It was a big turning point for the party. As far as the public was concerned, yeah and Like I said there were sort of the two factions with with cleaver in Newton. Some people went with cleavers. Some people went with Newton a lot of people. Left the Black Panther Party period at this point because they either didn't know who to give their allegiance to, or they just felt betrayed by this fracture, and the party wasn't what they thought it was. So the numbers are declining. It's it's definitely in sort of freefall at this point and Bobby Seale decides. Here's what we need to do. We need to close down as many chapters as we can, and and pull the resources in the money and bring everyone out here to Oakland, 'cause I'm GonNa. Run for mayor and we need to go all in on this legit push for political candidacy because I think I can win, so they literally called up people on the East Coast and the Baltimore Office in New York offices and said shut him down come. Come here to California and we need to go all in on not only running for mayor, but on a massive voter registration campaign the register you know people in urban communities to vote, so I think in the end they got like fifty thousand New People registered to vote and out of no eight or nine candidates. He finished close enough in second to get a runoff. He got like forty percent of the vote. Yeah, but ultimately lost in a runoff in a narrow a runoff and did not win Which? SORTA was one of the final nails in the coffin for the party. 'cause they had committed so many resources to try and get behind Bobby Seale's run for mayor, and he incidentally still lives in the bay area and is very much still an activist. Yeah Bobby Liz. Yeah, he was also. Did you ever see that documentary on the Chicago Eight? It was like animated. No. It's very good. Yeah! He was one of the Chicago eight and seal. He actually went to prison this before. It's mayoral run. But. He did like four years, or at least was sentenced to four years strictly for. Contempt of court because he he rejected that he was getting a fair trial because I don't think there is a single black person on the jury and he rejected that he was being tried by a jury of his peers, and he kept protesting in the middle of Corden and eventually at one point the judge had him gagged, but he got like four years for that. Yeah, gagged is in literally chained to his seat with tape over his mouth, yes, and You know that that set off all sorts of protests in the streets. People wanted that judge removed I thought that. was that not during the panther. Twenty one trial was at the other one Chicago. Chicago trial now, okay? And that was. That was a different trial. Also where did you ever hear the urban legend that Hillary? Clinton got Bobby Seale out of out of a murder charges. Yes, that was that came out of that Alex radically trial where he was on trial for murder, and he he was acquitted and Hillary Rodham. Clinton was nowhere near the actual trial. Is Terni. She apparently was a law student, Yale still and was coordinating with the Aclu to monitor the trial. So she she was there, but apparently had nothing to do with the Defense Gotcha. But. It was a an urban legend that came out of the two thousand senatorial campaign. Well, the Panther Twenty one. I mentioned just quickly. That was in New York the. New York Chapter Twenty one leaders of the black. Panther party were rounded up and arrested on conspiracy charges, and this is a really big deal. Because New York chapter was one of the biggest ones in the country after Oakland and people got involved and tried to raise money like celebrities got involved in donated money and it at one point I don't know if it still is, but it was the longest criminal proceeding. New York state history of the thirteen month trial by jury, and they're all found not guilty and released. So that, all of them were found not guilty. Yeah, the Panther Twenty one well and that's jumping back in time a little bit and just wanted to mention that. So there's a distinct legacy beyond just the look, the image or black power and black power. We should also say I think it was stokely Carmichael, who, either coined fraser at least was the first really Kinda. Pick it up and run with it. and stokely Carmichael is nuns nonviolent student coordinating committee. They got together with the Black Panthers early on, but if you I mean just in the popular culture, the Black Panthers live on, but the there's. Even more of a legacy as well before he died, eldridge cleaver gave an interview think back in nineteen ninety-seven. and. He said that he basically blamed the gang violence that plagued inner cities in the eighties. He traced that directly to the death of the Black Panthers. Well, he said that as it was, the US government chopped off the head of the black. Liberation Movement and lift the body. They're armed. That's why all these young bloods are out there now they've got the rhetoric, but without the political direction, and they've got the guns interesting, so he he basically traces that directly to the Black Panthers, being taken down. Yeah. You got anything else. Actually do so. We were talking about how you know there's a legacy. There's not just a legacy of the Black Panthers is a legacy of. brutality against black people that apparently is at least as bad if not worse today than it has been chuck. Yeah, so the toast. Tuskegee. University in Alabama has a records of all the lynchings that took place. In the Jim Crow Era, eighteen, ninety to nineteen, sixty, five and two thousand nine hundred eleven, black Americans were lynched during those years and the worst year of the Jim Crow era was eighteen, ninety, two and one, hundred and sixty one people were lynched in two, thousand, fifteen, two, hundred and fifty eight black people were killed by police in the United States so. Not to change in. It's possible that it's gotten worse. But if you look to the black lives, matter movement. They have chosen the way of King. And in preaching non violent rhetoric for social change, rather than the Black Panther rhetoric of militancy and violence self-defense. Yeah, I think a bit of the Black Panther Party. Spirit was alive in the black lives. Matter Movement, for sure yeah, for sure so. Yeah. That's all I've got. That's all I've got good. Yeah. I thought so too man. You ever see the movie. The one with like Mario Van peebles. Yea, he made it he did. He wasn't in it. I don't think okay I know I didn't. I heard it was not good. Yeah, see Malcolm X. Never seen that one. ooh, that's great. Is it yeah? Yeah Spike Lee movie sure. Yeah, really good. Okay I'll check that out. Yeah, the The panther movie was Just read a few reviews it and apparently the the setup is pretty good with some of the history, but then it kinda goes off the rails. Okay in like and not just goes off the rails like bad movie, but bad movie, and not historically accurate or honoring. The matter dance scenes keep breaking out. but I. do think that I was like man. Why hasn't there been a movie made about Fred Hampton. Yeah. He sounds like he's. A. Pretty inspiring figure. Seeing some of those speeches I keep he had gone. He said his one big quote was. we're not going to fight fire with fire. We're going to fight fire with water. Nice saw that was a good one. Yeah, that's a great one. Yeah! That's Black Messiah Talk Right there. If, you want to know more about the Black Panthers. There's a bunch of stuff you can do. You can go onto the site at how stuff works dot com and search those terms. You can go watch Black Panthers Vanguard of revolution. You can watch the black power mix tape. That has a lot to do with the Black Panthers. I haven't seen it yet. Though have you know? Know you can go to Emory University I. Bet and get in touch with Kathleen cleaver may be offered by our coffee. Yep, there's some just a lot of really good articles out there. that just searched black panthers in it'll. There's a lot of I opening history that you didn't learn in school since I said you didn't learn in school. It's time for listener mail. I'm going to call this addendum to rubber trade. From the elastic episode. Guys? Just listened to the one and elastic, so it was fun and informative as usual, but I wanted to call attention to a small important omission you discussing the rubber trading Latin American you only mentioned Brazil, although is indeed the largest exporter of rubber in the area, the Amazon Basin, and the Puccio River. Valley region in Peru and Colombia were also important sites for the production of rubber trees a sadly when you combined global demand with the natural product, result is usually some form of exploitation in the case of rubber. It came to a horrible extreme with the Peruvian Amazon Rubber Company, or as it was known in Spanish, the Casa Arana Name for Julio Cesar Arana. Peruvian businessman that set up shop in the region enslaved tortured mutilated indigenous populations to the brink of extinction in the pursuit of rubber. his crimes were documented made public in nineteen thirteen, but his business and atrocities only stopped when rubber production move to Asia and he couldn't compete This whole rubber bonanzas chronicled in the. Colombian novel, the whirlwind by J E. Rivera today the offices of the company add on or Iran. House are being converted into a historic site. Remembers of local tribes can gather remember those atrocities in their own way, telling your own stories in their own words This is one of those poorly documented poorly discussed examples genocide as a result of trade at least in Columbia. Every kind of economic bonanza is somehow tied to one massacre or another. So, that's the Downer I wanted to share. Who is that? From aw Santiago. Santiago's the person who wrote it. Yes, thanks a lot for writing that Cynthia we appreciate it. Yep, that's a good one nine. This has been like I opening history lesson through and through absolutely. If you WANNA. Give us an eye opening history lesson. We'd love those so get in touch with us. You can tweet us at Josh I'm Clark and S. Y. S. K. podcast. You can hang out with us on facebook at Charles W. Chuck Bryant and stuff you should know you can send us an email stuff podcast at how stuff works dot com, and as always join us at our home on the web stuff. You should know dot com. Stuffy should know is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more podcasts. My heart radio is iheartradio APP apple podcasts and every into your favorite shows. Hi I'm Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and we're the hosts of the science podcasts duff to blow your mind. This show is the altar where we worship the weirdness of reality. If anybody ever told you, you ask the weirdest questions, it is time to come. Join us in the place where you belong the stuff to blow your mind podcast, new episodes publish every Tuesday and Thursday with bonus episodes on Saturdays. Listen to stuff to blow your mind on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. Young World the world is. It is I. The producer of the. Show podcast featuring none other than myself and care for Bari Finish. Following show podcast tip keeping you in the know with the latest you'll, but celebrities, current events and provide free games and listen as a me. Join the talk of the town because it's going down the broiler Marsha podcast baby, don't you? Only cover the latest in entertainment, but we bring you the entertainment directly from the source. That's right. We have celebrity guests. Interviews. Down on the bother alert show podcast. Number one source for the culture, so DJ callous says don't ever play yourself. During the conversation day head on over to the Bowler show. Join me for worrisome. And offered do from the OCC on the baller show podcast. iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast.

Black Panther Party Panther Party COPS Huey Newton eldridge cleaver Oakland America panthers FBI Bobby Seale Fred Fred Hampton J. Edgar Hoover Black Liberation Army Chuck Bryant Black Panthers Vanguard Elaine Brown Cuba Josh Clark United States
Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

32:37 min | 6 months ago

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"Question America. It's. The land of the free and the home of the brain. We have free. Telephones. The plan is being threatened. But we want to live. In. Welcome back Brown girls I'm sean goal the founder of the broncos Guy to politics. We want to. You to our bonus season. Freedom Summer. In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people I. Just I. Love hearing that history so much because you're in the Black Panthers in thirty Rollins, who is the chair of the DNC Blackhawk as she was involved in a Black Panthers Snow I love the fact that they're still so women women around and leadership who are able to tell us so much about her past one more thing about our past which we have to take seriously now Edgar Hoover targeted the black man the party many people were killed people were set up to go to jail I have my file, and if you could see my file in the lies they told are and how they tried to. Set me up in many ways to be killed. It's really a very dangerous that was a dangerous time for us who were involved in the movement. It's a dangerous time now. So we have to be very vigilant about what the what this administration is doing as it relates to these Ray. Armed militia coming into our communities and the danger that's being readily seen by everybody. So coin tell pro with dishes. It was terrible. It really didn't help destroy the Black Panther Party and we cannot let that happen again. And if anyone hasn't watched a documentary or research, the Black Panther Party please do so and with a congresswoman is saying right now is really true because there are several black historians on twitter who have been showing the correlation between what the chorus woman just said with. UH, seeing these rates today and with a did due to the members of the Black Panther party particularly when they saw black and white people coming together to fight the systems of oppression grow to be very vigilant they woke and understand what's going on right Now and then talking about where we are at right now from the Black Panther Party, you have worked on many campaigns to free ran for office yourself including Shirley Chisholm campaign, and you endorse Inter Kamla Harris for president. What has it meant to you to see the evolution of black women's political leadership. God's spent like amazing. It's been. It's hard to really describe because those of us who were like really in the movement and then we're elected to public office could have only done that because of a Shirley because of my mother. Because of those black women who came before it. And it always been for me about making sure that more black women have have a chance to break these glass and marble ceiling and Co two seed this in many ways it's like a quantum leap to see now the movement catching up with what many of us really wanted for years decades is just It's it away as very humbling, but it's like it makes you think, okay, you know we all this is a marathon where in we have to all take the baton and run this lap of this race. And those of us who were activists in movement I say I'm still an activist and move and movement, but I'm also an elected official and so to see so many black women now. Who are bold business airy and saying enough is enough we are here to stay and don't even you know don't even try to say something about taking a back seat to anybody I. Mean it's it's just a remarkable and I'm so happy that hopefully, their struggles won't be like mine. I was there were only like when I was a chief of staff on Capitol Hill to Rondell. there were probably. Maybe. It was caroline who was Shirley Chisholm chief-of-staff myself. I don't even know if there were any other black women chief of staff on the hill i. mean it was like maybe two or three, and then just staff in total on Capitol Hill there may have been ten maybe and I'm saying maybe ten. Okay. So you can understand the trauma of those of us. At the fighting all these battles on the hill with thank God Ron, Dellums, Shirley Chisholm and black members. The CBC members got it and they were very. Conscientious and conscious of hiring. And protected US and supported from all the attacks on the sauce and the the sexism and racism permeated Lil as relates the staffer. Like. In. Is really a beautiful thing for me to see so many black women not have to go through quite as much. They'll a lot to go through, but still we rise. And it's one when the many reasons I have so much respect for you. It's because you are about opening doors and trying to make it a little bit easier for those black women around you those who are coming after you and I appreciate so much that you said that you're an elected official but you're still an activist because something I tell women all the time is that. I actually find the women who start off as activists make really great elected officials because they have that fire in their heart and their soul about doing that community work in it translate so well into policymaking, making for communities so I love that she said that, but you sound so many black women come to elected positions or to corporate America Artsy. Not Top it's coming from movements. Faces where injustice It permeates. Their existence and so I think black women in general you know come to these positions with that type of consciousness and it's integrated into all of our work And I know, I, see it all the time when you're introducing legislation when y'all are on the floor talking and I love how you all back each other up that always is. I'm like that's how it should be. Having women just really they're supporting other women. So thank you for doing that as well and showing that example, we had to stand with Congresswoman Alabama Gop Carpio Cortez based on. This. This gusting bio comments of the bad guy wasting his name. Act No. We came down to that floor and we stood around her and we spoke we we dared them to you know. what the the low life. But anyway, you're right we we didn't even have the tape could rate down there to say something and be with her you all did not and if any of our listeners have not watched yet, please watch congresswoman. Makasiar Krebs Ortez speech it is amazing definitely worth the ten minutes of your time but then also congresswoman Lee and Congresswoman Presley said as well just. It's so important to see women standing in their power like that especially when a white may on try to abuse them and take away that power, make them fill small. There was some bidding on a bunch of different mattresses is sure they all look alike, the same goes for pillows but peel away the layers look at what's inside. You'll see they aren't all created equal and that's what makes every purple pillow mattress unlike anything you've ever slept on the lead up to the fight of our lives in this election, I've had to less restful night but is it porn I'm? On my game while working to trade. So media credible democratic women who want to run for office, and that's why turned purple with proprietary technology that has been innovated comfort for over fifteen years I wanted to see what all the hype was about turns out. The purple rid does set the purple mattress apart from every other mattress is appended comfort technology that it's Ilia Dab your body's natural shape it's sleep style. With over eight hundred open air channels designed to neutralize body heat purple provides a Cooley effect. Other mattresses can't replicate received purple pillow and have to say because it's issued here with the same grade as a mattress, the total headed ex support it added airflow has resulted in a more deep. Were always on the side of the pillow. Even if I move throughout the day for BG losers exclusively purple is letting you try every purple product risk free with free shipping and returns. They even have fights available as low as zero percents APR for Qualified Customers experienced a purple grid, you'll sleep like never before go to purple dot COM slash bTV Tan and use the Promo Code BG ten to receive ten percents off any order of two hundred dollars or more. That's purple. Dot Com slash. Bg Tan Promo Code the Ted for ten percents off any order of two dollars or more terms apply. So getting back to some of the great work that you've done in Congress congresswoman, you call for the creation of the truth racial healing and Transformation Commission and the commission would have abroad advisory Goal asking the US to address a legacy of oppression beginning four hundred years ago with slavery. Tell us more about this. Sure. Let me start by saying Congress kind of God blesses all introduce HR forty. I think. I was the commission to. Look at reparations. Were two of us on that bill for years I was one of the two. And so I, support Tacoma Sheila, Jackson lease efforts to GET HR forty pass in mind truth commission hr one, hundred compliments. What we're doing is like forty, some countries have established the historical context of the middle passage and four hundred years ago put forth. We can before the public so that they can get through the process of truth talent, which we've never had this country with the commission and after truth telling their process of healing transformation where you look at housing that begins to disrupt the semak racism, you know many people, and then this country don't understand I come from progressive area and when they. Some of my constituents why constituency saw the disproportion numbers of black and Brown people dying from Covid nineteen they would call me say what's going on I'm saying I. Don't understand the disparities in healthcare as it relates to. Example the African American community land next communion. Don't you understand this is connected to four hundred one years ago at the chain of slavery have not all been broken and so it's a you know. So connecting what has taken place in place in a historical context put before the public to the horrific death and murder of Mr George George, floyd or to the wealth. Yeah. or how that's connected to the wage discrimination how about connected to all of the Simic racist policies. In this country, we've got to disrupt dismantle them and transformed the country based on racial justice and so countries around the over forty countries who have done this they've called and truth racial healing, some transformation, some reconciliation and I'm saying there's really not a to reconcile in America's. As it relates to the the middle passage and they've played of of human beings in this country. So we buy, we want to transform this country and to be in a country that truly reflects liberty and justice and equality for all, and we've got quite a few coach process again, working with Congresswoman Sheila jackson-lee we're putting these two together and we're gonNA build more momentum. It and I would encourage all of you get your members of Congress to support HR. Mine H Conrad One, hundred Congresswoman Jackson Jackson Lee hr forty. Also WanNa go into our next question keeping with Cove Ed and the disparities you've called for defunding the Pentagon in one of the things you said was Congress needs to prioritize our safety and our future not more war though prioritization of defense spending and the underinvestment in public health has led to ten times more deaths from covid nineteen than the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan by over prioritizing the Pentagon and military solutions. Our country is drastically underprepared for any crisis that needs a non-military solution. So tell us more about this. Okay I think and I'm glad you raised because my predecessor a wonderful statement at Warrior Rondell came to Congress in the seventies based on the answer being opposed to the Vietnam War. And he became a member of the armed. Committee and he became the first African American. Who has chaired the armed services. Committee I worked for him for eleven years and. His agenda was about. The the domestic and Pentagon spending and how because of the huge expenditures over at the Defense Department that have nothing to do with national security but more about waste fraud and abuse, and feeding industrial, the Military Industrial Complex and Developed and missile systems for a cold, War era, the does even exist. So there was so much money we were wasting that could be used for housing and healthcare and educational country that this was part of my work with him and part of his main objectives, and so my district historically has been part of this it and wink and continued and continued and continued for twenty two years to make sure that we build support for. These for cutting the massive expenditures in the defense, department over at the Pentagon that I. I can fighting. For instance, seventy, two million could be cut right now lark cocaine and I. Excuse me, seventy, two, billion we have an amendment just this week to cut it by ten percents we got about ninety to ninety, three vote. But. It doesn't even begin to scratch the surface with a ten percent. Cut Him. So I have a resolution calling for three, hundred, fifty, billion dollars cut which lays out where these cuts could take place and when you look at being clean expenditures. There's a slush fund that's about seventy billion dollars to fight these wars are budgets. We don't even know where that money goes. The Defense Department the Pentagon that's been the only agency that's never been audited. I've been working on legislation to require them to audit to conduct an audit. So we finally Have that in in place, but it's been thirty years. You know and so there and and the black community and women and. People of color throughout the country need to embrace the whole deal with regard wasteful spending at the defense car because that's where the resources are. You're talking about this year seven, hundred, thirty, seven, hundred, forty, billion dollars I know three hundred billion could be cut for combat and you were healthcare schools for education. For housing. To prevent of. You Know Wars From taking place and a dozen, even touch what our troops need. Some of our brave young men and women are living off of food stamps and section eight housing, and so we're saying that we need to cut the budget and. Support are true. It would do nothing to diminish our national security and put those resources into domestic spending for young people so that they can have a debt free college education you know. So we can have a good quality public education and we can do this. If we can just get the political will most Democrats and Republicans won't vote for these cuts because the military contractors put. Plants and jobs in their districts, and so nobody wants their constituents constituency US move a job, and so we have to build support showing how and we've done this how this is not going to impact job loss in member districts and types of jobs that are going to be created with a domestic spending for purposes that would then in terms of our economic security would far outweigh the jobs that are created by the defense industrial complex. Years Oh. Yeah. Never been audited never and so we've been trying and we're GONNA they're gonNA get though. So who are listening in, please get their members of Congress and please show them and we have all the data, the Poland and I mean it. It's really immoral. The Habit Defense Budgets at seven hundred and thirty eight, billion dollars in here we have to beg and and Work Magic to try to increase food stamps and snap benefits and I'm on the Appropriations Committee I see every day how this administration comes forward to two zero out the office of minority health example or to cut funding for HIV AIDS, or to cut funding for. Health disparities or cut funding for public education or to cut funding for civil rights programs in the agency I mean fair housing. They're trying to cut that that agency and so they're just demolishing like trump said they their agenda was the deconstruct, the administrative state, and that's what they're doing, and so we have the resources to not deconstruct with the build up this country so that it can truly be a government that supports its people before the people and for our economic security and we can do that by reducing the Pentagon budge. Congresswoman, you've told us how we can support the truth racial healing and transformation commission about defending the Pentagon. What should our listeners also be doing in this moment to get Congress to move legislation around addressing all the inequalities. Thank. You. Just pointed out I would say get in touch with your members of Congress. This weren't grown of violence Excuse me pandemic moment. I'd say go to their offices and. Sit in and insist, would you meet with their staff and tell them to sign onto these bills short of that get your member of the Congress by emailing them and tell them to sign onto hr one hundred signed on to HR forty, get in touch with my office about all the other legislation co-sponsors. Let me tell you. You GotTa get two eighteen in in the House of Representatives to. Get. Your bill to the floor and together hearing shorter that we're we'll be working another thirty years to get this done and so political organizing and mobilizing inbetween elections is important. So get near members of, Congress, tell him in no uncertain terms that you're holding them accountable for support these efforts, and secondly don't forget the elections I. Mean November is coming very soon and we have got to make. Sure that everybody registers people to boats, gets engaged vote Ashanti. I know you know the importance of this and not feel that our vote is not going to count I. Felt like that before I met Shirley Chisholm and I was not registered. I was very deliberate about not registering because I. didn't believe either Party the Democrats or the Republicans made a difference in my life and the lives of black people. And she called me the task about that. So I understand where a lot of young people are about voting. Me But believe you me. If you don't you end up with the Donald, trump is going to decimate You know your your life in many respects, generations to come and go have donald trump who's who because of his inaction So many black and grab people have died of Kobe nineteen. That's what we get when we don't vote and so I would encourage you to do that and could make sure you participate. In the places because the census coming up determines the resources that are coming into your community and in addition to your political representation, and so it's important to do the stuff. So they buy back a lot that we can do and given the tragic horrific moment we're in as it relates to corona virus, we need to use all of our technological skills and I know all of you are brilliant and can. Negotiate a navigates this world of technology and and so let's organized. Yes, unify. Topo this administration and lip make sure the house and the Senate returns to democratic hands and make sure the whole Europe elected officials accountable for what you think will enhance the life and of everyone and deconstruct racism and build a country built with racial equity as part of a DNA now. So semi grace, the is part of its DNA? Amen in we gotta get it done congresswoman. I. Enjoyed talking to you I'm going to move into our final question in it is what does Liberation Mean to you? Liberation means to me. that. Black lives matter. I love it congresswoman. Thank you so much. You are just such an inspiration and the congresswoman and I were chatting before the end of you. So for our listeners, definitely head over to you to for the African American policy. Forum Youtube Channel. They did a great conversation with Congresswoman Lee, Congresswoman Ileana Presley in Kim Fox from Cook County. Just amazing amazing conversation with those three black women. So go ahead and check out that conversation congresswoman. Thank you so much again for joining us. Appreciate you taking the time I thought even break you so much. Let me just say how proud I am of you leading emerge what you're doing because you are really. Helping everyone especially black and Brown women and it's Really be leading in the polls efforts for change in this country and thank you so much. Thank you congresswoman. Thank you for listening the up to date with us on the BG website www dot the BG guy dot com and on our social media facebook instagram and twitter at the beach guide. The BG podcast is produced by wonder me network you can find them on. Instagram at W.. M. N. Dot Media and on twitter at Wfan. Media. Until next time round. Hey everyone I want to tell you about a podcast called hurting cultures. They tell us stories from the Middle East and North Africa and the spaces in between like the story following the Lebanese cave diver into the depths of the deepest cave in the world are one man's mission to remind specialty coffee in Yemen and Miss Occur. The Guardian calls it the this. American. Life of the Middle East. Listen to Kurt and cultures wherever you get your podcast is spelled K. E. R. in I N. G cultures.

Black Panther Party Congress Black Women Shirley Chisholm Black Panther party school Congresswoman Barbara Lee US Elaine Brown America Panther party Pentagon official Congresswoman Jackson Jackson African American community twitter Joe Biden browns president
S3E19: It's The Self-Incrimination For Me

MNO Podcast

1:12:04 hr | Last month

S3E19: It's The Self-Incrimination For Me

"Hey everybody this is mandy. And i don't know what twenty twenty one or this episode about the liquid hollywood. I am retired to corporate america. And then the mandy at you search for guys with the most days ran away with the keys to the mustang us. They been all of this because this is twenty twenty one path. Mo- awfully speak. I am how can we speak. Already exists because the actions and the realities of that are coming into twenty twenty one also already existed and people were just living in the rose colored glasses with glassy. Things the fail well into twenty one is all about the truth. That's what i'm saying is it's showing some truths me 'cause i thought twenty twenty. You know clear vision. That would be different things upheaval. But maybe that's you know who startup and now starting to like come to our own people are like. Oh i didn't know oh no idea. This is not america. this is mrs america. This is just not your america. Like many said with your rose colored glasses that use them are just usurp intro. I've been drinking. Y'all we got. We went through the in shows. I think we're in space when we would have talked about some goals. Which i do we do that. I just want to say to everybody episode right. Yeah we may do our. We may not be known that both of us are drinking. Ms because of the current state of the world Like it's going to be a structure we've been talking about restructuring something like let's just have a a this is the mandy and ali having conversations with you all let our you know. Our thoughts have offensive stuff. And we're gonna do it while we're having our voices some people gamble. Some people eat buggers. Some people guarded. It's today. We decided to drink all the podcast. So that's why we are where we are i'm drinking a mall bach. Which is on the heavier side. You're supposed to have a stake in a ferruginous and the mashed potatoes. But i just had. It was a macaroni and cheese. So i'm good red wine. Why is it. I will say the times. When i was with people in they knew about lake wine pairings and stuff guys good right. Why would the steak. I was like all i get it. Yeah this tastes good in a basic side name that i got from aldi. Okay maybe started may be having already be having some good. Why leeann award-winning manny. Actually put me onto this thing. Called petit chuckle. I think it's a little wine that's like it's really on the sweeter side but it tastes delicious is like imagine you have this chocolate milk and they boiled it in a pan and they put sugar in it and then they dumped a whole lot of wine in it. They called it off that you can drink cold. A cold pizza is delicious. it's really it tastes really good but you can also tell that a strong typically desert winds are strong so it's lake something to death like appreciate Maybe drank if you feeling like being drunk in one something sweet ear mouth I don't have kill two. Birds will winstone tuba. Two tucson's two birds two bars. One rock yeah. I agree definitely worth the kathy. Yeah i do. Say a little something about my goals because flipping well with stem repair about it. So i created mine. Twenty twenty one goals For in different categories based off of something. I saw e surrey. Do with her vision board. So i did like personnel goals professional goals financial goals and then miscellaneous And a lot of it was just about like you know things that i want to achieve. Yes but also thinks that i think will be like a lifestyle change in lead to happiness in the feature kind of change the way i structured my bore That i have on my kitchen where i have. Daily tasks as goes. Weekends has less goals monthly year. Lifelong things. i'm mark enough for the days to do. I was getting done against them. li things done in those monthly things. That announced kicking butt. And then yesterday. I do none of those days burning i to talk about it my goal. Okay i'll be really quick you guys. My goal has been to an unfortunate. I'm leave that right there. Unfortunately current corporate america. I've had within the last two weeks. I kid you not. I've had ten interview fix than haven't really well. I'm gonna talk to you about this bullshit with the episode tracker warning bullshit interview. I had Earlier this week but also guy soon offer so just contemplating which way i wanna move so yeah not that off my goal. We'll call who. Which i'm very happy for you for because getting back into the work field as always we're I'm sarah applying during the time as we're sure but you've been making good moves about it and you're even more so in the Position excuse me of like billy choosing things in companies based off of what you want in them aligning with you. Because i think a lot blur in a period of dislike they need to find work because it's been so successful But you're looking at it more than just instantaneous. God formation looking at long-term rewards that she can heal from it nan. Trying to figure out the right fit And of course you may get there in. There still may be things about that one place that don't fit with do but i i am because when i talked about a lot with people and what i set with my goals is like even when i create a standard of goal for me. It's impart thinking of like my general happiness ear in that putting myself in placer situation of being unhappier stressed out or feel like i'm being taken advantage over. Whatever the case may be like you always want to feel like if you can be in a healthy environment that environment. Because there's always going to be outside sings the Fuck it up. So you don't wanna put yourself in the situation that you know go focus right harsher. I want to get to this call to miami. May i want to hear about that again. All right we're liz. Do it in a space suit. So soon how mandy. From the great fun. If you've got an entry safe you ready to enter into into the space right lou. The doors open. Okay like those people. You tell it i call i was i was working In my line five listening to podcasts. Have much of a happy delete all day. My mother called me and said there is a coup happening affability and now said she didn't she don't stay but we've said she don't have always magnet so that's the way she told his supporters to go in iran up on the capitol building because of doing the alette. Li lexin confirmation. My mom said they got they went to they. Started at alabama in alabama. Went to cheeto a in. There was no jackson's and then they went to arizona. Get very far arizona. They was like we can test because of blah blah blah. And there's like all right. Well it's going to the democrats. Hell broke loose from there. Because they was because they went they went in everything to be to the cheeto head and when she told me that she was like she was like. Are you watching the news as like now. I'm working to get to start watching the news. I need you to turn on the news channel. And i have access to do that but as soon as she said he got off the phone me. My chest started hurting. And that's time that's just out And i called ali. And i'm just going to say how i felt because i felt like i've said on pockets before maybe i haven't. When the apocalypse comes whatever kind of apocalypse it is to be here or live. I live when it happens. I just figure iodide of so many things. I can't run like i used to. I get tired quickly. I wear glasses in. Context was not conducive for having to be able to fight immediately when you you. You basically can't see. Isn't that literally accuracy. If i had been in a fight or something like from a distant shoot someone from winston five cream. Go make it. Maybe i shouldn't speak at the people's last with i will say that what i will say the way that my in knowing myself in knowing myself. I don't have not daredevil. So i gonna be someone with impaired vision. And yet in hyper knows where a benefit me. My only hyper senses smell. And i don't think they'll help me out. I really don't so i call eilly was just basically like the apocalypse is about to start and i don't have any food at the house and We supposed to record today. But can we delay a little bit. I have enough time to get some supplies. In case bunkered down in my home because the apocalypse emily to enlist you take from year right and i was like coming up just getting out of never car her but i just I did my best to try to be there and listening call mewdell but also like say like yeah. Go get food. Go do what you need to do. Or also like i have a A third party at like. I can order you the food if you want me to because i feel like i've been saying it's just like manny told y'all like if there's a apocalypse from zombies or nuclear warfare. Whatever she's done so she not born the window you know. I plan on x. Las on the door like his time just like he said that. I've been on the opposite person. I'm like your shit together. Get to go back to water or better. You wish together because you don't know with gonna go down unless you're you infiltrated the party. Like fred hampton. Not a trumpet player. No fred hampton from the black panther party unless you've infiltrated infantry. Unless you fred. Fred the situation then i just don't i don't foresee you knowing so. I think it's important to be prepared if you want to. Continue living in this life and make changes or just live out. You live your kids and your great grand or you know gone that trip or maybe just read in the house and watch. Tv for next couple of weeks. He's important if you want to see living so be prepared so She she didn't go bag ready to. I mean like probably granola bar. I think i played cam food in their girl. That's wien one kennedy tuna never mind. That's like a package of sooner would be more portable and whatever but A what i had already. But when i knew to be too i was basically what i was saying is part of the reason why i went to was because i wanted to. Just come home. Watches netflix as i can. Before turning it off in the pacalypse sign needed food to the apocalypse comes. I'm not really planning to survive. Low plan to do what i said to her like. Oh i'm still working like buffy late like i wasn't planning for the Because i would be trying to do something. I enjoy my job. If it's an apocalypse right now. I totally understand. Okay so you all manny was the one who alerted me and i kid you not. I was like i had like two interviews before he. I don't know if she call. Yes you call me. And i didn't know what was going on. I you know. I had backed by interviews. None of them about it. I don't think they were where either. So the fact that. I talked to four different people that didn't know beforehand partially the camera. It kept on with my day. And then like you go out of capital and i'm like capital and uses the word capital. This is where my brain. I'm like a capitalist in canada with a and then okay capital no. I have no idea if i it up. And it was just like an r. e. I was like whoa. Whoa i got nervous. Because usually i'm like i'm like something pops off at the epicenter someplace. Then i feel like little insects will start uprising over the place. So i'm like i met the ap se l. then and whatever major city around the world is about to get profit and so. I thought i'm little dominoes and truck. I wasn't that crazy. Like i was able to go out and get some supplies and some fast food and then Make my way home but Yeah it's just it's it's i won't say a strange times living here but the fact that the response to this situation has been completely different from the other situations that were more demure more peaceful more respectable is just wildly the fact that congress is okay to take a break. And i'm just like been anyone else. And i feel like that's what a lot of the post and stuff are saying has been any other. Melanie aid party. That attacked our capitol building. There's no way that they're going to recess week. Just take a break and then come back. That's why because is a terrorist attack. Let's be let's the terrorist attacks by americans. Mainly there were a couple of pepper in there. I'm not gonna lie. And i'm sure you've made a lab but the majority of these Love thing that show me too. God i'm not gonna say that work majority of these non metal and eighty people that were there are white and it was just kinda like okay. Let me move the barriers. Yes let me open the door. Yes let me. God do this way. Yes when he takes selfies with you. Yes when we walk out of says and it's just like y'all wow in my my my my main concern is not so much as y'all wild because i'm like isn't the changeable there are plenty of police officers that are trump supporters so. I'm not surprised about that. I'm not surprised that they open the fucking door three. All my surprise comes on. The fed job gets a cost. Chaos destroy buildings destroy property. Be fucking disrespectful and leave and go home to your family. Bathroom fucking pissed off at. There's no repercussions there no consequences and actually with that kid though in In wisconsin minnesota you to be more specific kidding every state role. Who went out of town as i believe i feel. You know as wisconsin right. Yeah procrastinate yeah you're right. She went to wisconsin sat. Some people walked up to the police. They check for him so he went home. They said that it was self defense. And he had her mcdonagh police off to defend himself and also there was a mall of didn't they didn't they didn't check. It isn't that. I mean somebody many discern you what i'm trying to what they said. I'm probably what they said. They had molotov cocktails thrown the so he shot stuff defense and my this is first hand conversation. I'm having with someone. He had a molotov cocktail video. All the fucking videos here right there a off cocktail shot right there right there. That guy was fighting him. He shot right there and i just like to leave. Anybody has the right to especially a police. Opera has the right. to take someone's life. We have a judicial system which all likes to sucky remember when it comes to black people and other people of color but when it comes to white people is just like. Oh well you know. It's just like a slap on the wrist or we don't really have to go through this process bigger vigorously so they. They were giving him water. They were talking to him all crazy. It's just like frustrating. I know my albums will play. Well yeah we speak of that situation. Any talks about it fed him to earlier. I watch the movie. The trial of the chicago seven on net flicks long story short. The movie is about a riot that started in chicago in. I believe it was like nineteen sixty eighth. 'cause that's the year that Robert kennedy died but basically where people who were processing it was mainly Why some white people were protesting the war in vietnam In a leader of the black part black panther party from land came to chicago that same day to speak to the black panther party in chicago. He went home. Had nothing to do with the riot that happen. But when they decided to file charges for the main leaders of the protests they loved him in and said that he was involved in the riots. The movie basically depicted that the only reason he was left him to the case was because why america was fearful of black people but in particular the black panthers. They felt like that that was going to get the jury to convict all of them. Were strongly if there was a black person associated with the case in this associated with the case and the guy does kept having to say my lawyers not present. i'm not being represented. I have never met these people like. I've never been involved in this situation. Why am i here. This this case to be dismissed ultimately he was dismissed from the case but it was just like was definitely hard to watch but the constant reminder of even even in the situations when white people are like the threat. For whatever reason whether it's yes they did cause a riot for quote unquote just seemingly reasons like. They didn't want to continue a war happening in vietnam or unjust reasons. Like what people may believe happen yesterday because they didn't want to see a changing of leadership by democracy standards The black people still aren't looked at full-on as the villain black people of more of the as as villain right and it's only in the associations with black people. Do they become available. Because that's how a lot of the people talk about. White people who are black lives matter protesters ago that they like y When they become back guys too because they're associating themselves with the black people in lake or lake anyone can be a bad person right these right updates and provide the on this couch guy. They literally just two days ago. Just only two days ago charts to. He pleaded not guilty. White house Boy from wisconsin the wisconsin. Yeah but he lives in illinois but yeah. He traveled wisconsin and yada. Yada yada state lands to do this. This elite the legal firearm firearm basically The opened fire with an assault rifle killing two people and wounding one of their. He argued it was self defense. He went there to protect people and property and conservative race. Who million dollars for his bill. These conservative raised cool million dollars for this guy who had any legal fire arm. He'll to people with it because he quote unquote came to protect people property. And i'm just like y'all be the first one to say my amendment right by member right. Okay he had a legal firearm but dollar still protecting him. He's done since he was seventeen when it happened but he's eighteen now like y'all get like y'all you pick and choose i feel like it's sometimes i think about this when it comes to Not support religion into it. but i'm pulling religion into it when people pick and choose what they want out of the koran out of the bible out of whatever readings or methodologies you you wanna call it a religious like okay well i must say that this applies because i like this or because the situation but that other stuff in the book nine on They didn't know what they was talking about. You don't get to choose if you follow the law. These they america kaku great applies to everyone. Or you fucking don't and sounds any like you fucking go. Oh annoyed that me. I'm annoyed and that's how motherfucking go. I'm annoyed nor may have lamb. Listen that is a segment. I wanna introduce later on. I want us to stay something. That's factual and then say and that's on and then say like fable or fairy tale. That's kind of what i wanna do. Lady storm storms at the capitol building was bullshit. And if it was nominated skin there will be dead. And that's three motherfucking little pigs curve. But i wanna do do later okay. Later later later Yes so i don't know if I don't know i'd love to hear from listeners. Posing it here If you feel like they've going to be a civil war because the reality is this. This is a us a problem. Global crab looms right now. It's just america acting a fool and everyone else looking at us leg You have a stink face into just that. I didn't know why they were serving people. Stay here you write thanking america. S t. a. And catalina. I think going you feel. I really start to pop off. Especially how it how it's presented where it's coming from the person who's supposed to be leading the entire nation has given permission to coup. Because he don't wanna leave him fourteen days right who. They're not going to help us go be like don't which our right. What do you mean they who outside parties like the civil war happened the eighteen hundreds in even when it was happening. There i think the main country they got involved with england and that's because they were lake. Oh the style's y'all still wanted to keep us around two hundred years ago so benefiting off of y'all financially so we'll help you because we benefit financially. I don't think any countries benefiting off anyone side of america in particular they they just gonna let leave us to our own drama allow especially because we are place with mass weapons and nuclear weapons are her. Can't take someone with a nuclear weapon or fuller. Whatever decided to be record is going to be like. We're gonna leave out over there. Yeah yeah i that does now. That does bother me. When i think about how america comes to everyone's aid but when it's time for us to have aid is like y'all got it Or like we don't wanna get painted or get involved or like anything and it's just like that's us is like are honestly going through this foreign aid building can call what they want will. Six hundred dollars seamless check. That's going towards the mini people's bills and debts that they already have right now they they can try to dress it up as stimulus bill all they want but it was a foreign aid bill and i feel like we give so much other people that i mean we. We can't fix ourselves clearly. I feel like we've been trying to fix. Oh entirely for a very long time as american citizens and it's just not working so these other countries that we're giving to aid and telling them how to behave country and how to develop as a country or whatever the fuck it is. How are they going to tell us what to do. When like the bully. It's like we don't need your help and we're going to have our own problems. Yard is on fire. But we're going to help you build yours do all the stuff that doesn't make sense. It just doesn't make any sense. Maybe what i just said. It doesn't make any sense. So yeah america. I don't know. I don't know so many hot mess loose end it some is is is. That's why it doesn't. It feels like even after what happened. Happened in the senate had to convene belied to get on Like they're still. It's still very clear that the leaders are like it doesn't matter what were presented with in a situation where allies were literally threatened. We're the court around what we are doing in the bunkers. If not have a conversation about how we get through to figure out how to agree to disagree that we a laugh here. Mike howard all like barricaded inside and still disagreeing so now on the same page. I'm a thousand intend fucking percent on page with mandy like okay truth. Time white flag We need to be. We need to together. We need to be a one page when we go out there and then after this dies down or come to a resolution that we can go back to your address. I thought or i don't agree with that but right now. Our lives are literally endanger a. Y'all still like we can't even get through the. Hey ella bama alaska arizona. Arkansas we can get as don weiland. So they probably did alabama in alaska alaskan. Those both went to trump got to arizona that was a rep cia arch. Trump is the trump is coming like. Oh how do you do. You have any feeling about these articles of impeachment introducing. What time like i mean. Yeah it would. It would be good scoring his record. But i just felt like i like i asked you a question to start answering. How do you feel about these. Articles of impeachment have been introduced. What i know that last night they were talking about inaction the twenty fifth amendment last used when kennedy died But but they were just trying to say that he was that that trump was Mentally stable in their foreheads to revoke his rights. And i'm mike nothing that he's saying today or doing today from anything. He's done five years or he gotten to the presence. So how are you going to be able to explain why he's justifiably insane now in order to remove him from presidency. You're and the same would be said for impeachment. We already been down this road. A y'all say that nothing illegal Nothing justifiable for For removal happened because he wasn't piece but it wasn't just five but for removal and nothing differently his happened since that time. Oh talk looks like yala. We got scared so we kinda willing to discuss it now. We're kinda willing to put out there but also this pay. I'm listening. we must met. There was another person who ran for president in this year. Who has bipolar disorder. Unless nothing against those who are mentally ill but chooses not to take his medication vocal by he does not like to take his medication. Now pay everybody's looking at him like he was crazy or joining the campaign well after all of the primary elections happen and knowing he was on every ballot in every state he's still did it seems to have very similar traits to the person who already president running for and Except i feel like the current president even if he did have mental illness and was not taking his medication. Wouldn't admit either of those. Facts are not currently still isn't emitting to any of the behaviors that he chose being inappropriate. No no not at all media by the leg social media saying like they branding. His accounts like it's helpful would doing is keeping is protecting him because keeping him from having evidence. More evidence of lake has inflammatory behavior. Yeah it's protecting him like exactly. What you said is putting him in a bubble or putting him on time out so he can't express themselves then boss and it's just like no y'all have allowed him to express his thoughts he's cheesy mall handed thoughts for last four year more than that before he was even president because this is a joke job to him and he just stumbled upon one. Let's be real about that. He was like. Oh oh i. I'm actually winning. Okay so let's be real about that. First of all i have all. Y'all have allowed this to this whole time. This inciting violence is fighting rice. It's encouraging behavior. Him repulsing people saying why power. Let's be real about this. You guys have encouraged us now. I'm not blaming these platforms. But i am looking at you. Motherfucker saw a for waiting until his last fifteen motherfucking days to do something about it. Youtube twitter instagram looking at all. Y'all fucking sideways. Now you wanna step in it making make sense. It doesn't making so. Don't silence him. Let the record show what. He's thinking what he's saying what he's planning what he's encouraging less fucking records show lait. 'cause how. How are we going to be able to prepare if you don't give a lettuce. See the game plan if you put the information out there lettuce soon so we can know what to do with it. Because i promise you. There are sites that are allowing him to put in his two cents or prep race or whatever and they don't know what's good her. Because as i did last night you guys come on we do. I was like there was a comedian. Who who put this on social media. And i was like that makes a lotta sense but basically she say y'all acting like y'all had no clue that this was coming in you couldn't prepare for it. Meanwhile these people got shirts that say civil war january six two thousand two twenty twenty one. That lake house is going to be a last minute situation. Birch made right elise nepotism business days to get them stuff printed out and delivered to whomever they had to place an order to have on stuff. Yes like to place an order for a wife from no no no no. They'll directly cheeto head dress to me. Kkk yes yes yeah Yeah No no no. We don't want the blackshirts nothing black shirt only the white black all league. This definitely eventing mobile. Because again. I don't plan to be alive. During the revolution revolution. Might not be televised. But i'm be watching tv. I'm i'm asking all the television up until and when i say television is not going to be the news. Prepare me for the next. I'm going to be watching all the shows that i can until turn off netflix. Because they don't have anyone to man the station. 'cause they shouldn't get out of the country i wanna see so i've seen a lot of not by a lot. I mean three to four. I've seen news outlets lamey social media for the attack on the capital yesterday. That is excellent. Thank you wasn't typing on my gosh thank. You were a little colds in the phone that we literally knocked out window And week so not your values to passing the buck placing blame on everybody. But the person at fault especially if they are non melanie. They're so used to it. They're like they're not there. But your there's no white just can't be the i can media. They influence them. They told them to pick up their pickaxes into destroy podiums. A buster walls and tacoma lake social media in them media. I two different things yet. Well they're blaming social media. Now that's what their thing. That media is blaming social media because more people did they news off of instagram and msnbc. Hello 'cause i don't wanna hear y'all's drove first of all. I thought post where it was like. It showed it was someone. Instagram show They had footage. They were there. The of all self-incrimination. For me. Sometimes times i will say this the hour every meal record saying this. It's the mother hugging self. Incrimination for me because i was in the capital. Oh yeah. I was by the polio. Okay and the thing. That again. Like i said in the beginning saying that pisses me off. You know what. I'm serious going to lower the thing that causes me off is that it's the motherfucking self-incrimination for me yet. No consequence uploaded it to several platform. No consequence the fbi and cia. No media is the place to use the be figuring that exactly who rely more skills than the people in espionage. Detectives office people fat person. The social media was lagging. This this person this person available bar social media started it was social media's the was solving the crime yonggang making a make mother fuck instant making make sense because it i'll make to it. Don't make dollars maintenance don't make sense to me mandy couple of depressed quick you so since you are planning to survive the apocalypse what do you think next step should be for you ever marigny okay. Well honestly because i feel like honestly you included. I feel like some of my friends. Don't think the same way. I think so my next honestly i was going to order you all either those little ring tasers or just bikaner or something. I was going to see what was legal in the states that you are revived and i was going to send it to you all and that way. You have a choice because maybe you decide okay. I don't wanna survive but at the intel on breaking decide. no. I don't want somebody doing survive. You're going to grab something and protect yourself. That's the first thing i was thinking about. I was thinking about my close friends. And what i call order for them to protect themselves in case of emergency. They'll potholes doesn't come you know nine. Maybe where you're out and about you want to protect yourself. Those are the things. I was thinking about thinking about my close friends in westwards iphone order for them legally to protect them. That's number one number. Two where i live in business as usual. It'd be a you. So i'm just kinda like on. I'm looking around. Everyone's just like. Oh nothing's happening here and i'm like someone pastas motherfucking bubble. Y'all gonna be motherfucking law. So i'm just trying to make sure that wear and i'm conscious of my surroundings at all times because again as a black woman in america you don't you you don't know when someone's going to be doing something stupid like yes not yesterday but earlier in the week i with coastal with a friend and they were joking about the jokes about Like my name's rob. And i'm here to rob and it's funny when we're like hanging out in indoors and it's like that. They were making that joke in public while we're in line at a motherfucking marshalls and i'm like they like i say get off and you don't do that and they're like what's wrong and i was like don't joke about robbing we're black people in a line at a department store and you're loud joking about robbing like don't do that so i'm just like overly cautious stuff one thing for sure overly cautious and i'm just i'm just trying to be aware like i don't i don't let my guard down. I feel like in general but especially right now. I'm just trying to to be aware. I think you'll make it. I mean it could be reversed right. It could be that like. Maybe i'm saying the i want by going survive and then something happens and i'm like hey lower. I mean who knows. Feel like sandra bullock When we watch that burr box. I feel like the main reason why she decided to live was because she was already because their whole tom in that moving she was giving me vibes. Like i'm sick of this shit. And i don't wanna be here and if i didn't already have your me in something or someone to live for baby born if i didn't have boy am i building way. I can remember this gear. Girl boy olympia boy. It was like she was just like. I'm living for boyd. But also there's an apocalypse happening outside. So i can't get to tach to either of them so going to be boy and girl that's going to be their names in the never gonna go ahead while we're while yeah so i know we're doing unstructured today. Is there anything else you wanna like have into before we hop out of like a popular cop. I think i'm thinking of 'cause. I don't i just don't know this go happen next. May hey m no podcast listeners. This episode is brought to you by anchor. Anchor is a free podcast platform with everything you need to make a podcast in one place with anchor can record and edit from your phone or computer you can also distribute your podcast to all the major platforms including spotify google and apple. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor that fm to get started. Now let's get back to the podcast. Do you wanna do my thing. That i guess earlier like banning. So do you want to go first or do you want me to go for you. Little i i could figure out what i wouldn't say okay. I mean it could be anything. It could be related can be not related. So i just feel. I don't think too hard on it I just wanna say that my cooking skills honestly have gotten better and better over time and the last night of creatures. I felt like they weren't super sugary. Super sleek i use tiny but a lot of people think that they thought so. I just want to tell you how to get your cookies to give up. And that's all hansel and gretel. I like that because hansel and gretel into Candy confection house. I had to present so that was actually really clever. Thank you. I appreciate your appreciation. Thank you. I just wanna say that is called. Being ambidextrous is not a. You could only do one thing on one side for most things. I only raise one of my eyebrows. Oh at a time or on either. Goes up or both apples but that other one. Don't go up. Oh boy i can only jump rope with one foot in front of the other but i can't do the other foot in front of the other. Wow is a lot of things that only mono ability he'd hamas to amber dextrous on rumpelstiltskin. Soon okay i like what you did there because he used to be finished but he's both hands and used to be. Connie he's both brain for that. So i like that. I like that like that I just want to say that you always have your way. You guys. don't care what side you're all what color you are I don't care what you've been taught. But i just want to let you know that sometime in life early on or later on you will have to come to compromise compromise. You will have to meet in the middle. And that's on fucking goldilocks. That's best song. Antibody bear the bear at got me. passport o of non american passport. In case i needed to use it. Now because the only way i would have survived the apocalypse. And that's on the wizard of is because they're not gonna let me us. Oh i like what you did that call. I like what you did there. I liked what you did. Because they were traveling with us they ask. Do you get the right paperwork to get into is feeling Again they are getting is gonna be stuck out here on the yellow brick road on the album chrome. I'd wanna stay that. I see all these post Always like oh. This is your year. yeah i wa. And i'm just like i honestly believe that we choose to be a year is going to be your year so these might not be in your favorite. Now things may be all over the place. Steve might not be what you want them to be but it will blossom until you're year you will blossom and see your success in you will blossom into the person that you want to be and on my mother fucking ugly duckling. That's that's that was a great wine duckling turned up to be a soi. I mean i guess on why francis too but you know now. Works from la dougie. Doug though i wanna say Though man try to say that wigs are falsified situation earn every day. We go out there that same from shakespeare. all the world's stage her every time we go out. We put on a performance. Had some women prepare more so for their performance in the imaging costume they wanna create. That is just part of storytelling. And that's on sad. Cinderella now the ball ninety put on a costume subway. That's what cinderella going to the ball full circle full circle that's on cinderella going to the mother freaking ball. She is beauty grace Speaking of women dressed up for themselves. I ask for sexual liberation. If you're a woman do not feel like you can call women. Oh let whatever buckets yada yada yada and it doesn't apply to all genders. You can apply to all gender so whether she wants to be one person to polygamy monogamy is her body and that's her choice and that's all snow white and the motherfucking seven doors so if you wanna seven door. That's her business. I just wanna say what you want to sing. I just wanted say wanna say do a. Ups stood outside of my door. Oh to drop off a sliver of paper that inevitably got a cold in it scaring the life out of me because the world was ending. Are we in the pandemic and you didn't make me sign for that. So why did you have to wait order to drop her now. It was literally the size of my hand. That was weird scary. And that's on the big bad wolf. You can call me little red riding hood. Ooh i love delayed gratification. Because you know the end of that story. That won't got morgan. And she and her grandmother popped up out of that thing. So i'm real happy about that People doing the baba black seat. Ooh you might think. I'm going there but i'm not going there. I think it's really important that you wanted to think for yourself. My mentality is not going to help you. Association by negativity is not going to help you. So i think it's really important that you thought being hurt it you learn to think for yourself. And that's all. Mcdonald's is the association by negatively. That was the word to because people that find themselves in a collective because of misery i notice say misery loves company. But will you just join the club to be leg and we wanna be able to act collectively clubhouse ibn michael but i'm classic to power the truth our phone. I mean i just after all this. Is america go. Need a mass therapy class. It should be a requirement. Would you be a higher somewhere. I think it should be a requirement like we allow this and that may maybe not maybe not a requirement but like we allow this service. If you need therapy we have this service available at least but they don't. You usually have someone list to tell your problems too. And then some people don't like to listen. And i saw area not listening to sebastian. Hello even say that you bet a monday. We can't say that. I think i'm dealt with the fables. If you wanna keep going we can take him out. I felt satisfied. You know. I just want to give me a hand. Clap with me because she had no idea this going to happen. And then just off the down off google or whatever i want to the dumb let. Y'all have pat bravo the worst jersey jersey. I love okay. What do you want to go into next like how are you feeling. Are you feeling benca. Fine are you sound like they're still something to get off your chest. Are you sound like you want to go back to regular structure like what's the first thing that comes to mind that you wanna talk about right now. The one thing. I really wanted to say at some point in this. Podcast is that there is a man named david purdue and i wanted to just be happy him but he got his name back because there was a never man named david purdue who is running for congress. That was ruined. His life blamed for steph. Now literally baby. Like dave purdue racist and he holding a white supremacist time and then they were at do or die which is a david purdue who is black man who went to morehouse and as a comedian. And he's not running for senate that same hand side most people would just assume he's a kappa and not a white supremacist. But because his name is david purdue and there was another david producers getting more traction and likes and clicks. I just felt bad. I don't even be remembering dave produce. Last name is purdue mind date than his social media's at dur dash house to add door because his last name is purdue and. I'm sure this isn't the first time is coming up for him. Be like you got a name like that other guy definitive georgia but right now when it's been up at the election all here. Is david perdue in jon ossoff. I just wanted to be happy for david. Purdue the and all this is going to be over. And that's what i had intended to say and i am happy for him in rafael. Were not k. because tube from morehouse though it was a good day for them one guard they name back at one became a senator I love album warehouseman. Not men of morehouse are elevating. Their communities are doing right by their communities getting elected into positions of power. They weren't they can't make change. I love to hear about it. We love to see louise's the sounds the day before regained control of his own name. I know that has to be difficult. We shouldn't they with someone who has different beliefs from you. And you both getting publicize. I know it had to be. Wow disappoint so yeah. Yes why german staff naming people Eight us makes sense makes sense. I haven't been paid off. I don't think ever massage the history books makes sense. Makes it okay mandy. I have a different question. That's different from our scheduled programming. Which is okay. Because this is are scheduled programming. This is a very special episode. Q the after school special that that the staff. I want to know when things get better as normal as they're going to get his one eight me nine your list to do and i have a lot of things that come to mind in general but i wanna know what is it that has been missing from the job like damn. I can't wait to will or without my mask to go outside and do like what is in that blank navy It's funny that you say that. Because i don't think life ever go back to normal And there are things. I think about where i'm like i i you know that i haven't been able to do but i'm also like are these things that i wanna do right. One thing for sure that are my friends have brought up. And i'm like i do enjoy this data into a form of it but not the way it used to is branch. He added you wait for branch to come back. And i'm just like you definitely need do brench at home. But i do enjoy a eat outside people's bryce but a lot more from restaurants during this pandemic i typically understandably takeout and you're not the only one so don't feel any kind of not the only wa But i do just miss being out in a bow. Feel very confi. I miss i do. I think this is what you thought. I was gonna say to extent due to do. This is going to the movie. I didn't think i have anything in my advice. I remember brench conversation with other oga. Yeah they have anything in my no not malinche. I've been to the drive thru during this pandemic period. But i liked going to the movie theater. Eilly knows this. I was like going by myself but it was just like i like popcorn. Alex lessees. i'll i like the whole vibe going to the movies especially leg right now. It would have been like award season. That's happening because they're trying. They all wanna to do it in person in their delaying ladder stuff like most things are pushed back to april may consist a. We're we're time. And i know that it will ever be normal again I are you thinking about less normal. Or what else. You're expecting where you turn speaking about homecoming at howard. I'm go to homecoming again. Of course you will in the future. I'm sure maybe not this year. Maybe not the next year but definitely we gotta say for at least twenty twenty three we are we at least at least gotta go play. Twenty three homecoming. At least i don't know what a madurai i dunno but yet when the main thing and the same that homecoming thing reminded me the main thing. I wanna do when the world gets back to. I wanna see my grandmother I want to be able to see her before. I can't see her anymore. Been see her in years from because of separate things in corona. Be fear. So argument okay. Yeah that's definitely something that is on my listeners will i i mean i could see. My mind is more accessible than yours. But i didn't actually get there so we have something on jointly. That's on our list. Little susan earless You know that's a hard question outside of traveling. I do want to take a girl's trip. And i don't care where it is. I i would like for it to be out of country. But i like americans are allowed out of country right now out now before i really like. Oh y'all got don't know how to behave proven very well to be true because there were so many people that just positive instead i'm going anyway Died or had to be Arrested in four countries yup but now relate. Don't even treat y'all all stuff we really not about here right and this affect us so like i. I feel like if i wanted to see my close friends. They will be open to seeing me most of the time i work from home. I'm a secluded basis. If i am out and about to get stuff i need on an out I had corona before corona became the thing. You know what i mean so now everybody's trying to do it And i don't mean that in fact the way to the people have come to it. I mean more. So in the way of i feel like i got really really really sick early on like either last january or last february and had to deal with that way back when before it became like a national epidemic type of thing so i feel like okay. Long story shorter if i wanted to see my friends. I felt like they will be open to seeing whether it's a club or disobeying came to for a little bit be open. See me so. I'm not necessarily having that at the top of my list but there is definitely I wanted to travel with my girlfriend. I want us to have an international experience together. And i just feel like i'm just asking for one and i'm i. I enjoy local travel as well. I want us all to be enjoy. Some be able to enjoy something new together Before everything gets locked down or before people just get nasty crazy people already crazy and people already nasty but nasty crazy does bother me like if we're live for the steelers and then somebody just like walk up and shake me to me. That's nasty crazy though. I just want to be able to do something before. People get to that nasty crazy place. Yeah i've i've i've like for this at least for what i can. I see the new year. I think the only thing i'd be comfortable with in terms of traveling would involve me road tripping so it's not a i can opposed to driving maybe even like a longer period of time but i don't think i'm trying to get on a plane because i got on a plane is one point. I don't think it turned out the way i wanted it to go that. Okay i can understand that. So is it that you're trying to like see certain cities. Are you trying to like. Let me go. See the biggest ball of yarn. Let me go see the house. The old things which fan okay cool as long as you gotta bet right. This minimum yes very minimalist is like when it comes to traveling like i just need one basic thing and whatever else happens happens and i appreciate that okay I feel like we're close enough here. Do you have any laugh mark No all the things that i wanted to the other things i was gonna say i'll even know the gel ever gonna hear him now because they didn't feel important relevant this now. I'm just good on that. He can but. I hope that i will say this. I hope that anyone who listens to the mino- progress feels is is safe Up they feel loved and appreciated. And i hope that they see the potential for good things to happen for them. Yeah in twenty twenty I 'cause i'm still of hopeful. Recommend that. I'm glad i'm glad would ask now. I'm glad that you hope has not been stomped out I was fully completely honestly and also let you all know that we talk and we joke and we talk about like our personal experiences but we keep our ears to everything. That's going on too so don't feel like you can't pasta us. You can't tell us you can't relate to us cantons out of mother. Free continue can so if you want to message as the complained to disagree with us like we are here for you if you want to chat if you want to argue maybe not arjan on top of that but if wanna do like reach out if you feel like no one's listening to you or no one gets it like definitely reach out to someone and we can be that someone for you so just want to add that. I feel ventilated. Are you doing mandy. yeah we got we got it out and see how everything goes how it goes. Thank you all for listening mandy. Would you like to tell the people where they can find us confined on instagram and twitter at amino podcasts Where you can cyanide. Dmz singer comments on our post. You can also send your questions in concerned at mandian elliott jima dot com. Please be sure to liken. Subscribe to the podcast that you know up new episode. I say everything you often. Listening i uh.

america wisconsin mandy manny fred hampton mrs america arizona petit chuckle black panther party chicago Li lexin alabama eilly david purdue ali black part black panther party leeann netflix Mike howard
Police Killing Of Fred Hampton Remembered Via WBEZ Archives

Reset with Jenn White

23:49 min | 3 months ago

Police Killing Of Fred Hampton Remembered Via WBEZ Archives

"Makes sense of the day with consider this. The new local meets national podcast from wbz npr. You'll get up to speed in less than fifteen minutes with context and commentary on stories happening in chicago and around the world. Listen to consider this wherever you get your podcasts. Hi i'm suzanne and this is reset. Eric garner michael brown tamir rice. Liquid mcdonald riana. Taylor george floyd just some of the black americans killed by police officers over the past several years. Their deaths have outraged. Millions sending people of all colors into the streets demanding justice and demanding actions be taken to change difficult and often deadly relationship between law enforcement and black america december fourth marks. The fifty first anniversary of one of the most notorious police killings in history. It happened right here in chicago chicago police. And what's now most often referred to as a murder killed activists organizer and local black panther. Leader fred hampton and fellow panther mark clark as. They lay in bed sleeping justin. Toby ash is in charge of wbz's archives and she recently unearthed the broadcast did december fourth of nineteen eighty nine to takes a deep dive into the death of fred hampton. So we're doing a few things. Here were celebrating. Wbz's past we're remembering the life and death of fred hampton and we're highlighting grim parallels in thousand nine sixty nine and twenty twenty when black americans were killed by cops and people took to the streets demanding change. Here's the original report. Put together by carol gray with from the pacific radio archives that crap. We might not be back. I might be in jail. I might be anywhere. But when i leave you my head on apply fred hampton old chairman of the illinois black panther party shot dead by the chicago police in a predawn raid on his apartment. Twenty years ago today peoria illinois panther leader mark. Clark was also killed the official story to hit the press. Was that the police came armed with a search warrant at four in the morning to confiscate illegal weapons. They said they were fired. At by the panthers and had to shoot back in self-defense. At the time state's attorney. Edward hanrahan confirmed their wireless criminal reaction. The occupants in shooting officers emphasizes the extreme viciousness of the black panther party because of the climate of the times. There was some reason to believe the police version. Dennis cunningham attorney for the hampton family. People may remember. There were The panthers swore in those days nationally. Newton lay down an edict. they don't get past doorstep. You know you defend the place you're into the death and anybody who was captured in a raid excommunicated and hampton himself always had a quick answer for why the panthers were armed posse as we intend to invent Did to the past. We're gonna do it today the day after that and then day after that because only property example of self defense in the profit example of retaliation and by letting these people know that we moved fuzzy basic laws that anything goes down with the press people on the of the oppressor is should be reciprocal in plain language. It takes two to tango but people who feared the panthers had to admit there was one thing that police account couldn't explain the physical evidence of the apartment. There was only one bullet hole that showed. A shot was fired from inside the apartment and ninety nine bullet holes fired from the outside in later. Investigations concluded the one shot. Outward was likely fired by mark clark as his gun. Hit the floor following a fatal shot through his heart flint. Taylor another attorney for the hamptons tells what happened when the police inadvertently left the apartment unsealed following the raid panthers organized tours to go through the apartment into show everybody what had happened. Because of course hanrahan was saying that it was a shootout and the panthers that initiated it and and the panthers brought the community of thousands and thousands of people paraded through That apartment in the next ten days or so and they showed them where the bullet holes were and they showed him the bloody mattress and they caught and it was just. That in itself was incredible. Educative experience outcry in chicago grew loud enough to force the police into taking extraordinary steps to defend their actions. They built a mockup of hamptons apartment and the local. Cbs tv station ran. An exclusive of them reenacting their every move that night bombers man with the center of his body coming back like this two hands were laying over the bed like this and offers or right below. his was a forty five automatic. Cbs went for it but they had a rehearse it again dennis cunningham and they had to do it over and over again for the cost gitta right because they were making it up and so they had these outtakes that showed them cussing and say you know they'd opened the door. No maybe say the wrong thing and then they'd have to start over and so we got a hold of the outtakes finally in case and it was a joke. I mean it really ridiculous. They also gave in exclusive photograph to the chicago tribune. Which they said was the bullet. Ridden door to hamptons apartment again to show how they were attacked by the panthers. The bullet holes turned out to be nails in the door. Their cries of self defense fell on deaf. Ears as survivors of the raid began telling their side of the story. They broke into the door and they had flashlights and shallow flashlights around the room and they started shooting and they black panther brinda harris nineteen years old that was shot in the hand and leg in thirty eight now. She lives with her. Mother works as a clerk and goes to school to learn spanish. I had my eyes closed. A lot of the time and one of the policeman thought i was dead and i heard him say this will look like she's dead. And when he said that opened my eyes and he started kersee and some policemen's they kept telling me. I better die in the back room black panther. Deborah johnson slept next to hampton. Two weeks later she would give birth to their son. Deborah had been in the back bedroom in bed with fred and see went out and then the cop went in and and south through the head twice while he lay right there. In the bed today johnson worsening a law office. She's a strong woman with trusting. Is that show no trace of what she saw that night when i was coming out of the back room While i was pregnant i had on a roll and One of the policemen grabbed open my role by have anything under it and they said what do you know. We have a broad here. I mean i was still pregnant. Should have been no question another officer pull my hair and kind of threw me into the kitchen area. I was handcuffed behind my back and I only had on how shoes it was snow outside. We got out one of the policemen that took me out of the paddy wagon put revolver stomach and said you better not try to escape. I could hardly walk. Let alone run. Initially the panthers were charged with attempted murder but the charges couldn't stick and were soon dropped. The survivors then turned the tables and sued hanrahan and the police for violation of their civil rights and the wrongful deaths of hampton and clark during the trial evidence surfaced that shocked the country rather than being the isolated act of an overzealous police force. The raid was part of an fbi. Program designed to quote neutralized black militants. Who director j edgar hoover thought were a threat to the country subpoenaed. Fbi documents revealed that the purpose of the covert counterintelligence program. Cohen was to eliminate the possibility of a black messiah. Dennis cunningham tells how co intel pro worked was you know so discord right false letters. Put it make. He dropped hints at people are snitch. Informants you know set up for criminal arrests work with the local police to try and get them busted. And and i mean there's a tremendous literature and those files of how elaborate an operation. This was how many people and how much energy and resources from the fbi was devoted to. And how hoover and a whole echelon of top dogs were completely consumed with it over months. And months of time. I mean it was the flow of papers staggering hampton. Although not named as a possible messiah was considered such a threat. He was a rising star and the national press was starting to focus on him. The following interview was with a member of a new york-based video documentary group of people that are outside of the black community who haven't been harassed till now or even even people in the black community. That don't really know what the panthers are. Act how do you tell them that. You are defending yourself. All the they see five. Panthers violence just like they see Maybe hippies in violence or sds and violence and they think that you know that's all you wanna do is get guns a more kind of like even an education program. What are the panthers into as far as that. Five people in the ghetto don't have to be educated. I know that but like there are people a lot of people should be and maybe you could like get to those people. Are you trying. I don't think anybody trying harder and in this temps admit any more successful. We out there. Every day and educating people learn by example. I i don't think anybody has now. I think when you can see the people learned basically by and participation. I think by the caught on onto that. So what you're saying is that they learn. Bob's vision and participation that we need to do more acting than we need to do. Righty and i think the black panther party is doing that. We didn't talk about a british petroleum. We've got more. We not going to tell you. How many keys maintain the freedoms feeders. The cargo feeding three thousand four thousand every week already and i don't know how many all around the country we're not talking about beginning to think about treating people free when they need medical services. We opened in the free clinic in the city of chicago in less than three weeks. These type examples that people can relate to hampton said. The panthers were the vanguard there to help educate the public. We're moving to a level where people are going to take over control of their destiny. They are going to take over. Control that nudity. And the first doing this is dealing with the most Integral part of the fascist tree. Three way oppression. We said demographic line pilots and avaricious greedy businessman and we fascist peed cops but the one that's most evident wanders closest wanders more clear the one that's more defined in the black community is those fascist. Pa cops so what we're saying is if the people can deal with these fools we will we will have taken a revolutionary. Step revolutionary leap. I should say so. That's the program that we think going to move into. High level is going to raise. Contradictions antagonistic contradiction. We prepared to deal with the people who deal with and indeed another threat to the fbi. Was that hampton was reaching out beyond the black community is also important that the people in peace movement moso identify with the black panther party calls people they believe in peace and people peace she deal and support the vigorously peacemakers. The black panther party must be designed. It has to be out of necessity defined peacemakers because we deal with defending our those break the peace keeping an eye on hampton. The fbi planted an informant. Waymo neil into the party. Many believed o.'neil drugged hampton. The night of the raid because no one was able to wake him up when the shooting began. What's known for sure is that o.'neil supplied a floor plan of the apartment to the fbi. The floor plan was a layout of the apartment. Showed the safe and location of the rooms and showed where the bed wasn't doorways. Were and Showed them where they could. You know what they would be dealing with if they would come in with of course since they came in the middle of the night and was pitch dark was Invaluable to them for the next several years the lawyers refused to give up on the case even though the police took it all the way up to the us. Supreme court jeff has a third hampton attorney tells how it was to argue the case before federal judge sam. Perry curry was eighty. One year. Old white judge from alabama. Who was not the least bit going to ever allow the panthers to prove that the fbi Kill their leader anyway. He said well. You don't like anything as far as you concerned. Except your way. And i said well judge. There hasn't been anything that has happened and he said. And you're not going to have your way. I said i know my way is a fair trial. I know i'm not going to get it. Judge that is totally clear in this courtroom and he said you bet your life. You're not gonna get it. I think he said rather specifically exactly what the circumstances were that case but against all odds the lawyers won a cash settlement for the families and survivors. Fourteen years later it was paid for by the city. County and federal governments cunningham said that the trial papers produced over the years explained why the original indictments against the panthers were dropped right from the start when the fbi said it was investigating the raid. There wasn't fact a deal in the making the fbi was pretending all during that time to be You know independent and looking into it and so then hanrahan start a white male them and he said you know. Don't push this stuff too far. We're gonna tell you were in on it too. And that's when they cut a deal and the deal with reflected in a memorandum. That said you know okay. They're going to drop the charges against the panthers and And the Grand jury investigation is gonna not result in. Police will be indicted. They'll just write a report. Which is what they did on all hooked up according to cunningham. Everyone felt vindicated in exposing the fbi. Even though they weren't able to prove that the federal government actually intended to kill hampton the involvement of the fbi and setting up the raid was totally intimate and indispensable particularly in the provision of the floor. Plan and the intention of the fbi to neutralize them is undeniable. So you know. What's the difference when you get to heaven. You find out the truth. The men who might already know the truth the police hanrahan and the fbi interviewed twenty years later. Many see hampton's death as just an accident of fate but a deliberate act again. Flynn taylor december fourth tribune and The papers we're talking about a shootout and that kind of thing and then you see the by the boston globe last month when they were talking about he newton they talk about the hampton case and they talk about the murder of fred hampton. So at least we have that as a palpable. Change in the way history. And and and that's Some kind of almost mainstream history not just movement. History views The event so. What's the legacy of that bloody night that silence to angry invoices twenty years ago today a lot of respect for for all of chicago's second ward was minister of defense back. In those days he said of the many things hampton's death did one was to change the face of chicago. Politics rush said the black community once willing to vote democratic no matter what turned its back on the democrats after the raid sacrifices lying then the political victory herald wasserman would not every because the result response to murder The black community would enter state attorney. Who was one of the board of the democratic party. something that indicated. He was going to be the person who replaced the original. The of merit and The black community rose up and defeated. hanrahan hope relented and the blackman has not been to the democratic. Party has says hampton's death was another blow from which the black community has not recovered. I think when you study the facts of the hampton case it's clear cases probably is well documented will ever be of a state assassination have ads. We don't see people of the stature of fred hampton in leadership positions and we want one of the reasons why there are so many destructive elements in the black community wide drugs and gangs have taken such hold is because to some extent the co intel pro program was effective. It did wipe out. Black leaders like fred hampton. And it's no accident than hampton and malcolm and martin luther king and a number of other people who probably could and would be leading. The black community are dead. Deborah johnson agrees. The section of louis farrakhan there are no leaders in the black community to harness the rage she sees every day. Johnson vowed not to get involved or join another group after she left the party but now he's having second thoughts. I see the same things occurring in nine hundred. Eighty nine that occurred in nineteen sixty. Nine police brutality. The attitude that permanent permeates is country is wanna. it's okay. What is done to african americans in this country. It's acceptable by law. You will not get punished for. We see that not just in chicago. But across the united states also the Control and manipulation of the media in terms of distorting what happens to us in our community and not reporting things that are pertinent to our survival also see very vividly an escalation of denial of medical care for african americans in minority people. Basically it's a repeat to me sixty nine and i'm not satisfied with myself. I'm not involved in that. So i vowed never join. An organization is no void. If johnson's right if it is nineteen sixty nine all over again. Will the public be more prepared for battle this time around again. Fred hampton the people who don't want to be wiped out struggled. We struggled properly. We don't feel that people that don't struggle right to. We think that if people go into the ring mohammed ali and put up any musicians and it'd be wonder why get in they have to be idiots before you have no right to win because you didn't fight. We severe steps your data struggle to win if you didn't have to. Struggle dole deserves nobody including the panthers. New the danger they were in or how numbered their days really were. The following conversation took place only a few months before hampton was killed. Would about killing anybody to calls. Though they by tidal power be wiped out. Martin luther king and he went out now. Thematic wiped all these people will produce flat things in the near future youth program immediately by the government. They probably have a protecting people like us because they wiped out new cleveland. I know very well. If we wish to god that we had a huge new only beef because dismal was the whole you heard hampton speak would are with the fbi about one thing. He was a powerful voice. Who was hell bent on leading his people from his early days in the acp to his brief life as a black panther our company dad moved. Dad us this guy out as In dat black panther leader. Fred hampton shot dead by the chicago police twenty years ago today for. Wbz this is carol gray. Original material from the wbz archives things to wbz just in tokyo. Carol gray was the original producer. Special things to the pacifica radio archives. And that's a wrap for today's reset. If you like what you hear on the reset podcast telephoned about it and take about thirty seconds to leave a rating and review really helps other people find us. I'm suzanne thanks for listening. And we'll see you right back here tomorrow for more reset from. Wbz chicago right now. On the curious city podcast one hundred years ago and african american boy drowned igniting a week of race riots in chicago but tensions had been building for years and some chicagoans wanted violence. They were looking for an opportunity to blow the lid off and so when this event happened at the beach. They said this is it. This is our chance to really meant to race war. The deep causes of the nineteen nineteen race riot. That story and many others inspired by your questions. Wbz dot org slash curious city.

panthers fred hampton hampton fbi chicago Dennis cunningham hanrahan hamptons mark clark Carol gray Eric garner tamir rice mcdonald riana Taylor george floyd Toby ash wbz illinois black panther party Edward hanrahan Deborah johnson black panther party
Who killed Fred Hampton?

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

57:10 min | 2 years ago

Who killed Fred Hampton?

"Wars. From the same team that brought you at Lanta monster comes a new season and a new monster season, two tackles, the riveting story of one of the most infamous serial killers in history, the zodiac killer with new interviews and information, join the hosts pain Lindsey of up and vanished and me Matt Frederick of stuff. They don't want you to know as we take a deep dive into the real story behind the headlines. Listen and subscribe to monster the zodiac killer on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. UFO's to psychic powers government. Conspiracies history is riddled with unexplained events, you can turn back now or learn the stuff they don't want you to know. Oh, hello. Welcome back to the show. My name is Matt is no they call me. Ben, we are joined with our super producer, Paul mission, control deck, and most importantly, you are you you are here. And that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know it's twenty nineteen and a if you are remotely aware of the news, you understand that the government is still shut down. The government is this is the longest shutdown in modern US history. So presumably, they're not assassinating any political activists at the moment while the assassins are getting paid at least there's back bay right load. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. This is a divisive time in the country. But that's something people always say, you know, how like older people are always like all new music sucks, but old music good. And people are always like, oh, this is the most divisive time ever. It's always been a real. There's a free. Knoll knoll stumbled upon that I really like it's always been real ship show. It's true. 'cause we're family show. We are. There is a p just everyone listening yesterday like a trade show for boats shift on stilts, you get to look undercarriages books like that. But with with rampant wanting havoc politically with quite real danger to many people, and we're not we're we're not gonna do some AM or FM political talking points show. We're not gonna pair it out some headlines at you. We want to establish that context because it's often said that history is cyclical, right? It maybe maybe it doesn't repeat, but it rhymes. And the reason that cliche is a cliche is because it's true. That's the reason most cliches are cliches, it's because they're true. Everyone knows it. It's such an eye roll. When people say. Today, we are taking a journey into a into an event that may be familiar to some of us, and maybe brand new to others. And it may be something that you just remember of from one line in a rage against the machine song down rodeo, right? We were we were talking about this off air listening to rage against the machine and the three of us. I don't know if you agreed Paul, but the three of us at least here in the booth thought, you know, reach against the machine holds up. Well, the thing too about not not that to me doesn't all of a sudden a critique about rage against the machine and their cultural significance. But the thing that stands up to me is that all of the other like rap metal bands, or whatever they sound completely cliche and Hackney now but rage against machine. Just sounds like rage against the machine. Nobody else really copied them. So exactly that they sound like a tired, you know, copy of themselves. So good on them. Yeah. Yeah. Being innovative. Just another thing. That I was reminded of my wife is always trying to get me to listen to a newer music and back in the day, Jay Z, and who's that guy? So other guy Jay Z in Connie. I'm just joking. Gimme a direction is not sure I think if you're looking at a map, I think it's still the left Connie north by northwest something like that. No. But they had they had a song that mentioned the person. We're talking about today. And it it just reminded me of that to just wouldn't that? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So specifically that line in down rodeo is they ain't going to send me camping. Like, they did my member at Hampton, and that is a real person. Yes. This is common knowledge to some of us. This is maybe a an Easter egg for some people. But today, we are exploring the life and times and untimely end of a very young man named Fred Hampton today. Most people would not be able to point out Maywood Illinois on a map it's relatively small. It's a community of at the closest estimate a little more than twenty three thousand five hundred people in cook county's proviso township shortly after World War Two now. Was this kid? His name's Fred Hampton. He he went to. He was born in summit, Illinois. He went to a high school in Maywood in the area. He was great at math was he was a great athlete and for time. He was a pre law student. He died. Spoiler alert when he was twenty one years old as bonkers to me every time I look back at these. Whether it's like musician musicians the dies has nearly age like Kurt cobaine. I forget they're like twenty three twenty four years old. I still think of myself as a relatively young, man. But it really makes you puts things in perspective. You just just getting started for at Hampton was. So what happened to look at this? We will have to start with some some social context and background. So here are the facts Fred Hampton is today. Most widely known for his association with the Black Panther party or be p p officially the Black Panther party for self defense. This was founded in Oakland, California in nineteen sixty six by Huey Newton. And Bobby Seale originally these guys wanted to protect local residents of the Oakland community from police brutality and this information crime and just as a like a local defense forces sensually a self-governing community, right? We don't we don't need a we don't need the law enforcement industry as they saw it to further repress our community. There's so many things. That could be solved the reasoning goes by by just talking to kids because these are teenagers just saying, hey, don't cause trouble. Or, you know, it's it's like you hear the stories of young kids who maybe get pulled over for something. They get caught drinking underage or smoking pot. And then the officers up to their discretion. They can they can book a kit and take them to juvie or they can do something that is scarier more. Frightening for some of them, which is called their mother. It's interesting in the movie black klansman. I don't know if you guys have seen that yet. But it got some Spike Lee finally got his first Beck's best picture and best director Oscar nominees first nation in thirty years since do the right. That's right. I watched the plane. Yes. But there's a scene where Stokely Carmichael who's the leader of the Black Panther party. Is speaking at a university and one of the organizers who's a college student who's got this. You know, college group that organized this event is very abusively pulled over by the very racist, local Riley's and just hassled for being the person that brought these people to this town. I believe in Colorado the city in Colorado. So I kind of stuff was happening all the time. And that was the there was absolutely need to have some kind of protection within this specific community to keep stuff. Like that from happening ednid- need is key. These people were making these decisions for fun, right? They weren't like, hey, should we go bowling or should we should we start a political party and? And then rock paper scissors for it. They saw a need and as the BP evolved its goals expanded. They recognize this was not something that needed to exist only in Oakland, California. But in the continent entire right, especially the US, but also also Canada and the group eventually called for nationwide changes meant to combat. The racial inequality in the US which still exists today. Now by the late nineteen sixties this organization had over two thousand members two thousand minute members. There are probably many many more sympathisers, right? Where people who said I see what you're doing I-, tacitly if not explicitly supported critics of the party, including the FBI saw this work in ization as a they saw it as a hate group Naisoro it as a on the level of racial supremacy group, you know, like the KKK, and they also saw it as primed to explode in some sort of like massive uprising or riot kind of situation. When in fact, they were building schools in inner city areas of Oakland, and they had like clinics and supply free lunches ops in all of this really incredible community building stuff breakfast programs for kids, and clothing drives and all of this stuff. And the thing I mentioned. Earlier about the, you know, protecting themselves against, you know, racial, profiling it certainly wasn't it was much more of an awareness thing. And I've like let's stick together and make people aware that they can't mess with us because we are of one mind, and we will, you know, look out for each other. Yes, and draw attention to the fact that this stuff is happening and know, your rights that also big proponents of the second amendment, which you know, the right to bear arms. Not the animal bear arms. Yes. I feel like we always have to say that now. But the the right to hold a firearm. I think this is a good place to mention that the Black Panther party is one of numerous organizations that find their origins in this time period. Yes, we're in these are somewhat splintered groups where members of one like chapter of the Black Panther party would go and form their own group. And this was this was happening throughout the United States. So they're they're basically you have to imagine. If you look on a map there are. There are smaller groups all over the place rather than one unified group. Absolutely. Absolutely. And that's an excellent point because not everybody agreed on every facet of the of the ideology. Right. There would be people who agree with the push for quality. But they would say, hey, this is N tag mystic work within the system. And then we're other people who said, well, you know, the system is built to destroy you. So you are destroying yourself and us if you play along with these games, and if you look closely enough, it's interesting how you can see the rationality for almost ova groups like because it almost makes sure complete sense in every scenario with these groups that are coming together. It's all about philosophy. Sure and fluffy is ultimately only as valuable as the actions and inspires which I just made up, but I'm gonna stick by that that that turn of phrase it belongs on a bumper sticker. And or a plaque of some core a shirt, oh my. Gosh, dude. So, but this is totally true. Because the biggest thing that Fred Hampton was known for was being like an organizer. He was a great speaker could bring people together, and he pushed for this idea that the people in charge were using tools. We being racism as a tool to control people that were not in their club. You know, that's that's the conspiracy theory. No, that's just absolutely look at it. And and some conspiracy theories for the record or true. But he he's right there. There's an active conspiracy, the the federal government at this time as the Panthers expand the federal government considers this group and associated groups terrorists, and they lump them in with the various other separatists or status quo challenging groups that you alluded to earlier met in the FBI's estimation. The BP was an extremist group that. Quote, advocated, the use of violence and guerrilla tactics to overthrow the US government. That's that's a heavy freeze to drop. It is. That's there's whether or not you largely agree with the idea of let's just pick one thing. Whether or not you agree with the second amendment. It's it's a hell of a leap to say that people attempting to police their own communities are automatically going to the White House to burn down the Oval Office. That's that's a that's a logical leap. And it's when the FBI by will. It's absolutely didn't how they solely sold. It. Exactly. It's absolute hyperbole. And it's like we're saying it's this idea of selling to the public this notion that this group of organized African American people are somehow a threat to you in your white communities, or in your, you know, way of life and your job in all of this stuff and your safety. Yeah, they accept whatever they need to do to get rid of it really is propaganda. But we cannot discount that some of these splintered off groups were using your dream extreme violence, man. Yeah. And I think it's a symbionese liberation shirt. Like, these other much more extreme could even now be classified as terrorist groups, right? This is during the during the Vietnam era, meaning that the I have a great metaphor for this. I wanna save it for the. But but the the idea here was one of an existential threat. So the Federal Bureau of investigation deals with things like, you know, human trafficking, drugs murders across state lines that kind of stuff and they said back burner. Backburner back Bernard dissidents extremist terrorists people who want the US to be. Less racist them to and meth our number one priority. That's our priority. They said like, you know, drugs human trafficking, interstate murder. That's stuff happens. You know? I'll let's eggs, but I'll tell you what buddy these hippies these Black Panthers this injustice shall not stand. Only our injustice, she'll stand one might imagine. Oh, man. So let's with that context. Let's look at Fred Hampton. It's a name that's familiar to people. But it's also it's this is the name of a real person, not just a symbol rains. He's a smart kid. We mentioned that he was born in summit, Illinois. There was an August thirtieth nineteen forty eight. So like us he's Nagas kid. He was raised in Maywood, and he graduated from the high school there with honors in sixty six nineteen sixty six from high school. He first went to the developmental. Institute at the YMCA community college in Chicago. And then he attended TRITON junior college in river grove, Illinois. He majored in pre law because he planned to familiarize himself with the legal system to know his rights with the aim of better protecting his community against what he saw as the threat of the police, and there's there's a there's an interesting confluence of contracting views here because Hampton saw the police as an existential threat the community and the FBI eventually sold the Black Panthers as an existential threat to their community. So originally. In the he's very young kid at this time originally Fred organized for the in double ACP. Yes. The national sociation for the advancement of colored people just to put that back in there. And then he ended up joining the Black Panther party in nineteen sixty eight which was headquartered at the time in Oakland, California. And you know after he joins up with them. He moves to Chicago. And he he basically develops an Illinois chapter of the Black Panther party. He gets in on the ground floor and over the next year in Chicago, Hampton, and other members of the chapter and people associated with it achieve some pretty impressive stuff. You know, like like Nole said earlier, they are supplying clothing. They're supplying food. They're organizing they're educating the most notable achievement under the one people. Remember, the most often now was that Hampton, bro. Occurred a deal between some of Chicago's most powerful street gangs by saying look, we are in a system that wants you to fight. It wants you to kill one another because then you won't vote. It wants you to kill one another because then you won't get old enough. Maybe not even to your thirties. Yeah. You have to be in your thirties to be president. Right. And if you're finding each other you can't see the real enemy, essentially, exactly, yeah. Yeah. And this message resonated with these gangs. And so he he televised this racial class conscious alliance between the BP the young patriots organization and the young lords. Yeah. This was technically a nonaggression pact. Because he he said, you know, this this is what the system wants it wants to keep you. Pour. It wants to keep your dying young. Yeah. Or put you in prison. And he was you know, we said this was televised. He Fred Hampton was somebody. If you listen to he is very convincing. And if you if you listen to him, I mean, it's just one of the there's sometimes comes along a speaker public speaker who can in a way, and I don't know if this is the right word, but almost in trance you where you're just listening, and you're okay. Yeah. I I hear what you're saying the way you're speaking. What you're saying? It's speaking to me, it's not you're not speaking at me. You're speaking to me, and since it was on television, the the right? I guess and wrong. People were noticing excellent point that. Yes, yes. Because this is a moment that can be propagated before it can be censored, right? Yes. So after this. Watershed event after this watershed year during this year. A Fred Hampton also coins of phrase that will be familiar with a lot of people who may not have heard of Fred Hampton, which is the phrase rainbow coalition arguing again for multiracial cooperative to address the entrenched poverty of lower working class, Chicago and more importantly the country as a whole this was later taken up by successive political pundits. Right. Yeah. It was really used it morphed over time. Let's say it did it did. And one thing I like about what you're pointing out with the televised with the televised. Let's all get together. Cooperate over through the system. Right. Forget the G rides. I want the machines that are making them this this the BP did have a Maoist or communists. Tinge to its ideology and this made the idea of the white panther party, a compounding threat. That's right because we're still we're we're in Cold War era at this point. And they were essentially messing with the money. What happened this year well at the very end of nineteen sixty nine according to the official story Fred Hampton died in an apartment raid searching for illegal weapons on in the early hours of December fourth nineteen sixty nine the FBI saw themselves as protecting the population protecting the innocent population of Chicago and officially they were reading dangerous group the possessed extensively illegal weapons one more time officially that's what they were doing. It should go without saying. But I'll say it not everyone believes the story, and we'll get into that story after a quick word from our sponsor. Let me tell you about Pete who loved hockey and always wanted to play in the NHL Pete play since he was three and begged his mom to let him stay on the ice by some nights. He even slept in his hockey skates. Pete practiced and practiced until one day when he was forty seven Pete realized he just wasn't that good. So he threw his skates in the trash. But then you heard how gyco proud partner of the NHL good save money on car insurance. So he switched and saved a bunch. So it all worked out. We're back, and I just want to point this out here. This is when Fred Hampton died just as a fun fact, it was it's not fun. It was two months after the last confirmed zodiac killing. Okay. Let's keep going. Here's where it gets crazy. So the federal government sees this and associated groups as a threat, they are terrified of the idea of anything challenging the solvency of the government, the breaking of the rule of law. So the question becomes how far would the US government go to prevent what they saw as the spread of subversive elements. Would they in fact M I five style CIA style break the laws they were supposed to enforce in pursuit of what they saw as a greater good evidence overwhelmingly indicates? Yes, the FBI, essentially, engineer and assassination. Yeah. And it's tough to look past the evidence, especially if you look at the the full picture here with something we're about to get into a specific program. Yes. Yep. Yep. Yep. Which will be familiar to fellow longtime listeners. Let's start with a guy named Marco Neil. We'll we'll go into detail about him in a moment. What you need to know about Mark is that he was in the BP associated with it. But he was also for part of the time an FBI informant and on the night of December third after a political education session Hampton, and his girlfriend was pregnant and several of their associates went to when went to this apartment where they were going to spend the night and the sky Marco Neal was functioning as security he also made dinner. Yeah, he made dinner and he drugged. Fred Hampton with barb. It's which prevented him from waking up at all. Yeah. Yeah. He slept peacefully in this bedroom with this girlfriend and the police when they conducted the raid around four AM or so they came in guns blazing right? And there was was Marco Neal. Was he the one holding the shotgun? Mark O'Neill was was there or at least for a time. Yeah. Because again, he set the entire thing up. So. The police shot security was one guy with a shotgun. They just shot him. Yeah. That was not Mark. That was not you know, they shot the guy as he's dying. Shotgun. Discharges and see only shot the BP fired that night, and then they aimed their fire on the bedroom where Hampton and is again pregnant girlfriend, and again, these these people are in their twenties. Right. Yeah. He would they shot at twenty one year old kid asleep in a room, and you could claim fog of war, you could claim a best of intentions or that the road to hell is paved with those kinds of tiles. Or you could claim this was part of something called co Intel pro. Which it was just for the record. I want to put that out there. Cohen toll road. You may be most familiar with this word, unfortunately slash kind of fortunately through the work of Alex Jones, and you'll hear him yelling about it on the internet sometimes. But yeah, co Intel pro it's an actual thing. And I was founded by the FBI in nineteen fifty six, and it was just kind of a catchall term for a counterintelligence program was short for a counterintelligence program that was designed to stop the communist party initially, and then it began to kind of branch off and attack. Some of these more domestic groups that we talked about, including the socialist worker party. Of course, the Black Panthers in any of the other splinter groups that we've been talking about throughout some of which were quite dangerous and did pose a threat also in their defense, the klu Klux Klan. Yeah. So they were hunting anything. They saw as subversive is a very bad time to be vegan. Just give you a sense of how how rigid their ideology was on Sam side or an animal rights activists. Oh, yeah. We're an animal rights activists, by the way. I watched it's not in. All right. Sorry. I watched this movie called edge of darkness last night. Did just happened to be on HBO and. I was just flipping through. And it was activists who were trying to expose a nuclear weapons program. But it felt very similarly the off the grid groups, you know, that are functioning for higher purpose Shusha on. No, no credit cards, right? No credit card usage. Watch out for your phone has GPS. Yes. Not about the money. It's about sending a message. Okay. Sorry. I know I'm making crazy. Is it you. I just I get it. Yeah. So the panther party wasn't originally part of the co Intel pro targets right part of the FBI targets, but by nineteen sixty eight J Edgar Hoover himself, consider them to be quote, the greatest threat to the internal security of the country because he saw them as commies right as communist and additionally as. People stirring up the pot. You know, almost as insurgents he saw it as a potential insurgency. Well, yeah, it goes back to that existential threat to the United States because some of the philosophy and some of the. Some of the truth is being spoken within these groups and being televised speaks to some of the biggest problems that exist in the country at this time from an inequality Stanton. In that's dangerous. If you get enough people to truly follow and believe, especially if you have made parts of this group that are armed Reichen. Imagine why J Edgar Hoover in some of his groups were terrified of of this type of organization. Yeah. And by nineteen sixty nine the Panthers were would, you know, one of the primary targets steer by Hoover, and the F B I attempted a number of nefarious strategies to weaken, the group, the FBI was primarily concerned with a sort of a domino effect or to Chretien, you know, of similar groups that got together and said, hey, you're on the same page, you you also understand the idea or you agree with us with his idea the proletariat right in the class struggle. Yeah. Let's all work together. Dangerous for as long as it lasts. Yeah. Yeah. I mean human beings have been saying, let's work together until one of them stabs the other one in the back before recorded history, probably before homo sapiens, just sort of our thing. So the fact that Fred Hampton was as as you pointed out met this enormously. Compelling brilliant speaker this unifying force the fact that he had these capabilities made him a target it put the target on his back as far as I'm Sam was concerned and especially at the age of twenty one. Yeah. Especially being so young like you said he's just beginning and to prevent this growth to to stop him short. The FBI started surveilling Hampton and his associates to the best of their ability wiretapping, which listening to phone calls infiltration. They were stealing the guys mail. Mail. They were reading his stuff, the attempted extortion. They did more. I mean, this is this is a an era of domestic security wherein the same government agency, the FBI wrote letters to Dr Martin Luther King trying to convince him to kill himself. Yeah. Yeah. Who by the way was assassinated just the year prior to Ryan Fred Hampton was killed. Exactly, exactly. There's an escalation and at the time. This may sound like common knowledge to a lot of us listening today at the time co Intel pro was classified. Nobody knew was happening. Nobody knew these operations were not public until nineteen seventy one. And that's important because it means that during the early morning hours December fourth nineteen sixty-nine. There was no public scrutiny of the actions that the FBI and its proxies local law enforcement shows to take. There was definitely not congressional oversight. Yeah. And even this is terrible to even think. But even then at the time if you look at congress, I mean. I can't I can't say, this is my opinion. But I feel like congressional oversight wouldn't do much for something. Like this. Fortunately, that's just my a completely Meiping. I agree with you. And one thing that this touches on is something that's occurred in this government and other governments quite often who which is the the conflict between elected unelected officials. Right. If you live in this country, and you are able to vote you can vote for a Representative. You can vote for a president. You cannot vote for a supreme court Justice, those nine creepy ringwraiths that run this place in everybody's still pretends that's normal excuse me, different episodes, or like, you know, people who are on the Federal Reserve people on the Federal Reserve. Yeah. Excellent point. So you you, and I and anyone listening cannot directly vote for the heads of intelligence agencies. That's never going to be on your belly. And. And presidents can come and go. But that is a different game. You know what? I mean, I'm getting creeped out. You know, I a passionate about this a feel like I'm preaching to the choir here, but it, but it's true. And the reason we bring that up is because we I I wanna be very clear that there are people in congress with the best of intentions who had no idea what was going on. Yes. You know what? I mean they were concerned about their constituency. There were probably they'll probably mainly concerned with being reelected, if we're being honest, but the they would not have co-signed these sorts of actions right because now looking back we have to ask ourselves who were the terrorists who is engaging in guerrilla tactics. Who successfully assassinated more people, oh, I know. I know dang, well, I'm just asking just asking this. This stuff comes to a head in nineteen seventy six the select committee to study governmental operations. Which is something you hit me two years and years ago. Matt the church committee. Yeah. Yeah. They they finally realize in seventy six the FBI was violating the law and had been violating the law in several operations under Cohen, tell pro pretty rough stuff the so the stated aim, right? Cohen tell pro when when they go into an office, and they're like, okay. We're would is what Kuhn tell pros going to do. We're going to prevent violence. And that's really what it is. But some of these the actions that they took during this it hit arguably promoted violence between not not between the FBI and other groups, but between the groups that the FBI is surveilling under co Intel pro specifically the Black Panthers in several other rival organizations, and we we mentioned this in our video that we made God years ago. I don't even know when that was, but we talk about to other groups that United slaves and the Blackstone Rangers who are two other. I say similar group. But they're they're very different in many ways. But it's these two other groups were then having major conflicts with the Black Panthers because of the actions taken by the FBI. Yes, in the FBI did not want these groups to unify in the eyes of the in the eyes of the bureau. These groups were similar enough that they should be kept apart. They were considered troublemakers. Right. And the FBI also worked ardently to prevent prominent BP members from making public appearances, according to Nome Chomsky who I know it can be a controversial author for some people Coen. Tell pro eventually expanded to include political assassinations, the reason we say, according to Noam Chomsky is because even today you will you will quickly go down a rapid hole of various. You know what I'm gonna call him apologetic. I'm going to call the various attempts at rationalization okay of assassination. Okay. The official story right here. We can we can just give you the blow by blow back to the death of Fred Hampton, supporters of the party claimed Hampton was assassinated, and that the government assassinated Hampton because they feared he could become a visible unifying leader an icon, a figurehead of the black power movement. So how did he actually die? We'll get to that. Right. After a word from our sponsor. This episode of stuff. They don't want you to know is brought to you by how to money, and how to money is not your typical personal finance podcast. It involves best friends Madden. Joel not to be confused with matinal, but still great guys nonetheless. Yes, these friends hostess humorous in relatable show, that's all about money in ways it pertains to you in the life you want to lead. But not only are they best friends. They're also neighbors who enjoy sitting down together with craft beer yum and making money conversations fund, interesting and most importantly, informative so tune in every Wednesday, they cover a real life money topics like ways to cut your grocery Bill, for example, Matt in his family of five spend five dollars per meal. That's one dollar a person how you might ask. I don't believe it for a second. What are some of the other topics stuff? Like, why your house might not be the greatest investment in the world? Unless of course, you're doing what Joel does and house hacking your home. Paying over half your mortgage with rent, and then of course, the ultimate personal finance topic how to achieve financial independence. So if you're pretty bad at money, or maybe you're just interested in personal finance than how to money is just for you. Listen and subscribe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Just search for how to money. And we're back in the early morning hours of December fourth nineteen sixty nine eight Cook County police officers who were acting under instructions from the Cook County state's attorney's office approached the west side, Chicago headquarters of the Black Panthers. As you might imagine in a raid type situation. There was another group of officers that approached from the back everyone inside was still asleep, including Fred Hampton inside. What was he say headquarters, and it was really it was an apartment it was a flat there were nine people still asleep. This is in the very early morning hours before the sun had even risen. Yeah. It's crowded apartment. First floor nineteen guns in the apartment more than a thousand rounds of ammunition. The way that the Tribune report. The series of events was that this was a national hate group known for their revolutionary politics. More importantly for shooting police officers. That's there were cop killers. That's how this was reported. Right. Yeah. Is there any sand to that? Like, I mean is there may be some kind of conflict between police and black diamonds that resulted in a police officer being killed, and they spun it into these are cop, murdering Savage's, you know, I don't have the reporting right here with me or the police reporting, but in to my mind for the Chicago Tribune to print that for killing cops, I would say that at least a few instances occurred yet there. There are claims that there were thirty five police officers who were murdered by the Black Panthers and the subsequent black Liberation Army across the sixties seventies and eighties. So the work hops did dot they were shot. And it's it's important that we mentioned this people were dying. It's it's easy and tempting perhaps for some people to get caught in the game of equivocation. Or to forget that there are actual human lives at stake. You know what I mean? So we can only imagine that of the six officers in the back door in the eight officers in the front several of them may have thought they were on a mission of dare I say vengeance. Right. So what about four forty five AM a sergeant Daniel growth knocked on the front door of the apartment. There was no answer. So he knocked. With his gun and presumably shouted. Yeah. Yeah. Shouted. Yeah. Then they busted in the door. The next seven minutes of gunfire. Become one of the most intensely debated and disputed incidence of the entire decade. There was a federal grand jury investigation that found that the police fired in the neighborhood of ranging between eighty three to ninety shots. Yeah. Into this apartment is a small again, this is in apartment in Chicago. This is gonna that. That would just be chaos. I would fear for the lives of the neighbors. And again, the the one of the nineteen guns in the apartment owned by BP one. Shotgun discharged once there was one shot fired. Yeah. It's pretty it's pretty rough pretty pretty damning usually after the shooting stopped. Fred Hampton was dead at twenty one and a party leader from Peoria. Mark Clark twenty two was also shot fatally. And I believe the grand jury found that he was the one who knew discharged that one shotgun blast right? He was as he was set to be security, right? And now we return to William O'Neil panther. And informants people didn't originally know the extent of his involvement with the FBI is in the right? Yeah. Wasn't until so this occurred. The death occurred in nineteen sixty nine and his role wasn't revealed until nineteen seventy three. And yet it's pretty rough actually. So we mentioned that he was a there was a member of the Black Panther party. He was on the inside working closely with Fred Hampton as well as more Clark. And he was simultaneously serving as an informant for the FBI. He would send information to to the FBI. And by the way, he's a teenager at this time is it. He's a young guy when he's starting out working with these guys tragedy. These people were so young. Yeah. Exactly. Among the things that he. He sent to the FBI the primary thing, I guess that that people focus on is a floor plan for this apartment. That was eventually rated his cover was blown. And at you know, at one point there. I I believe it was I believe it was seventy three when his cover was blown. But I I am not completely positive. It might have been earlier than that. I do not unfortunately have that specific information, but he ended up going into the federal witness protection program. We can say it here he his name at the time. Or when he went into the program was William Hart, and he moved out to California. And then eventually he moved back to Chicago in nineteen Eighty-four in the reason, we're talking about O'neil in this way is because in January of nineteen ninety on mar Martin Luther King junior day. He actually took his own life by running out into traffic. And we know this because he had an uncle named Ben heard who was with him that day and his story is told by these Chicago reader, and that's what we're reading about here. And he specifically this guy been heard has some insight into Neil's life. Yes, he learned of O'Neill's work with the FBI shortly after the death of Fred Hampton in nineteen sixty nine and per. Been heard O'neil denied everything that he was asked about heard says I thought about some of the things he did and said I asked him, but he denied it. And then later O'Neill opened up told his uncle you've been in trouble for everything from car theft to kidnapping, and torture and so on and listen pretty heavy things. Pretty heavy things heard says that his nephew told him they tied someone up or reporting hot water over his head. They were trying to get him to do something. So an FBI agent told O'Neil he would take care of all of it. If he turned if he infiltrated the Panthers in heard believe that O'Neill had regrets, right? Yeah. I think that's pretty safe to say. So he went on to say he's he was sorry that he did what he ended up doing. And that he was it was his impression that this was an FBI raid of the. House, but the FBI gave it over to the state's attorney and then state police local law enforcement took the reins from there. They killed Fred Hampton, and in this person's estimation. And made sure that he was dead yet. That's a crucial point here. O'neill according to his own statements before his death O'Neill thought this was just going to be a raid. Maybe people would get arrested for possession of firearms or some sort of violation of possession laws. Right. Maybe it would have been a drug possession possibly, right? Heck, you know. I if they were looking for something maybe would have been a violation of the fire code. Yeah. I don't know. I mean, the the biggest thing is the firearms charges, you probably sent them to prison on just firearm charges, but that's not how it went down. Right. So from O'Neill's perspective. No as far as we know today. O'neill did not say that the FBI on records say that the FBI lied to him. But they did say originally that this was simply going to be a raid and. He was with his nephew the morning after the raid and Hamptons apartment, and he saw the he he saw the aftermath. Yeah. Day. So there were papers strewn over the floor blood all over there was a trail of blood from where they police had dragged Fred's body and William O'Neil in this case Bill he says just stood there in shock, and he never thought it would come to this like all of his involvement with the FBI. He'd like we keep saying he didn't think it would be a massacre, and that's only to to speak to this person who has been I guess reviled throughout history. Now at this point, she'll as being the guy that set up Fred Hampton, painted his Judas. Yeah. And in in, you know, there's two sides and in a way he was. But in another way, he didn't understand and to be very clear to be crystal clear, the FBI actively conspired to to assassinate or to neutralize at the very least a twenty one year old boy for his political. Beliefs because they saw it as a threat to both the economic and the racial or social status quo of the United States. This also occurred during the Vietnam era where in Hampton and many others like him would be lumped together as potentially existential threats to the solvency of the nation. Right. Because this is again, this stuff sounds so crazy sounds like people getting in a bubble. And getting carried away this bubble was real. Yeah. I think there was something in the outline here. Ben that you didn't end up saying, but our buddies the culture kings have a phrase they use where it's talking about messing with the money. And that's when government starts really paying attention. You know, when I up setting the apple cart in a way that affects economics. I did with that. And yes in a shout out to Keith Edgar I didn't originally say it because I think we still owe them song we do. I'm going to at least make the track for this next one. I don't claim to boxy, but I can definitely make some beats. So let's I commit to that you're grid that to thanks. Fantastic MC's. I say we put out in twenty twenty just the surprise out of nowhere and call it hindsight. We know they don't listen to the show. So be. We should have them back on. I had a lot of fun in the Michael Jordan episode. I wasn't around for that one. That's right. I forgot they were all maybe listen to this show. What am I saying? Hey, guys, you as you missed out. It was actually really me. Sure. Was there dre people as far as we know they are not elements of co Intel pro strip. And and hopefully die there you guys. But it's like a witch hunt. Rules, right. Like, if you tell me, you're not that's more evidence that you are. Yeah. I think I think you'd have to say, no. And it's also I'm sure we've said this before a complete myth. If you ask and undercover cop if they're undercover cop. They don't have to tell you the total myth. They can commit crimes with you. Exactly five rules for sure and people would say that's for a greater good. And that's the argument rate that succeeded in pitching co Intel pro and in violating the laws and the rights of US citizens and taking the lives and US citizen taking the lives taking the one thing that cannot be returned. And to this day, officially the FBI the Justice department, the Chicago police force they reject claims of political skulduggery they say that the raid was. Unfortunate. It was not the ideal outcome but on their side. It was conducted correctly into the letter of the law. We're conducting a raid to find illegal firearms to neutralize a threat in nineteen seventy-one. However, an activist group called the citizens commission to investigate the FBI stole co Intel pro documents they stole the paperwork from field office. And this is how the this is how co Intel pro became a public thing had they not conducted that raid, you see the parallels. Here have not conducted that illegal raid, then it is possible if not plausible that Coen to- pro would remain a myth in a rumor and conspiracy theory in unproven conspiracy theory, even today. Yes. In April of the same year, by the way, nineteen seventy-one the FBI officially terminated co Intel pro yet numerous critics of the US government believed that program. Like this never really go away the names change. But like Dr Manhattan says watchmen nothing. No, they never ends. Oh, yeah. Have you guys seen there's a watchmen series? That's coming to HBO. It looks a lot less shiny than the Zach Snyder movie less shiny. Yeah. I felt like Zach Santa movie was a little like overly. Polished every every seen a painting. Yeah. Kind of this one like what's his name? Roy shacks mask is literally just like a sack with kind of like, you know, prequels, right? No, maybe. No. I think it's the I don't I don't know. I. Has to be cool. Right. I don't know that it is. I think I think it might even be a either a deeper exploration of the series with more of because at come on you you need more than a movie to really like go deep into that book. Right. There's so much stuff in there that they couldn't put in dude. I just rewatching it holds up. I didn't like it. I I don't know. I loved I loved. All right. I don't know. Maybe it is just stellar. I think the reason for me was that I that was such a formative graph. And that was the first graphic novel. I've read where I was like, oh, I see what graphic novels can accomplish. And it was just like mind blowing to me. So I felt like it was very sacred to me in the see someone try to. I felt like it was a valiant effort, but I also didn't really care for Zack Snyder style. Anyway. Allen more hated it. Yeah. Yeah. I'll add more is like he watched. He probably didn't even know. He he does right excellent comics refund. But I think is it's the support. His main hobby is main passion, which is just hating stuff. Oh, jeez. Just interestingly enough here in this show is not brought to you by watchmen or HBO just so you know, that if you go to HBO dot com slash watchmen. The first thing you see is nothing ever ends. And the little the little blurb. Oh, and Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross doing the music, that's pretty dope. And it's show. Run by Damon Lindelof who I believe did it lost. That's correct with Jj Abrams. And unlike Dr Manhattan's quote, unlike his observation in the fictional world of watchmen this love it or hate it is the reality in which we have collectively lived for the span of this episode. And some things do end namely this episode, but not our show we hope that you enjoyed this cursory journey into the murky murky morally problematic ethically bankrupt world of domestic intelligence, we hope that regardless of whether or not you agree with the views of various groups mentioned in this show. We hope that you can agree that the loss of any human life is a tragedy. We also want to know if you think Coen tell pro really ended, do you think is still around? And if so in what it ration-? Do you have a story or a particularly suspicious death that you think deserves more attention? Let us know you can find us on Facebook. You can find us on Instagram. You can find us on Twitter. We are conspiracy stuff at any number of those and you can meet the best part of the show your fellow listeners on our Facebook community page. Here's where it gets crazy. Matt will not for for various reasons various, non sketchy reasons reveal is personal Instagram Nolan. I will I am at Ben Bullen, and I am at embryonic inside. And if I'm not mistaken, Matt you sort of dropped a few clues last time you're gonna keep it on the DL like that. I am at an egg shaped objects. You the Twitter just the Twitter at its tells me time. The anonymous Twitter user, but what if somebody doesn't care for the internet? You guys will then I don't know how you're getting by in life these days. But no, you know, what that's not true. There are ways you can there's tell took took Telefoni telephony to till love me. Remember, you guys know telephony till often telephony Jones, that's what they used to call. It you guys back in the day. Remember when like the early days of the internet where there would be like a telephone till often sweet in a in like prodigy or something you make phone calls through the computer. It was crazy phony literally phony. We do have a number that we have an old school number. We are one eight three three S T D W. I T K. Yes. Call and leave a message. But what happens if what happens if someone says, okay, I don't want to use social, and I hate phones because it's, you know, twenty nineteen absolutely just send us a good old fashioned Email. We are conspiracy at how stuff works dot com. My name is Danny Shapiro. The host of family secrets three years ago. I took a DNA test and this test meant to be a fun exploration of my family history turned up a massive family secret. I wasn't who I thought I was join me, and my guests in the journey family secrets wasn't a family secrets on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or ever you get your podcasts. And if you want to read about my family secret, my new memoir. Inheritance is available. Wherever books are sold.

Fred Hampton FBI Black Panther party US Hampton Chicago BP Intel Matt Frederick apple Ben Bullen Illinois HBO Mark O'Neill Panthers California Oakland Maywood federal government Jay Z
Albert Woodfox: Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

1:08:43 hr | 2 years ago

Albert Woodfox: Live at Politics and Prose

"This is live at politics and prose a program from slate and politics and prose bookstore in Washington DC, featuring some of today's best writers and top thinkers, sit tonight, I'm pleased to introduce Albert would FOX to politics and prose in his book solitary. In his book, solitary would fog shares his life story from his rebellious childhood in the south to his current life of activism around the world. For much of his life would FOX was behind bars and Anguilla one of Louisiana's if not the nation's most Torius prisons after being initially imprisoned for armed robbery would FOX joined the Black Panther party inspired by social commitment and code of living when a white guard was killed he and another panther party member were immediately accused of the crime and placed in solitary confinement, where they would both and another remain for decades aware that anger and bitterness could destroy him. What FOX instead channels such feelings into activism and resistance, resolving to never be broken by inhumanity or corruption would FOX remains a committed activists to this day speaking to many audiences, including the innocence project. Harvard Yale the national lawyers guild, and now, politics and prose. Reverend Leon dot co author of for colored girls who have considered politics rights Albert would Faulk shares. His coming of age story with crystal clear perspective holding nothing back as he unwraps the unvarnished truth of his life. Deftly weaving the undeniable threads of race class and systemic inequities that make his story, and so many similar ones possible his journey of resilience perseverance growth and triumph is at once a cautionary tale a challenge to all we think we know about the Justice system and an inspiring testimony to the power of human spirit would FOX will be joined in conversation tonight by Catherine m Kimball current visiting lecturer in law at Yale Law School, and formerly one of FOX's legal representatives. Now, please join me welcoming Alba would FOX and Kathryn Kimbell. So I have to start tonight with a story a little one that will lead into a question for Albert about Albert when you read his book, one of the things that jumps out to me is something that also really stood out to me when I was getting to know him, which is how compassionate and caring. He is throughout in the book, you you you hear stories of him taking care of his siblings when he was younger taking care of a baby rabbit. He finds an field and manages to smuggle out of the prison for his sister. But also taking care of others who are incarcerated with him. Whether it was making sure that they shared a cut and the dungeon cell or learned how to read were protected from being raped were able to maintain some measure of sanity and dignity and solitary confinement that care runs throughout. But I've personally experienced in witness that. Carrying as well. Whether it was the first question always out of his mouth was house Herman has he doing? What what can we do for him? Or when we were talking about all of the petty indignities of litigation. What can you do to make this less? Burdensome for king. What can we make it? Can we take it a little easier at him? Let's let's let's be dental or even when I would call. So I used to call once a week to make sure that the wardens and everyone else at the prison remembered the lawyers were watching and inevitably if I was stressed or sad or sick or otherwise out of sorts. He would hear it, and my voice and say, well, how are how are you? What's going on? And he wouldn't just ask. He would want to problem solve and give me wise advice and help. And so it's just such a striking aspect of your personality. And I'd love to start there. Where do you think that came from that, compassion, and empathy and caring for others? Good, Nara one. Thank you. Before. Course on gas less yard stand. Please. Know, this could have been different if not been the influence. You know, while the book. Is my voice in my experience the influence left. We made it a much better. So I just want the knowledge. What you cost caring? That's another example of care taking care of other all starts at home with my mother. My mother my mother. For value. Try the see from becoming a proud of the street on full of devices street was allowed in my mother's. And eventually fall to the black at the port was louder than the voice of the street. And they are began my voice step in the Johnny that has me setting him for all these wonderful people at night talking about forty four years, ten months of our and brutality and individual institutional graces that exists in this country any prisons. So, you know, caring about other people started with mama. She's one of the most caring women that I've had experience. Let's talk a little bit about the Black Panther party for some even that the name and the concept can be scary or off putting I think there's a lot of misconceptions for you. The Black Panther party in its principles was a source of hope and direction. Can you talk a little bit about what it was that? So we found so compelling and sort of how that gave you strengthen and those hard times. Well, you know product John Black Panther paw. The product. I guess just a Matic racism in America. And you know, I was predator prey on people mall community my own neighbors in people that large inside. And as a result, I wound up in prison and a skate, and I went to New York 'cause I was familiar with Harlem and. But this was not the Harlem is seem, you know. You know, the last time out this was a Harlem that had been in women moon amongst commute with so much pride in so much respect is so much terminates and up to that point. I always. Since feel fear in African Americans in this country because of the social position that we have for the very voice time. I saw men and women who head no fear, and then I saw police cough, trolled Harlem and lo and behold, the fear was in nil. And you know, that was very impressed. When I have to be honest, Ma initial interest in the poi- was beautiful women. The beauty that. Mistake thought was physical later turn on the stand that the beauty was from within. It was DEA belief that occasion discipline, the terminates. Protect America meal. And so, you know, that was Monness uconn any basically, you know, out the time I was running escaped and I was running from. Fifty years sentas in in the Wease, and eventually I was captured in place de Neo Manhattan house, which was called tunes and. Full memos from the twenty one which was a twenty one members. Wade been the hey causes have been attacked by New York police and shoot out stuff and. You know, come on your reduce themselves, and they started holding political classes, and you know, in our listen, but I wasn't hearing what they were saying. So the Beckley another guy that came down from upstate. I was in the sail. And you know after talking with him a couple of days, you know. You know, I have some I want you to. So he gave me a book call it different draw. And up to that point. I did not believe that one individual. One one individual could influence all the envy. And taught me it was a fish, no peaceable award. But it was based on great migration. The African American. From the south to the west not east part of this of this country seeking availa life seeing you know under the luge in that racism on. And but inspired of would they will expose to, you know, even today, you know, they showed great determination and Williamson sat vice work. In all worn is equal playing field. Were there particular aspects of? What the Black Panthers that you interacted with what they sort of talked about in their ideology that had resonance for you being inside. The most impressive thing. You know? He I am guy prison fifty six. And yet they saw in me such work in a sense of that. How many political on this? You know, what take a poison in prison possibly for the rest of his life in say come John Columbia for the us. And no matter how long you live no matter how long we will be. And so that was doing initial voice fresh. Ten point program would know K recite is been so many decades what the ten point program had the father was basically a guide on how to of tech and serve the community and other polka mute, and you know, some of the books that you know, we had read one was does in lead of China, chairman miles, Tom, and, you know, in you know, from that point on once I read a different drummer up to that point. I hadn't read a book, but after that became Averill Sereda in began to you know, as I said, not listen, but to understand what the party was saying what other men and women cheer nine common in the rest of. What they will say. And so here we are him to you everyone and not a what the horrors in root-out of of, you know, solitaire of the useless used this news of and. The institution individua- systemic racism that exists in prisons across this country. And South America influences. The other were arrested the were to try to king in I've been around the world speak in try not them follow practice of United States. When it gained cost the rate. I think there's a perception sometimes that solitary confinement and the way it's used as necessary in order to keep prison safe. That's unnecessary part of corrections institution. You obviously have had firsthand experience about its abuses. And I think it'd be helpful to have you to stare a little bit about why that's not your viewer experience. You know, when you take a Huma Bain, and you can find them too. In this case nine seek. Sale. And the only allowed out that sale one. Are they recording four hours? Imagine that multiplied other meantime, imagine being confined to that area in not seeing any end in sight. Because you have no way of being released all the way to be released for myself in harm king was we had to renounce for black black the father renounce social struggle. Anna be good Lobos. Full years. Ten months later. They got the asked. I'm sorry to see that we lost harm while. It's out the forty one years he won his freedom. As a result of the work of Robert Hillary king the memo the living memory, eight three. And so so many wonderful men women and children, especially attorneys who John and struggle the free us on fourth three days after when his freedom dot cast, and that they had left untreated. Yeah. They didn't even you know, they wouldn't even tell me head casts. Head law is not in involve threatened in hide doctors to come in Dritan, the go into court. They were never taken him to the hospital and give him dot knows. And then after they did it. They went what ten days without provide giving the medication been the subscri-. So, you know. Still very tall. And he's with you know, with me in in every day. Herman was a special man. Manage to bring brightness in life. I think to some very dark and lifeless places. Are there aspects of his friendship that stand out to you memories that you'd be willing to share that are? Indicative of his personality. You know harm as you know, harm ahead of bigger than life puts. Light up a room, you know, like all humans. We all have faults, and we all have a deal. And he was no diff, but what was in his heart. What was his solar this commitment? Stroll his commitment to humanity. You know, was found these in what he's he spilled on the foundation, would you know, he gave his life for you know, because we all we were initially put in solitary confinement in seventy two 'cause we we never thought that we would be there for decades. You know, but we all made a commit continue to struggle and make whatever sacrifice witness and Harmon was in example. While it's not the only reason. But if the fun, no other reason. You know, I could never walk away from being social Adams and doing things doing, but how you know, I have to honor this may if every. Including is. I know that you all talk to me about some very purposeful choices you made about what you wouldn't wouldn't do while in solitary in order to maintain your sanity, essentially, you wanna talk a little bit about those choices, so many bows, I think to tour the ballot that I think not only the men around us. One was they used to feed us on the door. Put out trays and we had drag our trees on the bilby goals. And you know, what is he did today 'cause acts of one individual? A particular answer can raise your level con. So what your day is no long, accept the mar. And that's what situation. You know with being fed lockout, you know. And so we ask only that they could food in the ball of the sale and feed us in a dignified now, and they reviews and so being held inside. It was very limited a how we could resist this. So we went on a homeless gripe that lasted for the five. And so he Benchley guys pass out in, you know, become a real ill. And so Robin now is almost same tier? In harm was all another kid, but we communicated regular, you know, would letters and stuff. And so we became concerned. I will concern was always men around that that you we lead the men that follow us. So, you know, we talked about you know, we had to find a way to end this with much dignity as possible. So, you know, the security people, you know, we asked to see the major the camp. So we made on agreement that we would come off the homeless threat, if they would cut votes lots in ball, any agreed. And there they were determined to make us falsely trees on the and so we said, we will if we can stay whole our trees and eat do the boss. You know, that's how we will eat until it cuts bought a across when thought it would be eighteen months later. You know? So for eighteen months, we do the balls. And you know, they say, you know, contradictions is is mother chain. And so someone came that the make little tree. Straight. And so, you know that arrested, you know, came the whole all all sales had these callable trays, and you know, so when they bring food they set the trae on with up to that, you know, we used to stand in all the trae one hand the balls in. Rather than be fed in on dignified in the inhumane of Mana. You know, and the other defining thing scripts. You know, our that's win prisoners forced to strip naked in front of all the prisoners stuff and been spray the but acts and raised a general to raise the feet in opening mouth stuff. And it was very abusive at at time. But until we begin on the stand that this was a tradition from jails labor, it this was something they used to make our ancestors do all slave box. And this has nothing to do with security this. You know, the thing about ain't goalie eighty is a former plantation, and you have fam- that were deal. Oh, that's been there. They go back fifteen yellow race. So their attitude and in a way look at after America is was passed down. It was tradition. And so, you know, once once, you know, we became aware because of the studies in the books who are reading stuff, you know, it was no longer conscious been raised at it was no longer acceptable. It'd be treated liveliest, and so we decided to to resist. So we physically, you know, refused to be stripped. So in as a result of that. You know, we were gassed and beaten place in in Don gin. You know by the time they saw was over. I had something four hundred seven days in. In in. They would make me do ten days. And then they would, you know, take me out for twenty four hour respite in then when I went back. They were like, okay. Screw in our views. They would you know. Eighty nine on. They would jump me and beat me slam me on this and full of this free, but making our com derogatory and racist comments stuff in soon as I got up all this. I would just go swinging like I was crazy because the humiliate humiliation in on dignity would they had just done my level continent. Just not let me accept this. What was important to me in the end is is is very important me. Not get up in the morning looking middle. I'm not shame. What was looking back in? So that played you know, that was a great motivation that would not allow me to be stripped. So he forcibly beaten Milly in not back and as east Sean that happened. I was written up taking this even more time. So we we. Filed a civil suit, and we won the case and part of the. Judgment was a judge all to re release me from on the and. Take back all the time. I thank God. All things we hit the other defining moment was for me poisoning with teaching other man how to read. I thought that was I still think that was product out of all things I've done as prison that soldier. I don't think anything will become more fought in the meeting. You know guy. Call him. Go. One day, we will talk after about six months, he was deterrent. And using the dictionary the voice key about appease teach. You the difference between how the word is spelled is now I was able to teach him in six months time. He was reading high school. And one thing he told me one day man, you have opened the world. That was all the thing. I have done instilled for I think that is probably my proudest. Obviously, you're in fact, a part of why some of the things that Angola in Louisiana got better. But. For those who don't have a lot of access to our interaction with incarcerated folks, either in Louisiana elsewhere in the country. What what's your sort of? Can you talk a little bit about how humane are inhumane? Those places are. One thing. I don't think most Americans relied on the thirteen memorably US constitutes slavers league. There was a clause. That was added in the after the civil war, which is a once you'll be enslavers involuntary solitu- unless convicted of failed. So every time a man woman child in this country is convicted felon, you become a slave state. You lose all human rights, civil rights, constitutional rights and a stake. Can do what you as the please. The thing. We try to do is remind models fathers and grandfathers on all brothers, and these are your fam-. These people didn't come from another world it come from your household. And the difference between your support can mean a difference between life in debt some of these and on four th you know, I've had the rough seeing mango insane had the horror scene take the all live on themselves could not deal with fresh you of being confined to a sale twenty three hours out every pointed for our here, and, you know, thank. You know, we've we found the anti rate squad. There was Dr sex mall gone on. Echo in our member. One before I was put in solitary outset. No, mom. This little kid about seventeen signed to the bulk across. Any I've been rate. And I came mad anything most said in the CO human being head spirits broke. When you burn Huma being spirit. He can never get it back. No matter how the try he made gain some similar slow. The bag or his pride or can't get that bad. When you when you break a man spirit. It is when you break a woman ever when you break a child is ever, and what I was dedicated to it is no way that I could CDS in not take so me and other members would although life chapter harm tonight phone we decided to form any way squad, and we provided full some of these kids that came in in prison in sailor out. The we will up the Murdo right Miller on our members lost his life know trying to tip. Young. And he was stabbed for. You also use the courts pretty effectively, I might say to improve things for not just yourself. But. Countless other inmates in Louisiana. What are some of the ways? How how did you talk a little bit about how you learned the law? This man knows a lot about the law. Learn the law and how to use it to affects change or one of the things, you know, as I see their early. Sean you love the confidence raise you become a whale was gone on around. Now, you know, we realized that we could not keep physically resist because though nice sticks. Hurry. You know, Annette gas in pipes. They will use the whip us with and breaking bones. You know, we had a we had to find a way to struggle not in place of debt along with. There was there a prisoner on a Tia who was with taught himself allow, and so you know, we see it. Well, we need start taking these people the court in further now only two ways bring a by chain. It is either through the legislative body on through the courts. Our we will not gonna get in seventy a help on the legislative. So we decided we would take as challenge what was happening in angle in court. So in all of the do we learn the law? So we got you know, we, you know, a good friend of mine's. He started a group. That's very successful. Fawn name is ours. In a group is called vote a voice of experience. Vicks him in all the make consummated plus get both that we non when they would. And so two months in years of studying alot. You know, an opposite to remember as I see the time when I was sitting on flow floor myself trying frame all some Titley human rights bodies, civil rights bodies, violates stats low. And you know, you you experience turn a, you know, how difficult that is every judge seems to have different interpretation what the constitution that would stats to reload. High should be applied. So you know, you trying to find in this this law, Casey one thing in this law case contradicts that in this law case contradicts voted them yet. Now, you know that some land there low nugget there Lou. Something that all of the judges agree upon? And so you try to find that once you find it, then you try to shape your legal. And you present that cold and you cross your face. So. We lost cases we won. But the ones we won seeing the makeup all the ones we love. What are some of the things that, you know, have changed with respect to how Louisiana deals with solitary confinement after your advocacy, or, you know? Eruption taste, you run a mile turn harmony low and George KENDALL win Karan Williams in Koren. You know? The civil suit. We file was Salo and apart agreement is the head change with Iran CR. So now, you have situation where you know, a dead row who lives on the same conditions are now given group hall. They've yet they give them more time. Outsail more time on the yard on a daily basis in NCR has CR as the role CEO restriction is solitaire. And so what would happen now is the Dave from was called transitional dominator. Antle. If you inside tear for soya Tamale time in a remove you from sale to that dome and depend on your conduct you'll eventually theory transitioned into for the population, and you know, effect, the Horo one of the heart of solitaire is you can be placed in there for anything. Any? God, maybe try to Halley you in on dignified now, and you may demand that he treat you with human dignity, and he can have you locked up solitaire. I don't know about other. But in in in an goal average. Stay teric farm. No matter what you is five years. And so you had the situation. Now, you have a situation miss contra with envy, another prison industrial crop. Where prisoners being built facade? Not billing Dhamma Trojan all builders sale. And you know, con to some of the research done is much people to house Princeton's in sales and the able to control the actions of brenda's more in should prison reveal against being treated a certain way in it's much easier to the isolated CEO by themselves for what was once punishment is not come away of housing prince. And so that's part of the ballot will, you know, educate publicly Gus too hard private prisons in his country, which has become such a prosperous enterprise that the trading on Wall Street. So you can imagine the amount of money being made when you have star wall. So, you know, one of the most worst changed in name, the something, but. Call wackenhut. Nave built private printers all around or when they Bitlis province for take your tags failed and Emma's guaranteed. These people that they will pay them for ninety percent of the passing of the prison irregardless to many prisons, for instance, they have so they have they could be half fifty percent capacity based space, but they still must pay these conference companies nine percent in. That's not coun- phone calls in medical care, lack of items clothing, canteen. The have a cooperative the top ridden system minutes. Your tax payer dollars, go towards this. There's one thing that you would hope folks who read your book takeaway. Something that they really remember or that stays with them. What would you say that that you would hope they would take? For me. It would be distracted human spirit. If you don't allow yourself to be broke, you can survive. It always remember reading something. It was you know, all the way, you know, Mr. Nelson Mandela saw that. See if the 'cause you carry is noble, you can carry it away to the world. And I thought fighting for humanity was a noble calls. So that allowed me to carry the burden of beatings gassings, the horrors of being confined to sell no bigger than average bathroom closet farther for years and ten months. I was willing to Harmon Dave is life in. I was willing to give mindedness. I believe in you mad, and I believe that we have the ability be a better. People in Bill Bella side. And so that's that's beside my grandbabies. That's what motivates to do door. I don't want them to be. You know? The from not won't Mark grant, one of my grandkids to be studying before an audience doing the same thing. When you think about social Justice movements? Now, one of the criticisms that can be levied toward the movement for black lives lack lives matter movement. Previously known as. Is that it's too aggressive or? To fill in the blank. I know that you and Herman have thoughts on that. On your says for the black. As a matter of fact, whenever Robert in who. Who speaking we always try to meet with leadership, lack LA mala? Whatever OECD we met with Latin mala chaps nine England Paris, France. So we always try to meet with him. Give him the benefit of our experiences in our wisdom in Larne. What we can't on them. One of the thing knife has told me that you know, each one teach one. In, you know, no matter what is always something that our from. So, you know, I think the biggest problem. Is the same as black path for? They represent a threat to the challenge of powers that be in the call chew in institutions higher. Ran Howdy lives people inside and so same technique that will use against bag. Pat, Eddie as you see for years, decades, federal government technology who shape people's are paying about what the black. The Black Panther party was in the mischaracterization of what they would what they believe in what they were trying. So you have that same thing happening now with the black lives will voice ball trying to make a one issue move in the continued debt apple American men by police around. That lab mount is not a one issue movement. It is a complete tone move in is it's about economic empowerment about social Justice is about a community police in s about. You know, creating Touche's that bring out the very best in you met. It is about placing the integrity of the human being above the dial sense. So you know, what you know? Smoke difficult now because with the end Benetton net in stop, you know, the mass miata carp control media can no longer control. The flow of information that goes out to the public. You know? And so, you know, I think that you know, it's more difficult for them to. Create surname in a mile of American people about black. So do you have hope for social Justice in progress? You don't do for for us out there. Without home. I never be. Never gave up hope for was that one day. I would be free. And you know, a lot of what I'm trying to do. Now. In seventy two when Robert I mean when Harmon place in south farm, we made a solemn vow. We print has had no voice. And the head no face. And when we went for a while. How long we would beat at us. We would be the face would say this is what you'll sons in dollars your grandparents and your parents what they looked at. Need your love and your support? And so that's what we you know, we tried it trying to make families. Remember that you know, printers, you'll houseful and because particularly the economic situation this country overwhelming Gerard demand. Women want prison the economic situation, you know, strong. Instinct humanity is survive. And I think every man woman child would like to be to survive in within the constitution said to relaunch or whatever country. Land america. That's not case. That's not our reality. So most after Maryland another monarch is poor Weiss wind up in prison because it trying to survive in the case of the right way in survive. Anyway can't. On foolishly. You know, they hurry. You know society more than the hell, but you know, desperation excuse my language with my mom, Tim or drawn mammogram flow by. No disrespect. But that's true. You can't you can't. Press individual group. You can't deny them human dignity fry. Self. Asked him to be opposed aside new within the cost to live within statutory law. We're live within the college. You have you create a sad where everyone has not to ride now in the we were talking about this early. You have men in women in prison who can near the gate as well as any attorney in this. Men who can take piece of wood try to the most beautiful sculpture are take paint in campus, create the most beautiful picture. Why does the institutions in this country? Did not create an environment where these people could realize they had this skill or the head. This Cal are their had this ability. A why they had to go to prison when in most cases it was too late. But rather than become discouraged in hopeless in give up on themselves. Give up on the lots still, you know applied. He'll this count still. Reeducate themselves or educate himself. Cases and become very productive people very productive and could be releasing society in Friday would be, you know, make sad much. Rick much better than what it is now. But because of the attitudes of thing an what's worries, nah is with the end vent of the prior industrial prison conflicts at exists in this the emphasis now is to make money every. Prison bay represent sense dolls. So there's no desire to rehabilitate create environments where you know, people can become betting when being better members of humanity, and, you know, work towards a better society the else's nine get rich to be the ride around big calls own big houses. You know, yachts Nali other luxuries of the very rich in this country. I'm not condemning you know, people who cannot be rich. But I am saying, you know, whereas you. Where'd you says you mad? In a way, your own poison of luck luxury at expand while the men women children me's MO. Dan, the new call you have a defense out. Until Lance's you'll see time to come on. Would be. Oh, my motivation behind this book was no, man. I'm speaking. I no matter how many people out from full. I will never be able to reach his many people this. Is both has Tetra reaching hundreds of thousand maybe millions of. So this book in a assess is my voice. Smile way. Using my experiences in the wisdom that come from and teach and reason of conscious of humanity. No better place to turn it over for questions than there. So there is the. He's my personal hero. The microphone. Thank you. Good evening. And thank you so much for your humanity and your gifts that you're sharing with so many people. Sir. I would like to ask a question. Well, I guess I don't need to to ask. If I need to record it because you're filming this rate for like, okay? So I'll put this away. My question is about grand jury. I am currently serving a federal grand jury. It's a totally surreal experience. We were told by the judge that we're there to be a protection against government overreach in. All of the people in serving with for an entire year. We all. Have different feelings about that. And I wanted to hear what your thoughts are in. If you have any ideas about how that could be changed for the better to better. Protect people who've been accused of crimes, thank you. First of all, I thank the laws statutory laws and govern grant years change because you know, in our situation, you know, mock case is almost unheard overturned for different time. In only one stop that. Was granting me Neutra. Last time. I was in dive in two thousand fifteen. Andy lady that was film. Another grandeur was deeply upset and disturbed. By what was taking place? The illegal on Tuesday in you may tax that Johnny will use to Hammy reindicted, but because of the laws in. That constitution amendments statutory laws. She felt helps doing thing about without risks. And all. And she has a twin system. And so when when the assistant knew she was on a grant. She knew, you know, a mock case was one of the case that will go before the grand. So she started doing our research. And so the was. So bothered by what took place. She went to on. She says, you know. We just indicted this, man. They did all kinds of things. And also to see Tate. Thank you August. If I'm not pouring on the have become audience. Rava in myself and good friends. And but the most amazing thing is you have these two women. So the bills serve the Republicans who have not become social active and in the us for inspiration lead. If you and so they ruled over five hundred eleven to judges district attorneys. Prosecutors. Cheats, narrowed thing I'm planning about the way issue in police diplomas in this state St Louis down was conducting and demanding and they're still added even to this day. And as I said, you know. Yeah. We asked to meet with us. Once we got out, and now, you know count him among the many wonderful friends, you know, that made. Cain visit in essay, physical freedom because. Meant you know, emotionally in mentally philosopy long. My freedom was a physical. My improve the my body. They couldn't imprison my mind, my heart, my soul spirit. And so all know on on those day they fail miserably. You know, so. To ask you a question. I think I was talking with the loss earlier, and we have tennis in this country. Thank that. Patients in positions in life. You bus. That's not hot. We supposed to bring tag to whatever position, we whatever. Patient. We we bring integral society don't give terrier to us. We give and take. So when you said grain your. Volume. If the district attorney is saying one thing what prove circumstance or whatever that poll you saying melts truck truck fuel add my mom trust. You. Don't be afraid say no when area instinct, and you body screaming is storm make sense. This is not right. In a day. You know that is proud of the four step toward creating a grand jury. Thank you very much for sharing your voice with us. And you're very powerful messages. I look forward to reading your book in sharing with others. This more Monday in question. But important the day you walked out of the prison. What support if any did you get from the government did now boss that was it solid? Give Louise out. Be in prison thirty forty years when you relieve they stick at ten dollars, or for me, I family friends where you know, we we formed the, you know, the internet coalition free dangle tree from that. I made so many friends and family and of caused great attorneys. Katherine Armani in George Ken, the went Rhyne Williams Karan Irish, you know. So we had a turn is dead. Believe in us that solely our humanity. And we're not, you know, the sad thing about issue system in this country is yet has been reduced to new process. Your dance doesn't map doesn't come in late. Is it long as the DA do police? Do it by the book that yea do it by the book the judge do about? But no one that will stop staying this, man. This woman on this child is. And we have to we have to restore that back into this. In police forces, and John is of this country in this war. We demand from the very best. No show cut too. Thank you. Come in the day. Got a question. Been locked up as long as you in this country solitaire. I have a distinction harm of being the longest ale for another south Kerry bomb in his dribble net with user asked. Solitaire farm forty four years in two months. We think it's a longest world based on what's available in terms of the record. I was thinking that too. But no, I grew up in a very I'm from DC. I grew up in very political. Militant. Fam- as well. People were Black Panthers. They grew up a product of honorable Elijah Muhammed nation of Islam schools in DC myself. But I wanna actual another question only to quests so much talk about because. The problem. I see now current. What's what's happening now in the black community is black people? Now, I'm fifty one which is short period of time. I know compared to what's in the audience. But I I'm seeing something I had never seen before specially in DC. I'm seeing certain fear among them. I'm seeing certain. A very contentious existence between black people in DC, especially the men and women. They don't speak to each of their frayed to speak to each other. Look each other in the face. I don't know what's going on. I never seen this before. Also seeing hypocrisy a lot of apocryphal among black people have never seen before. It's like they doubled Dilling triple Dylan. I don't know what's going on with him. They existence is very premier free meal. You know, never seen that before say well will you've been at. But I I have a very rare backward. But the point is is that when you talk about this desperation, you say people are subject to doing anything when they're desperate. And this is not just the poor people. This is the people who are middle-class very well educated and who have established themselves in this society, especially black people. They they get these jobs. You see him because I was on jury duty they lady excuse me from jury duty. Because I had overwhelming influence on a particular case was drug case side to go back. But his that's alone store. But the point is they they they have this point system where they get money for locking bubbas minium Kamata how will university law school. They come from all of these different schools, and they don't want this. And they know what they do. And they got sons at home, they got kids at home, but they do it. And they go home, and they don't have like you said, they don't have a conscious is this a part of the desperation on that level that we're dealing with now in the black community is that is that a part of that desperation on that level. And please talk about that level rather than the desperation of the poor because many people talk about the poor, but don't talk. They don't talk about the desperation on the middle and upper class blacks. Please talk about that. America. We live in was called class side. You will determine what class you belong. And you laid all saying boys feather flop. I remember one time I read about this study in high school where they do by the kids in different and all the groups. African Americans span American white. American. And so all of these kids, no matter what they background again to adapt. While used perhaps was stuff of group named belong to. So you have a situation this country wealth cultured is contra we are class aside in our sense. Self ROY terminal how much well we can acutely at wealthy Hughes. And so long as we, you know, operate on that it will always be Khan. Now, you can get that contradiction two ways you can look at Mecom angry and bitter start hating. You know, all you can look at it as a contradiction to manage and you try to develop ways in which you can fight bridge that gap. His one thing we all I don't think people reali- worst deport live in Auburn is aside. If it's not going to guarantee, you two basic necessities, food, she met medical. Education opportunity society came make you happens must come from within you. So you may have should be to Bill at a who man who can Bill side and. Mom, brother. Find other men women children who thank you and find, you know, up political party oversight group or whatever and try to fight this not by hatred. One individuals create chaos mass movements Crea que. So you'll go should always be create a mass move. To to bridge that gap between do have nothing in those. We have Eric. Anne vastly. A you know, you hope that you know, you Bill us aside it way, the value in of citizens means more than the individual wealth. So if the next three people who have questions, if you just ask your questions all at once, and then Albert you can answer them. But just ask the three questions in a row. Oh, hello. I want to thank Mr. would FOX for your faith in American society that you didn't just disappear, but she wrote a book, and it's a book for us to read and respond to in your faith that will respond correctly. I'd like to repay that forward. I'm a citizen Maryland mail has a lot of prisoners tens of thousands of prisoners people in solitary, they are cutting budgets for correctional officers. So as you said, it's cheaper keep people in the cellblocks. Our legislative sessions just about over for this year. But I would like to for the coming year, find some sponsors. I think I know some people we could ask in our state Senate or house delegates in Annapolis in work to banish Saltaire confinement in Maryland in also do as New York City did in provide free telephone calls for prisoners. Totally an of your humanity in your faith and your courage. I'm curious if in all of the awful things that were done to you by prison guards. If you ever had experiences of of them seeing that humanity in responding. I'm curious if there's anything that we all learn from that in any times when that that there was any kind of difference in terms compared to authorize retreated. Hi, I was just curious on what was your highest moment? Moser lowest moment during your time in solitary. Sara. Yes. Hi moment was teach man how the read write my Louis tomorrow more hours in in in Donya Nasr called because I resist being treated a certain way. And it was in the wintertime, and they turn off the heat insist in the walled in also by I was forced to drink out. His Todd I think that was Lewis now tallest Donoso field. The instinct in the wheel survive is probably that say, the strong emotion that run human be. And I think that was problem the lowest in between that was all, you know, mostly all hail. But every once in a while, you know, somewhat happen. We will win out small battle that made all the other Taliban punishment in whatever. And in you know, as I say earlier through an live with Lauren is that one human being a some event. Raise the level of pass. So the people around. That is not what you do in it unit determine how you turn out in our side as all right out. And then the question before was about whether there were moments of connection humanity with any guards. You know, you know, it was it was crazy because our memory Nelson Mandela, and he was talking about how you know. He had always seen prison go as any. But appear to time he began realize that these were men and women who had family with children and stuff, you know, in that, you know, if if he didn't see much as enemy, but the seat him as again father, the mothers brothers and sisters stuff, then it would make it easier for him to relate, Joel as Huma be he so he started do, you know, any realized? You know, the response. He got was amazed. And you know, muscle went through that. There was a period of time when I really hate white. I'm not proud of it. But it was a period in my life. When everything that went wrong, all of my softened pain is suffering caused by system. You know? And, but, you know, true salvation and experience and wisdom stuff, you know, began to see every man woman child as a member of the human race nothing else. If I was bad, it wasn't bad because they will white land because they will Latino oil attack, it will bad because experiencing they life made him that. And so I began to take Molly Mandela stop automatically assume that every prison goal was mine. So I started valuate each prison guard based on his conduct in his attitude away treated for this. And and. The response was was over. Well. You know, people often see well you so calm know. So, you know, I'm very very good. No, you don't lack a man in the sale for forty four years ten months, and you know, but. I learned a long time. I defined I defined. I. Why? I developed my mar prospect bags and my coat. Ma we are getting back at all people who hurt me in brutalize me and took over half from my life from me for crime. I didn't commit. By setting here with you. And doing very opposite of what they thought out turn out mop prison sale was meant to be dead chain trend into a high school and a universe. In a debate hall in a law clinic. So everything new one immediate be figured best revenge was the be the opposite. Politics and prose is a co. Production of the bookstore and sleek dot com for information about up coming politics and prose events visit politics dash pros dot com. And please let us know what you think of this program. Our Email is podcasts at slate dot com.

Black Panther party FOX America Louisiana United States Albert Harmon Dave Herman Harlem Maryland Nelson Mandela New York City Johnny attorney Huma Bain John Washington DC
Episode 161: Who were the Black Panthers?

WokeNFree

46:51 min | 5 months ago

Episode 161: Who were the Black Panthers?

"Hi, this is Asha and Gloom are the closest welcome free. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for tuning into 160 first episode of low-wage. If you've been tuning in every week for we open for Wednesday, you know, that will country is all about being real and honest with each other and you we talk about everything and anything important to us off you the world and nothing is off the table this week. We're discussing who were the Black Panthers. But before we dive deep into the subject, it is your favorite time of the day off monologue. So without further Ado, I'm just going to jump in if you are if you've downloaded this episode by going to welcome., and proceeding to the Pod being off you deserve Applause. That is fantastic. Why because that's how you show the ultimate support for the show. But then also that's how you join the conversation because if you've downloaded the Episodes of the Padre an app that's how you're able to put in your comments and that's how you can share your thoughts. So whatever you think about the Black Panthers whether you were a fan whether or not a fan if you had questions..... That's how you got to share it with us. So make sure you do that. Now if you're like Tosh you love you, we adore you awesome right back at you. But you first sentence for some reason can't download an app then all that we asked is make is that you make sure that you are some porting the show on whatever platform you're catching this on. So for instance if you're all about iTunes or if you're all on the edge in in or Stitcher or Google play our YouTube channel, SoundCloud iHeartRadio Spotify, whichever platform. I mentioned and many more that you'll be able to find them on the list and tab at Logan free.com. Just make sure you go there and you're subscribed and Following the show on those platforms. And of course if you can give reviews I usually talk about that at the end game. If you can give a review 90 seconds guys 90 seconds and you can give a review of the show on whichever platform or all the platforms that you catch show on that would be fantastic. Now when it comes to sharing sharing is always carrying absent covid-19 racism bigotry sexism discrimination and must I see so make sure that you are a part of woken Free Nation by doing your part by a catching the show every single Wednesday woken free Wednesday, but then also doing your part of the journey guys and sharing it whether you just share it via email or you share it on social media. However, you get the word out when we like things we share it you also, you know what to do share share share Ur own now when it comes to social media, you can always find us on Facebook Instagram Twitter Youtube Tik Tok. Yes Tik Tok and Pinterest at woken free and guys, there's some fun content on there. So make sure that you log Are checking us out and you're engaging with us there with that scene end. Each week. We like to share a little bit about us before we dive into the topic for the episode last week. We asked which famous calling. Do you prefer Donkey Kong or King Kong this week. We're asking wage to shake off that trust. How would you rather relax drinking chai tea or doing t'ai Chi you think you're funny, huh? That's about my joke. That's not mine. Yeah, you know one wants to claim that one now. No, well, I don't know who claims it. Well, my answer to that interesting question is definitely T, but I'm not going to get siteid. I'm going over Jamaican mint tea or just regular peppermint. Tea turn regular peppermint tea. That's a regular I think black tea is regular. Yeah peppermint. All right, see that's pretty good to know green tea for you. I mean not a student try like well if I'm trying to you know kind of start a party in my stomach sure. Oh, wow, right? Yeah. No. Okay. Maybe you should do like wage and probably try to learn t'ai chi I think that would get your Center in order doing that. I didn't start doing it, but it was good thing you look into. Yeah, if I learned it it would make me very centered as a being so I think I'm I need to look into that. That's what I'm going to choose. I'm going to choose Tai Chi even though right now I do drink the tea. I would like to do Chinese Tai Chi thought the chod. Gotcha. Yeah, I guess that would be my preference and I don't know what other preferences other people would have like groups. You know, what they want to be centered that themselves if they were like wage political organizations like the Black Panthers. Maybe I don't know. Would that be a group that would want to send her their holes or how about just find out more about them, huh? Well, maybe we should discuss them. Like or who were the Black Panthers clever glamour a very nice answer. So according to history.com. There's quite a bit of information out there. And so, let's get everyone on the same page. So they claim or not claim but they report that the Black Panthers also known as Black Panther Party was a political organization. It was founded in 1966 by Huey Newton and Bobby seale to challenge police brutality against African American Community. They dressed in black barrettes and black leather jackets, the Black Panthers organized and armed citizen patrols of England and other US citizen cities. And at its peak in 1968 the Black Panther Party had approximately a roughly 2000 numbers the organization later declined as a result of internal tensions deadly shootouts and FBI counterintelligence activities aimed at weakening the organization. Now the kind of the reasoning behind the fountain Foundation of this organization, but by Huey Newton and off Seal was when they met in nineteen sixty-one, they were students at Merritt College in Oakland, California. They both protested the college has pioneered a celebration which honored the Pioneers who came to California in the eighteen hundreds, but omitted the role of African Americans in settling the American West Seal and Newton formed the Negro history fat Group, which called on the schools offer classes black history. Well, then history.com goes on to say that they founded the Black Panthers in the wake of the assassination of black nationalists Malcolm X and after after, Police in San Francisco shot and killed an unarmed black teen named Matthew Johnson sounds like today's climate interesting and then originally the black party Black Panthers party for Doug the Black Panther Party for self-defense. The organization was founded then in October 1966 and there early activities primarily involved monitoring like that like earlier like history.com said earlier rather police activities in the black communities in Oakland and other cities and then they grew it wasn't just in California. They grew Across the Nation they let's see they were I think about they were in about 70 cities across the United States, which is pretty cool when they also had this thing called the ten point program which called for an immediate end to police brutality employment for African-Americans and land housing and justice for all and then what else did I thought was interesting the Black Panthers? The the article goes on to say the Black Panthers often were portrayed as a gang their leadership saw the organization as a political party whose goal was getting more African-Americans elected into political office off but by the early 1970s FBI counter-intelligence efforts and all of you know, the kind of internal unrest kind of broke the party apart. But yeah, there's more I think to to share there but that's kind of like a summary. Okay. That's very that's a that's a good summary from the institution. I mean, it's not bad thoughts on some of the good stuff. So the I think a really good book to read goes against like the mainstream as this book called black against Empire and it details the like the true history of a black panther party and some of the turmoil that they went through so people probably don't even know that the Black Panther Party was actually made up of a bunch of different parties and I dead So I don't have the names or right now offhand, but the book does mention all the parties that were going by different names and actually kind of grew into the Black Panther Party name of the book the name of the book jet black against Empire. Yes. Okay. So and then we have the you know, we'll have like the authors and are now that's an arm no free.com. Yeah, so you can see that there but this is a good book to read cuz it'll really detail. How long came to be in which parties came together to form the Black Panther Party as we like know it today and so unlike this the whole this is an excerpt from the book like a little summer. I'm like the civil rights movement that called for full set instant citizenship rights for blacks within the US the Black Panther Party rejected the legitimacy of the US government and positioned itself is kind of a global struggle against American imperialism and the face of intense repression the party flourished becoming the center of a revolutionary movement with powerful allies around the world including China wage. So that very much sound symbolic of what we saw saw in Star Wars Rebels standing against the imperialist forces off India that's going to be really similar there. It's very interesting. It's similar. Definitely what are things that people typically don't know or even change and maybe misconstrue about the Black Panther Party know the thing I never knew was that they started the first program dedicated to feeding underserved children wage, which part the government to start somewhere programs where they get started giving out the free lunches the children, but that wasn't a government initiative that came from the Black Panther Party. Nobody ever mentioned that to me while I was in school. Like I've never heard anything about that. That was crazy me. I didn't know black panthers did any social reform programs? I didn't know that I just yeah, that wasn't one of the things I knew then like I mentioned earlier. There were multiple groups that called themselves the Black Panthers, but they're actually some that weren't even affiliated with the main group. So they would go on to do things that maybe people saw that was you know, kind of like I'm going against the law but that wasn't actually the Black Panthers that was just a group that called himself the Black Panther that was like the anarchists going out and protesting are not protesting the wrong kind of making a right, right? Yeah. We're actually doing the protesting recently for the George Floyd situation. Yeah. It's interesting. Yeah a very similar thing to that and then another thing and I mean conspiracist probably knew this but the the federal government they hired people to pose as members to gain insight into the group and cause internal conflict. Well, it's you mentioned a little bit off from your article and article history.com. That's not the article you wrote. All right. I don't know. Okay. Yeah good point and then another thing I never, New Jersey. They were negotiating connections with China as you renewing a founding member of the party met with Tsao and lie as told by an article on radar. So I didn't know that they went over to China and yeah, he was for me connections. I didn't know about that and it was cuz they they both had the common kind of goal of fighting in. Lism off. It was a very bonding thing that at the time us didn't have great relations with China pretty well and I said at the time but we know how it is right now. Yeah. So similar to some of those facts are also shared you can see link on welcome free.com including a link to insider.com which has a really in-depth article kind of things people do not did not know about the Black Panther Party. So they the party opened Liberation schools where children learned black history and political science, they practice penmanship by writing letters to incarcerated members and at its height the Black Panther Party had thousands of members and nearly seventy cities, which I said before which is pretty cool and pretty impressive. Also, what was funny or interesting I thought was like kind of if you ever thought about their uniform like why did they decide the Black Beret and the black jacket on insider.com have an kind of quote from Stanley Nelson director of the Black Panthers Vanguard of the Revolution who is Huey Newton and Bobby seale chose the the Panthers look because it was something that everybody had. Their closet they said, you know, every young black man has a black leather jacket or can get one or can borrow one if they can't buy one. He told fresh Air's Terry Gross. Everybody could get a Brett everybody could get some sunglasses and get the panther. Look the uniform was also calculated to be distinct from the suit and tie look favored more traditional civil rights activists. Oh, that's nice, you know a little bit of a tidbit as to why the look of the Black Panthers came to be so that was interesting also in 1969 the Black Panther Party began serving free hot breakfast to kids in Oakland wage listening food from local Grocers and Consulting a nutritionist on healthy and filling recipes the schools and parents praised it but the police and FBI spread rumors that the party was actually using the meals to indoctrinate or even poison kids smart and then in nineteen seventy-five just as the parties breakfast program were being shut down the USDA permanent permanently authorized the Nationwide School breakfast program, which fed more than birth. 14 million children in 20. I don't know if that year is correct. That can't be. Oh, yeah that was before before that. So but nonetheless actually so what's interesting is incentives, suggesting that the Black Panther Party created a free food system similar to what you're saying. They have like they did something and then the government then indoctrinated that action or that wage initiative under their own system. And so if the party was so right like out there then why would why did they adopt the same system? That's interesting. You have no credit. Also the article goes on to talking about they created the first Nationwide testing and screening program for sickle cell anemia. The Panthers established a national screening program training volunteers to walk door-to-door and predominantly black neighborhoods and give free finger stick tests follow-up care for anyone who tested positive was arranged with local hospitals and that's super like off. Super super forward also, they mentioned article mentioned that they help migrant the Black Panther Party help migrant workers organized against Safeway. So in early 1960s Cesar Chavez United Farm Workers Union boycotted Safeway in California for selling grapes picked by non-union workers Safeway coincidentally was one of the few markets to refuse Thursday 8 to the Panthers free breakfast program seizing the opportunity the party began ferrying Shoppers to competing lucky supermarkets free of charge. The boycott was successful enough that at least one Safeway in Oakland forced to close. So that's super super interesting. They also inside our common goes on to suggest to share that the party taught self-defense classes to senior citizens, the Black Panthers launch seniors against a fearful environment safe after a group of older Oakland residents asked them to teach them self defense to fend off muggers. The seniors had originally approached the police for help, but were told Just walk close to the curb according to the and a black star and so the safe program also provided free transportation to older locals could posit their social security and pension checks out. All right. So yeah, just even more that they even talked about as well. But yeah, so, you know those were all like brand spanking new bits of information for me. So that's why I thought that would be really cool to share here with local free Nation because who knew the Black Panthers did all of that amazement. I mean, that's something yeah, they have a lot of things under their belt that we want to know how long they're not we just always see that there are some type of militant group but there's a lot more to the Black Panthers than we knew definitely what should people take away from what the Black Panthers stood for equality isn't reserved for a specific race gender Creed or age as we talked about some of the phenomenal initiatives at the party not only in English. Editing created but implemented right? Cuz it's one thing to have an idea and it's quite another to actually execute and they they actually executed and they actually helped other people's lives right whether the party was you know, nothing in life is without fault. Nothing in life is without needing of change. But yeah here I think in this conversation the focus is really thinking about some of the positive things that they did and ultimately there's a lot of negative stuff that you can find on the internet yourself. So we definitely were not looking to have a conversation to bash the group. I think having you know, generally not knowing kind of some of their own initiatives I think is great insight for not only us but anyone listening here because if you didn't know this you now know and now you can make your own judgment call about the party home and if you want to learn more, this is a good starting point to learn more. I think that's why I love our conversations because it's usually just like a really great starting point to say. Hey, I want to look into this more. I want to suck. And a little bit more so that that I think is something to take away is it like you should listen to this and say I want to know more and then you should also listen to this and say I need to have an open mind about all things that I'm educating myself on definitely that makes sense and think yeah, there's just a big misconception about the Black Panthers that they took like a hate group that promote it Supremacy over others and that's just not the case as we saw from some of our examples. They were social justice group that stood up for the disenfranchised and they believed in defending oneself against abuse and domestic Terror. They weren't people just to sit back and turn the other cheek. They said hey, you know, we have the right to bear arms. So we will wage this battle was it was definitely part of their belief, but it wasn't just the main thing. They didn't go around saying hey, we're in a threatened you with this. They just said we'll defend ourselves and people didn't like that dead. Even though they're Second Amendment is a second amendment lovers who they definitely yeah offend categorize in a way that you know, they didn't get categories like them and even even even now phone number we have people going out against the protesters armed with their rifles and shooting protestors and no one and there's no big stance against them. There's no FBI investigation into these groups and militias that we publicly know. Oh, yeah. I mean, hopefully there are but we don't publicly know about that. I mean, yeah, we don't know at least we've never witnessed that yeah, maybe years from now, we'll find out right as of now just seems like they're kind of like going about their business doing what they want. There's no public kind of like dismissal of what they're doing Behavior. Yeah. There's nothing nothing's being said publicly about that's not weird. We don't stand for that. I think people do like some our leadership is doing that not leadership other type of people in the media not everyone stands behind birth. Type of behavior. There are people who are like that's not acceptable but it's like yeah, our leadership has made that clearer shipped there. There's a lot of things that could be said. Yeah, it is a lot but I just think that's interesting. But as of now we have these people that are coming out against protesters armed and there's the leadership isn't taking a stance on that but it's an interesting thing right here compared to a black panthers that many people took stands. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, they yeah FBI and all that. Yeah. Yeah. They I think they were just trying to make Society Equitable and I thought they were about empowerment for blacks that little to no support at the time. They weren't trying to hurt anybody else. They actually just wanted to help people which is a great thing to do in that a good moral standing Point actually, which I wouldn't have known when I was a kid. I didn't yeah black you're black panther and you thought who percent of people was there some just yep. You do not really tough and just do whatever they want to get their get what they want but they are more they're so much more than have. There's so much more to the Black Panthers the biggest takeaways that people don't understand that there was so much more that they yeah and and then in the open minded to hearing about them as well and like I said, there was a lot of perpetrators in the group who were made to make them out as the bad guys and young people don't want to talk about it or trade it by yeah. They were they were paid by federal government to do this. That's interesting and the US government's been caught doing this before for other groups. So it's like what's life, I mean they did it for the Black Panthers as well. We have to we have to be honest and honest with ourselves. Yeah. Our government will fund certain things that go against parties that are actually doing good things for the community. They they do that. It happens. Well, there's no there's different initiatives that are maybe more radical in nature and that Doe not necessarily stand like a dog Of us as American people are all of us in this country may or may not agree with that stance. But you know more more I think at least we should just be the problem with Pop-Pop public life around that like not just be like, oh that happened like but we should say like we should have accountability and we should we should say what actually happened though too. Right? Yeah and what actually just say that was their first job like a national issue with that. You know, there's a lot of it's it's challenging life is very sticky. Oh, yeah, but that but it's just good to know don't just have a one-sided view of these groups. I want to say that group evil know they should never exist. No, that's not what they were about let's get real people sure. You are now listening to walking free walking free walking free month free and free podcast about being real and honest. Here we go. Yo, here we go. Yo, so what so what so what's the scenario? It's scenario time guys. Scenario one Ferry and heard that the Black Panthers used to carry concealed firearms whenever they were meetings. Does this mean the Black Panthers were a pro violence militia? That's an interesting question. So especially living here in Arizona. I would say she carrying around a concealed weapon is not necessarily mean whether you're for party or not or whether you're like Pro violence or not. It just means you have an affinity for guns off. So easily forgotten. Do you have your about life at least? I guess but yeah, you'd have to and also you can't assume based on people's names if that's the type of Association affiliation you're going there you have to ask people and or if people say something some type of rhetoric that speaks to a certain party organization, then you could maybe start to ask questions or make deductions around that but one person and and just there's no tie like for me I at least that's not a clear deduction I would make but okay we have for me this this is crazy to ask just cuz you have a firearm warn you that doesn't mean you're Pro violence and you're part of your what I would go by did you use that gun? Like how often do you pull out that gun and shoot somebody if you like if you're shooting people on a daily basis then yeah, you're there's something I think your pro violence. I mean if you're okay with in writing reading laws, not necessarily what if yourself defending yourself every day. I mean, yeah, you speak with an attorney. Yeah, but you can't log But in terms of really bizarre, but I'm sure there's people that they pulled out their gun more than once though. I don't know speak with him about her. Now. I'm just saying there might be people that did that like there's public streets. You mean? Yeah, defending themselves though. Always had the best number you can well, I mean, well, yeah, that's that's a stickier situation. I mean, I don't know how it's coming about. But either way if this if this people are not pulling out the Gun and shooting people, I don't think they're Pro violence. That's all I'm I mean, that's my yeah. I think that I think a probe violence person is somebody who goes to protest and shoots the protesters that's problem Islands which has happened only recent recent times. So that's that to me is the pro violence not black panthers. They were doing that. They weren't going and shooting all these people probably thought were happened. They had very few incidents where there were few. Maybe not act in the best intention of the party and or were and maybe that was perfect. There. Were there were there were some perpetrators. Yeah, there were some perpetrators who just did stuff where it was. Like that was not a black panther affiliate. Well, you know, it's kind of like it's like let's say I'm a Democrat and then I get in a scuffle with somebody is that because I was a Democrat or is that because I'm just did ask up on my own such an interesting time now where it seems like you're going to play anybody by any Democrat you wouldn't want to but people are very tribalistic now in nature and and so for instance if you continuously see Dem like one political party in media being like really hyped up and and aggressive to another but maybe there becomes this like this song Asian and people's minds at like, oh that party does they tend towards the violence, but I don't know why people are I guess it's just that like indoctrination because certain media Outlets are more media will do that page report on party over another so then but just think of it what the media does they love to paint a picture of this person and their stories that are going to say, yes, it was this young black Democrat who was dead. Out of the Black Panthers like they would say something like that compared to this person was prone to violence, you know, hey, what would tell you focusing on the facts are like painting they've paid their own narratives and it's like, oh yeah, you know, this is part of their background maybe that's everybody and that background has the same views. No, that's not what the Black Panthers were about. No scenario to rovina is a college student that caught wind of a new group that said they were the resurrection of the true Black Panther Party. She got Shivers thinking that this group may cause civil unrest on her campus because of their probe Mantra. Is it possible to be pro-black and not racist? What an interesting great question? Yeah. So we definitely I think planned to talk about the the fact that you can love your race and not be anti other races on the show. So that's definitely to come in this scenario, you know again. And so her frame of reference here is that she she just I guess is maybe thinking on maybe some of the media or other types of narrative of what black panther Fairy Tail dead. So he's heard and it's his kind of is unnerved by that and and as thinking wow is this going to be an issue? And so it needs to be said that yeah, you can be a Warrior Race and love being a black person and love your black community and that not mean that as the antithesis and or hatred and or disdain aunt or and or attack of others to be pro-black has to be pro-black. It is not in any way have anything to do with anyone else as the same way. You would say for any other community of someone was Pro Native American. I mean they're in anyway talking about anything else or just saying I love my people you can love your people and love your culture and love your community without harming and or hurting and or wanting that intentions for anyone else. Yeah. Yep. This person needs to open up their minds to the idea that this that the the party starting could be for the empowerment of the black people present which is not to the office and or harm of any other community, but just to ensure that black people feel represented on campus at the black people feel like they have a voice and that if they are disenfranchised in any way or form that that is appropriately addressed by this community. Yeah, I mean, I think she's jumping the gun to just think that just she's going off the past things that she sort of the Black Panther Party and assuming that the same things are going to happen in today's day and age. I don't know. I mean if of a new Black Panther Party came up today, I think right now would actually not be the worst time to be honest. I think they could actually do pretty well now something about that where that they were saying that it was like a hate group. Oh, they're already trying to put well, well my truck roll party the new party might be we don't know they may just be I know I saw rhetoric saying that it is a hate group and but you know, I'd have to do more research, but that was I mean whether it is yeah cuz it's like who was saying that it was was it coming from a conservative side of the field or two? No two on it, but that's just one has information on that guys, but that in the comments, please because loved if you want to, you know, kind of talk about the new age Black Panther Party if that is a conversation people want to have put in the comments about yeah and about being pro black and I racist. Yeah, definitely agree just because you're Pro and I don't even want to think I mean races are fake. So I want to go beyond that and just say life and culture. So it's like I love my culture. That doesn't mean I hate you or it's like I can see your culture. I can bring in parts of your culture, but I don't hate yours. I just love mine a lot. Like that's fine. I'm promoting my new age. Trying to destroy you or so don't worry about that. I'm not so now if I try to do something where I said, mine is supreme. Yeah, not now now that's insane. Not the same Minds know exist know any of those words. That's that's when you get in trouble. Yeah, because now you're trying to say why you're better than one another and this is totally subjective. But yeah always subject of conversation their line of thinking with if you're pro-women, right? That means you have to be anti man. Yeah people think that too. Yeah, you can love the community that you're in with an apart separate from any of their feelings on anything else or anyone else like so you can be a feminist and not be an time an innocent man and Mystic Let's not even take ourselves seriously at all. Well, we do there's no real term for it. But that at least kind of goes hand-in-hand have everything but you know need something else wrong like a young to your yang know you gotta have like some kind of but it's a down versus Anna nothing know. Well, the universe is made for all the universe is all in everything will be good to see how that gets played out. Well, it's playing out as we speak. Well things need to change change takes time. People are impatient who you telling me. It's the real truth choir. Yeah. It's it's a hard truth. Yeah, most people they say we haven't seen enough change will do, you know, the people has not been around that long. I know people will say maybe it's years and years and years like it shouldn't be moving a bit faster this stage of the game, but maybe that is blow, you know where something that's well cuz our technology is moving faster than our social progress birth. Donna like that. Yeah. Our technology moves a lot faster is incredible technological enhancements in our society yet. Socially we're not that far off from throwing rocks at each other. So it's nice. It's just like, you know get by so like what happened? Yeah. It seems very confusing. Scenario three, but Sarah's grandfather was part of the Black Panther Party which inspired listeria to join the black lives movement a few weeks later. She was contacted by federal agents told her not to attend a political National Convention as she would be labeled a black identity extremist and possibly detained for questioning should listeria quit BLM and just focus on her day job because of these new threats. Oh, wow. That's a really profound question. So hmm. Solace Aries grandfather was a part of the Black Panthers and then that inspired licera to join the black lives matter movement. And then she was contacted with this is a real contact not like a fake person know this is definitely real federal agents not fake saying that this person is going to be identified as an extremist and probably black nationalist or something like that. Yeah off and you know, possibly her career and life consequences could be quite severe. What should lasserre do I guess at this moment unless there's going to have to have to weigh the the consequence how much juice does it matter to this person to move forward with the social justice active activity that lives there wants to do comparatively to the impact on that person's life. There's career unless there's a wife every choice you make in life has a consequence good or bad and again good and bad is our subjective terms. It's all really just contrast right so long Loser has to make that decision my decision would I I would tend to how I grew up in my lifestyle choices. I will I would choose to keep the job and identify alternative methods of activism, but that's just because I also have a Virgo and I'm a rule-follower and so you're not going to attend the National Convention might be said they told you. To do it. And you said okay, you could pick up the phone and they're like, hey, you can't attend this, you know, we're going to label like, oh, yes, I have you officers. Yes, I will not be attending now. I will he going right back to my day job you'd have yourself a fine day sir off the phone. Like yes, I am a boy not a conflict and I'm doing well, you know again do I want to deal with the I mean, it's it's a challenging situation cuz you all suck. Look into you know, did you collect the the federal agents information? And did you verify that the people speaking to you were not like you can do all that? Yeah that they were real and if they were real and this was a legitimate inquiries same to you or and or warning telling you kind of your life is about to go down a whole new brick a roads that you might not want. You have to make that decision. Not everyone's Malcolm X right not every that's true is is I you know guns blazing I I think for me I like to live between the line of wanting to pursue certain lifestyle decisions life and and and and start to build a platform for myself where if traditionalism isn't necessary at some point in my life cool, but it depends on where the Sarazen in that person's life. That's a challenging question that that's something that can be debated for hours really? Well for me this is no debate, but it's going to be something that you don't like and it's because her grandfather her grandfather was part of the Black Panthers. A party I think that obligate serve to actually continue on our movement because it's kind of like the Legacy she got to keep it going and I know you don't I know you don't cuz we're Side by that that's what it's but it's kind of know but it's kind of like I say the grandfather instilled in heard like all this knowledge. You can't just let that knowledge died. She can use that in a new party write a book know you gotta be in the trainings. She can do she's gotta be going to win it. You gotta be full in it. She can she could do quite a bit of sick. She can finalize the content. You can have a wildly successful blog. She well, you know what I would say, but I know you hated social media. Yeah, but I know I don't think you would like this but I would think that she should put this on social media that she was contacted. So it depends on what I know. He's the like a place I would want her to say. I want her to let people know what's happening to her and that she's been challenged. You know, there's You have to you really have to think about the concept actually, you know what you technically should talk with a lawyer too though, correct? I think I think that's the first step is helpful to be honest. Like I would say I would recommend taking the rights attorney. See what yeah what see what you're right, especially now identify. Like I said definitely verify the colors and get their contact information whenever someone that represents a part of the government getting their information and verify that who you think you're speaking to is what you think you're speaking to it's it's a tricky. Like I said, that's a tricky question but obligation that that part I disagree. I think I know you would disagree, you know, you you can come from a lineage of doing whatever you are your own person and you have to make your own decisions and just because you know ten Generations before you did something doesn't mean you have to just do that. Like that's I don't know not ten Generations, but a couple of generations careful about putting the type of pressure on people because it's you know, it's not fair to that person at the end of the line who's like, you know, what I don't want to do this job. But you're you're the continuation of your old Generations into the future. So you need to keep that Spirit Alive and you can do that in books and in blogs and in Social year and in trainings and you can find a way you can find a way but you don't have to make someone you don't have to obligate someone to it's the same thing. Right? I come from a family of doctors office and they don't give you a doctor. I just felt like being a street artist, you know, like that's unfair to tell someone that they can't live they can but they should draw hearts and they should draw a lungs and they should draw off human anatomy. And then that would be fine doctors patients that they are performing. I mean, well the patients are the canvases then yeah. I'm just saying they can be a street artist and just draw off me draw organs. That's fine. You're you're kind of doing medical doctor for your joint parts and but if you draw or go like realistic-looking versions, not an MD. Yeah, but at least you're home. It's in the vein same vein. I say definitely not it's not even if they draw veins on the heart come on down and you don't you don't take it as your separate. All right, you don't take us an artist that draws medical or not of them D. But something even greater. I would definitely not. Oh, yeah. Well, you know why because they're the Medical Art therapy kind of thing. You can do art therapy. Yes, but again, our therapists are not you know surgeons they're absurd but I think can they be doctors? I think they can get a doctorate in art therapy look into all that. Yeah. I'm not sure on the accreditation. Yeah same but all I'm suggesting and you're laughing so you understand that like, you know audiences laughing here. Yeah exactly. I'm hearing them right now. If you hear of the VIN your head you like I hear the I hear all the dead. Blades right now, correct. I'm ready for my anything. That's good. I know my speech will be fire. That's all I know. Oh, yeah, I you know my you've been practicing it with your monologue practice in my entire life. I've never will be fire without a single. Is that what it's all about, correct? It's challenging to make someone feel obligated to live a life just because of their history. That's all I'm going to say on that. But I'm giving you freedom in terms of not you don't have to do one space in the career, but you just gotta kind of keep true to your heritage. That's what I say. Just keep that Heritage alive. I agree to disagree. I know. Yeah, I know you want to go for but I go for people have to be free. I just think it's too much you people put so much pressure on people and it just seems so unfair and I just think there has to be another way. I think that people have a right to determine who they are before this preconceived notion of who they should be based on what where they come so you're saying or so you're saying let's say even a president's son can be become a Turfgrass major thoughts are you being so no, I'm not. I'm just saying like you just for one thing you're again if that person if that's their dream then yes, that's their drink. So that's what they decided to do. How we can improve the fields of all the you don't know what's going to happen to that for all we know that. the grass that's going to because we're going to Of grass. They're like you never know what's going to happen and what they should do is just suggest that oh, I'm my father was President. So I have to go study political science and I have to go to law school and then I need to go run for Senator and not necessarily that would be president at once what we can become a community leader or something. He wanted to be, you know, a a drag queen host or something. Like do you like live your best life always and it doesn't matter what the history dictates before you because you are you're unique person and we have to be true to ourselves even when you have a legacy, but then the trash says it's not in the trash man, if that's your legacy. You'll never disavowed that like it is what it is like but it doesn't mean that you're obligated to continue it. That's what I'm suggesting that it can stop at you. It doesn't have to continue through you cuz guess what maybe you don't want to but then you decide to have a child and that child wants it and it continues that way like dead. But you can't say that I mean in your history in your life. Do you feel you follow through on your legacies gotta know enough money? Well, technically. Yeah, I well. I mean only immediately but I don't know enough of my like super past Legacy. Yeah, I can't go back three generations and now all right. That's what they were doing. So I do this African-American. Yeah off not knowing where you come from. It's such a challenging question. Yeah, that's what makes it a little tougher. I it's hard to have that Legacy cuz then maybe I would have done the other stuff. I don't know. I might have been like a lighting expert off figure out. What's the perfect lighting for different rooms? I don't know. So you're not taking this conversation. Seriously at all might be saying that I'm just telling you about different ways. You can go I mean I could have been a political activist too long to say that I don't think that was part of my legacy, but it could have been yes. I see it now the man formerly known as K. That's what I would be Game Over song. That's what that would be my political name game over. Well not that would be my rap name. Probably a hundred percent a hundred. Thank God we are I think the universe is this page here at the time coming to the end of our hundred and sixty first episode of well M free. What was that a ritual know that was the wrong self-defense voice? Oh, yeah. See the year that that sounds kind of like tough and like you can't mess with this person. You don't shrink if you have to explain to the voice sound stuff off. Tough though. It's not I mean, I'm trying to like improve the voice acting a little bit. Okay. He said every time they know not each and every time. Why not but this was one of the times one of the few times. Yeah. I yeah I try. I mean that's pretty close though. He's got in there. Yeah. Love the ego. Nice big brother good progress pretty do you yeah from self judging off. That's one of the best judges self-correct know thyself episodes and discussing who were the Black Panthers will we leave you hanging for? What our next episode will be about drum roll, please own our next episode. We will be discussing his coffee good or bad for your help. Make sure you follow us on social media to follow along with the conversation and make sure you tune in next week for welcome very Wednesday to join the conversation at woken free.com. If you'd like to be a guest on the show, please submit a topic for an upcoming episode right now. We're definitely scheduling into twenty. Twenty-One 20/20 is pretty much wrapped up guys. I know that that sounds scary to hear but it just is off now. Where do you know our contact us page at woken free.com. That is W. Okay e n f r e e. I've definitely been paying Don social hitting me up people's time. Flight into the DM all that good jazz go to the contact us page at Logan free, and submit your query there when it comes to social media. You can always find us on Facebook and Instagram Twitter Youtube app Pinterest Tick Tock YouTube everywhere, right all at woken free, which super super exciting and then of course for collaborations, where do you go it gets redundant contact us page. Welcome. Dot-com if you dinner already subscribe, please do share the episode and make sure you come back to join the conversation every Wednesday for woken for Wednesday's remember woken free is more than a podcast in a way of life until next time stay strong. Yo.

Black Panther Party black party Black Panthers FBI Black Panthers Vanguard federal government Oakland Facebook US Panthers California Huey Newton China YouTube Malcolm X Google Tosh
Black Agenda Radio - 06.03.19

Black Agenda Radio

56:24 min | 1 year ago

Black Agenda Radio - 06.03.19

"This is black agenda radio. A weekly hour of African American political thought and action. Well, go to the radio magazine that brings you news commentary, and the nets from a black left perspective. I'm Glenn Ford along with my co-host Nelly bay lead this week. We're going to dedicate the entire program to the issue of so-called black identity extremists. The term the FBI invented to justify its permanent which hunt against black individuals and organizations that fight for black people's rights and interests in the United States, human rights activists regard, the black identity extremist label as part of the FBI's attempt to repackage for the twenty first century, it's old and discredited Cohen, tell tro, dirty war against black and left wing organizers, some of those activists recently formed, and I'm from a group to coordinate their resistance to the FBI's latest offensive against black. People. It's coal the block identity extremists abolition collective the collected plans to hold political education and organizing events and cities across the nation. The first session was held at the people's forum and midtown Manhattan New York City. Five organizers representing key human rights groups were unexpectedly joined by a boo Jamal, the nation's best known political prisoner. They discuss the threat posed by the F B I's attempt to demonize in neutralize radical politics and the black lives matter era. A jumping Cosa is one of the founders of the black identity extremists abolition collective, remember, the national comes black lawyers. And I'm also part of a collective that met in April twenty eighteen to figure out what is the FBI assessment colon. Black extremists set to target the police. It was a bit shocking when a lot of activists looked at this, particularly those who operating in DC, but as we discovered and researched and looked at it. It appears to be an is a continuation of how the FBI has been looking at, and targeting dissidents, resistors social Justice, racial, Justice activists, very, very, very long time. It's like endemic in their DNA of what they're supposed to do to support and defend property rights and the elite the mission of the collected that organized around us had various names haven't really decided name is to be. You can help us figure that out 'cause we're all in this together, but the mission is to end unlawful police surveillance of racial Justice activists. And to do that by initiating nationally, a public education campaign and strategy session. One's rhetorically. I have a question that sticks the back of my mind. And that question is win ever has there been a social Justice movement capable of stopping unlawful state surveillance of those who complain resist criticize question and seek to change the quality of their lives, such as the no longer. Oh, press this collective when it started consisted of a few organizations, the national lawyers skill that transforms Justice coalition of DC, and it has been growing, and we hope that this is the first of our discussions in New York was gonna take place in DC and June to be Parvin ongoing national effort to rebuild a social. Justice democratic base movement. Which is is now nascent emerging, so that we have the capacity to defend our REIs against what is a very dangerous, insidious assessment, racial profiling of black activists what we know is that the FBI sent out this assessment to eighteen thousand of Phyllis throughout the United States. We also know that they have gone to black churches to seek assistance from these black churches to identify folks fit the profile. So this sit on there for a moment. The FBI is actively attempting to pit the black community against its own racial Justice activists. Where are we, what is this John been friends will own time. And the other day we kind of out loud. How do you talk about this in a way that doesn't sound hyperbolic? How can you help us assess the urgency of the time, why is it that we don't have an antiwar movement? Where is the social movement for workers Justice? Where is that power of people with agency to affect quality change and to the extent that people do that? The pattern has been that the state comes down to squash them. What we have also discovered the first case that came to light in two thousand seventeen in Texas a state that has opened carry a young black man who had guns because is part of the gun culture, Texas. He's a hunter and he's also organizer. I guess. Police brutality every I started to Savell him because he says the profile of somebody likely to attack the police because he's pissed off and police getting away with killing a black men and women Brown men and women historically, this has been going on forever. You know, this is not new to minority communities visa the police. So office sudden, this incendiary assessment came to light, but why and why now. How many of you are familiar with the counter intelligence program known as co Intel pro? There is a thought among some activists, not all that somehow Coen, Tober was exposed and ended in one thousand nine hundred ninety one because of the church committee recommendations. What many folks don't know that Cohen told pro came into existence, quote unquote. I mean, the name came into existence nine hundred fifty six I was just thinking, well, you know, in nineteen fifty four four the education decision when that decision came down, and around that time, the French had lost in with the United States was the primary supporter. You had this thing that percolated from the FBI to kind of sit on descent, and it targeted black people people of color, and workers resisting that is not a coincidence. There is a nexus between everytime, people of color rise up or have an opportunity. If it's no more than to believe that they have hoped for better day than the state takes notice to push them down, and that pattern has been repeated. What else do we need to know? We don't know what criminal cases have come into systens as a result charges have been filed arrests have been made. Maybe some of these speakers may know because the FBI does not reveal this involvement in cases, the case that just talked about brother Christopher Daniels there. There was no record of FBI involvement in his case. No one knew who knows the nature of, of it is secret. So when you have Coen to-, bro. Kotel was exposed. It was exposed by activists going in and stealing documents and all that it was exposed. There was a social movement as I'm reminded by my good buddy, that existed at the time that was part of why the government responded in a way to Cortel. But did you know that and one thousand nine hundred eighty one Ronald Reagan began to create an assessment to pull back the restrictions that have been placed them. Coen tell quote unquote. And that Clinton went on to do that. To continue those assessments and Bush did the same thing with the Patriot Act. And now we have this assessment, and all the while we have a society, where three white men who are rich own more wealth than the bottom fifty percent. I mean, there's something fundamentally a sustainable about this picture, and the F, B I continues is, it's not a conspiracy theory to think of them as the secret all, but as folk Xinning with a determination to preserve the status quo to preserve the privilege and it uses the rationale of terrorism, international terrorism, anything's a high on the means by which to repress democracy. And repressed people voicing their need to thrive and before it, but I want. To leave here with some folks, signing on to how we can continue these scholarships, deepen these discussions because you are frontline activists. You are in the streets demonstrating a variety of issues, and you have a state apparatus limiting your success at your own expense. And for people who claim to be freedom fighters, you know, advocates for you know, a more humane democratic society that is unacceptable, and there's no reason to think that somehow simply lobbying, the Democratic Party or whomever to change you end up chasing your tail because they're imperative as much larger than what you've defined to be. So we wanna talk through what that looks like in practice. What we can do about it and. Have a sense of losing, and cynicism because we are the democratic majority, we have the capacity to define what law is based on our rally and codify that so that's our challenge in this beginning discussion because every Massey's, then needs to be the foundation for the next messy that one thing I did not say which, I don't think I need to talk about is this many, who's the president United States and the complicity of the Republican party in this line was, what is it? It's more than a constitutional crisis is the collapse of the rule of law in this country. And that's very, very frightening and shouldn't incentivize us to fight back and deliberate protracted and smart wet. That was a Johnny sent COPA at the national conference of black lawyer. Lawyers, and the blocked. Identity extremists. Abolition collective my issue. Hayes is with the center for media Justice, which has challenged the FBI's reincarnation of choline. Tell pro Hayes knows all too, well, that the bureau's aim is to turn black activists into political prisoners. My grandfather was a member of the Black Panther party and growing up like his experience and credibly informed and shaped my politics, and I grew up listening to him talk about working on the free breakfast program, working with real righteous people, and also organizing know your rights trainings, and cop watches and Harlem and the Bronx. And so in many ways, like his experience in the panther party really motivated me inspired me to become a community, organizer, particularly on criminal Justice issues. And in his stories when he's talking about the panther party of. Consistent theme of that is Valance and the criminalization of black radical organizing for liberation and freedom when he talks to me about organizing on the free breakfast program. You know, he talked about getting business owners to donate their funds and resources and food eggs, whatever to help them fee, black children and also would notice how cops were following them, harassing them, and they did this regularly, whether or not you were at politically involved, or active in any sort of party, but it was well understood within the panther party that they were being criminalised and watched and so growing up. Like I always had this understanding that, like, wow, it's really righteous to be involved in these in this work. There's consequences that come with it. There's personal sacrifices that come with doing this work. My grandfather, like so many other people were surveilled through the Cohen program and subsequently had to deal with that surveillance impacting their organizing work and ultimately. Led to him being incarcerated by the age of twenty eight and nineteen Seventy-three. And this is after Cohen tell pro was exposed for the next forty five years. He remained incarcerated it really impacted our family, our life, and I'm happy to say that, you know, he returned home. I summer after serving forty five years and made his last ten throw board hearing. And I'm happy to talk about that aspect later to about the movement to free our political prisoners and the need for parole reform. But when I heard about the black identity extremist as a nation of it reminded me and such a profound way, like the influence of my grandfather, and why it got into this work because of the personal sacrifice and consequences that he has made in so many others to fight for our liberation, and there's so many parallels to with the black deputy extremists as a nation, and the sort of criminalization and surveillance, that the Panthers doored over fifty years ago. I mean back then they were saying that the panther party was the domestic terrorist group and that they were as bad as the KKK, and it wasn't because of the free, I mean free breakfast program was amazing and really crucial, but it wasn't just because of the breakfast program that the police state was surveilled them. The Panthers were forthright in their criticism of state sanctioned violence and the history of police. Polity in the black community completely. That's what the state found threatening. And so when we look at the black extremist doesn't nation today and see the way that they have turned black people's protesting and organizing response police brutality, day today. We're looking at the same thing, we're looking at the evolution of Cohen pro into a new name. Call the black identity extremists doesn't nation. And I think it's really important to call out the falseness of it. Right. Because they tied these isolated incidents of violence towards police by black people as an indication that there are some racially motivated, group, a domestic terrorist group. But the year before this report was leaked most of the violence, committed towards cops were done by white people. I mean there studies coming out all the time about how some of the most deadly violent acts of domestic terrorism are committed by white, nationalist groups. So. So what is a black identity? Extremists. Where did that come from? It comes from this history, and this legacy of surveilling, black folks and black organizing, and so, at media Justice, which is organization that I'm, I'm representing today when the report was released we immediately like, swung into action and filed a foia requests to understand the scope of the designation in this in the surveillance program. And of course, we got a bunch of redacted documents and information. But nevertheless, that's still important. I think some of where power comes from is recognizing that we have a right to demand transparency, and we have a right to demand to understand what the FBI is calling domestic terrorism and challenge that. And so, after we filed the foia request and didn't get the information that we requested we then filed a lawsuit against the FBI demanding full disclosure. What we asked for. And in addition to that launched a petition which currently now has over fifty thousand signatures, supporting our demand recently. The FBI said in a homeland security meeting that they're not using the BI dozen nation anymore. And so some folks are saying, oh, haven't we kind of one. Isn't that a victory? Yes. And no, right. I mean, yes, in the sense that they're responding. They see the backlash and the criticism and all of these different groups, including media Justice responding. But we know from the history of surveillance that these terms evolve they called a co Intel pro there were restrictions that got pulled back. And now we're here, what the black identity extremist doesn't nation, so just because they're not calling it be. I e doesn't mean that they're not looking into black organizers surveilling our movements. And in fact, they said that they are not using this term anymore, but they re organize their domestic terrorism categories. To include a more blanket, term racially motivated, extremism. And so essentially what they're trying to do is say, we're not saying e but black folks, have these extreme ideologies are comparible with white, nationalist and white supremacy, which is factually not true. So the fight is going to continue our campaign, part of the collective as well. We're working on creating more space to coordinate with folks working on this issue. I think that one of the things that we do. We work on digital security trainings to both educate our communities around the history of surveillance, but also to provide some tips and resources on how to protect secure your organizing because what is despite all the parallels, and similarities? There is a little bit of a difference today in the sense that, you know, a lot of organizers are using the internet and social media to organize and connect with people. So Facebook and Twitter and. Instagram are really important spaces for us online. But at the moment, a lot of these platforms are cooperating with the police. So, for instance, one of the ways in which media Justice got involved with some of the hey content on Facebook was because when Coren gains was defending herself against the police. Suddenly, the video, and her account was taken off line and Facebook has done this for daily with the protests at the North Dakota pipeline. All the sudden activists couldn't livestream their standoff with the police. And so today, some of the ways in which we talk about securing our movements also have to include the way that we sharpen our analysis about the roles in which technology and social media platforms play a role and undermining our movements as well. And so our digital securities trainings also get into that. How do you identify dachshund harassment and fake accounts, which are tactics at the police do? Right. Like it was reported in Memphis that. The local police department, there was setting up fake accounts, and friend ding black lives matter, activists trying to gain information from them trying to disorganized. There organizing. That was my issue. Hayes of the center for media Justice that New York based center for constitutional rights has been in the forefront of the resistance to the attempts to criminalize, political organizing and speech, especially and block and Muslim communities. I Siad represented the center at the people forum in New York. So I was born and raised in Saudi Arabia, and I came here about a year before nine eleven and I remember before nine eleven even happened hearing stories of elders in the mosques, talking about the ways in which they were surveilled in the seventies, and in the sixties as members of the nation of Islam, and there being the extreme fascination, I think of all of us young, people around stories of surveilling of Malcolm X Muhammad Ali in the ways in which these figures, had sort of. Been seen as domestic terrorists, and shortly thereafter nine eleven happened, and as you can imagine in a lot of ways that created a kind of hysteria around wanting to criminalize and identify oppress Muslims, both globally, but also domestically in particular, what it ended up doing is it provided. The federal government and state agencies centrally with a mandate to really militarize the ways in which they're fighting this really amorphous definition of terror. And so what happened right after nine eleven is despite the fact that these are all historic practices, but now they were given really the Amien ish into go about equipping themselves with drones and technologies that are now modern. They're sophisticated that are extremely aggressive, and difficult to pinpoint and utilize them, not only to fight the Taliban, and Al Qaeda and ISIS. This and whomever, broad, but really also use those tools domestically not only against Muslims, but also amongst black folks and folks, in general, so just to give you all a bit of a look into what that looks like now. So I work at the center for constitutional rights, which is a movement lawyering advocacy shop that really does a broad range of work in this space. It started off in the sort of black liberation struggle in the deep south and has since developed into an organization that works on one time obey shoes. In fact, we were on the first organizations to represent Guantanamo Bay inmates. It's also now working very heavily on issues of prisoner rights through pelican bay and also a wider range of international human rights issues like shoes in Palestine cetera. But we've recently actually similarly filed a foia with the color of change to try to unearth documents that demonstrate the ways in which the FBI and the department of homeland security are really targe. Getting a movement for black lives. Activists after a few years of litigation. We actually finally got her hands on series of emails that not only demonstrated exactly what it is that we were talking about, which is that they were FBI DHS, where identifying but activists, and then surveilling them very intentionally because of their activities of protest, but also interestingly, we uncovered that there's a belief that I sit in the Muslims are, quote unquote, co-opting, the movement, that there was evidence. They unearth that ISIS was in fact, supporting protesters in Baltimore, and that they were calling on protesters in Baltimore who are rising up against the death of an murderer, Freddie gray saying that this is not taking advantage of the situation, calling people to join them in their fight in Syria, and how the Muslim state is an alternative to what black, people are fighting against the also uncovered documents that suggests that there. Our Muslim activists in Ferguson, who wanted to not only coop the movement, but actually leverage it as a way to spread certain. Ideologies. And what was really I think fascinating about some of the documents that we can earth does you know, obviously a part of it is a bit. Sadly, predictable, what we realized is in a really sophisticated way the FBI DHS recognized that there's the profound fight against white supremacy, and while issues in the causes and the calls to action are radically different. Because in no way, can you put movement for black lives in the same conversation as ISIS, there is this really profound struggle against the technologies of white supremacy. There isn't some way, some continuity across the globe. And so they're fighting the sort of state apparatus, this fighting in categorizing all of our struggles as similar if not the same in there is. And I think there's power. Power, and recognizing that while some of our issues a Muslim domestic rights issues or black civil rights issues are bifurcated. I think there is power and really realizing that intersection Alevis of these issues and fighting against them as one mass of block because the realities were being perceived as one massive block so without that, sort of unity really becomes difficult apparatus to fight against. And then one other quick, example, I wanted to plug in a case that we recently settled into twenty eighteen called Hassan v the city of New York. So I don't know if you all were found the case it was a big settlement in large part because NYPD had to shell out a lot of money, but it was essentially a response, just by way of background to media reports that were beginning to piece together the ways in which the NYPD was really mapping out Muslim communities. Not only New York, but in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. And they found that the NYPD created this really Orwellian twenty-first-century map of Muslims by surveilling over twenty thousand Muslims in New York and jersey and the tristate area by focusing in on over twenty businesses, I believe thirty restaurants and over ten schools, and that means that they were literally listening in on and following and surveilling college students high school students who did nothing other than go to a Muslim student association meeting. So once this information was uncovered CR, along with our allies at Muslim advocates filed a massive lawsuit on behalf of all the Muslim plaintiffs who were surveilled by NYPD and ended up winning this settlement part of which included that they created a civilian board that now looks at all the ways in which NYPD surveilling communities in has to prove. Move in some bizarre way, though, it's not really effective strategies that they employ. But one quick thing that was really remarkable about the lawsuit is, we also uncovered documents that suggested the way in which the NYPD was going about surveilling, people was by categorizing folks into what they deemed to be ethnicities of interest. And one of these ethnicities of interest are black Muslims, essentially, black American Muslim. So not only black immigrants coming from Somalia, Sudan, but also, just straight up like folks, who are Muslim, and just happened to be living in the NYPD, and in the Tri state area, and again, it sort of really crystallizes solidifies this idea of the ways in which the technologies that were once used to fight against ISIS, and Al Qaeda, actually, now being used and repurpose reuse to fight against our own communities at home in that this is particularly dangerous for not only Muslims in the US and black people in the US. But. Particularly for black Muslims in the United States for whom the realities of surveillance are long standing, but they started well before nine eleven but are now particularly dangerous and there's really no recourse of action that is just as strong and just as industrial really is the problem that we're sort of facing. And so I hope that we sort of start to see the similarities intersections and begin to build around them accordingly. That was I. Siad of the center for constitutional right downing veterans human rights worker and a member of the national conference of black lawyers. He's also part of the group that founded, the black identity, extremist abolition collective, simply said something forty years ago that is just as true today as it was back, then he said, we are past the time for description. The time is now for prescription. We stop talking about the problem, we've got to figure out what to do about it. We don't need any more information about Cohen. Tell a little more helpful. Don't you have enough now to take some action to give it a good kick, you know, where you have enough information now? So that's what I would like to contribute to the conversation is, what are we going to do about it? So please feel free take down some notes. If you have some things to add to it, that's going to be part of the conversation. And so there are three areas where I'm going to suggest that ways that we take action. We must fight black identity. Extremism in our personal lives. Second. We must fight black identity extremism in our lives as protesters and third. We must fight black identity extremism in our lives, as members of organizations to on the first one, we're going to fight extremism in our personal lives. Here's some things that we want to do the first one is we have to stop believing the hype you hear some of the things they say, oh, there's government is all knowing. Oh, they listen to us now. Oh, they here now or they follow in everything we do every time we do that we're digging ourselves into little deeper, and adding some paranoia that keeps us from thinking, we can win or thinking, we can take action. We wanna be scientific, but it becomes a faith based initiative, when you think without evidence that they are everywhere, all the time doing everything and can stop it. So we want to be careful about how they do it and history has shown that they may slow things as whether John who said they may slow things down. But. They can't stop them and history will prove that to my second point. We must fight black identity. Extremism when we're dealing with protests and here list the action items. I'm gonna run through briefly the first level of tack that the system is used is in our descent at our attempts to get out in the street, that's the first place they attack. And that's part of the I E in the Coen, tell process. We don't really think of it that way, their goal is to shut us down by any means necessary. So we have to start off by knowing our constitutional rights. What role is I play the fourth amendment under which basis can they stop us keep us from doing the things we wanna do? And what ways are we able to say what we want to say and stay where we wanna stand. So our foundation is going to be to know what will laws, we operate, I became a lawyer, because I saw how Huey Newton without the law book while he was doing the community patrols and said. Underselling, so Oakland code, we have the right to carry weapons in the city and as long as we're in the vehicle, they cannot be loaded, but I am outside the vehicle right now. So I'm loading the weapon, and that was the beginning of the anti-gun campaign. If you wanna really know when it began okay, it was against it was against the Panthers. So for us dealing with these organizations in addition to knowing rights when we're these protests, we have to keep our eyes and ears open. We have to look for things that stand out that are unusual that are out of the ordinary. We also of course, want to be aware of the police, and that's in all of their formations. What structures how are they dressed? Are they relaxed? Are they moving forward? What agencies are there? What insignia are they wearing when we were down at the protests that the Venezuelan embassy a few weeks ago, we saw a new law enforcement agency on the ground wearing military uniforms, the secret service. They were in charge of the streets at that time we had never seen that. Before. So we wanna pay attention to those kinds of things. Are they in plain clothes? Are they operating undercover? We have to always make note of those kinds of things. Also, we have to be on the lookout for provocateurs people who are stirring things up, but we have to be careful about that because we can't assume that everybody who's doing something whose politics we don't agree with, is an agent, or an informant or provocateur. Some people who wanna just lock arms, and sing think provocateurs sitting down in the middle of the street. No, those people who are using civil disobedience as a tactic. And there are other people who believe in self defense and when the police attack they defend themselves, so we can't just automatically launch into the fact that people are provocateurs without doing some opposition and being scientific about it. So we don't want to jump to conclusions. We want to recognize the different tactics. Also while we're looking out for the police the informants, the provocateurs will also wanna pay attention to the all right now. Now going to protest has become a form of three dimensional chess. It used to be us and the police. Now it's us the police and all right. They have a first amendment right to be out there. So we're going to watch them, but we're not going to trip off everything they do until they crossed the line when they threaten our people, or when they make any, any moves, or are people, and more importantly, when they show their true stripes by collaborating with the police, and we saw in Portland, how all right ran up got flex cuffs from the police and helped arrest protesters if anybody's had any personal experience when any of these events on naming raise them because some people who may be there may have things that contribute to the conversation. We have also seen the police collaborate with alright, so at a protest in Kentucky, after the city fought every attempt for the people who were protesting the right to try to have those protests. The police let the right wing people plug into city hall. After having denied that to the left for years and years, just let them plug in their sound systems and everything. So we have to pay attention to those things because those let us know who's on which side and where they stand also when it comes to protest we have to pay attention to technical, I wanna raise this, 'cause this was part of one of the areas that job who was asking me to particularly address. We're seeing the use of technology in our surveillance, some of its unseen, but a lot of it is seen, and we have to pay attention to that to police filming us. Fortunately, the courts have said they have a right to film us. It's our position that they don't have a right to film us, and less, we are breaking the law, but they're doing it. And so we wanna know who is doing it. And what are they filming? You gotta pay close attention to that. Now, there's more serve tissues devices that are being used one of them is called phone trackers or cell site, simulators, and you'll see vans around the protests and the vans have little antennas on them. And what they're doing is they're pretending that they're a cell phone tower in their sucking in all of our call. Phone numbers, and all of that. So we wanna pay attention looking those vans other cell site trackers, look like little, little antennas that police can handhold and you may see them walking around with those, so we wanna pay attention to those and where are they position? And where does that person go after they walk off with that radio? What's the license plate of that vehicle, so we know what agency it is also we're seeing a level of aerial surveillance that we haven't seen in a long time the USA planes. Check this all out in Baltimore people who are bitterly use their Benach, yours to check the tail numbers of planes, which is the federal license plates were tracking planes that were circling over the protests in Baltimore. They also found that you can go online, and you can get the flight patterns of these planes. So when you go to the website and you look at that plane and that flight, you can see the circles on the printout around around over west Baltimore. During these protests. So these folks went back, and they track the tail numbers. And guess what they found these were planes that were tracked back to shell companies that were held by the F B. And we didn't know what the planes were doing. And through other research. We found out that some technology was privately developed and using it rock where a plane circles and takes a digital photograph every second, a digital picture every second. So what would they do in circling around the protests, taking digital pictures of what every second protests, everything by running, these things forward and backwards. You can see every vehicle that came to the protests in every person, and you can run it backwards and find out what car they got out of where did the cargo where did, everybody meet, where did that car start out running it backwards to track all of that? So they were doing that in west Baltimore. We saw a helicopter that was doing the same thing. We risk standing rock. We saw the same thing there. And then in Charlottesville, there was a helicopter circling. They're very low and doing the same thing what happened to helicopter crash in three state troopers were killed. But the newspaper articles, acknowledged that they were doing surveillance, the papers knowledged it. So we're not going to be afraid to do things, but we had to pay attention to the fact that they're using technology to so strong. If you can see planets light years away, and then you shine head down to earth. You can probably read the buttons that people wearing what they're t-shirts say. So we just wanna be aware of these things, and the last technology. I wanna talk about. And there's a lot more is facial recognition facial recognition is now being used to identify people's faces at protests at airports everywhere else, and it has the same high digital power. But there's also pushback just last week, the city of San Francisco voted against the use of facial recognition, San Francisco. So we've got to push back in other cities, so that these, these cities are not using this as part of their police departments because soon as they talk about fighting crime, they're really talking about fighting protests last one. Now when we're dealing with organizations. And this is critical one, because this is what the whole goal was in stopping the Black Panther party. One of the first things that we have to do is stop, as I said earlier, believing that they are invincible, and they can crush us. And that there's nothing we can do about it. But one of the things that we have to do is stop undermining ourselves by spreading stories and talking about people and doing it in ways that undermine our own work. One of the things I learned from the black named the party's saying that I can't tell you, I've said thousands of times, no investigation. No right to speak. No investigation. No right to speak. So when people sit around the meetings that person's agent, you know, and somebody else hears it and they pass it along is irresponsible. It's a way to bring people down. People have died behind those kinds of ignorant ignorant, passages of claims that are just passed around. So we have to put that in check, and we have. To tell people, and I've done this in meetings when somebody says that we had, we were preparing for the RNC and somebody in one of our training meetings like forty or fifty people, there said that guy who was here during the first half of the training. He's an agent now I'm sitting there facilitating things like what am I going to do with this? So I said, excuse me, brother, our policy, is anyone who publicly announces that somebody is an agent is immediately under suspicion themselves. Please tell us about yourself. He shrunk back had nothing else to say we have to nip that stuff in the bud. Because he could have been knucklehead just talking or he could have been a ninja trying to put a bad jacket on somebody else. And get somebody else, poor guy was wearing a little sports jacket because he came from the civilian review board. So this knuckleheads thinking, guys, not wearing jeans and t shirt so he's got to be the agent. Well, you know what the agent is wearing what probably wearing the movie. Oh, t-shirt. So come on. We have to do better than that. Also, we have to build. Consensus when our organizations stop doing things up and down votes that builds factions that builds bitterness, and it causes dissension. We have to build evaluations and self criticism into our meetings because people leave the meeting. What do they do? They go off into little factions and they start talking about to you who do they think they were trying to overturn my motion and all that you got issues? We bring it up in the meeting and clear the air, so that the rumors don't spread anybody ever played telephone what happens when you get from the other side of the circle. Go ahead. One person, what'd you say something completely different. What did you say messed up? That's the legal word for what happens. And people have people have died from this kind of telephone stuff. We also need to have organizations established security so many times, we don't pay attention to that. Have you trained any of your people in security, everybody just sort of thinking, well, we'll all just kind of look out for each other. Have you set aside plans for your event are there plans for if something happens here? Some. Happens at one of your meetings at one of the protests, are there contingencies if something jumps off, who's going to do what who's going to call who who's going to reach out to the lawyers, who was going to call the doctors. What are we going to do, if there's a raid, we have to build this stuff in, because our reactions to this stuff our failure to react can undermine us more than any agent could or lack of preparation when there is a rasmin? We have to publicize the harassment don't just keep quiet about it collect the information, spread the word be careful about what you say, don't say, reach out to the media to all the powerful people. You know, to get the word out and turn the rocks out from under this, because when you're quiet you're going to get hit. Again, that was came down eight of the national conference. So black lawyers, fifty years ago, the I designated a Black Panther party, the greatest domestic threat to national security and try to. To destroy the organization through a ten pain of Sasser nation and imprisonment to Hannah Fernandez is with the campaign to bring home move me, a boo Jamal. She's also a professor of history and African American studies at Baru cow. The Sedition Act, the alien and sedition acts, what did they argue? No immigrants. No foreigners, no protesting government, essentially everything that we're hearing today. No immigrants. No foreigners, no protesting government, that is the formula that the federal government has used and I say that because we need to essentially establish solidarity with immigrants. And with Muslims were being persecuted both abroad and domestically. What's the second moment the rise of the Cold War, a moment when the United States becomes hegemony? We have. The red scare which is the response to the labor upheavals of the nineteen thirties, the fight against communism at this moment, bringing it back to race is combined with the early suppression of the civil rights movement. Part of the job of repression is logical. It links black struggle with the major foreign threat. So in the fifties race mixing is Jenna grated as communism. So the struggle for civil rights is, in fact Jenna grated as communism because communism is the threat of the moment. What's the third moment that moment came immediately after one of the greatest crises in American history? When the United States face a fierce challenge from the Vietnamese abroad, and from the many social movements at home, especially those built by a radicalized black freedom. Movement. The Black Panther party during this period, becomes the target of federal homicide violence, and it's identified as a national security threat, so black resistance, and resistance that challenges the status quo of the United States and black resistance has always done that because black oppression is the biggest contradiction in this notion of American democracy, which is why when black people fight in the United States, people around the world. Listen, most recently, the Palestinians, people in Brazil in London and around the world were building black lives matter movements and solidarity with the United States. It has happened in every moment in history. Black oppression is the biggest contradiction in the notion of American freedom and democracy. And so for that reason when the Black Panthers organize. And they'd be gin to establish solidarity with the, the means they become national security threat, number one again, there's an ideological campaign at work here. And what does that look like in the nineteen sixties when historically oppressed, people became the unequivocal vanguard of political dissent in the United States and around the world? I'm talking about black people, and other people of color, repression political repression acquires, a new patina the US government now weaponize anti-communism with race because all of the people who were organizing in the sixties were colored with the communist brush, but now they're not just communist. They're not just reds. They're also black. So Black Panthers are communist, but they're also the people who are going to break the law, right? That's the race. Ity Olivetti that colors repression in this new period, government officials police and the media begin to we Kwait black Brown yellow to sent and resistance with run of the mill criminal activity to be feared by law abiding white citizens. The police in New York followed suit with this very early logic, that linked communism with black people, but not just black people, there criminality in nine hundred sixty six here in New York, the demand for an independent civilian complaint review board of the police gain traction in response, the NYPD's union hired a PR firm that ran ads on TV and in billboards across the city to ensure that New Yorkers voted against the civilian complaint, review board, one ad focus on the vulnerable of white women leaving New York subway station at night. Night in the aftermath of a riot riots resistance, is centrally signals the demise of white women, another of the ads that they ran throughout the city, especially in places like Staten Island and queens, where white people live another feature. The menacing gaze of black and Puerto Rican us with switchblades and guns. It ended with the following message of warning, quote, not threatening any person just a threat to the community, and there's a straight line between that and the central park jogger case. Right. This is in the sixties nine hundred sixty six then there are satement s- by New York City council president Samford garra, like some of you might remember he's the New York council president, but he had previously been part of the red squad. He justified the lawless repression and assassination of resistors of black people. P to weaponize anti-communism with Ray city, Allah, Judy. He called the young lords, and the Black Panthers quote, armed terrorist groups, the outgrowth of an era of disrespect for the law at that point, the Vietnamese were called terrorists, and guerrillas. So the ruling class in New York, the little ruling class in New York is actually equating our foreign enemy with the Black Panthers and the young lords who are resisting oppression in uncertain. Terms domestically and also equating that with violation of the law, he was part of the red squad. When my God, I have Mohammad Jamal here who wasn't supposed to call. But let's ask them a question. Hello. Hello. What was that? No, I'm not meeting. No. I'm not eating mentally giving talk on black. Identity extremism. And we're here at the people's forum and your friends are here, including Mr Ford who visited you not too long ago. We're wondering if you wanna share your thoughts with us. Yes, we where you're by. Here about this situation. With being treated. But the stink. It's almost like co until throws three point, the rebirth of the criminalization of the black freedom movement. At a time. When we are. In precedent rise in violent Italy, white, terrorism and white supremacist all across the country. It gives you some sets does it. Of the very nature of the state. Yes. But be armed elements of the space, the so-called police, the so called the. VI named after a racist, J Edgar Hoover, whose name still graces building in Washington. This was of fish. With black power movements. A man who criminalized any kind. Of black consciousness of black action of black resistance, and feed of black prominence itself. We have reminded when we think of Coen, telco of someone like Richard collect, and Gregory known popularly as victory. Did you know he was in the black militant filed? The Hanes file he was identified as a black activist at therefore the FBI shared his critique of the mafia, which he compared to a snake with members of the mafia. Think about it. They would try to get the money yet to do dirty work, right? Okay. What calling from? This, this is the time that, you know, we should take very. Straighten up movement, build up movements. But also when struck young people of the potential for something very deadly very ugly. Who can forget the role in the offensive? In his bed December, six nineteen sixty nine they use the tentative security, a wreck, and it formed an agent provocateur to not only draw a floor plan of the apartment in Chicago. But specifically identify with bid Fred happen and his wife would be sweeping pregnant wife that, that. But also ghost his drink with Seco barbital to your he would be a deep sleep when they raided but consciousness as always, and will always be an enemy of white to Premacy. Impromptu. Thank you. Fremaux man. And that's it for this edition of black agenda radio. These sure to visit at black agenda, report dot com, where you will find a new and for bucket issue. Each wednesday. That's WWW dot black agenda, report dot com. It's the place for news, coming, Terry and analysis from the black left on Nellie Baillie along with my co-host Glyn Ford are saying to the good people at the progression radio network.

FBI Black Panther party United States New York City Cohen Panthers Coen NYPD Mohammad Jamal panther party Intel Glenn Ford ISIS Baltimore federal government John Hayes
The Feds vs. the Activists | Fred Hampton | 3

American Scandal

43:46 min | 4 months ago

The Feds vs. the Activists | Fred Hampton | 3

"It's early morning on december fourth. Nineteen sixty nine. Deborah johnson sits on a narrow cotton shivers uncontrollably. The air is frigid and johnson is only wearing thin robe. But that's not why she shivering johnson stares at her arms and legs. Her brown skin has been sprayed with dark red blood. She rubs herself trying to get the blood off her handshake with desperation. But it's like she stained it won't come off and now more than anything. She wants to scream to escape this nightmare. But there's nothing she can do trap behind. The metal bars in the cell. Johnson has been sitting in this chicago. Police station says just before dawn. That's when the cop shoved her in the cell. She's been waiting ever since and trying to find some way to get out but she knows she's all alone except for someone else who's been keeping her company with a trembling hand johnson touches her swollen belly. She waits to feel something some sign that her baby is still with her. She doesn't feel anything. Moving tear rolls down her cheek as she pinches her eyes shut. I got fred the love of her life and her fiance. She still can't believe it. He's gone forever now. She's going to lose the baby to she clutches her jaws and keeps her eyes. Shut tight somehow. She just has to get out of here. Find a doctor johnson. Here's a door swing. Open down the hall. Police officer with thick neck comes sauntering towards her swings. The door open and stares at her with cold and tired is all right. Let's go where are you taking me. No questions just move. The officer yanks. Her up leads down a hallway with buzzing fluorescent lights. A moment later the officer shoved into a small room. She catches herself from falling. Looks up to see a young white man in a suit sitting behind a table he jumps up furious a. You can't treat her that way. I can't you got ten. The officer walks out and slams the door behind him. Johnson turns back and sees the other man hurrying around the table he pulls out a chair gestures toward sit down. Please sit down were you. My name is geoff. I'm a lawyer who is defending fred. I have my credentials. If you wanna see them when you want right one is to help you. The first are you okay. I'll be okay amounting of you make that happen. That's exactly what. I'm going to try to make happen but just i. Could you tell me what happened. Johnson holds back and tear. She can see the pool blood. She can hear the gunshots. The smell of gunpowder in the air. I was asleep. Started shooting at us. The cop started shooting out of the bedroom. And then what and then two cops went back into the bedroom. I heard one of them. Ask if fred was still alive and then there were two more and the other one said. He's good and dead now. The police claim they entered your home with a warrant. Say they were looking for guns and announced their presence. They claim they were fired upon return. Fire in self defense. And that's how they shot. Fred line was no warrant and they didn't warn anyone. They kicked in the door and started shooting. They're liars. they killed him. Deborah listen to me. I'm going to get out of here. I promise to believe that he believe me. Johnson looks at this man. There's something about jeff haas that seems innocent and pure. He seems honest. So i won't lie to you. They're all lined up against us. The mayor the attorney general even the fbi. They want people to think. Fred was dangerous criminal and got what he deserved you and i we can prove them wrong. Johnson's chest tightens with anger. Fred hampton was no criminal. He was brave and smart and beautiful. A man who wasn't afraid to stand up for himself and his people lead the black panthers in illinois right then. Johnson feels jab in her ribcage. Sir baby incredible feeling relief suddenly washes over her and she smiles because she knows that he's a fighter just like his father johnson rubs her belly feeling her son kick again and then she realizes that no matter what. She's feeling no matter how badly she's been heard she also needs to keep finding that's all she can still do. Not fred has gone so i she needs to get out of here in the second. She's out she'll start working with this lawyer and together. They'll bring fred's murderous justice. American scandal is sponsored by monday. Dot com. i've got a small shot me in two employees but a lot of collaborators writers researchers producers the ad ops people cat remind me that i have to write and record this ad. My team is much bigger than me in my employees or the boundaries of anyone organization. Three podcasts a week is a lot of moving. Parts and a lot of opportunity for the key is communication among the team. Monday dot com is an easy to use flexible and visual teamwork platform beautifully designed to manage any team organization or process online. You can improve coordination between teams of any size in any industry anywhere. That work is done through. Collaboration which is everywhere plan manage and track everything. Your team is working on was scores of integrations with tools. You use like g mail or dropbox all made better by being in one centralized place visible to everyone who needs to see it so if you want your team to be more effective than ever visit. Monday dot com for your free two week trial. This is actually happening is now a wonder original and available ad free with wondering plus each week listened. Extraordinary true stories told by the people who live them. Start your free trial with one degree plus in the app today. Wandry feel the story from laundry. I'm lindsey graham and this is american scandal in nineteen sixty six civil rights. Activists founded the black panther party a political organization that fought to protect black americans from police brutality. From the start the group was controversial. Its members call for oversight of law enforcement and they advocated armed self defense. It wasn't before long that the panthers drew the attention of j. edgar hoover the director of the fbi. Hoover had already waged warfare against other civil rights groups using top secret campaign known as co intel. Pro this far reaching program used a number of unconstitutional methods to target activists including spine intimidation and violence soon. The fbi was using co intel pro to target the panthers two as well as one of their emerging leaders fred hampton worked to unify. Chicago's minority populations bringing them together. In the fight against racial injustice hampton develop programs to fight poverty as a black american. He aggressively challenged white supremacy but his quick rise within the panthers would lead to a quick downfall and in their quest for justice for hampton activists would follow a trail of corruption leading from the chicago police department to the highest levels of the. Fbi this is episode. Three fred hampton the fall of nineteen sixty seven and two years before fred hampton was killed by police right now hampton gazes at a crowd of people who surround him. They've gathered on the lawn outside city hall and maywood illinois. they're standing side-by-side their faces intent and strong the side makes hampton feel like he's glowing because they're ready to take action so as he amount of what happens hampton plants feet on the grass and steadies himself and he thinks back on the last four years. He's worked tirelessly to organize the young black people of may one for some. This may be asleep e. town happy suburb of chicago. But hampton knows the truth is much more complicated in maywood. Black people live very different lives than their white counterparts. Their lives aren't always so happy. That injustice makes hampton furious and so he's educated himself and tried to figure out how to bring positive change to his home town. He studied martin. Luther king junior and malcolm x. and now at nineteen years old. He feels fully prepared to meet this moment because tonight he and his supporters are going to make an important request of the city council. It could be a big step forward for racial justice. And the first many more to come hampton digs his feet even deeper into the grass. He pulls his black cap over his curly hair. He folds his arms as a gust of wind whips. Pico up ahead. the door. To city hall of a thin white councilman exits the building. You stops just beyond the door and peers. Out of the crowd hampton cassia right away. Councilman looks nervous. Hampton approaches him. Hello sir my name. Is fred hampton. I'm with the n. Double acp youth council called earlier this week. Yeah okay what do you want. What is all this about. We're here to ask the city construct a public pool for the residents of maywood. I was told those gathered here tonight would be allowed to speak before the council. I'm afraid whoever said that was made a mistake there's too many of you are facilities are far too small. I understand that sir but these brothers and sisters are here to represent the black families of the city. They don't have a public pool to swim during the hot summer months. The council and stares at hampton and credulous was wrong with the pool in bellwood. That's just down the road. Bellwood pool has a whites only policy problem as simple. black residents. don't have a local place where they can go and cool. We need a pool just like everyone else. i think. I'm sorry. There's nothing i can do. You honestly do yourself a favor qiao hong just all of you go home sir. I was promise. I can speak hampton. Spins around several black and white lease car suddenly pull up their lights. Flashing hampton turns back to the council but the man has already reentered city hall. Pamphlets mind begins race then. He addresses the crown brothers and sisters. Stay calm. I want you to stay calm. Please let me handle this white police officer steps out from one of the squad cars. He holds a bullhorn to his mouth. Watering disperse immediately disperse officer. Everything's all right here officer as you can see. This is a peaceful gathering it will remain peaceful but we all at once. Police officers jump out of their squad. Cars hamptons heart starts to pound. He watches in shock disbelief as they rushed the crown of his black neighbors. The police officers shove in punch force them to the ground. Hanson can't understand how this went so wrong so quickly. He thought he did everything right. He was reasonable and followed the rules. But now it's obvious that mattered. White people who run maywood saw something that made them scared a large group of black people standing in one place. That was all they needed to respond with force. Hampton watches the scene unfold. When a police officer slammed into the grass he pulls hamptons arm back and cuffs arrests as hampton lies on the watching his friends and neighbors get beaten. He realizes he was wrong. He's done asking why people treat them with respect. They won't give him any so from now on demand it. It's time to change tactics. He's going to start organizing on a larger scale and he's going to go to war on behalf of his people. It's november fourth nineteen sixty eight and a year after the skirmish at city hall tonight. Fred hampton sits at the kitchen table and dimly lit chicago apartment. He looks across the room and sees his new friend. Who's leaning into the fridge balmy russia's a twenty two year old dressed in black with a full afro in a neatly trimmed. Goatee rush grabs a couple of drinks from the refrigerator and return to the kitchen table with a smile. A moment later the to clink glasses and they began meeting at hampton hopes might change the course of his life hampton and rosh met earlier this year and a black power rally in maywood. It was one of many rallies. The hampton had organized since he was arrested at city hall and his life took a turn since that moment he's increase the intensity of his work as he told rush he's ready to take his activism to the next level rush. Seems to have gotten the message because just earlier this evening. He invited hampton over and said he might have a new opportunity for russia. Just gotten back from oakland. The city where the black panther party was founded over the phone. He told hampton to hurry over. This could be a big opportunity now. Sitting together at the kitchen table rush launches into it. He explains that while he was in oakland. He sat down with black panther leaders. He learned a lot from them and was inspired. The state of illinois needs a chanter of the black panthers. Hamptons is gonna wind as a tingle of excitement. Reaches to the tips of his fingers. Hampton knows that the black panther party is one of the most important political groups in the country. They're organizing black americans who refuse to wait for progress. They're fighting for change now not in a timeframe that makes white americans comfortable the panthers are exactly what illinois needs hampton believes and so as he locks eyes with rush. Hampton asks an important question. What can he do to get involved rush laughs and takes a sip of his drink. He says that he was just about to get there. He takes another sip and then explains that he told the panther leaders about hampton. And all of hampton's important work. He said hampton was one of the smartest most charismatic activists government hampton shakes his head both flattered and encourage an embarrassed by russia's praise and he begins to feel jittery nerves if feels like russia's about to deliver news. He's been waiting for rush. Smiles takes another slow sip. And then says it's official. Hampton can join the black panther party. Not only that but national leaders have asked them to help build the panthers illinois. Chapter hampton leans back with giant grin rubs his hand over his forehead. He didn't realize how nervous and sweaty gotten. Now he feels invigorated ready to get to work in illinois. Chapter of the black panther party could help him achieve his ultimate goal. Uniting the cities people of color hampton tells rush that this is a big step forward now they can finally help feed educate defend. The black community hampton leans forward saying this last point is the most important he believes like the panthers that if a white man hits you first and you have a right to hit him back. But suddenly russia's face crow song he pushes the drink and asks of hampton is prepared to die for those beliefs. He points out that the police have killed plenty of black men who think canton us. Hampton doesn't hesitate right away. He says he is ready to defend his ideals even if that means facing his own death rush pauses takes a deep breath for second. Hampton is worried that he misspoke within russia extends his fist in hampton knocks. It with his own rush announces that the black panther party of illinois is now officially established. Hampton will be the deputy chairman. Rush will serve as minister of defense. They have to get to work. Immediately hampton nuts because with russia his side. He knows he can make the local panther party. The most powerful for chicago has ever known. It's november twenty fifth nineteen sixty j. Edgar hoover sits reading a newspaper in his office at fbi. Had he finishes the article and with scallon his face. He throws aside the newspaper. Hoover glances across the office which is preserved especially for him the director of the fbi. Hoover's now seventy three years old and he knows that he can keep this space tidy and neat but that's not how the rest of the world looks every day. Dark and treacherous forces only grow stronger in america. He subversives want to destroy everything. Hoover loves his life his agency his country. He knows he can never let that happen. Overlooks back down at his copy of the washington post which is still open to the article. He was reading. It covered recent demonstrations by the black panther party. Hoover has despises group since he first learned of its existence two years ago. They're saying they're trying to lift up the black community but hoover's positive bits and they're just black thugs he believes and they want to kill any white man. They can get their hands on. It's as simple as that but even worse. Their ranks are now rapidly swelling. There are now black panther chapters and over sixty. us cities and counting hoover's jock clinches as he glances at those numbers he knows. It's only a matter of time before these gangsters tried to launch a revolution endless war against decent white society so hoover makes a decision. He knows he can't waste any more time. He must crush the panthers now. He'll do it with the most powerful weapon that he has co intel roth who returns to his typewriter and begins rapidly. Typing out a memo. He addresses it all. Fbi offices from this day forward. He writes his agents are to employ hard hitting counterintelligence measures to cripple the panther movement and agent should work side by side with local law enforcement to do it. Hoover types the last line and grabs a sheep from the typewriter. He then rings his secretary as she appears. In the doorway hoover holds the mental out with an instruction distribute this without delay after his secretary leaves. Hoover allows himself grin of satisfaction. He's waited long enough. But now co intel pro unleashed on the black panthers. He's confident that day marks the beginning of the end for the panthers. American scandal is sponsored by policy genius. I didn't planet. But i've spent a fair number of years working for insurance companies. I worked my way through college and a big insurance call center and i ran the marketing department for a shop that sold. Mostly death and dismemberment insurance. That stuff's often crap. What you need. Is life insurance and easiest way to get it. Is that policy. Genius dot com policy. Genius will compare policy starting at as little as one dollar a day you might even be eligible to skip the in person medical exam and once you apply policy genes will handle all the paperwork and red tape. If you hit any speed bumps they'll take care of everything that kind of service has earned policy genius a five star rating across sixteen hundred views on trust pilot and google. So if you need life insurance head to policy genius dot com right now to get started you could say fifty percent or more by comparing quotes policy genius when it comes to insurance. It's nice to get it right. Things are normal right now. So it's understandable if you're feeling off center but if it's more than that if your own feelings are overwhelming you it's time to talk better help is therefore you better helpful. Assessed your needs and match you with your own. Licensed professional therapist. Someone you can begin communicating with and under forty eight hours. It's not a crisis line. It's not self help. It's professional counseling. Done securely online log into your account anytime a message with your counselor or scheduled video or phone sessions. It's more convenient and more affordable than traditional counseling and better health is committed to finding you the right counselor. You can switch anytime easily and at no charge visit better help dot com slash a. S that's better h. e. l. p. and join the over one million people who have taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional so many better help is recruiting more counselors in all fifty states. Get ten percent off your first month at better dot com slash a s. It's early evening on january. Twenty four th nineteen sixty nine. Fred hampton gazes at himself in a small mirror straightens the collar of his overcoat and the justice black beret. He takes a deep breath. He's ready to go on camera right now. Hampton is waiting inside dressing room in public access tv station in chicago. He knows that today's work is important. He's about to go on television and challenged the misinformation. That's being circulated about the panthers. People are saying that. The panthers are gang that they're drug pushers in attack white people without provocation. Hampton knows none of that's true and so tonight he's ready to sit down with a talk. Show host explain what the party is really about. He'll describe the panthers free breakfast program for school kids and promote his rainbow coalition a multi racial group of chicago residents who want community control. The police hampton straightens. His brain starts rehearsing his talking points. When suddenly there's allow knock on the door time for the taping. He thinks but when the door opens he finds to police officers standing the hallway. One of the officers steps forward and growls at hampton is under arrest and shouldn't make any sudden movements hampton fields his stomach lurch but states calmly that he hasn't committed any crimes officers smile since his hampton has an outstanding traffic warrant. Yes come with them immediately. Hampton is awash with bitter exasperation. But he knows he's not getting out of this building except in police custody so he follows the police out to a squad car. He's told to get in and hampton does as he's told. The police officers then began a quiet discussion across the street. As hampton sits in the squad car he realizes he hasn't been put in handcuffs and police officers. Just keep talking. Hamptons heart starts race. Something about this adding up. He looks around the squad car trying to find an answer then as i catch the glint of metal in the sunlight. It's a revolver that sitting right next. One hampton freezes suddenly. It's all too clear what's happening. The police want him to grab this revolver. They can say he went from one of their guns and they had no choice but to shoot him in self defense. Hampton feels his muscles tightening and he knows he only has seconds to act so he sticks both hand out the window and start shouting saying that someone left a gun. In the car both officers walkover looking at and disappointed one tells hampton the just hand the gone over it's not loaded but hampton does. That's just another trick. He says he doesn't wanna put his prints on it. He'd rather have the officer pick up the gun himself. Officer smirks and hampton can tell that he's won this battle then the officer says he surprised hampton didn't try to use the gun to escape the f. b. i. told them to expect resistance. Fbi at that moment hampton feels like. He's cratering down into the earth harassment from local police. The fbi if they set him up for an execution and hampton isn't true danger. Its may nineteen sixty. nine fred. hampton stands in their centenary of chicago's black panther headquarters. The party offices are small and dimly lit not only have a couple of wooden tables but on those tables were piles of guns ammunition hampton checks. Watch it's eight fifty eight pm. He's expecting guests to arrive any minute and glances at the weapons sitting on the table. This should be a friendly meeting. But for the panthers you can never be too safe. Still hampton does feel hopeful because right now. He's on trial for a robbery. he didn't commit. He needs legal health and he needs it now. Now just so happened that earlier today. He was at the courthouse when two white lawyers approached him and said they came to voice their moral support hampton looked in the eyes and said if they are serious about the revolution. They should come by the headquarters tonight. The two hand agreed and hampton felt grateful because not only could they help and fight these false charges they could help the panthers and large movement. Soon there's a loud knock. Downstairs and hampton exchanges looks with the men who stand by aside their two of his most trusted fellow panthers one lean silently against the wall holding heavy metal flashlight other carries a shotgun hampton speaks into the intercom was skip andrew from the legal assistance foundation. I'm here with my barner hampton onto this fellow panther who buzzes them in a moment later the two young white men in suits reached the top of the steps both look nervous but something has got tells hampton that he can trust these so he grins and gestures to follow his fellow. Panther stands with shocking. It's nothing personal. Skip it. it's good to see you. We've just got to be ready for anything. People aren't always who they say. Skip andrew one of the lawyers straightens his time not oh we understand and probably not a lot of folks you can trust these days right no not when the chicago police and the fbi trying to destroy the party. Anyway they can. Yeah those are pretty serious enemies. You've got so. So how can we help you with that fine. Well we need a legal team when you you to fight. The charges brought against the panthers and the state keeps trying to set me up. Get me convicted on crimes. i didn't commit. that's why when the struggle isn't just a black struggle to class and impacts us. All white people are welcome to join the cause. Well we we really want to help you friend we know chicago. Police are corrupt. Everyone knows that we believe in what the panthers are doing. But the legal assistance foundation doesn't allow us to work on criminal cases hampton size. This isn't the first time that white do-gooders let him down. Whether i don't think you can help us. Criminal charges are all we deal with. You heard them. At the courthouse they accuse me of robbing an ice cream truck one. That's the plan. I think jailing me over and over. We'll stop the panthers but we need to show them the wrong. Andrew looks down thinking not as you head turns to his partner and says a few words under his breath before the hampton. Well you know what we. We've got a partner jeffrey haas. He's an incredible attorney and specializes in civil rights law. Andrew then pauses weighing his words. So what. I'm thinking is one if we start a whole new legal office independent dedicated to representing the panthers fighting your find and using the law as our weapons. But i need you to understand that if you defend us. You could become targets yourselves. Career scare lives. You're putting it all at risk so yeah we could use your help. I want you to think long and hard about this well. I don't have to because someone said if you walk through life and don't help anybody then you haven't had much of a live. Hampton blinks the for a moment he's overcome with emotion. Those were his words. Thank you we've needed men like you for a long time and we're happy to help fred. Hampton smiles as he walks lawyers to the door for years he's faced harassment from police and those in power. They'll do anything they can to keep black americans from gaining equal rights and hampton has fought back every way he can and sometimes it feels like he's losing but that's not how we feel right now as he parts ways with two young lawyers hampton feels renewed sense of hope. It's time to back to work organizing and speaking making the world a more equitable place. Hampton thinks about deborah his fiancee and fellow black panther. Who's two months pregnant. He thinks about the black child that you into this world and now that he has legal support on his side hampton knows. There's no letting up. His work must continue. Its late fall. Nineteen sixty nine william. O'neill walks quickly through downtown chicago. He turns every few steps to make sure he's not being followed. O.'neil steps into a bar where the air smells like cigarette. Smoke and mildew is is adjusted the dim light. Neil scans the room. The skinny bartender is in his normal spot. Winding down mugs a couple wino- sit with their eyes drooping then o.'neil spot who is looking for balding white man in a dark blue suit sitting at the edge of the bar o'neill walks over takes a seat next to the man in orders scotch and soda. The man of history then slides a cocktail napkin. Toward o.'neil clicks a black ballpoint pen places it on the bar. He then tells o'neill to get to work. He needs the floor. Plan of fred hampton's apartment o'neill's drinker is and he pauses to take a deep swig. Feels like the scott burns more than it should as it goes down and o'neill dips his head. Thinking about the mess. Brought him here two summers ago. He tried stealing a car. That's when he was busted by the very man sitting beside him. Fbi agent roy mitchell. O'neill was given to choices. He could go to prison for grand theft auto or he could go undercover as a black panther and report back to the fbi. About the party's activities. Neil didn't have to think about it much if giving the fbi information would keep him out of prison. That was fine by him but now this meeting today on neo feels a slight pang of guilt. He's pretended to be a friend of fred. Hampton and deborah johnson. Not mention all the panthers and so he turns the mitchell and asks the fbi agent what he plans to do with this information. Why do they need hamptons for agent. Mitchell takes the last of his drink in orders another. then he turns to o'neill his breath sour with alcohol and says that is not his place to ask questions unless o'neill's tired of living on the outside. There's always a place for him in prison. If you want o'neill shakes his head and sips his drink. He doesn't want to go to prison. Freedom does taste sweet and so he begins. Explaining the floor plan of hamptons apartment. He says at hamptons pregnant fiancee. Debra johnson lives there too. Not to mention several other black panthers mitchell downs his drink and pushes a glass towards the bartender and he rises and says that this will probably be their final meeting pats. O.'neil on the shoulder tells them the have a nice night and then he walked out the barf. O.'neil rubs his face with his palms and orders and other drink. He looks around the bar and all the men drowning their sorrows. Everyone's running from something. Thanks a mistake something you can never take back on. The you'll knows that he's now crossed that line. He's not sure what the fbi will do with fred hampton's for plan but he knows it bad for hampton for his fiancee for all the people. O.'neil has gotten to know so when he can only hope that they make out mind. American scandal is sponsored by simply safe every twenty six seconds. There's a break in in this country but with simplisafe home security you can protect your whole home around the clock and that means you'll know your home family are always safe. Simplisafe gives you serious lasting protection and all it takes is a simple thirty minute setup. You'll even get a free security camera when you protect your home today. More on that in a moment with simplisafe you an award. Winning arsenal of sensors and security cameras that blankets every inch of your home. You set it up yourself in no time at all without any tools or wiring which means no technician or salesperson has to step foot in your home the years. I've installed my simplisafe system three times if you understand double stick tape. You are qualified simplisafe installer once. You're all set up simply safe or monitor your home around the clock. If there's an emergency immediately sent help to your home right now visit simplisafe dot com slash. As and get a free security camera plus a sixty day risk free trial with any new system order. So there's nothing to lose go today to simplisafe dot com slash a s. It's december fourth. Nineteen sixty nine denver. Johnson lies in bed asleep right now. She's in the middle of a dream. She's picnicking in lincoln park. It's sunny breezy day. And she's lying on a cool patch of grass but she's no longer pregnant stanford boy is a toddler. He's wearing red overalls. And he runs laughing toward his father. Fred hampton hampton. Grins and scoops. Her son he lays quick playful kisses on the boy and her son squeals into light. Johnson has never felt happier more. Peace suddenly the ground begins shake. It's louder becoming a deafening roar. Johnson opens her mouth to cry out. Her i shoot open. She's back in the real world back in her apartment in chicago and it wasn't just a nightmare. Apartment is full of terrifying noises. Pounding footsteps screams. Johnson jumps out of bed instinctively holding her large belly. She's still eight months pregnant whatever's happening. She has to protect this baby. Johnson freezes at the sound of gunfire and shattering glass. She can't see who's doing the shooting. What is clear. The panthers are under attack. Johnson turns back towards the bed. She sees at hampton. That somehow still asleep. She shouted him to wake up his eyelids flutter and he begins to lift his head but then he sets it back down again. Johnson screamed so loud. Her throat feels like is going to tear open. She shakes hamptons shoulders. But he won't wake up. Fellow panther appears in the doorway and shouts at johnson. Get down. there's a series of more shots than plaster comes bursting off the walls white cloud of dust. There's another bay. Johnson sees the panther in the doorway. Take a bullet to the stomach tumbling to the floor. Suddenly the shooting stops. Johnson hears heavy footsteps approach soon. A policeman fills the doorway. He's a towering figure with a shaved head is is travel over her body and he sneers johnson pulse wroclaw's tight but he marches into the bedroom and grabs her by the arm. He flings her into the hallway. Johnson trips over the wounded panther that just fell and the second officer pushes pastor into the bedroom. Hamptons still lies asleep. Johnson knows she should warn hampton. All she can manage is an incoherent stouter. Another police officer dripping with blood. That isn't his own tells her shop. He drags her to the kitchen. That's when johnson. Here's an officer in the bedroom. Asked hampton the still alive then two gunshots ring. Johnson puts her face in her hands. She knows what's happened. She doesn't even need to hear the other officers. Say that hampton is good and dead now twelve hours later. Jeffrey hall sits in a dark bar drinking as fast as he can. The bar is crowded and other people bump into him but he doesn't react. he barely notices. Every part of his body is numb aside from his chest which feels heavy with a doll lake. Haw sometimes comes here after work to sort through his thoughts but today there's nothing to sort through. He has only one thought and repeats in a loop. Fred hampton his dead. Ause the lawyer who works with the panthers and he saw him to net the law suit. Couple of days ago hampton was talking about political education programs for the poor who's powerful larger than life but that all changed this morning ran four thirty. Am when hampton was murdered alongside another member of his group miraculously seven panthers survived including deborah johnson. But that's small comfort hospice with johnson. This morning what he learned about the raid will haunt him for the rest of his life. Ha's knows that he'll need to keep fighting to get justice for hampton but right now he doesn't have to strike haase's just about or another drink when he looks up at the tv in the corner on the screen is the illinois attorney general according to the news reports the attorney general orchestrated the raid on hamptons apartment. He's bringing criminal charges against the surviving panthers claiming they attacked police officers during the raid. Ha's feel sick to his stomach has watches the state's highest law enforcement official line. He so distraught that he barely notices a white middle-aged man taking a seat at the next barstool man. Let's glass and salutes the tv screen heard. The cops only got two of those panthers which could have been there would have helped him get a few more house glares at fury taking over his thoughts. And you should stop talking. What did you say you heard me. What's wrong with you on their site. You actually support what those animals are doing shooting cops running around with guns. They're terrorists they're human beings is what they are. They just want the same rights. You and i have Give me a break up. There started to shoot at. They got what they deserved. You shoot a cops the cops shoot back as one thing. slams his glass on the bar what they deserved for the cops to leave them alone. That's not what the god is it now. The cops ambush them because the attorney general. He doesn't like that. The panthers criticized the cops are being dirty and corrupt which they are in you know it. He doesn't like what fred hampton stood for for. Yeah what's that revolution revolution. My friend one that is long overdue. Haas finishes his beer and stands man glares at him eyebrows. Raised that that on tv. That was murdered. I'm gonna prove it haas heads for the exit. He's determined he's going to keep digging and pushing and fighting in court until all. The panthers are vindicated and the official lies are exposed. He won't stop until the world knows. The truth about fred hampton's death has has walked through the dr chicago streets. He remembers the last four words. That fred hampton ever said to him. Forwards panthers often say to each other in greeting and farewell power to the people hoster into corn and brees in the cold december air. He quietly repeat the words to himself power to the people. Jeffrey hawes spent the next thirteen years working to prove that the fbi and the chicago police department conspire to murder. Fred hampton he ultimately succeeded and showing that. The official account of the rate was aligned. Ballistics data revealed that chicago police fired. Nearly one hundred shots into hamptons apartment. There was only one shot fired in. Response the official account of the raid was alive surviving. Panthers were cleared of criminal charges. Ha sued for damages and nineteen eighty-three the city of chicago cook county and the federal government paid a settlement of one point eight million dollars which went to the survivors of the raid as well as the families of hampton and his fellow panther who died. Ha's legal team. Also use subpoenas to uncover internal fbi b. i. documents that proved to be damning. The file showed the co intel pro. The top secret. Fbi program was focused on the destruction of the black power movement as well as its leaders. Such as fred hampton using the documents he unearthed hamas has claimed at the fbi coordinated with local law enforcement in preparation for the deadly raid. In twenty twenty has described the murder of hampton as the most well documented case of domestic assassination by the us government. Many also believe that the fbi was responsible for hamptons inability to wake on the morning of the rain. They claim that the night before hampton had been drugged. By william. O'neil the fbi informant twenty. Five days after fred hampton staff denver. Johnson gave birth to their son. Fred hampton junior. Both are activists to this day. Hampton didn't live to see the opening of an integrated public swimming pool in his hometown. But in two thousand six the bust of hampton was erected outside may woods. Fred hampton family aquatic center beneath the bosses of plaque inscribed with the following hand. You find leave. I'll be back. And when i do come back i'll be back to stay and join the revolution next on american scandal and nineteen seventy-one eight antiwar activists plot to steal documents from an fbi office of pennsylvania. The truth stan cover will forever change the bureau and the country from wondering this episode. Three of the fed's versus the activists for american scandal. If you like our show please give us a five star rating lever review to tell your friends subscribe on apple podcasts. Spotify the wondering how or wherever you're listening right now. Join one replacing the one. Listen you'll also find some links and offers from our sponsors the episode notes supporting them house us keep offering our shows for free another way you can support. The show is by filling out a small survey wondering dot com slash survey to tell us what topics might cover next. You can also find us and me on twitter search for hashtag american scandal. Or follow me at lindsey graham. Be sure to listen to my other. Podcast to american history tellers and american elections wicked game a quick note about our reenactments in most cases. We can't know exactly what was said but all are dominant stations are based on historical research. If you'd like to learn more about the fed's versus the activists. We recommend the book. The assassination of fred him by jeffrey haas. American scandal is hosted edited and executive produced by mean lindsey graham for airship audio editing by molly bach. Sound design by derrick barnes. This episode is written by hannibal. Ds added christina mossberg. Our senior producer is gabriel. executive producers. Are stephanie jen's jenny lower backman and her non lopez for wondering. Imagine your apparent nervously pacing around your injured child hospital room. A doctor begins asking you question. After question about how your kid got hurt you begin to realize that they are asking about your involvement in the accident. Where were you when he fell. How did he actually fall. And then you slowly start to see that they think you hurt your child intentionally from wondering and nbc news do no harm is the terrifying. True story of a family torn apart by the system that was supposed to protect them investigative reporter. Mike hicks nba. Chronicles what happens to the bright family. When they're three kids are ripped away from them and the shocking moments that came next with exclusive captured as the events unfolded. Do no harm takes you inside. The most harrowing moments of the bright families fight to protect their children. Subscribe to do no harm on apple. Podcasts join wondering plus in the wondering app to listen one week early and ad free.

hampton Panthers Fred hampton fbi Hampton Johnson hampton maywood fred Hoover chicago johnson illinois city hall russia Edgar hoover neill black panther party O.'neil intel
Raw & Uncut Inches

Unproductive & Unapologetic

00:0-1 sec | 2 years ago

Raw & Uncut Inches

"Right. All. Say you just thought he was at a Fox News county. What's up everybody? Hey here. That was gonna happen. How? Everybody. Mouth. Got the Mike and his mouth combat. Jim. Hey show has started. I got fix this. One for real. He called you deal. Scott. Oh. Hey, brennan. Thanksgiving. You hit them too. Unproductive an unapologetic. We are back with your thanksgiving episode. How was everybody giving? Test especially it was hard. It was awesome. We'll be going to talk about it for a little bit DJ. Drink too. Pick up. Girls. Touchy. No me. Smell like fun. Fine. Hey, it's your boy. Okay. Johnny O. H underscore K G underscored Johnny next to me is issue boy waves and catch me on Instagram waves underscored DC, that's what Z not a s next to him is rip the spiritual gangster missed the I am. I am everything wanna being nothing. You can make me next to him got. I'm just regular. Got you a N D? You Scott next to him is remain man, Little's Instagram. One one two six next to him issue. Boy, Sunday, mother love call me, Tom Cruise mission impossible. If you come back. Get rid phone check. Anyway, how was your thanksgiving? Everybody youthful beautiful. Tell me about it. What was your favorite thing you eight? Yes. What was that Thursday? A woman Saric. Joke you off so serious joking. Turkey my mom took. Oh, yeah. Who else who else who has something? Good. Sweet potato pie. That's cute. Nobody pumping. A nanna put. Putting and I know he made me some of that. I know he made. Put your wife made it. No plea. She she made you a special dish. I didn't share with anybody. Of course, not. What did you? I don't remember him. Oh. So sorry. For thanksgiving. I'm slipping tonight. It must be this wind. I blame you. We have a special guest in the building we won't give her opportunity to say her name extra extra special. Nicole, aka, the booty builder. Oh, wait a minute. And that wasn't in Iraq. Go ahead. Explain. This Budi building a personal trainer. And that's what I do. Nice. I'm like, Dr Miami. Okay. You know, natural. Oh, absolutely. What's your Instagram? So sort of people out there can know to inspire inch fitness. You put that in. 'cause I see some nice snacks meals. I'm point. I'm point. All right. The build it is in the X. Question. What is the most challenging part about building booty? Consistency. Gotta be willing to get up and do it. Okay. Okay. Anybody can build a booty. Really? Question. I'm like anybody can do really. So so average was like what's the timeframe because I've seen some some voters that need building. And I'm just curious. Nothing's overnight. Okay. So some people be like I'm trying to be like, I'm adding on the table win swat. Swat work that way. So you gotta eat it there you got to build it. Live girl to be afraid to lift weights. So, but what you what you doing is still full body body. Wow. I think they didn't put that in. Sharman, you know, still to be. Shit. Damn. Why are we on it? How long have you been a personal for the last eight years? Professional for ru how long would you say, you think it takes the average woman to build her booty too? Everything at least ninety days. But I mean to really see some stuff one hundred twenty days to really see it. One hundred twenty days like diet, exercise all that. Got to build a Bassa. You gotta be consistent with it such as social media, people know inch by inch fitness. Right. Bieber. Nobody knew how to respond. Because I think I think the fake booties have like tried to take over the world. Laura definitely do. All look alike now. We just saw. Difference, absolutely different. You can tell us though, like to look at you know, the volume down. She looked good. But you don't even look at the ads ratio that that ratio the way it sits up or the way it's pushed out, and it don't move look crazy. You hit it on the hair because I'll be going at my time. I can't tell who thinking this is the girl in Tommy. So if you arms looking. The whole body. Absolutely. Don't they're all going to the same doctor. So they faces look like the bodies look alike. It's like build the body and getting I think too much praise is going to the fate body. Yeah. We need we need. You know, we thank me wrong. Natural girls are still winning. We still win it. But. Especially have feathers. I mean, we're going record and say that seat, but the thing is Donald really care. No more. On to do some news out there. Definitely don't care. I'm sure I king. Jani king. Care about the fake order room. I don't want. I don't want. But how did you say you never had fake booty? But he don't know either. What to say, I even mean the trans fat transfers. See discussion. Right. They. Build it came from. This move down. Like, you know when the to pace. Because I've always under this belief like okay a transferred, then we rock with with with the silicone. Which each is own China and again natural. I you know, I worked with so. Bright productive trouble over. On your podcast app. Google play music beyond par player. FM pod chaser podcast addict, just Google unproductive unapologetic, and we have. What is it the booty fix it? Boody? A new train. But I didn't know. Booties my classes butts in good. Whatever. Ladies come through the class. Love when. Retro fitness Atlanta. Oh, okay. Eight o'clock and Saturday mornings at ten thirty AM. Saturday. Definitely down for that. So you don't forget. Onto the Instagram. You might come Wednesday might change will be going to build our booty too. I mean. I mean. Let me say this. So when I have been in the class actually change ultra some things for you guys do. But it's the be similar to what they're doing. Women do glue. Nice pulling on we'd like to. Because this these to a question now, we we have been talking on his show about a lot about male female relations. And I'm under the belief that a female chooses a ga- academy. Choose a female, let me okay. So you. Yeah. Okay. So gas thing they got all these chains or they dress so fly all all this stuff. But typically a woman knows whether she going rock, which you're not from the time. She meet you. It's not what you say. Or what you do you agree with? Right. Doc talking about. I don't think I think women choose me is this point per game. Now, women got it. Women got bass, he's. Flags. Absolutely awesome. I mean, you always meet a person's Representative anyway. So it looks good. It sound good. But then when you come third four months. Because you because you you work out and you train and you put a lot of emphasis on your Z. Do you get of a female's when they see you? They assumed that your your body is not real. I actually girls walk up some touch my ass. Hey, don't bother me as much. But I mean, it'd be like damn this axe me, you know, what I mean. You know what I mean? You know, what it's not even? Upset because they think is fake it. Don't look fake. All not lumpy. But like don't look right put together like this because I've I've been out with my lady, and they female see her, and they just automated some because she's she's so in her, but since so nice thank thing. Oh, she has got to be fate. I'll be looking at girls. Eight. But I am magin that happens. You know, what I'm saying because it's so much emphasis on booties nowadays or just by these amongst women, and I know how women could be kinda catty, especially if they don't have the by because they'd be the ones under your comments like posting. These naked pictures should know. What's funny, though? I'm allowed to get that I can husbands contact me work drop. My wife off. Where can I bring my girlfriend? You know what I'm saying? Like that. Business. Training. That's all right enough about. Go all men men who can't find a woman to treat them. Right. Is there for this best? Best. What is definitely in the group? Okay. Guided knows how to treat them this guy. That knows how to communicate he's respectful empathetic helpful has great. Dick knows how to cook takes them on trips of buys them gifts. He does all of these things the perfect guy, but do ya'll know how to treat this, man? Once you find them oftentimes chicks, fine, this guy and still treating him the way they treated the last week. And this Nick knows his wife. He's looking at you leg most times, you actually how they're going to treat them. She's gonna say I'll cook for him and give them some pussy. I'm like that's all I'm worth pussy and chicken chicken with come with something that every other woman ain't got like I've never met a chick that eight. Now, you wanna negative by gift for Valentine's Day Christmas? Your birthday Veterans Day, all of these things all you got to offer his fried chicken too. That's why we don't settle. I personally only wanted me with a chick. That knows how to treat a nigga that knows how to treat a woman chick. Day go here. Okay. So. I agree with him. Will you think about men and? I'm not gonna say every relationship female certain relationships with the female. The female. Like, he said, no anything that. You can Gable values some pussy and some food. And you know, what I'm saying relationship is more than that. So. I'm not gonna say every feels that way. Because there's some is a lot of shallow guys. Guys this into just debt that thing. But a certain guys that want to one more than than just put a good meal, but I'm actu- is that kind of us guys is that kinda fault because that's sort of like how we all. And I agree with you. I agree with you. Because usually guys approach usually it's around in. That was after that goes to show you how most guys don't feel like dealing with conflict. Right. So we don't feel like going with the back and forth with a female having certain conversations with a female and stuff. So we leave it suggests. Okay, we're fine. As long as we getting some good pussies some good. Hey. We're not known to express these needs that we say we are looking for a woman. So they figure oh, well as long as I being seed, and everybody's all good, partly is is like you would say like seventy percent, I'll fold. Probably ninety. I tried to Sweden. You know, if I say this all the time like fellas you would think once you reach a certain age that you start looking for more substance. I think that usually don't happen. Because usually if you got a good strong woman, or whatever at home, and you fuck up who you know, me fucker inning. Another good strong woman is some dingy. You know what I'm saying? They don't have nothing to offer. But that so it puts women in a mindset of this is all gas. What do I got a point? But. You go you exactly right in that goes to to the point way. If a guy's in a relationship, he's not getting what he wants. And that relationship he jokes to another girl and all he wants from. That of a girl is some good food and some good sex. So it's like a. Is like so we not we not demand. I'm not gonna I'm not gonna use the word demanding we not expressing what we want in our national. No, we go to the sap piece or the side, schickel, whatever we only look at full this certain thing. Then all women think that this will be one exactly I think, I think too. It's like you said, I don't think he's being communicated a think that a lot of people don't know how to communicate what they want people know what they want to run into it. You know what I'm saying? You know what I'm saying? So I feel like the new woman to today's woman is very headstrong, very, she's a boss. You know what I'm saying? So her time is not what it should have been should be in my traditional and a lot of ways. But I feel like, you know, as a woman today that making good money and getting it and helping your man out and all that it should be important. You know, but nowadays are not in the kitchen anymore. They're not taking care of their man. Like, they need to not a thing. Whereas you come home from working ten hours. And then, you know, you're gonna get some it's like Negga. I've been worth these. It up on the show saying exactly that we get these. We Sala time guy talk about oh, you know. I'm gonna take care of my woman. I'm gonna do this. I'm like women nowadays. Don't want to be a stay at home. Mom, all working. Okay. So, but it also wanna know that their man can take care of the home. If need be no doubt me too. If I'm gonna if I'm going to submit to my man, and he needs to be the head of home. Absolutely. Because I was reading a book the way of the superior, man. Verge mastering the challenges of women were sexual desire. Book was saying was like a lot of times men have to be they have. Relationship. It depends on what type of what type of masculinity you express. If you like alpha male then. You more tracked it to feminine female, if you more of a feminine male, then you more attracted to a masculine female. As as coacher today's coaching, especially in the black community. You have a lot of women who are used to be masculine. So would you do when dealing with those masculine women like if you not a mask, if you not a masculine new she's going to dominate you. And she shoes. When you think about how coach especially black coacher. A lot of black females are are put in a position to be masculine why? But they're forced to they're forced to. I mean, you gotta understand like today's men. So I feel like the rose of have reversed. And I feel like it's our fault as women because my son I have a two year old, and I don't baby him. You know what I'm saying? I mean, I'm has he knows mommy's here all that. But a lot of these young men growing up don't have a mask a man in the home show them how to be men. So they grow up some of these mini still boys. And they don't know, you know. So as women, you know, we're single family homes, having a raised whatever. And now is a lot of these model boys out here who run into the mama who you know, who? They put in a position where they have in the raise more than one one show. Yeah. Oh, but listen, the whole clip scene. Can a women head to a man when he's the man that they went to be we just sat here, bashed all the men when the Massey can the women handled the man that they want which I didn't understand why we was talking about men. Went down a row. But what are we talking about women here? I can jump on that. I feel like I feel like a lot of times people don't deal with their bags before they jump into something else. So like you said, you know, you get a good, man. And you don't know what what you got. Because you still stuck on what you was just in you. You can't see him. You know what I'm saying? So the issue is also she hasn't been taught how to treat a man. It's not. It's not necessarily that. It's it's more is more or less her watching her mama or against the kids. These kids raising kids. You know what I'm saying? They don't know respect it. I see now where I've never liked called Amana bitch. Never. And I see that more. Now, I see that whole play fight stuff going. Whoa. Does. She does smack him. And I mean to me there's no respect between us. You know what I'm saying? So it's a little different now when you win we were today and here came out the relationship, and I ended up my shit, and you try to show me XYZ, the moons of styles and all this nigga. Fuck you, you probably just like this other negative. It's not your fault. But again, there's the maturity of having to know that she needs to deal with chill people walk around their broken broken people. You know what I'm saying? Would you say? If I could. Thursday, we covered a lot. To be ISIS possible. Going going back to the clip. The brother was saying there's a lot of women when they find a good, man. They really don't know how to deal with them. Basically all they know how to do is give him sex and food. I would say that's a lot of people have been in relationships that are built on anything tangible, and you're not built on anything tangible, basically sex and food is enough. Because the only reason which was because of the way you look, so if I'm just which you look all I cable was the sex and the food is actually a bonus. So there there is a look every man is not your baby. Daddy, every man is not your horrible ex-boyfriend awesome. Good men out here, regardless of what you and the words Johnny regardless of what your girlfriends told you this good men out here. And when they they look a for a woman to treat them the way, they treat they and that can be difficult to find. Because woman is always going to have a guard up. A woman is always going to be protecting. And the woman is always going to believe you just like the rest of. But until you hold on. Now get back to what Nicole was all about. She was and we were talking about the families. She was saying she felt like. A lot of things that happen on paraphrase. In a lot of things that happened may have been the the woman's fall. And again, I'm I'm paraphrasing. I would say a lot of things that happen to us as as as as a people was was was done by design. And I think it's very important that you have when you're raising children, you have a masculine and feminine energy in the household because a child needs both, unfortunately. We have a history where we have a lot of single-parent mothers that were raising children. And a lot of these women have told their kids. I'm your mother and father, and that can be very confusing and unfortunately. Too many single mothers. I'm not saying oh too. Many single mothers are raising children or put it on demand. Or raising young boys to be the man that they wouldn't want to be with themselves. Small question. Unfortunately. When you saying single raising boys, I use some black mothers. I'm talking about our people. Yes. Okay. Just talking about all of them. I'm not talking about all of them. All right. But I'm talking about unfortunately, too many. But it is important for a child to have that masculine and feminine energy as will. And there was another thing we touched on drawn a blank, we talked to so many stuff. When women are put in this situation. I mean, let's just beyond like, we know a lot in bullshit. So it ain't it ain't a situation where we like on the woman said. Will all put it on all on Negus? But we know a lot of situations away dues ain't doing what they supposed to do. But when it comes down to like, Scott was saying you have to have a masculine you have to have a feminine. It shouldn't be on the woman to be being to have that masculine energy as well as feminine energy. The one is supposed to have that feminine energy. And then in the gospels have that mask, and I'm sorry. You say look if the the father of the child if he's not in a good place, if he can't responsibilities grandfather on a football coach of passed a teacher, somebody to be to it to just show on this is what a positive male role model is don't let them hang out with the gang bangers and the gangs because he will hit way. Absolutely. But she said she says something early on that was very key. And the keeping she say, it was that most people don't really know what they want because most people don't really know what they want we fumbled in bumbled alone. So in the meantime, while we fumbling and bumbling along the child suffers from that in bumbling. And so like we say guys out here. Trying to do whatever they trying to do and women trying to find the guy that they think they they supposed to have need to have. But at the end of the day, nobody is really getting to the meat. What a relationship is opposed. What you're supposed to build a relationship on? And that's why merges relationships don't let it's not built on any. It all comes down to. You know on yourself if a woman don't notice openings this off for her to be to teach somebody being woman, and if a man don't know who he is as a main hall for him to teach of Maine to be a main. Absolutely, absolutely. Let me tell you. What thing would I go bad woman only allow you to if would allow you to feed her some type of way, treat it that way. So that's how I feel about the home subject. Says. Listen. That's what you. No, I always true. What is it? Always go to listen. If I meet somebody. And we're at a at a state where she told me what it is. What is going to be? I have a choice when she throw her. 'cause I have a choice to be a, you know, anything about did with if she likes our one beat the next person. I talked to be Myrna. More than likely betting. I want a roll out. But if she just having fun by about I'm gonna have fun with you too. You know what I'm saying? So it's more about how the women allow you to treat her with the whole situation. So if I'm showing you something different. If most women tell you what they will off the break, see fails. All listen, we're gonna let Iraq. It sounds a little different than how he just explained it. Okay. So when you say, you know, I mean, I'm I'm a dude where she allow me to do when a sense how they came off. It was kinda like standup guy would integrity respect for yourself. Then you know, how you are going to treat her what she say because you know, what's right from wrong. You know what I'm saying? Like I treated that way because you need to get your life. Whatever live, and I'm not going to do this. Quite the same. The person as. Your point is still valid because there's a lot of guys they'd think like you. Absolutely. But again a lot of loss. Little Salat of women are here. These women are growing up thinking is one way this one. This is not you know, what I'm saying. Again, me come from. I was security police and in the school. I used to have girls run up to me, you know, oh office Hinton, I need, you know, talk to you. Like what's up? None of the girls. Don't do that. They will say, you know, something like, you know. Oh, yeah. I felt forced to perform do this on these two guys because they watched a parent mama's out here just doing like, nobody meets my son. What I'm saying? I'm gonna be excellent day or you can bring your son like Brown. No. You have -solutely. Absolutely. It was something solid going on. And then you met his father. I and he was like all right, cool whatever, but it's different nowadays. It's like whatever the respect that you show right now. I'm not a big what you say. But, but that's the thing when a man talked to a woman that's show respect for herself. He show respect to her. So if I'm talking to you, I'm like, hey, you should bring yourself cool. Cool. Because of that must be no out here if he has his whole which way he'll face, but he's not gonna say. Say he's his mama was different type of man this. You know, it's not competed doing anything, it'd be not going to be okay. Two. My single be hope. Not. And it's all good because I believe in that go through your stage. You gotta go through that. Like, my mom, always say girl, you're too young to be relationships. Like, they're like. By out your system. So that when you get that man, you've you stray good. No, man. So anyway, yes, y'all making value valid points. So that leads us into the Macy's aid that came out. There were no father black father figure in the right? There was no traditional black family. So they have what they had to get ahead. I had a a white family. It was modify kids. A gay and throw it was a black male a white male a black kid in the white kid in the head. A black a black family, which just the mother, then they had a all white family with the mother and the father in the white keys. They wanna show you that like many strong for. That's I look at that whole the reason. X where he talking about black people in tech, you know, overdue. The whole. Delaware state. Is that reality to a lot of people? I don't I don't believe that though. Because only reason I say our reason I say, I don't believe that because they talk about like black. You'll be able to win. This just the way they talk about. White people with it. The most. Say just like they say they like to trae like we don't want all the Robin killing show white people doing it all the time all the time. Although it may not be statistically, correct? It's still some truth to it. You know what I'm saying? That's why save so true. So it's not telling the whole story because there are a lot of black fathers out here being fathers. What I'm saying? What I'm saying? Four right, man. The family like that division visionary. With the family part is in our in our community is or is it I was saying to somebody of day. I'm starting to have a beef with this whole narrative that all black may do was run out on their children because I'm like, I said back about it. I say I don't ever friend that I can think of that's not actively involved in their child's life. So for me personally. This is bullshit as a it. Everybody. Eighty showed up that game. Right. Right. The people in charge subscribing to the age old thing that no black black men. Don't take your keys. I think they should they should have a job for doing that. It's a holiday to spread Christmas cheer. Everyone had representation so street black man in the family, you got three kids, and no man and. Right everybody. Everybody is represented looking happy. And I don't think it's fair. I think whoever's responsible need to be because that's. Black men that are innocent children. That's the thing. That's what you're only hitting is the children's life this. These are these are black. These are men in their family. This is a family unit. So there are a lot of black families. The black man is not there. White people though, it is. But that's true there. You know what I'm saying? So that's not overlooked the job before you go before he was crazy about because I just looked at it. She had three Soanes, bro. Her like, it ain't like two daughters in the sun. John. The mother was with Chang. I thought the mother was was because when I first saw I say, well, we can't Burs. 'cause I was wondering to children. Things ugly. I was like wait gentleman's ugly, but to but to push their I mean, we know there is some truth to push that narrative, I think is kind of bowl. Yeah. And I think it's kind of it shows how powerless we are when it comes to. That level of business or whatever. Because I find it hard to believe it was if it was a black man on that board would they let that right? Look, she looking she liked. You know what? Even even a net sense is that's always connected to the black family like this child. Support thing. It could be white people. We just don't know about Santa always go hand in hand. My son's father is not on child support. He's a good day. He may not be a good man to me. But separate the two as a woman that he's a good father to son. You know what I'm saying? All together. I mean, but as long as my son, which is the focus is good. He has his grand his grandfather's his father. You know what I mean? So I'm happy net instincts. You know what I'm saying? So anything else if I gotta take take take on the chance for that. You know, all that cool. My son good. You know what I'm saying? But that child support thing that bothers me. Oh my gosh. We've based this this conversation right now off of all if we if we've made social media the reality, then you will be nominal because you just say you say me and his relationship don't have nothing to do with my child. I don't have more child support. Which means you not on social media all day talking about how bad you'll baby daddies angle. Anger booty real you like. We go to woman land in bed with you got that clip. This is a topic. I don't think that's a clip. That was not a clue. Oh. So. She put this Twitter. She say I'm a bay with a nigga watching the movie, and he really watching this movie touch me once time to go y'all really my mentioned token about consent is midnight in I'm in my damn be. There is there is your consent book out of, hey. Is far. Lease to-to. Does she make the first move, bro? But let her go. I let her go first, please. That very true. But at the same time, I see both sides. You know what I'm saying? Because we always like damn Nick came over to do was fuck like. Right. Over what I'm saying? But I feel my clothes moths don't get fed. So you need to be you need to ask. What say? From around. Aggressive. You. I should take right now. Yes. How when you watching that you Netflix and chilling. Trying to make a move in. This goes back to conversation. We had the episode with about the rate. I was just about to say. Was just about to say. With it. I believe in the second. We never go into that personally saying on the show and record that I purposely don't make the first move because I never wanna be victim of her saying are forced her or pressured her or anything. So I'm that do I'm gonna do. I come over can get in the cubs with you lay in the bed. We could watch movie if you don't show me that you trying to own it, right? No way. Coda account. She all she got do is. Off all on the dick or something. Ready? She. Is she is she grazie grazie. All I have. I'm speaking. Bathing with a woman watching a movie, and we watched literally watch that movie, we fell asleep, whatever and nothing happened. Hey. She everytime after it went down because she said, hey, never been in a band with the nicotine. Yeah. Here saying from her from her perspective get what she's coming from. But from a mass perspective, it's a whole different ballgame because game that's the game. Which is. It is. Let me like. Interesting. He he running game. No that women are like, you know, all he's not into hang touch me. He do this. Oh what the fuck route? What the fuck route, Hoppy? It turns into gain. But in the end, the actual act of it. I wasn't running game. Like, I say my motto is I'm not making the first move. If you don't do something like you said rub. Your butt up on me or do the fake. Do the fake. Rupert right now. Why are you go to her house? Most of the time she coming over your house. Vice versa. She say she coming tonight. It ain't. That's the best place to watch moving fall asleep. Never situation. So we. But that's good. You you like you aggressive. Exactly, everybody's like that. And I get it. But what is he in your bed? If that's not what she wanted to go. But let's be thinking that. But he like would if she nights. Go back to the HOGAN. Okay. If she ain't your bay if she in your bay, I'll feel like that's a clear sign that you can make a move. But I feel like oh, but look. Of course, you do. But I feel like she has to be reciprocating some type of some type of energy. Subtle look if she's putting her fat because she couldn't her own you. She's like puppet her. But on you been showcased day doesn't sound right day quick hook. Like, okay. If she coming over your house to. Y'all watch movies. She'd be like she won't get coupled. Comfortable, she code or whatever you give her a blanket. She's like her parents. She just got her panties on she. What are you thinking? She's right. Okay. A real story we're here. So. Here. So. That's what I'm saying. Second hand on that. And when she do that, I will put the heat on her back. H. The moment the moment, she takes her paint soul machine as for blanket. She's cold cold. They pay them. Hey. But for the sake of this show in these cast members you better make show because I want nobody overweight child. These. What happens? I'll feel like I feel like if she's even. Little. Get it together. Cheesy. But coming over there at a certain hour, then you shouldn't even have to about X. No quite over. Grower. Not. Like that. Let me take. Don't walk into every situation. They get everyone is the same because you're going to be disappointed. But you can tell hall and like you say press a female aggressive females. It ain't going to be. You Don a grant. Joe? We just talked about this on the group shape agree soggy about like Greg was saying. Greg with saying like he feel like he can holler at any any cheap. He can get any cheap. So if you gotta do feel like he can get any cheese. Because this is what I'm saying. Especially if you've got. She said, she's I don't know. Okay. Okay. So. What was I saying? Oh, so an aggressive female. I want to say it ain't going to be hard to tell. It's neck won't be hard to tell you ain't gonna have to you know, man. I wonder what's gonna go there because she didn't already told you. It's going down the night. You know what I'm saying? It's these fake they wanted but don't want to say that they wanted 'cause they don't wanna be seen as undercover hope. But like I was saying I'm grown. I was saying. Look John saying like how great was saying. And the way that I will look at it is. I can get anybody that I want right. But this we know. No, it's not like that fucking. Having confidence and certain Nick is just don't wanna look at it like. Let me say this to now, I don't know how everybody is in a room and don't matter, but the twenty twenty what's the twenty eighteen the twenty the social media of women are different than before social media facts, fellas we can all agree on. So I heard it ladies. Scrapped addict than we know. So any anyway, I'm edit every time you said that probably take pot sue coming out on Tuesday. Yes, I will take enough. But anyway before social media. I feel like you had to put in a lot more work. Yeah. Yeah. You just feel like social media, you know, girls if you don't take her out wine and dine her on a couple of it was really put in work or you had the head that bomb. You know, rap game talk that stuff. Now to me. It seems like is a hole that more. Like you say aggressive women. That'll just say look, this is what I want is what I'm looking for. But it might be like you say earlier to that women are in a different place in life where they don't feel like they need that from a man. I know what I want. This is what I want come through that. And then go home. You know what I'm saying? It's just the dynamics is different. I came in early may. That's why it's funny to me now because I'm like. Because I came through where you had to put in that work. You don't say, so we're not get to talking to you not a couple of weeks. Give tricks. He gave me all this. We talk about politics. Like, oh this like the greatest because I came up during that era. Now, you're just his mind DM cinema pit and it boom. Boots all like, a false sense of self esteem conflict. That's social media stuff. You can do anything over social media. But in in the person's face, you won't have that same type of confidence. Most definitely. That filters girls taking the angles and sprite. You know, that's another shoe when you meet that girl off social realized, oh, you was just frightening. You know? If I could. Real quick. Just just going back going back to the post fellows. I'm trying to help you through through trial and error. Trust me wrong. If Scott if a woman is at the crib late at night, and she wants he talking about she wanted to watch it net flicks movie in the bed chances. She really don't want to watch. All right. So you got two days. But you guys don't watch many of these tapes. But you gotta shoot, you know, fell is don't be stupid don't punch nobody in the race to try to make them do nothing. They don't wanna do. Right. You gotta shoot you like John same. I women women know what they want. They going shoes. So if a woman's coming over your hose one o'clock clock in the morning. I mean, how will say I will say, here's a little isn't. You got a silly ones got to play right? If you've got a silly woman ain't no telling was running through her. But if you got a grown woman with since should not coming over your house, a certain time of night and going up into bed. She trying to. Having been the agrees which. I think it's a lose lose situation for men in that situation. Depend on what's girl comes to your house? If she comes over earlier and watch wants to watch movie, and you don't do nothing. She might look at you this any. This Nick any. Oh, that's all. Voda? I feel like if she coming over to your house Perry. She know what she wanted to do. So what hold up? Wave just say fool me if she wanna go out somewhere, she won't say you she wants. But if she coming over your house, did she know what's up, I'm gonna hit you with this. And then we'll move on. So like based off of what you say if she come to your house. She was coming forward. You know, what she wanted to what if she get there and change your mind. I mean, if she changed her mind it is designed. Let me let me take this. Sure. That's true. She she quick type type of dude. I am. I'm not gonna force you. Anyway, take your shirt over. Like, I mean, I'm not gonna push anyway. I don't care if you coming over. I'm just I'm yeah. I'm not sure and I'm gonna chill. What you regardless. I feel like I feel like either way I'm putting in work. So that poses about you. You know, it's. I hope. Bird. Shrimp. Say this that we move. Moshe? Oh, all the women. The same thing adult unless I. Scotty nutty. Calmness. Shit down follow that. Scotty, hey holiday season. Hopefully everybody, you know, got with a family or friends and loved ones sit down. We eat together. We have a good time. But. You know me. Oh, no. That the free breakfast program was started by the Black Panther party. This was in nineteen sixty nine the federal government did not have a federally mandated free breakfast program and January nineteen sixty nine and the church and Oakland the Black Panther party started the free breakfast program and within a few weeks. They went from feeding a handful of kids to hundreds at its peak. The Black Panther party fit thousands of kids per day and forty five different locations. J Edgar Hoover. Charge of the FBI said, and I quote, the free breakfast program is potentially the greatest threat to effort by thirties to neutralize the Black Panther party and destroy what it stands for J. Edgar who've actually sent FBI agents door to door. Tell him black parents that the Black Panther party would teach their kids racism, and that the food was infected with venereal diseases on that making this now this is the FBI in the nineteen sixties tell them black parents that the Black Panther party is going to teach their kids racism that to me is amazing. But. All today's did. You know is the Black Panther party started the free breakfast program, and basically newspaper articles media outlets pick this up. They were amazed to the Black Panthers. Feeding school kids with the Black Panthers. It was basically found out the research showed that kids. Learn more when they went to school on a full stomach. So they put the word out in the neighborhood. Send us your kids before they go to school will feed them. They'll learn better. Once this hit the media outlets. It got really popular it put political pressure on the federal government, and they federally mandated the free breakfast program nationwide. Number one because Jay Hoover was pissed off. And he wanted to story to Black Panther. So he's like what do everybody in the Black Panthers ain't got feet, nobody. So that's the days that you know, and to add to that Jay who was also across in a closet homosexual. Thank you. Scott. Not. Scotty with his segment teacher something. Do one more. And then we're going to get your views outta here. There was a clip about a gap paying dinner with a credit card. Okay. Live. Testing you and you podcast unproductive. Polly unapologetic on your podcast app. Google play music beyond par player. FM part chaser podcast addict and game requests on your Amazon, Alexa, box take you on a day. And then when it's time to pay. Here's the clip Alabama game real quick ladies, don't like these Negus play y'all don't let these Necas tell you don't take you on a day. And then when it's time to pay nigga wanna planet fucking credit card like like broadcasts. Nick, don't take me on day. If you got show on cash if you got all debit card. Don't take me on your day that ain't taking me all day metro Puckett credit card. You take me on a date with a fucking government because you're paying the damn government. But taking me on the damn day. Be another fucking date. Moore woman. I Bohm government dish out. Her. Okay. What's she talking about? What I got. At the end of the day. She's not paying for shit know, exactly. Why does that matter? Hodel? But first of all, you don't pay the government ways, you pay your credit card say, it's different ways you pay with a credit? I'm a Sunday. Hey, we not gonna have a whole topic. In dispute about a woman who obviously came read. Move on the credit card ignorant credit card. I guarantee you that government you pay the government. Hey, come from. So what's his dating preferences purposes? Bodybuild member we were talking about bathing purposes in spies. Oh, we were talking about Jill, Scott not. I gotta. Would you? Now, we talk about a booty builder. Would you date a female bodybuilder? Strong about how strong they. All about competition. We talk about we talk about a chick where and. Ebbs and he. Better than me. No. Users use code. Okay. So a woman with with six pack based like you said, basically, her body is more cut ripped more than you know, you can still be I don't even look feminine. I tell you. I would now go. Dater first of all she will give me she. So that's number one number two hours will be so fired because. Going going and going and going. And that we done around should go. Eat lettuce. That was a joke though. But for I would date her. If I was attracted tour, I would because I have dated people. That's know me for a while. They know dated women of all different shapes and sizes and looks never dated two women that look look the same. So if I was attracted to okay little if you if she's attractive handsome feminity about her. Okay. Super Manley Joya I've seen so she can't be like those. Hi, my negative. Okay. Okay. I mean, you know, I will say August as long as long as she hopes she hosts. Why Scott say is she knows femininity? So we're okay. Okay. All right. Well, I think I would I'm not normally attracted to that. Like, you know, cut up muscular. But you know, if she got a nice personality and. Booze date a bigger. What the fuck? No, why would you say the big? The bigger probably not. The best people in the world. I like my girls BB w. Question is why not. That's not what you're trying to. I mean, they Bernie, but yeah, it's not what I'm attracted to as in like the physique. You know, it's a lot of pretty big girls. But that just not what attracted so. Twin? Throw at you. So these sort of juice video. Oh, that's not. She can give me some. Hey. Oh my God. To do exactly. No. I mean, I feel a little different because as a trainer, you know, if I dated bigger guy than I'm just going to take with me, and we don't work out. Okay. Okay can change because see you look at look like this today and three months later, look like him. What's that movie when chick Ohio? No. Jay, right. What she lost all the weight. He he regretted this main because I work out a man in a more play. Thank you. She just say what I was say. When you get a certain age Dow innocent, don't go out the window. The day. I'm not there yet. I needed negatives in the channel. Okay. Because I'm just talking about like the Jim Jim or like this. What type of? Talking about. Are you talking about? Right. Name. Worth a spelled J. I like, you know, what I mean? Like a like to feel like I want to jump on him every time. I see him. So you saying big do can be strong. He can be but he needed to be able to see his shit too. So you you. So you say he needs to match. Effort. And everything. Okay. Okay. And everything. Winning go watch her not dead. Every week. Maybe ready. No. Joke. Come back at three months, then what she was gonna say shit. Shit. Oh. Let us you, bro. The ripper. Views. The Brian for today follows quite quite if follows into this. So. I was very unproductive today. The river puts the code daily practice so daily practice, so. A lot of. So we talk a lot about daily practices. We we want to be positive. We want to work out. We want to get in shape, those type of things, but when it comes down to it is all about daily practices. Okay. Ailey practices. Okay. So. Real. Real. 'cause I gather. Right at it. Okay. Daily practices. So you hear a lot of times a lot of people talking about they wanna get in shape, and they wanna be more positive. They want to do this. They wanna do that. But when it comes down to is all about it being a daily practice that want to get in shape. It comes down to it being a daily practice. Working out every day eating, right? Even if you not working out is eating, right? Ms mad, plenty of towns where I took a week off of working out. But I'm eight should that eight is plenty of times. I wanted to stay positive and. Affirm- myself took every day to affirm. So so when you think about. You wanna be positive? You wanna work out? You wanna be this way? You wanna change this? You wanna change that? It's a daily practice. You have to take every day to change the things that you wanna do if you always a negative person. You always looking at this way, my wife getting on my nerves my kids getting them a nurse. It takes a day where you have to look at the positive. You have to work out. You have to do this. You have to do that. It's all about positive is a daily practice of what you wanna do. So when it comes down to it take every day to look at the positive of each situation is you're drunk. As I say, but not I'm going to the gym in the morning. Talking to me. Okay. That's all. Goth who to me I thought God. Thank you, answer, gym and work out. This is one of her no lie. I'm back. We. But it was it was true. Data's photo before I went play ball today. Oh. Everybody. Listen, listen. Oh, my so I'm gonna start hitting the gym everyday warning. And rip just spoke to me. All that. But definitely. I Jim also I ain't gonna lie. It was on productive. So we leave it at that. The code is. Should you sorta? What we do here with the reviews, and we're gonna get outta here. All right. I got a three quick reviews for you. Okay. Star with the movie. Yes. So code escape from. Two weeks ago? And it doesn't come out to the middle of January preview. Hope Fassi is she become January. Negative people shutting. Escape from you. Probably don't recognize you probably people from the movie time movie Lawrence from insecure. Okay. And Karen from daredevil, she's the main woman endured over she also played true blow. Her basically six people get invited to this building to to join a escape from game. The winner gets one hundred thousand dollars if you escape, and they turn it turns out to be not a game one three star down. Basically think of it like a a soul movie without the bloody. Because it's rated PG thirteen. Show catching it was decent. I wouldn't go to the theater and see the free. So okay, I'm gonna say gonnit expensive movie ticket. Okay. Movie ticket waiting for Netflix. However, Marcus sees his movies. We're not gonna get that right now. It wasn't even Lovie escaped room. It comes out early. So we did that. Is not much. Stalls premise, but it was there's only so much. You can show PG thirteen should have been rated. Gotcha. Okay. All right next movie is movie, I was forced to see over text message by John. That's. That's. Moving. What did you think? It was. You're welcome. Robinhood stars tearing Eggerton from the Kingsman movies. If you saw those and Jamie Foxx who is known for its fake Carolina beard. They stars Robin Hood and little Joan knows, basically if you know, the Robin Hood story you've seen at a time. Robin Hood and little Johnny steal from the rich. Give to the poll. Nottingham? It's the white man shooting arrows. Okay. Thank you. I was dead ash though. Action packed movie some blades. Very enjoyable me. Give that a three. Good is every into the whole way through the whole like like famine into what he's in home movie. Okay. Okay. Now into the best movie. I saw since episode. Chris widows widows stars by Davis. Michelle Rodriguez common Kalou out sunk in place, if you don't know. If you don't know who plays paper, Atlanta. Basically the stories about four wives of some criminals who just tried to rob Dame Kalou and pay for two million dollars robbed them. And then they were killed. They a robbing them too. So they put the pressure on the full today. Got a return that money. And then some so holiday was finds a handbook with her husband's we've Liam Neeson. Okay. He was planning a robbery in the future. So they put the pressure on the wives to commit that robbery to return that money or they're gonna come. Oh, wow. Wow. So it's basically them building a friendship over there lows and during the robbery very good move one of the better movies. I saw this year. Wow. I wanna see fifty two movies. Wow. Oh that at the end of the move. No. When the movie the husbands. Call widow. Saying if you're coming to see Liam Niessen in the movie and all the other people that played the husband's like, the do the punisher. He's one of the husbands. The movie comes on. The rest is all about the wives. It's probably under a star is born. Probably give it a four. Okay. Very good active. I Davis is one of the night in Hollywood. I'm gonna check it out. You're going tonight. You're going to movies. Do that to me? Yes. I am. Also another. Also quick review also free to Monday would rip. It was excellent. Not as good as the first one. But very good movie. So the first one was better. I was you commit sit out sit. Get deep into this. No question was creed to not good as Crete one. Not as good cre- two is better than increase. Okay. Okay. Okay. You missed the last episode in two episodes ago, we did Iraqi I'll saying I think twice already so. Okay. Big baller. I'm gonna go with the goddess two movies. All right last one that we ought to hit close during sex. Yes. Or no waves. No, it depends on what type socks. Let me let me right then they like. This year. All of it. I like I like Baker if I'm having. Sex with chicken, she got close on gay. I like if she has closed on like like taking plenty of times where I pay. Let me let me let me just shit out. Oh shit. So I like it when chick. So so. The twenty bursary of the greatest hits. Besides that Jay. I like it when chick as on outfits like that excites me even more like I've had situations where pay six way like. Fuck this shit. Sex. I'm later shit out. So I thought. Outfits. Okay. Forty four eight away. My heart where she will wear like. Crotch lewis. Docking carry this body, suits, or whatever. Okay. That's the type of shit. I mean, if she got on the sexy outfit. The I'm trying to that sexy outfits. Buckner? Birthday suit. I need some of my feet. Sorry groups are first of all would attract me more is a woman with clothes on clues off. So. We'll take shit home. This led to the side. On the I think, I think outfits and all that is great. And that's all cool when you come in the room, you know, you here's lingo and all. But public. But I'm with Scotty. I'm taking it all I got. I guess I always the body. I feel like the body essentially can can we talk. No. Tears. You know what I'm saying? That is the setup. But I wanna see. I wanna see. No, maybe single. Minds telling me. Sangria got. Both that saying. Close. To the word. I'm you know, at first I'm more about experience. Okay. The whole overall. So I wanna come to the door with with the lingerie on to the door at the trench coat. What the walk through the wealthy, and he'll be I'm here. Hey, skinny thing. It's all of that. So I don't like I mean when we get into it. I don't really, you know, at the slots with that on some other stuff, but. Komo close off because I don't need. No restriction. But that goes to both ways though. Habits. Well. The socks. You stayed in over the bay. Where you're standing over the bay. He wasn't hurt over. On that night that track. You mean business? Unapologetic up your point. Okay. Johnny O underscore K. I N G underscored Johnny this show might go down. Nicole, aka the bodybuilder and your inch by fitness Mexa. Hurry, I'm next to her is it's your boy, son the but Bill your mother. This your voice over call me to Bill because I'm a builder inch. In Maine, man little. Instagram Twitter, six next to him. Hey scotty. I'm here. I'm just regular. Issue. Boy, rip dispersion gangster. I am everything. You wanna be everything? Catch me on Instagram Instagram only waves underscored DC, that's z and not s. Pop. No. Still.

Scott Black Panther party Nick Johnny O. H Jim Jim John Iraq Google Robin Hood Nicole Netflix Atlanta Jay Hoover X. Question Negus robbery
BONUS: Power to the People

Lost Notes

35:45 min | 9 months ago

BONUS: Power to the People

"Hey, gang nick and Mike here producers of loss notes. We haven't been in your feet for while we know, but we are hard at work. On a third season of lost notes were telling you today, and we are so pleased to say that we are working on it with Hanif. Abdur Kate you might remember him as the man behind our episode about. About cap power last season. We loved it. He's a poet SAS cultural critic. He's based in Columbus Ohio his book about a tribe called quest came out last year. It was super, critically acclaimed. It made the New York Times bestseller list. I just loved it. If you don't have that book, it's called. Go ahead in the rain. You should read it immediately. We're going to do something a little different this season with him. If he's not just curated our stories, he's also writing and producing all of the stories this season and they are all based on one theme, and actually on one year nineteen, eighty yet, not the entire decade just that year so much happened in nineteen eighty. It was the first album by the sugarhill gang, which is an iconic early hip hop record. We lost John Lennon. Darby crash and Ian Curtis that year. The walkman was introduced by Sony. It was just a huge. Huge year for music and technology. We can't wait to share stories with you meantime. We have a couple of bonus episodes for you this summer and we are sharing the first one right now. It's about the Black Panther party, but more specifically about their house band, an rb band at the party. Put together to help spread their message of revolution. That ban was called. The lumpen in this story comes to us from Peter Gill Strap. Who is familiar voice to listeners of Los Notes, he did the story line Shirley in season one. And this story has these incredible exclusive interviews with members of the lump in and with the Black Panther Party, including Michael Torrance Cetera, Ned emory, Douglas and Billy Jennings, and we'll also hear from Rickey Vincent the book about the Lumpen, it's called party music, and if you dig the story, you should go get his book to learn even more okay. I think that's it for now. Here is Peter. Gill strapped with the story power to the people. We would is coordinating body because we dropped. Okay! We left everything to come. We join US say. We John, it'd be revolutionaries automated revolution which under. To be paths. In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture. It's a journey unlike that of any other band and Michael. Torrents was at the center of it. Up? In Nineteen, sixty six Huey Newton and Bobby Seale Co the Black Panther Party. Most students at Merit Community College in Oakland within a few years. The party offers educational programs, food, service, free, medical care and Drug Rehab. The black community and the panthers lead the fight against rampant police brutality. By the end of the sixties, changes in the air in the bay area is Ground Zero. San Francisco that I will ruin. The fillmore district was very very hot tension. Police were riding. You know if I've if you are selling your papers would come in. Who asked us at you pay? Arrest at new. But at the same time there was a lot of energy. an s the best thing about it. You could really feel the energy particularly among younger people that we felt we could really make a change. Not only make and we're GONNA make. Their will us this commitment to die if necessary. Those papers are the weekly Bible of Party information a publication called the Black Panther and the Howard. Quinn Printing Company on Alabama, street is where the lump and story begins Wednesday. Night was distribution night where we would get out the paper. Everybody will come. That's James Motte now known as the to ruin Ned in nineteen seventy. He's newly arrived from the Sacramento Chapter. All the future members of the lump are in attendance stat Wednesday night, Torrance Motte William Calhoun and Clark Santa Rita. Bailey, they all have musical backgrounds ranging from church choirs, pro level experience, but when they meet their just loyal young soldiers, taking orders along with everybody else, it was a community, gathering and film and what You'd imagine at that time. Feel more has not like it is now changed the Jennifer -cation. It was feel more and on those distribution nights when various chapters would come together and be to get the paper we would saying. And we were saying that point. Just do off song so one night I went over there, and they were saying join in, and we started harmonizing. We just blended in so cool, and then we begin to do with us. We just would put other words the popular salts because we would be sitting in what we call. A revolutionaries struggle. In terms of The lump any kind of grew out of that just a saying any other part I. Guess Tradition, Sing, and while you were. It's typical Wednesday night, the four panthers, or at the print shop, stacking and racking harmonizing into the night, but this time there's somebody new listening Emory Douglas. The party's Minister of Culture. So after I got back to central emery comes in, and says hey, both come Jane as a yeah. Every he says you know everybody relates to music. You're really do so you guys are good, said we can create a group, and the group could be part of the Minister Cocker where we be able to get that message out in the news. That was from when I first heard them. Emory Douglas is the brilliant style guru and visual artist. WHO's iconic posters and flyers helped brand. The movement I just may suggestion. Popularly adding some. Justice, context to the lyrics. At this point bobby? Seale and Huey Newton or both behind bars, so Douglas Approaches Panthers Chief of Staff David Hilliard. He understands the value of spreading the word through music in a green lights. The project he also gives the Group A name, the lumpen. It's a play on Karl Marx's idea of the lumpen proletariate, the lower class that would rise up to crush the capitalist power structure. At, the town of Party was coming about political education the awareness. was was growing tremendously. Billy Jennings is a former Panther and parties longtime historian. He was tight with the lump and members fifty years ago and still is to this day. And Nineteen Sixty eight alone James Brown play on a song. That really changed Dave caused black people. Part of that time were referred herself as mid-growth. You know Jay Brown came out. Is We're black and we're proud. That Rick. You can never go back and say you're a nigger. You can never go back. June Bronco the data and sixty is the one the group like the black man the party they had set up a foundation of knowledge already. It was wasn't minister of Culture. So recognize the role of music, historically and black people. Just as part of our culture and he begins, we can do something with this. You guys on decent to get Lee anyway because we clicked like that. And so he interracial us to put something together. It wasn't easy. It wasn't like. Okay. We started at nine o'clock. Your Day was never in. You might if you were able to get some time, Hey, look, we've got forty five minutes to rehearse. Whatever rehearsal we would, we would have to do that after whatever other assignments we add, so we eddie goes other papers. We set out to breakfast forward and we'd have to do garbage. Your do secure. We'd have to do whatever it is any other path that we do. From the panthers perspective, the Lumpen was not about show business, it was about contributing to the revolution. Is a matter of fact for us. It was a PRI-. To prove. You know that we have under percent. Panthers second for us was just political. And if they said the next day, okay, that's it fine. 'cause we didn't join. You know if I was really about that. I could have been trying to do it. I tear. Neuro, a good out there trying to get paid. We never got paid. It was just this how we can be helpful of are. We can be useful advas-. The Co and this is what we do you know, but it was always. We follow orders. Now only a few months, since they were harmonizing to the oldies at the printing plant, their orders to get on stage and get to work educate, the people spread the word and earn money for the party. The lump and assemble a six piece interracial backing band from local players sympathetic to the cause. To called the Freedom Messengers led the summer of nineteen seventy group is performing at rallies, community, gatherings and panther events around the bay area, and they're good. They're tight. It's a professional show on par with almost any act. They've got the energy of James. Brown and the dance moves and harmonies of the temptations, but the lyrics are all about what the panthers are all about. The dead to. Has Been Arrested in new haven and the first thing that we put together actually was. Bobby must be set free. That song titled. Free Bobby now was recorded at a studio in San Jose in August of nineteen seventy. Bill Calhoun groups. Songwriter thought the session was intended to be a demo with the panthers decided to release the single ask is. One of Calhoun songs no more on the flip side. The record was released on the Panthers Zone sees the time label with credit to Black Panther party productions. It was promoted in the party newspaper and sold at live shows and panther events. Any prophets were funneled straight back into the part. Must Be. Say! They took the craft seriously. That's ricky. Vincent is the author of Party time the inside story of the Black Panthers, Band and how Black Power transformed soul music. It's a subject. He knows well. His mother was an early pancer. When they did people get ready by Curtis Mayfield and the impressions they hit those notes that you had to hit the shows respect for those aspirations that were in that song in nineteen, sixty, four, sixty, five, the lumpen flipped lyrics, obviously, instead of saying people get ready. There's a train a-coming, and they said people get ready revolutions. Come right you, don't you? Don't need a ticket. You need a loaded gun and it was like. Wait a minute. That is so music the way it's supposed to be Sung but. Oh, those are not lyrics way. We've heard them before. The lumpen start headlining their own shows. They're single. Isn't getting radio play free? Bobby now was considered too controversial, but Of Mouth and constant promotion in the Panther newspaper or drawing crowds, the group or gigging weekly, doing benefits and playing college campuses up and down the west coast, and when they're not headlining their own shows there on bills with the grateful, Dead Carla Thomas and Curtis Mayfield. And not only is the music on fire, but the live show takes choreography to a whole `nother level nonstop. Say. Even makes in of DAS- routine. We would act out, but his drive in dies J.. B. C.. Would come and harass and he be beaten as A. Funky Broadway. Beating him would. Watch it and then I finally get discussed. I'M NOT GONNA! Take it anymore would. Jump in and jump out Nick Saban. Would beat the gop down was when just as saying it was? The whole. Experience was something. They hadn't seen before they'd say it, but it hadn't seen it like that. In the winter of nineteen seventy, the ban hits the road for a tour of the Midwest and East Coast. The crowds are enthusiastic, but tension is in the air. And I'll never forget this. David Levinson is the Freedom Messengers nineteen year old sax player after a show at the University of Minnesota a snowstorm, kicking in the band is packing up their gear when they were approached by members of the Black Student Union. These guys from the student, Google they come out, and they've got all their like. They look like a bill chair. Who? All the black beret the black boots. What are you guys doing? Those guys excuse me. They are part of the lump in band. Well. You know they can't stay well. He told you multiple huggies. We're not staying there. I said this is a people's revolution, and these are brothers that we stay on. That's just a small, but very real example of kind of camaraderie and kind of unity that we felt so there never was any racism promoted for practice by the Black Panther party at all. Lumped, are also in the crosshairs of the COPS wherever they go late one night after college show in New Jersey the police follow the band and an empty road heading Outta town. James Motte get out car. They knew who he were pitch dark with us over. We'd like visit. They will kill us. You know general is back then Goto alighted area, or what they gable with one car got thrown US slow down, and the other one got right behind us, and they waited for that real dark area. PULL OVER! This is part of the intimidation, right? There was granted sang for us, so we started saying. What was that song as we stroll? To get mad. Harmony! These guys all the back. They made a pull out all the band equipment. Them okay. You can load it all back up again. Still Kill you fuckers this kind of language. They tell us right, and they were just to harassers to let us know we watch you. We know who you are. The lumber battling another force besides the authorities, and it's coming from within the party. There were people in the party. Some leadership. Rangan, for that say oh, these is open. Think is something special. If it wasn't for Emerald Eleven came about Imerys, the one who had to juice and it was people that. was an into the lumpen. They didn't they revolutionary. Be doing that kind of thing what? They were older people, too. You know they aren be people. They were blues, people, and during that time there was a difference 'cause like I said. Most of the leadership of the Party was seven guys. Southern guys like blue. We are young guys, we RV. So. That's why they never really got. Anymore hired in were because they will always related to its panthers I. Well I think some people may have thought of it as not being important. State, not understanding how how important the culture was to get into message out. But that didn't stop them. It's November Tenth Nineteen Seventy at Merritt College in Oakland it's the all mater of Huey Newton and Bobby Seale the birthplace of the Black Panther party. Tonight to a packed auditorium, the lumpen will get the message out. Lady Jill. The black breath, the body very raleigh. Bear in mind. This group has been together for less than a year. We'll almost everybody else. In the San Francisco music scene has been getting high and jamming, Alumna been working fulltime revolutionaries pursued by the police, and the FBI and they still got this together. And tonight is special. The show is being recorded for a live album and the group pulls out all the stops. Billy Jennings's there with his fist in the air. It was one of the best shows in my life because. Audience was. Electrified. Lumping came onto band. Are Playing you here? Ville repeats something to the crowd and the crowd with thought that. When I see all power to the people that crossing our people with the force when they said to the fastest pizza deaf to the speed. Ran. Out. Listen to people feedback alone. You just get I own then they were killed when I heard in even to this day. When I hear, it just gives me that revolutionary enthusiasm. Oh, you know 'cause. Everybody was all the one that night we were thinking about the same thing. You, know revolution. The show was an undeniable success, but no album appeared. The master tapes made that night went missing and have never been found. Some have suggested they were confiscated by the FBI. It's also possible. They were mislabeled and disappeared in the chaos and discord of the time period. Or they could be decaying in an attic somewhere long forgotten. Only a grainy multigeneration cassette of the show has ever surfaced, but it captures the raw power of the band. Nineteen seventy-one arrives the Panther Party leadership in chaos. Bobby Seale is still in prison in new haven eldridge cleaver. The Minister of information has fled to Algeria to escape an attempted murder charge on an Oakland cop in a CBS interview with reporter Mike Wallis Cleaver makes his feelings about violence against authority figures abundantly clear. When the American people here that you want to shoot your way into the United, states Senate take off the head of a senator. Dig Up Hitter of Richard Nixon what's this is rhetoric. This is not a very. In February of seventy, one cleaver and Huey Newton appear on the live show. Am San Francisco? Newton has recently out of prison after serving almost two years for manslaughter, and a serious falling out has been growing between the men now it's coming to a head. For this interview, though neither one is actually in the studio, the show is broadcasting alive phone call. When Am San Francisco Book? These men to producers expected things might get heated. and. They were right. We've got lots of things coming up here on am this morning. Things that you like to see and we're looking forward to the two right here on am. got. Art. So I WANNA now are. You that the Erika meal. Is expelled. Deal with that. Deal with this. I'M GONNA. Her, by the headed to but I. Stay here at the guys. You see your car and your. As. You? So what you just heard was two of the leaders of the Black Panther party firing each other from the Black Panther Party on live TV. This bizarre public fight factionalized the group which falls completely into disarray. You gotta come back with some different ideas about God bless you got to split. Tudor born did unfortunately as you panther against path, depend on whether he will these. Oh whether you. National Headquarters. Eldred was still promoting violence. Right right? You invite which. was. A Web, even we had because all of our original is was picking up to. My window. Via. Metal. IS GOING ON INTERNALLY In Germany is being. That I didn't agree with I didn't join for. And it wasn't about Dipoto. This was bad about. About? Is Bad when you give them all concerned about the people that you knew. As the atmosphere within the party becomes more desperate, interest in the group from those in power dwindled to almost nothing. The lumpen members reassigned taken off of R. and B. Duty and put on security detail. Their days as a singing group are numbered. No, no wasn't justified. It could have been worked out, but you know. He had people who want to exercise their position. As being in jars, all those things complained to. Petty Petty Spiked Panisse all that. We nabet side of us as anything other than panthers. And it was a cadre. A unit for a Cacho purpose. You know we loved it. We enjoyed it. But in the big picture. Is just another as I am. And so wins education circumstances change. Then you move onto an as assignment. And we didn't really have to know more about it. Because does exactly what? On May, twenty, third nineteen, seventy-one in Sacramento, the lump and play their final Gig a few days later, Bill Calhoun decides to leave the party completely. He was the group Songwriter. So, only eleven months after it began. The band is done. But the Panther Party is still Michael Torrance's life. It's all he's known since he was a teenager. To I committed my life to it I-. Intention I was going to be my life. which brings us back to that night in nineteen, seventy, three at a bar in West Oakland. The night torn talked to Bobby Seale and ask for some time off from the panthers. Philip I'll go to bobby. At his birthday party. I was as. I said well chairman. I have a daughter. She needs some support. Plus I'm here with these Lula. My work so. I. Don't WANNA quit. I don't WanNa leave but I need some time. Get by so bad yet and then I'm coming back. I'm coming back. And Bob, it was real cool with me. You know I'm Cryan. Torrance's leaving the bar. When Huey Newton causing backups upstairs, he says the Party will contribute fifty dollars a month for tornadoes daughter support then Newton puts a gun to Torrance's head and says this. Okay. We seventy dollars. But you say. All Power to the people? People. So I stuck around. and. About. Six months later. What are the guys from you go by? Says you still WANNA go. Sale got. We can of coke in mom you. You even. Alright do. People now. And that's it. Michael Torrance is out of the Black Panthers, and and it was from what was traumatic for me was leave. But was dramatically from what it had become. You feel betrayed. Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. Betray eight angry. Bit Frustrated. Yes? It took me a while. To. Get back to what they got living in. The party was more. As what you asked me who? Path. You know that's what I was at who walks. And in the lose. You know and try to get back to adjust matt here. Trying to get a job. And I put on my resume. Batori did have something on his resume. That worked outside of the revolution. The London it got him A. Job Hey. Torrance wound up singing behind Marvin Gaye, and he appeared on the singer's nine hundred seventy four album Marvin Gaye live. It was recorded just a few miles away from where the lump and recorded their own live album, just four years earlier in Oakland. Torrence went on to write produce and sing for other artists for the rest of the Seventies. and. Then, we parted ways with the panthers almost fifty years ago. The whole experience is still very much a part of it. Is As a Black Panther party is concerned I. Don't regret anything. I was with people. Is S alive to? James? Always And I wouldn't. I wouldn't take that back. We. Do We Mesa mistake. But at the time. What it was. It was right on time. and. I was glad to be a part of it. We didn't we never did it. To get famous, whenever did? We did it because we really wanted to do something. And make a change.

Black Panther party panthers Huey Newton Oakland Bobby Seale Michael Torrance Panther Party bobby San Francisco Billy Jennings Michael Emory Douglas Nick Saban torrance New York Times Sacramento London US James Motte
Voices: Women of the civil rights movement

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

23:30 min | 1 year ago

Voices: Women of the civil rights movement

"The role of women in the civil rights movement is extremely important and actually women were central to the civil rights movement. That's congresswoman Barbara Lee of California herself a veteran of the civil rights movement expressing a core truth that the movement was powered by women. And because of the time they lived in the kind of work. They did their stories are rarely memorialize in the same way. The stories of men like the Reverend Martin Luther King junior Ralph Abernathy John Lewis and Andrew Young. Are. There will strong women throughout this movement that nobody knows. The men had a hard time getting along with each other because they were all young and each head of different approach to civil rights. They were very high strung, and brilliant and competitive young men, and it was Dorothy height of the national council of negro women that basically kept the peace amongst the six civil rights organizations and set in on all the meetings, but they didn't let her speak at the March on Washington. And she was a great speaker. Dr. They height would go on to live to be ninety eight years old still fighting for Justice until the end in his eulogy, then President Barack Obama paid tribute to her commitment by recounting an episode that took place just two months before she died in two thousand ten last February I was scheduled to see her and other civil rights leaders to discuss the pressing problems of unemployment Reverend Sharpton, Ben jealous the end of Lacey pe-, Mark morale of the national urban league. Then we discovered the Washington was about to be blanketed by the worst blizzard in record two feet of snow. So I suggested to one of my age, we should call. Dr heightened say, we're happy to reschedule the meeting. Certainly if the others come she should not feel obliged to to form, Dr Hite insisted on common, despite the blizzard never mind that she was in a wheelchair. She was not about to let just a bunch of men. In this me. Hi, I'm Jonathan Kaye part in this is voices of the movement a series from my podcast Cape up sharing the stories and lessons of some of the leaders of the civil rights movement and using them to figure out where we go from here. During the civil rights retreat in January at sunny lands in California, we all sat down for remembrance dinner, various leaders stood up and told us about those. They worked with who are no longer with us. Andrew Young kings, chief strategist was assigned to memorialize start the height, and he used that moment to herald other women who contributed so much to the success of the movement who are no longer around to share their own stories at a time when the world seems ready to recognize them that could not have been a civil rights movement without the sacrifice the vision, the support and the hard work of the thousands of women. One of those women was start the cotton as the director of the citizenship education program. She was the only woman with an executive position in the southern Christian leadership conference in Atlanta with the civil. Rights move. But Dorothy cotton came down to work with us in voter registration and citizenship education, and we joined her with septum Clark, a teacher schoolteacher from Charleston. There Reverend Martin Luther King junior used to call septum Clarke, the mother of the movement Clark believed that literacy means liberation. So she worked with the Highlander folk school to set up citizenship schools, which were designed to educate disenfranchised voters and empower black communities and shoot taught. Literacy on the ferry boats going back and forth between Johns island and Charleston. Every morning and every night every afternoon, she was there to teach people to read and write to register to vote, and it was about an hour and fifteen minute ferry ride. And she was a every morning making sure that the longshoremen got their reading lesson in everyday eventually Clark combined her efforts with Dorothy cotton citizenship education program, but the SEC and together we recruited and trained six thousand our leaders from Virginia all the way over to east, Texas, the names, you heard about most than Louima, Amelia Boynton. So almost all these people came over to Dorchester center and are the cotton. And septa Clark. Basically kept them for a week. And we help them to know how to read and we didn't teach him to read like we taught children read because we assume that everybody can read something and our job was to convince them that they could read. And so we started with us have a Coca Cola sign you hold it up. What does that say they can all read Coca Cola? And then you spell out the syllables with them. They knew them, but we taught them the sounds of the reading that they knew and then they conducted classes in their homes, and that churches and Abune Paulos. And we we trained a generation of leaders between nineteen sixty one and nineteen sixty six that was Dorothy cotton's work. Well, we we had somebody from just about every county and South Carolina about half of the counties in Georgia and about half an Alabama read across the black belts from east, Texas, all the way up to Virginia. That was the foundation. Of the civil rights movement upon which when Martin Luther King moved in and started a movement. They're already people that we trained the people trained by Dorothy, cotton and septum Clarke went back to their communities and helped educate and train more potential voters. Those people included women like a million Amelia Boynton from so Alabama went there went to Selma as a nineteen year old girl in nineteen twenty nine and she worked in voter registration and community organizing throughout her life. And she actually lead a get out. The vote caravan across the black belt of Alabama for Obama's his reelection to his second term. And so from nineteen twenty nine to two thousand eight she was an active voice, and nobody really. As much about. But that's what we name. My recent mine newest granddaughter Amelia after Amelia, boys. Young also talked about Kereta Scott King. We all know her name, but they're so much more to her story with Kereta, Scott King. You had a young woman who had fifteen. Came home from choir. Practice only define that a house had been burned down and her father got her together with her sister, and brother and mother and had them kneel and pray I thank God that no one had been home. And then he asked them to pray for the sick people who felt for some reason that necessary to burn their home down. Then he asked them to pray that they never feel any bitterness or hatred in their heart. He asked them to forgive their enemies. So it speaks the two things that speaks one to the strength and power and determination of the women in the south. But because this happened probably sometime in the nineteen forties. It talks about a nonviolent tradition that existed in the south independent of Martin Luther King or any other rest of us. Martin would say he's a Juno it. We hadn't married these little country girls, we probably wouldn't be where we are today. So everything we talk about women have been suffering and in this country and solve forever. Silently. But they pushed us men. Young includes his first wife Jean child's among those women. I was in New York shuttle down a good job at bought a home. The Nashville sit in store came on and my then wife and two children one on the way said it's time for us to go home. I said we just bought this house. We're all she said. No, this is not home. I said, well, what do you wanna do? She said. So Liz house quit your job by was working with the national consulate in New York and said, what are we going to do that? And she said, I don't know God will make a way we came back south, you know, an- and ended up with Martin Luther King young would go on to become the United States embassador to the United Nations as well. As the mayor of Atlanta some years later when saw her ex boyfriend. And I said throw arrogantly, I guess you. Glad you didn't marry him. And she said she. If I'd married him. He'd have been the mayor of Atlanta. After I got back from sunny lands. This idea stuck with me the idea that we're not recognizing the women of the movement in the way that we should oftentimes women in the movement. And fortunately word in many ways, not seen but we saw them anyway because we knew who they were. And we knew that the movement never would have happened. Had it not been for these heroic women who really in many ways was the backbone of a lot of the movements. That's congresswoman Barbara Lee of California. I wanted to talk to you because she embodies the legacy of those who came before her and how the movement involved in the years after king's death that you didn't know she was a member of the Black Panther party when she was a young activist. I spoke with Lee at the US capitol about her involvement in the late stages of the civil rights movement and activism that started literally at birth. The issue of infant mortality with African American women it's enormous in this country. And I am obsessed with with turning this around. And I think this comes from my birth. My mother when she was pregnant needed a c section. She went to the hospital in Paso, Texas, and they would not allow her in they denied her admittance into the hospital because she was black the way my mother got in the hospital was really a quite remarkable. First of all, we all know the history of of sexual abuse, assault and rape of black women, or my great grandmother was a domestic worker and losing Anna for Irish household. The head of household sexually abused and repeatedly raped by great grandmother. She couldn't do anything about it. That was her job out of these rapes. She had two children was my grandmother. My grandmother looked like she was white because her father was Irish. And so my. Grandmother had to come up to the hospital and insist that my mother get in because she said, this is my daughter, let her in, and you know, everyone kind of looked at each other. And my grandmother told me store, and my mother Thome ama- graph. They couldn't quite figure it out. Because my mother, you know, she had she was beautiful. She had green is she was fair skin. But she her father. My grandfather was all the way black. And so, you know, they couldn't quite figure it out. And so finally, they let my mother in the hospital because they thought that she was okay enough white enough to get in because she was the daughter, my grandmother who thought was white. But she did finally got get in due to my grandmother, they left her on. And what my mother calls a gurney and in hall, no one tended to hurt she became delirious. And she almost died a nurse walking by Saul her called doctor, and they rushed her. Her into the emergency room. It was too late for a c section. She almost died, and they delivered me using foursomes pulled me out. And I almost didn't get into this world. Okay. I almost didn't make it as my mother almost died in childbirth. And I almost didn't get here and there was a scar. But my I for years up don't five or six years ago. Right above my I wear the forceps pinched. My I as they were pulling me out. And so this problem is the beginning of my passion and commitment for Justice and equality and the end of racism and sexism in all the 'isms that we know because for me almost didn't get here in so I have to repay the debt that I'll for just being able to breathe. I had to fight to be the first cheerleader at San Fernando high school. Yeah. What? When we moved to California, I wanna be a cheerleader at San Fernando high, and it was a selection process. And if you didn't have blonde hair and blue as you would not selected I had to go to the NWEA sleepy at age. Fifteen say, I wanna be a cheerleader. Can you help me? The NWEA CP helped me we went up to that school. We made them change that selection process to an election process. I tried out in front of the student body. I one, and I was the first black cheerleader San Fernando that same year and Asian Pacific. Japanese American Jeannie Tanaka one. Also. So I broke that glassy on at age fifteen. So you know, that was my first election after high school Lee went on to work with the Black Panther party and organization that took up arms and was the philosophical opposite of the nonviolence preached by king during the civil rights movement and unsurprising position for its members to adopt when you know that the Black Panther party was originally formed to protect. African American neighborhoods from acts of police brutality. The Black Panthers also provided community resources such as education, legally, transportation assistance and more believed in social activism and ending poverty and equality injustice. Black Panther party at a ten point programme feeding hungry children. I worked on the breakfast program. We provided free medical care through the George Jackson medical clinic, I had bag groceries with my children people didn't have food to eat. They didn't have shoes. And so we bagged shoes and food and gave them away at survival rallies. And so part of what I did with the Black Panther party as a community worker was just work hard in the community with the party on their ten point program. I got involved in politics through Shirley Chisholm. Shirley, Chisholm was the first African American woman in congress and the first of her race and gender to run for president. And she insisted that I registered. A vote, and I did, but I actually got her hooked up with the Black Panther party. And that's when the Black Panther party conducted its first voter registration drive, and I live forget this. But I asked you a Newton to hold a fundraiser for Shirley Chisholm, and he did and we raise money for the Shirley Chisholm presidential primary, and she was so happy to receive their endorsement and from what I remember. She said something to the effect that she wished that the country did need a black man the party, she wished we did have a society that was just and fair, and no descr and the end of racism, and but until that happened we needed the black man, the party were there women in the movement or in your life, who you looked to as role models as this is what this is what I want to be this is who I want to be like, my mother and my mother unfold. Definitely passed away for years ago. But she was phenomenal woman. She passed away at ninety. She was the first African American civilian at Fort Bliss, Texas. She was one of the first twelve students to integrate the university of Texas at El Paso, sometimes I look back at some of the lessons that she taught me. And now I realize exactly what she meant in what she did. And why she told me never looked back into keep moving forward. Don't let anybody turn me around believe you me. She took the back seat to no one. She was active with the AA C P. She was active with the Phillis Wheatley club and El Paso, Texas. And so she'd always taught us that we were equal to boys intimate, and boom, I grew up and realize boy, my mother was really far ahead of her time because this was way before the feminist movement. Why don't you think women get the recognition? They deserve for their role in the civil rights movement. But that's a very deep question in it's hard to understand. But yet understand 'cause we still haven't addressed the issues around of gender, equity, and sexism and racism, so as an African American woman, I still feel this each and every day, and you know, we're fighting to be seen, and I have to say Hidden Figures the movie was phenomenal. I mean, that's a clear example, look at Kereta, Scott King, for example, another one of my she rose, she was really active in the peace movement, and she was very influential with Dr king and terms of really talking about world peace and why we have to fight for peace and Justice. And so the society has just never unfortunately valued women as equals and that day is over though. It's over at. So we've broken a lot of glass ceilings, and we're still breaking a lot. But I think for the generations coming before after us these girls aren't gonna have to fight the same battles that we have to fight black women, especially we're not out for equality for ourselves. But it's always breaking those barriers for others. So that others can won't have to go through the crap that we have and continue to go through. And I think that's extremely important to recognize. So black women in the movement in the civil rights movement in the struggles, right after slavery Harriet, Tubman Sojourner truth, you know, to be well, you know, all these unbelievable brilliant black women women like those we've talked about in this episode like Dharthi cotton. So I said to my then husband George cotton. I think I'll go down to Atlanta and help them out for about six months, and I stayed twenty. Three years when I do because the civil rights movement, just became my life. Fannie Lou Hamer. American. Land of the free in the room of the brain. We have to. Without teams. The current. David, but we won't live human being. Dharthi height. Have what I call kind of humane sense. They're concerned about school. You're on children with the sip of elderly, and they. They have learned and they will join hands. They might have their disagreements and what's not. But when it comes out, I always say whether know how to get tickets on Kereta, Scott King. But I was blessed with parents taught me not to let anyone make me feel like it wasn't good enough. And as my mother told me, you are just as good as anyone else, you get an education and try to be somebody. Then you won't have to be kicked around by anybody, and you won't have to depend on anyone for your livelihood. Not even a man. And Shirley Chisholm. I spend before you today. I candidate for the democratic nomination for the presidency of the United States of America. I am not the candidate of black America. Although I am black and proud. I am not a candidate of the women's movement of country. Although I am woman and I'm equally proud of that. And so many more their stories are just beginning to be told now and their boldness and how they were the backbone of so much, and that's who we are and still we rise. Coming up on voices of the movement, George Wallace and his fateful meeting. With Shirley Chisholm that upset one Barbara Lee.

Martin Luther King Black Panther party Andrew Young Barbara Lee Kereta Scott King Atlanta Texas Shirley Chisholm California United States Dorothy cotton President Barack Obama Amelia Boynton septum Clarke Washington Alabama Jonathan Kaye El Paso
Albert Woodfox Speaks on Racial Justice in America

TIME's Top Stories

08:58 min | Last week

Albert Woodfox Speaks on Racial Justice in America

"Brought to you by seat. A new memoir from jeff immelt the former ceo of general electric. Emily explores his time at the helm of one of the world's largest companies from navigating a post nine eleven world to the two thousand eight financial crisis and more preorder. Your copy today. America's notorious for saying one thing and doing something else. Albert would fox talk solitary confinement successful distancing and racial justice by josaia bates february nineteenth mark. The five year anniversary of would fox's release from louisiana state penitentiary. It also marked his birthday. Would fox seventy four had spent over forty years in solitary confinement while incarcerated. They're one of the longest periods of solitary confinement in the history of the us during their time in the penitentiary would fox along with robert king and herman wallace joined the black panther party and became activists. We use education to help transform ourselves from habe criminals into political activists. Would fox tells time. The black panther party played a great part in doing that. It gave me a sense of self worth and a purpose and direction. They became known as the angola three. The louisiana state penitentiary was also known as an gola risen as they were to improve the conditions of the prison. While also educating their fellow inmates and organizing protests their actions caught the attention of the prison administration in nineteen seventy-two would fox wallace were charged with the murder of a fellow inmate though there was no evidence that connected them to his death. King was convicted of a different prison. Murder all three were later. Sent to solitary confinement. Would fox was released in twenty-six teen after multiple challenges to his murder charge in court. He sends written a memoir and been involved in numerous creative projects recently. Collaborating with producer. Fraser t smith on his album. Twelve questions as well as continuing to advocate for prison reform criminal justice reform and basic human rights. Speaking with time would fox discusses his activism both past and present his experience in solitary confinement and his expectations for how the biden administration will address criminal justice issues time. Can you talk about your experience. Being in solitary confinement for over forty years would fox. I was actually in solitary for forty four years and ten months king. Wallace and i made a conscious choice to fight against. What solitary confinement can do to you. It can take away your sense of dignity. Pride self respect self worth. It can destroy your mind. Kill your hope. I think this pandemic has helped king. And i explain more what. It's like to be confined to a small area. This pandemic has forced people to quarantine and stay in their houses and cut off socialization with family and friends in print. Just limit all that you can do so. It made it much easier for us now to try to make people understand what being held in solitary confinement. Is i still get requests from a lot of guys in prison to help in any way i can for some reason. What happened to us what we went through and how we survived has resonated with other individuals who've been locked up. We feel a moral obligation to make society aware that these people exist and are aware of the sacrifices they've made and continue to make even now even five years later. Are there things about freedom that you're still adjusting to espn. No i've considered myself to be free mentally end philosophically since my early forties. When i was able to define the kind of human being. I wanted to be i developed moral values and a sense of self worth out of years of oppression as complicated and as long as my life is. The results are pretty simple. Now i just wanna be happy. I wanna have the basic necessities that humanity needs to survive and given the opportunity to create happiness for myself and people in my immediate family and my extended relationship with friends in the last year much has been said about america undergoing a reckoning on racial justice. Do you see any parallels between your activism while in prison and the black lives matter movement or the response to last. Summer's police. Killing of george floyd long before the world embraced it. I saw the similarities between the black lives matter movement and the black panther party there are a lot of movements in the country right now and they seem to be growing with influence because the level of consciousness is once again growing. I work with a lot of political organizations and king and i made a point wherever we went for speaking engagements to ask the host that ran the meeting to connect us with some of the young leaders in black lives matter. George floyd murder touched. People people seeing a man begging for his life and the cruelty of the police officer who was killing him and the pivotal moment when he realized he was gonna die. He was trying to connect with his mom. Any was calling for his mom. That kind of thing cut so deep and it raises people's level of consciousness and it them out of the comfort zone that they live and it makes them realize that the world is not as they're being told it is. This is reality. This is what's really going on and we have to do something about it. Do you think today's forms of activism and protests are proving to be effective particularly the fund the police movement for example i think that any form of activism that's against inhumanity is a good movement. It may not be a movement. I would participate in. But i still acknowledge it. I don't see it as competition. Robert king had this saying when we do speaking engagements he'd say time somebody throws a pebble in the pond it creates a ripple keep throwing pebbles the ripple will become a way. You keep throwing pebbles. That wave will become a su- nami and as soon nami is a force of change. It could be progressive change or it could be destructive change. That depends on the people. Throwing the pebbles i see any movement in society or in the world right now to make humanity better to make society constructed in a way that treats humanity in the most dignified way. I see that as a positive step towards the goals of building better humanity. What are your hopes for the biden administration and any potential progress on criminal justice issues. I don't have a great deal of faith in the political movements in this country right now. I voted for joe biden and comma harris. But he wasn't my first choice. He was the lesser of two evils. My vote was more against donald trump and his white supremacists administration than it was having confidence in president biden and vice president kamala harris right. Now i have a wait and see attitude. America's notorious for saying one thing and doing something else. We have a very short attention span. We forgive too easily and forget too quickly. What steps do you think should be taken to. Ensure that racial justice racial equality and criminal justice issues remain at the forefront of the national conversation challenge challenge challenge take a stand become part of a movement create a movement. Changes never easy. It's a difficult process. It takes us out of our comfort zone but it's necessary. One of my goals is to teach humanity the importance of embracing change rather than seeing change as the enemy. See it as an opportunity to move forward to improve yourself to improve humanity to improve society. I try to raise. People's level of consciousness making them understand the economic and political and social institutions in this country and how they work against humanity rather than four humanity. I have four beautiful great grandkids. And i'd like to leave a society better than it is now. I would hate to see them fighting the same battles thirty years from now. So that's what my life is about right now. That's my purpose. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

fox black panther party jeff immelt biden administration josaia bates louisiana state penitentiary herman wallace George floyd fox wallace Fraser t smith robert king America general electric angola Emily Albert louisiana Wallace fox espn
COINTELPRO, Part 2

Stuff You Missed in History Class

51:24 min | 8 months ago

COINTELPRO, Part 2

"This episode of Steffi missed in history. Classes brought to you by Schmidt's naturals. Schmitz is the natural. That works Schmitz is never formulated with aluminum or artificial fragrance with coconut, oil and essential oils. It keeps you fresh all day naturally, so Schmitz is the natural deodorant that works it is certified. vegan certified cruelty free aluminum free with no artificial fragrances visit Schmitz Com to learn more or to find it at a retailer near you. Unimaginable crime, we couldn't believe something like that. What happened here? People that are all from the same family. Nobody had a clue about. Oh, who or why that eight people things like that? Don't happen anywhere. This is the patron massacre. Listen to the Pike and massacre on Wednesday July twenty ninth on the iheartradio App Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to stuff. You missed in history class production of iheartradio. Hello and welcome to the podcast I'm Tracy Wilson. And I'm holly FRY Today we are wrapping up our two parter on Cohen's help rail including its targeting of so-called black nationalist slash hate groups. and. Targeting of a very vaguely defined movement known as the new left to briefly recap from part win, which is highly recommended before listening to this because it includes a lot of context and overview. But just a quick recap, we're GONNA quote from the Church report, which followed more than a year of Senate committee hearings into all this quote, the origins of Cohen sale pro demonstrate that the bureau adopted extra-legal methods to counter perceived threats to national security and public order, because the ordinary legal processes were believed to be insufficient to do the job in essence, the bureau took the law into its own hands, conducting a sophisticated vigilante operation against domestic enemies. Whether. Those targets were really enemies. Though that is a different question, the report went on to say quote. The choice of individuals and organizations to be neutralized and disrupted range from the violent elements of the Black Panther Party to Martin. Luther King Junior, who the bureau concedes was an advocate of non-violence from the Communist Party to the Ku Klux Klan from the advocates, violent revolution such as the Weatherman to the supporters of peaceful social change including the. The Southern, Christian Leadership Conference and the University Committee for debate on foreign policy. Just a heads up in this episode there are going to be some discussions of suicide and also police violence. In nineteen, sixty seven, the FBI started co Intel pro black nationalist hate groups for the most part targeting of civil rights groups that had been carried out under co Intel pro, CPA USA which we talked about last time rolled up under this newly established program. In the words of the program supervisor, the targeted groups were selected because they were believed to be violent or because of their quote, radical or revolutionary rhetoric and actions on March Fourth Nineteen Sixty eight FBI Director J Edgar Hoover sent a memo to be routed through forty-one FBI field offices. This memo was called counterintelligence program. Black nationalist hate groups racial intelligence, and this is a little bit long, but it so illustrative of what the FBI was doing here and more generally what hoover's. Across the COENS help rose. We're GONNA. Read a chunk of it, so it began quote goals maximum effectiveness of the counter intelligence program, and to prevent wasted effort. Long Range Goals are being set number one prevent the coalition of militant black nationalist groups in unity. There is strength a truism that is no less valid for all its trait miss. An effective coalition of black nationalist groups might be the first step toward a real Maomao in America. The beginning of a true black revolution, so for context Maomao is a reference to the MAU movement and uprising in Kenya which advocated a violent overthrow of British colonial rule this. This went on to prevent the rise of a Messiah who could unify an electrified the militant black nationalist movement Malcolm X. might have been such a messiah. He is the martyr of the movement today, Martin Luther King stokely. Carmichael and Elijah Muhammad Ali to this position. Elijah Muhammad is less of a threat because of his age king could be a very real contender for this position should he abandoned his supposed quote obedience to quote white liberal doctrines and parentheses, nonviolence and embrace black nationalism Carmichael has the necessary charisma to be a real threat in this way member three prevent violence on the part of black nationalist groups. This is a primary. And is of course a goal of our investigative activity. It should also be a goal of the counter intelligence program to pinpoint potential troublemakers and neutralize them before they exercise their potential for violence number, four prevent militant black nationalist groups and leaders from gaining respectability by discrediting them to three separate segments of the community. The goal of discrediting black nationalist must be handled. Handled tactically in three ways you must discredit those groups and individuals to I the responsible, Negro community second be discredited to the white community, but the responsible community and see liberals who have vestiges of sympathy for militant black nationalist, simply because they are negroes third, these groups must be discredited in the eyes of Negro radicals, the followers of the movement this last area. Is entirely different tactics from the first two publicity about violence, tendencies and radical statements merely enhances black nationalist to the last group. It adds respectability in a different way number five. A final goal should be to prevent the long range growth of militant black organizations, especially among youth specific tactics to prevent these groups from converting young people must be developed with memo went on to outline the primary targets of this. Cohen's pro that everything we just read was going to apply to. These were the organizations that hoover described as the quote, most violent and radical. It included the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Revolutionary Action Movement and the nation, of Islam this is an incredibly veered with. Snake have nonviolent right into the name like the southern Christian Leadership Conference Martin. Luther King Junior, helped found. This represents the whole spectrum of from nonviolent direct action to revolutionary black nationalism. And the FBI even noted that in its view, some individual members of the nation of Islam had been involved in violence, but the organization itself was not violent. It was being targeted because of its separatism. Basically, the FBI grouped a lot of different organizations with a wide range of objectives in ideologies tactics under this co Intel pro that was supposedly about black nationalism and hate groups. Some stories you just mentioned were strictly pacifist some advocated gun, ownership or violent self. Some spoke in very theoretical terms about the need for a revolution, and some of them for an actual armed uprising or other violence, all very different ideologies, but still under this one umbrella, the FBI class them altogether as violent and radical viewing virtually any organization, calling for equal rights for black people as potentially violent, and as a consequence as needing to be disrupted yet like the thing that these all had in common was like black equals. Equality. Or like demanding equality with very aggressive rhetoric and sometimes violence. That's what it all had in common. The FBI put intense effort into discrediting and disrupting all these organizations and other organizations that were not specifically named using all the methods that we talked about empire one. But about a year after this co Intel pro was established, another different organization rose to national prominence, and that was the Black Panther Party, and this Cohen's hell. Pro then pivoted to shift almost exclusively on that the Black Panther party originally called the Black Panther. Party for self defense was founded in Oakland California in Nineteen Sixty six by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. A lot of the black panthers rhetoric was radical revolutionary, arguing that the only way black people could be truly free is if they were able to govern their own affairs when they were establishing the Party Newton and Seale crafted a ten point program, which began. We want freedom. We want power to determine the destiny of our black community. Miss ten point program went onto to call for full employment an end to quote the robbery by the capitalists of our black community decent. Decent Housing Education Exemption for military service for black men, an end to police brutality freedom for black men who were held in prisons and jails, and it ended quote. We want land. Bread Housing Education clothing, justice and peace. The ten point plan elaborated on each of these points. The exemption from military service stemmed from the United. States involvement in Vietnam and the idea that black people should not be forced to serve in the military of a nation that did not protect them. The idea behind the release of incarcerated black men was that they had not been given a fair and impartial trial, so their convictions were not valid as part of their work. The Black Panthers started more than thirty community service programs known as survival programs. These included things like free breakfast programs for schoolchildren. Screening and Treatment Program Medical Clinics Ambulance Services Legal aid education programs. The Black Panthers also created a screening program for sickle cell disease that later served as a template for the federal government's screening programs. Over time, a lot of these services were expanded to include anyone who was oppressed, including poor white people. The Black Panthers also showed up to support other marginalized groups in their own activism they are. Are, mentioned to different times in our six impossible episodes from SIP INS to physicians, which focused on direct action demonstrations in similar protests. In that episode, we talked about the Black Panther support of the fish in movement in the Pacific Northwest, and they're providing meals to disabled activists who took over the Department of Health Education and Welfare Office in San Francisco during the section five Oh four protests. The first thing, a lot of people, especially a lot of white people think of when someone says the Black Panthers is guns and violence. The Black Panthers organized armed patrols of black neighborhoods to protect residents from police brutality and from gang violence. At one point, they staged an armed takeover of the California state legislature that was in response to gun control legislation as other examples outside of the parties organized activities Huey. Newton was involved in a shootout with police in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, in which an officer was killed. Bobby Seale was charged, but not convicted with conspiracy to incite riots at the nineteen, Sixty eight democratic national convention, and of the murder of nineteen year old Black Panther, who was suspected of being a police informant in a memo back to headquarters, a California field office described the Black Panthers as quote, the most violence, prone organization of all the extremist groups now operating in the United States and that alleged that they were reforming quote, not only verbal attacks, but also physical attacks on police. Later J. Edgar Hoover called the Black Panthers quote, one of the greatest threats to the nation's internal security on November twenty, fifth nineteen, Sixty eight several FBI field offices, received a memo, ordering them to submit quote, imaginative and hard hitting counterintelligence measures aimed at crippling the BP. Of course, the Black Panther Party. This directive was expanded to additional field offices in January of Nineteen sixty-nine kill Intel pro black nationalist hate. Group soon focused almost entirely on the Black Panthers, rather than on that collection of groups that we outlined earlier in that nineteen sixty eight memo. Of this co Intel pros two hundred five documented actions, two, hundred, thirty, three of them were against the Black Panthers, using all those various techniques that we described in part one as examples. The FBI intentionally undermined the black. Panthers Public Service programs for example by sending fake inflammatory membership materials to food pantries and other organizations that were donating food for the breakfast programs. The bureau used disinformation to try to spark violent conflicts between the panthers, an area street gangs, and sparked violent conflicts between the panthers and police to reinforce the idea that the black panthers were just inherently violent in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine, the FBI became aware of a Black Panther coloring book. The origins of this book are a little bit murky, but I can Sonya Cambone, who was then known as Mark Teamer has taken credit for its creation, and in a two thousand sixteen interview, he describes it as a history book. It depicts slave owners, greedy store, owners and police, all as obese pigs with exaggerated lower tusks, while Cambone has stressed that these pigs can be any color, which is why it is a coloring book. They are generally interpreted as representations of white people and this. This book is full of images of black people, adults and children, men and women, stabbing and shooting the pigs Black Panther leadership felt that the coloring book was inappropriate and ordered Cambone to destroy it, but someone made copies, and after the FBI obtained one, it made more copies and distributed them as though the Black Panther, party, had officially created this book with the intent of distributing it to children. The FBI harassment of the Black Panthers also went beyond the organization's membership and its programs. Dean Seeburg was an actress who donated to the Black Panthers in support of their breakfast programs. During her pregnancy, the FBI sent false tips to news organizations, alleging that the father of her baby was a Black Panther. This of course was a huge scandal. seabrook tried to take her own life as a result, she went into Labor prematurely and her baby died. According to family members. She tried to take her own life every year around the time of the baby's death, and then she died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, nine, her death, was ruled a suicide, although some of her family's had suspicions that there was foul play involved, and perhaps most notoriously on December. Fourth, nineteen, sixty nine, the FBI orchestrated arrayed that was carried out by Chicago police who fired between eighty two and ninety nine gunshots into an apartment where several members of the Black Panther party were sleeping among other involvement, an FBI informant had provided police with a floor plan of the apartment. CHICAGO, black, panther leaders, Fred Hampton and Mark Clark, were killed and four other people in the apartment were seriously injured. Police claimed that this was a violent gunfight with the Black Panthers being the first to open fire. But an investigation revealed that only one shot had been fired from inside the apartment most likely by Mark Clark after he had already been fatally shot by police, according to Hampton Fiancee Deborah Johnson, who was in bed asleep with him when the shooting started an officer who came into the apartment after the shooting stopped asked if Hampton was still alive, another officer fired two shots and said he's good and dead now. The Black Panther party dissolved in nineteen, eighty, two with co Intel pro, being one of the many factors that contributed to its end. Former members say it is unrelated to the new Black Panther Party, which was founded in nineteen, eighty nine, and is classified as a hate group by the United States Commission on Civil Rights and the Southern Poverty Law Center. Let's take a break. Support for stuff you missed. In history. Class comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home. Today is so much more than it was yesterday, but it rocket mortgage home is still about you. During these challenging times I'll experiencing the top priority at rocket mortgage is the health and safety of the communities they serve, and while things are changing quickly every day. One thing that will never change is their teams commitment to giving you the best mortgage experience possible. That's why if you need mortgage support. Their team of experts is there to answer questions and offer solutions. They understand that hardships happen and they are here to help whether. Whether that means working with you to save money on your mortgage or finding a new way to navigate payments, if you have questions, the team at rocket mortgage has answers. They know how important your home is to you because you are important to them. If you need mortgage assistance, the home loan experts at rocket mortgage are available to help twenty four hours a day seven days a week from their home to yours. The team at rocket mortgage is with you. Visit rocketmortgage dot com slash history to learn more call for cost, information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and s consumer access, Dot, Org number thirty thirty. This episode is brought to you by Boll and branch. What do millions of Americans and three former us? Presidents have in common. They all agree that bollandbranch ether, these softest and most comfortable pure organic sheets on Earth Bollandbranch cotton is rainfed. It's pesticide-free and it curious a highest organic certification, and that is why it is so soft. I am eagerly awaiting my new pewter sheets said, which is going to go with all of my star wars bedding. Since they sell directly to you. Boll and branch sheets started just one hundred and sixty dollars, but that is a thousand dollar quality for a fraction of the price, plus you can sleep on them for a month risk-free in right now you will get fifty dollars off any sheet set at Bollandbranch Dot Com with Promo Code History Class that is spelled B. O., l., L. and branch dot. Com and the Promo Code is history class for fifty dollars off bollandbranch. Dot Com Promo Code. History class restrictions may apply see bollandbranch dot com for details. The last formal co Intel pro that was described in the Senate investigation reports. We're GONNA. Talk about in a little bit was Coen sale, pro new left, and that started in nineteen sixty eight. And of all the formerly named Cohen Sale Pros this was the most loosely focused and I mean as we've discussed. Most of them were loosely focused as we mentioned in part one. The FBI didn't really even have a definition for what new left Mentz the new left supervisor. He was quoted in the Church Committee report, said quote. I cannot recall any document that was written defining left as such. It is my impression, the characterization of new left groups rather than being defined at any specific time by document it more or less grew. It has never been strictly defined as far as I knew. It is more or less attitude I would think that makes it sound almost like an advertiser soundbite new left. It's an attitude the incident that prompted the FBI to create this co Intel. Pro was a student uprising in Columbia University in nineteen sixty eight. There was a lot involved in this protest, but it's most direct. Precursor was the university's decision to build a new gym in Morningside Park. Even though the gym was being planned for public land, it's facilities would mostly be for use only by the university, and not by the public to add to that frustration. This was part of an ongoing pattern of the university's expansion into Harlem, which was pushing the. Predominantly, black residents out of their homes in order to build facilities that they were not going to be allowed to access, so the resulting protests was complicated. Of like we cannot get into all of the nuances here, but generally the university's student Afro. American society or SAS started voicing their own and the communities objections to this gym, and then the school's chapter of the students for a democratic society or SDS, which was predominantly white saw this as an opportunity for a larger protest that would also focus on the university's involvement with the Vietnam War. Members of the SAS felt like they were being talked over and that the SDS was taking the protests in an entirely different direction in the end, the student Afro American Society took over. Hamilton Hall and the students for a democratic society took over other buildings on campus and took the dean hostage. There were more than a thousand demonstrators who took part in this campus shutdown that lasted for a week at the university's request. The New York Police Department began clearing the demonstrators on April. Thirtieth nineteen sixty eight. Black, demonstrators who had taken over Hamilton Hall left peacefully, but as more than one thousand police moved into the other buildings, some of the other demonstrators verbally, and physically resisted including by throwing things like shoes, bathroom tiles and books at officers, police forcibly removed people beating some of the resisting students, and in some cases, bystanders with nightsticks, others were trampled in the end, one hundred thirty two students, four faculty members and twelve police officers were injured so co Intel pro new left was motivated by the FBI's frustrations that the university had not brought in police earlier and also. Also by a sense that these types of protests should not be permitted to happen in the first place. The directives for Cohen sale pro new left were distributed by a memo and May of nineteen, sixty eight, and as described in the church report agents were to gather information on. This is all quote. One false allegations of police brutality to quote counter the widespread charges of police brutality that invariably arise following student police encounters to immorality, depicting the quote, scurrilous and depraved nature of many of the characters, activities, habits, and living conditions, representative, new left adherents and three. Action by college administrators to quote to show the value of college administrators and school officials taking a firm stand. And pointing out quote, whether and to what extent faculty members rendered aid and encouragement point two sounds like a lot of the other counterintelligence efforts. We've talked about in co Intel pros, but otherwise in the FBI's view, the use of force against demonstrators was warranted, and if demonstrators were injured in the process, they deserved it in one, thousand, nine, Sixty, eight, both the FBI, and the NYPD viewed the amount of force used at Columbia as appropriate and restrained. No tear gas was used. No one was shot in the injuries, sustained by students and faculty were minor enough that those who had to go to the hospital, were treated and released at disassociate weird bar to me. That's the weird bar of whether they used was appropriate br. The use of force was appropriate was like okay. Nobody like died was kind of the rate soon. However the FBI, also had a similar interpretation in cases of police brutality that were far more clearly egregious for example, after riots broke out during the nineteen, Sixty, eight Democratic National Convention in Chicago a memo from F., B. I. Headquarters to the Chicago. Field Office read quote. Once again the liberal press and the bleeding hearts, and the forces on the left or taking advantage of the situation Chicago surrounding the Democratic National Convention to attack the police and Organiz Larssen agencies. We should be mindful of the situation and develop all. Evidence to expose this activity and to refute these false allegations, conversely the Walker report, which was prepared for the National Commission on the causes and prevention violence concluded that there really was police wrongdoing. A portion of it read quote. Demonstrators attacked to, and they pose difficult problems for police as persisted in marching through the streets, blocking traffic intersections, but it was the police who forced them out of the park and. And into the neighborhood in on the part of the police, there was enough wild club. Swinging enough cries of hatred, enough gratuitous beating to make the conclusion inescapable that individual policemen and lots of them committed violent acts far in excess of the requisite force for crowd, dispersal or arrests to re dispassionately the hundreds of statements describing at first hand, the events of Sunday and Monday nights is to become convinced of. Of the presence of what can only be called a police riot, so while Cohen Felpro new left was extensively about targeting this very vaguely defined collection of left-wing demonstrators as being a threat to national security. It was also paired up with this sense of a much needed law enforcement crackdown that was justified and necessary and the need to protect police and other law enforcement from false accusations of brutality aside from. From that, it is difficult to talk about co Intel pro new left in a cohesive way, the counter intelligence program wound up targeting virtually every antiwar group in the US as well as student demonstrators, who were demonstrating for just about any reason in the words of the Church report quote, none of the bureau witnesses deposed the new left Co. Intel pro was generally effective in part because of the imprecise targeting. Also the tone of a lot of the FBI memos, regarding the new left sound almost baffled agents really did not get these young people most of them, white and affluent, a lot of them, looking like stereotypical hippies, agitating against things like police brutality in the Vietnam war memos include kind of perplexed, sounding references to things like Yoga and drug. Participants in the organizations targeted under Co. Intel pro new left also tended to be simultaneously idealistic and cynical, so the bureau had a harder time, finding informants or infiltrating organizations. For example, the main phone at the national headquarters of students for a Democratic Society had assigned tape to it for more than a year that said in capital letters. This phone is tapped. That is not to suggest that the other targeted organizations were clueless. They were just particularly cynical about the bureau by this point. The people who ultimately got the ball rolling on exposing Coen's L. Pro were members of anti war and other activists movements that had been targeted during these programs history, and we'll talk more about that after response break. This episode of stuff you missed in history classes brought to you by Bombo. Working out can be hard, and even when it's easy, it can still feel hard. Baba's socks cannot change that, but they can make exercise more comfortable so if you've been trying to get more fit this year, you can start by getting socks. They can keep up every step of the way. You can do a lot of different things to say active. So Bama's made a lot of different types of performance socks designed for everything from running to hiking cycling and more, they are made of a lightweight poly cotton blend and. And that means that no matter how hard you're working, your feet will stay cool, dry and comfortable and never sweaty. I love my Bomba socks. They are so comfortable. The seem is so almost invisible, but I never have that situation where they're rubbing on the top of my toes and causing irritation while I'm exercising. Goto bomb dot com slash history class today and get twenty percent off your first purchase. That's B. O.. M.! B. S. dot com slash history class for twenty percent off Baba's dot. com slash history class. This episode is brought to you by apartments dot com apartments. Dot Com is the number one rental search website with the most listings of apartments, condos, townhomes, and the best tools to find a new space without leaving your place with three D, virtual tours and hd videos and photos, including interiors neighborhood images, and even drone footage of exterior views. You can explore floor plans and amenities offered in thousands of units all from the comfort of your couch. It's that easy apartments dot. com also has super detailed property descriptions see you can find out more about apartment communities and the. The range of amenities as well as read reviews from other renters in just a few clicks, so it doesn't matter whether you're upgrading downsizing. Settling Down Bachelor, patting or empty, nesting apartments dot com make the search experience, more intuitive and easier than ever, and with so many choices and virtual tools. Waiting for you always know you're seeing the very best of what's available. It's not surprising. They've put more renters new homes than any other website visit apartments dot com to find a new space without leaving your place. APARTMENTS DOT COM, the most popular place to find a place. Counterintelligence is still part of the FBI's work, but in terms of these formerly named Cohen Sell Pros those came to an end. Thanks to the work of some regular people who pulled off a heist. When we say regular people, they included a cabdriver daycare center, director, a social worker and a professor. It sounds like one of those walk into a bar jokes I know it's my favorite part of these episodes for the number of reasons one of them being it's the most straightforward. Yeah, also it being kind of a David and Goliath story soon become clear to many of these groups that the FBI was targeting them left wing activists viewed the FBI with increasing suspicion, but nobody had evidence of what they thought was happening in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, a group of antiwar activists in the Philadelphia area decided to do something about it. Antiwar activist and college. Professor William C David on came up with the idea. John and Bonnie Raines married couple with small children were also involved. John had also been a freedom rider. Others included Keith Forsyth Robert Williamson Judy Feingold and two people known by pseudonyms, one of those is Susan Smith, and the other is Ron durst. A ninth participant dropped out before the burglary actually took place. There was no way they could break into the Philadelphia F., B. I. Office, which had tight security, so they looked other FBI field offices finding one nearby in media Pennsylvania. This office was housed in an apartment. Apartment building with a shared lobby space which was adjacent to the county courthouse. They cased this area Bonnie Raines posed as a student from swarthmore college and arranged a meeting under the guise of researching career opportunities for women at the bureau. They scheduled their burglary for March eighth nineteen, seventy-one, the night of the fight of the century between Muhammad Ali and Joe. Frazier reasoning that most people would be watching the fight. After breaking in they removed thousands of files which are being stored in regular file cabinets after sorting through what they had stolen, they mailed selections to newspapers and members of Congress anonymously, calling themselves the Citizens Commission to investigate the FBI, most of the newspapers returned these documents to the bureau, but the Washington Post confirmed their authenticity and ran a front page story on March, Twenty Fourth Nineteen seventy-one. It was titled Stolen Documents. Describe, FBI, surveillance activities. The article described surveillance of black activist organizations and efforts to enhance existing paranoia to. Further serve to get the point across that. There is an FBI agent behind every mailbox. More male documents and more articles followed J.. EDGAR HOOVER OFFICIALLY CANCELLED CO INTEL PRO on April twenty-seventh Nineteen seventy-one, citing security reasons, although some co Intel pro activities continued just without a specific name attached, but it wasn't yet clear to anyone outside the bureau. What the term co Intel pro meant or what its scope was J. Edgar Hoover died on May Second Nineteen seventy-two. He had been the director of the FBI for. For forty. Eight years in nineteen, seventy, three and nineteen, seventy four NBC journalist Carl Stern filed a series of requests under the freedom of Information Act those requests were repeatedly turned down until the documents were finally released under a court order, and that is when people finally started to get a sense of what co Intel pro meant and just how huge it was in nineteen, seventy four Seymour Hersh wrote a front page article for the New York. Times titled Huge CIA operation, reported in US against antiwar. Forces This article reported that the CIA was engaged in very co Intel pro like. Against peace activists in the US but the CIA was not supposed to be operating domestically at all these news reports sparked outrage within the government, and among the general public president Gerald. Ford appointed the Rockefeller Commission to investigate the C. I.. A. The House established the Pike Committee to investigate illegal activities by the CIA the FBI and the NSA. The Pike Committee's report was never published on January. Twenty, first nineteen, seventy, five, a resolution was introduced in the Senate to create a committee. Committee to investigate federal. Intelligence operations and determined quote the extent, if any, to which illegal improper or unethical activities were engaged him by any agency of the federal government, congressional hearings went on through seven, five and nineteen, seventy, six, a Senate committee was dubbed. The Church Committee was headed by Senator. Frank Church a Democrat from Ohio. The other committee members were selected to represent a range of viewpoints and experience levels with the final group, including six Democrats and five Republicans a staff of. Of A hundred and fifty people went through the thousands and thousands of pages of documents that were involved in all this. We should take a moment to talk about the FBI documentation. The FBI under J hoover was intensely bureaucratic a with a relentless focus on documenting everything also most of Choline del Pros existence took place before the freedom of information. Act was passed in nineteen, sixty, seven. All of it took place before the privacy. Act amendments were added in one thousand, nine hundred. Hundred Ninety four, which gave citizens the right to see the FBI's files about themselves. In other words, the FBI was writing everything down, and it was not doing so with the thought that anyone might ever read any of this outside of the bureau whether the information flow was going out to field offices and agents or back into headquarters, nobody was disguising their meaning or intent. Everyone was saying the quiet part loud, and doing it in writing also FBI documents from the CO Intel. Intel pro era, our full of racists, slurs and offensive stereotypes of black people after the FBI formerly started co Intel. Pro Black nationalists slash hate groups. Agents talked candidly about how if they didn't do a good enough job. The bureau was going to be forced to hire black agents. This idea even came with its own slogan that mimicked the accent of Attorney General, Robert F Kennedy, a rhyming couplet that ended with the N. Word, also as a continuation of that new there were. Were only five black FBI agents during most of the conseil pro era they had been hired as personal assistants or drivers for J., Edgar Hoover and then they had been given the title special agent during World War Two so that they would not be drafted so back to the investigations, most of the hearings were behind closed doors, both to try to prevent them from turning into a TV spectacle, and also to protect information about the US methods for conducting intelligence work even so. So the hearings were criticized for threatening us. Intelligence efforts and Senator Church was accused of using it to bolster presidential bid. While the Church Committee wanted to protect legitimate US intelligence efforts. It also wanted the public to have a chance to learn about what was going on. And to that end the committee held public hearings in September and October of nineteen seventy five. These hearings were focused on specific areas of misconduct. This included information about a biological agents program run by the CIA. CIA Domestic Surveillance Program from the White House and the FBI's programs to disrupt the civil rights movement, and the Anti Vietnam War Movement after one hundred twenty six full committee meetings forty subcommittee meetings more than eight hundred witness interviews and a review of more than one hundred ten thousand documents, the Church Committee issued a report, the described quote, a pattern of reckless disregard of activities threatened our constitutional system. This was not just unique to FBI, but the FBI is our focus here. Report went on to say quote. The abusive techniques used by the FBI in Coen's pro from nineteen, fifty six to nineteen, seventy-one included violations of both federal and state statutes. Prohibiting Mail fraud wire fraud incitement to violence, sending obscene material through the mail and extortion more fundamentally, the harassment of innocent citizens engaged in lawful forms. Political expression did serious injury to the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech and And the right of the people to assemble peaceably and to petition the government for a redress of grievances, the report also made it clear that the national security and violence prevention concerns were not the FBI's only motivation quote, the unexpressed major premise of the programs was that a law enforcement agency has the duty to do whatever is necessary to combat perceived threats to the existing social and political order. Eighteen percent of the approved co Intel pro proposals, targeted speakers, teachers, writers, or publications, meetings and peaceful demonstrations, all of which were just exercising a constitutional right to free speech operations tried to stop lawful speakers from speaking teachers from teaching writers from writing and demonstrators from demonstrating the Senate committee made ninety six recommendations to quote place intelligence activities within the constitutional scheme for controlling government power. This included changes to how the FBI was run. That included a ten year term limit for the director of the bureau. It also included recommendations for additional. Additional oversight within the bureau. Every counterintelligence proposal had to be approved headquarters, but outside the bureau, the programs were almost completely unknown specific elements of Co Intel pro, CPA USA and white hate were both known to various attorneys General Presidential Advisers, and Cabinet and committee members for example Attorney General Robert F Kennedy authorized the bureau's wiretaps of Martin Luther King Junior the bureau also notified multiple attorneys, general of various accomplishments and progress. Those are their words against the Ku Klux Klan without describing the breadth of what had led to that progress. Even with these two programmes, though the full scope wasn't known outside the bureau, and it appears that the other co Intel pros were known to anyone outside the FBI at all. Efforts to bring in more oversight of the bureau's activities included the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of nineteen seventy eight, the exposure of Cohen sell pro and the hearings that followed drastically affected mainstream American perceptions of the FBI, according to Gallup polls, the proportion of Americans with a highly favourable view of the FBI dropped from eighty four percent in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, five to thirty seven percent in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy five. At the same time, no criminal convictions followed the investigations and the Church report, even though that report detailed numerous instances of criminal activity, as we said the F. B. I. is still engaged in counter intelligence in the years just after co Intel pro was disbanded. The FBI did extensive counterintelligence work against the American Indian Movement and the Committee in solidarity with the people of El Salvador this included a disinformation campaign during the nineteen. Nineteen seventy-three occupation of wounded knee, both to discredit the American Indian movement to the general public, and to try to create division within that occupation. Cohen's help row has also made headlines at numerous points since the mid seventies, comparing it to policies and programs that have been introduced during multiple presidential administrations. This includes comparisons to various aspects of the Patriot Act and the NSA's warrantless surveillance programs in the two thousands the general focus. Focus on black liberation, as somehow inherently threatening and violent has also continued to be part of the FBI's rhetoric in two thousand, seventeen and twenty eighteen leaked documents revealed that the F. B.. I. Had targeted black identity extremists as a major threat with really similar language about potential violence to what was used during co Intel pro quote the F. B. I. Assesses. It is very likely black identity. Extremists Bi perceptions of police brutality. Brutality against African Americans spurred an increase in premeditated retaliatory lethal violence against law enforcement, and will very likely serve as justification for such violence. This was paired with criticisms that the F. B., i. and other federal agencies were ignoring credible threats of white nationalist violence. Yeah, this is basically a very similar protests to what has been going on in the last few months as we're recording this, which is on July, seventh twenty twenty. With demonstrators, basically saying, please stop shooting unarmed black people. And the FBI creating the this. Category of black. Identity extremist. Which led people to go? That's not a thing. Made, that up. To Circle back around to the Citizens Commission to investigate the FBI. None of them were ever prosecuted in connection with this break in in media Pennsylvania. It is possible that law enforcement believed that the culprits went on to be involved with a different group of anti Vietnam, War activists who were known as the Camden Twenty eight. A screw broke into the Camden New Jersey draft board office, and they destroyed draft records there the Camden Twenty. Eight were acquitted to the Citizens Commission to investigate the FBI actually were involved in that, so there's some speculation that law enforcement was like well. They've already been tried and acquitted of this other thing. We probably have no chance. Regardless, though several members of the Citizens Commission to investigate the FBI came forward and twenty fourteen. Their story is told in the book. The burglary, the discovery of J. Edgar Hoover Secret FBI by Betty, Metzger, who also wrote that front page Washington Post, story that we mentioned earlier on I have not read that book, but I have watched the two thousand fourteen documentary nineteen seventy-one, which also tells that story. Co Intel pro. I know it was a lot. Do you. have listener mailed to take us out hopefully on a peppier. Mikheyev is This is. An email from Alison I wrote back to Allison, but I thought other people might also find it helpful. Alison was writing about the behind the scenes where Holly Nice talked about and countering racism out in the world. And whether we were prepared to counter it. and. So Alison wrote high on today's behind the scenes. Many Tracy I heard. You say you have a response at the ready for when you hear someone, say something racist I'd love to hear what you would say or at least a generalization because I'm terrible. With on-the-spot responses and terribly regret, and think back on my lack of response or retort I'd love to hear your at the ready, so I might be able to have in mind and practice so I can be ready for win. That should arise in the future hope and wish it would never happen and I'd never have to hear anything as such. It's just horrible. I love what you do and never miss an episode. Thanks very much, alison so. Thing that I am prepared to say like. Let's say I'm at the grocery store and the line is moving really slowly which it probably is right now and somebody behind me implies that it's because the person running the cash register is incompetent because of their race. I might say. I hope you're not saying that to me because you think I agree with you. I I heard that on a podcast I'm pretty sure it was on an episode of politically reactive towards the end of its run, but I'm not actually sure and like that is when I want to make it clear to that person that that's not acceptable. The thing that they just said, but I'm also like not wanting to start a fight with that person. That's a stranger in public. If I'm talking to a family member and the family member says something that is is racist on some level. I might say I don't understand what you mean by that. Could you explain it to me? And then a lot of times like as a person stalking, they will hear the words they're saying. A good resource I have found is if you google responding to everyday bigotry. The first or second result should be a pamphlet that was published by the southern. Poverty Law Center that combines a lot of like real world, anonymous examples of when people have encountered bigotry in their everyday lives, and like practical responses to that. I like that it's a publication that's been around for a while. It doesn't cover every conceivable thing, and it is based on people's personal experiences. But if you're like I, don't I. Don't know what I should say when something happens like that can be a good starting point for folks. You're so much more thoughtful because I can read all of that, but in the moment what I say is you're a racist expletive. As probably evidenced by my story about where I wanted to punch a stranger in public, so yeah, yeah! I am not applies to family members as well. Somebody tweeted at us about that story that you had told about being in the cab, and basically that person who I think was was from Ireland. Basically said that should have been. So anyway I mean even even as we talked about in that behind the scenes episode like you can be prepared and still freeze up in the moment it happens sometimes, but I. The first time I read that particular publication. I was like I feel like I am more prepared now. To talk about things so. If, you'd like to write to us about this or any other podcast history podcasts at iheartradio dot com. Or also Labor social media missed in history, and if you want to subscribe to, our show, were on iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts and anywhere else to get your podcast. Stuff you missed in history classes, the production of iheartradio radio for more podcasts, iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi. This is Leah Rimini and I am joined by Mike. And we are so excited to continue our journey with a new podcast called Scientology Fair Game Mike. When can people here it? The first episode is airing on twenty one July Leah and then week lead thereafter. Okay and for those who are not hoity-toity, that's July twenty. I think you listen to Scientology Fair game on the iheartradio APP, apple, podcast or whatever you listen to podcasts. Hi I'm Heidi Merck off of what to expect when you're expecting and host of the upcoming what to expect podcast on iheartradio. I always say motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood, but did you know that black MOMS in the United States are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy, related complication because of disparities in care and more than two thirds of those deaths are preventable. That's unacceptable and that's why I'm asking you to join us on July twenty second for our. Our Sixth Annual Bump Day. To celebrate beautiful bumps in healthy pregnancies raise awareness and show your solidarity and support for every mom everywhere just share a bump pastor present yours or bumpy love with the Hashtag bump day, so every mom can expect a healthy beginning and healthy future for herself and the baby. She loves on July Twenty second. Please spread the word share the love help save lives. See you on bump day for more information. Go to what to expect project. Dot Org.

FBI Intel Black Panther Party Director J Edgar Hoover United States Cohen Senate Church Committee hoover Co director Luther King Junior Tracy Wilson Ku Klux Klan Democratic Society CIA Black Panther federal government
The O'Reilly Update, June 5, 2020

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

13:00 min | 9 months ago

The O'Reilly Update, June 5, 2020

"Yeah. Bill O'Reilly. Here Friday June fifth. Two Thousand Twenty. You are listening to the Riley Update. Here's what's happening today in America. Well this week, the country witnessed anti police demonstrations in more than one hundred cities what began as peaceful protests in the aftermath of George, floyds defeat at the hands of the police quickly turned to chaos and criminal activity. At least ten thousand people have now been arrested in all fifty states, hundreds of businesses damaged or destroyed thousands of people heard, and at least two police officers killed mandatory curfews in place in New York City for the first time since World War Two. The National Guard deployed fifteen states and the nation's capital. Predictably many in the media blamed Donald Trump for much of the unrest. The new. York Times writing quote. How trump's idea for a photo op lead to havoc in a park unquote. The Washington Post quote trump's threats to deploy troops moves. America closer to anarchy unquote. Both newspapers are hate trump enterprises. You can't believe a word either them print. Top Democrats also trashing the president. Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey calling Mr. trump scum for fueling racial hate Nancy Pelosi, accusing the chief executive of ripping the country apart. Many. Celebrities Blame America itself Colin Kaepernick football kneel. Down Guy, 'cause violence, the only logical reaction to police brutality, Justin, timberlake Steve Carell Seth Rogan others donating money to help bail out violent rioters violent. These actors also support black lives matter, which is really an updated version of the Black Panther Party. Black lives matter the organization wants to ban public policing and release all minority prisoners. From Jail Black lives, matter is a radical and dangerous organization. So what happens now in America violence is slowly dissipating new poll show. Seventy one percent of Americans want the National Guard to enforce peace. There is backlash coming, and it could play out in November. The majority of Americans do not want anarchy and do not believe they live in a racist country. I add our listeners sound off right back. Working from home is causing the worst type of cybercrime home title theft. While we're doing everything from working banking shopping in the House cybercriminals are targeting our homes. They want the money they can get by taking out loans against the house. The crime is called home title theft, the F. B.. I. Is Warning All homeowners home title lock protect your home from cyber thieves. Your home's legal title is online. Thieves can find it and forged your signature. Stating you sold your home to them. Then they take out loans and leave you in debt, banks, insurance and basic identity theft services do not protect you. Home tied lock puts a virtual barrier around your home's title, so please go home title locked dot. Com and register your address to see. If you are already victim, you can use the code bill for thirty free days of protection. That's code bill at home. Title Loc Dot Com. Timothy Riley update message of the day. Listeners sound off. We do this every Friday. You can reach me by email bill at Bill O'Reilly dot com bill at Bill. O'Reilly com, so let's begin with Christine in Bufton South Carolina. I don't understand the point of the protests. What do the protesters hope to accomplish? What do they want? Well there isn't one thing Christine is a whole litany. Of Grievance on the streets of America. Some of it is legitimate. And some of it is not. But overall. Millions, of Americans not the majority, but millions feel we are an on just country. That minorities do not have the same opportunity to pursue happiness as Caucasians do. So any chance to demonstrate their anger, they take. And? That is what you are seeing this week. Robert in San Jose California the statistics do not support the idea. The police are hunting and killing black back. The communities do not care about stats and the protesters will not believe them anyway. That is absolutely correct, Robert. Two Thousand and nineteen, there were ten killings by police of unarmed blacks. Ten. And there are eight hundred thousand. Police officers in this country. And if you look at the ten, some of them involve. People driving cars trying to run over police. That kind of thing so you're right? Stats don't matter in these protests and people will not leave them anyway, which is. Irrational once you get there. You're in dangerous place. Mia, in Lincoln Nebraska couldn't believe the Chicago mayor said the F. Word to the president, the United States that would be Lori lightfoot I trump hater who has lost control of the city of Chicago as her predecessor did Rahm Emanuel the black on black murder rate in Chicago is horrifying and has been for years yet. Lori lightfoot. Has No clue on how to protect poor people in her city. Philip in Bangor Maine. The George. Floyd death was a vicious and inhumane. Terrible thing that no human being should ever have happened to them and deserves punishment to the fullest extent of the law. Okay, Phillip No one is disagreeing with you. Now, the officer had his de on Mr Floyd's neck and killed him charged with second degree. Murder will be convicted the three other officers who stood by all charge with felonies. Mike Malone Aberdeen Washington. Can the president by executive order eliminate the contract? CNN has at the airports. No CNN pays for that access private company. They pay the airports. That's what you see by the way. CNN's coverage of the race stuff is been dishonest and. Appalling. I'm Bill O'Reilly and I approve the message by putting it together for more news analysis, please visit. Bill O'Reilly DOT COM for honest coverage in a moment something you might not know. You. Know me as a news guy, but today I'm a science. Guy I've accumulated my share of aches and pains over the years, which started my quest for a natural solution. I found it in Omega xl. The stuff works, and it has thirty years of research to prove it. A mega is a powerful natural anti inflammatory supplement that helps relieve joint and muscle pain. There's nothing like it Omega. Has Health benefits way beyond joint comfort. Here's another reason I take Omega Excel research shows that it can rebalance inflammation in the body and promote a healthy immune system vitally important, so please do two things today for yourself. Stay close to your loved ones and order Omega, xl the supplement that can deliver pain relief while improving your overall health order now and get a second bottle. Absolutely free of charge, please go to Omega. XL, DOT, com slash bill. That's Omega. The letters xl dot com slash bill. Now Rally update brings you something you might not know. The pandemic is closed hundreds of thousands of restaurants across the USA while the dining rooms remain empty. Fox are turning to old favourite for a quick meal. The drive through. Forget fine dining sales at some fast food. Restaurants are way up in the age of cove it. The industry currently taking in more than eight million dollars each month. Some locations even reconfigure their parking lots to accommodate the motorcade of hungry customers going in for pickup. Here's how the country's biggest chains are feeding folks during the shutdown Taco Bell, introducing a new quote order in advance option on their website, allowing customers to pre pay to promote social distancing sales of the belt of six percent since March. McDonald's however taking a big hit from the breakfast situation before the pandemic millions of Americans stopped offering egg mcmuffin on their way to work. A more sales of plunge twenty two percent in March Alone Kentucky Fried Chicken Pizza Hut Popeye's all relying on delivery to survive the play the restaurants. Now you services like seamless Grub an uber eats to get their food to customers who don't want to leave the house. Those businesses are holding their own. All platforms now offer contact lists delivery no cash. You give your credit card over the phone. No conversation at the door. No problem seemingly delivery drivers dropped the food off. Ring Your Bell and Zip away sales for that contact list delivery up thirty percent from the same time last year, and here's something else. You might not know the biggest trend fast. Food is not. Not a quick burger or some fried chicken. It's bulk ordering Americans afraid of venturing outside our ordering three or four family meals at the same time to be delivered. They freeze the surplus food for later fast food, purchases of fifty dollars or more are up two hundred percent since the arrive, but beware the average. American has already gained five pounds since the shutdown began in March back after this. Two Guys Kyle and Josh. We're both losing their hair. which was no surprise to? Either since they knew male pattern baldness ran in their families. The way they dealt with their hair. Loss however couldn't have been more different. Kyle put it off losing more and more hair Josh went right to keeps dot com to learn how to keep his hair. Keeps. Offers generic versions of the only two. FDA approved hair loss products out there. The genetic version save Josh a lot of money and the consultation was simple. He answered a few questions online and snap a few pictures of his hair. A doctor then evaluated and recommended. The right FDA approved hair loss treatment for Josh. It was shipped discreetly to his door. Keeps lets you save your hair without ever leaving your home, please go to keeps Katie EPS dot com slash bill to get your first order of keeps hair loss treatment fifty percent off. Half! OFF THAT'S KEEPS DOT com slash bill keeps. Dot Com slash bill. Thank you for listening to the O'Reilly update. I am Bill O'Reilly no spin, just facts and always looking out for you.

Bill O'Reilly America Donald Trump Josh CNN dot National Guard president theft United States Kyle Chicago New York City Black Panther Party Washington Post Christine Lori lightfoot George
Is This The Blueprint for Black Liberation?

Black History Year

37:41 min | 10 months ago

Is This The Blueprint for Black Liberation?

"We learned in school at George. Washington later Ray tag on the against the greatest army in the world the British army, so he lives Ragtag Army. He overcame the oppression and the throne. He became president of the United States. Then he went home to Mount Vernon and live out the rest of his life. As peaceful country farm gentleman. That was the Mount Vernon. That they teach in school, especially to white children, the to might resist tyranny, and you might still survive. But for us. We had no Mount Vernon. They wanted to show us. If YOU RESIST WHY TYRANNY! Why depression you with that a? That's civil rights leader Robert F Williams speaking the truth. History is written by the victors. The survivors, the oppressors, the people own the printing presses and decide what starting school. black-americans are taught that our ancestors were docile. Shout like beings who are too incompetent to find a way out of slavery. We're taught that non violent protests and forgiveness are the only ways we can achieve our goal of liberation liberation that can only be granted by, but Netherland White people. On one end or supposed to celebrate the white so-called heroes. Of the American revolution, who used force and violence to stand up against British oppression and fight for their independence, but on the other hand we're supposed to feel no love for freedom fighters such as Malcolm X. in the Black Panthers and what about Fred Hampton the chairman of the Black Panther Party and legendary Chicago organizers of one, the first multicultural political organizations, the Rainbow Coalition. Amanda Tremendous, vision and deep love for his community, a man who was so effective death Bi Chicago. PD assassinated him in his bed. As his children. Slept. In December nineteen, sixty nine. Fred. Hampton has been dropped down the memory hole of American culture. Today on push blacks black history year we reveal the truth about how black folks have risen up against oppression, and why that matters to our lives today. There are hundreds of documentary votes find slave people in America. However only a handful of them can be classified as successful. We're GONNA. Take a quick look some of those. And then we'll dive deep into the most successful rebellion of all the one that gave hope to every black person in the world at the time the one that they didn't want US Nobel back then, and they damn sure don't WanNA snowbound. I'm Jay from push black around here. It's always black history year. Fifteen twenty, six, only thirty four years after Columbus Lands in the Americas. A group of white explores formed a colony in the area where Georgetown South Carolina now sits. They arrive with about one hundred slave. Africans who came straight from Africa and recalled vividly would admit to be free. Things started going left for the colony almost immediately. Starvation? `isolation. Perfect conditions to create the gap Africans could exploit. They set the settlement ablaze and teamed up with neighboring native Americans. who were already fed up the terrorism of white invades? This collaboration led to the burning down of much of the town. blacks left the ruins of the settlement behind to live the rest of their lives as free people with their first nation collaborators. Middle Fifteen hundreds Mexico. From the BOM is enslaved, and with thousands of other Africans pressed into labor in the brutal Mexican sugarcane. Is Response doesn't slave with swift and determined? Here's author and filmmaker Henry Louis Gates Junior. Tell the story on his documentary series, black and Latin America. In fifteen seventy fifty years before the mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock Gaspar Yanga. Several other men and women not only ran away from slavery, but spent thirty years hiding out in the mountains around Veracruz attacking the Spanish in guerrilla raids and defending their community. The Spanish never could subdue them. Finally in sixteen o nine, the Spanish admitted defeat and offered Yanga his own independent town in exchange for peace. Youngest settlement became what some scholars believed to be the very first town founded by free black people in all of the Americas. Gaspar Yanga starts to resistance. Keeps a European colonial power bay. The sheets an independent region I? Don't know about you, but I didn't learn about Gaspar Yongan School. All of these revolts struck fear in the whites who wanted to maintain the status quo. But none can compare to the mother of all black bolts. The revolt, they changed the game forever. The one that led to ramifications that are still felt to this day. The one that made the most feared military leader of the time Napoleon. Trimble in his boots. The Haitian Revolution. During the seventeen hundreds. France prospered off the Labor of enslaved black people. Haiti known, then as saying to me, was the wealthiest European colony in the world because it's resource, rich land produced sugar, coffee and. INDIGO, Some estimate that twenty percent of France's wealth came from this colony. There were nearly half a million slaves on Saint Demean massively outnumbering the white slaveholders. To keep the blacks in. The wise created a buffer class of mixed race. People who are the offspring of sexual exploitation of black women by white men. And this constant arrival of new Africa's to demeaning preserve the connections to west African languages and traditions I slave Africans in saint demand were constantly reminded about who they were where they came from and what freedom? This was also the period of the European enlightenment, so there's a bunch of ideas of liberty in the air. France had adopted the declaration of the rights of Man, which ensured that men are born and remain free and equal in rights. This idea of enlightenment paired with a group of black folks who are fed up with oppression in new exactly what freedom meant? Set the stage for what would be the largest slave vote in the hemisphere. The Haitian blacks had a long history of small rebellions against why slaveholders and they were about to take it to a whole `nother level. To build this then we're going to turn to a guy I've known for years Dr Brendan Bird. Doctor Bird is a historian and the author of the Black Republic African Americans and the fate of Haiti. Will Link to it in show notes. His Book Offers Fascinating View into the very complicated place that Haiti is held in the minds of black folks from independence to W. Two boys in through today. Dr Bernard Great to have you with us. So could you describe the conditions that set the stage for the Haitian Revolution. Yes absolutely so generally speaking on the conditions that set the stage for the Haitian Revolution. Similar to the conditions are bad, confronts black slay people throughout the wrestling America's. There are similar, but they're also in many ways amplify and send may which is the French colony beds. Independence becomes Haiti so sentiment on the even the Haitian revolution is a it's a majority enslaved population. That SOB is approximately five, hundred, thousand, or so misled people, approximately fifty thousand or so. Europeans and European Americans and about fifty thousand or so agenda Cala Pre people of color. is so I mean you see the start disparities right there? This is a slave society through, and through is one in which the majority of the world's sugar will come from the world's coffee comes from Haiti the most profitable stretch of land on earth, really right, and it's all built on the brutalization of those enslaved people, planters and slam incentive main had essentially done the calculus. They essentially done the Mac and they concluded that it was more profitable. Basically work enslaved people to de than it was to keep them alive in so that enslaved population is majority African population of because. Enslaved people are is basically in this cycle of day. They're brought in to war to die in more enslaved Africans abroad in these are the conditions. is a brutal slave. Society is one in which we see the excesses of how slavery and capitalism worked together at all of these off of sugar and coffee are built literally on the backs of enslaved people and again those sleigh people was majority African population. With this constant influx of folks from Africa. That creates a different dynamic than the system of slavery. That existed in America, didn't it? So. Yes, he pointed out right on their differences among slave societies in a march section of. Colonial mainland, British, North America and then what's becomes the united. States enslaved populations are reproducing themselves right. A lot of that has to do with very islands processes of as we put it. Very Grassley in the terms at enslavers talked about reading writing these things that scholars like Dana Raymond Berry have show. That that reproduction is intentional again. It's a very violent process or the structure in Mainland Bridge North America what becomes the United. States of reproducing population is in part due to tobacco is less taxing of a crop to produce than sugar. Debbie disease environments are more conducive to sustaining human life. Than they are in the Caribbean Plantation Society, so those sorts of banks right? Question, but what effect that? Cycle of dead banned and importation has on domain in this society. There We're talking about a slave revolution. Heysham revolutionized flavor balloon. We have to talk about it as a decidedly. Africa Right. We can locate A. Very difficult to locate. Jesus played people in a specific locale. June speaking. We know that many of them are Congo lease, so in thinking about how the Haitian revolution is conducted from a military standpoint we have to look it the conduct of war in the Congo during the Arab, the translate trait that is how many of these slave rebels are informed about how to go about conducting warfare would talk about spiritual and cultural beliefs. That influence, just even a bet that drive towards insurrection. We have to talk about those as African and specifically Congolese influence right Beijing revolution begins in August seventeen, ninety, one with a baudoux ceremony begins with the invocation of African deities with this idea. This claim that is people had to forget the God of. Europeans. And had to strike a blow against slavery based upon their affiliation with these African Davies, so it is really all about. Eve Lucien demands that we re orange. It's our understanding the political right the history of the modern west at least politically a history of. European and Euro American politics in political ideas the Haitian. Revolution requires us to pivot towards the question of why did. African. Spirituality Africa in opposite. Ways of knowing. How does influence the politics of the West? Requires a whole reframing. What should we look to then as the catalyst for the start of the Haitian Revolution? That's a great question, so. Like the standard explanation of the catalysts. Or Much of the twentieth century was really bad He's revolution as part of the French. Revolution extension of the French Revolution that the catalyst was really seventeen eighty-nine in the beginning of revolution founded on these ideas of Liberty Fraternity inequality or free people of Color. Demand Rights based upon. The happenings in the French Revolution based upon the Declaration of Rights of Man and citizen that they claiming equal rights for themselves. They say that they deserve just as much as Europeans and Euro Americans. Image its out of that contest between. People of Color and White Bridgman. That then enslaved people use that opportunity to assert their own claims to freedom, so that's the sort of typical. Explanation for the catalysts. More recently scholars have really unearthed a more bottom up a more grassroots history on the Haitian revolution, especially odd the countless for right. So it's much more attuned to what you point at now, I will what are the histories of slave insurrection proceeding hr booster mortar these histories of Maroon communities. And what did they tell us about Asian Revolution because there is longer trajectory of modernized right, there is longer trajectory certainly of enslaved people again, emphasizing the point, many of them African of resisting slavery in ways that do not appropriate European ideas of liberty equality, but instead assert their own African understandings of what freedom looks like no it certainly based upon is understanding of our rights and a right to have rights, and as a fundamental part of that a right to not be enslaved. In, it's also based though on what been freedom will look like so that history? Marin is clues into up for many of these enslaved posts in particularly Africanus late books, freedom has to look like some communitarianism for example right like freedom is not tied into. This individualism as it is with those European understands based upon belong to a community. Bright in that takes very tangible forms and the maintenance of a small collective platform land like. Writing takes the form in ideas of popular democracy ride so. To your question about the the catalysts right again back to this point about African ways of knowing African understandings of what freedom looks like and how those ideas are rooted in idea, the collected. So, if communitarianism in African route, ideals of freedom are showing up as revolutionary sparks. This gives us decidedly non Eurocentric set of catalyst. It's less than expression of acquired European ideals and more continuation of African culture. But back to the story. What should we know to have a good grounding in what actually happened in the Haitian Revolution? So. In the summer of Seventeen Ninety one, you have real. Beginnings Emergence of a new stage in slave insurrection, maybe a better way to put it inside Omai the beginnings of what becomes known as the Haitian Revolution. Begins in the northern Haiti around. Prison Day competition. In a very quickly becomes a colony wide bannon slay people, earning plantations, striking a literal direct blow to this plantation economy that has the heart of the plantation economy of America's the world. Right miserable Lucien very quickly. Seeing this uprising is seen as certainly destabilizing force for the French it as an opportunity upper, other imperial over imperial powers. So almost from the outset. The summer seventeen, ninety, one, the British see this as an opportunity invade central main, right The Spanish see this as an opportunity, they allied within enslaved folks most famously do solemnly virtual begins. Says an ally of the Spanish that allegiance? Actually, seventeen, ninety, three, seventeen, ninety four win the French concede to emancipation when they concede to the demands of been slay people who? Were striking a blow against slavery, and that pointed out to Solomon Virtual or allies with the French he becomes on the Governor General of the colony of Senna main and effectively governs it as a independent a sovereign entity. That's a problem. Because see for some of some of these imperial powers. It doesn't sit well certainly with the French. It doesn't sit well with European and American sovereign hours for. A formerly enslaved man in Orleans laid people who had destabilize the plantation. Commun- destabilize the ratio hierarchies upon which Economy's been built read. That was not something that was going to necessarily sit well. In so, that's what really leads in. Eighteen O two when Napoleon has consolidated his power, France, he makes a. A essentially. To Louvre Chore From Power By some sort of huge by basically acting as if this was an instance where these two leaders were going to. Our lay e- ends up. Extraditing too solid with Chore Prom on the County of Santa Main to France, where which died or issue at that point, the Haitian revolution. really becomes a war for independence in the insurance. They knew stage where to saw the matures Omer generals including Joie de Celine's at may then. From? Bear allegiance with France and then some complexities there right, so they had. Sided with France business, an opportunity to ship the power dynamics right us for the time being before that opportunity arose as rates after the extradition in death of Tucson were chore these Former Generals Including Jacques Desk Leans Lee, went again and becomes a war for independence. Independence is achieved off January I eighteen four John Lanes declares the ends of slavery. The end of French colonialism declares literal debt of San Domain says is now eighty. A return to the name of pre. Sendo may I've been name that the indigenous people knew it by. So that's generally speaking how Beijing Revolution on all the it is just monuments. It's hard to over our state that meant to have a black state declared a black state in the middle, just looked. Visualize a map of. Of that time right is colonies that are part of slaveholding empires instant in independent united, states us constitution, and allowed not just for maintenance of slavery, but actually expansion of slavery right, and then you have a black state whose existence as founded upon anti-slavery on antiracism on anti-colonialism bright again it's hard to overstate imports. Had sent shock waves into America and around the world. Even as the revolution is ongoing. lumers gossip information about it are spreading like wildfire throughout the black America's. Black. Sailors who are moving about port cities including port-au-prince Charleston Baltimore other ports throughout the Caribbean et Cetera. Spreading information about it as you can, imagine says racial. This idea that enslaved people to strike in a boom for freedom. It catches on like that. And so when when Haiti declares its independence. Or A it's not necessarily A. We can't identify that as the moment win, you know eighty takes on international meaning is more so than it's a cements. Abbas meaning right because again. In many ways, the significance off the insurrection is identifying even before the declaration of independence, so when the revolution succeeds and leaves, the Independence Right veges amplifies it's. Just to take the African American example stock. That Declaration of independence. It's a it makes synonymous with a range of things. It makes a Haiti synonymous with abolition and emancipation, and makes a Haiti synonymous with a racial equality. We have an independent black state. It is the Second Independent State in the Americas. It's BECCA. Ration- is the second only written decoration and America's right that is. All par with the United States a republic that is almost from its initial founding self identifying as white right, so Haiti stands in not only abolition and a mess patient, but also racial equality for many African Americans is now only an abstract idea freedom, but is quite literally a site of Renal. Basically the first six decades, or so of the nineteenth century thousands of African Americans, twelve thousand, almost certainly more. Americans go Haiti. They leave. I say that socio economically politically black life in the United States is unsustainable in Haiti will have access to land to political rights to civil rights to more freedom of expression to dignity, and so they go there. This is a meaning ascribed ascribe Haiti, in Tabriz difficult to overestimate. It is a literal sight of freedom for thousands of African Americans right is a place that African Americans identify both symbolically and in reality as a place where black people can. Achieve things impossible. Throughout the rest of the world. Amazing? Now. That was the black reaction. What was the white reaction journeys speaking much different? You do so we will A shoutout out to some white abolitionists come and these folks like we'll. We'll certainly now a militant. Is like. John batchelor John Brown son John. Junior come not only celebrate salt. Lubar chore as this Respectable Model of abolition ISM right, but who? Is a small population of white abolition. Won't say. Revolution assignment violence works. That it is not only a symbol of racial equality, but it is also a sign, or what we in the United States should be willing to do to achieve emancipate for our black rendering and the United States so again. That's a small population of abolitionists, white abolitionists who either celebrated to Salt Lake shore along who went so far as to say that the Haitian revolution should be emulated so small set. For the most part of the white American Population Bachchan Revolution really stands in for number. Able S- right. This idea of the horrors of San Domain basically becomes a catch all word for fear of slave insurrection in the United States. In that Europe slaven searching the United States is tied into the horrors of Santa Main is tied into a revolution. Have that manifests itself? In, the material world is through. The non-recognition of Haiti, basically from eighteen hundred to eighteen, sixty, two of the United States, government or these. Matt Recognition Haiti. Enlarge are due to the influence of southern slaveholders government. Who say we can't recognize it because it. We recognize eighty that ballots. Slave insurrection it will also lead a literally to black diplomats in Washington. DC and we don't want that. Materially it also leads to. A. Really significant, argument war secession. On the eve of the civil war, confederates are trying to drum up support for the confederacy. They travel quite literally travelled themselves or they a moon. Procession Documents Roch Lasalle that are essential. Make an argument that if we do not separate from the United States then we're going to have another Haiti here in the US that it will remain here. That eventually is going to lead is another whores. Is Santa made in our pockets? So to really significant rhetorical move that does have the effect along with other arguments for does having back to drumming up support or someone succession, so Jillian speaking, there's certainly a difference between the ways in which black-americans. The Haitian Revolution since radiation in the way that many white Americans view it as a as a real problem. That divergence of view, white and Black America's sing. The same thing very differently is kind of the story of our lives in. It seems like the Haitian Revolution is particularly way down because it's significance crosses so many lies, so I think when we approach. History Writ Large. The fundamental question about this perspective. We approach history from. Do, we approach history from the perspective of the colonizer, the COLLINA. Being Slavery Asleep. oftentimes, we are giving the idea. Well, you know. Ideally you approach it a quote unquote objectively. Viewpoint of a variety of perspectives. Right the Haitian revolution. I think. Probably, the most important meaning. Identify one takeaway is value the need the post to assess history on the perspective of the enslaved that colonize the downtrodden the oppress if we do that. From the perspective on Haitian Revolutionaries, in particular masses that drove the hang listen even even the early lead of the Haitian. State, but really left with is one of the most powerful messages and world history right? We are left with a revolution that is explicitly anti colonial. That's explicitly anti-slavery. BET is also against striking a blow against systems of capitalism that are tied in the systems slavery, so it's a revolution that gives us really revolutionary messages right to stay a really obvious point, but. That we really have to appreciate by? Grappling with the Haitian revolution on its own terms and Willie appreciate the value understanding history not from this quote. Unquote object. From the perspective of the enslaved in the press themselves. Really left with is. One of the most profound declarations and vestiges of human rights and humanity in quality and will history. You know I can't think of a more profound example. Yeah the Haitian. Revolution still misses people though I have this ridiculous clip of White Christian televangelist Pat Robertson claiming that the Haitians Use of traditional African spiritual systems was actually a deal with the devil. Even when far is to say that this was the reason. They were devastated in two thousand ten by the earthquake. Kristie. Something happened a long time ago. In Haiti and people might not want to talk about it. They were under the heel of the Franch-. You Know Napoleon the third whatever. And they got together and sore pact to the devil. They said we will serve you if you get us free from the French true story, and so the devil said okay, it's a deal and They kick the French. Oh, you know. The Haitians revolted and got themselves free. But ever since they have been cursed by by one thing after the other desperately poor that island, it's just eerie how the simple statement! Throw away the lightness of the White Man's God. Led Robertson to jump to a conclusion as extreme as making a pact with the devil. It indicates that he believes the White Man's God is the only guy there is the inhumanity of Robertson. Statement is almost. and. It's so hard to process right that he. He gives a statement from the two thousand ten earthquake. Where hundreds of thousands of patients have. Either died or lost access to? The things needed to stain light housing medical care. Water in comes out and says net the earthquake is a consequence of the Haitian revolution, as because Haitians made a pact with the devil in securing their freedom. They now suffer this cataclysmic disaster. Inhumanity is. It's almost impossible to fathom bright. Sort of thing, if that some degree, you do not believe that Asians that blind people occupy the same category humanity as you, but I think what that statement speaks to is not only Robertson's just deeply deeply rooted prejudices, but also speaks to. The ways in which revolution is so difficult to process for hours in the moment it's happening for Europeans in your Americans, but then even afterwards for countless your Paeans, Euro Americans and Americans right. We've been can't process on its own terms. Then this invented. The Haitian Revolution is to take words on the storing around the ball is the greatest assertion of human rights and world history. That's assertion of. The right to have rights the most only mental right being the right to not be enslaved, which is a right at all humans. Possess right so rela. Michigan Revolution at everybody will want. ENSLAVERS and their descendants have difficulty processing on those terms, because it's a revolution that strikes a blow, not just against colonialism, but also slavery. Also against racist, also against the systems Capitalism and economics bet all those systems of racialism and colonialism are tied up in Sault. Dead into the revolution that happens because of African ways of understanding the world that it's a revolution that happens during the agency of Akron people who are supposed to lack agency. Can't process it so if you can't process a revolution on its own terms. And what do you do you make up ideas about why this revolution happening right? So then the rationalizations that come to stand in our that the revolution happens strictly because. Enslaved people wanted revenge, ride. On. There was no love lost between them and their slavers right, but they also want again as we've talked about also what them on their own turn, so they have a worldview that goes beyond certainly just a striking a blow against the man bright up at the understand what freedom should need other excuse that come to stand in back to Robertson. You know this revolution is just about you know some. I bet it's barbaric. That it's evidence of savagery. That is evidence of You know you'll be superstitious foresights. It emanates on having to come up with some rationalization event that you cannot process in this noise can distract us from the key points that are so clear when we look at these revolution. In every case they were black movements. They organized around their group identity. Their goal was extremely clear and unwavering. When they formed coalitions, they were intentional about who they allow to be their allies. Their vision of justice was on their own terms, and they took action when the conditions were right. These elements are immediately transferrable to our lives today, and how we organize in our communities at work for elections everywhere. Dr Bert. Thanks for being black. This three-year appreciate. Push Black for having the on this. This is great and I appreciate the work that y'all are doing again. We'll have this in the show notes, but Dr Birds. Book is titled The Black. Republic African Americans and the fate of Haiti recently published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. In just like that, we're at the end of this episode of black history year. Black history years produced by push black. The Nation's largest nonprofit black media company production support from Michael L. Successor and Limonov's. Obviously the power that comes from knowing our history. To you? Push black exists because we saw we had to take this into our own hands. You make push black. Happen with your contributions. ADD BLACK THIS THREE-YEAR DOT com. Most folks do five or ten bucks a month, but everything truly makes it gift. Thanks for supporting the work. I'm Jay from push black. Thanks for checking us out piece.

Haiti Americas United States Africa France Black Panther Party Pat Robertson Beijing Jay Washington Napoleon Mount Vernon Eve Lucien Fred Hampton Society South Carolina America Chicago
Judas and the Black Messiah Trailer from 99% Invisible and Proximity Media

99% Invisible

03:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Judas and the Black Messiah Trailer from 99% Invisible and Proximity Media

"Hello beautiful nerds for months. Our team has been working with the team at proximity media to create a companion podcast for the film judas in the black messiah coming up february twelve. The movie is in. The podcast. Had so much history and insight. I'm so excited for it. And i hope you'll all subscribe. Here's a preview risk. Free chairman fred. Hampton was the leader of the illinois chapter the black panther party until his life was cut short on december fourth nineteen sixty nine when more than a dozen law enforcement officers busted into his west chicago bar in a predawn raid. Hampton was shot to death in his bed. he was twenty one years old. His life inspired the new film judas in the black messiah coming up february twelfth and theaters on hbo max and this official podcast series produced by ninety nine percent visible and proximity media in partnership with warner brothers. We're looking at the black messiah. The center of the film. The real story of chairman. Fred hampton i of live and you keep saying in put made hampton so special that he was anointed as leader at such a young age and then targeted in a federal assassination. Join me elvis mitchell as we go behind the scenes the film's creators including shock king. The whole purpose of the movies to humanize this individual and these people and the thing is you're trying to humanize someone who is super superhuman. You didn't sleep chain smoked. He drank buttons off. He didn't have ability so they had to kill and producer. Ryan kugler the pressures afraid you assault affective that he was assassinated by the most powerful government on a plan. Dig about suddenly. Be so good at something that the most powerful governor in the world is live. You have to kill this part in do and trying to snuff everything about this partial. We'll also talk to co stars columbia. Keith stanfield and dominik fischbach and to real black panthers. New chairman fred including his widow cohen jerry. I don't think whoever played me had to look like me. But dominique fit the bill. She presented a nice but not sheikha cut. Somebody and our number one guy through the whole series will be chairman. Fred hampton junior. He was born three weeks after his father's assassination spent his life protecting his father's legacy. It will get word. People tell. You need to check out this individual. Your are free it happen. you'll serve recognized. Servants new us recognized leaders. Join us as we talk about the making of the film and set the record straight but the chicago panthers in chairman fred senior. Watch the film in theaters and on. Hbo max on february twelfth and search for the jerusalem. Black messiah podcast to get the full story wherever you get your podcast.

chairman fred Hampton Fred hampton elvis mitchell black panther party Ryan kugler warner brothers hbo Keith stanfield dominik fischbach illinois New chairman fred cohen jerry hampton chicago sheikha panthers dominique columbia