35 Burst results for "Black Community"

Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Food Heaven Podcast

01:55 min | Last week

Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

"To the podcast. Sabrina thank you on so excited to have you so tell us about how you started to explore issues of body image and wait specifically for women of color while this is actually almost like a family legacy for me. My grandmother was born in rural georgia during the late nineteen thirties and so she was growing up the jim crow era and lived in a racially segregated community as part of the great migration in nineteen sixty. She traveled west and at that time for the first time in her life she lived and worked around white women and she was amazed by the number of white women diets. Seems like what is this. You know sort of like a typical black grandmother fashioned. By the time. I came of age in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s. When i was in high school she was still troubling over. This question like what is going on here. She would even ask me like why women dying to be thin. And i was like sixteen years old but it wasn't until about ten years later when i was working in a predominantly black community in san francisco baby hunters points. I met women of color who were hiv positive. And we're attaining an hiv medication adherence clinic where i was a researcher who refuse to take their medications for fear of gaining weight. And i thought oh. Wow you know this. What was clearly a phenomenon that was mostly about middle class white women in the nineteen sixties arguably even through the ninety s. Clearly by the early dots was something. That was impacting women of color as well so i wanted to be able to dig further into this question of why is it so important for women of all racial ethnic backgrounds at this point to feel like they need to discipline themselves and maintain a particular. Wait

Sabrina Georgia San Francisco
COVID Pandemic Claims Black Morticians, Leaving Holes in Communities

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

COVID Pandemic Claims Black Morticians, Leaving Holes in Communities

"The corona virus pandemic has had a big impact on the black community and on those who provide funeral services second generation mortician Shawn Troy in South Carolina lost his father to the virus this level of vision loss of looking at my father's name plate to go on a William Penn Troy senior died in August of last year that would go to do this so very close with the national funeral directors and morticians association says the funeral director is the most prominent individual in the African American community no disrespect to my colleagues across the country we're we're more I should say more because culture plates John Troy says he still gets inspiration from his father's side you can do is catches you with a train you for this all your life you've been ready to do it is not your time since the start of the pandemic about one hundred thirty black morticians have died from the corona virus I met Donahue

Shawn Troy William Penn Troy National Funeral Directors And South Carolina John Troy Donahue
Study: Black Opioid Overdose Deaths Increasing Faster Than Whites

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

Study: Black Opioid Overdose Deaths Increasing Faster Than Whites

"Among black. Americans rose nearly forty percent across four states in two thousand eighteen and nineteen. That's according to a new study published in the american journal of public health. npr's redo chatterjee reports. There was no rise in overdose deaths for other racial and ethnic groups. Death certificates from nearly seventy communities in four states show a thirty eight percent rise in opioid overdose deaths for non hispanic black individuals in the two years. Before the pandemic the increase was highest in kentucky and ohio in comparison opioid overdose. Deaths stayed the same for other racial ethnic groups in most states in new york overdose deaths for white individuals when down. Although recent studies have found that overdose deaths continued to surge foster in the black community in two thousand twenty. The new study calls for an urgent need to address this disparity in part by making sure that evidence based treatments reach the communities than them most rita judgy.

American Journal Of Public Hea NPR Kentucky Ohio New York Rita Judgy
Pro-Abortion Democrats Support Less People of Color

Mark Levin

01:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Pro-Abortion Democrats Support Less People of Color

"Very concerned about Choices. Except when it comes to health care, except when it comes to education. Except when it comes to any aspect of a free persons life they wish to impose their will. In every way possible. Except when it comes to a boarding babies. And choice. Trump's life. It just does. Notice. The radical abortionists. Don't say look in the case of a mother's health. Or rape. Or some other circumstance. You know, that's when we support abortion. They never say that they support it right to the end partial birth abortion funded by all taxpayers, whether they want to funded or not, whether it's part of their belief system or not. No exceptions. Then I noticed most of the people who argue this are White supremacists. Like Nancy Pelosi, because I guess we're all white supremacists. Right, Mr Producer. The white supremacist Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi. Chuck Schumer. Because In the black community. The proportion of abortions. Far outweighs the percentage of the black community as a Percentage of the population. So for the white dominated white supremacist American Marxist movement, a k A. That includes the Democrat Party. Obviously they're not interested in more people of color. They're interested in less people of color.

Nancy Pelosi Donald Trump Mr Producer Chuck Schumer Joe Biden Democrat Party
Why the Civil Rights Movement Was a Bad Thing for Black People

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | Last month

Why the Civil Rights Movement Was a Bad Thing for Black People

"What are some of the hot topics we you said you wanted to talk about. Pride month prior month so black people only get twenty eight days but Lgbtq pride month is it's now the month of june and june teeth which is in june cuts into pride month. So it's fundamentally homophobic uh-huh need to talk about that so i'm gonna say something that's groundbreaking and is going to offend. A lot of people are right. The civil rights movement was the worst thing to happen to this nation into the black community. Why because the civil rights movement pivoted this. lgbtq narrative and it's also pivoting. Pedophilia push as a form of sexuality. Follow me for a second. we're gonna have to. This is crazy. But i'm gonna be real with you. People don't tune out. Could this always ends well. But you gotta hang in is heavy so now which helped understand the segregation was not an all of the united states of america. Right it was only in the south correct right so let's talk about. Harriet tubman for a second. I'm as an example slave in maryland. She traveled a hundred miles north to philadelphia. The moment she touched philadelphia. She was a free woman right. So this tells you in the north. Obviously since i found it fathers there was no slavery. It always was in the south. Okay jim crow laws and all of this stuff. This success always in the south. Now you may have. Had the north people like marco mex and all of these people talk about it and take on the culture in a sense of the depravity of what was happening but that wasn't there portion right so now martin luther king comes in. He says listen. We want to have the same abilities in the same access to what white people have but we had it. We have built our own schools. We had owned businesses. Our homes solid right so now. Civil rights comes in Jfk dies and the newborn johnson steps in and he says listen. I understand your struggle. we're going gonna make it equal for everybody but we also do a warm poverty. We're going to give you guys welfare

Philadelphia Harriet Tubman Marco Mex United States Of America Jim Crow Maryland Martin Luther King JFK Johnson
Vivek Ramaswamy on the Hypocrisy of 'Woke' Corporate America

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:29 min | Last month

Vivek Ramaswamy on the Hypocrisy of 'Woke' Corporate America

"Very important book out woke inc inside corporate america's social justice. Scam vivek rama. Swamy is the author of his national best. He's a very successful entrepreneur. And he understands what's going on so my first question was other than cowardice. How would you explain it. I find his explanation in addition to cowardice. Effective it's a smokescreen for all the bad stuff that they do. So i'd like to develop that Theme vivek and will begin a with the example of nike. Which if it didn't begin. The current wave of anti-american hatred from the corporate america. It certainly was one of the big starters of it. What animates nike. Look i think it is a in large part the same theme with one additional nuance that i wanted to get to. The same theme is that they're using woke smoke to cover up their act business taxes. Because i'll tell you then it is a lot. Easier to verbally criticizes slavery two hundred fifty years ago than it is to reduce your reliance on slavery today and i will tell you they source their shoes from slave labor in asia to sell to fifty dollar sneakers to black kids in the inner city. Who can't afford to buy books for school. All in the name of serving black communities and don't intend to millions of dollars to black lives matter marxist organization that professes to care about black lives. What called for the decimation of nuclear family structure and i think for nike that allows them to sell more sneakers. Allow them to build a better brand with the community to whom they are selling those shoes while deflecting accountability from actually relying on not flavor two hundred fifty years ago when the united states was born but slavery today into your twenty twenty one in the present without being held to account for it and there's two dimensions on nike where they criticize the united states to no end but they do not take a peep about drew human rights atrocities in china where you have over a million weavers in concentration camps subject to forced sterilization and communist indoctrination and nike ceo. John donahoe goes earlier this summer to china and says we are a brand of china and four china. Those are his words not mine. But i also think that in some ways consumers in the united states got in in order to be what nike consumers demand is for us

Woke Inc Vivek Rama Nike United States Swamy Asia China John Donahoe
Black Church's 'Street Team' Encourages Connecticut Residents to Get Vaccinated

Morning Edition

01:59 min | Last month

Black Church's 'Street Team' Encourages Connecticut Residents to Get Vaccinated

"Connecticut, a historically black churches, sending teenagers door to door over the summer to encourage residents to get the covid vaccine. Connecticut has one of the highest vaccination rates in the country. But it is a very different story in the town of Waterbury. Here's Ali Oshinsky from Connecticut Public radio. Police. Taylor is hitting 10,000 steps a day. A lot of them on hills and up to front doors to ask crime, ma'am, Are you interested in taking the Covid 19 vaccine? This person already got hurt. Oh, great. So I think we left the information Flyer. Yeah, right at your door. So if you do know anyone who's not vaccinated you can share with them. Thank you. Taylor is 15 and she's part of the Grace Baptist Church Street team. Every weekday morning, she and seven other teens pair up and walk around Waterbury, knocking on doors to have conversations like that one. I'll try to do you know my little bit what we do have people back at the church that will, you know, walk them through. There were ease. The process starts with the street team. Residents get a knock and a flyer. The teens were trained to ask a few questions and take down a phone number. If there's interest someone from a phone bank can call later to arrange an in home shot or transportation to a vaccine clinic. Grace Baptist pays the teens $15 an hour with funds from a state vaccine equity program. The pastor Christopher Reese, says this church is trying to make it as easy as possible for Waterbury residents to get their shot. Especially in black communities. My church, I think, is maybe 90% vaccinated. Why? Because their leader, their pastor has been pushing it now races trying to be that leader beyond his congregation. Connecticut ranks near the top for the percentage of residents that are fully vaccinated. But Waterbury lags behind the numbers are especially low among the city's black residents. Just around a third are fully immunized.

Connecticut Waterbury Ali Oshinsky Taylor Christopher Reese Grace Baptist
Why New York Mayor Bill De Blasio Is Racist

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:45 min | Last month

Why New York Mayor Bill De Blasio Is Racist

"The blasios racist new york city is racist you want to know why one of the lowest vaccinated communities in new york is the black community. Black new yorkers aren't getting vaccinated. don't just take my word for it. Maybe you'll listen to the mayor of boston. Acting mayor kim janey the first woman and black boss stone ian to be there was asked about. New york's policy mandating vaccines for indoor activities. She says the move is reminiscent of slavery. She says the move is reminiscent of the long history in the united states. She said of people needing to show their papers when asked about the mandate. We're gonna find this clip for you from wc vb. I've got the article here from the new york post. During slavery this is a quote mayor. Kim janey of boston during slavery. Post slavery as reason as you know what the immigrant population has to go through here. We've heard trump with the birth certificate. Nonsense i don't know what that's got to do with papers but so so be it. She says here. We wanna make sure that we are not doing anything that would further create a barrier for residents of boston or disproportionately impact by pock communities b. i. p. o. she. I always forget what these people of

Acting Mayor Kim Janey Stone Ian New York The New York Post Boston Kim Janey New York City United States
"black community" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:52 min | 2 months ago

"black community" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Equally traumatic experiences but unfortunately even as therapy has become more mainstream. The black community has had a tough time getting the help that they need. I don't know if you've heard twenty twenty was a crazy year Off the pandemic. we had the election. We have to uprisings that. Occurred after the murders of george floyd ahmed. Aubrey brianna taylor. I needless to say we were country. That needed some therapy especially black people in the black community access to mental health. Care is lacking black and hispanic. Children are less likely to get mental health care then white kids and studies show that irritability and the average white teenager as often labelled as depression. That same behavior is more likely to be seen as disruptive black latino children and doctors say that can lead to feelings of hopelessness at a very young age. We have a stigma in the black community when it comes to dealing with mental health black students say where they come from it shameful to talk about anxiety depression and trauma making the crisis worse. Not enough african american therapists today. Only four percent of psychologists are black. It's a serious issue and then have insulted therapist who don't understand you. That could make matters even worse. Like imagine wasting half you'll session explain what while out means like you'd have to stop every ten minutes talking to a white their pets to break down some of the damage or imagine how awkward it gets telling your white therapist state urine therapy because white people but that'd be like the road runner into another coyote about why i oughta i don't have time to break this down to segment that we did on the show that was only six and a half minutes in. There's a lot more to explore with this issue and that's why we have to go on the scenes so to help me do that. I'd like to bring into wonderful wonderful people from the daily show. I saw these people in the hallways numerous times before the shutdown i. I'd like to introduce ashton womack. He's a producer in researcher for the daily show with trevor noah ashton day to you sir from parts unknown wherever you are whatever is gonna stay parts unknown. Because i don't trust nobody on the internet. Woulda you're literally on the internet right now talking to but that's okay. I just heard is that of one of our many emmy nominated writers on the daily mail x. What is happening. How roy now. It's my job to take this topic and kind of merge. We're youtube came in because you both have different entry points but you all are intrical part in how the show is created on the day to day. The best thing the best analogy. I can give to these two for the listeners. you know you have a producer. Researching you have a writer. The producer researcher. He goes in shops for the groceries. The writer is the schiff with is that analogy. Does that make sense at all. Does it even a great analogy. If i bring the popcorn apples the milk and i tell to make me a great essay. What the fuck is this is. Two dollars do popcorn apples and milk. But i grew up on. Okay yeah that sounds wild. But that's literally how the show is made. One person has an idea or an issue or problem ashton. We'll go to trevor and the producers and go. Hey mentally often the people. We need a hug. Nobody's organising the people they could give you a professional and the x. Goes okay. I'll figure out a way to make their funny. You go sit down somewhere and have yourself milk and apple so ashton. So how did you settle on black mental health and clearly the pitch was so good that we actually put it on the show. so what. What is your entry point into this topic. The entry point was actually. I wasn't gonna. I wasn't going to submit that idea at all i had. I had my pat. It was already done. I was at the end of my pack. And i was looking at it and i it was. It was a topic. That's been in my head. And i was gonna topics i was talking about in. I was like if i'm going to submit a packet. I'm going to talk about something. I'm not gonna talk about what everybody is not necessarily what everybody's talking about but i'm gonna put my flavor on it. What is something that is deeply inside of me that i wanna talk about an mental health issues like. Let's say mental health issues. Some had overcome. I think that's something many people everyone in this country faces. Everybody on planet faces a mental health issues. And that was something for me that kind of really help define my adulthood was battling this battling trying to stay mentally healthy..

george floyd ahmed Aubrey brianna taylor anxiety depression ashton womack trevor noah ashton trauma depression ashton emmy roy youtube trevor apple
Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

People of the Pod

02:22 min | 2 months ago

Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

"Last month. Three us senators announced the launch of the bipartisan senate caucus on black jewish relations. I sat down with senators. Jackie rosen of nevada. Tim scott of south carolina and cory booker of new jersey to discuss the mission of the new caucus. Here's a portion of our conversation senators. Welcome thank you. it's good to be with you. You very very much reinvigorating. The black jewish alliance is that was at the bedrock of the civil rights movement. And it's key to combating racism rising anti-semitism both here in america and around the world. And that's why today's announcement is so critical. The three of you have joined us here on the global forum stage to announce the first ever senate caucus on black jewish relations which you share with our audience fees each of you. What you hope to accomplish. During this caucus i would suggest the wisdom to i yielding. Jackie i it sounds good. Well thank you. I appreciate that. And i want to tell you that. I'm so proud to be here with tim and corey because when i went and talked to them about this idea there wasn't a hesitation for a second and i'm just so excited to do this first time it's ever happened in the senate and i just know that we are going to have so many good conversations positive things going forward and we're going to show real leadership in this issue and just very excited to announce this those senators white. Why didn't you hesitate for me. It's been a lifelong journey in many ways. understanding appreciating the parallel tracks that the jewish community in the black community have been on if you think about it from a biblical perspective for centuries of slavery in egypt and you think about the four centuries. African americans were enslaved. There are tracks that are parallel and pain. That creates promise an opportunity. The tragedies that became triumphs. it's a story that continues on and for my life For me it seems. It's just personal in that. By some of my first mentors larry freudenberg. Who helped me become a part of his insurance agency. And then it gave me a piece of the pie and taught me not to work for someone but worked for yourself

Jackie Rosen Black Jewish Alliance Senate Tim Scott Cory Booker South Carolina United States Nevada New Jersey Jackie Corey TIM Egypt Larry Freudenberg
Digital Redlining and Why Some People Are Stuck With Slow Internet

The 3:59

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Digital Redlining and Why Some People Are Stuck With Slow Internet

"At the digital divide all year today. I want to discuss how today's broadband deployment mirrors illegal mortgage redlining practices for the past. Why would see similar devastating consequences down the line saying this. Is your daily charge here discussed. This problem is team at senior reporter. Sharp ticket welcome sharp. Thanks for having me. So i offer a listeners. What is redlining it's a. It's obviously a long standing. Practice has been around for a while but folks may not necessarily know what it is and the impact it's had writing is kind of a term that we've heard but a lot of people don't necessarily really remember realize what it was so it was a practice by banks in the thirties basically to map neighborhoods in the country. And say this is a good bet for mortgage loan. This is a bad bet And it literally redlined areas that had huge communities of black african americans so it was saying that anybody who lives in these areas are a bad bet Not worth making a home loan and so people who lived in those areas couldn't get home runs they couldn't they couldn't homes. They couldn't get insurance They basically were cut out from this really way to generate wealth and paths that wealth onto future generations. So what we've seen is that you know it's really had huge impacts on the black community in the united states so only about forty two percent of black people in houses versus about two percent of white americans and the medium black household only holds about one eighth the wealth of a white household and then also in these neighborhoods there's lower life expense expectancy Higher rates of chronic diseases worse impacts from covid nineteen. So it's really just something that you know. It happened in the thirties and the forties is kind of its heyday But it still having implications. Today

United States
DOJ Suing Georgia Over Election Law It Says Restricts Black Voters' Access

Pat Walsh

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

DOJ Suing Georgia Over Election Law It Says Restricts Black Voters' Access

"Department suing Georgia over its new election law. ABC News Senior National correspondent Terry Moran Justice Department would approve the Georgia intended in this election law to deny the right to vote it to make it harder to bridge the right to vote black voters in that state because how these new laws would operate in the black community effectively limits their access and their right to vote. Georgia Governor Brian Kemp, a Republican and Justice Department launched a politically motivated All on the rule of law and our democracy rescue

Georgia Terry Moran Justice Department Abc News Governor Brian Kemp
H.R. 1 Is a Democrat Political Grab to End Thought-Diversity

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 3 months ago

H.R. 1 Is a Democrat Political Grab to End Thought-Diversity

"To destroy The political And philosophical diversity of the states. A direct shot in the heart of our constitutional system. Go ahead. At this point, um, state legislatures, as you referenced across the country are passing away of anti voter laws based on the same they're not. They're not passing anti voter laws. That's why would a red state the anti voter, if it's mostly Republican? Does that make any sense to anyone when you don't want their passing anti voter laws? Oh, yeah. Yes, they are. They're making it impossible to vote. You know Michael Steele so damn! What did he can't come up with a voter? I d Oh, my goodness. Also, what's his problem? And signature verification. We can't have that. That's Jim Crow. We cannot man and so literacy test to compare somebody shouldn't and you know, it's amazing. They're the ones that come up with red tape pile after pile of regulation. If you actually earn money and pay enough in taxes, you've got to look at the tax code under penalty of perjury yet to sign your your tax returns, so If you have a complicated return, you actually have to hire people because you don't know what the hell is going on. But getting a voter ID. My God, how they're gonna get. They can't afford that. How are you going to get a voter ID? This is Washington. The so called phony think tanks. The ideologues and the media. You go into various communities. Ami Horowitz has done it gets gone in the black community. Given what our idea Yeah, man, why are you asking me such a stupid question? Because these people aren't in the neighborhoods or the hood. They're not in the suburbs are nowhere. They talk to each other. It's pathetic. It's sickening. They represent nobody. But they get power. Go ahead.

Michael Steele Jim Crow Ami Horowitz Washington
Sen. Chuck Schumer Racializes Everything Again to Aggravate Black Community

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Sen. Chuck Schumer Racializes Everything Again to Aggravate Black Community

"Win stuff. The ballot box. One man 1000 votes if necessary. That's right. Chuck Schumer on the floor of the Senate today, one of the great Demagogues and low lives of American politics. Just look at a racialize. Everything just look how they want the black community upset all the time about everything. Because the Democrat Party relies On racism of one form or another. It is used African Americans, it is used black Americans. Its entire existence. At war with them on one occasion. How abusing them in other ways on another a cake. Cut one go. Republican legislatures are making it easier to own a gun than to vote. No, they're not, You idiot. Making it easier to own a gun than to vote. You have to go through background checks to buy a gun. That's federal law. Federal law. They're also state requirements for owning weapons. You need a voter ideas, an example. Or an I D and identification. The Democrats oppose an identification when you but but why the games? Why the distraction? Why not get on the floor of the Senate and explain exactly what you want to do to our voting system. Go ahead.

Chuck Schumer Democrat Party Senate
Biden Signs Juneteenth Bill yet Has Done Damage to the Black Community and Others

Mark Levin

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Biden Signs Juneteenth Bill yet Has Done Damage to the Black Community and Others

"So here's Biden The White House today. Now, remember what I told you about Biden? Biden is a street Politician is a thug. He's a chameleon. Is a nasty Ignorant man. Has clawed his way. Up the ladder. He has done things that are outrageous. Two people, including a black man by the name of Clarence Thomas, for which he gets a pass. He did things to terror read. Which would simply dismissed Which As part of the definition of rape doesn't matter. Doesn't matter. He has said things about black people that nobody would even think of saying and he has said it many times. No problem. No problem. He's a plagiarist. He's a liar. No problem. Why Because ladies and gentlemen, he is the vessel through which they're pushing their agenda and they don't care. They don't care if his brain dead they don't care. He's the guy. And he's performing. As they wish. Him to perform. And here's something else. Biden does know instinctively. As long as he hangs hard left. As long as he does the bidding of the American Marxists. The teachers unions. The open border immigration groups. Massive spending Bernie Sanders Marxists. As long as he does all these things and more, he's untouchable. The media won't touch him. And he won't be criticized. And he can go light his way through four years of the presidency. No matter how Handicapped he is mentally or otherwise it

Biden Clarence Thomas White House Bernie Sanders
Rep. Byron Donalds Destroys CNN's Brianna Keilar for Devaluing His Conservative Views, Merits

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Rep. Byron Donalds Destroys CNN's Brianna Keilar for Devaluing His Conservative Views, Merits

"Hapless CNN hose it Brianna Keeler. It's trying to question a fantastic GOP rep from the West Coast of Florida happens to be black doesn't matter to conservatives. It matters everything to liberals, and she tries to put him in a spot in corner and but she hasn't realized Byron Donald's a lot smarter than her. Check this out. You have defended President Trump. You think that your defense of a person that said things like that might be incongruent with the mission of the CBC? First of all whatever the president said in the past has nothing to do with this discussion at all. I think Well, you defend you've defended you've defended. Don't cut me off. I didn't have not cut you off in his interview, Please do not do that to me. Thank you As a black man in America. I'm allowed to have my own thoughts on who I choose to support who I choose not to support. I think that it's important whether you're talking about the Congressional Black Caucus or the Florida State Legislative Black Caucus or the National Caucus of State black legislators organizations. I have been a part of in the past. My support of President Trump has been consistent, but at the same time I've had the ability to advocate for issues, ideas proposals. And funding that have helped the black community in my state. You're talking to somebody who my first three years in college was at Florida A and M and Hbcu. So whether my support my support for President Trump. Whether it's for or against is irrelevant. That has nothing to do with this discussion. This is whether the ideology of somebody who is conservative is welcome in the Congressional Black Caucus. It's really that simple and so to bring up President Trump to try to make this about him does not matter. It's irrelevant. It has nothing to do with the situation in hand. Yes, Yes. Hold on for the fox nation. Years. This is standing. Jim. If I'm off to my concern, yes Stand to go. Byron Donald's spectacular Nice job. I'm here alone in the studio. If we had a peanut gallery in the studio, they'd be around clapping to love this guy again, folks, the bench in the Republican Party is deep. The bench on the Democrat side is pathetic. It's

President Trump Byron Donald Brianna Keeler Florida State Legislative Blac National Caucus Of State Black Congressional Black Caucus CNN Florida GOP West Coast CBC America FOX JIM Republican Party
Civil Rights Leader Reverend William Barber Delivers Speech at Tulsa Massacre Memorial

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Civil Rights Leader Reverend William Barber Delivers Speech at Tulsa Massacre Memorial

"Of members of the city's thriving black community were killed by a white mob. Civil rights leader, Reverend William Barber told the crowd a historic Vernon a M E Church. That mob will not get the last word in Tulsa. We must be more powerful. Then even they were so that this and nothing like it ever happens again in public policy or in public violence. Other events in Tulsa Monday featured calls for reparations for survivors of the massacre and their descendants. Brian Clark, ABC News more details about the

Reverend William Barber Tulsa Vernon Brian Clark Abc News
How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

08:10 min | 4 months ago

How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

"Hi it's bryce dallas howard guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from an incredible ted fellow and the stem educator brittany young a community leader tackling national issues by turning passions into opportunities for stem education and career development. Hey ted talks daily listeners. I'm adam grant. I hosted another podcast. From the ted audio collective called work life and it's about the science of making work not suck next time the number of protests targeting firms. Today it's on the order of sixty times. The numbers that you would see and early tens employees activism is on the rise. But how can we use our voices effectively. And how can leaders manage all those voices find. Work life on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen. I show people all around. Dc antiquites my guests engaged. I liked sprinkle in a fun factor to net. Stop dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet then just have to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has been you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial. That's od co dot com slash. Ted i want you to take this journey with me. Let's set the stage. Is a sunday in baltimore in a park. We endure a hill watching dirt bike. Riders go pash do tricks. Willies do stunts zipping. He hit the engines revving. Smell the gasoline. You could see the join excitement. Netface someone's probably learning how to fix the dirt bike way too expensive to buy. Then they can go to school. They can get a pop quiz or a test teacher. You'll account we all heard. And we've all hated train as leaving new york to cleveland. But they're here in baltimore. How does this relate. They don't get it. They fail the test and now they can hate then now. World can turned upside down. They can get on facebook instagram. Get a call or text. They can watch as their friend can become a hashtag. A kid in the wrong place wrong time lost to the streets loss of the system lost a gun violence or kick that could be arrested for dirt bike. Because of my city it can be a misdemeanor. Possession of dirk like this can be elected story for black kids across the country. And he's like miami. Cleveland atlanta philly. Whatever please had the dirt bike task force now. Acts yourself if the thing you used to relieve your stress if it was demonized would you still do it if it was criminal us. The answer is yes. That's the reality black people across the us right now. They've watched as we made room in. Cities escape borders bicycles in any other sport. They can watch tv in seattle games olympics on. Espn the style and stain ad campaigns and films but in baltimore would they have looked forward to would do. Right is get from all of it. No space no outlet just typical narrative. Like i said this is a communist story. I was a kid in the park. I wanted to be just like the big crowd is but i hate the fall. Instead i became like bill nye the science guy i was doing all kinds of experiments blown out burrows off glowing people to the chair and i may or may not have made stink bombs at school. They would describe me as a bad kid. Where they didn't see was all my jeans. My talent my voice was not hurt. Then i became that black girl from west baltimore working stem my first position. I was confused for the secretary was pissed but liquefying soon get more people in industry and it's one eight hundred. That's what i start doing. Working small groups for kids students teach them some activities then and twenty fourteen. I lost my little brother to the prison system. In twenty fifteen. I lost all faith. In system period. The world watched following a freddie gray uprising as possible burn. I wondered people go and listen. Where would it solutions. And where was investment into my community and twenty sixteen. I broke the system and became the founder and ceo of beat through sixty carbonell. I went back to my experience in park. I thought about the kids bikes those scales. People use to pay the bills just like mechanics mechanical news. We lane in system s sights the sign's behind popping best willie playing in dirt bike. It's home o'clock is busy quesion technology. The technology needed to get the best radio tires. So you don't have the channel asphalt engineering. The engineers needed to fix peg dirt bike. But the also get the best mac mac. 'em mathematics the math needed for the guests to oriole ratio. So you dirt. Bike does not explode then also gonna step further. I thought about the rights new only way to have programming solutions was ahead of them at because the people closest to the problem onto solution i thought about. Mike says he was six. He's rendered by geez when he seventeen graduating high school. He didn't know what you wanted to do but he knew he loved everything about their bikes and started working with us and beat through sixty. He's helped us. Educate kids trained by gratis and x twenty one. He's our lead instructor. He's created mates showed them across the country and he really represents the best to be three sixty at the corvallis. Work is constantly thinking about what people like. Like one for mike. He was a space. Basically work of students on our curriculum space. Keep training more. Riders and growing a skill sets a space where he no longer has skating but he has something his own city for him with your support and it's of more cities we can make this reality since two thousand seventeen. We've saved the city of baltimore about two hundred thirty three million dollars by dorm programming over seven thousand students. We saved the city of baltimore. One million dollars by growing workforce opportunities for people. Just like mike. That's less people that could possibly go to jail. Less money spent on dollars and cents of incarceration and more money going and saw black communities our leaders our culture and our voices. We don't need to black squares. We don't need your campaigns but will we do need as your dollars and cents behind us to make roach. We need more people like you and cities to believe in invest in our model of growing the people. What will you choose to be an ally being impact be the revolution be three sixty. Thank you hello there. I'm chris anderson. The guy lucky enough to run. Ted now has a podcast called the ted interview and this week on the show. I took someone really special name me. The woman married to jacqueline nova 'grats. She's been that he is learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the ted interview. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

TED Apple Brittany Young Adam Grant Baltimore Pash Netface Bryce Dallas Howard Bill Nye West Baltimore Cleveland Carbonell Espn Olympics Miami Atlanta Seattle Facebook
Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

"Is of course the one year anniversary of the murder of floyd in a year of protests and reckoning there have been signs of hope even during a pandemic that hit black americans particularly hard and closed many black owned businesses new data suggests that people in black communities started new businesses over the last year in cities like new york and atlanta the study from the national bureau of economic research says. Black americans were more likely than white americans to take steps toward entrepreneurship. during the pandemic marketplace's euler has more on. Why so the study found that. After a relief package is passed last year. There was a big surge in registered business formations in the following weeks. Catherine facia teaches business at boston university and helped write the study. She says that's despite the cares. Act not directly infusing. Any money into new businesses are passed not to pat is a lot of start up formation so it was very interesting for us to see that cares out had that ripple of fat another reason for the surgeon. Black entrepreneurship could be the americans. Now have a better understanding of historic inequality or he goes. Mom is an assistant professor of management at columbia university and a co author of the study. There's being clear intends in banks and government to make sure all the financial reports out this year. Which is wachner hurts. And andre perry says that speaks to a bigger lesson to be learned from this study about access to capital. He's a senior fellow at the brookings institution. If you really want to see the economy grow figure out two ways to invest in the under appreciated assets in our community in that happens to be black and brown communities it happens to be black and brown entrepreneurs he says black people represent about fourteen percent of the population in the us but only two percent of all businesses with more than one employee this investment and black businesses. He says shouldn't be a pandemic induced

Catherine Facia National Bureau Of Economic Re Floyd Boston University Wachner Andre Perry Atlanta New York Columbia University United States
"black community" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

07:48 min | 11 months ago

"black community" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

"Like what do you want to see more of in specialty coffee from kind of from the perspective of everything. We talked about your. I think this person to lighten. I think i've kind of figured out my answering. If i i'm not gonna lila's a weird question but i think for me. The the the thing that has rang the most true is to be. I think the question is just how can in specialty coffee shops be more inviting blacks or happens especially coffee. Bean were fighting to the black community and I try not to speak for indigenous communities as in communities communities to community. Because that's that's not. I don't want to speak for people who haven't lived that experience and the experts from us communities who is not But i can't speak for the black community. And i think for us. The solution is not necessarily into about more ways to invite us in book more ways to actually acknowledge that you're already in something that is blend and so there's multiple levels. The first level is most shops are in black or latino neighborhoods. You know a lot of the new coffee shops that are opening Away ones are engine defied neighborhood. So i think acknowledging the fact that you are actually injuring if the us cotton shop. You're answering a black community. You're answering to a community of people and businesses and churches and schools. And so i think by actually seeking to actually be an inauthentic member of that community whose integrated in not simply just there kind of pretending nichirei in a best native soon wonderland I think is the is the first step in. I think that if you answer it as a person who respects and values the assets community has that you will see that you actually have. An opportunity did as a member as a neighbor to be offer your assets in collaboration with asset already exist. I think that keeps happening. One and keeps up. Poverty mindset happening whereas i all the poor blacks and they need help. I think it keeps you kind of like the same union talented out. And then i think to it keeps from a really negative view of the neighborhood setting in which is the only crime. There's only poverty is only five business Why those things may be present. There are also a lot of really beautiful things present. I think if you as a community member seeking to find in value the assets. I going to the restaurants into neighborhoods partnering with bakeries that already exists. Even if they're not you know lake petite clip or whatever. The coup hazard bakery is partnering with the local donut shop nor partnering with businesses that exist. They're partnering with schools name. I think if you partner is a member. I just seeking the going to the restaurants that are nebulous enjoying them patronage. Going to if you're a person of faith attending the churches that are in that neighborhood religious houses that are they're thinking about the schools that are knows neighborhood. Educators already enrolled like. Would you consider sending your children to If not why not. Are you willing to be a part of changing the reasons why you would be comfortable. You want your business here. But you don't want your kids. I mean i think in that regard to it being gives you opportunity as you're engaging him to build relationships and to say as you're a part of the conversation was saying yeah like the kids don't have anywhere to go after school but oh we're actually looking stein. The coffee shop in the neighborhood. How can we help with that. You know what i mean. That's a way more I think a way more integrated solution to the problem And when you're having those conversations with kids the conference shot or with maybe at the local schooling and people wanna look. There's like you know a career day and they want businesses to come in and talk to kids about career opportunities. You can talk about the career paths but that only happens if you have a relationship with the school you know if you have a relationship with the people at the school are the charges doing and drive the head guys you come set of baba give away free espresso for you. The stop the violence mark like a lot of black churches have these white margins where people just not white and they marched to violence in our neighborhoods. Which is ironically thing that a lot of people don't know in they'd bring up. Why people that we actually talked about timely. Y'all are over here. So he's one of those. Many instances where people i tried to improve the community like people would love a cup of coffee and coffee shops could very easily as you want to donate coffee sale coffee in here. We wanna partner with his wanna partner with the school when a partner with his business is a restaurant that has really amazing soul food. You know what. I mean my be you can start catering from them or you know. Find a way to partner with people. can you know. Maybe you offer your coffees for their Hey have you ever tried the his cool coffee grown in africa. You know what i mean like. you might really enjoyed. This is a lot like black history month events. That happen where people talk about black history by your your local coffee shop could be a huge club to talk about black history costume but that never happens. I think because most shops are only in the neighborhood for what they can get And what they can bring into the neighborhood as far as business is concerned and not and for what they can get from the neighborhood. As far as assets of businesses that are already there and when they can learn in participating with was there so i think bet that revived. A lot of shops are missing out. Then what happens is like you know years and years and years of a shopping in the neighborhood of being this kind of silo in the community. That doesn't really interact with the community. It's me doesn't really interact with him. Then all of the sudden you know they have trying to figure out well. Wait. what can we do about. Racism like is really late in your existence. China start building a relationship. 'cause one thing about neighbors you know the best time to meet your neighbors is right when you read us live next to somebody for like fifteen years. You never said a wire. Tom like it's going to be weird trying to start sixteen but it is. You'd think if any advice for people who are starting shops like seek to really partner engage survey the neighborhood before you open so when their knees pop up you're able to digitally be a part of the solution to those needs. And when they are benefit neighborhood is experiencing The local artists. Who's working on the mix tape. I'll while we yeah the music neither every it. Would you ever wanna perform. You know what i mean. Things like that are ways. You can start to benefit from a lot of those things. Tooling celebrate the neighborhood to celebrate. It seems like just like basically be a member of the community. Like don't just talent isn't there and just yet have that be your only exposure to the community like actually participate in it and i think the other pieces as you are educating your patrons because coffeeshops specifically baristas education. I learned everything. I know about that. Went from really doe baristas in memphis I had great experiences on my coffee shops..

partner black community nichirei lila Bean us lake petite africa memphis stein baba China Tom
"black community" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

08:46 min | 11 months ago

"black community" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat & Cloud

"What's up y'all welcome to the cat and cloud. Podcasts names. alex. If you don't know me i am one of the employees owners here. Cat and cloud also run our marketing and partner program departments. I've been cutting cloud since we opened our first retail store back in twenty sixteen. So it's been about four years so unless you've been living under a rock you know that america's been undergoing sort of a racial reckoning as a lot of people are calling it and we can cloud have been trying to educate ourselves to just better understand how we fit into all this stuff one area in which we're looking to be more inclusive is on this very podcast so i am going to be launching a new kind of recurring feature on our podcast where we interview coffee professionals that are part of communities that are under represented in coffee. So we're gonna talk about racism and other forms of discrimination but not all the time we'll also talk about whatever that person is super excited about you know whatever they're working on whatever they're hyped on an important thing to note. I will present make mistakes in this process. I will say something that is wrong or ignorant or stupid and if you feel comfortable doing so i invite you to reach out to me. Send me an email. I'll put it in the show notes and just let me know that i made a mistake. You totally don't have to do this. I will be continuing to educate myself and critiquing these things with a group of people that i trust but yeah feel free to reach out. I'm down to chat was dude. So we're gonna kick off this new approach to the podcast with an interview that i did with bartholomew jones of coffee black i learned about him on spread back in june and just get really sucked into the work that he's doing with coffee black and i i just think he's an amazing human and i'm superstar talked to him and bring this interview with him to you in this episode. We're going to talk about a ton of different elements of racism that are deeply ingrained in the coffee industry. Things like building generational wealth the colonial history of coffee the problems with direct trade. And how we buy coffee. Ross about the representation of black people in coffee and gentrification so without further ado. Let's get into this thing. Here's our interview with new jones. What's up y'all welcome to the cat and cloud. Podcasts asked my. Name's alex in case. You don't know me superstock for our guest today we've got bartholomew jones and he is the founder of coffee black. Coffee black spelled c. f. f. e. black and a little bit about coffee black there in emerging social enterprise that seeks to bring back the intersection between black history and black coffee going to unpack all this stuff and more in the interview. But i you welcome. And i just wanted to take you to say what up. Thanks for being here and if you could just tell me about your journey that led you to coffee. Yeah man. I got into coffee Exposed to run up kind of a right of passage in our community where to a certain age where you can actually drink coffee. You know how many and your parents finally allow you to drink coffee kind of like a kind of growing up. So that's my that was my exposure. You know they had chart with you. Have the patty sugar and cream and everything to junkie and My dad actually. When i was in high school started to tell me about kenyan coffee which i'm not really sure how he got exposed to that. I know he took like a study abroad tripping college kenya and then he has good friends from california and he's like a whole roaster. He works at our church with my dad south. Yeah got expelled. I never really get into it for the purpose of drinking it until college for the caffeine and then after a couple of all nighters on some will of milk and sugar. Lactose intolerance in nikki. Doing this you know long story short that me. They're really trying to find. Something actually tastes good without a bunch of stuff in it that makes sense without like kind of blew in yup yup totally. I definitely remember like being in college. Like studying super late in. I guess my introduction coffee was kind of similar is like there's like starbucks. Those little lake isolated things that they sell in the glass jar issuer. Bro not very safe for sure. Roku do those awesome yet. Tell me a little bit about coffee. Black what are the kind of things that make up the coffee. Black ecosystem yes. oh blake We're starting to think about it as a team is three different departments so you have Apparel and music in being you have coffee in the rusty end of things. Mba you had indication on which is tied cast and a lot of other information so those are like the three different different lanes that we have and then those three different lanes of push people you know toward this idea of like reimagining reconnecting black people black coffee culture that can look like get that makes sense a couple of different things going on. It's a lot but it is. It's all kind of tied into culture making is essentially what we're trying to do. It's beautiful is it. Just you in the business or do you have like a couple of other people. No i think. I ended up being a fall guy So is definitely my wife and not a created together and You know she was. We were both working at the tom. Izzo was kinda my passion project as she would do. A lot of our graphic design She's actually walking by right now. She said hey. Jude design and Different mayor we started pulling in muhammad kenny. Kenny baker. who is the owner of ethnos coffee so he started doing our roasting for us on the musical to you know we have a lot of collaborative work with from these as like matt. Mejia's eighty three beat to musicians producers and songwriters like xm. You know one of my collaborators house as name is milan cradle. Especially my favorite rapper. So we work with him and his family on projects and then we also on the apparel tip. My younger brother has taken over. Doing all of our carol racers named julian henderson. He's also getting barista training. As my mother-in-law alydar packaging fulfillment. My brother's wife does customer service. And then i got a couple of guys in the community help us will pop up so it's kind of like a community family effort you know. That's amazing it's like a family family business. Yeah this goal you know. I think that like family businesses At least in our community are becoming more and more scarce you know. Most people are employed in unhappily employed for the most part of Being able to build something where family can have some some equity to pass down for the next couple of generations. I think is something that all of us are really in. I think in the black community generational wealth is kind of like. It's been a topical conversation for you know the last ten years inside. I think that that that ultimately looks like family businesses. You know what i mean. Yeah yeah thomas along shortest Totally that makes sense. Yeah tell me. More about like pele intergenerational wealth concept because like yeah i guess It's something that i that i feel like. A lot of people aren't aware of that Issue it's funny. I got into this conversation with One of my frequent facebook sparring partners and we use a cool guy. Like i haven't black rainy day because he's always simple we have is is. I think it's good to have people in your life. You don't agree with you. Don't wanna live at knbr south and he genuinely cares about people so we were talking about the protests and everything. That's happened and he was like what's the solution. Nobody's presented a solution and it was at that point that i realized like he was genuinely unaware of like the last four hundred years of solution that the black community has been putting for it and i I made a.

bartholomew jones muhammad kenny Lactose intolerance america partner kenya Roku starbucks facebook Different mayor alex caffeine Ross milan cradle Bro knbr c. f. f. Izzo Mejia
"black community" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Here this time. Hello. How are you? Can I help you? Yeah, I'm good. I'm good. What are your thoughts on Trump's platinum plan? Do you think it's a good move politically? And do you think it might help win some of the voters who were may be put off by his opposing black lives matter? This is a great question. So the platinum plan for those who who didn't notice over the past few days is President Trump's plan to say I'm going to do concrete things for the black community, and he's made a point of this. He's already done this. I mean, before the Corona virus and really before the lockdowns, he could say the other Lois Black unemployment history. And all the democratic race mongering and of fearmongering and race. Hustling never amounted to anything as tangible. Is that saying with lowest black unemployment ever I've actually done done right by the black community is pitching. 2016 was vote for me. What have you got to lose? You've been voting with Democrats and they have completely mistreated. You haven't done anything for you vote for me what you had to lose, so the platinum plan has four pillars, opportunity security prosperity. And fairness. This includes I've just pulled up the sheet here. Three million new jobs for the black community, half a million new black owned businesses. Increase capital to black communities by 500 Billion, so basically create incentives for people to lend more money. Add more police to black neighborhoods, which that is a great idea, and that's very popular among black voters. By the way, you know, the Democrats pretend that black people hate the police that is not backed up by pulling. I think it's an 80%, according to recent polls or more of a black voters, giving their opinion say they want the police to remain in their communities. They do not want to defund the police. So I like that the issue with trying to use the government to push new businesses, particularly toward one racial group, or another is one seems little discriminatory. To may to say that we're going to use the force of government to favor one racial group over another. So I don't love that. Also, you just create a lot of room for corruption went when you've got the government funneling money into the private sector like that, So I don't totally love that either. He says that he's gonna work on a second step act this it would be to follow it to the First Step Act, which I've referred to is the jailbreak bill. It's my least favorite thing The president has done so far. I think that the messaging is totally confusing. I don't like that. I think Republicans should be tough on crime. I think it seems pandering and incoherent tea weak on crime Overall, I like it. I like he's doing concrete things for the black community. But I think.

black community President Trump Trump president
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"Even with the training and helping people come even with the digital in distance learning a lot of schools are out and they transferred over to transition over to digital in distance learning. But a lot of kids don't even know how to even log onto the computers that were given by their school districts and may many institutions just think, oh, well, you got a computer now use it but we have a lot of kids who are disadvantaged special needs that just don't know. We have a lot of talk nontraditional students who need note takers and they need that face to face to help them not by we need a four computers so that we can teach our own. Out in in in March it's great but if you're not willing to donate and to really help then. You we were our hands are tied. That read their distribution of wealth. Don't just stop to come from the government. It can come just from your house to our house and back to your community, and that's what we have to do is that when you you're looking for hope you looking for help you have to be willing to give. It 'cause. Then once you give your making. Payment in your own as that. And you're taking that accountability and responsibility. So it's something that you gave. But if something it's always free, you're not gonNA, really appreciate that. True. But if you give them and you're saying well the the white people just to why people that in every ethnicity that I see they're taking care of their own. But in the black community, we're looking for other people to take care of us and give us where we feel as our. No what why. Why do you think that is why do you from your perspective? Why do you think that in the black community and I'm saying I agree with you but just enquiring and poking at your perspective? Why do you think that in the black community of the Common Implication is that we must go out to other races. Help versus helping within our own or receiving help within our own race or culture. we were talked to.

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"There and aside you have to know what you're standing for. True. Structure. Truth Major Truth you have to know your why have structure I did a live on yesterday. Those of you who missed it on facebook and INSTAGRAM. It's still posted on I g TV. Also, my facebook videos make sure to follow me on facebook instagram and twitter discussing the very thing there knowing why you're out there understanding your position, the hierarchy in local government not just federal and state government, and also where and how to support. So we're GONNA get into some more music. We got some more show coming up you guys, and when we come back from this break, we're going to discuss more about how you can help fund organizations, the Dome of Hope Organization, and continuing to add hope making hope a reality in the black community you do not want to miss another opportunity to allow your voice to be heard. We'll be right back after this. What to do? This is a rapping Harlem and you're in the this day in the morning. Let's listen. One love the original. Bob Marley right here on day in the morning. If you know anything about Bob Marley that would be one of the top songs you can identify with coming together and such a time as this giving thanks being grateful coming together as one human race one love one person or one organization. We are highlighting two day window and daily founder CEO of the Dome of Hope Organization this series the entire month of June with liberty just uh, for all for even for black voices speaking of hope. In the black community speaking for hope in the black community speaking with hope in the black community right before. That song we discussed how you yes you.

Dome of Hope Organization facebook Bob Marley founder CEO Harlem twitter instagram
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"Relationships and marriages. There's not just one pure right. Unless you. Send human race but a lot of people have planning that family members who are by Ray. So interconnected that bills stronger. So I am so happy because when you look out over the news and look out just on your street and see some the protests and involved in. A lot of non African American that are leading the protesters well, because we have to realize that every human being just what is what is just right? No matter what color you are and for them to stand in solidarity and from the young people I I so excited and so happy about it because that gives us folk and even in the black community because they're standing up and shining a light that this is not right. This is not right. So what are the things that we have to do elders is encouraged support. On the way. That'll. Encourage support and get out of the way. Warning to everyone who was tuning and is Ms j in the morning you have locked yourself into one of the best morning shows in the world we are live right now, Gwendolyn daily founder and CEO of the Dome of hope this is the with liberty just us for all freedom for black voices series and today we're discussing hope in the black community support encourage and get out of the way of young people who were on fire and passionate about standing against injustices police brutality. What's just not effective or ineffective, and what's not right right now, not only in America but around the world. and. Also those who were standing to support what is right and what is working. So with the Dome was hope and everything that you were offering in the community how is the community helping or how can the community continued to help and support the Dome of hope? Fundamentally. Financially meaning the money we need the money because in all protesting and all scenes that are of good. It's GonNa take some funding. There's GonNa, be some funding and raise them these funds. So even we need a funding, that's what we can do. It doesn't matter how much because everybody do a little bit. We don't everybody you don't have to all of us don't have to do a lot. So we we have to do whatever we can do to support the dumber file so we should support you. So funding getting the word out letting people know that the dumber fault exist in. So just and I think you J for even allowing me this platform because this is one of one of the ways that we can get the word out with Saddam out, join our our team and support us on our three million dollar campaign for. And just funding, find me, and that's the main thing because we get the funding, we can continue to do the work. And we can continue to support those who are on the battlefield and getting them prepared any quit. PREPARED EH equipped to go out and do much much more prepared and equipped to teach them. Okay. Just even who's on top lot of people know even in the Political Ram, they know the president may might know their mayor but they don't know their senator simply persons for just even to know that you have to be equipped you can't just run out.

founder and CEO Ray Gwendolyn Saddam America senator president
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"In the morning good morning good morning to everyone who was tuning is out to mark walkers Nelson Dj Maestro One, go the that's my the J. Good morning to everyone who is tuned in this series is owned by Walter. Hawkins. Thank you Lord for all that you've done for me. Special guest today. Ms Wendelin daily CEO founder of the Dome of Hope Organization not only is she the founder and CEO of an amazing organization? Making hope a reality globally she is also my mom talking about. In the black community with liberty, justice for all freedom for black voices the entire month of June I'm excited for all of you guys who were tuning in. Giving us a shot that shot out. Now it's time for the MS J area coach checking those of you who are listening to new to the show, and you don't know what this moment means. This moment means you get an opportunity to rep Yo city. So call into the studio right now tell everybody in your area to call in five, one, five, six, zero, five, nine, three, two, zero if you're listening. Online and you WANNA rep your city in your area code to my social media go ahead sliding. It's okay. Go ahead, search area, cody and real quick I e those of you who are calling in again right now it's five, one, five, six, zero, five, nine, three, two, zero, two switchboards lighting up and I love it I love it, I, love it. It's an opportunity for you to rep your city an opportunity for me to say thank you and to make you laugh. Yeah. Yeah y'all know this past week I finally released the official. Area Code check in song and then go to well because y'all know I never get it right? Okay it's okay to take a moment to laugh it's okay to take a moment to release. It's okay to take a moment to laugh at yourself and not take life too seriously all the time. So so you know listen up that face you know get a little tightening up get a little smile get a little release. You know studies have shown that laughing and smiling actually releases healthy indoor to reduce stress. To actually tighten your neck and your face. WHAT'S NATURAL FACE LIFT and it's good for your body. It's good for you to laugh. So we all get right into the midday area coach chicken is now..

founder and CEO Lord Dome of Hope Organization Ms Wendelin Hawkins CEO official
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"I break all of that, and now SOI party break every. Oh He. Changed Ball when I walked amazed stage and they call my name. Paul. I brought you. Yeah, I, can do it. You gotTa take that first. You gotta take it. Take. Give you. Yours every five. have an opportunity. Every bod- have an opportunity sometimes covered a lot of shit. But. You gotTA still go and get it sometimes you gotTa Walk Through Sid mortared again it. Through shorts. As Yours. Well. You come up and just like fertilize when you come up, you smell the roses. Now, let me have another SIP. True speaking just the way that it should be this morning on Dominion Day in the morning with Gwendolyn daily founder CEO of the Dome of Hope Organisation discussing hope in the black community not only is she the founder and CEO of the Doma hope she is my mother and we are live right now with liberty and justice for all. This series this month freedom for black voices speaking of.

TA founder CEO founder and CEO Hope Organisation Gwendolyn Doma Paul
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"So continuing the interview continuing talking about hope in the black community, you started sharing that your passions and the mission of the Dome Cope are fueled by your own personal experiences in your community so. As a black woman if you're a single mom you're coming up like you said, the baby of fourteen working through challenges in high school and a lot of adversity. How do you deal with or what messages do you share with people who are experiencing the exact same things you experienced in your community? I sure not only hope no hope because a lot of people don't understand Ho. Because what does that mean? So I share my role map, what did I do to get out? And I make my story I tell my story organically. To where I don't just talk my degrees and speak from a collegiate point of view. But I, see to a point of view of people who I'm to where they can understand that real life message. A lot of people don't have time to just sit in the to what you did what this midst and that they WanNa know how does how do I get out of where I'm at? If you go onto education and you, you only have a ged I can tell you hey, I had a ged I couldn't really read or write but now I'm a doctoral student. Some parents say they have children never went to college I can tell you hey, my child went to Spelman College I didn't even have money to send turn there. Then I show them how to do that. I could show you how to transfer out of the community college into a University of your.

Spelman College Dome Cope Ho
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"P. S. sets out to the women of Pumps Cidade we have. One special guest not only is she the founder and CEO of the Dome of Hope Organisation Miss? Gwendolyn daily is also my mother and also an elder sister. Organization, right now it's time for the first SIP. Those of you who are new to the show it's our. Unity to say, cheers to ourselves fake here's to you. Cheers to me tears to us. Cheers to a new day. Those of you who are not new to the show. You know the best part of MS J Waking Up is coffee in my cup hunting but this is a judgement free zone. There's no judgment you might have tea and your cup you might have water a smoothie juice milk I don't know. Maybe it's happy hour where you are and you gotta little libation it's okay. As long as you drink responsibly. So at this moment. Miss Gwendolyn daily is going to join us. For the first SIP on today bringing. Hope discussing hope pushing hope supporting hope in the black community. Sponsoring the Dome of hope sponsoring today's I sip my what do you have in your cup this morning. Girl I got makes good folger's in my. And I'm ready for this. Black. Instrument. Black. We're talking. We're talking about blocking. Hoping the black community I got a black song and sweet and I all. Ready for. ruined. Because As far as I see. Yeah. Everyone around the world to me at this time, we raise our cubs to say cheers and salute to making it to a new day. To make him through another night. Despite it all in spite of it all still holding on to hope. So cheers to you in salute. Let's take our first SIP together. Who? Always. Another one another one. Oh..

Gwendolyn founder and CEO Pumps Cidade folger P. S.
"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

P.U.M.P.S. Radio

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on P.U.M.P.S. Radio

"So but yes, still we find it that we have reversed the Tosh. Now we're still living back in the marches with Dr King they're right now they're preparing for the million two million persons watch a Washington. August the twenty eight. So we used that, we saw that with Dr King and then was myself living in the sixties and also intern in Washington D. C. in the Obama era for the first black president is that we have to go back into those music because this teams are still happening today. We're talking about we're we're talking about the lynching, and now they're saying that even would George. Flory Thousand Street went you know The News, but you have resulted in revolt with the sane. and. Finding ourselves one back to that use again, one of the things is that. The generations from there from the sixties until now the music's changed. What and not in a a derogatory way to the most part because I really feel that you can find good in everything even if it if it sprinkled with the little vulgarity, he's still can find some good because that's the pain. How people kind of work fare-paying pain points, their their displeasure are even pleasures. I feel about the and it's sad. They have that whole thing that we're going to see it we're going to stand and and after Dr King was not a leader comic coming up until Obama we have our certain leaders in our communities and some great people doing some things especially in our black community. That Iraq and say, Hey, I'm leaning forward. We didn't. So we had with the other songs in row solve they came out. Hey. They would just upset was we're still doing this in our neighbors. What's the parents and grandparents was telling me like you need to see that and now? that. there. was. They're coming out with Iraq but they still to go back a lot of people call it restaurant music but they. Go back and take a sniff it or even the song and say, oh I own the rights to the song but I need to play a song because just. Still fitting better suite. That was you gotta play these. Yes. We enjoy saying Tom. Truth Truth I mean there are plenty songs you know growing up for me that I remember you playing growing up listening to good arm, Music Even Jazz Oh Gospel Music and and those type of things shaped our my perspective and I'm I'm not just speaking for me but for my generation, those of us who were exposed to that type of music and appreciation. For, what is now called? Rin Route. where yet it's not just the music, but also the message that we can do. On today's message, we're discussing hope in the black community you are the founder, CEO, the backbone, the head, the neck, the leg, defeat, the tail toes..

Dr King Obama Iraq Washington Tom Tosh George intern president founder CEO
"black community" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"What was done, not what was promise. The Democrats have been promising things to to the black community specifically and in general for decades. And they have not followed through. When you look at the graduation rate when you look at the the state of the black family, when you look at the jobs, I mean they have failed miserably. And it wasn't until President Trump came along over the last 3.5 years, almost four years in the face of incredible opposition. And in the in the face of slander. Slanderous charges from the left. He's kept his promise. He's tryingto work down his list of promises, and one of them was to bring back prosperity and you know what a rising tide lifts all boats. You could scream racism all you want You know, if you ask the question, are you better off than you were four years ago that that could be a general question for the country? And the answer is yes, but you can ask the black community Are you better off than you were 40 years ago? Yes, it would be. Yes, You're going to be hearing from people who have experienced this not just from the so called black community, but you're going to hear from a diverse A diverse variety of Americans. You know how much the the left they just celebrate diversity? When you're going to get a real taste of that tonight is not gonna be based off of ethnicity. It's going to be the ideas. You're going to see how ideas impact so many different Americans, But not we're not getting together around the distal beauty of diversity. No, no, no, no. No Ideas are here is what's caused. You know the diversity on the right. That's going to be on full display. So yeah. Absolutely looking forward to you guys. A Senator Scott is going to be speaking tonight. Haley is going to be speaking tonight. You've got the president's son speaking tonight. It all kicks off. We have spent a lot of money in this state on trying to give convince you to mask up. 7 18. I'm going to show you talk about the height of hypocrisy and it concerns Lord Ducey. Let's talk about something important to us all your home. Here is a story that's happening way too often because of the challenging times. If you are concerned that you will not be able to make your mortgage payment because of the pandemic and forbears offered by the bank.

black community Trump president Lord Ducey Senator Scott Haley
"black community" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"92 3 new home for hip hop is standing up to racism and racial injustice in the black Community. Big boy's neighborhood. It is going down, ladies and gentlemen, our friend Blue face is in the neighborhood. Never could. We don't know what's gonna come out of marble blue face and unable to face you really one of the homies that I enjoy, man. The reason why I think so, too. Is one of our first sit downs, bro. Not only did you come to do the interview You don't know saying, but you stayed around for, like, three hours. And not only did you stay around for three hours, you stayed around for three hours, which is signed. And I had a chance to see whatever people see or whatever. May I had a chance to see that I had a chance to see the hand holding the RU Hungary's the hugging you notice, and we don't get a chance to see that. So not that I'm on his parade for blue face, but You know, And the thing about it to face is that one thing that I noticed is you control what you put out it may look crazy to some people about gang big getting the selling My whole plan, man. You sang too much of a man. But I remember when we had we had you in the queen at the station, right? And I'm thinking like, Oh, man, The lifestyle's crazy to design and he was like, Go interviewer, and I was like, man, Shannon gonna step in there you like. Oh, she's stepping there and which he stepped in. I was like, Okay, just do nobody doing when you release videos of you guys at the house. It may look crazy to us. But you know what you put now. You know it. Was there a man? What about the full on brawl That was going on at your house when you were shooting a video? Oh, yeah. The filming started off man started off great Anybody paint with playing the complaint that that goes with the way plan goes, baby, So we get the yak. They get. They get attitude, you know, flaring up where you dance on over. You did settle our dance over here are beauteous do that. Ah, mode and they got the pick. Besides in ages. This car friction a man why he didn't break it up, man. I broke it up about champ. I okay? I fell on the ground, trying to break it up. So that's when I start reporting. I might mean I'ma go by and we're gonna go viral. And if I can be me, that's the only thing that could come Good out of this. Hold on for a second. We're gonna come back, man. You know, we got more stick around our radios. We got more were blue face in the neighborhood Big.

black Community Hungary Shannon
"black community" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The black community. The death rate is 240% higher. Other groups. This's a woman 58 years old. She's Will Chazz for Children. She's from Jamaica. And the Jamaican government has come to us to help with their community and many many governments have come. And of course, we always say yes, and we said yes to the Jamaican government, as well as every other government that needs help. Because the cancer rates are so high, so swim in a newly diagnosed cancer the left breast if you imagine the breast like a clock at the 11 o'clock position. And it was about a 1.3 centimeter cancer. She had a biopsy of one of the big facilities. She had invasive cancer, which means the cancer was invading through the docks, and she had a carcinoma inside to DCs, which means it was in the duct itself. Yet both her weight was 180. She's five foot six is generally feeling fine. I examined her and when I examined her, actually, the massive growing almost a three centimeter mass In the left press and the lymph nodes were palpable. So she had the stage three breast cancer and her doctors wanted to do Mr activity. Like I said earlier, so many surgeons just to want to do surgery. That's why so many people with cancer suspected cancer come here, and we know what the big hospitals When I came to New York, 97% of women were losing their breast for breast cancer treatment, whereas here, 90% of women were keeping their breast. This's the work we do. I should tell you one more thing. And that is that she came to me three years ago, and after she met, she decided she wanted to keep her breast and have no surgery and no chemo. Even though the big hospitals wantedto have chemo and mastectomy, she said, No. She came here She was treated here. With a visible beams of radiosurgery treat her breast cancer. And now, three years later, she's in remission. She came this week. Examined her blood tests and other tests. Imaging tests. This is the work that we do every day at 13 80 for Broadway for each person, each person we try toe thread the needle..

cancer Jamaican government black community Jamaica chemo New York
"black community" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"black community" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In this is in I'm talkin specially in the black community here you are listening to the Commonwealth club radio program you can learn more about the club it's many events it's travel program and how to become part of it all at Commonwealth club dot work you can find thousands of our podcasts on iTunes Google play and stitcher today's program features Cornel west in conversation with Cheryl Davis now back to our program but as you talk about this to the black community talk about tradition you talk about spirituality one of the questions here is about really the old school way of one of the reasons I got a nationally on the Human Rights Commission is that certain things are still very taboo in the black community talk about LGBTQ issues when you talk about transgender issues and this question is about how do we deal with the discomfort still within the black community sometimes to have those conversations and see people as people the humanity of four to celebrate that to move beyond the old school traditions and ways of thinking this is where the issue comes back to love again comes back to love again you see deep can not takes self love never goes out of style I don't care what generation eighty so if you think that somehow you can love black people but not love James ball I'm not love Luther Vandross the game you need to check kill fell but when you walk in your church and see that by the plan at Oregon god bless you by now he gave gave ball.

black community
"black community" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"black community" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Russia hysteria russia gate and most politicians have fallen in line and as such the left and progressive elements must not allow themselves to be isolated in pushed into a corner politically they must go to the people and to the masses and they must not rely upon the ideological and political interests in line of forces that represent war and the establishment the establishment of both the democratic and republican party if we want to have a movement of the people we must go to the people we must politically educate the people we bus clarify the issues that are confronting the world's people and move on from there i think at this point we have not yet come to that type of thinking doctor anthony montiero's speaking from philadelphia the up a lot bala i felt blackish back coalition for social gesture if peace in preparation hansen important gate coming up with the philadelphia city council that black is back coalition and its allies are pressing for black community control of the police listeners do soup to fall to the community can kill ponies working group to the black is a coalition we're gonna be reading a whole contingent opposes into the city council meeting sewage those our bill for black community controlled the police which contains the principles or run the right to an independent nongovernment affiliated black community control the police commission that is democratically elected by people all the black neighborhoods and district level and this commission has the tall was a higher volume train and when necessary discipline police forces in our community by discipline particularly we talking about the power to subpoena and actually bring police that violate on our rights porn charges in theaters office the city government the court system and the police department to respect this process as well two passing this do so that's our main objective are going into the city council meeting on september fourteen.

anthony montiero philadelphia city council black community Russia philadelphia hansen