35 Burst results for "Black Church"

Maine Man Arrested for Setting Fire to Black Church

Jesse Kelly

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Maine Man Arrested for Setting Fire to Black Church

"Is the Fox News. Run down, Listen and subscribe now by going up fox news podcasts dot com. A man from main faces federal hate crimes charges accused of setting fire to a predominantly black church in Massachusetts extensive damage and Martin Luther King Jr Community Presbyterian Church in Springfield, Massachusetts, from a fire set December 28th. There were three smaller fires set on two separate days there earlier that month and some tires slashed in the area. Federal prosecutors say disco vulture I've 44 years old from Houlton, Maine, is responsible for all of it. They say investigators found on his phone, several messages using racist language about black people and location data linking him to the scene of the crimes. He was already in state custody, pleading not guilty of

King Jr Community Presbyterian Massachusetts Fox News FOX Martin Luther Springfield Houlton Maine
PK Problems

You Had Me At Black

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

PK Problems

"So growing up in the black church. It always felt like home. Always commute with a smile with with a hug with the kiss was love. Everyone knew we spent all day and service. I mean literally we were. We were the charges that would go and start at like eleven and then in three and then have a break and go to church chicken and then come back at five or six and stay all night until it was like okay. We have to go to school tomorrow. Can we please go home. And my dad being a pastor and my mom being bring really involved in the ministry it was family. It wasn't perfect. You know it was messy at times. It was in a drama it was. You didn't really have to stand up and tell all your business by you sentiment testimony time right but it did feel like home. I would always tell people you know when they asked. When i was really young wannabe and i would always tell them. I wanna be a pastor. I want to be a preacher in a like my my father all really new so in twenty fourteen married and we had moved into a community called fairfield alabama. Just right outside of birmingham and we really felt called to invest in the community that was majority black. A my wife had worked at a group home in that community. We had friends that were still house parents at that group home. I was working at that time. In city government also ministry. And so we're like. Hey how can we. How can we invest in and really give back. The church we were at the church. Plant was a majority white church. We were the first one of the first african-american families that were really a part of that church. We felt call to invest. We knew people. And so we're part of this church community that we feel really connected to and were part of a actual community And fairfield that were really connecting with until we find ourselves living in those two worlds and some ways really trying to bridge them together and then michael brown gets

Fairfield Birmingham Alabama Michael Brown
"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

"In the hyundai santa fe our book critic maureen corrigan has a review of the new novel the final revival of opel and nev which is set in the rock music world. It's the first novel by donnie walton. Who has worked as an editor at magazines like essence. Entertainment weekly and life marine says off hype that heralded. This novel is justified. I knew from all the buzz about the final revival of opal and nev that it's a work of fiction by first time novelists wall but after i started her book i had to stop and double check to make sure that this wasn't a true account of a real life. Rock duo from the nineteen seventies. That's how authentic this odd novel feels composed as it is out of pandemonium of fictional interviews footnotes to talk show transcripts letters and editor's notes to say that the final revival of opel and nev is a sly similac rim of a rock oral. History is to acknowledge only the most obvious of this. Novel's achievements walton aspires to so much more in the story about music race and family secrets that spans five decades and all the glitzy quick change narrative styles don't detract attention from the core emotional power of her story. I tell you even many of the fake footnotes in this novel are moving the premise of the final revival of opel. And nev is this in two thousand fifteen. A journalist named sonny curtis becomes the first african-american editor in chief of a rolling stone. Type magazine. sunny decides that her first big get will be a book length interview with opel jewel and nev charles their interracial rock duo. Who struck it big in the early seventies and were immortalized by a photograph taken of them. After a racially fueled riot broke out one of their performances afterwards opel who's african american naturally bald and held in her prime as an intergalactic showstopper along the lines of tina turner and mary clayton briefly became a punk icon and then faded from view. Nev- who's white and british has gone on to enjoy a long career sonny's interest particularly in opal story. Turns out to be personal. Her father. jimmy. Curtis was a drummer who had an affair with opel. He was killed during that infamous concert. When fighting broke out between members. And the hells angels type. Fans of a southern fried rock. Group called the bond brothers who are also performing that night. The bond brothers had waving a confederate flag around backstage and a fed up opel manage to slip the flag under her address and tie old dixie as she puts it the less place a cracker would come looking for it. Once opened never went on stage. The bond brothers fans racist heckling escalated and opel flipped her costume up so that as she says they could all see exactly what i thought about them and all their hate. If you know you're rock history the chaos. That results sounds a lot like the nineteen. Sixty-nine rolling stones concert at altamont sunny pieces together. The tail of that pivotal concert and the shameful secret that's been hidden at the heart of it. For decades through interviews with a chorus of characters they range from one of the surviving bond brothers to announce seventy year old woman who worked as a receptionist at opel unnerves old record.

donnie walton tina turner sonny curtis mary clayton Curtis maureen corrigan jimmy five decades first novel nineteen seventies opel jewel first nineteen Sixty-nine rolling stones early seventies seventy year old Nev walton nev charles african american
"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:23 min | 3 weeks ago

"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You know just emotional support. She helped fund him when he traveled. She helped fund the freedom writers. Oh absolutely she like harry. Belafonte eight was a blank check for the movement. It martin nascar. She wrote the check. And so that shows another level of complexity of the relationship between the black churches. Were in this case. A member of the black church and a musician in the black church with the politics affecting the larger black community and that role needs to be told all and one of the most important thing she did was when dr king was giving the i have a dream speech. He didn't intend to use the phrase. I have a dream which he got from eighth the hall as we say in this series in the book a break the whole. Use it in the sermon. She drove him the airport and he turned her and said pretty. I like that phrase. You don't mind if i use it. She said no. I'll be flattered and of course it's identified with him but its origin is with them is with the black woman. So he's on the stage in front of all those people on the mall and he's giving his speech was okay and mahalia who has an impeccable sense of timing says. Tell them about the dream. Martin tell them about the dream remember. She's sitting right behind him. Tell them about the dream martin. And so he shifted gears..

Belafonte eight Martin mahalia harry martin nascar one dr king eighth martin dream
"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Your book is dedicated to the memory of john. Lewis who was of course a congressman and a longtime voting rights activists was. Hey friend. did you know him. I had the pleasure of tracing congressman. Lewis family tree on finding your roots. I revered him. I loved him a. We were very good friends. And you know. I couldn't really be as friend because i admired him so much. He was a hero to me. And what i revealed to him was that his great great grandparents were tobias and betty carter and they both were born into slavery sometime around eighteen thirty in pike county alabama. They got married december sixteen to eighteen sixty five only ten days after they were freed and ten days after the ratification of the thirteenth which finally abolish slavery and they were landowners just four years after their marriage but tobias registered to vote in alabama in eighteen sixty seven and i showed john his grandfather's registration card and terry is one of the most emotional moments in all the years that i've been doing finding eretz as you know often people are moved to tears and and i give them their space. I was moved to tears when he was moved to tears. He looked at me. He looked at the voter registration certificate and his head fell and hit the table as he wept and we figured out that no one in his family line had voted between his great great grandfather and john because they had taken away the right of black people to vote with these state. Constitutional conventions during redemption and the laws 'cause movement and that's why the voting rights act was absolutely necessary. And then he looked at me after he wipe designs and he said. I guess it's day that's an amazing story. It's an amazing story and me. John lewis risk his life voting rights. Any and he suffered..

John lewis december sixteen john. Lewis Lewis john alabama betty carter tobias one both terry eighteen sixty five voting rights act pike county alabama ten days eighteen sixty seven thirteenth eighteen thirty days four years
"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's get back to my interview with henry. Louis gates his new book. The black church is a companion to his. Pbs series of the same name which hosted. When you're were twelve and you you join the church. You accepted jesus but you were not overcome by the holy ghost you were terrified of the holy ghost now the church you were attending a pentecostal church but a good friend of yours was a member of the pentecostal church. There was a pentecostal church in neighborhood. You are so afraid of being overcome by the holy ghost. You'd walk on the opposite side of the street when you pass that church. Tell us tell us about your fear and what your exposure was to the church. That made you so afraid of being overcome by the holy ghost. Church of god in christ was on water street on the right side of the street and while the methodist church was about two hundred yards further down the street on the left side of the street. And when i turn that corner. I cross over to the left side of the street and i walked down and zip by the holiness church because i thought the holy goes lived in the church and i thought the holy goes power was such that he he can reach out a grammy and and grammy in the church. Which is what had happened to my brother's friend. Vincent click benson claim was in a worship services at church..

Vincent click benson twelve jesus Louis gates about two hundred yards christ
"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:44 min | 3 weeks ago

"black church" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air today. The black church. We talk with henry. Louis gates the author of a new book and the host of the pbs series. On the subject. He describes the black church as the cultural cauldron. Black people created to combat. A system designed every way to crush their spirit. No pillar of the african american community has been more central to its history identity and social justice vision. We'll talk.

philadelphia Louis gates today african american Black
Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On the Black Church

"Guest louis gates has written a new book called the black church. That's a companion to the pbs series. He hosts of the same name. The book explores the history of african american religions from the days of the transatlantic slave trade to the black lives. Matter movement says black churches were the first institutions built by black people and run independent of white society in the us with the earliest black christian congregations. Roughly contemporaneous with the declaration of independence. He describes how churches became the foundation of black religious political economic and social life. He also tells his story about the bargain. He made with jesus that led him to the church at age twelve but life eventually led him to become more of an observer than participants in religion. Henry louis gates has hosted many pbs series and written companion books exploring the history of african americans including the recent book in series on reconstruction. He also hosts the series finding your roots in which through dna tests and in-depth genealogical research reveals the ancestrally. History of his well known. Guess gators a professor at harvard where he directs the hutchins center for african and african american research. Our interview recorded last thursday. Henry louis gates welcome back to fresh air a pleasure to have you back on our show in the acknowledgements in your book. You think a list of people for helping you fully realize the awesome significance of the black church and black religious beliefs in your own life and in the lives of other people. Let's talk a little bit about your own life when you were young. Your mother was methodist your father episcopalian. You attended your mother's church as a child. Would you describe that church yeah. It was a small methodist. Church is called walden methodist church. It's still there and many of my cousins and old friends so worship at church in many of the people most dear to me who passed away or memorialize on the walls of the church but it was a methodist church but it was almost the fundamentalist church. If

Louis Gates White Society Foundation Of Black Religious Henry Louis Gates Black Church PBS Hutchins Center For African An Gators Jesus Harvard United States Walden Methodist Church
"black church" Discussed on FiveThirtyEight Politics

FiveThirtyEight Politics

01:40 min | 2 months ago

"black church" Discussed on FiveThirtyEight Politics

"Back on. Wall will ask you once. We have the data and more information but for now. Thank you so much for joining me today. Stacey andrea and bashir thank you. My name is gail andrew. Tony chow is in the virtual control room. Claire bitter gary curtis is on audio editing. You can get in touch by emailing us at podcast at five. Thirty eight dot com. You can also of course tweeted us with any questions or comments..

Reproductive Justice & Women in the COVID Economy

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

04:41 min | 2 months ago

Reproductive Justice & Women in the COVID Economy

"Monica. Thank you for being with us today. Thank you so much for having me really is honored to be on the show with you today and to being conversation about reproductive justice. So i tell us what brought you to doing reproductive. Justice work and tell us a little bit abou- calling in reproductive justice in some people call her reproductive freedom. What brings me to reproductive justice. You know To answer that question. I have to take myself back to my hometown of wingate north carolina which is in rural north carolina. Honor one of those small one. Stop light kind of towns off a two lane highway and growing up in the rural south is. It's beautiful in so many ways that also opened my eyes to a lot at a very young age growing up in my community. I went to a school where there was only abstinence only education so we were desperately trying to find ways to have conversations about our bodies and to to talk about the feelings in the urges that we were getting as we were growing into adolescence and there was no space to do that until we had to find those things on our own and to create community with each other in huddle up in spaces to try to get this information in that to me. Just didn't seem right but we were doing the best that we could in. You know the church black church was episode for me my community. It's where i learned how to organize. I learned the had a voice. I mean there's just so much to Organizing route that. I get to the black church right because it was just an important piece in my journey however it was also a space where you know. We couldn't talk about bodies. It was just not the conversation that people were trying to have but almost every young girl that was in my church in so many that were in my community outreach. That went to school with. They were having children before graduating high school. And i'm like it's obvious that we're doing it. It's obvious that you know he's a conversation that we need to have and we just weren't having them and you know i i left wingate. I went to an h. b. c. You and came out while i was in school and it was like another part of my journey of understanding my body consent intimacy all different things that come along with growing into a young adult and i still felt. There wasn't a lot of space to have these conversations and I was desperately seeking those spaces and just trying to put the pieces together for myself. And so i think it's the experiences on. Unfortunately i also dealt with sexual assault in my adolescence as well as these experiences just all came together. And i didn't know what the term was yet but i knew that these issues were important to me in. I wanted to find answers and solutions to help me into also help those folks in our community that cared about. And so when. I put that beside you know reproductive justice movement that was started by black women in nineteen ninety four. The world starts collide. Right so yeah wasserman. Twelve black women actually came together. Some of which are very active in the work today. Like loretta ross. And dr tony bond able may will thomas here in georgia. These black women came together to create a framework that was more expansive in when thinking about our reproductive lives in this country and they brought together social justice in reproductive health and rights to talk about the intersection of her lives of black women and to have an organizing frame that allowed us to really talk about the myriad of issues. Right that we deal with lear making our decisions about our reproductive lives and so this framework was developed in nineteen ninety four battles women in now it is led by women of color all across country. Today right where we are all fighting for the human rights to have the children that we want in the ways that we want to prevent pregnancies without shame and with dignity to be able to parent our children in healthy and safe environments rights. We we we can already see the intersections of our work in terms of you know making sure i were not being plagued by you know. Environmental issues are making our water. Unclean or police brutality and we think about the rising rates of maternal mortality in this country and ultimately nova's work is really about our human rights bodley autonomy to make our own decisions about our bodies therefore our lives and so that's what reproductive justice is. It's the work it's not political home. It's where i feel whole and complete and those experiences again of growing up. Is that country. Girl and unique county is what really brought me to this work. And i didn't know that there was a movement waiting for me but it was.

North Carolina Wingate Monica Loretta Ross Dr Tony Bond Wasserman Lear Georgia Thomas Bodley
"black church" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

03:36 min | 3 months ago

"black church" Discussed on Houston Matters

"We started with an almost attempted coup in twenty twenty one. It's only natural. That chucky would be out on the loose now so like this is just part impartial. Four would is going on in two thousand twenty one. Thank you for all those people who thought we were going to be better off than twenty twenty panel fort worth residents spending more time than usual birdwatching since the pandemic began have taken greater notice lately of some birds that are eye catching social and well occasionally drunk as rachel richter from the texas department of parks and wildlife told wfan dallas this week cedar waxwings predominantly berries. And sometimes those berries are quote a little past their prime as in fermented. And just like you or me. Overdoing it with a bottle of chardonnay. The birds become intoxicated disoriented act uncoordinated and crash into windows. Don't drink and fly kids. Richter says this happens every year but north texas residents may just have started noticing it more over the last year fort worth residents buzzing about. We'll buzzed birds. Is this good better. Ugly lewis this ugly and sad i mean. Have you seen these birds. They're waddling in the air. They're they're disoriented. They're flocking water. Burger three a. You know it's not really a pretty slight. They try to be nice to each other. But you know if a fellow wax is like hunched over a branch the the wings. They can't hold back their plumage to kind of give him a hand there as their regretting that lasts berry that they had but the the story points out that they're they're all over abundant amount of droppings. Maybe a little bird. Pugh is the biggest concern with the the drunk waxwings there. At least they're not mean drunks right. Although maybe maybe leave the angry birds folks can take that his inspiration and the next angry birds movie can have them going to meeting jose cuervo. Who's a mexican raven of course and they can learn this lesson about you know moderation waxwings. Call your agent. I guess on that last. While all right natalie i think for i think it's hilarious and sad all at the same time. Which is a conundrum sad. Because they are the running into windows stumbling around but again it's twenty twenty one. It.

jose cuervo north texas this week angry birds last year Four Richter texas two thousand natalie mexican rachel richter twenty one twenty twenty three twenty twenty one
Rodeo Houston 2021 has officially been canceled because of COVID

Houston Matters

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Rodeo Houston 2021 has officially been canceled because of COVID

"Organizers announced the cancellation of the twenty twenty. One houston rodeo. It's the second straight year. The signature houston event has had to shut down due to the pandemic rodeo houston had pushed the event back two months in the hopes of pulling it off in may but ultimately as rodeo ceo chris bowman explained the current health situation had not improved to the degree necessary to host the event no rodeo again due to the pandemic again. Is this good bad or ugly. Natalie arsenault start us off so i think it's bad and sad at the same time. Not because they've shut it down that good because we haven't improved i numbers necessarily and we have new strains out there and things of that nature but i'm just wondering if they're away like the nba is figuring out how to do things virtually of these. Can't we like set up a baby. Lamb ham or something and people can pay and then we can still scholarships and it would be great. I just think we need to find a happy middle ground somewhere using digital technology.

Houston Chris Bowman Natalie Arsenault NBA
Federal conspiracy charges for 2 Proud Boys from New York in Washington, DC riot

On The Media

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Federal conspiracy charges for 2 Proud Boys from New York in Washington, DC riot

"Men identified his members of the proud boys have been indicted on additional federal charges in the January 6th capital Riot, Dominick Pezzulo and William Peep, were arrested earlier this month. On charges including illegally entering a restricted building. Friday's updated indictment now includes conspiracy Shortly before the Capitol riot, the proud boys leader, Enrique Toria, was arrested in Washington in order to stay out of the city after being accused vandalizing of black lives matter Banner. At a historic black church.

Dominick Pezzulo William Peep Enrique Toria Washington
2 New York Proud Boys charged in Capitol riot

On Being

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

2 New York Proud Boys charged in Capitol riot

"York men, identified as members of the proud boys have been indicted on additional federal charges in the January 6th capital Riot, Dominick Pezzulo and William People were arrested earlier this month and charges including illegally entering a restricted building. Friday's indictment now includes conspiracy Shortly before the Capitol riot, the proud Boys leader, Henry Enrique Torrio, was arrested in Washington. And ordered to stay out of the city after being accused of vandalizing a black lives matter Banner at a historic black church in December.

Dominick Pezzulo William People Henry Enrique Torrio York Washington
Washington Braces for a Proud Boy Invasion as Trump’s Loss Is Made Official

Mark Mason

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Washington Braces for a Proud Boy Invasion as Trump’s Loss Is Made Official

"Meets to certify the electoral results for Joe Biden's presidential victory. But some Republicans are joining the president's call to object, and the president is also said to attend a rally in Washington, D. C. It follows the arrest of the old right group, the proud boys Monday around boys leader Enrique Terrio is accused of burning a black lives matter. Banner Tauron from a historic black church in downtown Washington during December protests, Metro police say they found Terrio had to high capacity firearms magazines and so Added. Weapons charges. D C police chief Robert Conte's saying the National Guard will help this week with crowd control that will allow for the police officers to focus on anyone who's intent on instigating, agitating or participating in violence in our city. Anyone with guns will be arrested, says the chief. Chuck's. Iverson.

D. C. Enrique Terrio Banner Tauron Joe Biden Terrio Washington Robert Conte Metro Police National Guard Chuck Iverson
Trump Supporters To Converge On Washington DC To Protest Election Results

Morning Edition

03:31 min | 4 months ago

Trump Supporters To Converge On Washington DC To Protest Election Results

"Far right groups and supporters of the departing president Trump are converging in Washington, D C to protest the results of the free and fair election. Makayla LeFrak of member station W. A. M. You reports This is the third time in less than two months that proud boys another far right. Activists rally in D. C. The protesters have a permit from the National Park Service to gather at the Lincoln Memorial and applause in near the White House. City officials are prepared for the crowds to spread throughout downtown D. C. Mayor Mariel Bowser recognized their right to protest but urged Washingtonians who might disagree to stay away. We're asking D C residents and people who live in the region to avoid confrontations with anybody who's looking for a fight. On the best way to do that is to avoid the area. DC's most prominent resident president Trump Tweeted that he will be at tomorrow's rally. Trump support of the protesters and unfounded claims of voter fraud. Have DC leaders concerned that this week's crowds will be large. 1000 has called in the National Guard to assist with crowd control this week. We will not allow people to incite violence intimidate our residents. Or caused destruction in our city. Violence broke out during both of the previous proud boys protests in December more than 30. People were arrested and eight police officers were injured. Demonstrators also damaged property at four black churches and burn to black lives matter. Banner Yesterday D. C. Police arrested Proud Boys leader and wreak a tar eo on charges of destruction of property as he returned to Washington D. C for this week's rallies. Counter protesters were involved in the clashes last month. But Bowser says the out of town demonstrators at the past pro trump rallies came here looking for a fight. This is serious business. The will of American people through a fair and just election is being questioned in violence is being incited. The city has shut down a number of downtown streets for the next two days. Some businesses are also temporarily shuttering, including the hotel and bar that was a gathering place for proud boys. During the last rallies. During the December protests, four people were stabbed. Nearby. Police chief Robert Conti is trying to drive home one message to people coming into the city to protest firearms. Are not permitted. Repeat firearms are not permitted. Conte says he's been made aware of some protesters plans to bring guns into the city. Even with a concealed carry license. It's illegal to bring a firearm within 1000 ft of any permitted demonstration or areas under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service, like the National Mall. Conti is also concerned about the Corona virus pandemic. Unlike this summer's racial justice protesters, many of the far right activists have not worn masks while demonstrating in D. C. They're going to be a lot of people here. We certainly anticipate that on when we have a lot of people that are in our city, the chances for people to get us sick, namely My officers and other residents. We just want to be very careful with that again. Despite the health concerns, Bowser says police won't be focused on arresting people who violate the city's mask ordinance. She says officers main priority over the next two days is to curb violence and property destruction and keep people out of immediate danger.

President Trump Makayla Lefrak W. A. M. D. C. Mayor Mariel Bowser Trump Tweeted National Park Service D. C. Police Lincoln Memorial Washington Robert Conti White House National Guard Bowser DC Conte National Mall Conti
Proud Boys leader arrested in Washington, D.C.

Morning Edition

00:13 sec | 4 months ago

Proud Boys leader arrested in Washington, D.C.

"D. C have arrested the leader of the proud boys. A far right group, Enrique Tardio has been charged with two weapons offenses and the burning of a black lives matter. Banner removed from historic Black Church in D. C.

Enrique Tardio Historic Black Church
Proud Boys leader arrested in Washington, D.C.

AP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Proud Boys leader arrested in Washington, D.C.

"Supports President Trump is arrested. The leader of the proud boys was arrested in Washington, D. C Monday as he arrived ahead of protests planned by supporters of President Donald Trump. 36 year old Henry Enrica. Torrio was taken into custody after reward was issued for his arrest for destruction of property. Torrio is accused of burning of black lives matter banner that was torn down from the historic Black Church in downtown Washington last month. Dario told the Washington Post he had participated in the burning and said he would plead guilty to destruction of property and paid the cost of the banner. Mike Rossi, a

Torrio President Trump President Donald Trump Henry Enrica Washington Black Church Dario The Washington Post Mike Rossi
Proud Boys leader arrested, accused of burning church banner

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Proud Boys leader arrested, accused of burning church banner

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the problem boys leader has been arrested the leader of the proud boys was arrested in Washington DC Monday as he arrived ahead of protests planned by supporters of president Donald Trump thirty six year old Henry and wreak a toria was taken into custody after a warrant was issued for his arrest for destruction of property Torio is accused of burning a black lives matter banner that was torn down from historic black church in downtown Washington last month Torio told The Washington Post he had participated in the burning and said he would plead guilty to destruction of property and pay the cost of the banner Mike Rossi Washington

Mike Rossi Torio Toria Washington Dc Donald Trump Henry The Washington Post Washington
D.C prepares for Trump supporters protests against Congress certifying Biden victory

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

D.C prepares for Trump supporters protests against Congress certifying Biden victory

"The city is getting ready for die hard supporters of President Trump to protest the count of electoral college votes on Wednesday. DC Mayor Muriel Bowser says officials are working together to protect residents and businesses and to keep the protests peaceful. She also wants people to stay out of downtown streets on Tuesday and Wednesday. Supporters of President Donald Trump are coming to D. C to rally in protest. As Congress votes to affirm President elect Joe Biden's victory. Police are already posting signs downtown, reminding everyone that no fireworks are permitted as we're United Methodist Church told wt O p that they have asked for more help from D C police during the protests. The church is one of two historically black churches that have black lives matter. Banners burned by members of the proud boys last month. Valerie Bonked w T. O P NEWS.

President Trump Mayor Muriel Bowser President Donald Trump President Elect Joe Biden DC Congress United Methodist Church Valerie Bonked
Maine Man Arrested For Trying To Burn Down Springfield Church Three Times

WBZ Afternoon News

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Maine Man Arrested For Trying To Burn Down Springfield Church Three Times

"In connection with several attempts to burn down a black church in Springfield last month. You should cut Dusko vulture of of Holst in Maine, is facing several charges, including attempted arson of the Martin Luther King Presbyterian Church. Culture of is being held on bail and will be arraigned Monday morning in Pittsfield District Court Coming

Dusko Holst Martin Luther King Presbyteria Springfield Maine Pittsfield District Court
Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

All Things Considered

04:05 min | 4 months ago

Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

"The American public is hesitant to get a covert 19 vex. That number goes up to a third of Black Americans, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation poll last month. Hesitancy is rooted in real mistreatment and fanned by myths and misinformation, as NPR's Ping Wang reports some black doctors or finding creative ways to encourage vaccine acceptance. Well, very few vaccine safety problems have been reported. A lot of rumors are still floating online doctor Krista Marie Coleman has been tackling Cove admits on Tic Tac. She's the family physician in Orlando, and she describes one of the recent short video she made to counter misinformation. So yeah, so with the video I I'm using a trending song that people can relate to and as we can here with the song, it says, no, That's not true. So I say the covert vaccine will make you infertile, and I say that's not true. She posted the top second video in early December, and it's been viewed more than half a million times. And then I do a dance at the end, which people can relate to as well. A recent study published in the annals of Internal Medicine, like that public Health Message is geared at communities of color. Learn. It showed that black Americans are more receptive to information. If it comes from black doctors like Coleman. For some people, it means a lot when it comes from someone who looks like them. When it comes from someone who speaks like them. But only 5% of physicians in the U. S are black. Robert Drummond is another black doctor that's turned to social media to share accurate information. More broadly, he's an urgent care physician in Los Angeles, and in a recent Instagram live chat, he noted another big reason why people are wary of covert vaccines. With TV actor Dondre Whitfield's first Let me start by acknowledging the mistrust and acknowledging and understanding that there actually is a very real basis for that mistrust Well, said this deep distrust because that to the history of medical experimentation on slaves. It also goes back to the mid 19 hundreds when black men were deliberately not treated for syphilis. So researchers could see what would happen and it comes up to the present day. Just last week, a black doctor named Susan Moore died from covert 19 after alleging poor treatment at the hospital. When she asked for more pain medication, she said her white doctor made her feel like a drug addict. In the Instagram chat. Drummond pointed to a survey a couple years ago showing that a lot of doctors still wrongly believe that African Americans have a higher tolerance for pain. Everything from the top. We have thicker skin than two. We have a reduced we haven't heightened pain threshold so we don't need as much medication. This thing This is not from 19 hundreds. This is right in the 19 sixties. This is from the lake to thousands right now. As a black man, his part of the medical establishment, Drummond says his job is not to tell people to get vaccines. And said he wants to help people make their own informed decisions. But not everyone lives online. Alison Matthews, a sociologist at Wake Forest University, is researching how to increase trust in covert vaccines. In addition to the Internet, we've used conference wines as well, Azaz Mailed stuff out to people. You have to meet people where they are, in whatever level of communication is the most convenient for them. Matthew says that beyond black doctors, there are other community leaders that are trusted for advice. She works with black church leaders and sororities and civil rights groups. To generating trust in the health system is not a new challenge in the black community, says Dr Lisa Cooper, who directs the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity. Even before Cove, it 19 came up. A lot of the work that I did to try to address disparities in health care was focused on Having African Americans and people who are traditionally not given the sense of power and control in their healthcare play a more active role. For Cooper. The challenge is not just about overcoming vaccine hesitancy. It's for the medical community to learn how to build real trust. Ping

Ping Wang Krista Marie Coleman Robert Drummond Dondre Whitfield Kaiser Family Foundation Susan Moore NPR Drummond Orlando Coleman U. Alison Matthews Syphilis Los Angeles Wake Forest University Dr Lisa Cooper Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Matthew Cooper
Historic Black church in Washington DC sees opportunity in the burning of Black Lives Matter signs

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Historic Black church in Washington DC sees opportunity in the burning of Black Lives Matter signs

"Black churches being targeted by violent protests and the proud boys group last weekend continues, But some folks don't want to focus on the burning of black lives matter. Signs Metropolitan are resilient and faithful. Reverend William Lamar, pastor of the Metropolitan A. M. E Church of D. C. Appearing on attorney General Karl Racine is virtual Take 30 program. We do not want this to be about a sign coming down, Lamar says. His parishioners see the attack on their church as an opportunity. Their vigilance is we want a clear message sent to the city, the nation in the world. About the work that we do working in the world for Social justice to help set free people held captive by poverty. Christi KING W. T O P News New York City's police

Reverend William Lamar Metropolitan A. M. E Church Of Karl Racine Lamar Christi King W. T New York City
"black church" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:01 min | 5 months ago

"black church" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"2014 the book too divided mind of the Black Church. This is this. Common Is Pritchard on their war, or Nick? On public witness were not praised Marxism as a way to teach the black church on criticized Gary Marx, whom or not described as a scholar who operates from within the theoretical framework. Of his famous namesake for trivializing Black struggle struggle against Ah obduracy of white, capitalistic forces. Man, That's that's how come he's talk. That says Here's an excerpt from the book. This guy Loves To Be sure this this this coming running for Senate in Georgia, to be sure, the Marx's critique has much to teach the black Church. Indeed, it has played an important role in the match. And this is the guy that's the pastor. At the same church that Martin Luther King was the pastor. That's out, things have been flipped 1 80 maturation of black theology as an intellectual discipline deep in black theologies apprehension. Of the interconnectivity of racial and class oppression and provided critical tools for a black church that has yet to awaken to a substantive third world consciousness. What? What does all that mean? Lewis? This is gibberish. Gary Marx Analysis. There's a book by Gary Marx Analysis is flawed by paternalistic, pious with respect to faith, culture and experience that trivializes black struggle. Trivializes black struggle against the obduracy and what Capitalistic forces and lumps, all forms of black denominational and sectarian identity together and an undifferentiated way That hardly makes it possible for those who are its subjects to see themselves in discussion. Now, have your eyes glazed over. Have your eyes glazed over this whole gibberish. Share this What you call Kami Speak pseudo intellectual, Comey speak. Is Nothing more than the blunt instrument of racism used to bring about a Communist revolution in America. That's straight up yet more helium.

Black Church Gary Marx Kami Speak Martin Luther King Pritchard Nick Senate America Lewis Georgia
DC police investigate after BLM sign torn, banner torched at historic Black churches after pro-Trump rallies

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

DC police investigate after BLM sign torn, banner torched at historic Black churches after pro-Trump rallies

"Vandals hit black churches during some pro trump rallies in Washington over the weekend. Vandals tore down the Black lives matter Banner and assigned from two historic black churches in downtown Washington and set the banner of blazes. Nighttime clashes over the weekend between pro Donald Trump supporters and counter demonstrators erupted into violence and arrests. Police say they were investigating the incidents at the Asper United Methodist Church and Metropolitan A. M E Church as potential hate crimes. Video posted on Twitter showed a group of men appearing to take down a be a limb. Sign it one church. Another video showed people pouring an accelerant on a BLM banner and setting it ablaze in the street. The incidents followed weekend rallies in support of President Donald Trump, which led to dozens of arrests, several stabbings and injuries to police officers.

Washington Asper United Methodist Church Donald Trump Twitter BLM President Donald Trump
Washington DC police seeking church vandals after weekend clashes

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Washington DC police seeking church vandals after weekend clashes

"Vandals hit black churches during some pro trump rallies in Washington over the weekend. Vandals tore down the Black lives matter Banner and assigned from two historic black churches in downtown Washington and set the banner of blazes. Nighttime clashes over the weekend between pro Donald Trump supporters and counter demonstrators erupted into violence and arrests. Police say they were investigating the incidents at the Asper United Methodist Church and Metropolitan A. M E Church as potential hate crimes. Video posted on Twitter showed a group of men appearing to take down a be a limb sign it one church. Another video showed people pouring an accelerant on the BLM banner and setting it ablaze in the street. The incidents followed weekend rallies in support of President Donald Trump, which led to dozens of arrests, several stabbings and injuries to police officers.

Washington Asper United Methodist Church Donald Trump Twitter BLM President Donald Trump
"black church" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"black church" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"My church bigger problems and the one that'd be something sexual alison for the Choir Director. Brian carvers and nobody wanted to address that and and they just I think has to go to the church That create greater problems. I knew a lot of people in churches would catch. Std's getting pregnant because they refused because they only talk ads instead of giving people practical advice right Table Form Addiction. And everything like that. All Archbishop Vices listened weapon up right. It's obvious you're going to do. Why key spitting out two three four kids not Mary not three kids by three different fathers or your father with with multiple kids is. We're where's responsible of church? We've talked before about the institution that was our institutions This invisible uneven quote visit is to. That's all we have. We didn't have the boy scouts. We didn't have all these other thing is in euros. Clench excluded kicked out. I read an article that said the beaches of Connecticut segregated two thousand seven five. We repeat kept out of Seoul places in space. So is the Black Church. That's all we have is. It are responsible at that time they will and in this city. I certainly was responsibility that time to do more and I don't think it's changed. I think it's still a responsibility to do more and I think it. Has You raise? Of course early both will rally. I think not only raise the issues morality. treating people right how to live in this world how to survive. I honor is being a captain. Have been a captain in the Waterbury police departments. That's not something that many of us ever gets a chance to do the look and say oh. There's a cap honnor but what he did he canes me move this way worked as whipped ranks and part of the pods racism. Discrimination some of it. Sometimes it's ourselves. We prepared ourselves. You talk about how you had to drive from Waterbury to go to the university off in West Hartford to take classes for preparations as party of professionalism and I don't think there's sometimes people are aware of the price it has to be paid. The men who I call my pass economist. Carlota he would say a shallow Baptist church like a car would say you never know the goals that you will achieve until you reach for them and he said you gotta you gotTa Sheep Stars and we'll be honest stars and then focal told you could make a look back and laugh at him and he will tell us when he was saying a minute. You have recognized that your blackness in many ways the dominant society is a liability as you can turn it into a positive. They'll let you blackness. Keep you from doing anything. You does straight teaching. Do you think that many today's still suffer from some type of already complex while the Blackhawks? I don't know if I would call an injury. Arctic Communist thing there are black will suffer from maybe is the word I think the medium suffering from a lack of self esteem that that glowing to certain schools in certain situations. They don't know that they can achieve me for an example. I never had white classmates. And within the ninth grade and had a white teacher until I was in the ninth. Where he because all of my education some kindergart- do what they now call middle school. We call the gene. Hustle was segregated. I went to black schools. I have black black teacher. I had administrators back educators. So when I got the high school that was my first opportunity of being taught by a white person it was. That was different for me. I still remember my great. Isn't she missed the born and he was He was he was he was scared seeing. Although all and my school was changing it was on when I got to my school it was sixty five percent white and thirty five percent black largely Jewish and by the time I graduated was about fifty five percent. Black forty five percent white. Yes so so I think that. That's that's really important in just going forward. How does the Church even That there's a decline in membership amongst all church. The most major religion St- one of the fastest growing loss visa can call his atheism visit demand. The church remained rather and I don't mean just relevant spiritual although that support some people taking coaching particularly with the Black Church if the Black Church loses this institution if we can we can do to politics the Democratic Party. We welcome to the party not not a so. So where do we go? Lisa for space That we can have an institutional foundation of Fan Flint's of you while you name them. I think that what has happened largely the Black Church. In my opinion is that an even other ethnicities as well as that. You raise the question of relevancy. They failed to connect to concerns of people. Today when people talk about millennials millennials. Many never been raised in the church. And so how do I connect with the Millennium to say okay? Look you went to school. You Got Two. Parents have a bunch of college debt. Student loans Trying to raise kids trying to have a house trying to buy car how do I say allchurch welcomes you? And what can we do to assist you? Can we do educational training programs on finances? Can we do planning purchasing homes? Can we do planning on getting your kids ready for school showing off the daycare services? What do we do you grew up? Your parents. Grants now are at an age where they need caregivers. How can we help you as a church? Can we offer giving services one a week? Where whoever does this stuff with them won't Bringing trance to church flew to three hours on Saturday. When you can get your hair clip you get your hair done. And maybe willing taking do their hair. I don't think we're we're doing enough to say the people that we can help you if people get tired of Hellfire rooms on heaven. How can work is not working? And I think that's one of the things that has helped the nation. Islam works in the prison system. The emails will come out with. Watch them watch the other brothers who were needed to do and the imams will come. They will say man. Don't you the our loves you your child of God? You have transient community Da. Da Da da Raza al-mannah gods and let's go back and clean out to reason on the other hand. The weather's Jersey.

Black Church Waterbury Baptist church Brian carvers Connecticut Choir Director alison Seoul Mary Blackhawks middle school West Hartford Democratic Party Lisa Fan Flint
"black church" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

Black History in Two Minutes

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"black church" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

"Christianity and slavery were long intertwined. While, masters believe that their religion can be used to pacify their slaves. african-americans transformed Christianity and created a new culture that would serve as the foundation of their freedom struggle. The oldest independent African American denomination is the African methodist. Episcopal church founded in Philadelphia in Seventeen, ninety, four Richard, Alan the formerly enslaved black man who purchased his own freedom. Black religious leaders such as Reverend Alan. Took a strong abolitionist dance, even helping slaves escape through the underground railroad. During the civil war some served as army chaplains, and once the war ended many mobilized black political participation, some even helped public office. The Black Church provided leadership opportunities for men and women who, by and large, were in subservient positions in the workforce until all of these preachers doing work in the black, church have been critical to giving by people space to envision a different world as possible in. The late eighteen hundred saw dramatic proliferation of black churches. And the church remained central to black life through the twentieth century, particularly at the height of the civil rights movement. In the nineteen sixties, church is playing a much more overtly militant and political role in terms of trying to organize people to defeat Jim Crow End Racism, and also to promote economic equality. The tradition of black religious leaders, shepherding the Freedom Struggle Reached its pinnacle. The Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Junior. Dr King fused religion, nonviolent resistance and the Prophetic tradition to challenge. Jim Crow. Wall invoking the musical legacy of the spirituals that enslaved African Americans had created. A today the black. Church remains fundamentally important institution in the black community. The black, church has had to be everything to black people because American society was unwilling to do so. Today. We don't need the church to do the same things for a split. Do I think the church is still relevant institution absolutely. It is the place that you can common. Rebuild Your spirit after you deal with spiritual assault on black life that many African Americans experience because of enduring histories of racism discrimination..

Black Church Reverend Alan Jim Crow African methodist african-americans Dr King Philadelphia Dr Martin Luther assault Richard
"black church" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"black church" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"And and use us for our context but white progresses have got to ask what who serves the Black Community. Who's done it? Largely coup mobilizes the largest volunteer base in black communities. So it's not just that we gather it's just the one dimensional for for hundreds of years. When it was illegal we would go down our ancestors. I just preached about this. Recently they would go down and sneak up for meetings under the bushes. They break branches. You know which way to go for these secret meetings because it was illegal to pray because a slave on his stock and you got good legend religion. You would think that you were equal and you might wanna eat at their table. You might want to marry their daughters Hell you might want about property next door to them. So they brand was to substantiate or justify slavery because it was a it was a mechanism evangelism then when she evangelized your crew thought jeeze if we christianized him if we baptize them we can give them communion. These foods are going to think that they wanted us and they didn't believe in integrated Earth or integrated heaven so they didn't give a crap so they so they legalize prayer gatherings so slaves actually beat for praying but you know in the nineteen forties. My Grandmother Contracted Tuberculosis and four. Kids never married the church community in southeast Missouri issue would call it a town called Haitai. It probably was named up to Haiti but a spelled H. A. Y. T. I was called Haitai When she got married in one to find work in Chicago the church to her four kids at my grandmother loved Shuki. My mother would take case she'd go to jail over kids. In fact her first church gathering does he wasn't a church going lady. She had a knife an ice pick and a forty five in a purse. And what they care for her children while she established Chicago she came out of children in the church. Wasn't just what we went off the timbering. It's where you would be a boy or any All we put on a suit on Sunday new a superintendent. That's in your prayer meeting. You got to preach. Perhaps you've got to sing and put into talk. So the church is more to us than just A descendant of A European structure that dominated people took land and and was in cahoots with with with Rome. That's not the way to Black Church road. It was it was social service. It was empowerment centers. Training Century was the whole village that supported a child. It was all of that and for those of us who feel a call into ministry bucket was my colleagues who African American. That's still a mindset. This is what we come to the people and get money. Here's what people come to get a sense of hope in times like these happen and we're just beside ourselves because we can't and I'm finding ways to do so electrically so if there are if there are folks like myself who are who are who are white progressives who want to be allies. What are the best ways that we can support people our community who are not in that position of privilege like as you're looking at for instance your context and the people you know in Madison Wisconsin? What are you most need from them right now? Those who are operating out of more privileged context for progressives. I say I would say talk to your friends. Who are part of the community and I mean to geographical community for example people wanting to know what can we do in the black community? Reach out to your friends. Were part of the black community. Didn't said hey what organizations supporting who's helping in your community or what are the kind of organizations we should support against something somewhere if you don't know exactly where to go You help your gets are GONNA help anyway. But he is in. You need cross cultural relationships across class relationships to say if you're in this community where would you give money and you can make a difference anywhere in the country so if you don't know the communities there you might know the community someplace else and say? I know that they help their community and will need to be strong for their community. So I want to support Vince. You just WanNa take making a difference. Of course you want to do it at home because that's where it matters so much but really at this time people just wanted be generous and compassionate and to know in their hearts that they're helping someone in need or helping those who can help someone in need so that they're able to sleep at night. That's great and I would. I would note with a with the conversations that are happening in our government. Right now about sending Americans checks. We could be talking about one to four thousand dollars for a family I think it's important for those of us who are in a position of economic privilege to take A large portion of what we receive and give it to those who have so little for whom a thousand dollars is not going to help them get their get their heads completely above water right right. That'd be that'd be so helpful. Just like the government's in a position to help those folks. We have to look at those who got smaller amounts of didn't get anything. It's sort of the concept of paint afford. I'm working on peace right now about. Are we going to be a more generous caring community after this? What's what are we learning? What's being Adjusted what what can be. The positive outcome Berar appeal. And it's got to be feel more connected to our fellow human because right now we really really don't in it's odd that it is in social isolation. They're thinking how how how disenfranchised our society is because we have not down to others and we're not aware of each other's needs as well. Thank you so much To my listeners. I'll be putting a link to Both to ALEX'S CHURCH INTO A couple of worthy ministries here in Maine that you can donate to that fit. That's I hope you do that. And certainly I'll be making a donation As well so. I hope you'll all join me in that. Dr G. Thank you so much for coming on and talking with us this morning and sharing your experience all right I appreciate you bringing me into conversations like these and I appreciate the friendship with development so please keep talking and a stand touch indeed. Thanks a lot. She'll be safe..

Black Community Haitai Chicago Black Church Haiti Missouri Rome superintendent Tuberculosis Madison Wisconsin Maine Dr G. Vince social isolation Shuki
"black church" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"black church" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"That he's going to reach out to black voters he said he will advertise in black publication to engage with cultural institutions like the black church black fraternities sororities and historically black colleges I can't wait I can't wait can't wait to see Joe Biden the black church in the front row just the clapping off beat all read that I can't wait to see Joe Biden get behind the pulpit like other great Democrats that would be for him to start preaching and blacks creek I can't wait the bad news it buys is I have a long record the good news is I have a long record he said that I would you use that says the question above about his in during support among black voters if the people know me at least they think they tell me I think after all this time I think they have a sense of what my character is who hi am for you all back in shape I have never ever ever in my entire life been in a circumstance where I've ever felt uncomfortable being in the black community in the eighties he suggests that his familiarity with that matched by many of his competitors I'm comfortable around white people but then we talk about Bernie Sanders are you talking about senator spreading bull who said she was a native American and we talk about booty gig did not count bow round black folks like I am one of them black folks they're not see is by so he's going to turn hard he's going to run towards the black community he may even end up on the breakfast club and I'm not mad at the breakfast club I'm not mad at them at all they are one of the the bastions of black this you have to get to them in order to be accepted by the black community I spent last summer going through the black sections of my town holding rallies in parks trying to get black men to understand is not on mainly to wear a condom Joe Biden it is not o'malley I would do a blank is section the town now one is my little brown brothers to understand that is not on man late for you to wear a condom what in the hell was he getting at with that you know what I'm gonna go ahead and call the ball on this one for him to go into the booth I went to the black it's parts of town the try to tell my my black brothers that is not on man way for you to wear a condom Joe Biden he is a he's pivoting into a the race I see a racism is is is is institutional man is systemic is that the where we like Ross is systemic it is the white man's problem we are here to help or a little brown brothers and sisters to do better even though Democrats of many charges the blue states billing charges on blue cities some of the worst hell holes in America are controlled by Democrats but all of a sudden Joe by wants you to believe they can make life better for you notice he didn't say you know three words jobs J. O. B. if you think the it is a that he said he could help out the black folks by trying to convince them that is mainly to wear condoms last minute economic plan just lucky to tackle the number one and John facing the middle class and it happens to be a rock were John zero by all right arm leaves you alone we'll see yesterday I was so compassion for Joe but then he's does stuff like this dharma pivoting in the you know trying to play the race card and it just well then we we know how to push back on that I want to talk to you about some of the other twenty twenty candidates not just on the left side of the aisle we're also going to talk about Joe Walsh because he told while she the never try pretty is a radio talk show host he lost his radio show both of his fans are his listeners are pro trump but he's wanted never trouble board never Trumper has jumpers have done so much damage to their institutions it's it's it's quite amazing but when we talk about trump the range been central it doesn't just happen reside on the left side of the aisle in Joe Walsh he says some courageous eat things over the last forty eight hours he has made some crazy admissions he has gone on too liberal shells thinking that because he the never Tropper he's gonna try to primary trump he's going to get the love and adoration from the left wrong wrong and I think that his time is going to be very very short lived as well no one has risen from the ashes but just like old we wanna was it your just like Gilda told obi wan in the empire strikes back there is another now tell you what names being whispered out.

black church forty eight hours
"black church" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"black church" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"A headline mainstream. It's not it's not news. When when the suffering of black people is not news the mainstream America, and that's why the black presses important both for newspapers online social media. So proud that the national association of from Alabama's right? We do have to innovate. We have the message. But how we transmit semester until I'm lineal for listen, we need our young people. To also stay in touch. That's why there's radio program important intergenerational. We have no matter what you. Involving struggle for freedom just revving again about fifteen seconds or so fall. Nothing. Nothing about the black church. Burnings? Okay. Well, there you go. They have at one eight six six five nine four one eight six six five nine four four six seven three. What do you think about that should the president speak out about these black church? Burnings? We have a history of these black church burnings they've been used to intimidate my goodness for more than one hundred years. Fleiss talk about this. What do you think about these black church? Burnings? Are you surprised that many of you have not heard about it? Let's talk about it. Your opinion counts. One eight six six five nine four hope. One eight six six five nine four four six seven three. University.

black church America Alabama president Fleiss one hundred years fifteen seconds
"black church" Discussed on Are You Real

Are You Real

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"black church" Discussed on Are You Real

"Them and christ in them and they tell you those stories it's pretty difficult to say i'm sorry that's not valid or do you realize that my experience as a white guy in the world is not universal that's not how everybody experiences the world it really opens your eyes and also when we see that the things that i think are normal meaning going back to church the way that i worship the way that things work in the churches that i go to those are often things that that white culture came up with and there's nothing wrong with them in and of themselves but we often see the way we do things is the norm and then the way things the other people do things well that's a very asian on the norm so you think about theology and what's called what's known as black theology so we often think of like well here's regular theology and a variation on that is black theology but readily i didn't even know that was the thing yeah well people when you have again when you have a different walk of life you're going to see things through a different lens and so some things in scripture are going to jump out at you that may not jump out to other people and so you know again we if we see that there's this what we think is going to quote normal theology the default theology and then over here as a variation on that is black theology i think what we don't realize is that thing that we call theology normal theologies is the algae that was developed by white people most of the time and again i don't think there's anything wrong with that but we can't call it the wholeness the fullness of what what it is to to follow christ and we also can't say that the theology developed by the black church is not regular not normal or not real theology if that makes sense i feel i often when we get in deep into these conversations i feel ill equipped a lot of.

black church
"black church" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 4 years ago

"black church" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stand against the wind the winds yes to stand against the winds of southern apart day sustained against the wins how do i describe i grew up in the heart of southern aparthied and i'm not saying that i didn't realize that existed but our parents were spiritual geniuses who created a were world the language where the notion that i was in adequate in inferior or less than never touched by consciousness i grew up believing that i was a first class human being in the first class person in our parents were spiritual geniuses who were able to shape of kurmuk culture of religion black folk religion that raise so swim dispose ability to being eastcentral players in society and also tireless something serene about love i love every by the i love everybody i love everybody in my heart and so hey was that anything allow vocabulary i hate was not in a row kavulich absolutely not but you you do make this really important distinction between black folk religion which is what which is what nourish you which is what formed you and the black church and black preacher's which are in the picture but which is mostly what we've seen as the picture and any you know you say in one place it that the heart of the southern freedom movement it wasn't as much black preacher says it was black congregations ordinary people who participated in extraordinary things on this foundation that you're describing well first of all black folk religion grew up in the bush sharp ras on plantations in those we are you these are these two were in old buildings there were there was not an institutionalised jury was like outdoors sanctuary gerets secret media's yes it was a gathering spot for the community it was in this serving the black people begin to talk about god in this society were they were enslaved so it was not in every bite i participated the spirituals came up out of this environment in everyone has a voice in the conversation so it was.

black church
"black church" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"black church" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"She said none of us consider ourselves to be religious in the way our parents or grandparents are and there was a lot of religion but we were rejecting so much of what we grown up with we didn't think that defined as and we only realize later that even though that was true we were steeped in that tradition in the hole in the sense of love in the songs in the community we had our armor on and she said and then then we became involved in policy and we sent our children out into the empire without their armor on and i'd love to know how you hear that and think about it i love that ad i love that she said the i think we think about it differently i mean to be honest with you so many of us in the black lives matter movement have either been pushed out of the church because many of us are queer and out um many of us at the church has become a very patriarchal for us as women and so that's not necessarily where we have found are solace and i think we have had to contend with that during this movement how do we relate to the black church and how do we understand ourselves a relationship to the black church inside of this movement on but that doesn't the hasn't stopped us from being deeply spiritual in this work and i think for us that looks like healing justice work.

black church
"black church" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:49 min | 4 years ago

"black church" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Blacks behind bars and the acid don't wife's get drunk and he hit oh yeah but in this we give preference to blacks i mean that was that was the racism in my home town i was fortunate not been so fortunate in broadcasting public broadcasting to to i did a documentary come marshall texas marshall texted that my hometown about how was divided between black and right and how it finally integrated and that aired on pbs one of my favorite of my documentaries but and in the end of it was this i remember it very clear standing him my stand up outside of black church were we used to go down on wednesday night the young kids sometimes my mother dad would go and we sit outside this black church rolling which seeing these glorious gospel hymns the music live did the burdens of their own hearts and the pain of their own past it was just it was cathartic in so i did my last end up in this ninetyminute documentary by saying that i grew up in this town six blocks from the black lived in awassa in whit to blacks whites glue are six blocks away there was a black screw marsinah why ban six blocks away there was a black man covered the black white football team the while six blocks away her temper to high school the black football team was playing and i said it's possible this goes back to an earlier question that us john marshall was a demonstration of marshall was an example of how you can grow up well tall well churched and well loved and the absolutely unaware of the live experience of people right over there and that kind of division and segregation the story of america is the heart of what we're dealing with the today two major studies one from harvard in one i think from pugh said yes the plight of white unemployed men was a factor in the election yes the state of the globalization is of was a factor in the election yes the failure of our political system which is burn so many whites and blacks was the real cause of the the the outcome of the election was racism and misogyny the the gulf white who rule this country since colonial days well loved well church.

black church awassa marshall america harvard pugh football john marshall ninetyminute