31 Burst results for "Black Panther Party"

"black panther party" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:49 min | Last month

"black panther party" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"When there's a lot of things that make us feel not so hot right. And i think that that's why the one thing thing that we can always count on is to find something that we can love. I think that's what has made net flicks so incredibly successful as that. You watch two things they know what you love and then they keep feeding you what you love and to be able to escape in hard and also i was dyslexic. Child to school was super hard for me. So art was really the only way i learned to read through poetry and scripts. And you know. I'd alerting difference so to me. It was real important that i could see it in a way that was substantial enough to move me and it didn't happen in conventional ways but it did happen. I wanna talk to you about luke cage comics because you wrote them and it's got to be so weird to then see onscreen. What you kind of developed. So what was that like. You know. Luke cage had been around forever. He was one of my favorite superheroes as a kid. So it was a character that i've been wanting to write forever in fact the first proposal ever wrote for comics long before i made it into the industry was fairly cage. Comic and when they announced net flicks was going to be doing the series. I had just started negotiations with marvel write comics for them in cages comics. It was a very interesting experience but they keep those worlds apart. They keep the comments world in the live action film and all that sort of stuff and of course. I'm paying attention to what they are doing. The show and i know that the show's paying attention to some of the stuff that i'm doing comics. But we're not supposed to have these conversations and sort of becomes like the secret language or so where you're just sort of communicating with hand signals forever. So to me it was like i'm pretty weird in that. I try not special special. Okay i try not to think too hard about I guess you could put it like how my work is perceived in terms of like. Oh you're working on something that's tv show where you're working on something that's connected to a movie. Okay that's based on a comic book. That came out in the seventies. And i remember the seventies and they got a shaky then with a at the end of it. I mean what makes the seventies relevant today. What makes his comic still. Relevant to the twenty first century sell s. It was a sweet spot. I mean it's toll civil rights. I think people were kind of discovering themselves a new different society. That's kind of been changed in a in a major way and when you're trying to explore things in society when you have new rules new opportunities who you have this This black guy who is Basically a superhero under the under the same rules of saying that same new world these kind of discovering who. He is on a good day. I have figured out how to my pants on like both legs at a time right. And so i don't have to do when they get a time but i'm just a regular person and it's funny because i have a couple of friends whenever something really positive happens whether it's you know a good review or something related to a film production that i'm working on. They get all excited and they're like oh you're star and i'm like no no not at all not even close. My socks have holes in them. I think once you have your system and your process. I don't think it changes much regardless of how successful you become right. I can tell you that you know as an adult walking onto a set in what my process was. It's exactly the same in my late forties that it was in my early twenty s right and so i think that finding that and finding what that process is might be the key to longevity. Because you don't need to alter it. And i think it's important that there is some separation between the graphic novel and what they're doing on the tv show. Oh all the time and for me. I've worked in film and tv in the past and it's fine. I just happen to love this medium. Right and i love the possibilities of what you can do with it and so for me. A lot of it's just about getting back to this thing. That was really special to me. When i was younger when i was a kid. Comical cost like thirty five cents you know and if you were a kid who didn't have a lot of money which i was one of those kids you could get really cheap entertainment. You could trade it with your friends you know. Nowadays every kid has to have a smartphone at all. These things tablets There's something very working class to me about comics. And even the history of the medium is very working class..

thirty five cents seventies two things both legs twenty first century one thing Luke cage one today luke cage first proposal late forties couple of friends early twenty s marvel
Fresh update on "black panther party" discussed on NEWS 88.7 Programming

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:41 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "black panther party" discussed on NEWS 88.7 Programming

"You're welcome to bulls. I'm so happy to have you on the show. It's a pleasure. You have some amazing Alcatraz footage. I was watching some footage that you had of the people's launching a boat. Headed to Alcatraz for the native occupation. Yes, that's a home movie with a really interesting story shot by and man named Sykes, who was a black activist in the In the rehabilitation business came to San Francisco to try to shake up the National Trade Association, and he shot all sorts of things. He hung out with Earl Caldwell, who was the Reporter embedded with the Black Panther Party and Angela Davis. And he shot the activists on the way to Alcatraz that that boat is still running, and the son of the captain was in the audience. So great things happen. You know, that's amazing. What's different about if we if we take that footage of Alcatraz that was being shown in the screening that we heard a little bit of the audio from. Why is that particular footage of Alcatraz? Interesting to you or distinctive when there are obviously Uh, you know, hundreds of hours of footage of that famous prison, not least of which is the hit film The rock. You know, we're used to citizen journalism. Today. We're used to people, um, photographing, sometimes terrible and unfortunate things just because they're there were their phone back in the home movie era. This didn't happen so much. And so when you have footage that wasn't shocked by pros. It wasn't shot by Don't know. Universal news real but it was shot by somebody that just happened to capture FDR walking or the bonus Army in D. C. You know, lining up for food and their encampment across from the Capitol. It's very special, and it's It's the view of ordinary folks recording history just because they were there. Um, rare and always quite exciting, different point of view as well. I think for me one of the most exciting things about the footage that you collect particularly is The footage that is not off. Significant historical stuff. You know, FDR walking as you mentioned, right, but just a Moments of streetscape. I mean, you know you've you've made some films about Los Angeles where I live and seeing the neighborhood that's called Skid Row in the fifties or whatever. Um Is incredibly transporting it and kind of leads to a new understanding of a place that you might not get from reading a description of it or, you know Looking at it now. That footage of Fifth Street in Los Angeles, You know, a very troubled neighborhood, which is now filled with blank walls and sidewalks on which people camp when there Permitted to by the police. Act in the forties and fifties that was a neighborhood that was vibrant, filled with stores filled again with people who might have had some substance abuse issues, but also filled with older folks. With new Americans with people who are part of the casual work force. They might go to fight fires or log or get casual work loading freight cars, and it's a vision into Part of the economy and a part of society that was living and real and we don't see any more, and I think we we think of the future of our city's a little bit differently when we get into the details of the past. We can't go back. You know I'm not a nostalgic person. But I do believe that a lot of the templates for the world that we might want to live in the world we would hope to live in can be found or could be understood by by seeing this rich imagery from the past. Do you remember the first piece of ephemera that you saved? Well, a family, So my whole life I've always collected something. I was one of those kids that collected stamps and coins back in the mainframe computer era. Would go to the computer center in my city and ask for old IBM cards. But the first my dad, my dad complained to me that when we were walking to pre school, together from Glen Park Bart Station in San Francisco. He would have to physically drag me because I would be like picking up eucalyptus nuts off the ground for my eucalyptus, not collection. Well, this is right, you know, So we were squirrels. You know we were. We were looking for sort of intellectual nourishment we would carry in our pockets. Perhaps, but I'll tell you. The first film I collected was in the 1982 and I was a film came from the collection of the Grand Rapids Police department. It was a film called when You Are Pedestrian was about how to walk safely. And it was shot in Oakland on streets of Oakland by a man named Bainbridge, who put his actors at risk because he just sent him out into traffic to walk in front of cars into J Walk with their with their Children, and you know to walk along the walk the wrong way along the side of the highway leading to the tunnel on, But I don't think the car's knew that this was a movie. So it was great. And what sent me about that movie was it was shot in Oakland, as I told you a place where I'd lived, And it was such a rich picture of what the city of 1948 looked like. You know, in the middle, you had some kind of simulated accident. Kids falling off their bikes or hanging on to milk trucks and getting into trouble. But on the sides, and the periphery was all the life of the city. That's what got me collecting film. It's bull's eye. I'm Jesse Thorn. I'm talking with the archivist and filmmaker Ric Pray linger, Founder of the Prey Linger Library. When you find a movie like that, Uh, What can you do to learn about who made it? And how concerned are you that someone who has some claim to it will Interfere with you archiving and sharing it. So we spent a lot of time researching. The context of films who made them Companies that made them who were the people. Where did they go? What's their story? I'm one of the amazing things about the United States is that we are the most media rich country in the world. We produce more media than we throw away more media I should say than other countries ever produced, and because of peculiarities in our copyright law. A great deal of this media was never copyrighted, or if it was copyrighted. It was not renewed. Or perhaps they didn't observe all the formalities. So overwhelming majority of work that was made before 1964 is in public domain. And then even a lot of work made before the eighties, is also in public domain. So I've always had this great privilege where I can like I could go over to the shelf and pull a film and, you know, quickly check copyright on it, and there's a very good chance I'll be able to use it. S o. Just a tremendous It's the public domain is an amazing resource on most filmmakers don't most media makers don't know about it. But it's generationally unjust because I'm a boomer and my culture a lot of my cultures in the public domain. But if you're a Gen xer, or if you're a millennial, or if you're younger than that, Your culture is copyrighted, so he runs risks if you want to make work that rises above a certain Level on the horizon. One of the problems with that risk, you know, as a medium maker myself is that it is, um it's disproportionate. It's um Uh, you know, it's like it's like having a lot more. One side has a lot more nuclear weapons. Um You know, like the the issue is that if you presume something is in the public domain, or is fair use according to copyright law, and you are Wrong or even accused of being wrong. It can be. Catastrophic unless your honor unless you're working on a huge scale, and that is that feels that feels so scary to me as somebody who who makes stuff and sometimes has to like Use some of stuff that you know we use stuff that we don't have explicit permission to use on this show. Every episode. You know, there's a chilling effect..

Earl Caldwell San Francisco Jesse Thorn Los Angeles 1948 National Trade Association Oakland 1982 Black Panther Party Ric Pray Linger Angela Davis Sykes Grand Rapids Police Department D. C. Bainbridge Fifth Street You Are Pedestrian United States Glen Park Bart Station Today
Mumia Abu-Jamal, convicted of murder of Philadelphia police officer, tests positive for COVID-19

Necessary Blackness Podcast

02:30 min | 2 months ago

Mumia Abu-Jamal, convicted of murder of Philadelphia police officer, tests positive for COVID-19

"Shots freedom fighter in elder mumia abu-jamal Layoff death row. Believe it was back in two thousand eight on. He was on there for considerable amount of time There was a worldwide movement to get him off of their for also Worldwide movement stockton from being executed Was a fifteen year old spokesman for the black panther party philadelphia. He was targeted by f. Mona fbi in soil. He definitely should have been released by nanny so What we know right now is that his. He has preexisting conditions by the right. Amy is horrible He was most recently diagnosed with kobe nights. A he also has congestive heart failure. Which is where you know. Blood is not You know is significantly You know enough's sufficiently rather also hepatitis so we know what we know today. Is that mia. They're saying that he's still in the prison infirmary That the worst phase of the cova infection is over. The he's in the clear. This is from a activists who Gave an update to the philadelphia inquirer about his condition. And unfortunately that because he has hepatitis. C has a lot of like lacerations stores open wills on his scan and he's supposed to be getting a medical skin treatment in a in the form of a bat every single day per doctors orders. He has not been getting that. That is the last day at gotten Do comrades in. We'll be connecting this week and saw hopefully have some more updates tomorrow morning indefinitely as we're going through. But i implore everyone to pray for our brother. So-called can go on instagram. And look up or go on twitter Mumia abu-jamal official twitter account. You can also go over tomorrow. Instagram at lyon is crowned. You can see the flyers that were using. That had been circulated via official twitter for him. an call call the pennsylvania district district attorney's office in call various people At the prison at mandalay state prison in pennsylvania.

Mumia Abu Jamal Layoff Mona Fbi Hepatitis Stockton Congestive Heart Failure Philadelphia AMY Philadelphia Inquirer Wills Twitter Jamal Instagram Lyon Pennsylvania District District Flyers Mandalay State Prison Pennsylvania
Daniel Kaluuya on new movie 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

04:58 min | 2 months ago

Daniel Kaluuya on new movie 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

"Walk to popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a movie now called judas and the black mesa. That's so good that will you can watch it now. You need to finish watching me. Daniel speak but when you see it you're going to see something extraordinary and you're going to see my guest today. Daniel columbia in a really amazing performance where he brings the spirit of someone to life and that someone is fred hampton. So congratulations to you. Then on i think most markets in what. I realized this is the very months for years ago. That get out opened yeah. I'm glad humphry as of that black comfort. Low two years a year off. The gal black pants came out in february has very much every year. You're just working in working in doing this. And you've got that oscar nomination after we last talked to. Are you just impossible. Now had you become A complete tyrant on the set. I think i was always a tyrant allowed. This kind of spaceman allowed me to be more tyrant. So i just i just like you know. I liked ice cubes. In one cup blueberries in another and then some soda in. And i don't even like soda but i just wanna be ir like a roman tyrant. I don't wanna be like a new. I on the roman like the old that that's own. You know what. I mean when something like that happens and of course you had done so much work you know in england theater. You scanned you. Were doing all of this stuff. But get out was a kind of a breakthrough that changed your life. Didn't it change my life. You changed my life a lot to catch up to that or with me. Like only think eli lawshield. Go up to happen with go in all that time in an all the things you've done whether you're did black panther whether you did queen it slam whether you were in widows this working with the most amazing people and doing incredible things and in this case of with judas and the black messiah. You're playing this real person. Fred hampton so fred hampton. We know and i think here in america to it was yes. He was the guy that led the black panther party in chicago and new annoy. He was the head of it and died. Tragically young. and that's what we know. We know those two things and finally. There's a movie that says he had and he had a spear any had something that was happening. How did you get attached to it. That's the on on the set of a powerful on reshoots ryan and zinzi kuebler Produces film to decide and say. Oh we we're making a film about fred hamilton. Love to be bothered a mess. Chairman fred keith is is in it as well Unshackle king is directed. Just feel alive. Kim i really their intentions and reasons really spoke to and so it was that i was like i just felt really on that the full of me in that way and they will let y'all send your treatment. They sent me a toothpaste treatment. Which is incredible and i met with shock in new york during the get out. What's he's not. You may have one of the tricks. setting on with you on that same trip. I sat down with shackle. So like i said that masako spoke on. I loved him as a person. I loved his reasons than would season off the oscars the first script i read judas nabet messiah and then i would say less. So what do you do. When you're playing this guy who we know of as a more of a symbol than a human being and that you have to create him as he is. How do you go about doing that. Which you do so brilliantly. Thank you solo work on the web but was kind of taken As a as a man you know and finding finding why felt he loved understanding why he loved him loudly loved and who loved him Of him you know the humanity politics is is like he has to have so much love so much karen in one food actualization black people in the black community in order to say these things in these ways like the speeches. I just felt like this identity in a remarkable man Amanda is to be remarked upon. But he is. He's a man. And i feel like brandon him. His humanity kind of puts into context his muddle

Fred Hampton Daniel Columbia Eli Lawshield Humphry Mesa Zinzi Kuebler Fred Hamilton Chairman Fred Keith Unshackle King Daniel Oscar Black Panther Party Masako Judas Nabet England Chicago Ryan America KIM
The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

90.3 KAZU Programming

05:28 min | 2 months ago

The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

"Kenny and Keith Lucas are stand up comedians and identical twins. People don't have to react when I see twins. No. Okay, they go crazy like we were in the supermarket looking for some Jell O. Yeah. And we're just about to pick it out. And then some dude came out of nowhere. It was like, you know, you guys have a stick of Doublemint gum. That's from their 2017. Netflix special Lucas brothers were having a moment right now they're writing and starring in a remake of Revenge of the Nerds, But they also wrote the story for the new movie Judas and the Black Messiah. The film premieres today in theaters and on HBO. Max NPR's Elizabeth Blair has this profile. The Lucas brothers are best known for a kind of stoner humor. And here's a rule of thumb You should never do. Shrooms wouldn't do Who looks like you, man. I'm telling you. But underneath the jokes, there's a serious side that draws heavily on their childhood in the housing projects of Newark, New Jersey, called the Garden spires is you always, you know, broken elevators infested with rats and rotten Drug dealing violence everywhere, But you know, there's a community that is people that there's families is my family When they were six years old there, Dad went to prison. My father actually is out of prison. He's not in prison anymore, and it sucks that he's out. I wish he was still there. Oh, yeah. I wanted to go back because all he wants to do is father's sight. Don't like do we pay rent? Now it's over. The Lucas Brothers connection to Newark got the attention of New Jersey Senator Cory Booker in 1999, then a Newark City councilman, Booker went on a hunger strike in front of the Garden spires. He also served as the city's mayor. Here's Booker talking to the Lucas brothers on his instagram. I love your insightful, hard hitting humor and the sort of the Eddie Murphy and S O. My great heroes Coming up, you know, were uncompromising how they used humor to shake folks woke like book arm. Keith and Kenny Lucas went to law school and why you and Duke, But unlike Booker, they dropped out. It was weird Tonto Study law and and kind of be poor and black because it's like, Oh, I see what The consequences of policy and law are like on a daily basis, and especially when it in relation to African Americans and the notion of criminality and how it's projected onto blacks and I see that process. I found myself sort of disengaged very early. I always said, you know what I want to do something that has a direct impact on people. From an emotional standpoint, Judas and the Black Messiah is very emotional. Lucas brothers were in college when they first learned about Fred Hampton, the charismatic leader of the Illinois Black Panther Party in the 19 sixties in the movie he's played by Daniel Cholula, Mother Liberating You can't Murder Liberation is another revolutionary, but you can't murder a revolution for murder Freedom fighter, but you get amount of freedom. He's the Black Messiah. Judas is William O'Neal, an African American who was arrested for interstate car theft and Impersonating a federal officer in the movie. We see how the FBI recruited O'Neill to avoid jail time and earn some money. He was instructed to infiltrate the Black Panther Party. And provide the FBI with information about Hampton O'Neill is played by like Keith Stanfield Target You Like some good information, some nobody else No. Is it some kind of bonuses? I'm I'm counting on it. Bill O'Neill became so much of a Panther insider. He was put in charge of security. He provided the FBI with a floor plan of Hampton's apartment in 1969. The Chicago police raided the apartment and killed two Black Panther leaders, including Hampton for the Lucas Brothers. It was essential to tell the story of how the FBI recruited informants in the black community. I think it's important to see just how insidious The system has been in turning young African Americans against one another. Now they Essentially used poor black people against poor black people to execute their goals of minimizing the threat of black messiah is like we just felt it was important to see both sides of the coin. Whether it's a historical drama or its stand up comedy for the Lucas Brothers. It all comes from the same source in a big thing about our act is that we we always try to ground it and stuff that we've gone through, and it's always been Important for us to talk about these systemic issues and a variety of ways. Now they're writing and will star in Seth McFarland reimagining of 1980 four's Revenge of the Nerds Practice a bunch after school. They called US nerds. So one cool. The Lucas brothers promise that their movie will be almost nothing like the original because times have changed. It's like the juxtaposition of being a bully and a nerd is so different from what it was like in the eighties, where you had this one, a stark dichotomy between what it was bullying what it was to be a nerd. Now that's been fused together, and I think That's why the time is right to make a story about that. The Lucas brothers say it's hard to watch the original revenge of the nerds. Even though the movie was a childhood staple. They're excited to give it an update and to make it personal. Elizabeth Blair. NPR news

Lucas Lucas Brothers Keith Lucas Booker Elizabeth Blair Max Npr Senator Cory Booker Newark City Newark Kenny Lucas Revenge Of The Nerds FBI New Jersey Illinois Black Panther Party Daniel Cholula Judas William O'neal Kenny Netflix HBO
Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

Morning Edition

07:02 min | 3 months ago

Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

"The 19 sixties, Fred Hampton was chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party. He was a rising leader, organizing disparate multi racial groups in Chicago. Until police shot and killed him and another Black Panther member in an early morning raid. There's a new movie about Fred Hampton out this week, it is called Judas and the Black Messiah. It's not a question of ball. It's a non violence is a question of resistance to fascism or non existence within fascism Film got rave reviews after its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last week. It's the second feature from director Shaka King who, until this project came along, was on the verge of giving up making feature films altogether. MPR's Andrew Lyne bonked takes it from here. Yes, Judas and the Black Messiah is about Fred Hampton and how he led the Black Panthers in Chicago. But it's also about William O'Neill, the man who infiltrated the Black Panthers in spied on Hampton on behalf of the FBI. Shaka King told me that the Lucas Brothers who co wrote the story, sold the idea to him like this. Their pitch that they laid out was we want to make a movie about Fred Hampton and William O'Neal. That's kind of like the departed the 2006 Martin Scorsese movie Inside the World of Cointelpro, or Counterintelligence program, the 19 sixties project where the FBI infiltrated and disrupted groups like the Black Panthers, and I was like I see it. I'm done. I'm in Judas is a tight, intense movie. Yes, like the departed and other Scorsese type crime movies. It's a long way, though, from King's first feature film newly weeds from 2013. So what you got here? Newly weeds tells the story of a young couple in Brooklyn who smoke a lot of weed where Judas is loud and fast. Really? Weeds is quiet and tender. I'm done. I'm done online. Won't want Wanna hang out. We hang up. Yeah. How are we supposed to go to the Galapagos? If you mind the bag every two minutes. It hits similar beats as movies by other indie darling directors like Joe Swanberg or the Duplass Brothers. The film Independent Spirit Awards even gave King the Someone to watch award after it came out, which came with a $25,000 grant. Not bad for someone fresh out of N Y. U film school. But after that initial fanfare, I was so depressed after making newly weeds and my expectations for the release just not coming to fruition. The movie didn't get much attention outside the festival circuit from agents and distributors, largely because it was a movie with black actors who no one knew on at that time that was deemed worthless. The film's release in 2013 wasn't that long ago, but it was just before what a friend of Kings jokingly dubbed. The Black Excellence Industrial Complex. You're Selma's and Moon Lights and Black Panthers when movie studios realized they could make a lot of money by releasing films by and starring black people. Nearly weeds. Loss of momentum burnt king out on the idea of making another feature film, But he did have an idea for a short rolling around in his head. It was kind of silly kind of outrageous, sweetheart. Lips. Excuse me, miss. It's called Moon Yang's after the Italian slur for black people want heard on the streets of Brooklyn in it, King and two others play these three black guys who talk like they're in the mom movies. King has such a fondness for It was somewhat inspired by King's experience growing up in a mostly black part of Brooklyn, but going to high school in South Brooklyn, where everyone the Irish Americans, Greek Americans, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, all talks like the Italian American kids, and those kids were Hilarious. They were profane. They were quick witted, and we were not friends put like I could appreciate their sense of humor. The movie is a concise examination of race, gender gentrification. As King's character gets into an argument with his sister over a MetroCard, you did not have a dime. Put 1000 until the white guy comes by and says hi to the sister. Hi. How you doing? How are you? You guys just don't know what both outta here. Oh, Polluted the movie is fun and poignant, and the process reminded King how much he loved making movies. That movie saved me. You saved me. I didn't see that or know that about Shaka. But I could understand, and I could see how that could happen. Charles de King, no relation to director Shocking is the CEO and founder of Macro which since its founding in 2015 has produced movies and TV shows featuring non white people, including Judas and the Black Messiah. It was before the oscarssowhite moment. Of 2015. There's a lot that's happened since then. There is much more of an openness and I think an understanding of the business opportunity there. Which brings us to King today, making a movie about an anti capitalist black radical at a very capitalist Hollywood studio without watering down the politics. The deal is to respect the authenticity. Fred Hampton Jr is the current chairman of the Black Panther Party, Cubs and son of Fred Hampton. He says he and the other Panthers had their guards up when they were approached about this film. The Panthers have long been subjected to propaganda campaigns and misrepresentations. But he says King and the rest of the cast and crew definitely navigated the crossroads between their creative goals and the Panthers. Political ones. Well enough, anyway. Revolutionaries never satisfied. You know, I wish there was more political cartoon. We could've pushed. In a certain point, However, I'll put the people's need before before my needs my wants and desires. For instance, the relationship between Fred Hampton and his partner, Deborah Johnson, was a tricky thing to get right. The poet.

Fred Hampton Shaka King Black Panthers Illinois Black Panther Party Andrew Lyne William O'neill Lucas Brothers King William O'neal FBI Joe Swanberg Duplass Brothers Film Independent Spirit Awards Brooklyn Chicago Black Excellence Industrial Co Sundance Film Festival Moon Yang Martin Scorsese
"black panther party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the Black Panther Party on and They started dating after the party and fell madly in love. And several weeks after that, my father gained a bit of notoriety by climbing on top of the water tower that changed the university. And protests. You some sort of school administration policy that he didn't think was appropriate. And my mother she did her revolutionary domestic thing by bringing them sandwiches every day that he was up to the top three weeks she would cut off the corners Red. Now, having said that, obviously my family is not the typical American family, but they are On Every day my father would come home and he would Pull us together as a family now. Parents married an African ceremony marking system taking my picture My parents married and an African ceremony. It was that attitude they brought to the parenting of their Children. We were raised this Pan Africanist. My sisters and I Leyland, Libya. We've learned why, Hayley as we were growing up, we learned I run. The place is symbolic. And before I pulled Christmas goods housemother Christmas tree, I was lighting candles at Quantico. Yeah. My father would come home from work every day, just like any other family, and he would put his key in the lock and the three of us want to the door to greet him and he would come in the door and we'll be so excited he would greet us. That's why he even he would say who Which means freedom. And our response will be Sasa. Which means now and he said Who grew? Sasa? Who.

Black Panther Party Pan Africanist Hayley Leyland Quantico Libya
'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

Environment: NPR

04:40 min | 5 months ago

'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

"Catherine coleman flowers. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you thank you for inviting me. You've been active on this issue for a long time and have brought a lot of people. Philanthropists reporters elected officials to rural areas to see for themselves. Poor people living with this problem of simply not having sanitary disposal of human waste. I'd like you to describe the experience of just one of these tours and the reaction of those who saw what what you showed one of the persons who's reaction with i think sums it up was Dr phillip boston. Dr allston was to you in special rapporteur on extreme poverty and when he was invited to lowndes county. It's part of his official tour. He went to see areas where people were living amongst also which was the one of the homes that we went to It was a compound with a number of mobile homes that set off of a dirt road and one could see the the water lines. They carry water into the home. Going above of what looked like a ditch. Full of raw sewage and nearby was a Was a basketball goal. Which children apparently played basketball. And when he saw there was a were reporters with us On his his his tour and one of the reporters asked him. Have you seen this before. And he said this is common in the developed world. And i thought that that spoke loudly of what i had phil for all of these years did this and so what what people would see a new taken. So many people to this and observe their shock at what they saw was often in a peace pipe. V pipe running from home or a trailer to a hole in the backyard. And then when you get closer what you see. There are when you get closer. You probably see human feces and toilet paper. Aisle whatever was flushing in the toilet. that day. The one place that we win That was this out in my mind. Is that it was full of pitfalls raw sewage. As you say the person had pvc pipe there was a lot a lot of ingenuity. This involved. In this they the the pvc pipe was buried underground and it went to appear in that period again was full of you know raw sewage and you could see the eyes of a frog that was embiid in the sewage and was p p coming out from it and oftentimes depending on the time of the year and now that the days we have long warmer seasons. Their mosquito sometimes congregated on top of the sewage. Those animals will spread this stuff to wherever they go exactly. you grew up in lowndes county alabama. It's an interesting place in the history of the civil rights movement. Isn't it yes. It's very interesting place. In the history of the civil rights movement. Most people know about lowndes because of his fight for voting rights and the establishment of the lowndes county freedom organization which was the original black panther party And that the black panther was chosen because a lot of the sharecroppers had not been afforded the opportunity to go to school so they wanted to use a symbol that people could understand and also you know they wanted to slogans from their time was pulled the till for the panther When they organized their own political party and ran candidates On that part because at that time it was not But people running. This candidates was accepted on either republican or the democratic party In lowndes county. So that itself was more was a a great accomplishment on the side of sharecroppers former sharecroppers who had been kicked off property just because they sought the right to vote and that was the lowndes county freedom party that preceded the black panthers organization right yes and it's also is this area on the root of the famous march from selma to montgomery that dr king led yes. Most of the civil montgomery mind troop goes to lowndes county lowndes. County is actually between selma and montgomery

Catherine Coleman Flowers Lowndes County Dr Phillip Boston Dr Allston Basketball Lowndes County Freedom Organiz Phil Lowndes Panther Party Alabama Lowndes County Freedom Party Democratic Party Dr King Selma Montgomery
"black panther party" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

05:34 min | 8 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Minority Korner

"Okay. So what I to talk about it panthers because a lot of people it was all over like the US, no US weekly, people magazine all these people are talking about how? It was such like a dynamic thing it was. So it was so daring to put this terrorist group like people are calling the by panthers terrorists which kind of pissed me aren't they the same thing as the AK right. Like I'm GonNa go against everything I can't even played corner. Just to play the devil's advocate. That when someone says I'm just playing devil's advocate just walk out the room. Actually I think we have a minority corner drinking game I think next episode we still try to see how many times can say devil's advocate to. This each other. So I wanted to get into the facts about the black panthers fact. So people can know more about the black. Panthers. Other than that. They were leatherhead Afros were berets in had guns there's more to the party. It's a good look. It's good look. You also think that maybe it was a little tribute to Michael. Jackson would-be odds day was where it was a definite tribute to Michael Jackson Super Bowl performance. He had the whole gold military craziness, right? Beyond taking it to the next level is the lady power. So I would like to point out some the timeline I'm going to read some key points in the timeline of the Black Panther party dear one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six to nine, hundred, Sixty, eight. Wow and just let people know that got these facts from the UC Berkeley Library. So this isn't some organization with the. Purpose or your university. Terrace hate speech in that guy. You're a terrorist hate website. I went to my professors was part of the Black Panthers. One of my professors. Class with Angela Davis and she was part of the Black Panthers and Sidebar when they researching FBI was searching for Angela Davis. Two of my my aunts used to get stopped all the time Oh my God because my on my onslaught grew up in the bay area. All. The time when they were looking for. Angela. Davis. Because they had like the Afro just like her see. If you were a light skinned black woman. You've got stopped like God forbid your skin black woman who wants to wear an afro in the sixties like come on come on people they were so threatened by Angela Davis that they were trying to hunt down. She was awesome. I also was side side side Bar I was taught by a professor at UC Santa. Cruz. NAMED BETTINA AT thicker who they Know they're not together their friends. They were together because well. Let's be. Let's be honest. But what I heard she heard the first sight for that. She's an awesome woman who was an activist in the sixties in the seventies a Jewish white woman who stood alongside the black. Panthers. So let's look at those backs to so they couldn't be at all racist if they have. Tina. Beker right there in the middle of everything being awesome. That's why I always say blacks and Jews should be united everybody should be united but and I've never heard you say that this is new Tonight saying that before. Like a week ago. It's not. Wholesome that you say that you sign up on your email with that. It's Minority Corner t shirts. Say Black juice to be together and then parentheses happy..

Black Panthers Angela Davis panthers Michael Jackson BETTINA people magazine professor US US weekly UC Berkeley Library UC Santa Afros Cruz Tina FBI
Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:06 min | 9 months ago

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people

Black Panther Party Black Panther Party School Panther Party Congress Black Women African American Community Black Student Union Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Huey Noonan Bobby Seale Philadelphia Mississippi Joe Biden Minnesota Browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis Ghana Panthers New York
Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

Morning Edition

06:50 min | 9 months ago

Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

"Legislation earlier this summer that would require all incoming freshman at Cal State universities to taken ethnic studies class listener. Michael Variety asked our Bay curious team this question I've heard that there was actually a revolution in the Bay Area for an ethnic studies field. Is this true? And how did it happen? The short answer. Yes, it's true. Reporter assault A sonnet. Poor tells us how it went down during the longest student strike in US history. It was November of 1968. The US was 13 years into the Vietnam War. American soldiers hiking their way through the sweaty jungles of South Vietnam, searching for enemy Martin Luther King had been assassinated earlier that year, and the Black Panther Party demanded systemic change for black communities plagued by poverty and police brutality. That's what black students at San Francisco State wanted to bury. Proves to be a member ofthe last. This is Nesbitt Crutchfield. He started studying at San Francisco State in 1967 and soon joined the black student union. It was the very 1st 1 in the country. It was very clear to me that Black soon Union representative. Very progressive. Among black spoons at state among black students in the very but just a small percentage of black students went to SF State admission rates for minority students had dwindled down to just 4%. Even those 70% of students in the SF Unified School District for from minority backgrounds is a black person you expected for all intensive purposes. To be one of the very few black people in whatever classroom laboratory auditorium. The U. N was overwhelmingly white. Amidst that whiteness black students were hungry to study their own history. The black student union had been pushing the university to create a black studies department for nearly three years. But administrators resisted the idea. was an era of young people asking questions and want to transform their communities. Jason Ferreira is a professor in the Department of Race and Resistance at San Francisco State College of ethnic studies. And that impulse that That hunger to transform one's communities is actually what forms the basis of ethnic studies. It's around this time that Penny no. Okatsu was grappling with her own questions about race and identity. We want Asian Americans, then we were Orientals. An Oriental is a term that was imposed on us by the largest society, so starting to use the term Asian American was a way of taking back er. Our own destiny. Henny became a member of a student organization called the Asian American Political Alliance. It was just one of many ethnic student organizations popping up on campus and an early fall of 1968. These organizations banded together in formed a coalition, the Third World Liberation Front. And at that particular time, third world referred to the Non Aligned Countries are cultures in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was synonymous with how we might use people of color today. English professor and Black Panther. George Murray was one of San Francisco state's most influential anti Vietnam organizers. Students loved Murray, but his outspoken politics didn't sit well with us of state administrators. The war in Vietnam is racist. That is the law that crackers like Johnson are using black soldiers and poor white soldiers of Mexican soldiers as dupes and fools to fight against people of color. In Vietnam. The board of trustees fired Murray over Comment like this one on November 1st 1968 5 days later, the black student union and the Third World Liberation Front joined together and went on strength in aspic, Crutchfield says Despite coming from different backgrounds, the strikers had a clear goal. I wanted to find out and be educated about ourselves, and we could not get that the nobody getting educated Initially, strikers did things like cherry bombs in toilets and check out tons of books at once in order to overwhelm the school's library system, But almost immediately, administrators invited police on campus. Jason Ferreira says they swarmed the school armed with five foot batons. Students responded by throwing rocks and cursing out the police. Police came down heavy hard, and they just began cracking skulls Strikers carried on anyway. Penny No. Okatsu was protesting on January 23rd 1969. In what many call the mass bust. Two lines of police came up and basically surrounded the over 500 people who were there for the rally and tracked all of the individuals who are part with that net police charged at students, Penny says it was one of the bloodiest and most frightening days of the entire strike. That was a military movement, literally a practice orchestrated military movement. Hundreds were arrested. Virtually all of the individuals arrested head Tio spend some jail time. There are real consequences to having participated in that event. It's up two more months. But eventually in March, administrators and strikers negotiated a deal after five months of protesting the school agreed to many striker demands. They promised to accept virtually all non white applicants for fall of 1969 and they agreed to establish a college of ethnic studies, the first in the country. Class is about communities of color. Ethnic studies is a way of embracing all of the cultures that make up not just this country, but with the world. And if we don't understand each other, how we're going to get along. I'm a solace on before the news For more details

San Francisco Vietnam Third World Liberation Front George Murray Penny Black Panther Party Nesbitt Crutchfield Jason Ferreira San Francisco State College Of Black Panther Okatsu United States Professor Bay Area Sf Unified School District Martin Luther King Assault Michael Variety Reporter
"black panther party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 10 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are. The lumpen are battling another force besides the authorities, and it's coming from within the party, and it was people that Wasn't into the one thing they didn't think revolutionary should be doing that kind of thing. But there are over people too. You know they wouldn't RMB people. They were blues people, and during that time there was a difference. Most of the leadership of the party was seven sudden, like boom. We are young guys we like, are we? Well, I think some people may have thought of it is not being important. Not understanding how how important the culture wass to get in the message, but that didn't stop them. It's November 10th 1970 at Merritt College in Oakland. It's the almond mater of Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, the birthplace of the Black Panther Party. Tonight to a packed auditorium. The lumpen will get the message out. Lady Todo Black Panther party, very brown. They're in mind. This group has been together for less than a year. Well, almost everybody else in the San Francisco music scene has been getting high and jamming. Lumping had been working his full time revolutionaries pursued by the police and the FBI, and they still got this together. And tonight is special show is being recorded for a live album, and the group pulls out all the stops. Billy Jennings is there with his fist in the air. He was one of the best shows of my life because the artist's wass electrified.

Black Panther Party Billy Jennings Huey Newton Merritt College Bobby Seale FBI Oakland San Francisco
Power to the People

Lost Notes

05:25 min | 11 months ago

Power to the People

"In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture. It's a journey unlike that of any other band and Michael. Torrents was at the center of it. Up? In Nineteen, sixty six Huey Newton and Bobby Seale Co the Black Panther Party. Most students at Merit Community College in Oakland within a few years. The party offers educational programs, food, service, free, medical care and Drug Rehab. The black community and the panthers lead the fight against rampant police brutality. By the end of the sixties, changes in the air in the bay area is Ground Zero. San Francisco that I will ruin. The fillmore district was very very hot tension. Police were riding. You know if I've if you are selling your papers would come in. Who asked us at you pay? Arrest at new. But at the same time there was a lot of energy. an s the best thing about it. You could really feel the energy particularly among younger people that we felt we could really make a change. Not only make and we're GONNA make. Their will us this commitment to die if necessary.

Black Panthers Huey Newton Torrance Michael Torrens Bobby Seale Oakland Torrence San Francisco San Francisco La London Michael Co Founder Midwest Elizabeth Drug Rehab Bobby Seale Co Merit Community College New York
Power to the People

Lost Notes

03:59 min | 11 months ago

Power to the People

"In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture.

Torrance Panthers Newton Black Panthers Michael Torrens Torrence Bobby Seale Oakland Huey London Michael Co Founder Elizabeth Midwest San Francisco La New York Philly
"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:25 min | 11 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Our coffee. Yep, there's some just a lot of really good articles out there. that just searched black panthers in it'll. There's a lot of I opening history that you didn't learn in school since I said you didn't learn in school. It's time for listener mail. I'm going to call this addendum to rubber trade. From the elastic episode. Guys? Just listened to the one and elastic, so it was fun and informative as usual, but I wanted to call attention to a small important omission you discussing the rubber trading Latin American you only mentioned Brazil, although is indeed the largest exporter of rubber in the area, the Amazon Basin, and the Puccio River. Valley region in Peru and Colombia were also important sites for the production of rubber trees a sadly when you combined global demand with the natural product, result.

Amazon Basin Puccio River Peru Colombia Brazil
"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:44 min | 11 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"All sorts of protests in the streets. People wanted that judge removed I thought that. was that not during the panther. Twenty one trial was at the other one Chicago. Chicago trial now, okay? And that was. That was a different trial. Also where did you ever hear the urban legend that Hillary? Clinton got Bobby Seale out of out of a murder charges. Yes, that was that came out of that Alex radically trial where he was on trial for murder, and he he was acquitted and Hillary Rodham. Clinton was nowhere near the actual trial. Is Terni. She apparently was a law student, Yale still and was coordinating with the Aclu to monitor the trial. So she she was there, but apparently had nothing to do with the Defense Gotcha. But. It was a an urban legend that came out of the two thousand senatorial campaign. Well, the Panther Twenty one. I mentioned just quickly. That was in New York the. New York Chapter Twenty one leaders of the black. Panther party were rounded up and arrested on conspiracy charges, and this is a really big deal. Because New York chapter was one of the biggest ones in the country after Oakland and people got involved and tried to raise money like celebrities got involved in donated money and it at one point I don't know if it still is, but it was the longest criminal proceeding. New York state history of the thirteen month trial by jury, and they're all found not guilty and released. So that, all of them were found not guilty. Yeah, the Panther Twenty one well and that's jumping back in time a little bit and just wanted to mention that. So there's a distinct legacy beyond just the look, the image or black power and black power. We should also say I think it was stokely Carmichael, who, either coined fraser at least was the first really Kinda. Pick it up and run with it. and stokely Carmichael is nuns nonviolent student coordinating committee. They got together with the Black Panthers early on, but if you I mean just in the popular culture, the Black Panthers live on, but the there's. Even more of a legacy as well before he died, eldridge cleaver gave an interview think back in nineteen ninety-seven. and. He said that he basically blamed the gang violence that plagued inner cities in the eighties. He traced that directly to the death of the Black Panthers. Well, he said that as it was, the US government chopped off the head of the black. Liberation Movement and lift the body. They're armed. That's why all these young bloods are out there now they've got the rhetoric, but without the political direction, and they've got the guns interesting, so he he basically traces that directly to the Black Panthers, being taken down. Yeah. You got anything else. Actually do so. We were talking about how you know there's a legacy. There's not just a legacy of the Black Panthers is a legacy of. brutality against black people that apparently is at least as bad if not worse today than it has been chuck. Yeah, so the toast. Tuskegee. University in Alabama has a records of all the lynchings that took place. In the Jim Crow Era, eighteen, ninety to nineteen, sixty, five and two thousand nine hundred eleven, black Americans were lynched during those years and the worst year of the Jim Crow era was eighteen, ninety, two and one, hundred and sixty one people were lynched in two, thousand, fifteen, two, hundred and fifty eight black people were killed by police in the United States so. Not to change in. It's possible that it's gotten worse. But if you look to the black lives, matter movement. They have chosen the way of King. And in preaching non violent rhetoric for social change, rather than the Black Panther rhetoric of militancy and violence self-defense..

Black Panthers Hillary Rodham eldridge cleaver New York Bobby Seale stokely Carmichael US Panther party Clinton Chicago murder Jim Crow Yale Oakland Alabama Tuskegee Alex fraser
"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Right Fred Hampton by all accounts from this documentary in my research seem like he could have been the Bobby Kennedy. Of the Black Panther, party well put, he was vivacious, he was a great speaker. He was You know he would. He would give these speeches in Just galvanize people. He had a great personality and He was really getting kind of the movement back on track again in a big way when he was. Pretty much Pretty much when he was politically assassinated by the FBI Chicago Police Department. Yeah, he was executed for sure. So. What was the nineteen sixty nine year December? Fourth is when the raid went down. So it's something like four am sometime in the wee, hours of the cops kicked in the door, Fred Hampton's house or the house where he was staying and Ninety Bullets think I saw ninety also saw hundred ninety bullets were shot fired from the Chicago Police Department and one bullet was shot by the Black Panthers. That bullet was shot when the bodyguard to Fred Hampton, his name was Mark Clark, was shot and killed and drop the shotgun he was holding in. It went off. Yeah, and we should mention to. This was one of many many what they called. Raids after Hoover Ish issued that edict that they were the the largest and I'm sure there was an internal memo as well which we don't know about. But when he issued the edict that they were the most threatening group to the United, states democracy. It was pretty much open season, and they carried out these raids all over the country where essentially cops would just kick in doors, guns blazing. shoot I don't even ask questions. Yeah, but this was a little more even even worse. It was even more pronounced because this was targeted this. Yes. And it was targeted specifically for Fred. Hampton and it kind of falls in line with this part of CO Intel pro. Coin tell pro. This one of the the foundation of coin tell pro is that it sought to prevent the rise of a black. Messiah. That could consolidate. Yeah, the masses, and that was read Hampton right well..

Bobby Kennedy Black Panthers Chicago Police Department Mark Clark Fred FBI Intel United
"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:11 min | 11 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Said I thought you were going to army, and they said back to him I just did. Pretty good, yeah, she dropped the mic right after absolutely did, but I. mean that directly relates to I think point number five on the ten point agenda where it says that they want education for people that that teaches them about themselves that gives them a knowledge of self, said that if a man doesn't have knowledge of himself in his position in society in the world that he has little chance to relate to anything else. Yeah, which is. Exceptionally True Yeah. So, you've got all these programs. I think they had like sixty five programs what they called survival programs in place and it wasn't until apparently these programs. Were starting to really roll and get the attention of in support of a lot of people outside of the communities even that the FBI. Led by J, Edgar Hoover gave its full attention to the Black Panthers and they said about trying to destroy the Black Panther Party we yeah, I mean hoover. Ironically, these social programs are what scared him the most because he knew that that's how you're GONNA get. White Liberals on board on this 'cause. Yeah, which is exactly what happened? I mean like you said they weren't. They didn't shun the help of the white man by any means they like went arm-in-arm with these white lefties. basically watch documentaries. It looks like today. There's you know these college students with beards. Like modern hipsters, yeah, and worked arm-in-arm, and at one point they even got together. Who was the Appalachian Group the Young Patriots, yeah, it's just like you see this video of these black militants like given handshakes and hugs to these Appalachian White Appalachian. I mean rural. White, people. Who all seem like they were like. We have the same problems, and we can just get together, and it's just crazy especially in today's climate all these years later to see that happening back then yeah I, mean they were in favor of anybody regardless as long as they shared, you know kind of the same sentiments or the same struggle in one, thousand, nine, hundred seventy, he newton became the first black leader to ever publicly support gays and lesbians. Yeah, that was a huge deal to yeah absolutely. I mean the point was like you know. The the problem wasn't race the problem was this class struggling. You know everybody of a certain socioeconomic status or who is a worker. Yes, being held back, you know. So you were saying. Hoover was worried about those social programs. Yes, there's a quote from a letter that he wrote to an FBI agent who objected to targeting the survival programs as part of a coin. Tell Pro Yeah. Hoover said you..

Edgar Hoover Appalachian White Appalachian Black Panther Party FBI Appalachian Group Young Patriots newton
"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Yeah, and the reason that they were allowed to have guns, because one of their one of their leaders eldridge cleaver. found in the. California, a lawbooks that. I mean they call it a loophole, but it wasn't really a loophole right there in black and white is you are allowed to carry a gun in public on public property as long as it's not concealed. Carry Law and so they were like all right well. We have these guns. It says right here we're allowed to. They would carry a gun in one hand a lot of time, and then this California legal handbook in the other, and they knew it by heart. They could quote exactly the code and you know obviously. The cops caught on the word got around what was going on and. It developed all the way to the California in General Assembly and when you see the documentary, it's it's amazing man, these these black, the Black Panther party marches. Through the building onto the floor of the California generalists, simply wielding shotguns loaded shotguns and you. You know you see all the obviously the white legislature to sitting there like what in the world is going on including Ronald Reagan well. Yeah, he was the governor, right and so Ronald Reagan was the governor the time and he is in that documentary quoted as saying like anybody who thinks you know carrying open loaded guns. In public is okay, is out of his mind, and ultimately signed a anti open carry law. That closed that loophole. Yeah, the MO I act right so Reagan signed some gun control legislation, big gun control legislation in an effort to curb those patrols by the Black Panthers, yeah not so obviously you hear. All Right Ronald Reagan does this you think where's the NRA? So I looked up I was like all right. What was just the climate of the time? Apparently in the late sixties are a I. It wasn't until the late seventies nineteen seventy seven. When a guy named. Carter took over the NRA is when they really stepped it up with the Second Amendment Rights. More strict version of the second amendment, right and so the NRA was silent and obviously Reagan being very tough on guns. He had I guess you could call it. A conversion in the nineteen eighties S as well And then he and the NRA teamed up together and started saying things like well. No, it's it's okay. You can totally have guns. Right, this also happened to coincide with the break up of the Black Panther Party. Yeah when they win, the NRA and Reagan change their stance on gun rights. Yes, one thing you said was that it was eldridge cleaver who noticed loophole? It was Huey Newton. He was the one who who really had that. MIND FOR LAW. eldridge cleaver was much more the militant revolutionary. Yeah, and he was already a bit of a darling in the intellectual circles for a book of essays he'd written in prison called soul on ice. And so he joined the Black Panther Party pretty early on as their minister of information in large part, their official spokesman,.

Ronald Reagan Black Panther Party NRA eldridge cleaver California eldridge cleaver. Huey Newton General Assembly Carter official
"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:22 min | 11 months ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"That was the problem it was. Class they were basically avowed Marxists right that yeah, the central the central issue that created the struggle. was was class was capitalism, and that the white establishment and the police and the government were keepers of the capitalist structure, and that same capitalist structure was keeping the black, the black people in America down, and so to get to to rise up to become self sufficient to get that chance that they needed to grow in advance themselves. They had to get rid of the capital structure itself. Yeah, they were a very much into the socialist ideal and one of the first. First things they did was. They realized they needed sort of a an a foundation on which to build upon something easily digestible that people could could look at and could read and understand what they're all about so very smartly early on. They came up with a very specific What they call their ten point program what we want and what we believe and They wrote this out. We're GONNA read them in a second, but they wrote them out and then. Immediately print them on thousand sheets of paper, and set up an office and started passing these things around. This office was in Oakland. Which is where I think we already said where they founded. And You know they basically quit their jobs. Every member of the Black Panther party was a fulltime I guess you could say employee but full-time worker member. Yeah, member, yeah, and They gathered their paychecks few guys at the very beginning and rented an old shop, a storefront base and started handing out this ten point program. Yeah, they did and You to go over the program I, yeah, we might as well just go ahead and read all tin so everybody knows what we're talking about right. number one. We want freedom. We want power to determine the destiny of our black community. We believe that black people will not be free until we are able to determine our destiny..

Black Panther party Oakland America
Bryant Terry: Vegetable Kingdom

Chewing the Fat

08:46 min | 1 year ago

Bryant Terry: Vegetable Kingdom

"Welcome to chewing the fat. The Yale sustainable food programs podcasts. At looks at people making change in a complex world of Food and agriculture. I'm your host Irwin. Lee for final episode from our cooking across the Black Diaspora series. We host Bryant Terry Chef in residence at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. When Bryant was on campus in February? He spoke about recipes in the ways. They offer a reclamation resistance but he also shared about how in food justice work we can often forget. Recipes are about enjoyment to. That's why his newest cookbook. Vegetable Kingdom has song recommendations for what to listen to while you make each dish through his activism award-winning Cookbooks. And love for the history of black. Africa communities. Brian Wonderful guest to close our series. I'm also excited to say that. This episode was collaborative. Take an angle hosts the podcasts the table underground which features stories of food radical love and creative social justice she interviews Bryant in this episode at a time where physical distancing means. Were often staying indoors. Their conversation assured offer something special for all of us. It could be more excitement as you cook. A new dish and jam with friends or family or maybe. It's a feeling that you're connected to something larger to a people to a story that even in these messed up times where people across the food system and society at large are facing extreme pressures never before we can still find ways to come together. Hi Brian Hagan how are you? I'm good how you doing really well. Thanks for making time in your busy schedule for people who don't know you and your story. Can You tell folks? How did you get into eating a plant based Diet? How did you become Vegan? Well is interesting because you said how do I get into a plant based Diet and then you ask how to become Vegan? F- elect those two separate questions. And I don't know if it was necessarily a plant based I but I like to think that the Diet egg I grew up eating was Largely Vegetable base or you could say vegetable forward. It's because I spent Well it's because that was just something family valued I come from a family of farmers and my grandparents Migrated from the rule south to Memphis where I grew up and they brought with them. Those traditions of growing food and they're very knowledge and you know just the understanding that it's important that you be in charge of producing the food for yourself and your family and so you know that was something that my grandparents passed on most of their kids and they had gardens and spent a lot of time in my paternal grandfather's garden when I was growing up. And I call it a garden but it's more like urban farm because he literally used every bit of available space to grow food and he had chickens he at hogs and this is a neighborhood adjacent to downtown Memphis where you knows very productive and I That's what we ate from. You know I always say that the food that we was local as our backyard garden it was always in season. And we literally will go harvest food right before making it but in terms of me moving more towards a compassionate and healthful diet in in the way that we think about them kind of like labeling it as a Vegan diet that happened when I was in high school after I heard that The song beef by Boogie down productions and Karras when the MC of that group and it was really just this wakeup call for me. And I just had no idea about the violent way that are industrialized food. System can treat animals and the impact that can have you know obviously on the animals but also on human health and the environment and I just couldn't turn back so after hearing that Song. I really move towards More plant based Diet. And you know. I think it's important for me to always recognize. It wasn't a linear journey. It wasn't like a hurt that and I'd just stop eating meat. Never gone back. You know There were moments where I've eaten animal products again. I mean you know. Case in point how strict Vegan and then went to study abroad and France's and Undergrad and in the mid nineties it was hard to be a Vegan in France House yeah stain. What the host family. And they were feeding me what they ate. And so I I feel like important to note that because a lot of people have these purity tests and I certainly would fail any of those purity tests and I also think it's important for me to be transparent so that other people can just feel human and know that you don't have to be perfect and know that you know you do the best you can and sometimes you might do something differently and it's all about just waking up the next day and trying your best day right yeah totally Philly on that I know that history really informs your work a lot in particular the history of the Black Panther Party for self defense. And I'm wondering if you can explain a little bit about how both that history and other history really informs the way that you work in food. Yeah Wow always talk about the Black Panther Party for self defense being one of the major or learning about the work that they were doing in the sixties seventies Was really the major impetus for me deciding to do this. Work and particularly their survival programs. There were aimed at meeting. The basic needs of people living in communities and at a range of programs from you know free clinics to ambulance service to sickle cell. Anemia testing The programs that address this intersection of poverty malnutrition and institutional racism that grocery giveaways and Free Breakfast for Children Program where the ones that inspired me to start doing Food Systems working to become a quote unquote food justice activist But I think more than the programs especially after having conversations with many former black panthers. It's really the spirit of seeing the need in the community and then just jumping into action you know and I really understood that. We had to train a generation of young people who were equipped to make change their communities around food systems and lead the change in fact and I always talk about how you think about many of the most powerful social movements in the twentieth century and it was young people their energy. They're brilliant Fearlessness that helped these movements Pushed forward you know. We can look at the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa the Civil Rights movement in the American south. And you know if we imagine that food justice will be one of the most hopeful movements of the twenty first century. I feel like we need to make sure that we're quickly young people to be the ones who are taking the lead in the movement. What was it about food that made you really feel like that was the need that you wanted to take action on wall it was missing these parallels with where things were in the sixties and the panthers addressing you know. I think nutritional Apartheid and understanding that hunger and poverty were issues that had to be addressed and they start to breakfast. Well I mean they had the grocery giveaway because people are hungry. He wouldn't know where their next meal was gonNA come from and they started the free breakfast for children program because children were going to school hungry and they knew that they couldn't focus on what they're learning. They were having hunger pains and they didn't need any pure reviewed studies that prove the connection between like nutrition and educational and Behavioral. Outcomes is just like intuitive people need to. I mean like if I don't eat I feel grumpy and can't think straight and so imagine being a child having to go to school without being fed. And so when I I I. I tell this story about being on the subway Going from Brooklyn to Manhattan to go to campus. And you know teeing class and seeing these young people on the subway at seven o'clock in the morning eating candy bars and Red Hot Cheetos and drinking sodas and sugary juices and energy drinks and just realizing that these young people like that's the worst way to start their day and I know that that was just just that day you know this is this is probably the way they're eating often and so I jumped into action and started an organization called be healthy that used cooking as a way to empower them and give them skills that they could take another adult lives and help them feel more equipped to make real food but also as a way to help them be more politicized about the food issues that directly impact them their families.

Bryant Terry Chef Black Panther Party Food Systems Memphis Africa Brian Hagan Irwin San Francisco LEE Panthers France Museum Of The African Diaspora Karras South Africa Philly Brooklyn
"black panther party" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"But of course, you know, that they are the voice of the people the new black sure for all of, of course, dedicated freedom fighters in obviously and exile, the political prisoners and prisoners of war in America, saying AK tank you. You. Thank you. Failing America with three ks Facebook dot cruciate. That thing black you. But don't know own censor them don't pay any attention to the new Black Panther party. I don't wanna see anything that mentions white, and I'm fine with white supremacist. There's white person who supports anything they do or say, no reasonable human being likes or agrees with or even follows or knows anything about white supremacist, except we don't want to have anything to do with them. And we don't wanna see their nonsense. But you know, if you're going to if you're going to censor that you'd better do the other side to otherwise, you lose that protection, the federal government gives you not to be held accountable for the things that are done with that. They're going to be losing. It doesn't look like I hope I want to be too. But it feels like of they want this government regulation. So that that gives them even more safety. That's if only shuts down one side, it's this. It's the same thing that's enforced by the government on churches. If you're a church with traditional values, you cannot.

federal government America Black Panther party Facebook
"black panther party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"American exiles in east Africa, the story of Pedo Neil and Charlotte hill on their fifty year exile from the United States. My name is Felix Lenzi O'neil junior, my nickname, Pete O'Neal. I'm Pete O'Neal. Seventy eight year old elder black, man. Who else could I possibly be our story? Picks up in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine when Pedo Neal was the chairman of the Kansas City, Missouri. Taft Black Panther party in that year. The Black Panthers at the height of their influence with chapters all across the United States, and they loomed very very large in the American imagination for people in the counterculture who revered them and for their opponents who demonize them FBI director, j Edgar Hoover declared. The Panthers were the greatest internal threat to US national security as far as the government was concerned people like Pedo, Neil were enemies of the state, our producer Collier interviewed on Neil in Tanzania where he's been living for nearly fifty years. Pete was a prominent member of the Black Panther party. But he wasn't always a radical person bent on ending oppression. He has a fairly checkered past and he's tired of talking about it. But of course, I pressed him. I came up on where all the great jazz giants were and everything all the hustlers and the pimps and the prostitutes, and these people from the age of nine were my professors, they inculcated in me a way of thinking. I don't even know if they need to be talking about this. But nonetheless. Inculcated into my psyche. A manner of thinking that is very street oriented this square people just don't think that way they really don't from a fairly young age. Pete was primarily a street hustler and small time pimp. He had just two concerns in life making money fast and staying far away from the police the he had an argument with the wife of a police officer and the law caught up to him. Pete needed help. And he thought maybe the Black Panthers could help him. So I went to the headquarters in Oakland. They had no interest in his personal fairs that they encouraged him to stay and participate in political education classes, they started to talk to me about great revolutionaries people who had struggled and sacrificed lost their lives for what for the benefit of the people for the benefit of the people can cannot just said my God, I've been looking at this thing wrong to me was like what I am magin a born again Christian experiences when he seemed to.

Pete O'Neal Taft Black Panther party Pedo Neil Pete United States Felix Lenzi east Africa Edgar Hoover Pedo Neal Oakland Missouri chairman Kansas City FBI Tanzania Charlotte hill officer director Collier producer
A Brief History of Sickle Cell Disease

The Pulse

02:09 min | 2 years ago

A Brief History of Sickle Cell Disease

"Story is about a disease that could have been mostly wiped out. But it wasn't. It's a story about a public health campaign gone wrong, sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder blood cells bend into a sickle shape, which causes blockages and starves tissue of oxygen this illness affects people of African descent as well as Mediterranean and south Indian peoples. The American government took aim at sickle cell in the nineteen. Seventies jets Lehman reports on how public health missed the Mark. It's March nineteen seventy-two. Bobby Seale speaking in a crowded gym. And we're not saying that. Vava programs are necessarily revolutionary. He's the co founder of the Black Panther party, a radical African American civil rights organization founded in California survivor programs to and institutions by which we unify people around Abana reads sickle cell, anemia testing black community survival conference a blood test shows if you have the sickle cell trait or not. Trait carriers usually don't have any symptoms. But if two people who have the trait have children their kids may develop sickle cell disease, which can be fatal the Black Panthers had been calling attention to sickle cell for years. And it looked like the government had finally started to listen congress had approved a fivefold increase in sickle cell research. Funding, president Nixon made fighting the disease a priority. America has long been the wealthiest nation in the world. Now, it is time we became the healthiest nation in the work sickle cell testing had been possible for decades. Now there was funding as wills a mandate from the leader of the free world. We were going to stop sickle cell in America once and for all. Only we didn't. This is a young girl in her bed. Tears streaming. She's in sickle cell crisis.

Sickle Cell Trait Black Panther Party Bobby Seale American Government America Blood Disorder President Nixon Mediterranean Lehman Congress Abana California
"black panther party" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Can provide a model for community in power. And so in terms of organizing, we are committed also being much more disciplined. In terms of caring output goes -cation classes and overall aspects of life when it comes to help eating tation things that are oriented around tradition that we have learned from people such as the move organization. The Black Panther party in the kind of programs that they had. And so we see ourselves sort of as vanguard for that sort of movement, at least on the college campus. That was Chris Durand spokesperson for the concerned forty four students at Seton Hall university in northern New Jersey also in that state, New Jersey advance media release. They report documenting how police departments in every town and city and the state you sports against the billions activists on the ground have found the report to be very useful and pressing their case against police racism and brutality Saudi Muhammad. It's a veteran organizer with the newer communities or accountable police in for in cap, we ask is I eat if there were any surprises in new jer-. Advanced media report will the first prize is that it came from him of all places because that entity and its mother rations star-ledger have been in denial and not been terribly willing to investigate a very real way this phenomenon we've been facing since the institution has come into being. So that's the first apprise second surprises that it was as exhaustive as it was. And I have to concede that they did it in Embiid at that level, sir surprises that we have in the new attorney general who had to bear witness to how out of touch in the how appropriate it was that it did not come from the state when it was supposed to come from the state almost two decades ago remains to be seen. How far he will be turned around in implementing something similar and the other things that need to be. Be implemented to make police accountability something real, but it is there it is there to deal with and we all look at it. As a tool or a weapon to help move the issue, and it needs to be moved on so many firms. You're of course, based in Newark Newark, New Jersey's biggest city and one of its blackest. How does it say in that report mixed bag mixed bag and some of that because of the reform efforts in place now under this federal monitor that things are going in the right direction on the surface that appears to be so quote into that report it could go either way in his current actually going up with towards a large use of force in perhaps meet these? So we need to be vigilant even in this process where this some oversight involved, but I would go further Nuuk at in this new also the thing that was not mentioned mentioning this was very important in my mind as judgment is that what what do we do? Now, what needs to be in place? And it's thing that was Langley missing. There's a whole question of civilian oversight in Newark, we're in the throes of a fight for a survey you review board that was. Intended and put in place, but mayor Respironics that was like none onto the on the other in the country. And as soon as we got it in place the other side on the ship of turn auto police when into court to block its implementation with your sorry that we need to make the turn of count ability that we're talking about real. So we all need to get there. We all need to get to that place where we should have real meaningful civilian oversight of the police. We should have real meaningful civilian oversight..

New Jersey Newark Newark jer Black Panther party Chris Durand billions Seton Hall university Nuuk Embiid attorney Langley two decades
"black panther party" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Podcasts from thousands of black podcast on the web. Using search social metrics subscribe to these websites because they are actively working to educate inspire empower their readers with frequent updates and high quality of formation these podcasts right based on the following criteria, Google, reputation and go Google search ranking influence, the popularity on Facebook, Twitter, other social media sites quality and consistency oppose fees editorial team and expert review. So we may Duluth watching you make doing the metrics idea. I don't know like it's funny. Like, there's so many list, we don't make and I understand. I don't think we don't have the biggest broadcasts Nive necessarily the biggest footprint. No, I think we have the most loyal coolest listeners fans, you know. But I don't know that we necessarily, you know, up there with the likes of especially podcasts at backed by bigger sources fund them and things like that. We don't necessarily have that pool. But it's always cool to be mentioned among black podcast peers and peers in general. So yeah, we came in on this list at number eleven out of twenty five. I'll take that. That's pretty hot. I mean, considering the company that we are keeping in. The the words that were near the top of black talk radio network. I had not heard them before. But they they actually have a twenty five thousand Facebook fares. And seven thousand Twitter followers. So there must be somebody come on. Now the nod which is a new like well new word to the podcast game. But a great bar gas. I love got a lot of people say they're going to have had a chance to listen yet. Yes. The dope podcast still processing as well. I mean, I'm like lot of shit. I've been listening to keep it lately. Ray Sanni was on an episode of keep it. So I'll check that out the new Black Panther party. Did not know they had a podcast. Yeah. They got thirty six thousand Facebook fans. I guess they're not all Twitter. The right time, Bomani Jones. He owned a number four. To queens. On their number five snap judgment. That's there on that. Number six, many fans who my God, a hundreds of thousands of these people. That's what I'm talking about. KT in black America. I'm not sure what the K U T stands for. To be honest with jar. But it basically our that must be K U UT dot org and the name of the show is black America in black America. That's dope. Man. I didn't even know about these shows. I'm glad this person made the list finally list where I'm reading I'm like, I don't know somebody shows because normally I know all the shows if I don't actually some of the shows I might not listen to date like cute up for me to venture to get around to listen to them. Yeah. I have I remember I will try to put this in show notes for you guys soda child. Can check them out yourself. Great podcast if you're under where where we came in. We came in after let's see black girl nerds, let's see reveal was number eight black girl nurses, nine therapy for black girls. Ten and then I said eleven therapy for black girls is really really good. Your mama had told me about that particular podcast. And she doesn't really did a good job talk about mental health and. There is and and just talking about a lot of things that. Black women deal with black people in general got some mail. This heard Dobie a Ramey. So I was thinking ding, ding, just a real podcast positive guys. I gotta take my mail. All right. And we're back. Go ahead. What were Are you you saying saying? you forgot? All right. Let's keep moving therapy for girls. Yes. Black girls. Yes. Everybody is a really really good pie cast for those of you that are one nine about mental health, and and here mental health experts talk is a really really great pike has particularly in the age that we are in..

Facebook Twitter Black Panther party America Google Bomani Jones Duluth queens Ray Sanni Dobie
 How 'Coal Tiger' Became 'Black Panther'

Part-Time Genius

01:25 min | 2 years ago

How 'Coal Tiger' Became 'Black Panther'

"Here's a quick one about Black Panther that actually just learned this week. So comic readers were first introduced to Black Panther in July of nineteen sixty six and this was in the pages of fantastic, four number fifty two. And of course, his appearance was historic Mark. The first time that a super powered African character had appeared in a starring role in an American comic. What's interesting is that the superheroes? Name doesn't come from the activists. Black Panther party. You know, the the one that rose to prominence in the sixties the character's debut actually predates that group's formation by about three months. So instead, it's actually meant to reference a famous African American tank battalion from World War Two, and they were not allowed to serve alongside white US troops during the war and the unit was nicknamed the Black Panthers after this insignia they wore which was a profile of a ferocious panther with. The motto come out fighting written under it. Now. The Panthers later received a presidential unit citation. For their actions and actually considered by some historians to be one of the most effective tank battalions and the entire war. That's pretty fascinating. But how did marvel come up with this name for the character apparently Stanley and Jack Kirby they had lived through World War Two and remember the battalion and its nickname. Obviously Black Panther is better than the original name that they were thinking of which was cold tiger.

Black Panthers African American Tank Battalio Panther Party Jack Kirby Stanley Three Months
"black panther party" Discussed on Plz Advise

Plz Advise

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Plz Advise

"And he told her I know who you are except it made him rock-hard. Ride to he was he was not holding this double homicide against her. In fact. America's most wanted woman. And this is where I kind of do think female killers are so rare like it compared to like the majority of people who commit murders that that's why I think it's like hot date, Casey, Anthony, and like the the killers in jail who get girlfriends are like the night stalker in Charles Manson, and like these big like Scott Peterson like big sensational murder people. I don't think your average like baby killer or your average like just like bucket and roommate proxy male who murders people, I don't know if they really get letters and like hit up the way that the big the bigs do it bothers me because I think half of it is because a woman in most people's mind, doesn't pose a same threat that a guy does like Casey Anthony is probably not going to like bludgeoned to death a man, but any of these other kind of crazy killer guys that like Scott Peterson. Absolutely. It's got a minute had gotten off like knock. Guilty. Because Katie what do you held the type of person that like she was probably getting porn deals offered. One hundred percent, Amy Fisher, go. Yeah. Horn deals, right? Scott Peterson probably like one of the hotter. Murderers out there. I don't know that he would have gotten to like a Playgirl offer. No. And I I think that there is a sexualization of a like a dangerous woman. Yeah. It's the question is bothersome. Because if I know somebody's past is that Dr not like a rehab like Black Panther party, you Patty, Hearst, kind of like, right? Got caught them in a bad situation without the sixties. This is now, and they're totally changed like then there might be some conversation. But the kind of the examples brought up or people that I feel like have horrible personality flaws and Mike psychosis. I do understand. I don't know what that is the sound of a child just gleefully running through leaves. Oh, yeah. There's there's a lot of glee going on right now. I know it's so nice to be around like pure happiness. Except for those weirdos. We just got a gauge they don't even look like they belong here cost play. She's been deals. Yeah. And they're playing in culture through apple culture. Appropriated by white new in bitcoin. This. Yeah. But no everyone's really fucking as friends with them. Wording leaves over there. She's just running around hoarding. Oh, that's the most. So Molly don't talk about my new family. They're my new family. Honestly, I don't I don't see that lasts till thanksgiving. I don't think I think maybe for like you guys will keep in touch briefly after this. But I don't think you guys are going to be regular friends beyond us. So would you know, I don't think she's even I was going to say before before that child was having so much fun behind us. I was gonna say I don't know if she's actually literally asking us this question. I think that she just wants us to kind of talk about it. Because it is it is kind of overwhelming to think about a guy, for example, dating Casey Anthony, and like not rolling over every day in bed and being like, the weight, you swear you didn't kill that kid. Right. Like, you would want to you. You would have it natural curiosity. Yes. And I think that unless it worked unless it like, I assume all these people have a king for like, bad other. Yes, that's their thing. So you meant like these people as like the people around us who are apple. They got a king to sure do apples or their kink. Yeah. It's. My king. Yeah. I like a good core..

Casey Anthony Scott Peterson apple Charles Manson Black Panther party Amy Fisher America murder Mike psychosis Katie Horn Molly Patty Hearst One hundred percent
"black panther party" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

14:27 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Views expressed by the hosts on this program documented to be almost always right? Ninety nine point eight percent of the time. Great to be with you my friends. It's Rush Limbaugh. This the Limbaugh institute for advanced conservative studies advanced anti leftist studies and anti media studies. There are no graduates, and there aren't a grease because a learning never stops. So I got here today and I start doing show prep. And I I find. Some pictures of a bunch of military looking guys. Always Stacey Abrams signs. I mean, these guys are wearing camel and they've got serious weapons running around a serious weapons, and they get Stacey Abrams for governor signs all over the place that is running for governor of Georgia. It turns out that it's the new Black Panther party. The new Black Panther party has openly and willingly been photographed. Armed to the teeth looking very threatening and intimidating in the process and the messages, you better be voting for Stacey Abrams or there could be trouble. Now, we have history here in Philadelphia. Two thousand eight or two thousand twelve the new Black Panther party in Philadelphia was obstructing voting places in traditional Republican areas. I believe and Eric Holder. I mean, it was clear voter intimidation, and Eric Holder, the Obama attorney general decided, you know, what we're not gonna process. My people. What does that mean? What was our people is he a member of the new Black Panther? He meant. We're not going to prosecute African Americans. Tough enough wrote a whole is it is we're not going to prosecute him. And that led to some resignations in the Justice department, civil rights division, including j Christian Adams equipped because now these guys are back and these pictures have four or five of them each. I mean in they're looking very threatening and menacing, and we have a story armed with assault rifles. Black Panthers March for Stacey Abrams. Members of the Black Panther party March to the city of Atlanta strapped with assault rifles brandishing Stacey Abrams campaign signs immigratio posted on the groups Facebook page, Saturday members of the Black Panther party. You're seen marching through western neighborhoods of Atlanta in support a Stacey Abrams. Gubernatorial campaign is they marched the Black Panthers. Carried assault rifles and continually shouted slogans such as black power and power to the people. The the video shows the Panthers marching for nearly thirty minutes. Through a city of Atlanta until they enter a local radio station. So the president has tweeted about this. Law enforcement has been strongly notified to watch closely for any illegal voting, which may take place in Tuesday's election or early voting. Anyone caught will be subject to the maximum criminal penalties allowed by law. Thank you. That was not the case. Back in two thousand two thousand. I think it was Obama's first election two thousand might have been twenty twelve but I think it was two thousand eight. So. This is this is. A clear effort to scare or intimidate people. And they've they've used it used it before. I don't know what Stacey Abrams position on this issue. Probably downplaying it thinking, it's no big deal. If it were me, I'd be disavowing it, I guess she can't. Afford to to do that. Art. And I mentioned some amazing things that were happening on the Sunday shows the drive by media. Let me set this up by point the economy is roaring the economy is doing so well African American approval for President Trump is like forty percent. That that's accurate the dimmer. And if African Americans are going to vote. For people associated with Trump on that basis. Then I mean, that's that's a real problem for the Democrats. We know that African American unemployment is at a record low as well at around. I think it was four point four percent. So the economy is going great wages have gone up by three point one percent that hasn't happened in a long time unemployment we have more job openings than there are people to fill them. So you couple that ride rising employment rising, wages productivity is off the charts jobs that Barack Obama sub. We're never coming back have come back manufacturing jobs because of policies implemented by Donald Trump. And it's these policies the Democrats want to erase the Democrats want to erase the tax cut. They want Medicare for all they want to grow government. They want to establish is the premise that government is the focal point of everybody's life. That government is where you go. If you need anything governments where you go. If you want anything, including your enemies punished. And the economy's doing really really good so good that the drive bys have been ignoring it because in their world in the world of the Washington establishment back pocket issues. Have been the sole determinate. In who wins elections, especially in presidential election years, which this one is not. But if the economy is kicking butt, and if it's going great gangbusters the party out of power has traditionally had something practically impossible overcome. What's fascinating is that the drive bys have been ignoring the economy, they've been downplaying. They have been acting like it's not really that. Good. It's not only Kamala Harris who's one of the supposed- dream presidential candidates for the Democrats went out to Iowa last week. And she said don't be fooled by any. There's the economy's not that great. The only reason things look this good 'cause everybody's having to work two jobs, which is not true. That's what's not necessary anymore. A lot of people still are don't misunderstand. But it isn't necessary. That's the whole point of this. And yet, she's downplaying it. No big deal. The drive bys have been trying to downplay it because they think it's such an important factor. They think it would be such a boon to Trump and the Republicans at the economy's doing well, they would look at it as a huge obstacle for their buddies the Democrats to overcome. So they have been ignoring. Until this past week at the Mike. I'm going to switch up on you here. I need to find a. Soundbite that I'm looking for Jake tapper, and what's his name Tom Perez with that assigned somewhere yet? Let's see that would be number twenty. This will be the prelude. This was Sunday morning on state of the union, Jake tapper. The host is talking at Tom Perez is a chairman Democrat National Committee. Wait. No. This is not the one. I guess it's twenty one. Let me see if I can find twenty one real quick. I've got my whole here. It is. Twenty one. This is not the one I'm looking for. What happened was Tom Perez? Started talking about how no big deal this economy this economy and Jake tapper to took him to task on it. Let me see if I do have it here. Jake, Jake tapper was that. No. We don't have Jake tapper started laying into Paris. You can't you. He didn't let him get away with it. He didn't let him get away with running down the economy. I said well something's up here. And something indeed was up the drive bys have all of a sudden decided decided to start praising the economy here. We have a montage starting here with audio sound bite number four, and we have here a series of bites where the drive bys in the media praising the economy am asking, why Trump isn't focusing on. It will the president presiding over an economy as good as this one. You would expect there'd be almost a morning in America message, stay, the course, the economy's booming. Let's keep with this is it wise to be focusing on this. When you've got an economy going gangbusters. Why aren't Republicans driving home? The message on the economy. The economy's doing fairly. Well, why wouldn't Republicans be running on it? Why he doesn't talk about the economy? They wanted to talk about jobs in the economy and every Republican candidate I talked to the economy's booming unemployment is at a forty nine year, low annual wage growth top three percent for the first time since two thousand nine. Butts. And you knew there was a by the president's closing message is not on that. If we focus on the James Carville maximum, it's the economy stupid the economy is strong. Why should people wanna change course? I cannot tell you. I cannot overemphasize. How incredible this is? They have been avoiding talk like this for a year. They have been making it a point to not talk about the economy this way. In fact, they've done their best to downplay the economy roaring along. And these people, by the way, this was media wide. This was ABC Fox News NBC CNN NC Bs. There was a coordinated effort all throughout the Sunday shows. Just start touting the economy while asking why Trump isn't. Why isn't Trump touting the economy? Do you realize what genius? This may be. Trump has been touting the if you listen to his rallies, which apparently these people don't. At every Trump rally. He extols the great improvements of the economy. And he explains why not just that his administration serves credit. He gives the policy reasons for unemployment falling wages, increasing new jobs coming back businesses, expanding he gives you the things his administration has done policy wise that made all this happen. And yet here they are all over the Sunday shows yesterday, complaining Trump isn't talking about it. In the process. They are can you imagine? If you're a steady viewer of the drive by media and for a year, you haven't heard one virtue from them about the US economy. If anything you've heard it sort of ignored or maybe talk down, and then all of a sudden the Sunday before the election, the drive by media is thing in the praises the economy. Nobody has meant. Come on Jake tapper here unemployment forty nine year, low annual wage growth top three percent first time since two thousand nine. President isn't talking but he is. What's the real point here? Well, I'll tell you here in just a minute. Here's the next bite. This is Tom Brokaw. He's worried the economy is humming. Yeah. Req- them. He's worthy economy is humming. And you can't discount that he's very very worried about this at the end of the day. People have the best job creation economy. We've had since the nineteen sixties and made it and the industrial midwest for Trump been so long. Last election is booming out there. The economy is humming. You cannot you cannot overestimate the importance of the economy when people walk into that voting. What changed here? Why hasn't why hasn't the media and talking about this for the past year? Why haven't they even been worried about it? They haven't been worried about it because they haven't been telling people about it and in their world, if they don't tell anybody about it. Then nobody will know it even if they're living at the drive bys thank unless they tout anything nobody will actually know it or think that it's happening. But now all of a sudden, here's Brokaw and the rest of these guys worried death the economy is and then they have to add Trump isn't talking about it, even though he is he may not be running ads about it per se. But he's talking about it. Now one more skip forward number seven. Last night in Chicago Obama at a rally for Jay Pritzker running for governor there, by the way, this was another meagre crowd. I mean, they said it was ninety six hundred people said, that's what this place held. It was not full. Obama the Clinton. They just can't they can't do it. They cannot do what Trump drives they cannot draw crowds. They cannot create excitement they're trying. They want in on the action. But they're not pulling it up, and here's Obama. And he has to get something in about the Democrats..

President Trump Jake tapper Stacey Abrams Obama Black Panther party president Tom Perez Trump Tom Brokaw Eric Holder Rush Limbaugh Atlanta Panthers Democrats Limbaugh institute Philadelphia Justice department
Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 2 years ago

Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

"Sir. This is democracy. Now democracy now or the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman with one gun solace with part two of today's edition of fifty years ago that right fifty years ago this week, the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention in Chicago became a national spectacle as a major political event turned into chaos that culminated with a police riot, much of it unfolding on live national television. While Hubert Humphrey was nominated as the democratic candidate in nineteen sixty eight inside despite the fact he didn't run in any primaries outside was where the news was where police were clubbing teargassing thousands of protesters. For more. We continue our interviews with Bobby Seale founding chairman, Black Panther party was in the protests at the beginning in Chicago. Bill Ayers was arrested on August twenty seven fifty years ago and Bernardine Dohrn both Bernardine and Bill longtime activists for peace and racial Justice, former SDS that students for a democratic society and whether underground members. I mean, he Goodman with Juan Gonzalez one? Yes. Yes. With Bobby Seale again to follow up a Bobby on the conversation. We were having that the end of our previous segment when you were talking about how once Richard Nixon was elected president, he ordered. His aides to begin immediate eradication of the Black Panther party. One of the interesting things that most people are not aware of is that years later report came out in the New York Times that the f. b. i. had conducted a CPR secret poll among black Americans and found that more than twenty five percent of African Americans were supporters of the Black Panther party felt that the Black Panther party was fighting. Their interest is significant portion of the America of the African American population of this country was supportive of of your revolutionary organization. And yet as you were saying Nixon immediately ordered that you be crushed, could you talk about what happened in that first few years of the Nixon administration to the panther party. Exactly the year of nineteen sixty nine is the year. Now, remember I said he had a meeting with j. Edgar Hoover and Jade ago who were in the December the first week of December stated nationally on television that we were threat to the internal, the blackout, the party is a threat to the internal security of America. Come come. What was February seventeenth seventeenth. John a buddy Carter and John Huggins will murdered at UCLA. They were the leaders of the black path to party and loss Angeles California now. But she Carter really had gotten out of his gang group. 'cause he, he ran a three thousand member gang and he created a political organization call wretched of the earth delay to become and he later became rub. They headed up to southern California chapter the black part in the Los Angeles community. Eric, the what I'm trying to say here is that. That was the first attack on the part of the power structure using the us organization, etcetera. In a conflict situation to kill and murder. The leaders of the Los Angeles chapter, the blackout, the party do that process in the next three or four months. They attack more than twenty two offices I'm talking about in Indiana. I'm talking about the, they blew up the office and demands. I will literally got the crew Clinton of blew up that blow up that building. And I'm telling you. In San Diego brother. Bell was opening up to San Diego office at eight AM in the morning, and the police and FBI came jumped out of cars and came into place and shot him dead killing murdering. So I'm just says that period of tacking by the end of that year with the murder of Fred Hampton and then the shootout in Los Angeles, four days later after that cetera I have in my organization, I had twenty eight dead blackout to party members sixty nine wounded and defending ourselves. We defended ourselves and many of these attacks. By the end of that year, fourteen police were kill because we shot back when they came in shooting in us. We did not play. We shot back

Bobby Seale Black Panther Party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John Mccain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica Prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama National Association Of Black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill Bill
"black panther party" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"black panther party" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Power structure and believe me. They have way more guns and tanks and aircraft carriers and cruise missiles. I mean, they have legitimacy on their side. So violence is. Utter failure as as a strategy, we could have listened to the Vietnamese who told us, forget violence and nonviolent mass social movement. We could listen to the Cubans who told us do not use violence. You know, we could have listened to the Black Panther party who said, forget the guns. We're going with the free breakfasts. You know, we did it anyway. You know, we, we were young. We were era Gant. Sometimes you make decisions not really thinking things through an and it was a terrible mistake for us. It costs us a career. It certainly got us thrown out of the the music business and for the Black Panther party at got them. Death squads Black Panthers were murdered by police across the country. Ultimately put a gigantic stain on what was a legitimate social movement. We ended up doing the FBI's work for them in discrediting, a legitimate antiwar movement in discrediting legitimate human rights and civil rights movement, and everything else we were doing it was it was a big mistake. We got that one wrong. So you moved on from the MC five and things fell apart with that. And you eventually got into some crime. You ended up in Joe for a couple of years. Obviously, that's going to have a massive affect on someone's life. And as I understand it, I'm pretty sure everyone who goes to Joe does not have good feelings about it, but you definitely felt that it was not a constructive way to deal with any of the problems you're facing. What did you feel that you learn good or bad from being in that place for that time? Well, agreed. I don't believe prison sentences ever helped anyone ninety. Percent of the people serving time in prison in this country, and in America could be held accountable for breaking the social contract in their own communities. Prison is of medieval concept on a good day for me, I could see the upside was it probably saved my life in as much as in those days in the nineteen seventies I, I was doing more drinking more drugging than is healthy and probably the few years that I was imprisoned and not drinking and drugging and exercising every day in eating three times a day in sleeping well, saved some wear and tear on my internal organs..

Black Panther party Black Panthers Joe FBI America