20 Episode results for "Black Children"

461: For Black Children at the End of the Worldand the Beginning

The Slowdown

05:00 min | 3 months ago

461: For Black Children at the End of the Worldand the Beginning

"I'm Tracy Case Smith, and this is the slow down. I'm writing this episode at home while the Voice of my son screams no no. In defiance of some reasonable demand, his father has made. No he won't wash his hands no he won't pick up his toys. No He's not a toddler. He's a child exhausted from shelter in place and social, distancing a child sensing the stress and worry filling the atmosphere during a time of national unrest. He's also just himself naturally defiant like his brother and his sister kids who don't fear authority the way kids did in my day kids who know how to test and sometimes overwhelm their parents authority. Sometimes I think with envy of the way my mom used to be able to tame me with just a glance. But I know that this time my children are living in is different from the time of my childhood. The world is different and maybe kids born into this time twenty-first-century kids require grit and defiance in order to prevail. There is not a day in my life during which I have not looked at my black children and worried. There is not a day in my life when I have not made actual prayers on their behalf simple prayers for their safety simple prayers for their survival. Today's poem is more than a prayer for black children. It is a conjuration meant to fill them with magic power and original fire. For Black Children at the end of the world and beginning. By. Roger Reaves. You're in the black car burning beneath the highway and rising above it not as smoke but what causes it to rise? Hey, black child. You are the fire at the end of your elders weeping fire against the blur. Of Horse huff stick stone several plagues including time. chrysalis hanging on the bow of this night and the burning world burn baby burn. Anvil an iron be thy name yet may though, Ye, may walk among the harnessed heat and the huntsman who bear their Masters Hunger for Paradise in your rabbit death in the beheading of your ghost. You are the healing snake in the heather bursting forth from your humps of sleep. In the morning, your tongue moves along the earth naming Hawk Sky Rabbit run your tongue poison to the filthy democracy to the gold domed capitols were the guard in their grub worm colored uniforms cling to the blades of grass worm on the leaf worm in the dust worm worm made a rust sing it with me dragon of insurmountable beauty. Black child laugh at the men with their hoops and borrowed muscle there long and short guns the worm of their faces, their casket assembling of the afternoon leftover leaves from last year's autumn scraping against their boots. Laugh. Laugh at their assassins roofs for the time of the assassin is also the time of hysterical laughter. Black Child, you are the walking on water without the need of an approving master. You are in a beautiful language. You are what lies beyond this kingdom and the next and the next and fire. Fire Black Child. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the Poetry Foundation.

Black Children Tracy Case Smith Roger Reaves Poetry Foundation
Obama's 2008 Election

Black History in Two Minutes

04:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Obama's 2008 Election

"The. Obama do solemnly swear. Barack Obama's inauguration as president of the United States was a day. Few of US believe we would ever see in our lifetimes. And his success seemed to mark a profound change in the history of America's tortured racial politics. Very. Few people would ever heard of Barack Obama when he gave a keynote speech at the two thousand, four Democratic convention. Remember. Thinking who is this guy? He was so exciting and charismatic and put forward a vision of America that could excite. All of us. Across race. There is not a black America and a white America and Latino America an Asian America. There's the United States of America. Barack Obama who's offering the country who kind of aspirational vision of what it could be it proved to be politically, very, very powerful. Despite the enormous excitement that greeted the speech across the nation. When the first term senator announced his candidacy for president. It struck many as an exceedingly long shot. There was a lot of hesitation in terms of whether or not black candidate could win the presidency and whether or not voting for him would be in effect throwing away a vote. Those presidential campaign focused largely on issues other than race senator. Obama felt compelled to address the subject. After an inflammatory video surfaced quoting as pastor, the Reverend Jeremiah Wright out. Of Context. His presidential prospects in Dire Jeopardy Obama confronted the issue directly with a brilliantly Rod. And deeply personal speech. I can no more disown him than I can disown my white grandmother. A woman who loves me as much as she loves anything. In this world. But a woman who wants confessed her fear of black men who passed her by on the street. I think the fact that Barack Obama had grown up in a household where he did not have firsthand experience with. Relatives were gone through the Litany of horrors that is in the history of black people in this country meant that he had a perspective on race that very few African Americans in this country have we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes. We may not look the same and may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction. Towards a better future for our children and our grandchildren, there were African Americans who said speech and said okay. He understands wilbur coming from and will white people who plus Megyn said he understands that I'm not a racist even for have these ideas that people think unpopular about race. That was the master stroke of that speech. Obama's unifying message resonated with voters across the country. On November fourth two, thousand eight. They elected him the first African American President of the United States of America. We got. The idea that there is a black president that. Black Children. The black people. Can go out and say there's somebody that looks like me and the White House and not just Obama. Michelle Obama their children. That there is a family that looks like me in the White House is huge.

Barack Obama America Michelle Obama United States president Black Children White House senator Rod Jeremiah Wright African American President Megyn wilbur
White Thought Leaders In Personal Development: Where Are You?

JUST DO THE DAMN THING

19:58 min | 6 months ago

White Thought Leaders In Personal Development: Where Are You?

"He said I can't breathe. Listen to me and listen to me clearly. If you watch that. And you say nothing. And you stay silent. I want you to be a hundred percent clear. That you are at the core of the problem. You're not just part of it. You are listening to another episode of just do the Damn thing. Man I'm glad you're here. This is not easy for me. This is so hard. It took me like a moment just to pull myself together because I literally. I literally one hundred percent I said to myself this morning. White people of personal development. Were the hell, are you? Where are you? Upset about a lot of things in my lifetime for sure absolutely, and when you think about building business to getting to the next level, every type of next level or creativity or next layer comes from a place that makes us pissed off. Today I. Find Myself Angry. I watched. Closely and intently at certain social media accounts. At certain people who are supposedly the godfather of personal development, the core of peak performance, the other essence of what it means to do things with ease. Step into the next burgeon of ourselves build businesses. Build ourselves, claim or values tap into spirituality I've watched into everyone who white. At I can't even begin to tell you the disappointment that I felt account after account page after the page and there was radio silence. Having to look at the truth that actual court truth. That, they were silent, but they weren't just silent, but they were silent by choice in that they chose to be silent. I was like really. Because what came to me was the fact. That they stay silent because they can. And you reminded me a hundred percent. I can't. What makes me sick is thinking about how many stages and thousands tens of thousands of people you stood in front of. And you talk and teach about love and and connection, and you teach about frequency energy, and then you walk through the ability to have a strong mindset and look forward and to be strong and to tap into. And, then you talk about the world healing for crying out loud you talking about the world healing. Talk about me healing. You talk about everyone else healing. You Walk Through your own supposed- healing. And then before I blink your offstage. You're somewhere in Africa. Building some schools. For Black Children. And then you show the pictures on your instagram on that page. Where we now all believe that you're great human, you're an awesome flipping human. How the hell you go, go take care of another home. You don't even participate in the home that you and I both live in really. How can you be the core of personal development? But you're not at the forefront of developing the number one problem here in the United States. Or, do you just say to yourself? You know what Tiffany? It's not a problem for me, and it's not a people problem for the people. I serve! At this point? is nothing that I face more in building this business building the brand that I run fighting for the do the dancing nation community than the color of skin? I literally beyond myself trying to process the fact. That you've made a choice to stay silent, but you're still willing to take a dollar from a black person. So. You're willing to fight for me when it hits your bottom line. You're willing to step to the plate when it hits your bottom line, alarm. Sorry, you don't. WanNa get involved. Got It because it's not your husband. That's not your circle of friends. That's the truth. It's not your child. So, it doesn't impact you. That's their problem, right? To anyone can hear my voice right now. I want to make it so clear. You're either part of the problem, or you're part of the solution and you have to make a choice. There is no such thing as the middle. It is the most delusional state ever. You can't sort of do something. You're either doing the damn thing or you're not. Once one hundred percent clear for me. If, I make the same choice of so many other people who look like and I know why they make the choice. They make the choice to stay silent because we're like tiffany. We've gotten to this place in life. We finally got in. We got into that network. We got into the community. We got into that income. We got into that neighborhood whatever it might be. We're now being hired all the time. We have X. amount of clients I'M NOT GONNA. Talk about that stuff going to jeopardize my new or my deep white friendships. It's like so you'd rather protect your friendships. Chance at life. And Wanna I use the word knee. I don't necessarily mean tiffany Lardy. I mean for anyone who looks like me. How can you teach your children or the people that you care about love? And you truly are not fighting for all. Now it'd be one thing if you didn't know, but you're sitting on list right now. You have millions and millions of dollars, hundreds of thousands of followers. You have hundreds of thousands of people on your mailing list. You have their phone numbers. You tax them to tell them about the brand new funnel you created. You'll tax them to talk about the brand new episode of a podcast or your youtube, video? You tax them to tell them. Hey, it's okay I I I know how to help you. Clear your mind in tough times. You'll totally talk about Kogen nineteen. Oh my God. Will you talk about Kobe nineteen? As there are riots around. The death of George Floyd right now at this very moment. There are deaths. There are people in pain. They're not just in pain because of George. Floyd their pain because of what happened to to their friend, brother cousin. Uncle. Last week last year. Last decade. A century ago. That pain runs so deep. And they have to live with that pain and then still fight just to survive. They up to carry that pain. And they have to live it. Do you know what it's like to walk outside and just be afraid because of what you look like. To live. It's crazy scary way to live. You spend a ton of time. With your team creating the perfect launch. You spent a ton of time with your team talking about new products new ways. You want to solve problems. I know because I do the same with might team. But I'll tell you. I spent equally as much time. Talking about the social problems in the US talking about the problems around the world in looking at how to solve them. But the difference between meeting you I'm Oh. It's okay for me to lose followers and I don't have nearly at least at this moment i. don't have the size of platform that you have. But if I am afraid than the people who look up to me Bake State afraid. A I stay afraid of if I don't speak up and get to the front line. And and I want you to be I. Want to be on the same page like don't think for a second that speaking up. Is You putting an instagram post? That says racism is bad. That's not enough. White, the white person who's willing to get angry, the white person who's willing to get angry create their own ad. Take that talk amongst other white people. Be just as enraged as when they hear that story about a woman who dot dot dot, a child who dot dot dot. You have the power you choose not to. And, I don't know why. You have the power to. Choose not to. And it says a lot. You have the power to. And you choose not to. Scares me. I've made a decision for myself. And I've made a decision as of today. because. I won't accept the fact that you're the person that we need to follow. There's no way. If, you're going to be the thought leader in personal development. If you're going to be amongst the top five, top ten and top twenty whatever? And you actually don't have this on your radar. It is not part of the way you're trying to develop. The actual person or people that you serve. Then you can't be the person. That we should be following. There's no way. So I say you go ahead and stay silent. Go ahead and protect your money. I should actually silently say thank you because. Because of you either identified a brand new problem. that. I WANNA solve. Dear White people personal development. And anyone else who claims to lead in love. Where the hell are you? There are so many things that you can actually do. I WanNa see you do something i WanNa see you take action. and. It's not really like take a torch. Fight. 'cause man! Can you imagine what would happen if we all thought together? You imagine what would happen if we all together. Can you imagine if you could have what would happen if you brought your ten million followers and he brought his nineteen million a, she brought her six. P. Or Magin what would happen the same way you cross, promote in list and have JV partnerships if you did the same thing around this issue. It's not okay for you. Tw- ignore me. It's not okay I saved me and I speak on behalf of everybody who looks like me who is facing some version of feeling not enough in the US. Not Feeling Enough and trying to do your best is crazy. It's like an oxymoron all in itself. Not, doing your best is not a result of you not working hard enough. It's like it's Kinda hard to get to the top one. You're constantly being beat down. But forget the cards that you and I both share. We both have life cards. We have things we have people in our family who passed away. We have people in our family were. It's not going so well. We wake up one day and we get bad news. We both have had a tire that has blown. We've got. Maybe we get in a car accident. We find out we have cancer. Those are those are life were going through. But I have a thick layer on top of all of that every single day, and the black man in this country hasn't even thicker layer. People scared of black men for no reason. You know my husband pulled over six times I mean he's been pulled over six times by a police officer and monocle wouldn't even hurt a fly me so harmless in the first two times. I actually didn't even know why. We're being pulled over. My husband did not new. I remember him saying to me silently was like Sh- tippin. Please please please please don't say anything. And it was a very raw moment for me because I, I'm from Miami Florida. We have social economics and I automatically was like. Why are you point US over? I can't believe it this. That third Blah Blah Blah Blah. Blah and Lo and behold lo and behold. He looks at me one last time. Ask The police officers walking to the his side of the car and he's like tiffany. Please stop. And the seriousness of his voice, it really made me. You know I didn't agree with it and I didn't understand by definitely got quite because I was like. Something is happening here and I. Don't understand, but I'm going to trust what he's saying and I. Watch him mechanically. Very different from how I will respond. You know, say hi officer while playing us over level of luck. And the officer was saying complete foolishness. As far as I'm concerned, absolute absurd foolishness, it was complete stupidity. is trying to make up something as to why he pulled us over, and none of it was real. None of it was real we hadn't been speeding didn't run a red lie. We didn't make an illegal turn and we don't have a broken tail lie. There's no reason there is zero reason whatsoever other than the fact that we live in North Carolina. That's the reason. The second time it happened the third time it happened boy, the third fourth time it happened, and he had to get out of our car. Then go sit in the back seat of of the police car while I sat there I dan. They're lost my mind. Because it was the first moment where I could feel betrayed of his spirit, but he wasn't afraid of being arrested. He was afraid of being killed. I could feel the weight of my fear at that moment because I didn't understand, but I did understand. And the truth of what I was understanding. May My skin crawl? Because, it was something it's like it's like being punished. Being punished for not doing anything wrong. White people of personal development. Where argue. Where are you? To the person WHO's listening? and says to themselves. Am I in the Middle Ram I not. I'll ask I don't know I can't answer that question for you, but I will say this. If you are following a person today if you're spending money with a person today, if you're in their facebook, review, attend their live events. And this is not. Number one or in the top two or three on their radar of something you hear them talk about. Racism in the U S I'm telling you. That they are part of the problem. And most likely at the very core of it. Because their willingness to ignore in step over it. Gives their followers, the okay in the permission to continue to ignore it as they have for so long. It gives them the permission to overlook it to turn the other to change the channel because they ran. But guess what I can't. I can't turn the station. I can't turn it off. I can't stop listening to it because I'm living in. The fact that they make a choice that they make a choice not to truly tap into the highest. Of themselves, which means that they are really leading with love love for all people concern for all people. Desire to win for all people. That's the kind of follower you want to follow. That's the kind of fun. That's kind of leader you want to follow. That's the kind of leader you want to follow. You know I said tripped up and I said the word follower three times because of my head I'm thinking to myself. Those people are not even leaders. They're just followers of other. And that's why they figure out how to make. That closed system work, but it's time not only. Is it time for new leaders? Both for sure for sure actually time for new thought leaders of personal development who can really actually personally develop nation. But in addition to that, it's time for you to make a choice because when you make a choice. You'll stop cycling in almost getting there and you'll finally start to win. I know that this was not an easy topic. There's no way that I couldn't. We couldn't talk about it. You know what I mean. There's no way we have to talk about it. We actually have to keep talking about it I. Don't know where you are in your business i. don't know where you are in your life. I, don't know what that next step is for you but I do know one thing at do the damn thing nation. There's a home for you. There is a home for you. And we want you. To come in, find us and hang out with us. You would head to the thing nation on facebook. Outside of this, you can totally join our email lists. Dreamers wanted here dot com. I would absolutely love for you to report ever. You're listening to this hit reply. Send me an email. Jump on social media. Find me on instagram or on facebook or lengthen tiffany Larkin. Send me a note. I. Want to know how this made. You feel I want to know what actions you're. GonNa take. Do something inside of. Do the DMZ nation. We created an entire list almost like a guide of. How do you get more involved in? And this is not what you becoming an activist for changing your whole life. No, this is about you doing the right thing. Regardless of whether you think you, are, you are you are were all involved, and even if you listen to your like I hate you, doesn't it doesn't change the fact that you're involved, too. Because, you're going to be part of the problem that. I continue to solve right, but in some aspects. What I beg, you is that you don't listen to this and don't do anything I need you. And if you are hard to do the Dempsey nation, let me tell you this. I need you to get stronger. The reason why I need you to grow, Your Business is solely so that you have more resources tool and access to fight because the bigger of business, the stronger your weapons. It's just that simple. Man Have I. told you how glad I am that you're here like real talk. How I told you how glad I am that you are here. You have listen. This is the part of the show where I. Say go, follow us, go find us go follow US ghosts. Dhaka's just make sure the we're connected head to do the damn thing. Dot TV to the damn thing, dot, life, or just go hang on tiffany large dot com, if we are not friends on facebook, if you have not lighter instagram page, go do that because you're gonna WanNa see what we're doing how we're doing and how we're doing the damn thing.

United States facebook officer George Floyd Africa WanNa tiffany Lardy Tiffany youtube Kobe Dot TV JV Lo Black Children White WanNa tiffany Larkin North Carolina
What Can Black people agree on?

20 Minute Morning Show

23:33 min | 1 year ago

What Can Black people agree on?

"Hey what's up y'all. This is Jay Murphy and if you haven't heard about anchor it's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain. It's free this creation tools. Choose that allow you to record in et your podcast right from your phone or your computer anchors. GonNa Distribute your podcast for you so you can be heard on spotify apple podcasts cast and many more platforms you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership so it's everything you need to make a podcast in one place so download unload free acre APP or go to anchor dot. FM to get started. This is b.j Murphy. You're listening to the twenty minute morning. Show for Friday September the twentieth recently in Atlanta Sean Puffy combs and network revolt. TV held a hip hop summit summit on social justice killer might was there. Ti Conservative Candice Owens Mallory Katrina Pearson who's a conservative as as well Stephen Target and journalist Jeff Johnson. He hosted the a bit of a question. Would you say make America great again. Which period talking about women couldn't vote the period when we were hanging from trees? I'll answer or like the correct air which period in America I can try like so. I actually think that I would I would totally rocket hat right now. That said make America great again because I am. We've flashing. Was America great that we're trying to replicate rich. It ever was so great that you guys are forgetting. America was actually one of the uh-huh slavery was all over the world all over the world silicon. I'm not saying it's okay. So why are you saying Oh. It is so you so I wanna hear you wanna be able to hear this when I say I slavery was all over the world which is why. Are you pulling effect for those. You're making like. Oh people that look like us. Then ain't gonNA freeze. Maybe the walls really do not have one top. It came a fight over a lot of but I guess to gain my question would be some of the topics that we all just get behind as blacks. Can we get behind unity could unity be one of them on agenda though tackled the agenda for unity or by get behind it. I mean you know that I can you talk about what we all can agree on. We agree that we need to be unified right. I agree that we need to be unified for the right. Cause I mean we came together to pick cotton and how did turn out we come together to. We came together against Jesse Jackson when he was talking about Obama. How did that turn out this actually this. Why is it like when the Republicans want to get together. They didn't read what he saw. Every place they wanted a path put the judges and there were to make sure that they could put certain things in place. They were willing to say okay Komo so we can get these things. Why do we got about everything. We can't disagree on something simple that we can all get on even if we don't like everybody else what what is different about history. It's about it's about the history Sunday Sunday. You ask the question. Why don't they argue in the manner that we are because the Republicans are not fighting for their lives. We are fighting for our law that makes more sense for us to get behind a certain topics that we can agree upon that that we can push our agenda. We need to unify for a good cause okay well. Let's try to amongst the three of us. What what caused would that be in the week or agree. What could we agree on. I think that the three of US unified that both of you don't know what you're talking about. Also we've never do it. Yes that's right here on long sweetie. I should be the leader then we can come to a movie night. We know that's not going to happen because you're not. You're not okay. You're not qualified to be the leader. I'm more qualified than you. Doubt it because because so you don't you don't qualify then you Sunday because you sean you. Don't even have it in your mind to try to bring us together. You have your one track mind person. Nobody agrees with you then. It Ain't gonNA happen. You don't know how to how to compromise one. MOM person who I don't think like you. I think your mind thinks like this. You try to come up with every solutions where you don't have to disturb. Massa my solution argue to start mass. I'm GonNa always have a one track mind on that. Your ideas the bed your black on black people to keep voting themselves up and voting themselves up into Krom No. I'm saying that you own America just like white people on it but you don't believe that the I do you care organized the seat okay. I will use but we're that's not a winning way eight to figure out you know it's not you're not always it is may be sometimes we got our eagles. Go out of a great gift for all of this and I think that's what we all we all through their own perspective and not look look at the data. Give everybody that of course we can't and that's why you can't win a box of mouth unless you WANNA put your fist up so you write a push up put yourself. You'RE NOT GONNA win it out. The book was used if you go to war and I guess in fact over here at the best way to defeat on is the divide and conquer bill. That's what they're doing. That's what this statement is dividing having mechanism. I'm saying what is one topic that we don't have to be dividing will on that. We all can come together. Say Okay I can agree to do. We all agree that we sit. We need to really do something about it. Death rate a young young black men and women in this country you absolutely yes but see you're focusing the problem with us. Sunday is your focus on the effect and not the call see. I'm call Person Fiji artifacts. That's the problem y'all focused on what you Mr Hope we can release these Cleveland that we might have different terminology away looking like you can get on with that. Okay you go after the cause electrical go after the effect but at the end of the day those we want that number two degrees and you don't go after the call. You can't stop the offenders the point okay let let me can. I jump in Japan. Let's let's let's say we agree on this like They're going to have a forum for the school board tonight and they're going to be talking about equity in education. Let me ask this question is do we all agree that black people need to create create a alternative education source for Black Children in Charlotte what I will say eighteen you. BJ is black people already have alternative yes or no question and we we agree. We agree. I do you agree that they're already black. I schools friendship gotTa School. You know I don't know if that's considered black but I know victory Christian school calvary. Chris has the school black. People people have their own schools. Dj Okay let me let me spend this so we can make it clear they pass along the LGBT history. Cassidy taught in schools at least ten percent of history has to lgbt they they got behind LGBT. If you agree or not to get that move for your again what is it that we can do to get on one on page to move one thing for what is it what they maybe. We can all agree that we have to fight. We agree with that. We agree with that but it's tactics. Its tactics upon you. That's what we disagree. We all ably got. I think we we were there the fight that has encouraged but I think here's the problem and this is not only us but this is a bigger picture. No one's willing to so hey. I'M GONNA compromise here game here compromise. We we use it now. As a bad word compromise always a bad words the sentence you gotta give up a little bit to get a laugh. I'm not I'm not using. I'm not using it for my ideology all right y'all chefs. I'm not wanting that okay okay well. Sometimes you know all of us are not going to be together so we have to agree on that. All of us are not going to be together. We can all agree on yeah because because there is going to be separation in the black community to get some things done. All of us are not going to agree that black people people need to be totally independent and self sufficient from the United States government of America who is our worst enemy and not keep begging them for something they will never never do in your lifetime your children's lifetime and while we are suffering agreed that when something is old to you we agree that that's not begging that means demand a dead some of US agree keep burglars. Keep robbing houses stealing your stuff. Some of US agree that you don't do. Ooh Some of US agree that you got to tap again. I don't know what you WanNa hear her here. This is this'll what are if any other group Hispanic being Jewish Italian. They can at least say okay. We got subject to the to the Moon Ford's. If this is what we know more no real never move for no wonder compare a pair off at because people who who cares. It's not the south winning. We GonNa Mall Sore Walk. Why don't we use factors. HOLD US up. If we're GONNA stay there. We will never progress. That's what I'm saying. See less agree on this that you should not be trying to come up with a solution for black people. If you are not a student of history you little help. I don't know to come up with a plausible solution for black. People know how about this. How about you should speak about anything anything until you're willing to listen to everyone and then you can do that been recant. Move forward with crap. You don't stay in the same position because the thing thing is this. I understand my history on. No mine is strict but I'm sales my before okay because if if you don't you don't say anything. How do you move forward. How do you move forward you. Don't you don't understand history. 'cause you understood understood understood. As you history of funding you will be focusing on the route and not the branches okay so we they started keeping you say. We don't progress in stay stuff she doesn't she doesn't believe unity in this is no shay this. This is no shame because I don't even consider myself qualified. I think that you need historians. I think you need social scientists. I think you need political scientists with which is the same thing social scientists economists. I think that people like you should sit on the bench and let the real balls ball. That's what I'm here also use negative smart when you taking that Matt Smart enough to know when they wanted to get that those white judges up there they could care less about their own personal feelings. They got together. They got the bang on white judges against Roe versus. Wade and all the rest of the craft they want and they weren't minority but they stick together. They are the majority you live in a democracy where majority role do a minority you could win bound aw Sunday Sunday just no use to argue. Keep going back and forth with her. She's made up her mind and she's going to be the one of the people on the outside looking in. It's just it's just a fairly. I'm comfortable with that because I could care less. What uh-huh anybody thinks about what needs to be done. I know that we need to be unified. The only way we're going to get out of this mess as black people have to agree that we must unify unify now. How long is that GONNA take. It may not be in our lifetime. Maybe our children may get some sense to say hey look. We need to be on one accord because our parents are too stupid enough to realize that we needed to have our own school our own hospitals all of our own black businesses need to be. Let's put aside differences. ooh that collectively collectively do have money selectively. We do have money. People don't have collectively Lee. We do have money and we can create our own economy. We did it come out of slavery. God we could do it again as the rich slaves and in the history of the world and the most educated educated slaves and the history of the world we got more than enough to build our own economy. We're just not willing to put down our ego and come together I'm finished with what I'm saying. This is what I mean. This is what people like. You should not be talking for blasphemy because you're not with the the only come in. What's your feeling sick? You say you don't notice I'm not gonNA argue with you. Because you don't know what you talk about heal sick you don't have it. They've already told you I will people eight dollars per white now more years. We'll be civil dollars. Hey you should not talk black people. It was starting to say global now. I like to listen to a fool arguing. We had a discussion go there. You're not mature enough to to don't take you not tell me I'm not mature that if I know history listen. That's the only way the only way we're going to settle this you. I believe the only way we're going to be able. We can't settle this amongst ourselves on the phone. The only way we sell this for real is to be an open town home form and each one of US present these ideas that we have on this podcast and watch how the audience reacts to each one of US majority black people think like you know black people because be because they go off emotion going on passion CDs. This is your problem you don't know. What money is you think because black people can run out the Papa's the chicken sandwich. They got money. What you think like I said the only way we're going to settle this is an open forum. townhall form and challenges take a shot put. Brentwood bring moral bringing his argument out in the public to help me you know I don't need anybody to defend against. You know very immature when you think I'm saying that we need to bring this to the four layment why not bring historians like she said his research care. What a bunch listen. Sunday and I'm not trying to be fun as you also passed past that I am past. I know that the masses don't know the truth. That's why I'm saying that you I am not a you. The only one the history and what I am saying is you need a real owner. Wonder no tails you through understands. Take what would be the problem with getting historian. We're GONNA see in having you again to a town. Hall you want to change if they change. Let's say let's see what would be the problem with getting historians because you had now you talking to me. Okay okay. Wait a minute records record it this. Did you not record this the record and we wrote the Roman. I want you to replay Klay what I just said before they say anything about. I said historian. If you could record it I would really want you to okay which one but I'm saying I'm trying to lead to where you say you say we need historian and other and I said what will be the problem with having a historian to come out and let's have had this discussion with them there. I agree what you signed. I wholeheartedly agree which is unique and you need. A historian to teach history is and to tell you what costs can affect it. We're going to set it up. I know Taurean historian call boy listen. It's interesting when we go set it up. I mean we need to do it next next month. Historic could beat your history with one hand behind there. Let's do it. I'm looking for a call. Call you bring down. That's bringing that. That's the only way we can't sell this on a podcast. You gotta you gotTa get an audience audience of people that that notice subject to care about it and let them decide all we do is present our case and then let the people decide who they want go with. WHO has the best is presenting the best idea. I'm not. I'm afraid. Historic is done done. Deal it. Okay okay good man. So what so what would you won't do about it. You probably show up anyway. I guess you'll find out for more news. Four and about people of color our website you are news dot net this is you in urban. Internet News National National News and information for people of Color Welcome to you. I N Urban Internet News. I'm Alexander Cayden along with Erin. Maze Stacey Abrams lost two thousand eighteen bid for the Georgia governorship last November against then Georgia secretary of State Brian Kemp and despite acknowledging camp as the Legal Victor Abrahams Abrahams has refused to officially conceded the election. She feels in the political space to concede is an acknowledgement that the process was fair which she doesn't believe that to be so Bolivia love the businesswoman who posted the one hundred thousand dollar bond by R Kelly following his arrest on various sex crimes is now demanding manding her money be returned in light of the singers indictment earlier. A Cook County judge ruled that she's not entitled to receive her money back at least not right right now. The judge made it clear that you'll receive more money back at the end of Kelly's criminal case in Chicago but that could take years court ruling in south South Carolina says online realtor Amazon likely owes the state millions of dollars in sales taxes from other vendors who use the company's website. The ruling says the State Revenue Department will determine how much Amazon's should pay Amazon says it disagrees with the ruling but appreciated the new law in South Carolina branch of the Boondock. Should it'd be pretty happy. Hbo Max is ordering to re imagine seasons with twenty four episodes of the animated series to launch next year the series from create data Aaron mcgruder will launch next fall with a fifty minute special. All fifty five episodes of the original the boondocks series will also be available on the direct direct consumer offering at launch. You've been listening to you I and urban internet news for more National News and information for and about people of color it visit our website at you. I news dot net begging for listening to the twenty minute morning show a podcast production brought to you by inside urban media written and produced by BJ Murphy from our Charlotte North Carolina Studios. Please subscribe to the show and you'll be alerted when our daily episodes are published weekday mornings at at six. Am a daily contributors are Sean Sunday Aka from the U. I. N. Uncut News Team and for more news about and for for people of Color. Go to our website you I news that net. 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Episode 60: Kenosha: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

The Semi-Social Life of a Black Introvert Podcast

1:00:16 hr | 3 months ago

Episode 60: Kenosha: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

"Places please the dancers. World is short. The world is sure. Spot Just. Months. World is yours the world sure. Detail I'm that you're you're almost going on. This air bring you the semi social life of black introvert podcast road sixty. Thank you all for joining me. All around this world. Have to remind myself. Remind you all that I'm I. Don't take this time your energy. Your ear for granted. You all could be anywhere else but you here with me and and I and I value that night appreciate that that you're willing to invest in my life. As hopefully I invest in yours. This episode is going to be a low different. I'm already SORTA talking getting ready to heart right into. what this episode is all about the subject matter in. Emma. Hardest. Heavy. Even, last week as I was talking about be here now. In. Appreciating. Your be appreciating the here and appreciating the now. The now being my life. Currently. My life in this present moment. Embracing the fact that I do I have life right now that I'm breathing right now that for some reason, Guidon Has. Given me like another opportunity to breathe and see another day. 'cause I don't take time for granted like I once did when I was younger. I took time for granted understanding or probably with the belief that that my life the life is loan. Guaranteed to have prolonged years but as you as as you get older, you realize that. Life is really quite short. Your timeless earth is quite short. I'm thirty six. If I'm fortunate enough to see another thirty six years. That's quite a blessing. But also conscious that. There's so many people the haven't seen thirty six years. And so I'm appreciative of my be appreciative of my here. An. Appreciative of my now. This is a a difficult episode. Because I'm a black man in America. And like millions of people worldwide. The watch the. Video of another unarmed black. Man. Being Shot Jacob Blake. Shot seven times in the back as he was walking back to his car shot seven times by law enforcement. Some people said that they thought he had a knife, but he did not. Shot seven times and he somehow lived through it. His father said he's paralyzed. From the waist down. I'm appreciative of my be. Because I look at that video and I honestly say that could. That could be me. That could be. My now. I could have been there. That could have been my here. It's A. Thing. TO BE BLACK IN AMERICA IT'S A beautiful struggle? The beauty of that. You know you're proud of of being black you wouldn't trae win trade my blackness who I am a black man. I wouldn't trade it. I wouldn't try I couldn't see myself as as being anything other than a semi social year black introvert. I love. Being Black. I'm proud of WHO I am proud of my of my ancestry. My. Heritage. I'm proud of the culture. But on the flip side. For the beauty, there is struggle. The everyday struggle which. You see these videos and in in you see this footage. Of. Black men. Unarmed black people being shot. By the police and you can't help you, I can't help. Let me not say you I can't help but look those videos and black your that could be me. He looks like me. He looks like someone I know. Yob Import over twenty times. I don't drink I. Don't drink at all. I'm thirty six years old and I don't drink at all I've never done drugs. Of any kind. I've been a black guy, a nice car and the White neighborhood I've been poured over nearly twenty times. I've had I think three speeding tickets in a lifetime. How explain those are the seventeen. Driving while black. The description. I look like the suspect. In custody yelled at. Face on the ground has. Surrounded by cop cars and that could have been me. That could be me. In a video. That can be me recorded. That could have been me that that could be me. That could be my son that could be. My cousins that could be my. My students, my brothers, my my friends, my acquaintances, my co workers, my father, my uncle. My sister, my daughter, my wife, my aunts, my nieces. My loved ones that could be them. In we're tired. We're tired. You know I didn't even really WanNa talk about this on a podcast. I didn't I had a whole other subject planned out and I have, and I'm not even into the subject matter yet. But. I had a whole other topic planned out. And then this news hidden in when it hit me hurt. Even during this podcast some some days some weeks. Is Tough. It's tough to do. Because after bare my soul as a black man there, my emotions and these emotions at keep so guarded. I come and I, let it out. For you all is informational. You all support me. You tell me that that my words means something. To keep sharing. To keep. Lightning. And yet. To be honest I noted there are employers that I've contacted I know that their businesses I've contacted. that. Have hurt my podcast and. In of close the door. On any type of job prospects are opportunities that could have been had. Because I speak about my black existence. Speak About what I've been through. A speak about being angry. As if I shouldn't be angry. I speak about being hurt. For many. My experiences are two black I'm black. Saw each week you know I I I go to the sort of this fight does mental fight of Should I post this park has not. Because that's the struggle of many African Americans, the world will embrace you. Embrace what they want of you if you're not to black. Embrace some of you. The pieces that they like if you're not to black of a few to black. Your message will get rejected. It's okay to be woke but if you're to black. We don't WanNA. Hear that. Is Cool now to. Talk about black lives matter but if you really believe that in live that. The too much. Make. So many people uncomfortable. It's Ok in some regard if if If you're white, you wear A. Black lives matter t shirt or sticker because that shows you are conscious of the cosmos. That you were looking out for someone else. The your socially aware. But if I'm blacking aware that. Militant. I'm angry. I'm to black for my own good. I'm too black to be. Represented a company to black to be employed them to black. This is America. In, which blackness is is sold as pimped out. Your coach is monetize D-. Your trends or monetize black trips black cultures monetize D-. Black people are monetize historically in this country. Black people have been monetize whether you're looking at enslavement. Or cultural trends. Or just even our intellectual property. Our minds. monetize. D-. In this country wants everything that it can extract from black people but the actual black people themselves give me all your tools, give me your knowledge. Give me your your mind. But we don't want you. This is tiring. Experience is tiring. That's the word is really popping up in my mind. Retired. I'm tired. I walked around with a heavy hearts order. Because I don't like to see the type of footage. It should not be normal to see black men, black people, black kids black women being attacked in shot by the police. And then recorded. Input on social media is so normal now. We've normalized something that. Is just so mind blowing. We watch death. It's like watching someone like. Millions now. No millions of people have seen that video. Millions of people watch yours fluid. Millions of people. Will See Jacob Blake. When will it stop? I titled This. podcast episode. Kenosha. The man, the myth. And the legend. The man, the myth and legend this is almost wrong. The. So many layers to this story. But I want to talk about the man, i. WanNa talk about who? This man is. WHO This man is to other people. Jacob Blake is the father. How do I know that? Because he had his kids in the car. On the day, he was shot seven times by the police at point blank range as as he was getting back into his vehicle. Yes, he's a black man he's also an uncle. He someone's son. He, someone's brother. But if I if I were to put myself in his shoes. I think he will value. Being a father. More than any of those roles. Witnesses say that Jacob. Pulled over the break up a fight between two women. Somewhere along the line, the police came in. Somewhere along the line according to some footage. Either he was accosted body. Police the gone to will tussle. He was trying inter back into his car. As he was trying to enter back into his car. A police officer grabbed the back of his shirt. Fired seven time to point blank range in front of his girlfriend. In his kids. As a father that breaks my heart. One of my fears dying in front of my children. Because you as a father all WanNa do protect my children. I'm sure as a father that's all Jacob wanted to protect his children. There's some things that as as young fathers in his father's, we don't get right, but we always tend to one our children to be protected. JAKUP was shot. In front his babies in front of his children. I can't imagine what he felt. As, he saw the situation play out. Perhaps, he was thinking, I just want to get back home. I WANNA. Get back on my car so I could just get back home because you know what those are a lot of my fillings whenever I get pulled over by the police I just WanNa. Make it back home. Give me a ticket I. JUST WANNA make it back home. I just WANNA, make a back home alive. I believe Jacob. Just, WanNa make it back home. That is the goal of the black father cannot can I make it back home? This so many things that we can't control, but can we just make it back to our safe place? Make it back to our starting point make a back to the place that nurtures us make it back to the place in which. which are hardest To, be shot to be attacked for your children. For him I mean, it just had to be hard. Because, what can you do? You can't protect if if he was shot, he was shot. He can't stand up and. Look at police officers say don't don't don't do this in front of my babies. Hit a struggle for his own breath. Struggle for his own life. Leaving his Children his girlfriend there too. To fight for there's as prayed for his. Traumatizing. Young Children Young. Black. Children. Witnessing. Violence at the hands of the police traumatizing. I think about Flannel Casteel and in. His girlfriend the car and in his daughter in the back seat in the police officer that shot him at point blank. Range. As children what do you do with that? What their appeal what counseling Sh. Can. Deal with that. That's not what they signed up for his children. As soda that's not what they WANNA see. Daddy being shot. By the police officer but. That's one of those realities for Black Children To grow up, quicker. The your white counterparts because the world is that much more real. To you. You don't have that grace of being innocent. If you're black child I know this because I was a black child. I didn't have the same amount of grace set my white friends had. I don't have the same monarch grace to my white colleagues have now as a thirty six year old man. Even. Growing up as a child they're certainly couldn't say. Certain things I couldn't do. Certain places I. Couldn't go. because. I'm a black. Man. The risk is that much more higher. For me. I was writing my book that. I was conscious of my blackness in my race and people that did not like me. When I was eight years old. I was conscious that I that I could be that I could be hurt because of my black skin at the age, of Seven. Watching Rodney King. Being beat. And two eight being called a nigger. By my classmates. Often. Five six times a year school. An elementary school. Over the next twenty years because a nigger at least. Two or three Tom Year. I was aware of my blackness and in the in the threat. That people assumed it was. When I lived in a town, which we couldn't go down certain neighborhoods because. There were cross burnings, the Klan Rally, my hometown twice a year. I was aware of my blackness. When Susan Smith I believe I was ten years old when she said a black man stole her children and her car. In kidnapped her children. In though my city although my city was. Hundreds of miles away from hers. Threat was still there that this as this nation looked for a black man wearing a dark skinned black man wearing a winter hat. My Mom said Yo you guys aren't wearing winter hats talking to my brother. Now you guys aren't wearing winter hats because we live in a town in which people are looking to exact revenge. Though you're not a black man though you're a black boy, it doesn't matter. I grew up quick. Millions of black kids have to grow up quick. Those aren't the talks that white payers have with. White children. White, pairs have the talk with their with their white children about what to do we get pulled over by the police. My father had his talk with me at the age of twelve. Five years before I drove. He told me what to do to save my life when I get pulled over not if when I get over. The same talk I had a twelve, my white friends. Had IT. Fifteen. Sixteen seventeen or perhaps never. Black children have to grow up. So quick those kids in the back seat of Jacob's car have to grow up quicker because they witnessed their father being shot seven times by the very person by the very group of people. Better meant to protect them. The police are meant to protect them. On, top of that, their father is there to protect them. They watched their first line of defense. Slope Down to the ground with seven shots in his back as a screened. I'm sure they cried as they felt the fear in terror of death creep upon them in that car perhaps to paralyze to move. But there is open. I'm sure even right now they see his body. No child have to go through that. Flynn okay. Steals daughter no child should have to go through that. Even. Darnell a fraser who accorded the death. The murder. Of George Floyd. At the hands or by the knee of law enforcement in Minneapolis earlier this year. She she should have to go through that she seventeen. She seeing. She saw something that. No seventeen year should see. That many of her white peers would never see. Never have to be witness to. Yet she held that phone up. Look death in the face. If found faith within the fear. y'All I'm sad. I'm sad this is still. Something that we had to deal with each day here in this nation and around the world. Said that even though Jacob Blake. Somehow managed to survive. Seven shots at point blank range. I'm sad he will probably. Never walk again because he's paralyzed from the waist down. The whole situation. Makes me sad. What, what what was it? Why did it take three police officers? Three Three police officers were there. One. Could subdue him. I don't even know if he did anything wrong. This say he did everything wrong though. Let's say he did every single thing. Wrong. Seven shots. This is what black folks are are are talking about. If we do everything role. Could you still treat us like you do our white peers? You don't hear white men being shot in the back seven times at point blank range by the police you don't hear of it. You don't see it. People. WanNa give you know those statistics you know more white people get more white people get shot by the police s because they're more of you. That makes common sense there more of you black people or fourteen percent of the population in this nation. A yet, we have a higher propensity of being shot by the police. Why is that? Why are we more threatening? Why is it that there were three police officers there but yet we have one that wanted to play as I call hero bowl he wanted the be the hero. Instead of letting shakeup get back in his car instead of instead of just sitting back and said allowing his training to take over he instead wanted to be the hero in seven shots went into the back of. The man. Jacob. All, that training that that has talked about. All that training all those hours of being in the academy. The all went out the window. We we talk so much about the train police officer. With. Your so trained. The why are you allowed to be imperfect? Like we give officers such a pass if they're in `perfect. The trained officers, but you know they can't be perfect. And yet, we require citizens to be perfect even though Ron Train. So the so the weight of the situation gets placed upon the civilians where you should have done this. If he didn't do this as one of happened if he would just listen to the authors did he would not be shot. West the training. We require so much out of the common man, the common woman a Yes. The Common Black Child. That we give these officers pass. This past of privilege. This passer prestigious pass relief of class and yes racism there too. We hear these these these quotes of of there being a few bad apples. There's always a few bad apples for you know that that's cool. But you never put those bad apples. On the other side of the table. You treat us all like bad apples. If you're black apple your bad apple. Bliss safe I really WANNA take your bad apples analogy I see more than just a few bad apples in the police force. And then that's whole jaw say this all the time I respect the police I I have family members that are police I do. I can go into alone sort of dialogue about the importance of law enforcement jobs within the black community and how those jobs some of the first jobs that really helped put the black family into the middle class. level. But Yeah I'm talking about the bad apples. Always a few bad apples no, we're talking I'm saying they're more than just a few bad apples. There's a bad or. There's a bunch of bad trees because what happens that those bad apples grew? Historically they grew because they were unaddressed. And, they were given power. And they were given positions. And so they grew into bad trees to had more bad apples. In pretty soon, those bad apples from that bad tree grew. And now, there are more bad trees and so now you have bad orchards of bad apples coming from bad trees because. It's OK. The protected by the shield. They're given the benefit of the doubt. While America while this nation picks apart the character. The integrity of the victim Digging up past crimes and in past circumstances and well, if he didn't do this or she didn't do that or or the kid have a fake gun. In those people that saves type of excuses you are the problem. You are the problem. These are the same people say well, you know what she should've been raped if she did have that on. You Sir is you ma'am. You're. The. Problem. You overlook the actions that that inflict. So many. because. You're so caught up on your fake. Your. Phony principles that you don't even fully observe yourself. These principles that you hold onto. So daily because they make up. This facade. That you wished to project upon people as if you have an order together but really. Your frailty shows your lack of confidence shows lack of heart shows. Your fears consuming union or so pacified Bhai your privilege. By your perceived privilege that you refuse to. BE IN TOUCH WITH HUMANITY My heart heavy because Jacob. Blake. The man. had. Watch his kids. Scream to hear them scream at. The tariff on their. Face. As he gripped. And try to hold on for his life. My heart is broken those kids. Had to see the man Jacob? Blake their father. Presumed dead in there is. To See him being struck down there after being struck down by. The other people in their life should be protecting them. The hardest heavy because Jacobscall girlfriend had to witness like so many black women do. Witness the hunt for. The black men they love. That they want to protect. And that they do protect. She had the witness. Seven shots and yet protect her children, protect herself my my heart. Is Heavy. Put Springs me to the myth. The meth that this is normal in any type of way. The Myth that that we as a world to just. accept. This type of violence brought upon any color of people. As if this is normal. We've normalized violence. We've normalized. These recordings. were. This is just what happens. With this just America. What is nothing that we can do about it? That's a myth. You have to. Yet, take a step back. Before you almost take a step forward. In the reason to take a step back because you have to gain. Perspective. Sometimes when you when you take a step forward, you lose sight of the bigger picture. But when you take a step back, you see there is a bigger picture. There's something more fight for. This is a moment not to normalize. But to mobilize. Man Made so much sense when I said I just got chills discounts a moment not to normalize but to mobilize. There's nothing normal about this. This is part of our country's fabric. The RIP it up. Set It on fire. And let's build something new. This build a new fabric. Because, this is a working. This hasn't worked. The thread of racism is so prevalent in this American courtroom, this American society really around the world. Is So. Prevalent. Is the thread that is so entrenched in the in the fabric of this nation. And what people WANNA do they? They they they they identify perhaps it to stay like always there but I don't want to take it out the fabric because if I take it out, the fabric is going to mess up the the the the the totality of work. Is GonNa take too much work to get it out the fabric. Can We? Can we just go round it. Can we can. We can we stick around? We so around it. Can we nit around. No. Because it. Is Gripping everything. Is still there. You could try to turn away like it's not there but it's still within the fabric is still within our society. Your fear your failure to acknowledge it does not mean going to go away. For All those people that deny racism, I find it to be truly amazing because it shows that not only do you lack vision for yourself but you also like for other people in the U lack perspective now only when it comes to the present in what can happen the future but also mainly was occurred in the past and so. People people that. That deny. Racism. You almost have to tell yourself ally in, chew on it and believe it and I believe people denied because a they don't want They don't feel like they can do anything about it. Be They don't WanNa see themselves within the picture of the answer either being the answer or the problem in see. They don't WanNa believe it's GonNa come. Meet them. Wherever they are. In their homes, the suburbia. In their homes on the country. At their homes and see they don't they don't want to realize. That Yeah I maybe black and racism hits me a one way. But you can be white. And when those racists grab a gun. Does shoot you too. I we don't WanNa, talk about that. There's a myth. That that. That we deserve this. There's a myth that this is normal. Is A myth that? White supremacy. Does Not Affect why? People. If you believe. Any of those. You're believing. ally. We have to have the ability to communicate and identify these lies are being built within our country to have been built within our country and then deconstruct them. Name Them. Tear them apart. And build something new. You're either part of the problem or you're part of the answer. I don't necessarily like being. In the polarity. You either right or you're wrong and I still even though I still believe if you're part of the problem or you're part of the answer, you have a choice as to where you're going to be. If you decide to sit it out but you know I'm not GonNa do anything about it. You're part of the problem. But if you find yourself saying you know what I acknowledge that. That something needs to be done. If you can acknowledge that. That that something needs to change. The defy itself being part of the answer. We are living in a time which we need people to be part of the answer. We have too many people that are part of the problem. Holding onto America's past. To. Glory years that this country has never seen. They believe the myth. The purity of this country. They believe the the patriotic accident is country's founded upon freedom that all men are created equal in that this land is your land. This land is my land and they believe all of this rhetoric. Because, they have to put all of their. Stock. All of their being in a myth. Because they refuse to look in the in the mayor and see the reflection that this whole time they've been believing teaching speaking reciting and singing ally. The Myth. The Myth of this country. History will tell you that this country is not about his purity. History will tell you just by reading some books reading two books on American history would tell you that this country. Is. As bloody. Is as impure. Is As conflicted? Today. As it was upon his quote unquote founding, which is another myth. These forefathers who founded this country with native Americans already here. Yeah myth you believe it you believing ally. Who? In wear, the people that are going to challenge. The Lies Challenge the myth. Challenges Facade of racism. Yes. A huge task is a huge has all of these `ISMs are huge tasks whether you're fighting racism sexism classism. We need people that see themselves as the answers to these problems. They won't be solved tomorrow. But that does not mean that you can't give forth some effort. To fight. For the right. To write these wrongs. Or you content with living in this fantasy world in which. You believe these myths and these lives and and these. Stories he's illusions of grandeur. Just to make yourself. Happy. Em-? Patriotic. And a good person. Who will never see evil because evil does not show up to. Good. People evil only shows itself to bad people. Therefore, your purity you were lying your purity. On Your boss purity to make it through each day. which brings me to the legend. We talked about the man we talked about the myth. Now let's talk about the legend because the legend has showed up a little bit. Late within his Jacob Blake Story. I didn't learn the. Legend. Other story until last night. I woke up. So always doing check the news and saw there was a shooting last night in Kenosha Wisconsin in which an armed gunman. Shot at protesters that were there course protesting the shooting of Jacob Blake An. I that two people. Were dead. One person critically injured. SORTA reading. About this shooting. Heart. Heavy. Because I've been a protest once again, that could have been me. I took my kids to protest early this summer in. Masan as as I was being interviewed on the news. My son. After interview said Dad, there's a guy over there with a gun. For some Sun is seen A. An armed I, think it's like machine gun. On somebody he was afraid. And I told him son I got you. I'll protect you. And I meant every word that I said and yet as a father. That has reading about. Jacob Blake. With his children his backseat. Sometimes we can say. To our children with that will protect you. I'll protect you do it all. Sometimes, life creeps up on you so fast that you can't do anything but. Hold onto your own life. Let alone protect. There's. Told my son I will protect you because. That's what I'm here to do as your father and yet I read. Last night about. A shooter active shooter who? At the time woke up, he was still on the run. There was video. Of Him. Shooting. Going into a crowd of people in shooting running back, falling back and shooting from his knees shooting show somebody in shot somebody in the stomach. Was a white white guy. Is He looked to be about eighteen to twenty, one, twenty two. Witnesses describe. The shooter that we now know his name. Has Been identified all over social media all over facebook as seventeen year old Kyle Rittenhouse. Who after fleeing the shooting mind you? We're back home to his home in Illinois. At which point? He was identified in the police. Captured him, detained him. They did not shoot him seven times in the back because well, you figure that out. Though he may a shot two people and critically injured one. He was not shot not that I am condoning the shooting of a seventeen year road but. Those mistakes is don't seem to happen with seventeen year old white kids. It happened to Tamir Rice. And to Trayvon Martin. But for some reason I and and for some reason Kyle Rittenhouse just had great luck. He must've had some great luck. There have been no other factor as to why the police did not do the same thing to him that he did to. Let me get off the subject. But you know at as he was shooting reading some witness accounts and they were saying that. Cops were were coming on the scene of the crime. This is legendary. You gotta listen to this this. This is so legendary. That's almost magical. This is the stuff alleges are made out of because. I just couldn't believe it when I read it. These are the stories that will be passed down from generation to generation I. Can you believe this happened? So let me tell you the story that let me tell you this legend. As Kyle Rittenhouse was fleeing the scene of the crime because their reports of shooting which he was doing. Cup. Cars. Were were coming upon the scene in kyle believing that he was caught. Certain Street and put his hands up. He put his hands up. You got. You got me. He was awaiting his arrest. And and here's the legend. Comes into play. The Cup cars zoom bright bio. Wow what. So how do you WANNA. Tell me what I'm reading is that not for the cops to not? Arrests you from a black man with a gun if a black man walking in with his a report of a shooting and I have a semi automatic weapon on me. So all have to do is put my hands up and I become invincible I become they no. One can see me apparently law enforced Mackenzie can't see me because I have my hands up that's that's the trick. It worked for Kyle. It worked for Kyle but but for some reason I don't believe that will work for Erin. I can only imagine there was a port of shooting. In I had a semi automatic weapon around me. In I'm walking away from the scene of the crime. I highly doubt if I put my hands up a highly doubt that a our make it out alive be that the cops resume. Pass me. That's legendary. That is so legendary who knew. Kyle needs doing interview when she comes out and tells people how he did that. who how did he know that by putting his hands up he will become invincible. He would disappear It's funny how that? Disappearing Act. Works for some. Definite. Doesn't work for all. Cops zoomed right past them because he does not fit description. He doesn't he's a seventeen year old white kid. With a gun. He doesn't look like a killer he looks like A. Good. White. Kid. With a gun. My God do I wish the that that the police looked Tamir Rice to say. Good. Black hit with a gun. God how I wish that people look. At Black Children, black. Teens Black Boys, black girls say that's just a seventeen year old assist fifteen year. There's no threat there. It we have guns if we have guns onus. Heck even here in Columbus Ohio where teen was shot because he actually had a gun. He was shot and killed. He actually had a gun. I was told her Haymond footer hands up. They'll take your job, but you just put your hands up. You'll be invincible. You're disappear if you put your hands up. Kyle. Rittenhouse. Is An American legend? When I read that that that cops. please. Resume bypass them. Dowse, just. ICING. On the cake. Because that to me is a microcosm of this nation. You assume past the obvious. Yazoo pass the the the smoking gun so to speak. In order to USUA-, Gun. Upon a black man in America. Jacob Blake hat a weapon. Jacob Blake. Didn't he didn't go into a crowd and start shooting people. Jacob Blake was trying to get into his car. Cow, Rittenhouse shot two people dead and critically injured one. And he had a weapon and yet somehow. As. Legend has it. He put his hands. Up. and He became Invincible he disappeared. I've been to enough rallies hands up. Don't shoot. By I never heard hands up. Poof you're gone has up your disappear. This nation has a lot of work to do. This nation has. Has It has it has quite an opportunity looking at its reflection. My Heart. Is, heavy. But you know. To Tie back to last week's message. Is. My choice to be here now thank God that I can be. Here. Now. Because that disgusts me know that I am part of the answer. I'm the tool for the change. I'm the spark. That can cause the fire that we're nine eight. Hope. I'm? The is. that. Concrete Division. I'm the love that massaged the heart. That's the reason why I am here. That's reason why I am here now dass reason why I can have. Peace. In the heaviness of my be moment. y'All is not normalized these acts of violence. This is this is a normal. This is not how this nation should be. Heard my fringed sparks till somebody this week you're better than this. You're better than this is sometimes we need some people to tell to tell each other tell this nation you're better than this. I see for you. You have more to offer them or giving you have more potential you more depth yet more love yet more care. You're more courage. You're better than this. And yet somehow we reject people that. Tell us that were better. Because whistle stuck. We grown comfortable. We've normalize the experience of. Being. Bitter. But I'm here to say that we are better than this. that. I'M NOT GONNA stop talking because of the threat. Doors may close. You know what's doors will open. If people don't want to hear my blackness, you know what your loss Because I refuse normalize these types of behaviors. I don't WanNa see another, Jacob, Lake. Heck I don't WanNa see another car rittenhouse. But I refuse term is act like a snot they're. Like this isn't the the constant pressure that I since each and every day. I can't normalize his hurt. ow refuse normalize his heartache. Would I will normalize? Is Hope. I have hope. Have a heart enhanced. To help. To. Help bring change this world to this nation to my city to my community to my family to myself. Change starts. Here. Chain starts in my. Be Moment. And I'm powerful enough to. Understand. In the see that I don't have to wait for change because. Change starts. Now. My prayers go out to up. Blake in his family, his children. As leaders, let's continue. To. Lead. With love that did ladies and gentlemen the Journeys Zohar Sean. Thank you for listening to the semi social life of black and silver podcast episode sixty as always get at me on twitter or Instagram send US episode to some other people that need to know the man, the myth and legend we gotta talk about the stuff you. Can't just turn a blind eye to this look at it. This identify the speak about it this changes. I. Love y'All. Appreciate Joel has always To. So many thoughts. Boom. Rest. L.. You I do. Parting is such sweet sorrow.

Jacob Blake America Black Children officer WanNa Kyle Rittenhouse Common Black Child Emma Tamir Rice apple Klan Rodney King Susan Smith George Floyd Kenosha
Ep170: A Fight Worth Fighting

WHOREible Decisions

1:02:40 hr | 6 months ago

Ep170: A Fight Worth Fighting

"Take. Hey Hor hi welcome. Back to another episode, guys of horrible decisions. We were planning on going dark this week. Because God damn can't believe it's. It's been only about a week We have been going through so much. I appreciate all of the kind words. clearly I am a little better now. I have been out protesting here in new. York City and I just want to give shoutouts to everyone who has done their part for those of you who have been out protesting for those of you who have donated for those of you voting and telling your peers to vote are just want to thank you all. of course y'all know we talk a lot about sex, and just a whole bunch of Raunchy, and right now we just kind of felt that. How how do we do that? How do we do that right now? How do we get through the laughs and the jokes and all of these things, and so we easy and I decided that for this week's episode. We would compile just some. Previous conversations over the last three and a half years. That we have had regarding our experience. And Trauma With police brutality with racism with interracial dating with. our white listeners. And their white privilege, coming to us about certain topics, and also even conversation we had on our patriotic, regarding the use of the N. Word within the Latino community. As you guys know this fight is not anything new from the sixties to the seventies first centuries and centuries prior to now we have been fighting the same fight. And we wanted to let you guys know that outside of fighting for the comfortability and making. Within. The sex pace in the black community more comfortable that we have brought many topics to the forefront. and. I just wanted to kind of resurface and relive some of these moments that we the I have shared on this platform with bringing certain injustices and certain topics to to light once again during this time again I want to. Give, a R.I.P as well as a fight for justice for George Floyd, Ahmad, arbitrary and. Most importantly in my eyes, and for this specific platform Brianna Taylor, as having a platform, specifically focused I would say four black woman I think that this has brought a hard time for all of us. in seeing that we are all standing strong in the fight for black men, but kind of you know a a little fear in if we will get the same fight as black women. Sandra Bland there's there's a lot of just. Cases reopening up. Then involved black women and I do feel like black women are not. Kind of given the same voice, and that's what this platform does. We want to continue to give voices two black women. And and again I just WanNa thank you guys for all of your kind. Words this next clip that you're about to hear. goes into what I mentioned during my statement in the PTSD that I feel like I have experienced over the last few years with witnessing black men being taken at the hands of police officers, and so here it is. Me Talking about my experience in London, and how I I was able to realize that I am fucking affected by the ship Again. go ahead and listen and. I don't want to say I hope you enjoy, but let's go ahead and relive these moments. Over the past years of horace decisions. So I wanted to I guess share story because this opened up. To me, so while while I was in London, I did London impairs a weekend because I'm fucking crazy. I was the whole time, but I felt how rich I was to cause bitch. We spent probably four hundred dollars and food just on the Friday between food and drinks I. don't even eat a lot. That was fucking trumpets, and fucking dumped dumplings in dim sum and Shit Tim some. Yeah, we went to the. It's a restaurant called who tongue on the top of the Shard beautiful was drinking porn-star. Martinez the whole time which I love me a foreign soil fucking good then I love drinking shit. Oh, good! Point Star is by the way it's good. It's Oh I. Don't know why it's only in Europe. I've never been offered a point star in the state here yet. You make it I. Ask the Ingredients on its pomegranate. It's Super Sweeten Palm. Fruit. Passion fruit is sitting in there. It's super juicy, and then you get a shot of champagne next to it. Is. Maybe you that it was. My Shampoo You know you saw a little bubbly. They got excited. Was No, but so anyways we went to sketch, and then we had dinner reservations that Novikov. Around a shot her, she had. US on the guest list because she was like, she really want to be around nick. She wanted to meet new niggers, so she was like. I got us on the guest list. He'll sit us at the table and I'm like Bitch I. Don't do promoter tables, even the states, but okay I'm in another country I'll do it so instead of catching an to the club, one of the dude that really like her right now was like y'all I'll pick you up and drop you off the club and her eyes. She's like well now. Between got to pay for an. Seeing real innocent right, okay wrong. He picks us up from the fucking dinner. We go like I guess I'll show you the whole story because but I'll make sure we drive about fifteen minutes away and we noticed. We're still in the car. The Club is only about five minutes around the corner type ship. So we're like what direction are we going in? Because my friend is not recognizing the direction we're going in. This is like miles Nah I gotta go pick some up. No my mega I hopped out of the car so quick I said Ma'am were calling an uber because what you're not going to do. Is Anything up while I'm in the car with you and there was. No. But you either a businessman or your scam or a street Nigga? Whatever you are you going to pick some up having it in the car with me because I know what it is yeah to go down, we need to go pick it up, but it's now now to me. That's a run. I'm not coming with you on your runs, so I hop out the car and he's like Knob. Maybe growin do this. Man Back in okay I'll take you out to the club. We get around the corner from the club Oh. No! That's a sounded. We get pulled over, but it's a van. By police jumped out of the fucking van Nichols. Literally knock on the window Jesus. Ask them to pull it down. He pulled the down. He's being very like respectable. High officer was the problem because we did. We did absolutely nothing wrong. So he role the down and he's like where y'all going tonight did it up. Can I ask all of you guys. Step out of the car, please. We're literally on literally and I'm just I'm looking at my hunger like bitch i. told you to get you see if you listen to me and I'm looking at my homegirl like bitch what the fuck is going on! Next thing I know. She's a German citizen I'm a US citizen. They take both of our my passport. Her ID card. And I'm like what you need like here. It is I can give you my information. What do you need my card for? She takes it. She's like Oh. As long as we don't find anything in the vehicle will give it back. They have to police officers, all doors, open trunk, open flashlight, looking under everything and I'm just looking her in the tag. They knew the. Draw. She told me that that's what I said. That tag is marked and whether it's drugs or whatever they looking to get that. Nigga Mercedes Nice. He's telling its because I'm black his windows ten days to use black from behind it. So. I'm literally looking age on, and I said I don't think you understand mind you. My friend is much younger than me. This is her first time experience. She's twenty two veterans happen to me before so I'm looking and I'm just like you don't understand Adriana. If they find as little as a blunt in that car, we are all going to jail so I'm sitting here, talking to the other officer and And I'm just like listen I. don't even know what he's more focused. I landed today. You can look at the passport. Our notice people like she just met him a month ago and he is because he drove by. Liked it like where we all know what he's like. I'm literally like. I don't. Then I was like they. Say that name. Somebody that's pretty bitch and I was like technically Uber. Driver then I almost got. He's like this an Uber. Driver I said technically week. Over. So, they wasn't trying to buy that, so they're still looking so this is where. A few things happen to me and this is what I wanted to share with with the listeners. He starts getting the money. There's too negative one in the van I'll know. This is another reason why I got scared. As we're all put out, the driver's already handcuffed and I'm just looking like bitch white. He didn't handcuffs. Handcuffs they're questioning us, he's trying to say sorry to her, but now he's starting to look what the cops and this is where I realized and I didn't realize how much I had been affected that I had ptsd from what's going on here in the states and As he starting to get snappy with the officer, I'm yelling at him at this point like do exactly what he says. Stop with. The smart mouth stopped getting slick. Give him whatever he wants. Let's wait till the cars search stopped talking to him like that like I'm literally guys in the UK yet so I'm glad away. I only mention that because like in France. You went to your big rifles too much in. In, France yellow jackets is a big protesting thing going on, but they shoot out these metal balls. They're not can't kill you, but they'll like. Maybe knock off something, but in London. They do have guns so sure radio. He's I'm yeah. I I was I was just that I was thinking show they do at this point I was already coming up with how I was going to have my locked up abroad episode. was already thinking that content I was already. Jealous do you notice what the fuck my friend said? As soon as I fucking told her in the car. Let me get back to the sorry so I tell you house crying like a whole so. Finally, they find nothing in the car. We get our ideas back I. Say Jonah. We walk into the club. I, said Oh. British I have no gun so I'm sorry I apologize, that means that's why he was talking. He lists. Maybe that's why he was talking. I thought that the thought of the UK was one of the own. On. Okay okay. That's why they're always like six people taking someone out. There was six cops well in this car at once, so we're all getting the to check in the car. There's two questioning so that. Talk to the one officer and the other officers with us so finally they come back and they're like okay. Nothing's been found in the car. They give passport and ID back and we start walking away I'm like Adriana. We football to the club, so we walked back. They glaze him goes well they him, and he comes running to us at the end of the sidewalk, trying to apologize saying he's sorry. And all I do is burst into tears and I stay back home. They kill Y'all, and that's all I kept saying because he was so like. Getting so snappy with him and I just did not want to be part. I'm about to cry now. They were like you're so pussy, but I literally was like I didn't realize how much seeing all these black men die from the police affected me because I don't put myself in those situations and to be in that situation like I'm literally like I literally, had to tell my mom I, said `I therapy now like I didn't realize that missing the videos on instagram me reading the news articles. and seeing how many of our black men die being in that situation right there. I was just like. I was scared for him. I was scared for me because I know they looked. We were black women. So I know they want all of us gone and I didn't realize how it affected me so. Before I go to cry. I go to say this is why I realized when we talk about Dylan's Hood Nicholas. Street niggers scammers. This is why I know I. Don't put myself in those positions. His Manny, the sad thing about it is it ain't gonNA. Take a hood Nigga out. No, no, it's not going to die. However, my friend just got a new job I, said just because we were in the car with them. This would have affected your new job, I. I said. Do you think if I would've just called my my my job and said Oh by the way I'm in jail right now for drugs. Because that's what they have in here under. Wait till I get out. No, I would have lost my job and so even something that and this was a tip to you. Ladies, who if you're into men who may sell narcotics or carry around large loads of narcotics or anything? That could cause him to go to. Get in the car? Re Listening back to that. Might just add. that it doesn't even matter at this point if you are writing. With anybody with drugs at this point. My tip is to just be safe when you walk out of your door. we have seen black men taken from US for selling cigarettes. For being accused of using counterfeit ten dollar bill. We have seen people lose their lives for sitting in their living room. So even with that experience. And of course me feeling as though we were being pulled over for a drug related offense because that's what they were searching for in the vehicle. Literally just no know you can be pulled over. For driving while black so. Again this is just this all. We know it's a lot. And this next clip you're about to hear. actually comes from. A place of frustration we have. This podcast. Is. Black is fuck for reason. We have not away from that again. Shut out to our twenty seven white listeners, but this show is for us and so. In the next clip you're are about to hear wheezy. Kinda read for filth someone who felt offended? That we made this platform for us. And? You can Kinda here pretty much. Baltimore sentiments on our thoughts on that. Push out to our favorite one of my favorite podcasts the read. We. GotTa read your name names. We never really go up on. Anybody and Mandy replied this girl and she is very lucky I'm not going to say her name, but I'm just going to try to. All right I'm still I'm so irritated because I just fucking remember about this, so this girl writes in on a picture of Lisa splits in who came, and if you guys got to hear that episode, She's a fin dom who Michelle. Hope describes very radical. She a lot of opinions. She used the word white supremacy a lot. And had a lot of anger. She's been violated in a Lotta ways, so she told her story anyway. Here's the comment that please don't. Are you going to read it all okay I'm pretty bad yet. Is it okay so listen to try and then y'all can come up with your own opinion. y'All tonight! Is overreacting. IRAS overreact I responded in a fine way like you responded the way you should have nicely and. So I'm not overreact to non pc you did you should have done. We should be taken. Look, listen, listen. Tell you if. You listen to the comment. Thank you. Can I get my black card back Mandy about fucking loser, talking about I'm overreacting business. Nipple car back with top. I don't know. So I'm GonNa let them show. Let low. It's very hot in here. Which is why out I had a sweatshirt on all right read? This episode made me sick to my stomach. Forget the ignorance and prejudice that was pouring out of it as all caps, white child sexual harassment victim. Telling you this, take your explanation explanation of child abuse with white supremacy rapid in a gift paper. That didn't make sense and put it on. The shelf never opened again. I don't think you realize you're denying women to their own experience. Women of all colors body shame by men of all colors. The oppression of women stems largely which she's right on this. Men's desire for power and control the same need, which throughout history is driven men to try to conquer and subjugate other groups, nations, and oppress other classes and groups, and their own society drives them to dominate and oppress women. Since men feel the need to gain as much power and controls they can, they can steal away power control from women. They deny women the right to make decisions so that they can make it for them. Leave him and unable to direct their own lives so they they can do it for them. This is really long. Is this is why she? She was fast on that part? That pissed you off right. Do Do. says. Biological processes like sex ministration breastfeeding, and even pregnancy were discussing women felt themselves disgusted to, and that brings me me to the sexual power that brings them to the sexual power. Women have ever meant men resent that feeling is a sign of weakness, and women are to blame the other to produce it, and that means men can't complete the domination over women they may be able to force women to cover their bodies and faces like slaves, but any woman that's capable of arousing powerful and uncontrollable sexual impulses inside them. At any moment I got your call I got the call your podcast of black podcast, but you are so exclusive. It hurts me on a socio economic level. Mandy replied turns that everyone has own experiences. We've had many different people in the show. Sorry polices experiences different from your own. Perhaps we'll have someone in the show that shares your views i. just want to tell you something. I was. Read it and I gotta irritating and I. Thought about the words Socioeconomic and. How has this impacted your money or your job or your livelihood? Because let's take it for a second. You love to capitalize that you were white so on socio economic level. How the fuck did you get offended economically I. Mean Really. When black PODCASTS are the minority? Black people are the minority. What the Fuck Are you? How are you really affected by hearing a black girl? Tell her. Her fucking struggle, and then here you already white fucking tears about how your left out how the fuck did Lisa feel her whole, fucking light or every fucking black girl that goes through ship, even especially if it's what the white man and someone saying Oh. Hey, you know, it's okay. Get over it, but now we gotta cater to your mother fucking white ass on our black podcast. podcast because God forbid. We have some black bitch on here. Talking Shit about somebody that looks like your Daddy. No, the fuck you didn't and if it's such a problem you should never have ever have followed. Are Black asses half black asses? Whatever the fuck you WanNa say assignment indulged different. Even bring it up. You sound dumb. I know it's a black podcast but I'm heard bits. Bits shut the fuck up. Do know any black girls have been heard. You know how many black girls were feeling, Lisa not to mention how I was embarrassed, and we had black men on here talking about Spanish women and how they're better. Do you know how many black girls were hurting and where the fuck where you? You weren't offended because your hair is good to talk youth. Monica Rica Fuck? You Fuck you. Fuck you. Fuck you, fuck you. Most of the girls that are domes are white. Do you know how many black ones out there not a fucking lot not a fucking lot? She's feticide for being black, being big being whatever and here you are being heard on a socioeconomic level. What does that fucking mean? Did this podcast really take you away from work today? Because you were so fucked up? Anything that you listen to is catered towards. You is catered to your demographic and one fucking black girl. I swear to God like it. Almost she was this man. Yeah, this is. Where people he's always looking like and if I sound what am. I. Feel like we've always like we ride for any fucking woman. Bitch I new asshole for having the nerve to bring another black pitch black gas pocket, bitch, you have to go, and if it fucking sacrifices me. Listener away what she said I don't really the whole listener away. We just thought. I told Mandy when I started. This show that I didn't want it to be a black podcast. To be inclusive inclusive of everyone lucky if that's what we to do that, we had to do because if you can't sit and listen to a black girl, tell her feelings, but you gotta go. You gotta throw the whole person away. fucking, leave their one star review suck. My Dick can kiss my ass. I don't even know Lisa. I never spoke to her again, but I can tell you. I get it a lot of other white people. LISTEN TO A it. No one's out there and said Oh. My God, she's talking so much shit about one can't stand they lean, and I'm sell offended bits, Betty. She was offended when you sat there and said you were hurt on socio economic level. Affect you. I know you are so happy. You got that shit out. Who that's all I had to say, and that was the lead for. Today shout out to crystal and Kyrie This was hurried, and I think that they would approve of this message. Actually 'cause I meant it and mind you. This is coming from someone with a white, asked Daddy. The Flex White men works away. People has friends that are white. I'm offended on a socioeconomic fucking level bitch. You took me out my Goddamn job. I might lose money from our show on an economic level from talking shit. Out of her fifty. All the fucking nerve to do this. She on our Goddamn Graham and you're lucky. Bitch! The you wrote your aspects, right? That's why I'm not thinking that loss out of my money. Anyway. I'm done anyways. So? You. Guys this is your first time listening I promise. This doesn't happen often. She's just really angry about a comment that we received from one of our listeners, and I think it's good We express this. We show you guys so much love, and we appreciate all the love that you guys have given us however, even on the last episode. We just talked about how people do. This was definitely one of the comments that we got back that. Got Reaction. Do. You think I'm still overreacting, I think. You said your points. I I didn't feel that emotionally connected. But We're not going to introduce I. Guess our guest. Michelle hope has something to say about that and Well. It's warm in here. I think that what we need to remember is that there's a long history of white feminists who are very racist. Long History Fair and I think that what I'm hearing I did. I don't know who this person is. I just walked into this mess. I do love Lisa. I met her Afro Punk. WHO's The baddest bitch ever? NIPPLES OUT OVER! She goes hard. She was so hard, but for a reason, but we ride for women people period. Go hard unless you're an instagram up, not gonNA. Get into that, but I will say went through. I mean we all go through problems? But I do believe I mean my mom is white and she is a feminist, and she is a lesbian, and she has been in the fight for a long time before I was even here. She was a part of the movement but even I have had have come to Jesus moments with my Mama like yeah a pause. We'll white woman like right? Down every. With, people looking at you like what are you are? You? Don't walk into a store and people following me around for the same time for for reasons like Oh. You might rob us, and you know was interesting. When when my mother and I I love my mother. My mother and I. had that come to Jesus moment you know. It was hard for her to hear. From her grown child, but then you know. She left New York. She came to visit me from Indiana to me and she left and she went home. She processed and she was like while. You're right, right. She was like you know and. It's totally different experience and when I say, my mother has always been a part of the movement. My Mom has said on a board that really fought for women's equity, and she when I was growing up, was on a board of a women's arts and music festival that happened in Indiana I always call it like Lilith fair before there was Lilith. And when she was a part of that after we had this kind of come to Jesus moment, and then she thought about it, we had a conversation. She was like you know Michelle at that time when you were little because I would go to these festivals, kids camp, and it was super weird, because it was like Astro travel and dream, catcher, type, vision, boarding shit, but whether it was possible riots. And she said you know. The black women always said they needed their own kind of section in the space, and we would give them pushback like why. We're all fighting the same fight at after we have that come to Jesus moment. She was like Michelle. You taught me that I was being discriminatory I what we should have. It's awesome created space. Hopefully, she even understands where we zeze station came from instead of here hearing, you know the anger and we voice, she actually sits backs sits back and realizes that she's not sitting here, shaming her or anything like that I was really to understand that. Felt like. Lisa singled. You know people out, or whatever like. She singled herself out to say. I'm waiting. You did this white right? People are going to have so many different experiences women that go through so many traumatic experiences different men. You have to appreciate each person's story for sure. Don't get me wrong. There's things I've heard that I'm like damn. That's too much on different podcasts and stuff like that, but you can't shit on that person for, and this is exactly why I don't WanNa do sexual harassment episode sometimes, because never know someone's journey and we didn't know Lisa would go there and grateful that she did because Marley. Do not know lease was going to go there. I mean I thought LE-. Let's talk about some. Hail No, no, because part of the. Diving is stemming from her experience and I am for that but you know I'm just saying and I love. The other voice you heard in that episode was Michelle Hope shot out to her She actually joined me for the Briana Taylor Vigil on one twenty, fifth and Adam play in Powell Harlem. This this past weekend and I just want to thank her for everything. She's done, but just listening to this conversation was. I WANNA say triggering, but when into why my statement last week was so hard to get over my mom, even just called and we've been having just the struggle in how we are communicating right now as you guys know I I I'm black as hell, but I was raised by a white mother. And there's just been some some difficulty in that I do WanNa shut out also to the listeners who have reached out to me in my DM's for those who are not black, but who are raising. Black Children. And all the confusion that they're currently facing and I talked to my mom literally yesterday and she was like you know I'm okay with hearing that you hate white people I know that you love me, but she's like she's hurt by how white people are and she hates that she's white. Sometimes, because here she is raising three strong black women Her partner is black. Her Nieces and nephews are black, and and she has gone out and protested. Orlando and I'm grateful for that, but like I said as far as those white listeners and those. Non Black people who are raising black children. The only thing I can say as far as advice is to educate yourself. And more than anything I think what I've taken away from. This is checking your own. Check your mothers, your uncles, your brothers, your sisters, those individuals who are not black. Check them when they are wrong I think that as black people we have tried and tried and tried and tried again to tell y'all what the fuck y'all are doing wrong and we've shouted at the top of our lungs and y'all. Don't hear us so when. Our white allies, and our Latina, allies in our people of color who are not black allies are asking us what the hell they can do. I would say check your kind. Check them when they are wrong and let them know that they are wrong and be willing to stand there and lose a CO worker. Lose a friend. Because they were. Not Fighting, the same fight as you day meant to be a part of us. The next I'm about to play. Many of you may not have heard. It is a clip from a bonus episode with Brianna of these super trip. Talk podcast and we get into. Eighty deep conversation, regarding color ISM and racism in the Latino community and whether we allow. The Latino community a pass on saying that the N. Word we also get into the conversation regarding culliver them in what we I have faced as biracial women, having a black ass podcast, and identifying as black women We get into that conversation as well so. Buckle up. Turn up the volume and get ready for this clip. Dominican Look Like, they're black. The dudes I feel like they got little. Extra Curl. Curl pattern in their hair. Dude, we share an island with. Come on like it's we if you saw my family, it is the most diverse looking racial group of course like my grandfather. My sister was passing black, passing these things. We were like friends. Every time we'd go 'cause we don't look alike, but she looks passing my cousins. My grandfather's black doesn't interesting. Black passing is white passing, but why not? Just say she's blades? Blades for like a I'm actually this is the so they would understand, but from my listeners I. Say black passing because they don't really. They're not hip with those terms yet. What your never heard lasting blah, so I use it like. I've heard white passing I've heard black passing from Middle Eastern people and when they reference. Middle Eastern, people, but I've never heard. People say that Latinos aren't black and I just think that's a very. Limited way of thinking like Latinos are one of the most racially diverse groups of people like Latinos are Black Latinos are also white. You know what I mean. It's like a very odd statement to say. We're starting hot. Where do you think? That, they wouldn't get in the psychedelic community. There are mostly white because I was saying like Bitch Twenty twenty. They fuck no like the sensitive times and how people WANNA like beak? That's interesting I would just say but I say black. My sister called considers herself black. She treated like a person. She works at Boston. Children's Hospital and they'd be treated like not the best you know what I mean Ryan fucking sucks especially as my sister Ann like to be honest with you when you are Dominican. She's older than me. She always got treated worse because I was a little later right and that was shit that I saw as a kid like even my mom. My Mom's a fucking con. Sometimes I think about the way she beat her I didn't get that treatment. Or the way Mike, Aunts. Talk to my versus how they talk to me. Wow, and your own family I mean Color Ism Israel within the family base to think just to be hurtful like I've seen. I've seen conversations or like heard them within Latinos. About how maybe their family would whether it's pressing their hair, telling them me hard to find someone or bleaching, but I've never beaten on the fuck. Oh my God like you wouldn't believe. I would do the same shit as a kid. My sister would do it. My sister will get hit for it shit. He's the things that I'm talking about in therapy now. I'm super close with my sister who has said her birthday today and I'm. I'M GONNA I canceled my day today to go to her. She was like I. Don't feel in a way, but I feel like I. Own my own sister reparations for the amount of shit that I wasn't able to provide her as a kid empathy or like seeing that she was going through a tougher time, she was also overweight. Imagine that like Oh, it was just a lie and and so yeah I. She's a black woman. Period if she she gets treated like that out. So ninety like that's the thing that really pisses me off was as a kid recounting memories and thinking about X. Memories that I have that she does it she was there for. Like I was recently talking about like a family reunion. We have when we were like ten. And she remembers she didn't get fed. What she didn't get fed at this party and I was talking to her about this sound culture that we had that was amazing issues like didn't. They? Didn't feed the aggregates though we've had the conversation about Like the uncomfortable of even Latino saying the N. word. and so even having the conversation with you I guess this goes into why I don't like when they say it. because specifically growing up in Orlando and being friends like my friends growing up majority of them. Even if they were black, they were either Jamaican Haitian. Just because of the town I grew up on, but my best friends were also Colombian and Mexican, and in terms of how they treated. Black people is why. I don't want to give Latinos of any. Origin the right to use that word because they have been just as oppressive or racist towards black people as white people. Black people also that we all the black people. Show. That's true, but what she's saying. That far a different. I've had Latino friends. I've watched feedback back. People crazy to we're from. Lever Boston's. We're from Florida's. You've got a lot more like in schools. I honestly what Hep rallies or segregated everyone would bring their fucking flags so I went to Oakridge high school I went to walk in middle school like I went I, lived on on ochre on the west side of town, and then I went to high school in Pine. Hills, so in Florida like we would have pep rallies, and during pep rallies literally you'd have your Jamaicans and a section. Your Haitians in the section your Mexicans you Puerto, Rican and everyone would bring their flags, but we would segregate ourselves as teenagers based on what countries like we were from. Throw that. At my school specifically was like all of the schools that I went to over ninety percent block like blacker or Latino. I didn't go to any school really with any white kids, except for my freshman year I got into a magnet program for tea, production, but. Me being around, even my friends families growing up I remember them blaming me for their daughters dating black men. I remember. Yes might like literally like my friend was Colombian growing up and you'll we. may actually meet some of them at the Orlando but I just remember like them blaming me for them dating black men I remember. Certain, music or people that we like them being like using the N. word in a bad way like to where they literally to me, Latinos have a press shown hatred towards black people. The same way I've seen white people do so I. don't agree that all, Latinos not. Never say Oh, well. You said Latinos didn't use the word right, but. I think a lot of I have an issue with the Afro Latina. And Latino blanket the only close friend that I have. That says that Sharon is. That, he's you know he's athletic. He's he'll say for Latino but I just really feel like. Like there's this other dude. I know that talks about how he's Afro Latino and I feel like he does it, so he could say Nigger I. Know I'm the extra. It's a feeling I feel like. There's a weight when you say it in like Oh no this when Mero says the N. word. I don't know I understand. He's Dominican is our Dominican. So Black Shit to me Meryl's black. He's Latino. Dominican We'll say both. He's not black. No, he's black. He's so Dominican. What is it going to be? What is it? Guys wait? which mural the? About Jesus is the. Here. Here's why Merrill is. What you would say is black passing Ryan Grim, but there are a Lotta Afro. Latino people with I would even, and this is just me looking at you, not even. I would even call you for letting no soy, but also don't think you're black passing, so I feel like Nigga can't be used. Is that weird I? If there was a meter, the metric is the way people say I can tell when you weren't raised in this. You're grandfathered in this like when I can tell when people are just saying it to acclimate or like. Using it like on some. Type Shit appropriating shit. It's a weight of course when you talk about it, it's hard to context relies because it's a field. Just feel like Afro. Latino doesn't give you a Nigga Pass I. Don't believe that, but I gave that up. Like Afro Latino People like when you're when you have. Black skin is an Afro Latino feel like that's different. No, it's fucked. fucked up because I'm I'm mixed. You know what I'm saying and I don't have black skin, but at the end of the day I feel like this is a new thing that I've never seen before. That's come about since like I would say since I turned twenty five suddenly started seeing. This thing just moved up here. Though this dominicans all around here. Okay University I. Mean We're we're? We're from Florida so yes, New York is probably. On North on on a larger scale to as far as Dominicans, but No one like there was no just white and black in any question for the throwing up can. After Latino, say the N. Word No. MA'AM I think if. I think so here's A. It's a no for me. It's not wherever I do have A. There's a merrill thing for me. She just said his marriage bureau is. Because I didn't know which one. What makes it was these I don't know. Which one do they not appear to be black though no one looks Hispanic. Blaming me. Right now is meant looks so he looks mixed. He's not diesels is clearly the black one if you see both? One looks because he's attained this huge success. And now like does that. Give him a credence and credibility to say the n word because that's classic. That's not fair. That's an interesting point of view because I I. Guess that's where it's like subjectivity because I just said Oh. If you're a Latino Lexington, then I feel like you can't when I would say. Black but see, but see. Here's the thing to me. Your sister yeah, even though she is in in the skin of an Afro Latino. And would I guess identified like? View to us as someone who's black me knowing that she grew up in a family that was that was racist or presented on my sister, says the N. Word Right Right, but that's what I'm saying, but to me like even like my now like to me. I joke all the time and I. Tell her she's White. Passing. Be like Bro. Don't say the word on the because I know the people that you grew up around our races so to me being that you grew up around people who have that mentality to me that takes away the fact that you could use that word even more because the people around you. Showcase that of which is why we don't let why people say the word right? There was a level of oppression behind it and to me if you were oppressed in that space, and you grew up and the people that you love around are oppressing you because of the color of your skin and you being black presenting Iva problem with you even using that word. At the end result friends with that person who the person. Well we talk on the phone. I'll be like I'll hang up on like. Don't inward, okay go! We. Talking about and I. Every time she says it, and so we're. We're talking. I'd be like Oh. You can't say brought only because she's I. Don't know as you'd like skin what is? The look why you White Latino. Ever really interesting. Yeah, you're. In. My Dominicans would think that's white right, so don't say to work, and so I wanNA. Get the extra extra fee. That you brought this conversation, because so we have such a diverse listenership in the war hive of course probably. The. Diverse listenership. No, Oh, I'm about to bring up some shit that I would just say as far as the listener. The diverse listenership in our Hor- hive is is appreciated, but also real quick I know we're talking about Latinos right now, but I recently got a DM from a white girl, and it was just like On my stories from the podcast and she asked if white people would feel comfortable coming to our show she wanted to. And I'm just like absolutely like. We. We make fun of white people all the time like it's just kind of. Because you guys are both GonNa love this I actually have already talked about this on an episode. That's come out with Eddie but love, him. Episode was Funky so recline. He was so funny when a we mentioned science like Eddie so touching go because I mentioned something about science and he goes man. He doesn't science. Are you serious, and then he? But she smart. He's he's. He's great, and I like the he fits, but he ain't got a leg Irish people like that. They don't have to maneuver. Put this voice on, but anyway I read this Eddie. Because he's Peruvian, he let's you know, but I really WanNa read this again. So Mandy has never heard this I was gonNA. Do It on an episode Mandy, but that was like fucking. I'll do Eddie 'cause he's Latino. You guys have already heard this, but this is even better because you're Latino. So this is from a patron who is topped here. wanted to let me know that before she I went on the left. My feelings on this I called to Latino Friends of mine. To Shit, there's no signal in here is not loading, but just to tell you what's going on. Mandy and I made a comment on an episode. Fifty six. Valentine's or Ballantine's where I told her I was on a cruise and that I said Oh now that we're popping I. Don't know when Black people look at me, if I remember you saying that or or a black thing and then Mandy said horrible decisions is a black thing and I said Oh you right. That's true. Here is the listener Diem I didn't I yeah I! Don't know how low easy I know. This may not get seen, but this has been bothering me for quite some time I understand the motive behind your shows. Outline is for the awareness and a black community but I do get offended. That I paid fifteen dollars a month to hear about how horrible decisions is made for Black Women when I'm a mixed ethnic Latino. Relate to your show as well I've always been able to sideswipe the comments about Latino Women, etc, I do appreciate the love for Afro. Latino but from Latinos from all areas on a spectrum can relate to you. I don't understand how you can just always make horrible decisions of black thing when your audience is. is so broad especially when I know you're I know how y'all feel, and I keep reading living it out especially when no matter the type of Latino we're still minorities, yes, or aren't the same, but we still deal with one on the regular black women have overcome slavery, prejudice segregation fixation for years, but so have we a lot of our mothers and fathers, their countries, when no civility strength our education just to make a better world for us. I didn't say we had a bad. We have similar struggles And this show relates to women. I feel like the show was a woman show. We don't have a comfort or space to speak on the stuff. Because how do I asked my Mexican Grandmother About Sucking Dick? But it's taboo to speak sexuality and a lot of cultures and societies I. Just hope this comes across. You guys understand this bothersome when I've invested in you. Guys and I'm placing a category where you don't feel. I don't feel relatable. we're doesn't feel relatable. I'm going to include the clip that bothered me. Please be aware of our love She also mentioned that she did this with another patron going to wrap up when I said you guys heard it last week, but I thought about a lot what I said to her and. I was like you know what. It isn't a woman show. That's true because we have many male patrons, but it is a black thing. She's just welcomed in the space. And then I told her no one white has ever written me this. And they know this is a black show. No one ever written me this. The latinas that come to the show and I joke all the time and say Maria Maria is in the audience. They know it's a black ass. Bucket show, and no one has ever fucking said this, and what really pissed me off about what she said is I invested in it and you're making it black thing Monday I went to see Jesus and Mary about five times probably spent over Iraq and more than that overflying to their shit. Shit and when diesel goes on a Dominican fucking rent, and I don't know what he's saying I'm sitting there appreciating it and not saying I invested in this and you didn't speak English because I know that's his shit. I know when I do Latino should is their shit. I supported at Desi. Show an Indian comedy show I to be honest with you. Half of the jokes as many Indians there I really good, but I was like fucking like he's funny. I'm fucking would like I. Want to support your she. How dare she and I'm getting more angry of the weeks? Go on, say that. She was mad that she invested in it. 'cause it's not an inclusive thing all these. White people on our Patriot that ain't set a fucking word and I know out of the two of US I've probably been way more out there with you and I'm the one that the White Guy Fugger that says white right like. I? Don't I just don't like. She said that black woman overcame slavery prejudice veges. if you look at what's going on just even right now. In Society, black women are still fighting struggles that are outside of slavery, all of those other as far as like the war on wage gaps what black women feeling still the federal to of of a lot of other cultures. There's still things that we like we have not. I need to even. That black women go through more than can stop right there i. that's why it's funny. 'cause with the episode with the doctor where you said no talking about black women I said I'm talking about Latino women to win there with the rate that they're dying in hospitals. It's literally a one percent different. I'm not saying they don't go right and struggles, but we're not Latina, chicks so I. You're actor. I. Don't have the Latino experience show one in my family. Black through more shit. I'M GONNA. Tell you right now. I'm not I'm. Not GonNa. Say I'm not going to be to someone's experienced black women on on average. Yes, they do, but I'm not going to speak to hers. None of us have been through slavery and Amir. You or her, so I don't want to speak to that I'm not GonNa do this stupid. fucking black girls go do more than the Latino girl. That's fucking dumb. I think what should. Should be said. Is You're talking? The two girls that have grown up in a black community have a black perrine identifies black women and then mad that it's not a I think it's a woman like fuck you. It's not and I didn't say the fuck you said to her at first, but now I'm starting to kind of get more angry because I know that like marine doing these shows. Even Texas, which is so many Latinos no one gave me that energy at all, and I'll be talking shit. No one gives me that energy at all. You know who wants to get fake mad about a Latino accident black girls. That just fucking Dole like me. Why girls that don't fucking light me them Latina laughing I'm talking about how I. Sound like they're fucking grandma. She's really picking some Shit I don't even get you. Don't have any fucking shows. There are that like have Latinos and host them go listen to that I. I don't listen to white sex podcast because I. don't relate right, so you know what I'm saying. I listen to white comedy podcast because I have that kind of humor and I enjoy it. You're listening to those blacks because you feel like. There's a comfortability in it that sticking with you. I can't understand how you could even say you can't invest in it when it's still mrs not to mention you also said Oh. We're all minorities, so you can't do a minority business. I have to be more fucking inclusive to you. That's not fair like literally made this fucking space. And initially. When I had this podcast, idea came to me, I didn't even tell her I wanted to be black is the second episode was already a black fucking thing period? There was no going around Ed I'm not about to go back because the audience big announcing. Okay, no never mind. It's not a black thing anymore. You know what there's a lot of black things that fucking blow up and people become millionaires, so I'm not gonna now shy away from it and say it's a woman thing now Nigga is being are not when nick are holding us down and also investing much like you fucking child to see every. Day I WANNA shout out sticky Tang rich. Yeah, the. The amount of men who have come to our meeting and have put their their partners on is just I wouldn't say as tremendous as the women listeners but it. But it goes to show that men are listening to this and bringing this to their homeboys to their partners to their to their cousins to their friends. So I do want to shout out to our listeners because I think that they are just as important to our growth as the women are so yes. I know we've had conversations about feminism and women's support, and all the and I know that we do talk about race a lot on this show as well, but I know that there has been a strong focus in making this a safe space for people of Color, but again we have a black experience where identifies black women, so outside of you guys? Maybe not filling inclusive and all of the conversations I not only want to apologize if you're offended, but also say sorry, don't give a fuck. It is what is the only thing I'll apologize forever? Staying fucking slur whether it was our word and I want to apologize for the m word I know you don't want to apologize for it, but to me your small person, or if you're someone that has like mentally challenged people in your family and stuff like that and I've ever said something like that I'd apologize for. For that offense, I'm not going to fucking apologize for making a joke on your nicotine shit, so if I wanNA fuck and say Latino necas Shit I'm grouping in I'd say white and Shit I fucking give people I know for a fact equal trolling. Okay so I'm sorry. Can I ask you tell me how you feel about as long as those are a couple things. This such a small percentage of this is a very and she's anomaly. This is a fan who identifies with a lot of what you guys have to say. And something triggered her. That sparked this this message. You know I wouldn't give up to which way I wouldn't even get mad at it because I just I see that this is someone who is maybe a little lost in her own space I think and she's projecting one. I have a question, though just a popped into my head and I'm sure some you're listening to, but they don't have the privilege of being in front of you. Do you guys get hate from black women like black women? Telling you guys that Y'all are not. On the beginning of the show, not so much now now, but in the beginning of the show they said that are, we didn't have enough dark skin guests on the show. That was true. They also sell. Wasn't that wasn't bullshit? I disagree they. Also they also said that our experience because of how we look, and the color of our skin means that we haven't gone through some of the block troubles that they feel like. Can we really relate to? Yes, so we've had that question from I think more. Things to say, that's the one thing, I'll say what she's saying is different from from those comments. Saying that if if we've made blanket statements for black people, that's that's a fucking thing. The. Only thing I don't agree with is people are picking choosy over who can say Nigga and I've had a few people that y'all say too much. This isn't entitled. She's an entitled Fan, and by the way, the more you guys grow that going to happen more. Like. Let's just say you guys. Put a hand blow. If you guys are on network one, you guys I see this blowing major. There are going to be certain things like executives being like kid. We expand the way we speak about certain things so that we do include more minorities. Would you guys ever change your script? Or would you keep it on the podcast on TV I would I don't know if Mandy feels the same, but I I come from a TV background and I know for a fact that that would be the first I. Know I I'm not even GonNa lie. Lie Like my first conversation we are possibly talking wanting to expand the the podcast into TV format, and just because I think we've grown in audience with being exactly who we are I think one of my first questions was. How many dicks folks pussies negatives are we going to have that? We can say like I still want to be very true to us not and not wash it down for how we speak. What are lingo is what our demographic is, but I I sure would open it up to having Indians. Come on and express their IRA I one hundred percent. Down for that for TV versus the PODCAST for sure, why is it? So there was a lot. There was a lot in that. again. If you guys are interested in hearing more, you can join us. For more discussions like this at Patriotair Dot com, backslash horrible decisions. And before I leave you guys off with a final word from W- easy I do want to leave off by saying and telling you to say her name. Pamela Turner. Say Her name Sandra Bland. Say Her name Brianna Taylor. Say Name Kerlin gains. Say Her name a Tatyana Jefferson? Say Her name Shantelle Davis. And again guys continue to educate yourself, and let's continue to fight for justice for all of those wrongfully taken from us. just let you know guys. Although you have heard my voice. This has been a collaborative effort. between I picking out these specific moments in horrible decisions, and I am going to leave. You guys with Lisi She was just out of town and we definitely instead of not having an episode at all. We wanted to put this out, and so I am leaving. You guys with easy and I. WanNa. Thank you guys and everyone who has done their part in the black lives matter movement and fighting for justice. So here goes. We guys and again thank you. I, WanNa thank you for getting to the end of this episode. Because I understand that this could have been triggering for you. Honestly, there's a lot of podcasts I don't listen to if I feel like they're going to upset me. But. I love you and have happier year. And if you've been a longtime listener I'm happy to know that you may remember those moments in been some of the ones to email us. Tweet us and talk about your experiences to. Just want to say something before I Let you go if you don't. If you follow me on Instagram, you know about black power wall and probably know that have a Phantom Mex and while a lot of people like to argue and say that he changed his life for the better still always believed binding needs necessarily that things needed to get done. And in regards to conversations that you may have. Whether it, be on social media or with someone you know our colleague were someone. Even who's black, says Oh. Yeah, but why not peaceful and talk about looting and rioting? Even if you wouldn't have done it yourself, even if you're not the person that would break a window, we all need to understand that. Looting and rioting is war, and after war, people get what they want. Wars for a purpose now one just goes in and starts taking oil and in money and fucking shit up because they felt like it was Tuesday is a reaction to something, and that's exactly what's happening in our lives. We're watching people who have been the house for months. WHO'VE LOST THEIR JOBS? Who Have No fucking money? Watch black men women die in front of their face. On TV. On their twitter in their phones in their hands and Seeing that and feeling angry and wanting to fuck shit up. And Fuck Shit Up. Is that a lot of things get done? You may have heard me talk about. when I was in Paris with scissors, and how many riots and protests we saw things on fire, setting people on fire insane, but the French get what they want because their government scared of them, and I think a lot of our issue has been that. We don't press the government that we fund enough. We're tax paying citizens and got the nerve to. Men In uniform. That we pay to not shoot, US, that's insane. That's fucking crazy. and honestly. This is exactly why. I wanted people to donate on. Behalf of bail bonds for protesting. I'm not saying that it's bright that the mom pop shot guy don't don't get me wrong. But I understand that soldier die where I understand that things happen that people get affected. And it's sad. But it's just anger and it's exhaustion. and. We have to make sure that we're educating people about that. When we are having these conversations, these tough conversations don't let anybody run over you about something. You're passionate about no matter who you are. If you are black if you are Latina if you are worried if you're Asian, if you're brown of your Indian, whoever and you are passionate about the things we are passionate about. Make sure you can run those fucking circles around him when this gets going, make sure you can do it. Just. Do your best to keep yourself in the know that is the best thing we can do. We have it right in our hands right where you're listening to this podcast, the youtube whether it be fucking your phone, whatever please make sure I implore you to do your best to have high level conversations about things that are affecting us for the rest of our lives. Congratulations to you for listening to a podcast like this or Or other people may not like the opinions, but we all know we're going to be on the right side of history thirty years from now we talked our kids, and they look at pictures and ask us what the fuck was going on that week and we knew we were part of that. I want to personally thank you guys that helped me fundraise between some of our listeners and just instagram falling that I haven't twitter. We got to twelve thousand six hundred something dollars to go to protesting bonds, and it was amazing to see people band together like that and I I a lot of faith in humanity in his moment, and maybe I'm naive to say that, but I really know that the world is starting to see how we've all been feeling. Next week I'm looking for. It's making guys laugh again. I'm looking forward to. Figuring out WHO's making this outline I'm looking forward to Mandy and I press a guest. Laughing I'm really excited for that because I want some normal back to, but the normal that I. Want back is what I used to have an more i. want things to change. I know you do, too. I. Love You for listening. I love you for sticking through this end and. I just briefly again much like I did on that black lives little thing. last Sunday I just WanNa take thirty seconds to where. We breathe through this. We start a great day. We let a lot of heavy weight offer shoulders. and. We come back to center. So I'm going to take thirty seconds. If driving. Sorry you're. You're out in public my bad. But if you can. Close Your eyes. L., ticket deep breath through our nose. Out through your mouth. Into your nose. Out Your mouth. Just doing a quick. Thirty second meditation. I. Want you to feel it right in the front of your forehead. Set a good intention for the day said set something. You'RE GONNA teach yourself today, something that will make you feel good. In nose. Out their mouth. I- No means Maya. Yogi Psychic Guru. I know what to do and I need to chill the fuck out. I love you guys. I can't wait to see you next week piece.

Mandy Lisa Michelle hope officer London Orlando Black Children Black US UK Brianna Taylor Florida partner Adriana harassment Europe Afro Ryan Grim France New York
Food for Thought: Volume 43

The Semi-Social Life of a Black Introvert Podcast

26:27 min | 6 months ago

Food for Thought: Volume 43

"Places please. His? took. Don't. Mind! going. Always going on your air, bring you food for doubt. Volume Forty three here with the semi social life of a black introvert podcast I. Thank your for as always tuning in all around the world to listen to the semi social black introvert. Make his way. Through Life y'All I. had a a tough beginning of the week. I can't front. You, know the news of. The murder of George. Floyd by the hands, or in this case by the NIA law enforcement hit hard because. I still wasn't over. The death. Of a monarch, Berry still wasn't over the death the murder. A Brianna Taylor. I can't breathe is what George Floyd said is. The officer believe officer shot in his. His name had his knee on George Floyd's neck for over eight minutes. You know the same sentiment was felt all across his nation. We can't breathe because we keep on being hit back to back to back with no room, no time to catch our breath. With these senseless. Killings murders of black in. Black men and black women. His country. This world. People around cities all across this country in this world of EM- protesting the death of George Floyd. News hit hard in in when a hit. I'm not confront. heartbreaking. At if you know, sit down and sort of realizes sweet like yo I'm little. Stress a little on edge. Because I'm tired of seeing. Black men black women black children. Being shot and killed. By law, enforcement, I'm tired of seeing black men. Black Women. Black Children. Being murdered by vigilantes here in America. These vigilantes can gun down black men, black women and black children. Because they understand this country, Texan. Historically this country has given them permission do so. I'm tired. Tired Man I. It's I'm tired of social media and seeing. Black men! Black Women! Black Children. Being killed. That's not what social media my mind is four. I WANNA. Look at some food. I WANNA check out like a beautiful picture of vacation spot. Some new shoes. I, don't WanNa see. Someone die. I don't WanNa see someone murdered. I know we have to use that tool. The tool of social media in order to show our story. But isn't it a shame that that part of our story? Is having a show, black men, black women and black children being murdered. In order for people to believe us. And yet, and still they don't. That's part of our social media. Part of our of our story of our of our existence here in America. Tiring. That is stressful. Today I am. I went. Down a protest, the city I'm in Columbus. Ohio. They've been protesting each and every day. Numbers have grown, and yes, they're busy interactions with the police that. have been less say. CHAOTIC AT BEST In which law enforcement have been? The ones provoking. And I'm sure to their been. Protesters provoking law enforcement? Not In large numbers. But there have been. Situations. That popped up like that. The city I'm in Columbus, Ohio. The tensions are high much like every. City. That is protesting here in the United States, and really across the world. Tensions are high. People are tired. People are angry. People are fed up. So people take to the streets and. Yes there been some businesses have been damaged. Glass has been broken. Things Miss set on fire. Cities burned. Cities, burn and so have the souls of the people. who were inflamed were enraged at. A black man. Who Most? That are protesting never knew. Never came contact with. But yet. The videos the the visual. was enough for them to say you know what enough is enough. Let's March. I went down. To the protest. As a black man his thirties. Who understands who sees who has conversations with? My students were my family in their twenties. Who still remembers the fillings of being my twenties but I'm not in my twenty s anymore I'm in my thirties. I went down there to be. Of Support. To my younger brothers and sisters who are protesting. A went down there and I say this term a lot. Even thirty five and went down there as an elder. As a leader! To show my support to to show. That I care. Care about George Floyd, but also care about them. A went down there to sit down and listen to him. To show them that I respect them. Went Down there to? BE A. Person Peace. Within the pain. When I got down there, I sat down. Prayed. Protesters. Near me looking at the police police. Across the way protecting the state, House. Looking at protesters, And I sat down and I. Prayed. Simple prayer. I had the opportunity speech to a To a young African American woman. Who asked me like Yo? Why aren't you yelling? Aren't you upset? She didn't ask like from a perspective of. China interrogate me. But she honestly just wanted to know. My sister wanted to know. Why her brother? Was Yelling and if he was upset. Toda's like you know. My life is a protest. Black Man in America. WHO's an educator? WHOSE A COMMUNITY LEADER! Every step that I. Take is a protest. Every step that I take as a fight. From the moment I, wake up. To the moment I go to bed is the fight. For my life. For my rights. For my peace. No justice no peace. But had to fight so much for my peace, even in spite of not having justice. I have to attain peace even when I know the justice sometimes. Will Lewd me. We'll allude my my. Brothers and sisters. Each day, I go to work each day I. Go out some place. As a father as a husband. My voice rains. I speak up for my community. I speak up for the younger generation. Speak up for humanity. I told her like you'll for many people. Out here. This is a march. They're going to go out and March. March today. And I would join your our. Join the people on the march before me. This isn't a march. This is a journey. A Journey the I've been walking for thirty five years. So. My perspective is different. This isn't. A sprint. This is a marathon. The marathon. continues. And I was able to talk to and just have a conversation about. The marathon. How to how to maintain endurance hope. Faith it's a faith walk. Even with things don't look better, or or you're not getting your demanding justice, but not getting it now. You may not get it now. But. What about your then moment? You have to have the vision is still fight for the very thing that elude you. For the very thing that you can't see. You have to strengthen the patients to fight with a broken heart. Because your spirit isn't broken. I was able to have conversations a couple more of those conversations. Sharon with my. Brothers and sisters. In are all over were black by the way. My white brothers and sisters to. About the marathon a life. How to keep this momentum up. How to remember these moments that. We in your thirties and forties and fifties at. You could still tat back into. The moment. In which you had a fight. For your freedoms. No one of things I noticed while I was down there that I didn't really see that many. That many men. In their thirties, forties, fifties and sixties out. With the youth with the young with the with the young leaders. Not Delete tomorrow, but they're. The leaders are today. I didn't see people in the thirties, forties and fifties. I'm sure somewhere out there, but I would like to see more. I know some people might say like you're protesting. The is a young man's games young woman's game. No! Sugar game to. Their different platforms. Differ areas. Sometimes she had to get out your comfort zone and. Embrace. The fight from a different angle. And Show people your angle. So, people have this fight is on different corners. But encouraging the fight. And their corner? And then invite them to yours. Fight them over now up over to your. I I WANNA. Know like where are. The elders man like where where are these were, are you? Often talk about hip hop and how hip hop artists when they die when they're murdered when I look at pop smoke when I look at. Juice world. Descend name to. And when I when I read about dying in their twenties, like where are the elders where the people that are telling them know? Where the people that are saying I'm not here to make a profit off of you. I'm here to invest in you. Where the people that are telling no, you don't have to be this type of influences. You, not to sell yourself to being a fluent certain influencers who you are. You don't have to sell yourself. You have to ask yourself. WHERE THE ELDERS! They're serving the younger generation. Where the elders that are yes opening doors. And Trust me. I meant what I said. When I said serving. Where where are the elders that are opening up doors for the younger generation? How are you serving them? Some of that mindset is is what you know. They gotta earn it. No. One held the door open for me. Does that make it right? That someone had made. You work extra hard. To to you had to open up the door for your opportunity. And that they have to earn it. Does that make a right to? Someone screwed you over? It doesn't. That's some of our sentiment. Would they don't listen. There's no hope in this generation. Yeah, I hear all the stuff that we say about younger generation. In the same thing that that that we say about them, the same things said about us. So we take that same those those same words that we hated. And we internalize them, and then we project them upon this younger generation. And, so we push them away. As if We didn't go through the same thing. As if We? Don't know what it's like to be in our twenties. Or teenagers. We think we're so high and mighty, but really. We feel low. WHERE THE ELDERS! Where the leaders. Where the leaders that that understand that life is not about the mies about the we. That I push you. Move Us. That if you do, will I succeed. Where those leaders at. I looked around and in. I was so happy to see this younger generation just. Full of, Passion. FULL OF FIGHT! Get it. I WANNA fight to. GET PASSIONATE TO. But as you age, you learn. How to control your rage release, you should learn. As you age, you should learn or you learn how to. Sustain your passion. This is not. A sprint. This truly is a marathon. But you need an elder. Need a leader. You need a coach. You. Need someone that cares that loves you. His willing to invest in you to share that with you. You know I went home after the protests, a walked up there by myself and left. By myself. I left encouraged. Trust me I, know my voice is heavy right now, 'cause. His been heavy week, but I left encouraged. But, you know my walk by myself in leaving by myself. A lot of that is symbolic of experience of black men in this country. Or black women to. Blacks to? In which for? Many of us, if not all of us. This is. Why People March? Why people hold size that black lives matter after truly live this. After truly walked the sing out. Why people can March around downtown when it could be somewhat fashionable to protest? After really live this thing. Black lives matter looks cool on the sign in really and I appreciate it being on sign. I do. But after. This thing each and every day. After deal with the fact that some people don't find black lives, matter at all. Into also know that. was separates me. From having my face spray painted on a wall, saying R.I.P. Like George Floyd. I- Trayvon Martin. Like Flanders Casteel. Like Eric Garner. The Oscar Grant. Not, much. Because with some people see me. They see them. And they want me in the same. Position They are. Dead. On the ground. Alone. I WANNA. Encourage you all out there. All the leaders men, all the elders out there man. I. Don't care if you are team if you are. Your Twenties Thirties forties, fifties, sixties, seventies, eighties. Whatever age you are. You have the power. And really the responsibility to mentor. Those are younger than you. Issued assured duty is sure honor privilege. To Mentor, those that are younger than you to invest. In the generation. That is younger than you. Open up a door for him. Poor something positive to their lives. Year they may, not. Listen. The first time behead, neither did you? Show them some grace. Get outside of your comfort zone to meet them in a place of their fight. Hear their voice. Feel their passion. Connect with them on a heart to heart level. Provide them with some. Peace, in in their place a pain. Show, you're paying together. We need leaders. That aren't willing just to. Distance themselves from the fight. Or talk about those are leading the charge in wonder why the so unorganized I would do it this way. I would do it that way. Keep your criticism especially if it's not constructive. You have destructive criticism. You don't have constructive criticism. Your criticism is destructive. Switch it up. Be, a person that that invest. That pours. Positively, The Poor's love and encouragement. The poor strength to. The generation that is younger than you. I really do man like. The world needs. Your community needs to your family needs you. I need you? I need you to be the leader. That you know you are. We're all in a fight. Or all the march. All. In one way or another? Seeking peace and freedom. But I'll tell you what. I saw today. Is Much easier. It's much more. Enlightening. If you seek freedom if you seek peace. With your arms. linked. Somebody else. This power one, but certainly is strength. In numbers. Leaders. Elders. Your time is now. Don't Miss. Don't drop out. Of this marathon. On your mark. Get set. Go that's it. Ladies and gentlemen journeys over. The time. Breath. You I do. Parting is such sweet sorrow.

Black Women George Floyd Black Children America murder Brianna Taylor Ohio Columbus officer Berry United States Thirties COMMUNITY LEADER Glass Toda House China Sharon
If You Find This Conversation Uncomfortable... It's For You. Featuring Topsie VandenBosch

The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

1:08:03 hr | 4 months ago

If You Find This Conversation Uncomfortable... It's For You. Featuring Topsie VandenBosch

"The phone rang. PODCAST is a deer media production. She's a lifestyle blogger. extraordinaire than terrorists, nick and HE'S A serial entrepreneur a very smart cookie now lauren efforts in Michael Bostick, bringing you along for the ride. A major illness welcome to the skinny confidential. And her. Sometimes people don't hear the little people until you actually say something out loud, and not all the hush behind closed doors, because I think that that's why systematic racism and race in systemic racism has been rampant in our culture, since the beginning of time is because there's a lot of behind the scenes discussions about things, nothing's really brought. The life made it to Friday everybody welcome back to the skinny, confidential him and her show back in the studio. Feeling good that clip was. was more guests of the show today Topsy Vandenbossche this episode we are diving into a lot of topics that been longtime coming on the show talking about systematic racism, talking about prejudice in the office space, talking about how to be woke learning how to be woke, but those of you that are new to the show. My Name is Michael Bostick I'm a serial entrepreneur brand builder. Most recently, the CEO of the deer media podcast network to my right, not across the studio. My Wife Is My rock Iraq your rock. Just just introduced. I'm Lauren. Everett's the creator of the skinny confidential I am so excited for this. topsy is a fucking bad ass. You guys are going to be obsessed with her. I actually met her on instagram. She's a mind coach. She works with female entrepreneurs who are struggling with toxic thought patterns, negative thoughts and beliefs that prevent them from showing up and making bank in their business and I cried owners episode, and he cried like a little bitch. Yeah, you cried! That was cute Katie Lawrence. Okay? It'd be vulnerable once in a while. Yeah, I like that I think that's really cute. We're going to get some later. Creggan, don't make me cry. Going to be calling for a different reason, so guys stay tuned. Listen to why I cried into one. My wife does finds me so incredibly irresistible, okay? Like I said, topsy is a mindset coach. She's a clinical therapist and she's also true crime obsessed and she is going to drop some major illness on this episode with that. Let's welcome. The incredible beautiful gorgeous topsy to the skinny confidential him in her show. This the skinny confidential him in her. It's nice to be back in the studio with Taylor because you never know if he's actually doing his work or if he's watching porn masturbating, don't get me in. Trouble were already trying to get the soft opening of the office. We're taking listen this'll. People were taking the proper precautions I. Don't don't. He's not watching report about their. Social distancing. He's sanitizing. He's wearing masks I i. don't know about that, so yeah I if he's not we. Sound. Going okay, so we have topsy in studio. I. Love Tell Michael This off air, but I guess we'll talk about it. I love it. Okay, so how we met I put that in quotes. We were talking over instagram before everything that went down. DOC lives matter. And when not all went down, you went on your story and you were talking to the camera about multiple different things and you were talking about creators. Who you think can do better. Yes, an in one of them. You tagged me and I went to watch it. And I thought she's right. We can totally do better. We can definitely have more diverse guests on the show on the blog and just really agreed with you so. You and I said I, think I said. You're right or I don't know dead. You were like this is really. This is really This is good feedback. Yes, that was my whole point was to create like conversation, and not to like block it off because I do think when it comes to antiracism education, and like especially for your listeners who are not familiar. There's a method of calling out racism in a way where number wanted invites people into a conversation, so that can be. Be calling out, but creating actual steps like hey, here's what you could do to improve There's calling in where I don't recommend that people of color or black people feel like they have to call people in who are demonstrating racists, behaviors but I think that calling in could be reserved for white allies who are calling out other white allies like hey, let's have a conversation. How come you did that? Why did you think that that was okay? So that's like calling so my. My method is a mixture of both, but I really want to create conversation because I think that sometimes people don't know unless there. I hate to say it that way because I love you guys. I fucked with your podcast, but unfortunately sometimes people don't hear the little people until you actually say something out loud, and not all the hush-hush behind closed doors, because I think that that's why systematic racism and race end to systemic racism has been rampant in our culture since the beginning of. Of Time is because there's a lot of behind the scenes discussions about things and nothing's really brought the light all. This is based on extremely ignorance people because we are ignorant as a people we don't know and two people get uncomfortable things ignorant. They get uncomfortable making other people uncomfortable, so they think okay. I'm not going to address it and talk about they don't and so. I think there's a years what would I've observed exhibited here or what? I've observed throughout this whole process. I choose to believe that there's a the majority of the people in this country are well-intentioned, good people. There is a handful grew and I think that's the minute. There's a handful of people that are not well intentioned. People impacted when those people should be called out, and there should be light shed on them, and we should know about it, but the majority of people I choose to believe are well intentioned but scared to have hard conversations. And, so what happens is the conversation. Don't happen, and what we think is like okay, since we're not, we don't believe in say. We understand that people believe we're not contributing to a problem and by Nakajima As we see it, yeah, we. Were not part of it, but. Part of the problem is that people are unwilling to have these conversations so they way they are contributing to one hundred percent. First of all the pitch you sent in was incredible. Thank you. Dr Would hold on one second number. We can touch on it but I think you know. What would. I realized that this process is what I believe. The power of this show is and what Lauren and I try to do well, and of course can do better at is have conversations and share these conversations with people that want to listen for sure it's not necessarily like what we'd will learn and I do on the show. Most of the time has learned. People. And so and hopefully the listeners get a benefit of that learning, and and hopefully what these type of things do is they? Start conversations and get people more comfortable around them so? So you started the conversation on Instagram Story I responded and I when I responded I was very peaceful like Oh you were Ya not to you I felt very piece. Yeah, I can sense it. Yeah, Nice. We kind of talked over instagram story, and then I went and looked at your page, and you've got all this cool shit going on when we're going to get into coaching amazing stuff. That's motivational. And then I said Listen Send Me Your pitch yet, and you can talk about that because the pitch was insane. Oh, thank you. Sent. Off You guys have gotten so many. Fisher had a good pitch. That's that was the show. Remember that and I remember. The Need to do whatever he did. You want great patch you about how you put that together and what? You're like what your vibe was without creating the pitch. Oh Man! I was like what do I want? What do I want people to hear from me on this podcast? Because I think for many of my black women who I work with? They have never heard of this podcast, or if they do go to listen to it, they're like I don't know if I'm GONNA. Have anything in common with this. You know blonde girl and her white in her white man. Like what kinds of stories could they have that I could relate to and I think. Think that that comes from a place of privilege whether you realize it or not. Even though you guys are doing really good work in this world, and I love the like. Every single interview is like a knockout. The park and there's always really good conversation however, is it relatable like I really think about it from the Lens of the people that I grew up with. If I can't refer them to this podcast, you know like this is this is what how? It'll tangibly help you and your career. Whatever like they're? They're gonNA. Look at the two people on the on the picture and be like all right. I'm already. Triggered, first thing they're going to think is man. That's a handsome man. Exactly. Lawrence over it. But I fully I mean. You know the brand is built in a way that was built off the skinny competent. Paint like listen. I didn't have a lot of input on putting myself on a bright pink cover. But I get it. Looks a certain way even in a weird way like with some man like. I think I was sharing friend yesterday, and I was like man of of all backgrounds could listen and find some for sure, but they look at that pink covering. This isn't for me, see. Yep, so how did you come up with this pitch? And how can people out there do a similar type of Pitch Oh? This is really good saint pet. Okay, thank you I'll get back to it. Okay, so I'm being really humble here, but I'm really not a humble person, so let's just. Must just not do that. Topsy so The pitch was okay. So what do I want people to know what I want them to know about me I? Want them to know that I'm not an anti-racism educator. I want them to know how I help six and seven figure you know female entrepreneurs and their businesses, but I also want black women to know that they they belong here. They can take up space. They can send in these types of. Of Pitches and they will be considered right so I wanted to be that example because I know that pitches get lost. I know that they get lost. You guys get a sea of like eight hundred nine hundred pitches but I. Think what happens when it comes to guess selection this is where I think some systemic or systematic racism kind of comes into play or like white supremacy. Because of the proximity. You guys are to maybe people who. Who are in my tax bracket, or whatever my career? My like you get limited as far as what stories you're hearing. And how relatable are they to your current audience or the audience? That wants to listen to you, but they don't. They don't hear about about A. You know West African immigrant me West. African, immigrant who you know is the product of really educated parents, and who made their way in America, but I was taught that I will. Will always have to work harder than my white counterparts right, and that's not something I've heard on your podcast before, but because I I did grow up with the level of privilege within my own community. I understand, and I have empathy and I get it. Oh, hello I am just sitting in my sweat suit smelling so good, which is rare for me, because I haven't worn deodorant in a long time until I was recently introduced to each and every. We've discussed this on instagram stories. We're going to pull it to the podcast because I feel so confident to recommend this deodorant you guys I have been using it every single day for the last two months I am personally a fan of the ginger one. There's something about the smell of ginger that I just really really love so basically as always, but even more so I. Did all my research on? On this so this one has six simple ingredients and essential oil, so it uses natural ingredients like coconut, oil and Dead Sea salt that worked together to reduce body odor. I have been looking for deodorant like this forever. Just asked my husband if I knew that. I need to do is chop down coconuts and go into the sea for some salt. I would have done it a lot time ago. And at a little bit ginger till so just some background for you each, and every was founded by two women in the beauty industry who were frustrated by the lack of high quality and Natural Deodorant options. This has been my problem forever I. Mean I I couldn't believe. After years of blogging that I hadn't found a deodorant that I was absolutely in love with I mean I've tried every single thing. Nothing was working, so to actually have something that works is amazing I can understand the founders frustrations in the beginning. It goes on. On really release smooth, too. I think that's important, so it's not like chalky or sticky, and this is something that my husband again is just so happy about it keeps me odor free all day long you should also know it's Vegan and cruelty. Free visit each and every dot com slash skinny and use Promo Code Skinny for thirty percent off your first purchase note that that is not eligible to combine with other discounts or subscriptions. That's Promo Code Skinny at each and every dot com slash skinny for thirty percent off your first purchase. The Ginger One and thank me later. Wow! That's that's a very. Like I wanted I wanted. I know so many things I want to cover on this episode, but I WANNA learn more about a little bit about you touch on your childhood. Yeah, let's let's get a little back childhood. Like where'd you grow up like what's what was your background? How did you get into the space that you're that you're now? Yes, so I grew up with a dad who's in higher level academia, so he's a assistant vice provost at Spelman College in Atlanta and he. He, he's he had humble beginnings. He came to the US on scholarship. I believe his PhD He went to Cornell and so we ended up winning the lottery and being able to immigrate here to the United States so I came to the states when I was wait, you ended up winning the lottery. What is so winning, too? So it's like a term for people who are getting gained citizenship. was Ex girlfriend to win here's Mike Guarantees Exterior interesting. Turn your mic on, Remember Mike On. But he's like you. You basically get granted citizens shoe just like. A lottery type yeah, basically like a lottery type system, and so I think I will leave Cornell, but it's some of the bill or I'm guessing I? Don't quite know how all of that work. Since they were sponsoring him because he was coming here to he was coming. They're here to go to school there and so I've lived in different states. States I've lived in Maryland up in Michigan a mainly. We lived in New York so we moved around quite a bit, but my dad was always in academia. My Mom, I believe she started working in the states. Because the way it works again. The educational systems different here than they are, so they were already pretty educated, but in order to. To come to the states oftentimes as an emigrant, you have to go back to school which is just so insulting, but they kind of look at the educational system and say you're not up to our standards, and so that's just kinda how it is, and so my mom are already had a bachelor's degree, but she ended up getting her master's degree here. Here in social work, and so I grew up in a very I was very aware of many things growing up that I. Think a lot of people may not have may not have been exposed to you. Know I think just mean an African immigrant was hard so much racism further. What were you exposed to that? You don't think people racism allot. Give give. Give an example. Oh my gosh, teasing about my hair, my hair texture I remember for a long time. It took me a long time to really be proud of being African in fact, I I remember growing up I really wanted to avoid the conversations of where I'm from. Because my name was so different, you know my legal first name. Is Tammy Copay and so? God's blessing is upon you and so I remember never so I started going by topsy very young, and I loved it to be honest growing up because it just I ended up voiding so many stupid conversations about my name, but topsy still got shit, so it's like no matter what it didn't matter and so growing up I was teased a lot Oh my God. It was just not. A lot of racism of over covert racism you know like. Did you grow up on trees? And these were always white kids always. They were always white kids. So if there's someone out there, that's young. That's listening to this. That's experiencing racism like you did when you were little. What would you? What are your tools in your toolbox? Yeah I think what I did growing up. Sounds so shitty, but I feel like as black people. We've had to develop a very thick skin and I would definitely say to really rely on your support systems know who you are. I'm get educated about your culture and just fall in love with it as much as you can. It's hard shit. It's really hard I think something that was helpful for me, is that? That you know I, just I just tried to think about the fact that they never been exposed to anything, and so that's why they feel like. It's okay to tease people and make fun of their hair, but the shit never went away. I mean when I got older I. Mean I've experienced discrimination because of hairstyles? You know this isn't professional for the workplace these this this. This red these Red Braids Oh. My God, like I would have been so mortified in the corporate world to wear this in some corporate settings. They still don't respect black hair black texture. It's just it's bizarre is wild I. Think I'm opening my eyes so big because I I can't comprehend that, but when I. Hear The story I'm like my immediately. I'm like okay I need to. To educate myself more because like Michael said earlier because I. don't see it. I think it's not bear, but it is there. It's very much so going so off of Michael. What you had to say I I heard you I. Heard you say you want to believe and I love that you said that you want to believe that. Most people want to do good things. I don't know that I buy into it. I think that there are people who have well meaning intentions, but intentions don't have shit to do with the impact Ray, and so like I think even as white people like shutting down conversations in regards to white privilege. Right that mean that you're a human. That wants to do the right thing, or are you afraid to really realize? Realize like what exactly you've benefited from. It's not about being ashamed of being white, but what if benefited from Yeah I did this small? I don't have a big social fun, but I did a video. My account and they like the the basic point of the video, and we can talk about this second with like all these people coming out with statements and company PRP's. Complete Porsche it in my opinion control. One of my partners are gonNA come in whatever. But. Here's the thing. I. But here's the thing i. You know I did this video and make the point of it was shut the upper second. Listen to someone else's perspective and story, and so like for me like it's been a lot of like I've been observing I haven't said a lot I haven't taken like which is, but I I want to have these conversations again. I think they're. They're going to be the most impactful with this platform but it's been about. Listening and like you said it's not necessarily someone's fault for the privilege that you don't know you don't choose now or born in, but it can be your fault if you're unwilling to listen and learn. New agree like if you're not willing to grow and evolve and learn. Benue are be part of the problem exactly just shut things down. Yep, how you go about that and what you take away. That's a process. Agree no person of privilege going to learn this in a month's time or weeks like this is the thing that you have to practice in your daily life. Constantly it is, it has any my husband's white and so even. Even for him I mean he's always been down for the caused. You know, but he's had two. Oh my God I. Remember a few years ago. Your white people came out on net flicks and I was like let's watch it. He so triggered I. Mean Steam cut he. He's like this is divisive and I'm like Oh. No Ono did I marry a trump which. You guys talking about politics, but I remember be like what the fuck! Why does this trigger you so much? I thought that you've gotten desensitized and got an educated on a lot of this shit, and just because calls us out into. The one hundred percent. He was Ba-. Why does it need to be deer? WHOA, he's GonNa. He's GonNa. Lose his shit when he hears me out on like this, but I love him to death and he's great, I mean he gets it now but I mean. How have you taken it upon yourself with everything that's going on to have conversation with him Oh. My God that's actually been hard. It was really hard, but I'm like I'm his wife and I married him because I know he's focused faulk. I know he cares about me. It's not just for optics or anything like that you know he's. He's always been for the culture, and his always given back to the culture, and he's just an incredible human, so I just felt like it was my responsibility to talk to him, and he respects me, and so he listened, and now he's like Holy Shit. I can't believe some of the stuff that I used to say. Thank and he's a doctor, so I told him you have a whole `nother level of privilege here primary care doctor. Can you give me an example? May because you know I like detail I know you do what something he thought that now has changed. Can you not think of? So, there's a lot of talk right now, which is cool about anti-racism and think confuses a lot of people because they're like. What are you talking about? I'm not racist, so if I'm not racist, why do I need anti-racism education? And the reason for that is so my husband. He thought he because he wasn't racist. That was enough. So. He's like. What are you talking about this anti? So? That was the first time he's ever, and I realized I I've just taken it for granted that I didn't think white people gave a fuck about this type of stuff so I never talked about it, so he's like what is it and I'm like? anti-racism education is the practice of being an actual being on the journey of being an ally like are. Are you actively speaking out? Are you donating? Are you divesting into? You know black businesses. Like what are you doing in order to? Because this is a crisis in America. Black bodies are being murdered on the street, so it's not enough to just be not racist. You have to be anti racist, and that's a practice, so I think a lot of white people. White companies are waking up to I'll tell you. Personally yeah, and maybe some people disagree with this born, and I had so many different perspectives on this show in like honestly in our personal life. I don't care if you're black. White Blue Green does it I. don't see I and I, and you know gay straight. Yeah, it doesn't matter and so because we think like maybe people will say you know you don't, but like because I'm telling you, we think. We assume Oh. We're not part of the problem we actually are. The good guys. And it wasn't like the thing that I'm grateful for what this event is like. It got me to realize. Wait a minute just because I choose to not like the way I'll hire. The wheel gets shows that I'm not looking at anything a talented person. But then now realize like okay I somebody that's leading a company. Afford face, but yeah, it's media changed. Not only do I have to think about it I have to be proactive about so most of the things I'm doing in these interviews and we could talk about some of these companies statements right now, which will be controversial but. Every interview, I've been doing lately. I'm not participating canceled culture I'm not going on an apology tour. Judge me by my actions and six months to a year and see what dear media does. That to me is much more interesting. Where like these companies that going on? Here's my statement. That's written by somebody all of us as consumers. From every macro. Look at this little fuck. Enough to know your your opinion, and like who the fuck wrote this and it just doesn't feel so like for me. I'm like I will be facing. Let's go do something. Yeah, and I want to ask from your perspective. This may give me in trouble. When you see statements like that you see like. How do you feel about? Like your like your shots all my. My God I it like I'm like. Can we stop being reactive like I get it on one hand? I really liked. This is why I. Like I love your brands. Because you guys aren't going to get bullied into doing anything that you like. You're going to think it through. You're going to educate yourself. I'm not posting are very very strategic and I love that. I am posting a block square. Knock going to post it because everyone's doing it. I actually want to go out and do the work and then like Michael, said talk to me in six. Bad I love that I love that, and that's what I wish that some of the because I understand saying like you know we stand with black lives. Black lives matter I think that mattered because so many of us were looking for that, but beyond that it was like do the work. Just do the work? We do want to know how where you stand because we want to know where to spend our coin. But it's not a bandaged. No exactly because we noticed that shit to. Put the statement up and put the Black Square and then go back to normal life. which a lot of people did my thing is? I'M GONNA proactively. Choose to not do the short things to do the longer things and talk to me in six months to a year to fiber like yes, but like this wasn't like I'll just be transparent. A lot of this just didn't pop up on my personal radar because. Because yeah, and now that it has like okay so now you know that's that's the whole point and you know where I think people in this country should reserve some space for people if you see them trying. To face. Of Peace Instagram, live with with the guy friends with and we talked about like. Make sure if people are trying that, you acknowledge the trying and that you support me. You don't just shut them down and attacks a lot of attacking. Going on there is like then you're scared. I agree I think it is a double edged sword. I do have I I hear you though, and I have empathy and I think it's because of what I do. I have a lot of empathy, and I hold a lot of space for people so I understand that is important to encourage people if. If they're trying. I do that I believe in that. However, it's another perspective. I think another perspective is I think for so long. We have had to dance around topics, and just like fuck and tap dance all the Goddamn time so I'm like it's okay if White, folks have to play Double Dutch, you might get some black people or people are a person of color. That's completely not with it like they're like. You know what do what you WanNa do do the work. I'm going to cut. Cut You when you're down. Because the our lives are like we're going through. Shit So I don't have the energy or the space to coddle you on your journey, but then there will be some people who are like 'cause. Everyone's personality is different right? Black people are not a monolith. So then you're going to get some people who are like me that are like I. Get married to a white husband have had to have patients with his ass, so I can offer that to other people who I see are continuously trying. You know so. It's just another perspective that black people are like you know what like we're? We're fucking sick and tired. You know I guess to clarify what I'm saying is. Like I'm willing to say. I'm not purchase again. It's a culture apologies. I'm willing to take. The short-term punches were people who like a fuck this guy? He's not with it right, but what I'm saying. Let's see what happens at six Mayakoba and I'm willing to in the short term. Yeah, not look the best. Yeah, the long term for sure. I think Yeah Yep. That's what it's about. Oh K. I'm going to tell you about daily. You have seen it all over my instagram stories now. This is like the best invention ever. 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My account went viral. Viral Mike Cowen buyers was not my intention I just wanted to speak out about shit that I felt I felt like I had been muzzled for fucking years, and it was like the muzzle was off I was saying whatever the fuck I felt, but I thought about everything I, said 'cause I believe that you can speak from emotion and still be very. Strategic so I had a lot of emotion, but I knew how to channel it in the right way, and so I felt like that week it was just fucking. Fog like I'm connecting with people that I've always like I've always you know. Um supported their platforms whether it was a podcast whether it was a book or whatever, but I'm saying like what it is. I've always wanted to say. And now they're listening and it was very surreal very bizarre my. My account gained so much traction, which was not the point, and just like really like. Is this for real? Though like you know, it was just? It was a very weird feeling where it's where it's like companies and people were listening and wanting me on their podcast, and and it was like. Is this for real though like I don't WanNa be your token, I have a friend. Nick called me. Yeah, when all this is going. Okay, and she says. You. You need to get more diverse people on your podcast and I go hold on. I am not just going to do something to check a box. Yeah, so I'm just going to be honest if your pitch was not. That I think the audience would have gained value I would have said I like love you as a listener. You're rising right, but this just isn't a fit as you should, and I think that I think that there was that respect. I have a question. Just going back, Jen what we were talking about. Do you feel now that there's weight lifted off your shoulders because of of Dot Cathartic sort of? Transformational week or do you feel like things are going back to normal? How do you feel right now? I. Think I feel a lot settled in. Like, I feel like I've said a lot of what I wanted to say. And now I'm just going back in to do. The work I've always been so I can't say that. The fog got lifted, but I just learned how to just maneuver through these weird times. We're just in a weird time and I think I'm just going to have to be very selective as to you know companies I decided. Decided to work with, or you know what podcast I decided to go on what books I read what businesses I buy from? I think it's just part of the black experience is just figuring out how to how to make sure that your works and who you are, and what you stand for is respected. You know a lot of our audience. addressed and Message me during all this. Please have someone come on to educate us. And I started listening to all these different podcasts, meaning and I. It's not your job to educate us. Can you speak on that? Career! You don't agree. Of White, women? Right now because I get the most shit, the white working on with his white women I don't. I don't Know No. You're allowed to your. What's it? Do like video. Listening and then like I. I. Think is probably because of that passion of them, like just waking up and realizing, but I also think there's another side to it, too. where I remember observing Jenner Coaches Platt Jenner pitchers platform There was a lot of people who were going after her and I noticed that there was a lot more white women, but I also think he was her following her following their very white and so I think that it's just an interesting phenomenon. I'm I like. You had a question to education Oh. Yeah, yeah, do you agree it's? It's it's. It's your job to educate us. No degrees notch and. and. It's not my job. Yes I. DO believe that it's on the onus any block person's job. Yeah! I think is on there so many resources out there. There's so many incredible anti-racism educators who have been doing this work for a long time and I think that that's also why there are many black people that are just fucking tired is because we've been like we've been here. You know we've we like. Generations of US have experienced you know generations of people who have who have family members who were in the slave trade right chattel slavery is real, and it's still a fax. US Today. The effects of it is just. It's it's just heartbreaking so I think that white people have the opportunity, the resource, the wherewithal to be able to do their own research. Look up anti-racism educators and start from there. There are so many amazing black businesses you can invest in the. It's always been there, so we're not here to spoon. Feed you if I choose to educate. That's because I, want to, but it's not because I have to. So I think that that's something that's going to be important for your listeners. Now you're talking I was thinking about at one time I got interested in Salt because my dad told me that. At one point, it was worth more than gold and all the kid fuck salt. And like I didn't like this sounds really stupid and off topic, but you know I went onto the soul-searching mission to like learn about salt and read these all these history books also, and I think that like in anyone in any field in any area. If you WANNA learn something, it's your responsibility to put it up on your show, and do the research and learn agree in any aspect, and I think this attitude of like okay like. Like I'm going to put the burden on someone else to teach you. It's like no asshole. A UGO figured out. Yeah, absolutely. Figured out. Yeah, and you'll be fine and I think that this is something else to talking to my friend. The other day I was like I also think that it's very strange that a lot of people are not used to being called out on stuff and being corrected. And being wrong, and also let's even go further out ability accountability. I'm going to take myself at an outside perspective. A lot of influencers aren't used to being called out over. Saying, oh, my God your eyebrows are so great been doing. That that. I think when we were going through that that week. Yeah, if Italy I'm yet week for sure. I was like this is an opportunity for me and all the influencers out there to exercise a muscle. That isn't used enough. Yeah, there, we go. What do you think about that? Oh, I think that that I think that it's so I think being able to use your platform in a way that amplifies black voices is always the vibe, but I just don't think it's happened. Enough rate like I. I don't I. Follow a lot of black influencers and I follow a lot of white influencers. I don't see amplification of black voices happening on those platforms. I agree with you I just don't see it. I agree with you I. Think I, think collectively. Yes, everyone can can do better. I'm sick of saying Dubai. Like I wish there. What else can you say? Yeah? It's just the most layman's terms to say. Yeah, so if someone's out there and they're listening and in you and their friend. Let's say they're fro covers I'm not saying it's your job to know, but is there a direction that you could point them in? In terms of how to get started. Maybe Google. I don't know you to say. Google Google is Dr. Google's is always good, but I think. I know an account that has been just amazing for me to follow Rachel cargo. She's an anti-racism educator Leyla. Saieed I think me and white supremacy. I believe that's the name of the book. That's a really good book. I would recommend also do reading and doing research from the black perspective. There's a lot of anti-racism work that has been done by white people, but I think it's really important to listen to the actual voices not that they didn't have good things to say because they do. There's one that guy really That did really well on the bestsellers. List The New York Times I believe it's called white fragility by Robin de Ngelo and that. That's one that I think I. Don't think it's bad to read it I. Think it had amazing points and I think it's. Controversy within the. Some block like some some some. Don't don't because they're like. What are you doing with that income that you're getting from that book like? Are you investing it back into the black community are using it to profit your pockets that contributes to you know systemic racism and dismantling white supremacy. What are you doing with the profits so I? Think that's where there's a lot of distrust where it's. It's like. Are you profiting off of our pain and our trauma, and that's not your intention, but does that end up being the impact I haven't been worrying about like the bottom line with the company or the listeners of this show. I've been staying up at night. Anything about trump is much worrying about the exact DNA of our dogs. Yup, that's true. We are so excited because we. We got to do a test. That tests our dogs. DNA, who does I WANNA test their dogs DNA. You may be sitting there. Thinking like why the hell do I care my dogs, Dna let me tell you why all of us you know, but you think about all of us. Humans were all different. We're all made up different. We all have different genetics. We're you know we're human beings. Beings that we all are different ups, and we have to figure out what works right for our bodies, but when it comes to our dogs, nobody spent any time thinking like what is right for my dogs. DNA makeup. What kind? How do I care for them properly? What do they need to eat? What do they need? How do they need to be taken care of and this is? Is why you need to check out embark. 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That was appropriate reaction to get a conversation started. Where I was disappointed on someone. With the online community. is they carried that reaction through with more reaction, reaction, reaction, and not thoughtfulness about what they were putting out which? They were bringing home station. And, like the reason, it's taken some time like more than I, address it briefly. And the reason it took time to start having these conversations, as we wanted to be very thoughtful about presentation that a platform of the size presents to who absolutely and I wish more content creators or brands or people in the space. Okay, don't worry about your short term. Bottom dollar revenue your front facing the right now. Yep, say your piece quickly, but then like really be thoughtful like about the way you start a narrative or change, conversation or get people involved. I have your problem with people that are just like constantly reactionary and I don't think it's I think the intentions, not necessarily wrong, but I also don't think intentions right I think there's a little bit of like better. Save my ass. Better also get in. That are also like. It's a little bit ultras, and I wanted to kind of get your take. Which, people who do I think? Yeah, I. think that I. I really like the concept of saying something, but then I think to continue to educate yourself before you say further like you're gonNA. Fuck up! That's the one thing I think people need to know is on this journey of to being an anti-racist. You're going to fuck up sometimes big time, so it was a part of a facebook group and they really fucked it up. because there was someone that was. Was a part of the group that was asked by The group leaders on the PODCAST hosts They were asked to speak on I. Believe to educate their audience on Rick. The effects of racism I believe so it was it was a listener, but she was also acquaintances as well of the of the podcast I'm hosts, and so the podcast host requested this of a black woman to educate their primarily white audience on racist. White women asked to be compensated for having no, the the black woman asked. For educating the White Audience, sorry, yes, and so the podcast hosts said now we don't do that and we want to be thoughtful as to who we work with in that way. That wasn't a part of the initial agreement. Was You get you to get paid? So let's just call it good and so the black woman posted the emails on. I G and was basically like this is fogged up. This fucked up. You want me to educate your audience on racism, and when I asked to be compensated for my emotional labor. You tell me no okay. What are some other? She had suggested to the podcast house. What are some other ways? So? That's okay that you don't like for anything anything. She was like what about inclined? What about just? Anything and they said No. What is in kind I'd or Whatever yeah like I don't like donating the that you had in the past something like that. Yeah, and they still said no, so I thought that that was problematic. Because it's like if you want to hire black people to educate your audience in any capacity, whether it's podcast, or whatever they deserve to be compensated, I didn't ask for compensation from this because I'm not anti-racism educator, but there are people who are being asked influencers people have platforms that are being asked to educate why audiences and it's just. It's not okay. No I think like this is like it's. Talking to my team and also people are so fucking weird. My people can just be like I think. The problem comes down to with like an IT comes down to the asking the beginning like the audacity that you asked me to come onto this platform and educate my. That is the wrong way, yeah? That's not the right way to go. I would be irritated as anybody to come and someone. If someone produce Michael Come on this thing and educated like we talk about your. Exactly so I think it's I. Get where you're coming from there, but it's it's. It's the way that people go about things in with agreeing what can weird agree fucking weird exactly so there's a lot of that happening, and it's just it's unfortunate. If. There's a lot of people listening with kids. I just had a baby, yeah! I again I. Don't want to ask you what I should do I want you to say what a good. This is Google Direction. Honestly or yeah, like where? Where do I go with this I wanNA raise someone a compassionate, open, minded non-judgmental. Yeah, accepting person, beautiful thing about children is racism is learned. It is not you're not born racist. You'd look at a pure to three year old child. They don't have a racist bone in their mind. They learn it from of the people that are interested. In which is why I think these conversations are so important. You know the. Essentially, the the difference, our skills is a pigment. That's for sure in. You know if if you don't tell children like there's something wrong or different about picking up the learn it right, so you're teaching people. To do as a parent to understand like. You lead by example. You are the person potentially teaching. Racism if you catch them around environments that are exhibiting Alec you need to correct. Yeah, and I also think too for especially I'll speak to I'll speak to white mothers I. Think it's important also to recognize the privilege of not having to teach your children. That is the shitty world out there for black people and Black Children. Black children are often adult adult, defied very very much so Tamir Rice as a really good example, he was murdered. I think this playing in the park and He was killed by police. And so I also think that kids can handle hearing tough things. It's all about the way in which you communicate it because I also think there's a lot of what's happening now. Is that how come I was taught from a really young age from my west African family that you'll always have to work harder than your white counterparts is the way that the system is set up I. think that White Kids also need to know that this. This is the reality for many black and Brown bodies in the US and they are not. Their innocence isn't going to be taking taken away from them. That's the biggest I think. That's like the biggest misconception when it comes to parents teaching their children and I'm also a mental health therapist so I've done. I've had clients who are stay at home, moms and I mean I love I love. My Mother's I've worked with, but. I do think that that's a misconception. Is that you talking about some of these topics you? Can you know water it down so that they understand that they're not like traumatized walking away from the conversation, but they need to know. They need to know that this is not okay. This behavior is not okay. Not Saying that you don't see color is not okay. Right here we go good one follow. You and I need. To you was going to be as you've heard US Talk Dallas where we wrong. A good class. Good why because? It? To me, this is the conversation that just say Michael's all. Off. There's all say something like I. Don't see color, and if that's wrong here, you say that in this conversation. He did. Oh, no I'm so. I? Think I'm just. Hearing in my own life. I, I have not seen cholera raise. Oh! I want to know where I wanNA know where we're wrong. Go Yeah I would say that's probably the number. One thing is to see it to see it to honor it to respect it into it. Yeah, because I think I, think also I. Would is it pride month. I think that there's also let let's talk about you know black. Trans lives matter right, and so just because I don't judge people based off of their. You know their. Gender Sexual Orientation, etc. Etc doesn't mean that I don't need to make it very very paramount important in my life to make sure that they know that they're important and that I am, but I don't understand, but that I stand with them. You Know I. think that there's a difference we have to see it in order to acknowledge into order to call it out, and so even when we're talking about you know white privilege. It doesn't mean that white people have never struggled or that you don't. Have you know that you haven't worked hard for everything you've gotten. That was what my husband was really triggered by is he's like yeah I'm a doctor, but like. Like I had to bust my ass to be here, no one's debating that that's true, but there's built in advantages in the system that you are not aware of and that you're kind of been blind to where you're continuing to perpetuate these you know these beliefs in these behaviors because of what is already like like the system was built for you. There's one time I cried running Dir media. I. Even Know Up, you know this made me tear up a little bit here to honestly might make material. I, have I have some black women that work for me here. Okay, you saw other yeah, and when this first happened, it was the first time I had to acknowledge him. You know and I, we did a team meeting. fucking better we could. was on the meeting, and she blocked her scream and I know like some of the things I'm saying here is upsetting because we have a lot of white people black, but she was definitely minor in the group, and I I I realized at the time like you know what I'm saying things here and is probably upsetting her setting weak and I called the phone and she was crying. We cried, and all almost cried L.. It was the first hour had to face realistically. This is the experience that's close to me. That's worked. Lives is faced and I. Just didn't see it. Yeah, I was blind to it and I felt terrible because it's not that I was trying to not know I just didn't see it right, and when it hit me in the face like that almost. No now, it pulled my fucking. Real experience that people. Yeah talks me want to go to another room to have a life coaching. Steve Real quick. It gets deeper me because would it? Would it pointed out to me and like I don't I've actually talked about it. Was that Holy Shit I've been so blind to this. This part of the world or shares experienced that someone else could go through and me just thinking that I'm not part of it. Yeah, contributing to people's pain Yep. It was it was a wrong assumption? Yeah, so I think. Like when I choose to think that people are often like attornal optimists, shoes like something like this that this experience in this country has gone through. Yeah is like such. This is the first time what's huge scale that people are yeah. People like myself are opening. Their eyes made well. This is fresh air. This is experienced that people in this country black women black men have experienced and like there's no way you can not see it anymore, right, you can't. You can't just like Nazi and it's emotional, because like, and this is where I think when you talk about white people in. The book, but it's okay now to be like yes, needs to fully be acknowledged. We need to recognize it and it's going to be painful. Yeah, but we're GONNA. Experience that pain in a sharp, quick in both color in this country blocked white, Black Brown L. Babe experience for very long term. Short term pain to share is is okay. It's. Why people got toughen up and say okay. We're GONNA. We're GONNA listen for a little bit, and you'll be good you'll be. High I WANNA know how you are being an example with your community, and then I wanna get into what you do because it's so interesting I wanNA. Know like how you. Topsy are taking everything that's going on and being a good example for your community. I do I do and they are loyal. They are very loyal so I think what I've been doing. I have a lot of white people in my community, and that's been very interesting, but actually I've gotten really barely any hate DMZ nothing like that because they already know. Come in my inbox with that bullshit so. You will get fucking blocked. You might get blasted I. don't care if you're bold enough to send me some stupid shit. Bold enough to. Do the same thing on my clock at the. I'm the worst no dollar more, but I just really have taken a especially those two weeks. I really took it upon myself to just educate because they were hungry, they wanted to know and I'm like I have the bandwidth. I have the boundaries within myself to know when you know when to say something when to just rest I i. it's not my responsibility, but I want to and. I just educated a lot on my platform about the wealth gap in the US between whites and blacks, and just gave them actual statistics redlining mortgage loan. You know like the systemic versus systematic racism that goes on what's the difference between the two and I really infuse that into my content, and then of course i. let them know like this is not don't just follow me to get educated like this is a bonus. This is not what my platform is built on like I actually mindset coach. This is what I do. But I also realized that I have a lot of white people in my following that they have never hired a black coach. A lot of people had just never I've gotten passed over for white coaches all the time. Who charged more than me, but it was. It's very interesting, but that's how racism happens. It's like the subconscious bias. They don't even realize that's what they're doing is they're intentionally or unintentionally? Not Hiring, you know black people on trapeze bizarre, but that's just what my reality was, and so educating ally has been something that I've been infusing into my content especially for. The CEO's and just helping them understand how to navigate as much as possible from like as far as mindset shifts like how to look at owning your shit when you fuck up, you know how to look at what's coming up for you emotionally, because that's my specialty is talking about emotions and I understand that it's it's gotta be tough. You know running a company and trying to do the right thing trying to make all these calls, but at the same time here some here's some insight for you. Here's how to address being called out here's. Here's how to address. You know Shit happening in your company. You didn't realize it. And how do you continue to repair those relationships that you damaged with your white privilege? Not Realizing you know the importance of dismantling white supremacy, so so let's talk about your platform, and what you obviously are I mean. You're very very educated in the life coach situation and you said you worked in mental health. Yeah, I was a mental health therapist. Okay, so we didn't get to get past or you. Can you walk us through? That time was required. You. Down we got. So I have been clinical mental health therapist for nine years I have my master's in social work, so my goal was to help people on a clinical level one on one therapy that my goal, and so I did that, and I have my own private practice on the west side of Michigan that I'm actually closing down this month, because my coaching business blew the fuck up. Up I've had my coaching business since twenty seventeen I love therapy. That's what I do that's that's my heart. That's my love, but I love helping entrepreneurs with just their mindset shifts, and so I noticed that there was this gap in people who came to me for therapy. Who actually needed therapy? But there are a lot of people that they needed help with things. Things that were not clinical. They didn't have clinical depression an example. Yeah, yeah, I used to have a lot of business. Owners contact me wanting to know whether or not I could just help them with their confidence, issues and business, and just like self-esteem staff, and it was stuff that yeah, I could've could've you know. BUILD FOR IT and bill the Insurance Company for it and. and. It would have been fine, but they weren't clinical issues. So clinical issues are things that areas of your life have to be severely affected, and so in order to bill insurance companies, and so these people were destructing with self esteem. They didn't have depression that have anxiety. It was just more so situational stuff that would come up in business and they were like. Like how in the how like I've no idea what to do with these fluctuating numbers? My business like you know like one month making this the next month of making that I. WanNa make sure that I'm always making the same amount of money. So then there was that comparison piece that comes in comparing themselves to other business owners who are doing the same thing and they. They were they were all dealing with a lot of shit that I'm like I this isn't my therapy. This is coaching. This is something completely different. This is goal oriented coaching. They WANNA like. How do how do I move forward? How do I move forward and so I decided to use some of my clinical therapy skills psych based evidence based skills and incorporated. Incorporated, that into my coaching business, and so they're two separate businesses completely and I. Just Love The coaching industry. I think it's one of the fastest growing industries online, and I help six and seven figure deal entrepreneurs just address it and identify bill, yeah, for the most part, but I there have been some men that are like to work with you and I will work. Work, with men I do enjoy working with men, but women are my shit. Let's say Kristen in Louisiana has a mental block to doing something entrepreneurial. Yeah, what advice are you giving her? ooh, mental blocks, so I would talk to her about what I mean. What is it that you're afraid of? Maybe she doesn't have the confidence to put herself out there and actually execute. So I would look at what exactly is coming up for you. That makes you feel like you can't do it. Where's the evidence for it? Maybe she feels that she has fear towards towards putting yourself out there in front of her peers, and she only has one hundred followers, and she feels like it's not worth. There's a lot of young people. Let's say like oh listen to this show. Mina this is good ideas. But, they don't because they're. Fearful of either rejection and our failure that like they can't get past the wall, getting out there and one of the things that I learned and I've tried a Tom. Launch Bassim throw degree. Get it out there, but there's this block where people you know. They wait for the time in what happens at that time. Number comes the time never comes. Yeah, so I think number one I would agree that I love doing like the mindset, work plus action at the same time I don't really believe in the whole like think about it. Think about it. Think about it because you could think think. Think yourself to death so I think that something that's important is to really identify. What exactly is it? That's what is causing you to believe that you can't. You can't create the life that you want what's getting in your way. Is it the fear that you're not gonNA make money. That's a fallacy. Because I was monitoring my account long before I ever had three thousand followers. I've been making bank online since I've had like. Three hundred, so let's just so. Let's debunk that Meth so I think a lot of it is myths. What are you buying into? That's causing for you to believe that what you have to say isn't worthy of getting out there and what they're gonNA. Find is a lot of people. This is why I love. Coaching is because I. Really Look at evidence. Where's The for what it is that you're feeling? We operate off a feeling so much, but feelings aren't fax so just because you feel like the market saturated. Just because you feel like you're not gonNA. Make money, and you have two hundred followers, so why bother doesn't make. Make that true. So how can you look to find the evidence of it? Not being true, sometimes it might mean going on your stories and saying Hey, do any entrepreneurs follow me that you know have less than five hundred followers, and they're making money, or what, about going to stock certain hashtags finding entrepreneurs with smaller followings who are making money off of their platform. That's happening but I think sometimes we allow feelings to determine what it is we do and that's like my whole mission is that feelings can't rule the decisions that we make? We have to think from logics strategy excetera. What is the common denominator that you? You see across the board of where people are going wrong. Woo or where people are coming to you for coaching. This like and you just see like this is so called like Oh, my God I think money is a I think money is one of the biggest ones where especially especially with women lack of money or fear, fear of not being able to continue the success that they've had with their business or with their company, and I've worked with so many CEOS that have scaled you know to millions of dollars, and they still have those fears of what if my business can't sustain this? What if this is it? It for me. What if this was a fluke? What if people find out the next two months that I didn't know what the Fuck I was doing in my whole business crashes. I mean it's just like these these problems that we make up and our head. We've had so much success and you're just hoping you discontinue it, and that's the number. One thing I see is that there's so many CEOS that have made lots of money, and they don't believe that they can sustain and it. It breaks my heart. What's the common denominator with success? You obviously worked with very powerful women. What when you see them very similar. I would say. So with success. I would say that they're trait. You see these women that like Oh. I would say that the trait I see is a lot of imposter. Syndrome a lot of imposter syndrome, a lot of fear that they can't continue the you know the role that they're on with outsourcing and hiring team members and employees They fear that they don't know what they're doing. That's the biggest one I'm just figuring it out day to day. And what about with success is there one? That's an opposite of. The same people that are successful. Positive. You're saying that Oh. Yeah, people are successful I'm saying on I'M I? Get what you guys okay I'm saying. Is there like a tip that they do like they all wake up early Oh. Okay I get what you're saying. Sixty consistency I would say this consistency is what I've seen is create. Success is just being consistent, and whatever it is that you do even if you're not. Not Getting see I like to tell my clients like you know especially the ones who were I mean I don't work with so many now who are just starting, but when I used to work with newbies, it was pretty much what you do with the few people that enter your programs is what you'll do with the money so if you're not grateful for those two clients that. That you had verse to be quite honest. I mean I just had like a crazy successful launch. A created this program called destroy the mindset drama in his teaching online coaches how to implement evidence based mindset strategies into their programs, because part of business coaching is dealing with the mindset, but there's so many business coaches that just really don't want to touch it. They just throw all. All strategy. They're like just do the work so basically using psych principles. I've what I've built my whole career on and using some of that inside of coaching. When you're coaching people through their mindset issues, it's all of everything I. DO is based based in science. Everything I do is based Psych so smart, so you're saying that most entrepreneurial coaches they are using just strategy strategy. Yes. It sounds like you're breathing feminine energy to it to yes, because I do think that there is an I think masculine energies incredible, but I do think there is a lot of that when it comes to business stuff and it's like just go. Do it like a like. I know like you following the path that you saw me going on, and that's why you hired me. Ray Your Business coach so just go do what I said and it's. It's like well. It's not quite that simple. Sometimes you need to talk them through their mindset shit. You're right with yourself. You gotta gotTa you gotTa. Get right got to believe that it's even possible. If there's audience members out there that are listening, and there's some kind of homework that they can do at home. any tips. Any tactics okay, so any tactics for listeners who want to launch a business started on. Yeah, yeah, another fucking pod! No this is really good I would say. I I I would say first of all like who who is it that you want to serve like? Who Do you WANNA serve? Because? If you don't know who you're talking to, then we'll I mean. What are we doing here? Who Do you WANNA serve? What are you passionate about? What you? What do you know your People WanNa Learn? What do you know that people want to learn I? Don't do like market research really anymore, because I know my shit and I know what people need. Even if they don't realize it quite yet I'm going to help you. Help bring it to the awareness that this is a problem that you're having so I was I would say if they're wanting to start. Who is who does that? You WanNA serve on. Why do you WanNa? Serve them so what's your? Why was like your big biggest underlying reason and then really identify? What are some of the mindset blocks that you know are going to get in your way of accomplishing that goal, because oftentimes it's not the strategy. That's the problem. It's getting in our own heads of. Can I actually do it right? Identify like what are the? What are the automatic thoughts that are coming up for you? Do you actually believe that this is possible? You're very confident which I appreciate so much. Confidence to thank you. Do. You have any things that you do daily practices morning rituals nighttime routines that you do to work your confidence muscle skincare. Let's learn and I talked to myself in the mirror like I myself I'm a bad bitch and I put on my skin. Eight. Answer I knew you appreciated that now. I know you. I use my. What is it the roller? I can't think of Jade Jade Roller I love to use my jade roller I loved to like. Listen to affirmations on my modify Bets like my shit. That's like honestly my as I talk to myself in a kind way. oftentimes, we're looking for validation from everyone else. You're not GONNA get that. You're not gonNA, fuck and get that, so you need to speak life into yourself into what it is that you want to get accomplished for the day into how amazing it is that you get to serve. Three people in your programs or in your services, or whatever and you need to speak life into yourself into your business. Because that's what's GONNA sustain it your your internal self. Talk. Which top SU I'm really happy. We gotTa do this conversation I'm really happy to have it. Thank you so much. There's this is I was incredible for you. Go temp out your your whole coach. Coaching courses like tell us what they're going. So I have of course called slayer imposter Monster, so that's coaching. I I coined the term slayer imposter. Monster is copyrighted. But is teaching online entrepreneur especially new ones? It's an introductory course. Teaching online entrepreneurs how to identify and defeats the impostor syndrome that shows up and so I walked them to tangible action. Steps of how to do that I. Have a course called escape escaped the. escaped the thoughts spiral and his teaching on online entrepreneurs, but entrepreneurs in general I'm female entrepreneurs, but anyone could buy it. how to over I identify and overcome the toxic negative thought patterns that happen in entrepreneurship, so is very very specific to online entrepreneurs, but any entrepreneur can identify with it, and then I created program called destroy the mindset drama. That's like that's going to be probably my signature program and his teaching online coaches how to implement evidence. Evidence based on mindset strategies into their businesses so and shout out a black owned business. Oh Bama like the lip bar the Bar Melissa Butler out of Detroit. That brand is the shit. Do you know flavor or do I need to? Guam you might have to go on and look I lip bar bar. She's incredible. Yeah, that that brand is incredible. And where can everyone follow you on instagram? Your great follow. You haven't incredible. Instruments spent like an hour. You you I spent an hour looking through your instagram stories. You've got your shit like dialed. I do yeah, I do you can find me on Instagram at Topsy Bannon. Bash come MAC anytime. You're out here, my God, this is so much fun for having me. Next time you come on, we need to do like like. Maybe we'll actually get a reader on, so you can. Be Good it'll bring bring collins back on May. Maybe we actually bring a skinny confidential reader. That would be so dumb on like an actually coach her. That would be dope I'd be down and maybe we'll do a giveaway for one of your bucks. Absolutely. It's all good I lo boehner ability. They H- you so much for coming. Follow you on Instagram at Topsy Matab. See Band, Bash, topsy Vandenbossche thanks, guys and guys don't go yet. Topsy has offered to give away her course. It's called slay your impostor monster, and it's ninety seven dollars. She is going to give it away to one aspiring entrepreneur. All you have to do to win is leave your favorite part of this episode on my latest Instagram and follow topsy on instagram. It's GOP S.. S.. I. E. V. A. N. D. E. N.. B. O. S. C. H.. You guys won't be sorry. She's an amazing. Follow and get excited for next week because we have the one and only Dr Jason. Diamond, he is a major plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills coming on the podcast with that. Let's see on Tuesday. This episode was brought to you by embarked. The summer embark has limited time offer just for our listeners go to embark dot com. com now and use Promo Code. Skinny to get fifty dollars off your dog. 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Poet Eve Ewing Connects 1919 Chicago Riots To Today

Fresh Air

48:44 min | 5 months ago

Poet Eve Ewing Connects 1919 Chicago Riots To Today

"From whyy in Philadelphia, I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today, Eve doing she writes about systemic racism in our schools and teachers courses on race and education. At the University of Chicago, she's also a poet. Section nineteen nineteen looks back on the riots in Chicago. That year that were set off after a black youth drowned in Lake Michigan while being stoned by white people on the beach. A police officer refused to make an arrest. The poems reflect on the riots on the nineteen twenty two report, investigating the riots, and how so much now is radically different, and so much is completely unchanged. Also John Powers reviews the reissue of a novel by the late poet novelist screenwriter Alfred Hayes who John. Says was one of our great writers about social and personal disillusionment. Or writing a book about systemic racial inequality, in Chicago public schools. My Guest Eve L. Ewing did a lot of research into the history of segregation in Chicago. One of the most helpful documents she read was a report published in Nineteen, twenty, two titled the Negro in Chicago a steady on race relations and a race riot. It was written by six black men and six white men who asked to research the reasons behind the riots in Chicago in July nineteen nineteen, and to make recommendations about how to prevent them from happening again. The nine hundred nineteen riots started after a seventeen year old black youth was swimming in Lake Michigan and swam into a part of the lake that was considered for whites only he was stoned by white people and drowned. Black people on the black part of the beach demanded a police officer arrest. The person considered responsible and he refused. Ewing's Book Nineteen Nineteen is a series of poems in response to the report, most of the poems open with a quote from the report. Her book won this year's best. Poetry Book Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. Ewing also a sociologist who teaches classes on race and education at the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration where she's an assistant professor. Her books include ghosts in the School Yard, racism and school closings on Chicago's south side. She also writes the champion series for Marvel Comics and previously wrote the Iron Heart series. We're going to start by talking about her book of poems. Nine hundred nineteen. Issuing welcome to fresh air. I want start with your book of Poems Nineteen Nineteen. It seemed so relevant to today. You know we all say if you want to understand what's happening now. You have to understand history. This is a really interesting part of that history. That very few people know about I think. So the book of poems inspired by the report that was commissioned after the riots in Nineteen Nineteen, it was a commission of six black men and six white men who were tasked with analyzing what happened during the riots Wyatt happened, and to make recommendations from preventing that from happening again Before we get to what precipitated this uprising? Let's talk about the opening quote that you use in the book, which is a quote from the introduction to the report, and that quote is the report contains recommendations, which if acted, upon will make impossible in my opinion, a repetition of the appalling tragedy, which brought disgrace to Chicago in July of nineteen thousand nine, hundred nineteen. What do you think about? When you read that quote. Well. The most obvious thing that comes to mind is the many repetitions of these appalling tragedies that we've seen since the report was written, and I think part of what I wanted to do. In juxtaposing this text from nineteen, twenty, two with poems and inviting kind of analysis from the reader is that there are so many things from a century ago. That are radically different, and it seems that there are. Are Far many more things that are resoundingly familiar, and frighteningly the same, and so you so much of what the book is about is about the ways that time kind of folds on itself and unfortunately we follow the recommendations in that report one hundred years ago and Chicago in many ways doesn't look that different in twenty twenty as it did in nineteen nineteen. We're the recommendations in that report. It's funny. Their recommendations that would look really familiar to you in a report that somebody might put out now so things like we need to make sure that black people in Chicago have access to affordable and high quality housing. We need to make sure that black people in Chicago have access to excellent schools, and that they can get great teachers, and we need to make sure that people have a fair shot at getting the same job, says their white neighbors. We need to make sure that black people can safely use parks and pools in public facilities. It's discouraging to read the recommendations. You would read now. Being issued a century ago and knowing with the benefit of hindsight everything that's happened since. So I wanna read another paragraph from the introduction to this report and I think it shows the perspective of one hundred years ago that these people who were writing the report were looking at the issue of race, and they're trying to contend with like there's all these people who moved to Chicago during the great migration. White people like don't want them there, you know. How do we deal with this? How do we deal with the issue of raisins and that black people were brought here slaves? So they right countless games have been proposed for solving dismissing this problem most of them impractical or impossible of this class, such proposals as one the deportation of twelve million Negroes to Africa to the establishment of a separate, Negro state in the US three complete separation and segregation from the whites and the establishment of caste, system or peasant, class and four hope for a solution through the dying out of the Negro race. Now the people who wrote the report Later say it is now recognized generally that the two races are here in America to stay. So one hundred years ago. They're still addressing the issue of like. Doing, what do we do what we do with these black? Right, right? What do we do and by the way that you know the premise of that entire quote rests on the erasure of indigenous people right so even the framing of the two races is kind of predicated on that a radicalization and so yeah, it's it's really it's really disturbing and I think one thing I want to make clear. Is that the the folks writing this report? see themselves as kind. Kind of upstanding, see them as kind of upstanding citizens toward racial progress, so they're six black men and six white men, I always joke that women had not yet been invented this time, so they weren't able to find any to serve on the commission and so this is you know these are not their opinions, but this is their honest assessment of the things that other people have put forth to solve. The Negro problem. I think the most shocking part. There is hope for a solution through the dying out of the Negro race in again. It's not the people writing the report who are proposing proposing there. They're looking at how people have. Dealt with it in the past or thought about it in the in the past, but it's a part of the past that they're still contending with in right president of the nineteen twenties. Right and I think it's shocking to hear, said explicitly but I think one of the things about this text that resonates for the present moment. Is that you know I think that? That, there are a lot of people that still think that and I think that there are different ways in which it's become possible for that sentiment to solve and morph in different ways, and be said in ways that are more or less socially acceptable, but I think the basic sentiment is still there and undergirds a lot of the basic functioning of American society. Your, book, of Poems, as written in dialogue with this report, so after hearing that paragraph countless schemes from the report you have a poem called countless schemes. Would you read it for us? I'd be happy to and you pair this poem. With the passage that I read. Yes so every poem in the book begins with a passage from this archival text, which is my sneaky way of getting people to read in archival text, which by the way is available in its entirety and pdf a widely on the internet. So folks really want to can go read it, but Yes, I'm Read this poem. The title is countless, schemes. One. Year don't have enough boats. We came here head to toe. And now we are millions, and now we demand to sit upright. And so you don't have enough votes. To. You would give us the most wretched desert. Not The desert of our fathers were God is watching and Mana comes down like the snow. You would give us all. That has barren. You would give our children Santa Eat. Three, we've been had that. For you said hope for a solution through the dying out of the Negro race, hope for a solution through the dying out of the Negro hope for a solution through the dying out you said hope, for the Negro, dying hope through the dying hope for the dying out the solution dying, you said dying the Negro the Negro dying the Negro Hope. Hope the Negro you said hope for dying hope dying. Dying dying. You said hope. Nicer reading that even that's from Eve Ewing's book of Poems Nineteen. Nineteen I didn't know about the riot of nineteen nineteen. I didn't know about red summer in which there were riots in several cities across America. related to racial issues. How did you become aware of it? You Know Terry I think that you are. Not Alone in not being very familiar with this period in history, and that's something I've thought about a lot. My working theory after you know being asked this question, a couple of times about like why? Why do you think people don't know much about? It is that it's a story that doesn't have any heroes, so you know the other stories about racial conflict. We like to tell ourselves about America These are very facile stories, but the story about the civil war is that it was really bad, and then Abraham Lincoln came and saved the day the. The story we tell ourselves about the civil rights movement is that it was really hard, and then Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks came and saved the day and the red summer. Nobody there's there's nobody there's no hero figure that we can kind of pin this facile story on. It's just a story about people harming each other's specifically white people harming black people randomly in waves in America's cities and in Chicago The riot that we saw here was the most violent twenty-three black people died. Fifteen white people died. Five hundred thirty seven people were injured. And it lasted for several days lasted for almost two weeks. So you know the way I became interested in it I. Read Little Bits about the red summer here and there. But only when I was doing the research for my second book when I started diving into the kind of our. History of early Chicago this text. The Negro Chicago became a huge source and I was just so fascinated with it because it's something that shouldn't be poetry, right if we're thinking about it in an obvious way it's a government state commission document is really long. It has a lot of data and it's just sort of you know you might think of it as really dry, but it had these lines that for me were just so evocative, and and to me felt like little poems, and so I wanted to be in conversation with these authors, and I also wanted to be in conversation with my neighbors who were murdered one hundred years ago on the streets where I walk. I wanted to give them a little bit of a of a space for memorial and I also wanted to create an accessible way for people who don't really know anything about this time period to enter it. So what precipitated the nineteen nineteen riot in Chicago The broader context is that during the great migration thousands and thousands of black people are coming north from the the agricultural south looking for work, trying to escape what was really a violent state and extra-judicial regime of punishment and oppression of seen by governments in the south as well as the clan as well as just random lynch mobs, and And so fifty thousand black people came to Chicago during this one decade it was just a massive population growth in a really short period of time, and you know that was happening also in the context of this period right after world. War One when many black veterans were returning, and so on the one hand. You have white people who are increasingly uncomfortable. With the presence of of black neighbors keeping in mind that this isn't a context of just massive American demographic change anyway right like lots of Eastern European immigrants, lots of immigrants coming from other places. And yet the presence of black people is seen as too great an indignity, the specific event that took place was a teen boy named Eugene Williams. was swimming on a Hot Summer Day on July twenty, seventh, nine, hundred, nineteen, and Eugene was swimming in Lake Michigan as as we do, and in Chicago we never had jury segregation, so Chicago is never a Jim Crow City, but we've always had to facto segregation manning just by habit and by practice our cities very segregated, and so on this particular day eugene was swimming in Lake. Michigan and he drifted over from what was unofficially the black part of the beach and the water to the white part of the beach. Beach and the water and what happened next? There's a few different disputing accounts. Either he looked onto the beach and saw that there was a group of white young people throwing rocks at black people, and he became afraid and didn't want to get out of the water, and or he was actually hit in the head by Iraq but whatever happened Eugene drowned, and people saw it happen. a group of black people who witnessed it demanded that a police officer arrested the people throwing rocks. They refuse to do that. In tensions escalated, a shot was fired by a man named James Crawford who was then shot himself by the police, and that's how everything basically popped off thereafter. You have a poem about Eugene Williams. Drowning. Yes dying. It's called jump rope, and it's written like a jump rope rhyme. Would you read it for us? Like all the poems in the book, this begins with a quotation from the report. The Negro in Chicago here's the quotation. On Sunday July, twenty, seventh nineteen, there was a clash of white people in Negros at a bathing beach in Chicago which resulted in the drowning of a Negro boy. I. Rope. Little you gene gene. Swayed, EST I've Seen Sane Sane. His Mama told him ham them. Why boys mean mean mean? He did and then listen. Listen to what Mama say say say went to the Lake Lake Lake that July Day Day Day. No it goes like. Little huge W, so sorry to trouble. You rise Eugene rise. Calm your Mama's cries. Just sit up in love around. Don't let him bury you down. No it goes like. Down Down, baby down the waters tugging. SWEET SWEET BABY! Make me let you go. Swallow swallow, grab this guy. Swallow swallow dark, swallow, swallow, grab the sky, swallow swallow dark, grandma grandma sick in bed. Call Jesus because your babies. No it goes like. dressed in black, black, black, dressed in black, black black, all dressed in. And he never came back back back. Thank you eve. It's a beautiful poem. What inspired you to write it as a jump rope rhyme? That's also hard for me to read number one because it's very sad, number two, because I am not a singer and I have to sing this poem, so I get really anxious about it, but you know I wrote it that way because I think about a lot of my work has to do with children, and how we defend and celebrate the rights of children and particularly the. The rights of black children to be children and I thought about Eugene, and about the moments of terror he experienced in the last moments of his life, and all the things that he will never do and the thing about jump rope songs that amazes me. Is that somehow there this this piece of like childhood, folk or old tradition where the same songs get passed from? From generation to generation in a world where a lot of other things have changed and I wouldn't be surprised if maybe in his time Eugene heard or saying some of the same versions, or you know different iterations of of jump rope songs that maybe I saying and heard when I was a kid so i. thought about you know the jump rope song as as a really a. A way of of eulogizing him as a psalm and then also of course you know playing with the image of the rope as being one that is most readily associated with lynching so this moment what happens to Eugene is also lynching and the rope. The physical rope is is absent, so I'm I'm kind of bringing the specter of the rope here as well. Let's get back to the riot of Nineteen Nineteen in Chicago. During the riots. One of the things that the commission writes about is that there were mass groups of what we would today refer to as gangs what then were referred to as athletic clubs These were groups of young white men who often had the patronage of a powerful Chicago politician. They were kind of get out the vote enforcers. They were basically neighborhood muscle that had this political protection and these groups of young white men, these roving gangs where responsible for the majority of the violence that happened and there were also several black people that killed. Killed White attackers in in self-defense but for the most part there were these random acts of violence where black people were pulled off, streetcars pulled out of restaurants accosted on the street. and murdered at random by these roving groups of young people very famously one of the athletic clubs, which again we would today call gangs. was called the Hamburg club and the Hamburg club had a very famous member, and that was Richard, J Daley he would a couple years after the riots become president of the Hamburg. Club and he very. Very famously refused to ever answer outright whether or not he'd been involved in the riots of one, thousand, nine hundred. It feels pretty unlikely that when all of his friends were out, randomly roving the streets that he was like I'm GonNa. Stay at home if he had the level of participation that would make him then be president of the club a couple of years later, but that's just me. Speculating of course Richard J Daley would grow up to become arguably the most powerful mayor and one of the most powerful politicians and all of American history. History who oversaw the Chicago of the nineteen sixties who famously issued a shoot to kill order in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty eight during protests at that period, and who was the father of Richard M Daley who is the longest serving who succeeded his father and became the longest serving mayor of Chicago and so you know you could say that. a Chicago political. Dynasty in American. Political Dynasty is born in this moment of of the riots. Let me reintroduce you here if you're just joining us. My guest is poet and sociologist e.. Her Book of poems is called nine hundred nineteen. Her book about Chicago. Schools is called goes in the school yard, racism and school closings on Chicago's southside. We'll talk more after we take a short break I'm terry gross and this is fresh air. For this podcast and the following message come from each raid trading isn't for everyone, but each rate is whether it's saving for a rainy day or your retirement, each rate has you covered? They can help you. Check financial goals off your list, and with a team of professionals. Giving you support when you need it, you can be confident that your money is working hard for you. Get more than just trading with each raid to get started visit e-trade dot com slash podcast for more information, each rate securities. LLC member FINRA SIPC. That's get back to my interview with Eve. L. Ewing poet and sociologist who teaches courses on race and education at the University of Chicago where she's an assistant professor. Her Book of Poems Nine Thousand Nine hundred. Nineteen is a collection of poems reacting to a report written in nineteen, twenty, one by a commission appointed to investigate the nineteen nineteen riots in Chicago and come up with recommendations to prevent a recurrence. Her book about the closing of Chicago schools that were deemed under resourced and under utilized as called ghosts in the schoolyard, racism and school closings on Chicago's south side. You have a poem written from the perspective of James. Crawford, who is a black man who fired into the crowd of black and white officers who were refusing to do anything to stop the rock throwing The rock throwing that forced Eugene Williams to drown. Tell us the story of what happened in the shooting to your knowledge. Well. You know at this point. People were getting agitated. Demanding arrest, demanding that something happened and James Crawford who we don't really know much else about him He's a black migrant living in Chicago and for whatever reason he felt like there was not enough action being taken, and he pulled out a gun and fired at the officers and he missed, and a black police officer shot him and killed him. and the report says specifically a Negro policeman who had been sent to help restore order. shot him and killed him, and so he becomes the first casualty of riot. Why did you write a poem from his perspective? I'm always obsessed with which names we learn in which names we don't learn, and why and there's so much that we will never know about this man. I don't know why he pulled a gun I don't know if he was part of a broader political movement. I don't know what he thought was going to happen. I don't know if he had any prior history I mean. He was really outnumbered so. So you know I don't know what he expected from that moment, or if it was something that wasn't rational, and he was just overcome. We'll just I'll just never know what was going through his head. all I know is that he he then dies, and so the poem is a small attempts at kind of inhabiting the story and giving emotional life that we otherwise can't access to this historical moment. Would you read it for? James Crawford speaks. I saw the whites of his eyes before he let go the railroad tie that kept him almost afloat. Live almost able to walk home almost able to lay out I in the sand and feel the sun almost able to face the stones, almost more than a stone's throw away almost hidden from this terrible place in it's everywhere is almost free, almost not having his name in the mouths of fiends, almost not having his name in my mouth, almost nobody nowhere gone home ten nothing. Me To. Almost nobody like me, too. I didn't want to be somebody. But he was somebody because I saw the whites of his eyes before he let go of the railroad tie. So I spoke it. His name came out of me. And I fired. Reading that eve and that's from Eve Ewing's collection of poems nineteen nineteen. Tell us more about how the riot of Nineteen nineteen and reading about what black people from the south faced in the north. After the great migration, how does that affect your reaction to the killing of George Floyd and the protests that followed. First of all one thing is that I have come to believe that it is really important to make space for mourning and sadness and grief and This book is a is a is a grieving book. It's a morning book and I think it was. It was very hard for me to write. I've written four books. It was the hardest book of the four, and I think I learned through that to make a lot of space for my sadness, and so one thing I think is important right now is. Is for black people everywhere all people, but specifically black people to make space for our feelings to make space for sadness to pay attention to the ways in which fear and grief are shaping our everyday attempts to to live and breathe and thrive on a daily basis. So that's something I've been trying to do. and that has been hard. I'm very sad very sad a lot of the time. I'm very angry a lot of the time and that's just something that is a a reality of life. The other thing that I've learned is. I as a person. have very little faith in the sole power of information. Or even shocking information to change people sentiments in a country in which our entire social fabric is predicated upon the dehumanisation of black people since the nation's inception. And the reason I say that is because if you read this eight hundred page report, these were people that were really committed to gathering the right information. They were lots of black people. They did lots of surveys. They went door to door. They talk to people about the ways. They experienced discrimination in the workplace and in housing, and the fear that they felt, and they did their due diligence to tell people and to make it clear that this is not about. About failures of character, but about failures of a city to live up to its promises, failures of a country to live up to its promises, and so in recent days I have been deeply moved an in moments encouraged by the ways in which people are rallying around the cause of protecting and cherishing black life, but also people have been really good information gatherers for a long time. People have done reporting and incredible, just stunning reporting and research and and writing. And Documentation and storytelling to make it very clear for a long time. Exactly what's happening in America and I worry that. People really overestimate what we can accomplish just through that kind of storytelling, and how deeply entrenched this? This hatred and contempt is in ways that we perhaps are still not fully contending with, and furthermore the part that we are not talking about enough. Is that I'm always hesitant when I say that, because of course there are always people having the right conversation, the good conversation, but what many people are not talking about enough is that there's the other side of it which is that if black people have been historically denied opportunities, jobs, resources material wealth. If we've documented that if we're now saying that, that's not okay. That means that somebody else has to give something up. That means that we have to talk about wealth hoarding. We have to talk about the cruel of privilege, so that's the part of the conversation that I worry that we never quite get to and. Things become really incendiary when we do. Is what you're talking about a form of reparations. When you talk about the the hoarding of of well I'm absolutely talking about reparations and I think that reparations can look a lot of different ways I'm very proud as Chicagoan of the the reparations ordinance that was passed here for the victims of police torture and something. That's really inspiring about that ordinance, although it does not do nearly enough, because nothing, nothing can ever undo losing years of your life or losing your life or losing your dignity or the trauma of being incarcerated wrongfully or being incarcerated at all, but what inspires me about that ordinance? Is that It was not only about monetary reparations, but also thinking about. About how can we build new systems? How can we make sure that people in the communities affected by police torture have access to mental health resources one of the things that was also required in the reparations ordinance here is that kids? In Chicago, public schools have to learn about the regime of police torture that that happened here, and that's part of our history, so yes I am absolutely a hundred and twenty percent talking about material reparations, and I also think we need to think about what systems and structures we put into place to actually transform society, and not only repair what is broken, but build something new and better. I WANNA. Talk with you about simic inequality in the schools, but first we need to take a short break. If you're just joining us my guest as poet and sociologist E. Viewing her book of poems, called, nine. Hundred Nineteen her book about Chicago. Schools is called goes in the school yard, racism and school closings on Chicago's south side. We'll be back after we take a short break. This is fresh air. Support for NPR and the following message come from duck duck go. Are you fed up with companies? Selling your data duck duck go can help. They helped millions of people like you take back their privacy online with one download you can search and browse privately avoiding trackers duck duck ago, privacy simplified. This is fresh air and if you're just joining us, my guest is Eve, Ewing, poet, and sociologist, the teachers courses on race and education at the University of Chicago where she's an assistant professor, her book of Poems Nineteen Nineteen is a collection of poems reacting to a report written in nineteen, twenty, one by a commission appointed to investigate the nineteen nineteen riots in Chicago and come up with recommendations to prevent a recurrence. Her book about the closing of Chicago schools deemed under resourced, and under utilized is called ghosts in the School Yard Racism and school closings on Chicago's south side. So. If you have a book about racism in Chicago schools, you teach courses on education and racism. I'm wondering if you think one of the steps. After discussing Systemic, racial inequality in terms of how the police treat Americans if you think the next step or one of the next steps needs to be addressing systemic inequality in our schools. Absolutely, I think it's a concurrent step and I. Think you know? Many people are familiar with the phrase school to Prison Pipeline but many scholars including myself have moved towards describing it as what we call the school prison nexus, and what we mean by that, is that the same logic? The same systems that allow mass incarceration to happen that allow policing to be a violent structure in our society also operate within schools particularly schools that serve low income students of color, particularly schools that serve low income. Black Children and there are ways in which our school spaces become training grounds for the ideologies that we then. Then see functioning in policing and in the rest of our country and that includes the idea that you know. We need to control children's bodies. We need to discipline them through often harsh punitive measures. We need to make sure that we have surveillance set up, and then, of course, the most obvious example is the presence police in schools, which has become necessarily contentious in in recent days, which I think is great in an important conversation, so yes I think it's a next step, but in many ways it's it's. It's the same stuff to me. So you, you taught in Chicago Public School on the South side from two thousand eleven to two thousand and thirteen. It was a it was a middle school. And it ended up being one of the schools that was closed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, because it was deemed under resourced and under utilized. You know. These schools had fewer children in them than in the past, and that was in part because housing projects were torn down housing projects that had been home to a lot of children were no longer there, so the population of children attending the schools was smaller, and so you would think like if these schools were. Under resource? And underrepresented. why would parents and children be so passionate about saving the schools? There were three days of protests. I think there was a hunger strike. By parents for one of the schools that were slated to be closed, and that's a question you try to investigate of. These schools are considered so bad. Why are people so passionate about saving them? So tell us a little bit about what you found about why people were so passionate about not wanting to close the schools. Sure well, you know one thing that's important to note. Is that the historical context? You just mentioned which is the reason why the schools were underutilized why they have very large capacity as buildings and didn't have kids filling that capacity. Has To do with a lot of things including the demolition of tens of thousands of units of public housing on the south side and across the city, and that's something that was never. That's something I. Talk About extensively in the book, but it was. It was never discussed by any policy makers by any city leaders by any school leaders. At the time the closings were being announced, so it really felt like gas lighting to me into a lot of other people because the. The way in which it was framed was that the schools were just empty, because families had made other choices, or they had, they had just chosen to go elsewhere and there was never an acknowledgement of the historical conditions that pushed people into this public housing in the first place and then removed it from the landscape, which then caused a public school enrollment to be depleted at a at a rapid clip in a very short period of time, and then the other thing is that. Schools are really important in people's lives. Schools mean a lot more just a place where you go to learn basic skills, and that is especially true argue in the book if you are a person who doesn't have a lot of the resources that other people take for granted when it comes to wealth when it comes to private property when it comes to access to social services, the school takes on a magnified importance in your life because it's not just the place where you go to. To learn and we're seeing this. During the entire pandemic schools are the front line for so many other things for assisting young people that are homeless for assisting young people that are experiencing abuse and neglect for helping parents find the resources that they need to get education or to get jobs for basic healthcare. You know in schools we testing to see of kids need glasses. We test to make sure that kids don't need assistance with hearing. Right the. We make sure that kids have food. And then also in an unstable and uncertain world, schools are source of stability for children. They are a place where they have meaningful in deep social relationships that have lasted the entirety of their memorable lives. Right when you're eleven and somebody's been your friends since you were five. That's your whole life. The teacher that you learned to trust these are really valuable and crucial and important social relationships that mean more to people. Then you know the percentage of their building that is that is filled. and that are really important in precarious social circumstances, so that's that's why people fight for their schools. And finally. How would you like to see? The protest the insistence that policing has to change that we have to. Be Aware of systemic racism within policing. How would you like to see that used now? As appoint of departure to start to think more deeply. About inequality in the schools like what do you see an opportunity here? I think that conversations about police become contentious because policing represents really different things to different classes of people, one class of people can rely on the police to protect them to protect their property, and to reinforce the boundaries of the social space that they've prescribed for themselves and one class of people can rely on the police to terrorize them, and cannot call upon them for safety cannot call upon them for protection. And I think that if we examine those power relations that helps us open, understand how schools function that for some people schools are as horace. Mann said they were supposed to be the great equalizer. A place where you know you can come in as a young person full of potential and know that the best of who you are will be celebrated and nurtured, and for many young people in our country schools are a place where the best of who they are is silenced where the best of who they are is disciplined and controlled and a radical dated and I think that if we're willing. To face that uncomfortable fact, and if we're willing to listen to people who have been most silence who have been most marginalized, we can get hopefully a lot further than we did in the last four centuries. Of trying. Viewing. Thank you so much for talking with us. I'm overjoyed that I got to speak with you. Thanks Terry. Eve Ewing is a sociologist who teaches classes on race and education at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration where she's an assistant professor. Her books include ghosts in the School Yard Racism and school closings on Chicago's south side and the collection of poems nineteen nineteen. After we take a short break John Powers will review the reissue of a novel by Alfred. Hayes who John described as one of our great writers about social and personal disillusionment. This is fresh air. You may have noticed something. I'll be protests police violence. There are a lot more white people there than you'd expect. But how long will that last this of woking among White American voters? How far they really willing to go beyond dethroning trump Adam server on race and lessons from history listen, it's subscribe to. It's been a minute from NPR public officials from across the United States have been blaming the recent violence down rest in their cities on quote. Outside agitators. On this week Coz from NPR a history of blaming civil disobedience on bad actors from Outta town. Are Critic Large John Powers has a review of a new reissue of a novel by Alfred Hayes. Who John says is one of our great writers about social and personal disillusionment. His was a poet, novelist and screenwriter, whose name largely fell from view in the years after his death in one, thousand, nine, hundred five, but with the reissue of three of his novels. His reputation has been making a comeback. Here's John's review of the end of me. A few years ago, I was having lunch with my friend Pierre. One of those French cinema files who knew more about Hollywood than I ever could? Jump Polaris he said. What do you think of offered as? I said I'd never heard of him. Peer beamed at the smile that was equal parts, derision at my not knowing and delight the now he'd be able to tell me. It turns out that Alfred. Hayes live the life that was an encapsulated history of the twentieth century. Born Jewish London he moved to New York as a kid and grew up to become a left-wing journalist and poet. He wrote Joe Hill, a poem about Labor activist. It became a song made famous by Joan Baez. He's in World War Two and stayed on in Italy where he helped. Write such famous neo realist films as Vittorio Sikh's bicycle, thieves and Roberto Rossellini Suzanne. He got an Oscar nomination for that. Moving to Hollywood, he worked with high-class directors like Fritz Lang and Nicholas Ray before ending his career churning out scripts for TV series like Mannix. During the fifties and sixties Hayes also route three brief clear I deeply unsettling novels about screenwriters. New York review books already republished the first two in love and my face for the world to see and has just now bringing out the third one titled the end of me. Along, with the other parts of this loose trilogy. Elegant oddly grouping novel Establishes Hayes is the even more disenchanted air of F Scott Fitzgerald. First published in nineteen, sixty eight. The end of me is narrated by Asher, a middle aged Hollywood screenwriter, whose career has gone Louis along with his second marriage. Hoping to rekindle something Asher, and whose name you can almost taste, the powdery ruin takes a hotel room in his hometown of new. York City he plans to explore his lower east side routes while trying to figure out his future. But Sixties New York isn't what he knew in the thirty S it's been alternated as a waiter, says it an old haunt. That's no longer the same. As, a favor to an aging aunt Asher meets with grandson Michael an aspiring poet. He treats the young man with condescension and receives career disdain, return. issue is more kindly disposed to Michael's lover, a vibrant for wearing actress in her early twenties. Who Swears her real name is Aurora Day Maure. Pursuing Aurora down an amorous rabbit hole of his own digging Asher discovers as many of us do that. Neither he nor his place in the world is special as he wants thought they were. The end of me is stinging league good, but it's no great surprise that it is well known like the earlier novels. It was wildly out of sync with the grand eloquent postwar cultural moment in which it emerged. He doesn't share in the sentence flaunting pyrotechnics of Saul. Bellow John Updike. Nor does he pontificate about America like Norman Mailer? Resolutely unshowy. He's never out to prove that he's a great writer. He's rights with the UNADORNED clarity of the neorealist filmmakers, but he stirs a ruthless psychological perceptiveness. His work is colored by disillusionment with himself with Hollywood with writing which he calls writhing and with a postwar America. That appears short of deeper values. And he'd all three novels and with their heroes. Mingling with people don't actually want to be with. Hayes is at his most brilliant in exploring romantic relationships. He creates vividly alive. Female Characters Aurora mayor, Maury fairly leaps off the page. And he's unblinking, honest about the selfish often paranoid ways. His Heroes View Women. This is nowhere clearer than his masterpiece, my face for the world to see. The lacerating story of a writer and an aspiring young actress. He saves from drowning. Perfectly suited to Hashtag METOO era. The book is an unmatched portrait of how Hollywood misogyny choose up young women. Early in the end of me. As your that New York is and I quote constantly existing at the periphery of your site. You are almost always seeing at the very edge of what you see. Something else that you are still not seeing. The same is true of hazing slim novels, which are perfectly lucid in down to Earth yet keep syndicate, Moods and meanings. You can't quite pin down and it keep lingering in your head. Even when you finish a book by Alfred, Hayes His book is unfinished with you. John Powers reviewed the end of me by Alfred Hayes tomorrow on fresh air. We'll talk about what happens to women who get an abortion just under a clinics deadline, and what happens to women who just missed the deadline and are denied an abortion, and how does the reality of these women's lives compared to preconceptions? Many people hold about the impact of abortion on a woman's life. My guest will be Diana Green Foster the principal investigator of a ten year study, comparing those two sets of women. Her new book is about the results of the study. I hope you'll join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey, Bentham with additional engineering from Mike Villers, our interviews and reviews produced in edited by Amy Salad Phyllis Myers Hamburger Lauren Crandell Heidi Soman to recent madden, they a Challenor, Seth Kelly and Joe will from our associate producer of digital media is Molly seavy Nesper Roberta shorrock directs the show I'm Terry Gross.

Chicago Eve L. Ewing Fresh Air Terry Gross University of Chicago America Chicago Public School Alfred Hayes assistant professor School Yard officer Negros James Crawford John Powers Lake Michigan writer Black Children Asher eugene
Leading Ladies: Evelyn Preer

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:54 min | 4 months ago

Leading Ladies: Evelyn Preer

"Hey listeners rarely do I get to read an ad for a company? That I've seen grow since inception I'm so excited to tell you about Bev. Bev is breaking norms and changing drinking culture to women. Eighty percent of adult beverage companies are still male, owned and operated while sixty to seventy percent of the consumer is female. Bev is trying to change that Beth has three canned wines that are crisp, dry and a little busy. The fact that the wind is in cans mix. It's so easy to transport and take wherever you are. Get Yours by going to drink BEV DOT com and use the Promo Code Jenny to get fifteen percent off your order. Check it out I promise. It's worth it and you're supporting someone I love. Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today's leading lady was one of the first black actresses to earn celebrity status. She was known as the First Lady of the screen. Let's talk about Evelyn prayer. Evelyn Jarvis was born in eighteen, ninety six in Vicksburg Mississippi after her father died. Evelyn's family moved to Chicago where she performed in Vaudeville shows and practice street, preaching to raise funds to build church. In Nineteen fifteen, when she was nineteen years old Evelyn married her first husband Frank Career. In Nineteen Eighteen Evelyn met author and director Oscar me show who'd become a highly influential African American filmmaker. We show made films for a predominantly black audience and was able to avoid stereotypes that Hollywood Films Inc... Evelyn made her film debut in me. Shows film The homesteaders where she played a woman who's evil, overbearing father causes her husband to abandon her. Michaud Evelyn, his goto leading actress, and in Nineteen Twenty, she started within our gates. She played a teacher who fights to save a school for Black Children. It's the only feature film Evelyn made that survive to this day. As her career blossomed, Evelyn played dramatic characters and was known for her versatility. In between films, Evelyn joined the Lafayette players a black, the actual stock company since theaters were segregated by law in the South and by practice in the north. The Lafayette players brought traditional theater to black audiences throughout the US. Evelyn married her second husband fellow actor Edward Thompson while on tour. In nineteen twenty one, Evelyn performed in the chip woman's fortune. The first drama written by a black playwright to appear on Broadway. The show only ran for two weeks, but W E. B deploys said that dramatically and spiritually it was one of the greatest successes. This country has ever seen. In nineteen twenty six, Evelyn landed a role in the successful Broadway Production Blue Bell. She understudied and played the role of a Harlem Prostitute. She then appeared in the West Coast Revival of Sadie Thompson. We're her performance garnered critical acclaim. In addition to being a talented actor Evelyn was a gifted vocalist. She thrived cabaret and theater, and was occasionally accompanied by a young duke. Ellington and Red Nichols. Up. L.! Y.. Evelyn start in sixteen films. She easily transition from silent films to talkies in the nineteen thirties, musical Georgia rose, which was about a black family migrating north. In nineteen thirty-one Evelyn performed in the film. Ladies of the big house alongside Sylvia Sidney. WHO's one of the most famous entertainers at the time? Her final role was in blonde. Venus which starred Marlene Dietrich and cary grant. Evelyn's performance was credited. Evelyn refused roles that attempted to typecast her, and instead continued acting in challenging roles. Many black actors at the time were not permitted to play. In nineteen, thirty, two Evelyn gave birth to her daughter Adiv Evelyn suffered from postpartum complications, and soon after died of double pneumonia, she was thirty six years old. Though, her career ended prematurely. Evelyn left her mark on Hollywood and on history. She's remembered as pioneering actor and singer. Tune in tomorrow for the story of another leading lady. For more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out. Our Encyclopaedia Will Manica newsletter. We'll Manica weekly. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia. Annika and you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny Kaplan special thanks to Liz Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator. Talk to you tomorrow. I WANNA. Tell you about a podcast from wonder media network encouraging. Called Empire. Alarm fire feature stories of exceptional Arabs around the world and their journeys to the top. It's Co hosted by two Arab. Women who aren't afraid to ask intimate and sometimes uncomfortable questions for a deeper understanding of how success actually happens. Guests cover everything from the constant pressure of being a public figure in the age of the Internet to finding your voice in a world that doesn't seem to welcome it here from some of the most inspiring Arabs including the Guardian data editor, Ramona Shalaabi or podcast Godfather, JOT ALBUM RODEF RADIO LAB. Listen to l'empire wherever you get your podcasts.

Michaud Evelyn Evelyn Jarvis Nineteen Twenty Bev BEV DOT Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Black Children Manica Hollywood Films Inc US Sylvia Sidney Beth Harlem Sadie Thompson Marlene Dietrich Frank Career Vicksburg Mississippi Oscar Georgia
Amy Coney Barrett and the People of Praise: How to respond when critics don't understand our faith

The Daily Article

07:04 min | 2 months ago

Amy Coney Barrett and the People of Praise: How to respond when critics don't understand our faith

"This is the daily Article podcast published by Denison Forum or Culture Changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your email inbox week day morning visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now here's Today's news discerned differently. Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett are set to begin on October Twelfth, Senate, Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham said, the committee should clear her nomination by October twenty sixth leaving the Republican led Senate roughly a week to confirm Barrett before the November third election attacks and her family and faith have already begun focusing on the fact that she and her husband adopted two children from Haiti one critic suggested without any evidence. The possibility that her kids were scooped up by ultra religious Americans or Americans who weren't scrupulous intermediaries and the kids were taken when there was family in Haiti Judge Barrett and her husband have also been likened to white colonizers for adopting. Black Children. If past is prologue, we can expect more character assassination attempts in the weeks ahead, many critics have focused on the fact that Judge Barrett is a member of a group called people of praise. Newsweek headlined how charismatic Catholic groups like Amy Coney Barrett's people of praise inspired. The handmaid's tale. Their original headline incorrectly claimed that people of praise directly inspired the dystopia novel editors were forced to issue a retraction in change their headline though not the reporting in the article itself such guilt by Association was echoed by other outlets but has been soundly debunked. This controversy illustrates an important point about the state of our culture and the best way for Christians to respond. Writing for the Wall Street Journal. Peggy Noonan explains that people have praise part of Charismatic Renewal Movement that began in the nineteen seventies and emphasizes personal conversion and bringing forward Christ's teachings in the world. newnan notes members include Protestants, as well as Catholics they are joined together intentionally in community to pray together perform service and run schools. They're Christians living in the World David French's response is especially helpful. He quotes this New York, times description of the group in two thousand, seventeen members of the group swear lifelong oath of Loyalty called a covenant to one another and. Are assigned and are accountable to a personal adviser called a head for men and the handmade for women. The group teaches that husbands are the heads of their wives and should take a thorny over family French responds the more I look into people of praise. The more I had two simultaneous thoughts I many millions of American Christians see echoes of their lives in Judge Barrett, story, and second lots of folks really don't understand both spiritual authority and spiritual community. The concerns about Barrett reflect in part the glaring gaps in religious knowledge elite American media. He's precisely right. People have praised took the word handmade from Mary's response to Gabriel's announcement that she would become the mother of God son Luke One, thirty, eight says behold the handmade of the Lord be it unto me according to the word the group leader changed the term to avoid confusion after the handmaid's tale came out French reports that the group has been lauded by Cardinal Francis George. One of its members was appointed by Pope Francis as exhilarating Bishop of Portland it is founded three schools that have one nine department of Education Blue Ribbon awards the FUHRER's sparked by misunderstandings of Judge Barrett's faith illustrates an admission, new? York. Times executive editor Dean be cat made to NPR's. Terry gross we don't get religion. We don't get the role of religion in people's lives. They're not alone a recent study reported that only two percent of America's millennials hold a biblical worldview among gen-x those thirty seven to fifty five years of age only five percent subscribed to such a worldview only an estimated nine percent of adults over the age of fifty six hold a biblical worldview. George Barna noted that the report suggests a nation. That is at war with itself to adopt new values, lifestyles and a new identity. In other words, there is a war for worldview dominance. How do we win this war? Let's close by focusing on an important part of the answer. Across, the coming weeks of divisiveness over confirmation hearings and the presidential election, my prayer for Judge Barrett, and for all believers is that we will demonstrate the integrity of Daniel. His political opponents could find no ground for complaint or any fault has Daniel six four says so they reverted to attacking him in connection with the law of his God as verse. Five says. However. The Lord Redeemed Daniels Faithfulness. So miraculously that King Darius eventually proclaimed in Daniel six, twenty, six, he is the living. God enduring. Forever, his kingdom shall never be destroyed and his dominion shall be to the end like Daniel. We face opposition that does not understand our faith or believe in our government they need and deserve our compassion and our witness, but they will receive neither unless we live with such integrity that they see the unmistakable imprint of Jesus and our lives if skeptics are going to find fault with us, let them say that we are too committed to our Lord is this what the world would say of you. In my latest book, I, ask, how can a nation survive if citizens see charter is enemies two out of three Americans consider civility to be a major problem in our country today only seven percent say it is not a problem at all. It seems we are all fighting to be heard but no one's listening has our culture lost the art of civility in respectfully I disagree how to be a civil person in an uncivil time I offer a biblical path to becoming a people of civility in a season of conflict request your copy of my newest book today at the daily Article Dot Org. If. You like what you heard. Please leave a rating and review for the PODCAST. Thank you for listening to the daily Article podcast today.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett Daniel Haiti Supreme Court Denison Forum Lindsey Graham Peggy Noonan Senate Black Children Wall Street Journal New York George Barna Terry gross chairman Cardinal Francis George David French Newsweek Christ Judiciary Committee
E96: Nation of Yaweh - Hulon Mitchell Jr.

Cults

46:19 min | 1 year ago

E96: Nation of Yaweh - Hulon Mitchell Jr.

"On March thirty first nineteen eighty four white police officers went on trial for fatally beating being a black insurance salesman named Arthur mcduffie after six weeks of proceedings they were acquitted on all charges on May seventeenth by an all white all male jury by seven pm that evening riots had already spread through Miami's liberty city and over town neighborhoods over the next three days eighteen people were killed and eight hundred were arrested by the time the violence ended the city had suffered eighty million dollars dollars in damages the nineteen eighty Miami riots were the first major race riots since the late nineteen sixties but they didn't come out of nowhere. The city suffered from extreme racial inequality and the violence was a tragic indication of just how bad things were however in the eyes of one local religious leader. The racial tension in Miami was anything but a tragedy for the man known as Y'all way Ben Yeah Al Way it was an opportunity hi I'm Greg Paulson and I'm Vanessa Richardson and this is called. It's a podcast original. Every Tuesday we look at a cults. It's practices their leader and their followers today. We're taking a deep dive into the nation of Galway under the leadership of its charismatic leader. He Hallway Ben Yeah Way away. The cult was instrumental in helping improve some of Miami's worst neighborhoods during the nineteen eighties however underneath the surface the nation of Yao Galloway was much less benevolent than it seemed this week we chart the early life and various personas of Y'all way Ben Yeah away until he finally Ali founded the nation of Galway in nineteen seventy nine in next week's part two will examine the nation of y'all as growth throughout the nineteen eighties and and how the empire came crumbling down at the hands of the F._B._i.. At podcast we're grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do what we love. Let us know oh how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help the buses to leave a five star review wherever you're listening it really does help we also know have merchandise head to podcast dot com slash merch for more information formation you can listen to previous episodes of cults as well as all of our casts other shows on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts a new episode comes out every Tuesday. The Nation of Ya was founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine by mysterious man who who eventually called himself y'all way Benway the Miami based organization was a loose offshoot of the Black Hebrew Israelite Movement and also incorporated corporated messaging from the nation of Islam throughout the nineteen eighties y'all way Benway attracted followers with his messaging that God and the biblical. Oh prophets were black as a self-appointed Messiah Y'all way Benway insisted he would lead his followers to paradise by its peak in Nineteen nineteen ninety. The Nation of Yala was a veritable empire. It boasted an estimated twenty thousand members with churches and forty five cities costs sixteen sixteen different countries. It has been estimated that the organization had anywhere from eight million dollars to over one hundred million dollars in total assets to the public public. y'All way been y'all way projected peaceful benevolent image in reality. He ruled over his followers with an iron fist on November November seventh nineteen ninety he was arrested and indicted on charges of conspiracy extortion and murder. Although Ya Benway Galway died in two thousand seven at age seventy one his movement lives on in two thousand nineteen albeit in a more limited fashion y'all way Ben Yeah Away was born on October twenty seventh nineteen thirty five as Hugh Lawn Mitchell junior in Kingfisher Oklahoma the homa from the moment he was born. Hugh Lon seemed destined for a life dedicated to religion his father Hugh Lan senior was a holiness pentecostal hostile preacher and his mother Pearl was a highly talented church singer from a very young age. Hugh Lawn was convinced that he was special even though he didn't post especially impressive grades he boasted to anyone who would listen that his I q was so high that it couldn't be measured Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note. She's not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show. Thanks Greg Greg. Although self confidence isn't necessarily a bad thing hugh lawns inflated belief in his own abilities may have been an early sign of narcissistic personality personality disorder according to child psychologists Brian de Johnson and Laurie Berdahl narcissists filter information and react on the basis of their egos. They're actions reflect grandiose beliefs of superiority and uniqueness as well as their need for admiration and worship although it's difficult difficult to diagnose people with narcissistic personality disorder before they turn eighteen and early warning sign can be a child's egotistical view of extraordinary. I self worth and Little Hugh Lon certainly had a high opinion of himself when he was only three years old he reenacted the story of Moses leading the Hebrews across the Red Sea for his mother his role in the story the burning Bush or God himself from an Early Age Huilan Yulon practice guiding his own little flock as he was entrusted with the care of what would eventually be fourteen younger siblings with his father busy preaching get to churches and working factory job it fell to hugh lawn to make sure his younger siblings abided by their father strict rules no dancing no fighting no stealing and no improper interaction with the opposite sex but the ultimate authority in the Mitchell household household was still yulon senior. If any of his children's set a foot out of line he would punish them as a unit with group whippings by punishing all of his his children anytime a rule was broken. Huilan senior was practicing collective punishment. According to a study on cooperative behavior conducted Viallet Gow and zone Wong of China's northwestern Polytechnical University the authors ultimately concluded that collective punishment was an effective a tool for promoting cooperation within small groups in Chalon seniors mind collectively whipping as children also way to keep them all accountable for each other's actions teams however he wasn't considering the psychological effects that such physical punishments would have according to the U._S. Department of Health and Human Services when children are physically abused it can lead to educational difficulties low self esteem depression and trouble forming and maintaining relationships whilst Yulon junior certainly didn't suffer from low self esteem. He did eventually grow to resent his father's so-called tough love when Yulon Yulon graduated from high school in Nineteen fifty three he moved away from home and enrolled a Texas College in Tyler Oklahoma freed from his family's restrictive shackles tackles Xuan studied math and music. He was a talented trumpet player and was certain he could make a name for himself as a jazz musician but after less than a year in school a wrench was thrown into H- Yulon's plans in the form of the selective service act although the Korean War was coming to an end the Cold War was heating up and Uncle Sam still needed soldiers if the government's quotas couldn't be met with voluntary enlistment there was a chance Hugh nealon could be drafted into the Armed Forces Hewlett new if he was drafted it would probably be into the army most likely he would be stuck serving as little a little more than a lowly grunt rather than leaving it to chance Huilan voluntarily enlisted in the air force which historically treated it's black soldiers better in September of one thousand nine hundred sixty four nine thousand nine year old Yulon returned to his parents home in Enid Oklahoma where there was a large air force base but although he was back in his father's household H- Yulon had outgrown his authority as he waited for his official assignment H- Yulon started going to parties and dating women women one of those women was eighteen year old not may child's a kind young woman who completely idolized Yulon after only a few weeks of dating wedding they were married on October Fifteenth Nineteen fifty four in Hugh Lon Seniors Church shortly thereafter the newly minted airmen Mitchell it was assigned to Parks Air Force Base in California. The newly pregnant not may went with him having grown up following his father's orders Hugh John Quickly discovered that the military lights suited him the air force was its own sort of religion but instead of worshiping God Hugh Lan and his fellow airmen and follow the tenants set forth in training manuals and was subject to the whims of the United States government. He'll on completed the air force's general instructors course in the summer of nineteen fifty five he loved instilling the virtues of duty unquestioning loyalty and discipline in others at the age of Twenty Hugh Lon became a tactical instructor while H- Yulon had all the rights and privileges of an officer he still had the title and wages of an enlisted airmen by the summer of Nineteen fifty six twenty one year old Hugh Lon had two daughters with another on the way he began to worry that a career in the air force wouldn't be enough to support his growing ambitions and family as human contemplated as future the nascent civil <unk> rights movement led by Martin Luther King Junior had a profound effect at his worldview Hugh Lon was extremely moved by M._l._K.'s message that Christian Chen leaders had a moral obligation to fight racism it stood in stark contrast to the messages father and other holiness preachers had instilled in him as a youth which focused less on fighting inequality on earth and more on following God's rules so he could get into heaven. M._l._K.'s message also disillusioned delusions Yulon with the military. He didn't see why he should continue to serve a country which didn't serve him or his community in return in late nineteen eighteen fifty seven his term of service ended and Hugh Lon not may moved back to Enid Oklahoma around the same time Hugh Lawn search self-fulfilment led him to explore other religions. He became particularly interested in the occult teachings of the Rosicrucians who believed humans could unlock secret Krit wisdom hidden within themselves through discipline study and prayer as someone who believed he was destined for greatness these teaching certainly appealed old to H- Yulon but the occult was too much for not may to handle if she wasn't going to adopt his shifting beliefs Hugh Lon wasn't going to stay married to her shortly. After they returned to Enid he filed for divorce in January nineteen fifty eight twenty two year old Hugh Lawn took advantage of the G._i.. Bill which provided educational assistance to military service members veterans and their dependents he enrolled at Phillips University Janine it becoming one of the school's first black students in addition to his studies on the American government and social problems Hugh Lawn spent hours on end in the college library. He was particularly interested in history war and world leaders. He was obsessed with analyzing what made rulers throughout route history effective what made people love them. What made people fear them while at Phillips University Hugh Lon attended Rallies Leeson integration strategies sponsored by the Oklahoma N. Double A._C._p.? Youth Council embarking on a mission to end segregation in public spaces Yulon helped organize a sit in at to downtown ended lunch counters in August of Nineteen fifty-eight but as Hugh Lawn became one of the leaders of Oklahoma's civil rights. It's movement. He was dealing with the repercussions of his separation from not may the divorce trial was on January seventh nineteen fifty-nine but not not made didn't show up when Hugh Lon asked for sole custody of their four children he got it H- Yulon relished his life as a single father father he was raising his children managing a household and was still a fulltime student at Phillips University while studying Historical Leaders Hugh Hugh Lon became extremely interested in psychology here long nurtured his new interest by spending his weekends discussing psychology with a small group of other our students during these discussions Hugh Lana his fellow students struggled to make sense of their rapidly changing world he desperately wanted to be accepted in society society regardless of his skin color but didn't see how that was possible. Nevertheless he was determined to try after graduating from Phillips on June First Nineteen Sixty at the age of twenty four Huilan enrolled in law school at the University of Oklahoma. He was the only black person at his class shortly. After starting school. Hugh on met twenty-seven-year-old Khloe height she was working towards her doctorate in education bonding over for their mutual interest in the education of Black Children Hugh Lawn and chloe quickly became inseparable and were married sometime in early nineteen sixty one and unlike <unk> first marriage he and chloe never had any children for reasons he never disclosed. Hugh Lan had a vasectomy shortly after his divorce in the fall of nineteen sixty. One KHLOE got a teaching job at Albany State University and Georgia Hugh Lon dropped out of law school so he and his kids could go with her a small town of fifty seven thousand people Albany was still firmly segregated and one of the flashpoints of the Civil Rights Movement movement however Huron had lost his passion for protests and sit INS although he had successfully battled for integration back in Oklahoma Yulon didn't think it had improved black people's overall place in society hugh long later wrote the civil rights movement was about fighting and dying to get inside side of oppression to be better oppressed. You wanted to sleep in the White Hotel. The civil rights movement was not about owning a hotel in his search search for meaning Yulon studied the teachings of Elijah Muhammad the leader of the Nation of Islam perhaps most famous for influencing the philosophy of Malcolm X. Acce the nation of Islam preached black separatism in place of immigration in addition to its message of black empowerment. The Nation of Islam also incorporated rated pieces of the Muslim religion. Its members were required to adhere to a strict lifestyle. No Smoking no drinking no swearing no gambling and harsh punishment for disobedient children in the nation of Islam Hugh on found the philosophy he had been searching for his entire life in addition into a moral code that hearkens back to his upbringing. The message that black people should celebrate their blackness was a revelation in nineteen sixty four twenty twenty nine year old Yulon and thirty two year old KHLOE moved from Albany to Atlanta or the nation of Islam had a major presence Hewlett enthusiastically. He joined the growing movement to show his dedication to the nation of Islam. Hugh Lon dropped the last name Mitchell and took on the moniker Hugh Lon ax ax according to Elijah Muhammad's teachings the X. represented the true family name that was stripped from Hugh lawns ancestors when they were forcibly brought to America by white slavers and when the time was right Allah would bestow Hugh Lan with a new name one that would signal his true self coming up H- Yulon rises through the nation of Islam's ranks and his spiritual beliefs continue to evolve solve. If you're planning a wedding do it my friends arrogant. Diana did use Zola to take the stress out of Wedding Planning Zola has free wedding websites websites the easiest wedding registry affordable invite sweets and more Zola has hundreds of beautiful wedding website designs to choose from and they all have have matching invitation sweets. 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And Elijah Muhammad in addition to embracing Elijah's Elijah teachings yulon enrolled at Atlanta University to continuous education but he lon didn't think the nation of Islam needed anymore lawyers instead head of re enrolling in law school. He decided to pursue a master's degree in banking and monetary policy joining the N._O.. I hadn't robbed Yulon of his upward. Damn Bishen and he wanted to be a key figure. In guiding the organization's economic growth as Yulon continued his studies his wife Chloe also embraced braced life as a woman she was expected to stay in the background and support her husband. Although she continued to work as a teacher she was also responsible for homeschooling her four step children according to Elijah Muhammad's teachings public schools were dangerous environments that bread sadists drug addicts and perverts hugh loans dedication to the cause remained a strong as his wife's on May thirty first nineteen sixty five he graduated from Atlanta a university with a master's degree in economics at the age of twenty nine Elijah was full of praise for Hugh Lawn and named Him Minister of Atlanta's mosque can number fifteen Elijah also bestowed Yulon with the Holy Name Shah meaning the ruler chu-lan now all known as Minister Hamad received reports that H- Yulon was abusing his position for personal gain according to anonymous informants Hugh lawn stole fifty thousand thousanddollars from the according to one of Elijah's closest aides Taller Obama'd Hugh Lon was also accused of sexual improprieties. He's including sex with minors and having homosexual tendencies in the hyper masculine world of the N._F._l.. Why these are serious allegations he's almost more serious than stealing the fifty thousand dollars? Elisa ordered tight-lip to go to Atlanta at wants to investigate if the accusations against Yulon had any merit we don't know if Yulon actually acted inappropriately or if the rumors about him were fabricated by covetous subordinates who wanted take his place. Regardless Hugh Lawn made the decision to quit the N._R._A.. Before the investigation concluded but simply quitting wasn't enough to get him out of danger it was all but accepted that Elijah Muhammad had ordered the assassination of former members of the N._F._l.. I previously while it was never proven in court most members of the N._y.. Knew that Elijah had encouraged followers to go after Malcolm X.. In February nineteenth sixty five for his own safety safety Yulon knew that he needed to disappear for a while but he'd gotten a taste for leadership and at thirty two years old he couldn't return to a life without without power in June nineteen sixty eight after about a year in hiding H- Yulon resurfaced in Atlanta with a new identity uh he was no longer Yulon axe or minister shah he was Father Michelle a play on his given last name of Mitchell Hugh Lon linked talk with a local clothes salesman named Billy Stephen Jones or Father Johnny. The two men took to the airwaves as Atlanta's newest radio evangelists Angeles for the newly established modern Christian church during his time in the N._F._l.. Y H- Yulon had personally seen how a charismatic religious leader could gain influence over people desperate to find meaning in their lives having studied the powerful oratory skills of influential NOAA spokesman like like Malcolm X and Louis Farrakhan Hewlett had become a gifted speaker. He promised his radio listeners that for a small fee he could solve all are there problems whether they were personal social financial or anything else and they believed him with the contributions Hewlett and billy received. They bought more airtime with more airtime. They got more contributions soon. The supposedly nonprofit modern Christian church provided why did them with a lavish lifestyle Xi Lan wrote around Atlanta in a blinding white limo dressed in resplendent white robes using church funds. He bought himself a large house on a hill in northwestern Atlanta along with two brand new Cadillac El Dorados Hugh lawns partner billy was living it up as well although he remained slightly more modest than hugh lawn. He lavishly decorated his apartment. Even installing a velvet throne with a white tasseled canopy his living room the partners new lifestyles didn't go unnoticed at ten thirty P._M.. On May twenty twenty-third nine thousand nine hundred sixty nine three men rang billy's doorbell assuming they had an appointment with billy his wife life. Let them in without hesitation the moment they set foot in the living room they pulled out pistols and opened fire billy grabbed a gun he kept under his throne and fired off a few rounds but it was no use he died in his living room from three gunshots to the back mark. The police assumed it was a robbery attempt but the case wasn't so clear cut billy had managed to fatally wound two of his killers when when the police found the bodies they realized the attackers both lived in Jacksonville Florida over three hundred miles away. The third suspect aspect was also apprehended later in Chicago which just so happened to be where the nation of Islam's headquarters were located considering Hugh Lan left the Eno why on such bad terms it's possible Elijah Muhammad ordered a hit on him and billy. Unfortunately the case was never closed for whatever whatever reason the surviving attacker was never prosecuted but if billy's murder intimidated Hugh Lon he didn't show it after his partner's death Yulon dedicated himself to making the modern Christian church even bigger as the congregation grew hugh lawn bought got more airtime in more cities all over the country with large black populations his followers started calling him the king and Huron did nothing to discourage them them at an event for the modern Christian Churches First Anniversary on June twenty nine th nineteen sixty nine thirty three year old Hugh Lawn carried a sceptre and wore wore a gold crown inlaid with red gills the budding narcissism H- Yulon showed as a child had fully bloomed into what psychotherapist Dr Joseph Joseph Burgo termed an extreme narcissist extreme narcissists are driven by an overwhelming desire to put themselves over others one way they do this is by amassing vast sums of wealth but as Burgo wrote because there will always be someone more successful and wealthier the extreme narcissist is never satisfied. He needs to continue amassing an ever larger fortune and flaunting it to everyone around him dressed in his extravagantly royal garb Huilan fit those descriptions to a T. flaunting his wealth to the world he promised his followers that he and he he alone could miraculously cure whatever ails them if they subscribe to the fee structure of his blessing plan described in a brochure that was distributed he did his meetings Huilan boasted that his blessing plan would supposedly help the lame walk the blind see the deaf hear air disorders disappear operations are cancelled the also promised his followers great riches of their own telling them God wants wants you to be rich. The Bible says Richardson Wealth is the Gift of God Hugh Lawns followers deeply believed in his boastful claims they were willing to go to the ends of the Earth for the king. He knew that they would do anything for him. Even kill in the spring bring of nine thousand nine hundred seventy thirty four year old Hugh Lawn spoke to about two hundred congregants at a Sunday meeting at the modern Christian churches recently purchased Atlanta Headquarters <music> when a sermon ended human turned to his bodyguard lucious Boyce he had only just recently hired Boyce and believed he was a spy from the guy why he told his followers that Boyce was a hit man who had been hired to kill him. It's not clear why Hewlett believed this. Maybe he was paranoid about his former former partners killers coming back to finish the job. Maybe he feared that his extravagant displays of wealth made him a target. Maybe he just wanted to see how far is followers would go to protect him. Hugh Lan told the crowd he had proof to back up his claims but his loyal devotees didn't need it on Yulon's word alone they crowded around Boyce and mercilessly beat him. Somehow boy survived the attack. After he recovered heard he filed a slander lawsuit against Yulon but the case never went to trial H- Yulon's lawyer successfully argued that the First Amendment gave gave him broad protections of freedom of speech especially within the context of religion with the backing of his loyal followers Huron continued continue to grow the modern Christian Church in nineteen seventy four he decided the organization was ready to take another step at the age of thirty nine Hugh Lana amended the Churches Corporate Charter to turn it into a social economic and spiritual behemoth Hugh Lon appointed himself President and National Minister for life and made preparations to expand the modern Christian churches scope far beyond a simple ministry while the church which grew Huilan continued to skim from its funds to enrich himself donations kept rolling in under the guise of helping the needy with transportation services ervices housing clothing and food in reality. The money was going straight into Hugh Lonzo pocket. Eventually though Hugh Lon got too greedy in nineteen seventy eight his followers finally caught onto what he was doing and sued H- Yulon for fraud but once again in Houston was one step ahead before the authorities could corner him he took his children and disappeared without a trace leaving his wife Chloe and his crumbling fling empire behind but hugh lawn never stay down for long in short order he reappeared in a new city with another new name name and another new religion coming up H- Yulon makes his final transformation and now back up to the story in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight forty three year old Hewlett Mitchell was forced to leave Atlanta after his followers in the modern Christian the church sued him for using church funds to personally enrich himself hugh on abandoned the self aggrandizing persona of Father Michelle in late nineteen nineteen seventy eight and made his way to Orlando Florida. It was here that he started calling himself brother love falling back on the recruitment techniques techniques he had learned from the Nation of Islam Hugh Lon wandered the streets of downtown Orlando trying to attract new followers. Something Hugh Lon hadn't left behind in Atlanta Atlanta was his charisma he quickly gained between fifteen and twenty devotees mostly young women. One of them was a recent divorce say hey named Linda gains eleven years Yulon's junior. Linda was struggling to raise her three kids on her own. After meeting Hugh Lan at a social event she she quickly fell under his spell Linda lighth- Yulon strict moral code unlike her ex husband he didn't drink didn't get high and seemed we do have raised his kids with respect and love although both of them denied their relationship was <unk> movement originating in the late eighteen hundreds the black Hebrew movement preached that the original Hebrews in the Bible were actually black and that black people all were gods true chosen ones in that respect it was similar to the nation of Islam which claims that black people were the original man and were Allah's is chosen people the message of black empowerment appeal to Hugh Lon reflecting back on his childhood. He began to believe that he truly was the burning being Bush be all powerful force that would guide his people to deliverance but in order for Hugh Lawn to reach as many followers as he could. He couldn't stay a in Orlando. Although the city had quickly grown since disneyworld began construction in nineteen sixty five it didn't have a large enough population for hugh lawns purposes purposes but there was a city further to the south. That was absolutely perfect in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight Miami was teeming with would be messiahs. The city was gripped with racial tension it sizeable black community was all but forgotten pushed to the bottom of the societal ladder by the white dominated political system and the quickly growing influence of Cuban Immigrants Hugh Lawn was certain that what he perceived as a downtrodden desperate people would be receptive to his message but he knew it would be a challenge to break into Miami's religious seen if he was going to make an impact he'd need more manpower and there was only one group of people he could trust to follow him into battle his family in early Nineteen seventy-nine forty-three-year-old forty-three-year-old Yulon returned to his hometown of enid Oklahoma but he wasn't going back as Hugh Lon Mitchell he was going as Osmo Shea Israel Hebrew Abreu for brother Moses Israel like Moses H- Yulon was determined to lead his people to deliverance although H- Yulon had enthusiastically preached a Christian message just the year before he now told his family that Black Christians were stuck in mental graves of ignorance but he he had risen from the dead and undertaken a new divine mission as Huron later wrote he believed that a black man that wears a cross awesome planet earth lies and says he loves everybody but he's damnable liar going straight to hell he doesn't love his own black brothers and sisters except to use them and to steal your money. His opinion was informed by experience after all he had done it to his own followers but but now hugh Lon insisted that he had turned over a new leaf he knew that his nascent religious movement wouldn't appeal to everyone in his family least of all all his father who still preached decidedly Christian message to his congregation but Hugh Lawn didn't push the issue instead he started holding daily lectures. Here's our local school sharing his message with anyone who is interested as he had hoped some of his students included he lawns family members his brother Marvin eagerly joined hugh lawns cause as did his sister Jean when Hugh Lan returned to Miami to lay the groundwork for his new movement gene became his ambassador back in eanet by holding classes at her house and distributing hugh lawns literature gene was able to recruit a group of about twenty people willing thing to move to Miami in early nineteen eighty gene and the others packed their belongings and headed for South Florida. Hugh Lawn was already hard it at work recruiting new members to what he called the nation of Y'all way after the Hebrew word for God using select Bible Passages Hugh Lime promise perspective followers that they were gods true chosen people one of his favorites was Daniel seven nine. I beheld till the thrones were cast. Ask Down and the ancient of days did sit whose garment was white as snow and the hair of his head like the pure wool after reading this passage judge Hugh Lawn instructed the people listening to his sermon to run their hands through their thick curly hair. It was just like the woollen hair atop God's own head also liked to cite Genesis fifteen thirteen and he said unto Abraham no of assure T- that by siege shall be a stranger danger in a land that is not theirs and shall serve them and they shall afflict them for four hundred years in Hugh lawns opinion this passage reflected black people struggle as slaves bracketed by first coming to American shores in fifteen fifty five and the birth of the civil rights movement around Nineteen nineteen fifty-five though neither of those dates represents a particularly exact or accurate figure slowly but surely Hugh Lawn gain new followers in Miami at first he only asked them to contribute ten percent of their wages so the nation of Galway could help the black community at large there was no sense that the money going anywhere but to charitable causes in addition to preaching the inherent divinity of black people H- Yulon used current events to argue a wide ranging conspiracy against the black population of America Miami was particularly bad in September nineteen seventy-nine alight off duty police officer fatally shot a young black man who had stopped to urinate on the street instead of facing punishment. The officer received a merit pay increase but nothing compared to the Arthur mcduffie case in late nineteen seventy nine the police pursued a black insurance insurance salesman named Arthur mcduffie after he fled a minor traffic violation. Eventually the police caught up to him somewhere between six and twelve officers officers viciously beat mcduffie with heavy flashlights. He died from the beating but instead of coming clean the officers tried to make it seem seem like mcduffie had died in a motorcycle accident however when the coroner's report came in it was obvious what had really killed him. Four of the police officers were arrested rested and charged with murder with the trial date set for May of nineteen eighty hugh on us the publicity from the case to attract new followers as interest in his movement grew Hugh Lawn was finally able to establish a base of operations at the Joseph Caleb Center in Miami's predominantly black liberty ready city neighborhood. He held meetings every Wednesday night and Saturday morning the center boasted a thousand seat auditorium a library of Black History Archive Room of food stamp office and classrooms in May of nineteen eighty around fifty a few lawns followers gathered the Joseph Caleb Center her to watch the Arthur mcduffie trial unfold hugh lon predicted that the all white jury would exonerate the four police officers tragically he was right the not guilty verdict was delivered on May Seventeenth nineteen eighty at two forty five pm by five PM. Angry groups threw rocks and bottles at police officers in Liberty City. The first fatality occurred around six P._M.. When a mob killed a white vagrant by eight P._M.? Buildings on fire and the riots rage throughout Miami's black neighborhoods the violence lasted for over three days but it as a city mourned Xuan celebrated while he wasn't encouraging his followers to participate in the riots he capitalized on the racial tension to attract attention to his movement newcomers flooded his services eager to hear his message of black power and white injustice hugh long promised them that they would do in time. God would strike down the evil white man and the chosen people of the nation of Galway would inherit a new paradise ice on Earth Hugh lawns belief that he and he alone could lead his followers to salvation was indicative of what psychologists have termed the Messiah Complex Complex as described by clinical psychologist Stephen a diamond p._H._d.. People who suffer from this complex believe they can save people from existential existential aloneness freedom anxiety responsibility to think for ourselves and decide on our own behavior and provide hope and meaning to counteract our lack of purpose in life and despair as their divine leader Hugh Lon urged his growing flock to band together he encouraged them to pull pull their resources and separate themselves from the evils of white society. They were all too eager to obey him. Once again. Hugh Lon had successfully early amassed a base of loyal followers who would carry out his every order he'd learned from his past mistakes. He wouldn't alienate them by living extravagantly extravagantly rather than promising individual wealth he urged his followers to enrich the black community as a whole and they idolized him for it but being a revered figure in Miami's black community wasn't enough Hugh Lon wanted more he wanted his people to see see him for what he truly believed. He was a god thanks again for tuning into cults. We'll be back with part two on the nation of Y'all way next is Tuesday as the movement grew Hugh Lawn became more and more convinced of his own divinity but as his iron grip over his followers tightened he he had to resort to increasingly violent tactics to keep his empire intact for more information on the nation of Galway amongst the many sources we used we we found Sydney p Friedberg facebook brother love murder money and Messiah extremely helpful to our research and as always you can find more episodes of cults. It's as well as all of our casts other shows on spotify or your favorite podcast directory civil view of asked how to help us if you enjoy the show the best way to help is to leave a five Star Review and Oh forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see you next time. Cults was created by Max Cutler is a production of cutler media at as part of the podcast network it is produced by Max and Ron Cutler sound design by Dick Schroeder odor with production assistance by Ron Shapiro and Paul Muller additional production assistance by Maggie admire and Carly Madden. This episode of cults is written written by Alex Benetton and stars Greg Poulsen and Vanessa Richardson. You know that this episode is finished. It's a great time to check out. The new park has two original con artists. The first episode is about Bernie Madoff Atop Wall Street market

Hugh Lawn Twenty Hugh Lon Moses H- Yulon Hugh Lan Hugh Lon Mitchell Hugh Lon hugh lawn Hugh Mitchell Hugh Lon hugh lon Elijah Muhammad Atlanta Miami Hugh Lana Hugh Lon Seniors Church Hugh Lawn Mitchell Georgia Hugh Lon Black Children Hugh Lawn Louis Farrakhan Hewlett H- Yulon
Necessary Blackness Ep: 105  CPS Legal Kidnapping of Black Children: Is Your Child Next?

Necessary Blackness Podcast

1:28:02 hr | 7 months ago

Necessary Blackness Ep: 105 CPS Legal Kidnapping of Black Children: Is Your Child Next?

"By the time the world of movies the world of education get into the streets of black America. Some strange things happen because what history and the movies? I'm told the black man is that he's nobody unless he joins the white world. That is not true to not believe that that is dead rock. They don't discriminate against me because I'm Christian discriminating literally because I'm black on a two of my five for black liberation. Am I won the Milan? Top Him count stopped him on him. Cast Uprising Chavez anytime you want. Listen to Revolutionary Liberation via meet turn into necessary blackness. Podcast Yada Yada. Podcast THEM NECESSARILY BLACKNESS. Me Rock anytime you want your true warrior talking. Check out and C. J. Music Poacher Journalism Dot Com hop of global reach in all aspects of music culture and journalism and CJ is premier destination for culture video and editorial content around the country. Check out music. Culture Journalism Dot Com log on to day. Elementary genocide provides a critical expose of mass incarceration the war on drugs and the connection between slavery capitalism. And the Prison Industrial Complex. Visit our website at www dot elementary genocide dot com now available elementary genocide the school to prison pipeline elementary genocide to the board of education versus the board of incarceration and the newest release elementary genocides. Three Academic Holocaust log on today to purchase your very young three sets. Docu series is the latest by in Revolutionary Street works at the market. We need is the outfitters freedom fighters everywhere when he is a Swahili word. That means abundance. No one has ever gone broke by giving so if you have. An abundant sharing is better than receiving instagram. At winging apparel that's at W. I n. g. a. p. p. a. r. e. l. piece of Black Paul family. This is your host Ryan Shabazz. And we are here for another episode of necessary blackness. Podcast now today. I have a special guest today. What we'RE GONNA do is. We're going to talk about a subject matter that is rarely talked about unless says personally you or someone that's close to you but we all know that there's someone who had contact or intervention by. Cps Child Protective Service. They have been called on them all. They showed up at the house. All you currently under investigation and usually the outcome is never positive. So today we're going to interview because Liens Shabazz. She is very familiar with the inner workings of CPS The foster care system and the overall effect it has on Black Society piece sister. How are you doing a well? Thank you have a year? I am good. I am good now man you. We have spoken extensively off line. Saw I personally know the back story of the trials and tribulations that you were dealing with and we're GONNA get to that but before we get to that? I WanNa ask you a few questions. Ri- just to give some preliminary information to those that don't know about. Cps and their function what they do and what they're doing to undermine black society. And until as you and I know to still black children because there is a war to still black children so I WANNA act shoe. Why are so many black children removed from the homes by CPS in place enforce the kid one black vulnerable and having been vulnerable in the United States than sixty Mi- four mini protections What be it by the by law enforcement the about policy and so it makes it that much easier for our children to be stolen from us and then once a challenge for mold they make it almost impossible or you get your child back. If you didn't go back briefly tell us. What was the situation surrounding your client daughter? How did it transpire? And what was some of the things that happened so that other people could know what to look out for most definitely most definitely so my daughter had her bail. Christmas of Of last year and what happened was Regular checkups and they returned. I think it was eight weeks as you. Eight week checkup. That's when they first get back saying which I'm against vaccines but that's our doors. Choose so the baby went for the vaccines. Everything was fine and of course. She got a fever that afternoon. So she takes the baby back to their -mergency room they did accept it worker and they did X Ray and they found fractious uninspiring fractures and Rehab and the clavicle fracture though. This was the first time hearing anything about it today. Just as the czar Hospitals are mandatory reporters. Everybody has to report what they think could be abused. Not what they think is abusive. Just be a could be abused And that will initiate a reporting and so they reported it which we did not have a problem with It was what came. Afterwards that we have a problem so The baby was transferred over to Vanderbilt Hospital. Which is a DC. Yes hospital and what that means is that As any hospital that contract with child Protective Services Department of Children's services that is included in their budget is a CPS hospital. This particular hospital received two point two million dollars from BCS out of his budget every year so they transported the baby over there and the child abuse expert says that the baby's injuries are consistent with child abuse absent any underlying Identifiable do a deep and so The way they word it gave particularly important because it excludes them from ever being liable of any culpability when it comes to a faulty Diagnosis of child abuse and so the waited. That's word it means that it can go one of two ways and this was crazy that can mean that yes. It was child abuse or no. It wasn't child abuse. I'm so agency will use that to say well we're GONNA continue our nation and we're going to act as if this is what they're saying that it is actually abused one in fact that is not with that statement says at all. It's not conclusive of anything. It just gives them the room me. Just say that something is abused. And that's what's so horrible about all of this and that's one of the things that I notice. Is that with language words. It can be manipulated. So when you manipulate the language and wording and for someone that's a novice and don't understand the end the workings of cps you can really catch yourself in a blind spot and you can have your child taken away from you. So as a result of them said that Absent any What did they say absent any? What happens after that if the worker will say to you and often host that they'll say you don't sign this protective of reason we're gonNA take this date from right man and so you've got Paris but are destroyed. You know just hearing. That child injured in trying to find out what happened. You got pull these fair Iran duress. There's no there is no case where there is a parent that child would not be under duress in that situation but yet here come. Bcs with a contract for you to sign when you're not you can't beat mentally cognitive that of what it is just signing so guess what you did you sign it when they don't have a right to have you sign a contract without it being voluntarily done and so you you're saying you're going to do something to take away. Somebody's child of course they're GONNA sign it. Let me ask you something. What does this protective agreement stipulates and? Why can a almost make you sign this contract in this agreement without the vice of lawyer? So I'm because this is not a criminal investigation. The rules are. Kinda different when it comes to Miranda and that's that's part of seven angels the laws of we're putting forward to fight. This is that you should be Miranda's and you should be afforded attorney soon as you are approached by the Because it is in fact an interrogation at the moment that they come into contact with parents or anybody that is suspected of abuse. And the reason why this those are noticed a lot of time because you don't have that legal protection there. You don't have attorney dance to protect these parents to say. Hey we're not gonNA sign. You can't take the baby if we don't the law says that the signing of oppy a must be voluntarily and so the Eighteenth Tsa well. It was voluntarily. But it'd be like well you didn't tell me that. I had a choice but that that nine times out of ten never come of the washes never questioned as there is no recording of anything. There's nothing that you gotta sign. The says that this order is that this agreement is terribly you just have to agency saying where they signed it and every wheel when navid not true? You shouldn't have anybody standing any contracts at any time When you are presented you know somebody that's going to be interested. They're found out. The child is hurt the now under investigation. You've got the police year. You might be getting your child taken away from your your child. Put it up for adoption. That's too much stress. That'd be bringing somebody a contract the sign at that time alright. So CPS COM. They have this protective agreement. Your daughter signs protective agreement. What happens next? Okay so What's interesting I want to go to the happen next? Let me say within end this protective of Freeman though mine you bay. The dcfs worker had just came in contact with my in the in the baby's father and the protective agreement it had all ready stated what the EPS worker thought had happened. She claimed that this was that. The baby was injured as a result of domestic abuse. It was already written out. She already put in protective agreement. That a fast assessment was done in a fast assessment has to be done with the family. Ns series of questions. It's very narrow which will determine or help determine what kind of services the family may need in order to be reunited with with the child and so all of this stuff came already pre field out in the APP. Pa and so you know CPS supposed to do with their investigation. Well if you haven't had the time to investigation. How do you already know what happened? And you're talking about people I coming in contact with. Cps They don't even know what they're looking at In My my daughter was twenty four. The boyfriend is twenty two. They didn't even realized that that was what was in the IT. A until I came Dall- to look at all the documents and was able to decipher what was going on. Because I have a history of know how to deal with legal stuff. Which most people don't they signed off on something. That was completely false. Wow these are some devious people and we live in in the last days time family. There's a war is still black children and then then begin today. This war has been waged since we. I stepped off the slave ships in on the shores of Jamestown Virginia in Sixteen nineteen. What we gotta do is we're GonNa take a quick commercial break and we're gonNA come back and we're GONNA continue to talk to our sister but call raw while Leah Chabasse. So stay tuned. This is necessary blacklists podcast. And I'm your host Wahines Shabazz people. Call in then. We're not gonNA open up the phone lines this yet. We may open them up a little later on but south stay tuned family checkout and C. J. Losing Culture Journalism Dot Com hip hop global reach an all aspects of music culture and journalism and CJ is the premier destination for culture video editorial content around the country check out music culture journalism DOT COM log on to day. J- Leah Peril is the latest by in Revolutionary Street where to hit the market. We need as outfitters of freedom utters everywhere when he is a Swahili Word. That means abundant. No one has ever gone. Broke by giving so if you have. An abundant sharing is better than receiving follows instagram. At winging apparel. That's at W. I. N. G. I. A. P. P. A. R. E. L. Purse in broadcasting commercial can reach US via email at necessary black podcast at juvenile dot com necessarily blackness is distributed on all major podcast platforms to stitcher. Iheart song paramedic and Google Point will also promote your business and product across various Social Media Networks Ritchie over. A hundred thousand people daily the creators of elementary genocide part one the school to prison pipeline and to the board of education versus the board of incarceration presents the third installment academic. Holocaust each film produced directed and personally funded by rider Rahim Shabazz. Hollywood chronicles says the documentary. Elementary genocide turns a critical eye towards the dehumanizing educational environment that criminalizes black and Brown youth by funneling them from school. Because it is you learned anything shared any content or have received any now from the elementary genocide. Friend you're going to love elementary genocide. Three featuring the likes of Carbon Stephen Tanner Jock on leak. Michael and Professor James Small help spread to support message to the masses visit elementary genocide dot com. That's elementary genocide dot com share caused with your family and blackness. Podcast every Wednesday at six PM with a war winning journalist and filmmaker Raheen. She'll bears this. Podcast is only for those who are unapologetic because the mind of the conscious man or woman recognize no monopoly on truth truth is relative and always to be song piece in power. Black family. This is your host Ryan Shabazz. And we are back. We'll talk into procure while. Es Shabazz and we're talking about the incident that involves her granddaughter seven we spoke about cps what they do. We talked about how they came in contact with her daughter. The protective agreement that they use trick -nology in order for her to sign. And why is not a good idea to sign a protective agreement? Without the Council of a Tony. Now after this protective agreement was signed. What would what happened next after the agreement was signed Stipulations were that she was to have visitation with her Her baby's father was visit. Rome nine in seven in the morning tonight at night. They could not live inside of their home. The baby was Custody was transferred to Mother. Her Grandmother And they had to go through certain services that you have have a psychological evaluation and they were saying Anger Management. The anger management was put on there. Because of the caseworker saying that this was the result of domestic violence And so Also want to add that. The father is a veteran. And my daughter is that current active duty so US army the army Sokaia position where it supported my daughter They didn't believe that she had done this. However they did offer her mandatory parenting classes because it was protocol and they also followed the protective order of BCS So now you're just sitting and waiting and like so. When is this investigation? Going to start you know would often entail. They're trying to act like your friend. You know they do all of that that extra stuff and then it was about midway the beginning of March. My daughter was like mom. I don't feel like something. They're not telling US something. And so I come bail and I review everything and She was like so in the in the opera. It also said that this thing was this domestic balance was evidenced by the case workers. Now my the caseworker couldn't of evidence anything because she hadn't seen them fire to. I come in contact with them and in February at the hospital and the baby was never returned back to our parents. And so how could you evidence anything when you had never seen the baby with her parents individually to baby? It's that had stayed in unsupervised custody of my mother and so I started to Pete how. Dcss is able to facilitate a way to steal the baby's and to substantiate it You know in a court of law With the approval of of judges and society. And I I WANNA leave us out because since I came in contact with this this parents all over the United States. That's hollering about what's going on with them in these. Yes and it's been kind of like swept under the rug and so it is now obligation to make sure that we are battling out loudly about the agrees this Processes of this system that allows a black babies to be stolen and so currently right now we represent twelve point three percent of the population while thirty eight percent of babies being taken by. Dcfs absolutely ridiculous. Now I want to ask you something. Real quickly the worker this was her first contact with the family when they actually made them sign the protective agreement. Right right correct. So there's no police report stipulate in that. There was an argument. Domestic violence police wasn't call to the to the house stages out of thin air just grasping for stores and assume exactly. That's exactly what happened in there is an and I went just in case Because just because my daughter I still do this. Have to do my due diligence to thoroughly investigate all cases not biased in my work. I I call and now was there any calls to the house. Had anybody made any calls on them with the police On or off base there hasn't been there's not been any reports of valid from them when they were in school or in the neighborhoods prior to them coming into the military so they hadn't had any disciplinary records for anger or anything of that saw anything for that matter and the military so this was completely fabricated. Just completely fabricating. It really doesn't surprise me when we know who we dealing with and our history and our past with them You just gave us some statistic. Thirty eight percent of our children are being placed in. Cps custody right. Yeah and when you look at those numbers you know In Chicago Ninety five percent of all children in foster care or black and we know that once in foster care. And you're black. You REMAIN LONGER. You move more often than any other ethnic group and you receive fewer service and you're less likely to be returned to home are DOPP. Did then in other child so last with a low risk for and that's that's extremely important. I understand that we will have a lower risk board in our white counterparts and I write. Counterparts will be reunited with their families quicker than we are an they get to stay with their families and not be removed more often than black them. Why is there not a public outcry on massive civil rights lawsuit against a CPS in these court systems? So what they do. Is they use propaganda. Which is the world's one to keep a massive dumbed down so if we if we have a system that puts out that so not being abused of course. Everybody wants to protect children but if the members that they're using a saying that one point six million children being abused in the United States every day built when they put out Hernandez story that you know ship. The world about Cps How they should move to make us believe that more children are being abused and then a call for stricter laws to be Put IN PLACE. In advocated or Stricter policies within cs to be implemented and. So they have the world believed in that more. Children are not are being amused and so that they can cover up this thing and use that as a guy to bring children into the system when that is not true. And I'm GonNa say that seventy six percent of all cases on neglect cases and the can be something so simple as if they came by. The House wasn't clean your Porch Bernie. You were sick. You got dishes all this thing if Brooke on European European concept knowledge it. Yes of how we should keep our houses all old whatever they deem is a suitable for them. If we haven't met that criteria it can children being taken away which is is is nuts because they have absolutely no cultural competency whatsoever to. We've been you know render us. Greco and so we have seventy six percent of children in CPS constancy in there because of neglect if you subtract for one hundred left with twenty four percents and so really what we want to look at the numbers of actual cases that CPS should be involved in. It's only twenty four percent so those other children those things that they are in there for could be quickly remedy the if the family was given US supports in the services that they really need. We know that foster parents get anywhere up to fifteen hundred dollars a month per child but yet you the family zero dollars to wreck the fat whatever situation you have removed child from. That's absolutely nuts. They do the same thing with Juvenile Justice when you remove a child and put the challenge attention. We're spending two hundred twenty seven thousand dollars per year per child to how the Juvenile detention and give the family. Absolutely no services. The child services I have a few winning actually went in to to juvenile. Came out went into charge him as an adult he went into. I'm an adult prison. Came home with no. Ged how substantiate them taking money from us the taxes and and putting these children back into society where they're not GONNA be able to Malcolm make themselves and we also know that children ain't going to foster care are not times more likely to end up in press. I was just GonNa hit on that sister. Because you know that's my thing school to prison pipeline and I have been studying and my studied led me to the research. A what happens to children in foster homes when they turn eighteen. They are forced out of the system with nothing. No resources no money. No support system and many people believe such as myself and we viewed foster CARE SYSTEM. Nothing more than a holding cell and so they all do enough for them to put them in prison then back in an an and I like him in prison. When they took my grandbaby they put my grandbaby imprison anywhere outside of the Home Prison. So already my grandma. My grandbaby has done over thirty days in prison. Actually six weeks in prison already and crime. She only crime that we could say happened here is that she was born black in America. And that's that's all they need is for you to be black born in America and they could say that you neglecting your child now. I want our listeners to just know how petty it is for them to use neglect because under their guidelines neglect is sending your children to school in unseasonably light jacket. Meaning that you probably didn't check what the weather was. And you probably say oh. Yesterday was hot. You'll need a jacket today. And he goes out with maybe a sweat shirt or t shirt and throughout the day. The weather may have changed in the teacher. Says you know you should have on on jacket. You may get a cold. I see reports that that you're neglecting your child. That's right. They may say that his closes not all clean. You know he doesn't come to school. Heidi oh he's not well groomed and you know Parents they tried to teach their kids independence. You know they may let them pick out their own clothes Certain things like that any little thing can be overlooked when that child gets on that school boss. And you put them in the hands of your open enemy so we have to be careful about that family. But you know I'm researcher and I I've been trying to find out where this whole concept of putting children in foster homes in where the whole ideology of the foster care system comes from and What I discovered would is mind. Boggling because Anybody that knows about the foster care system you'll see that the initial practitioners of the foster care system was the Catholic charities. Ed So we we we can go back there and we can find out and we're going to talk about that a little more. I'M GONNA go deep into it. I'm going to tell you about the founder and what his thoughts was on black society. Because let me tell you something. The Catholic charities that started the foster care system. They was for immigrant children. There wasn't for black churches. If you was black you couldn't go into often `age that's what really started. It started out as a office but if he was black they wouldn't even take you into the often it. It was for the immigration children and then right after World War. Two a lot of things chains. So we're going to get into that when I come back. This is Ryan of necessary blacklist podcast. And we're speaking to. I'll sister are warrior in fighter. Who's out here on the front line fighting for all black babies but Curiel Wadia Shabazz? And I hope I'm not messing up your name sister. Can you now look for everybody here while the Savan? Okay you get that right. The last name right bads and yeah I know about the God head tribal Shabazz. So we won't be right back family. Just stay tuned. This is Suraj fans of the man in the project hanging out with Rahim Shabazz old away from the UK represent in that necessary blackness. Poke costs your what is the Mohawk and talking minimum fully visit day made us in the business fully podcast. You know me when you heard me the street. And he had his knee breathing down. Go next you are listening to the necessary blackness. Podcasts with my brother. Ma homeboy. My name number one cousin from another of my man writing Shabazz me. I get in. Get your mind right because it's necessary. Yo what's up y'all just to Lower Guru Thomas TJ Lofton from Compton California when? I'm traveling around the world. I'm in the car. I got necessary. Blackness podcast. On checking on my man writings biogas piece. This is as i Lee and when I am not studying the science of the universe in laws of creation I am listening to the big homey Rahim Shabazz unnecessary blackness. Make sure you support peace or right family. We are back from our quick commercial break and for those that are just joining us. We are speaking with Cora while Leah Shabazz. And we're talking about. Cps child protective services and the trick. -nology that they used to kidnap instill black babies and just before we went to commercial break. I was talking about the origin of the foster care system and how started it from the offenses? Dat was run by the Catholic charities now one of the earlier founders of child welfare was the indivisual. Aena end the doll a white guy. Whatever you WANNA call them I call them the end thaws. His name was Charles Lawrence. Brace he states. The purpose was to prevent these dangerous classes from exploding into rage against the rule of capital. Let me say that again. He stays that. The purpose of the child. Welfare system was to prevent these dangerous classes from exploding into rage against of capital that sounds like do United States of America the oligarchs the one percent that don't want the majority of the people to receive wealth. That sounds like eugenics sounds like everything that we know so this. Cps In history all you have to do is trace the money you back to the mindset of individuals that started it now before we blame their sister back on. And I asked a few more questions I I WANNA be the first one to say right. There are some people that work for child persective services and they truly want to do the job. They there to stop abuse but like anything else. They're working for a system. There's only so much they can do a lot of them when they do try to speak out. They voices salads. A lot of them are fired. A Lotta them. They see what's going on and they can't they can't fathom it. They go into other fields of work and they feel like if they can help wanted to people than they do on the job but they know that this is a racist in corrupt system. So let's bring the system back on Lille. I want you to tell me about some of the things that happen after Seven was taken on the stand that you guys took your granddaughter to the hospital and some things was discovered that prove that there was no neglect that there was no abuse. Can you talk about that right now? But I came down. Here started the advocate from outdoor system that liking so they orchestrated a plan to remove her from ethnic found out that we wanted to get a second opinion. And so what they did was they had this meeting and make orchestrated the mind that we've hurt. Take the baby out of the state with within our right to take the baby out of eight to eight ball specialists. Who WanNa be however they were stating that we didn't have the right to infantry had a COP system to remove the baby out of custody. They took her without a warrant Without probable cause and they knew that that was a violation of our our constitutional rights state violation of laws. And they're on policy but they had armed police officer that assist them with that kidnapping and so we didn't have a body. We didn't have the corpus the likely to present to the doctor so all we being half with the medical records so we submitted the medical records to another orthopedist down in Nashville Review. Once wants her. Heartache came back on and it was that This was not child abuse but in fact looked more like mechanical birth injury or metabolic bone disease that a number tell you about metabolic bone disease and they never tell you about her injury either. Oftentimes my daughter baby was delivered by Metlife in the midwives. I didn't I didn't hear a pop in the clavicle so I didn't hear it to note it in because we don't do x-rays when babies up on with the known anything was wrong with the with a real and she apologized and that was that And really that was all she you know. She could say she did now. I'm just like my daughter didn't know so We permit presented this this record from the orthopedic saying hey this is not what it is but then they may not be enough and then like well let me say specifically that is not child abuse but Ben Belts records. Didn't have to say conclusively that it was my understanding that even the orthopedic from the Child Abuse Hospital said he wanted to see the baby back and six to eight months in case this underlying bone disease so it just it just makes me really angry because they didn't read the whole report and I'm GonNa tell you people you gotta be able to read these. These medical reports look up these bars. You'll know because I had to do all of that and then I found on pace to the baby's trauma laugh was remarkable was made that there was no trauma densities baby so if there's no trauma how was this child abuse and also saying that there was now. No scarring no bruising. No internal bleeding. There was no Subhuman Thomas. That was no into coronial. Damages babies internal were all intact. There was no bus month vessel. There was nothing that would substantiated claim of child of what we do know is that you can't abuse somebody physically abuse somebody without touching them and so it says that with all. This baby was not touched if any way externally cause any trauma to the body. So how are we substantiate in child abuse with just for the pediatrician saying well the underlying leave? The injury is so if consistent but she didn't make a statement of Close that it was cutting and she knows she could and often but we also know again. They've been paid for these files. Yeah this is. This is something that I think everybody should be applaud. That and there's another component to all of this. You know you always have to follow the money we know that. Cps has as you stated get two point two million dollars rod for other components to this is when they take these children and you enlighten me to it and you I`ll. I'll let you explain it to everybody else. But there's a timeframe where your child can be placed up for adoption. You WanNa talk about that right. Okay go under the The family that In an effort to protect children they have the federal government have expedited the adoption process. So if your child is Incapacity any fifteen twenty two months the agency Kellyanne on a lot of terminate a parent parental rights none so parental rights are terminated. They can immediately fast track your child's adoption In fact that is exactly what they do. Because there's no other option In Pachalla for adoption. And let me explain to you. All People Thang have children for DOC. Shen every state in the United States and you can go to the fight and pull up all of these children and for sale. Now you'll think about pedophilia and you think about these people that have is open so you could just go and look at it and so how will we protect the sanctity of children by having them a bailable or the open page? But anybody should be able to see that their upper sale. This is worse than Craig. Listen back page yesterday. Because it's Children. But yet a put a gag order on a parent from being able to work to go to the social media and explain the oppression. That's going on to that child. Fan and you don't want to be embarrassed but yet you got children about for sale anybody to be able to see if they click on your website and most times than not when these kids are placed up for adoption day do not reach out to immediate family or extended family and they are giving to individuals. That don't look like you are not that. Don't have the same cultural background. And what this is called is called chance Ray shoe adoption and it does several things to the Children. So you cannot say transracial. Adoption is in the best interests of children because it does more harm than good when they lose their identity and their communication with their family and their loved. Ones they're ill prepared to deal with racism they don't understand their culture no more and there's susceptible to a lot of different things as we see when we looked to black society and we had individuals as blackened in black but on the wrong side of history is stand ten feet down with the oppressor and my grandbaby was placed with the white family and cultural raping. There is nothing that any European any African American child without their culture. Make him read a book all day but the lived experience as wet. The system is lacking when they talk about his being okay with children being placed with different races. Dali need is love. Low in order to truly about one has to be able to date are and be immersed in that culture and no one is living t s right and you know this brings to mind. I remember listen to a broadcast on. Npr Radio and they also news article as well and talked abou black babies cost less to adopt and this article that was posted it talked about. Trans Racial adoptions and it talks about the racial component of it and why it's not good and in the end. Black Society is going to suffer from transracial adoption. That I read was mind boggling when you find out to adopt a Caucasian child is approximately thirty. Five thousand dollars plus some legal expenses of course and for black child is eighteen thousand dollars and if you happen to be Biracial do is twenty. Four thousand to twenty six thousand dollars so from the ONSTAR. Black Life is the value at birth. They treat you as such and I tell people all the time they will treat you like a child at punish you like a dealt. And that's what they do to black children's parents where they take away your rights. You don't have a right to the education that they received the religion that is being indoctrinated into them. Now when you place a child in a foster care system and they are working to reunite a child with their parent you still supposed to still be able to participate in educational activities Know about their medical condition. They SMOLTZ's still here to your religious beliefs. None of this is done for black children because parents don't know that and because there is a deliberate system to take everything from you. This is the same thing as a chance. Atlantic slave trade with to take your religion. They take God they take everything from you. Several instance where they're adapted child and are changed his name. Yeah instead of Your child having the name of cool while cousy now her name is Becky Ferguson. Stein you know this is serious. We LAUGH FATTY. We have to it but this is what actually happens there. A lot of tricks that is being used and deployed to still these babies out of the parents arms. Can you enlighten our listening audience? What some of the tricks to look out for and some of the expenses and support systems that they need to have in place and don't think that just because you may be middle-class this you're not vulnerable the only thing difference between you and a poor person is you probably able to afford legal counsel and you better hope you. Guy Johnny Cochrane case right and what's interesting about that is that I'm Johnny. Cochran actually did fight a case out of Out of Tennessee. The same hospital. I'm dealing with right now. And even he was not able to win the case on all of the grounds that he had and they were good but they were defeated. And so that's that's what's so damning about this situation is that we are rendered help with an hopeless in this thing and so wh- what parents do it anytime you're contacted by CPS? I do not talk to that. You know you require an attorney immediately and because of the investigation depending on what level they say you are two and three one when normally initiated petition against you you request an attorney Or have to try to hire one yourself but I would not I would not talk to them without having Legal Counsel and always keep the records record from from day. One record everything an email everything. Don't try to have little as possible verbal conversation with these people. You want to track that you WanNa make sure you have your impeccable records so that you can Be Able to use them and put them on the record in case there is some foul play and nine times out of ten. It's always foul play with dcfs because of that mission is not to reunify challenge could challenge for adoption also You want to make sure that you staying on top of medical because what happened with my daughter's dcss remove my daughter's name and the child's father off of all of the medical contacts and place the foster parents in place of the parents and so they would not know what was going on. Medically I also understand that. They're using these false children to experiment with vaccines whale. So they'll get your child and say that Your child is suffering from all these Psychotic disorders just to be able to get up and try different drugs child for make sure you stay on top of the medical appointments and things like that as long as your parental rights terminated. You are the ones that should make the appointments and you should be at all times. Michelle you make all of your visits they will try to terminate your visitation rights. Which they did what my daughter until. I I they basically were retaliating against her because of my advocacy and exposing agency but we were able to get a recorded conversation of them saying that they were wrong in doing that. And they restored the visitation rights. Stop them from being able to press. The that was not able to be continued because the amount of time had passed you know to. She just wasn't able to continue to breastfeed. They denied the baby. Breastmilk that is a that is a major violation. We know babies need this. Press Milk to build up. Antibodies in anytime if they stop you from bringing best milking in. That's a violation. Get copies of everything that you haven't always always reserve all of your rights and signed everything up underneath the rest because you are a parent that did not commit the abuse you are under arrest throughout this whole entire procedure and you WANNA be able to maintain that because the legal defense and always people that can that can be. Um You went out. Can you say that again? You want to have people that can always vouch for you. It is very important to be able to to write letters on your behalf to the judge because they'll try to take you down as a parent you can be the best parent. They're going to make sure that you are seen as the worst. Perry also communities more than ever today. We need to have people that can come up and say. Hey I'm going to take this child When I gonNA put the child in in foster care it's extremely important that we have people on deck and our communities to make sure that we take the only people that keep us safe So you know we do not want babies in the care that needs to be a last resort. The trick that they'll do is say that nobody is available for kinship placement. They do not be kinship with my daughter and wouldn't allow us to use anybody else in the family. That is a violation. Put everything on the record. Make sure your law you have everything and you demand that everything be put on record because in case you need to appeal your case if you don't have it in a record. The appeals court cannot hear anything being brought in that was not on the record in a previous case. Now what was the reason for them? Deny you because I haven't okay so I have a criminal background record. I'm not a felon and I don't have any barrier crimes. The real reason why. She says she didn't feel comfortable with place in my granddaughter with me because I was I'm deceptive. So Am I in the past? I used to commit white collar crime. That is what I used to do. I ain't shamed about it or whatever that was. That was my 'em all single-parent. I did what I needed to do to make a much. Children had the best life possible. And since the end you know all of that has turned around and for the State of Tennessee qualified to adopt and to foster children so basically they just wanted to retaliate against my family. Because of my advocate she had no right in. Her feelings should've never became a thing that she uses. I'm it's not about what you feel is about what I qualify for. So in that case we know -tated all bad. It's nothing that you can really do about it but you can not to put it in a record and say that. They violated the only Their policy violated federal policy. That says the children are supposed to be placed with Ken. I before on in foster care. They also are supposed to obtain a warrant before taking a child out of the hall. And that's another big thing that they continuously do and it just haven't been reprimanded enough Ford. I spoke to attorney out of California's all doesn't CPS case he says money is not the issue because guess what the agency doesn't pay for their lawsuits castle. Paints within lawsuit payers. Do that's right and so we should be mad as hail that we allowing these agencies just run rampant and we gotta pay for their mouth faces. You know what's so crazy? 'cause I've been studying a lot of things that they do in the laws and even with the laws right when they don't follow the laws and judge knows off top that this is a constitutional violation of your rights. They still side with CPS. But what? I found real troubling. Is that the police. Can't question a minor or not supposed to question the minor without a parent. Presen- but DCSS can do it. It's mind boggling as if DCSS have more power than the police they can actually go to the school without the payment present and said listen. I need to speak to the child and take the child to a remote area. Tell them pull up the show. Let me see your arms. Do you hear your mother arguing it. Have you ever been in or abused your mother yell at you like it's crazy how these people can speak to? You shall not in your presence but but you won't let the police do that but you let these people. How do they get more power? That's the question I want you to ask if you can. How do they get more power than the actual police wrong? Okay so parents. Katri gives the state after the over over our children. Enough a get hold on one minute. I'm a novice. You gotta explain that to me was handling Katri now. Faith obligation to protect the most vulnerable which be to Elvis and pulling say they have a higher obligation to protect them the pair because parents are likely to use the children they realized the day. I actually warned that abuse to drink on a four out of that equation but because they have obligations protectees very. They have a greater interest in our baby than we do. And there's the court case that says that as soon as they are owed their allegiance to the government. And that's what me just found out about about a month ago and so you know we have. We have court cases that say that children and soon as they enter into Inca all day allegiance to a government has done nothing but right Hillerich of abuse and Keel on the like have a problem with that and my child allegiance to its creator. So how do you get to come up with something better than that? A child allegiance to government is so since the the Child. Allegiance is to government. The government has said its allegiance to Bam and so they have a greater interest than we do. Wow this is just unbelievable. A lot of information I had not new about previously and I'm learning as you all dispersing this wisdom and dropping these Jews and giving this timely advice about what the parents rights are and what's going on in his system. There's a few other things that I feel is very important. That parents should know one of the things. Is that if you do find yourself in a unfortunate situation with CPS and they knock at your door remember any information you share with them can be shared with prosecutors who could use them in a criminal case and have criminal charges filed against you so a lot of times. You feel like Oh. This is not a criminal investigation. I don't need a lawyer and you speak to them and you can say some. That is Mister School. And you can't say anything at all. A lot can be told on you and it will be used in a criminal case because child abuse criminal case so if you think that they just will just take your child and say that you you abusive to your child they can be charges filed against you and you can find yourself and a whole lot of trouble now. Another thing is if your child is removed you need to know that you have a right to a detention hearing and that has to be under the law hell within forty eight hours if you look at some of the laws off some of the rules of regulation and they legislation that is. We're in about these bills. If you've studied this whole system it almost mirrors was the criminal justice system when you get arrested what they have seventy two hours so rain you so when they kidnap you take you. They got forty eight hours the blinking of funding for judge and have a detention hearing. This is the same thing family. You GotTa know it for what it is and not what it presented itself to be. Studied the facts of it and know what's going on. Now we're GONNA take one more quick commercial break and we're GONNA come back. We're going to talk more with this. We're going wrap it up. My name is Ryan should pass. This is necessary blacklists. Podcast stay tuned. We'll be right back to an for the drop. I am tactic here. Taylor and when I'm tired of listening to fake news I will listen to some real news and I will check into the necessary blackness podcast with my friend Rahim Shah Bad bads is one of my guys from way back. You're listening to his show necessary blackness. Podcast state-owned this is a cooler Abrahams. And I choose the tune into necessarily blackness because staying connected to my blackness is very necessary this is surely when I'm not in the gym. I'm checking my son. Now on his podcast. Make sure you check out Rahim Shabazz. Yeah this is Professor Eric Garner when I am Not Spreading Liberation Theology throughout my classrooms African Senate therapists. I am chilling with my Homie Ryan Shabazz on necessary blackness. Podcast essential. Y'All that's what I'm talking about man you'll hear it here. I know our feature presentation okay. We are back from our quick very quick commercial break. I told Ya this won't be quick before we laugh. We was given out some advice and letting parents that they have certain rights There's so many of them and once you start seeing what you're right saw and you know your rights you'd be better prepared to fight against CPS in anybody else but when you look at what's your right. Saw some of the all procedures data enforce it mirrors the criminal justice system. You know early. I spoke about. Your child is removed. You have forty eight hours for detention him and if you arrested you know you have a seventy two hours before you be arraigned even And child abuse and neglect situations. You have a right to a lawyer. If you can't afford a lawyer one will be appointed to you by the courts. They tell you the same thing when you arrested you. Have a right to remain sounded. Same thing here so. This system is the same as the criminal justice system which we know was corrupt When you do Go in and you have hair AIDS. You have a right to cross. Examine any witness. You have the right to present evidence. Same thing as in a criminal court case they may not act like it's not a criminal proceeding but let me tell you some. You're dealing with criminals so you need to proceed as such so. That's it for me. I know there's a lot of other things and other rights that you need to be aware of but family everything is online. Do Your due diligence find out get widow organization out here. That are helping the people in before we leave. We're going to let you know about some organizations. But I've I queen sister you still here with me alright. Soul after you present the information and you let them know about the second opinion of the doctor. You told us What happened after that? Do you think that was one of the reasons why they allowed Your daughter to our well not your daughter. They allow all the daughters mother to receive do other grandmother to receive a custody of the baby when she was released from off the prison. It was because they didn't have proper calls. Remove the baby in the first place on so she had to be returned Was Interesting now is that you have to go through the doctors to to get them to provide evidence that this was not child abuse. And so that's where we are right now with this with this case about daughters had to move completely out of her home so that my mother can be in In her apartment and you know they have given her supervised visit. She only gets eight hours before they eighty dollars a month to see the baby in a supervisor outside my mother. Eight hours eight hours one hundred twenty hours a week been eight hours and they can't they can't they can't just go to your mother's house and him. Well you know agenda. They had to move into their house and so now they cannot go to their house and all that they can't go to that house and this is the supervised visitation spot that is designated by this out that agency. I'm also part of that. Visitation on we foul to become parties to the they make me part of that visitation orders wealth. I can't even see my grandbaby. There was like they punished us for going to get My granddaughter back from out of out of the and you know he spoke a lot about my advocacy on facebook. They hated it and so since then I've decided to come off as the intervening petition. So that I continue to advocate for families going through this situation because the gag order debate if our quiet nobody will ever know about the ingredients theme that on the family and he's babies That they are not protected. And so I came off and that my mother's Day on as the Realize they're not going to you know. Give me the baby. Let me be a vital part of my own biological grandchild's life until this thing is over and so you know so be actual question by you. Coming off does data Give you the right now to have a visitation since. You're not a part of the party tation at this time so none of that. It came off won't be able to see my granddaughter at all. I won't be able to be considered for placement of something happens about mother. I'm the baby will go back and and this. This is the trap the trap family. If something happened to my mother the baby will go back into foster care. Because they're not speak are not going to. Even though I next the penis they will not consider me And then you have absolutely no rights to not consider me for the fact that they are the dominant ratings at this would happen. They do what they WANNA do with. That's why important that we get this information out here so that we can together to change the you know. These policies from the federal government can trickle down to the state and we need to also remove immunity from agency. They should absolutely not have any type of unlimited or judicial the judicial immunity for their act upon families because we have spent in two months over ten thousand dollars not able to get back because of immunity. He cannot bounce through all of these parents that child abuse. I'm hospital said what child abuse You know it will child abuse that we found out that it wasn't in families had to go through doomsday cannot sue deep. And you can't tell me that. This was not deliberate because they have everything they need to find out that it's not but they won't do that and their banking people being ignorant on an even by right atrial process which will be the majority of it so it couve me at one time you know and and and they and they win. Just offer that alone. It is absolutely sickening. What they do if you enter into the into. Dcfs at the age of twelve. The likelihood of you ended up into sex trafficking. If anything's percent more likely than not children are coming up missing and so when. Cps abused the child while the Child Matt removed out of CPS like it is the mothers or fathers our understanding double standard. Yeah this is crazy but when we dealing with the devil that's one devilish moment we're GonNa have situations like this and no man. No woman can fight back by itself. Legal need everybody on deck. We're going to need all boots on ground now. This is the laid out some stategic tactics that we must do so that if we find out self and similarly situated incidents we know how to proceed and the main one is to have a support system have a plan of action. If any of your kids kidnapped who could step up and provide for them and take custody because you go and finally legal directive. I'm right now so if something happened for you your children are supposed to go and that way that was thought. Cps from being able to intervene My childhood legally have to go to. Whoever you doesn't make you can do that right now. Everybody can do that right now. You know what else I want to talk to you about system. I was speaking with someone else right and they was telling me about they in New York. By the way it was telling me in New York state they had this registry for child abuse and maltreatment dat parents get online you automatically placed on that when for this Cps shows up at your house whether allegation is alleged from you and like you stated you know. Eighty five percent of these allegations they find out not to be true You'll never taken off this registry. And this registry is a registry that comes up when you try to be a social worker or school bus a schoolteacher and it can take up to ten years for your name to all come off of this registry. You have to have a lawyer. It could take months and months. And there's no oversight on who could come who can go on there and what names could come off of there so for someone saying that you properly feed your children because you don't give them Diet that includes meat. You just feed your children plant based meals and Cps comes to your house and they have to open investigation. Your name will be on that list. Which how prejudice and rapists l? So a lot of times when your name is on this? This is just says that You had some interaction with the law for child abuse and maltreatment it that that's it also has to do with see child abuse and like. I said you know you can stay on this registry for ten to twenty years and this can stop you from are gaining employment and there's a movement in New York to actually working on Getting that overturned in dismantle. Its when you buddy up Herod to bet in order for your name to be removed and make sure that they give them thirty days to do it within the see through. And if they don't send you through the in that the agency a dishonor at this on ending foul whatever about paying for the damages and things that make sure you put everything and your own now. Improperly Act the judge verbally Act when England order so that it is not done. They have violated the order the very important that we want to have a record of violations because that goes against the commissioner of the agency and the governor of the state and so we can hold them accountable. If we have on a violation. That the agency has you know and the governor but I guess crazy man. A lot of this that that is going on you know our earlier. Refer to Cps The foster care system as the criminal justice system. And when you start looking at these numbers you start to wonder you know With the federal government if you have a federal case they have over ninety percent conviction rate right now. You juxtaposed that to what's going on with Cps just take in Indiana as a state right in Leander. Only fifteen percent of cases or proven to be child abuse or neglect. That means eighty. Five percent are unsubstantiated or unfounded desk crazy. Some more children are being abused. And that's just not the K- and all of these statistics is on the website or their website. You know I mean you can read them in books but just take those statistics right. Eighty five unfound in the criminal. Justice system eighty five percent of found. Not Guilty there would be no criminal justice system if eighty five percent of the people arrested are found to be not guilty. The evidence against them unsubstantiated but this system still exists. This Day need to be a new car when we talk about dismantling the prison industrial complex didn't need to be a new call to dismantle. Cps I say CBS and you know that the burden of proof is more evidence so you take a higher bird convicted of petty larceny that it does the child to be removed off at the slave ops desk crazy. You hear right here I. This is necessary blacklists podcast and we're speaking with because for Warriors Shabazz and. This sister has been lighting us on a situation that concerns her granddaughter seven and we are happy that she is back home with her family biological family and she's no longer in the care custody and control of the open enemy now. There is several different cases that had happened in the past where people have actually lost custody of the child and it was proven that they didn't abused a child and the child was adopted I know of one particular case where a chow suffered a stroke not traumat- but a stroke and was removed from the house because they said it was abuse and they said that she was shaking and it was later proven to be false. But guess what by the time it was proven to be forced babe was already adopted. Did you hear what I said family? By the time it was proven to be fought false. The baby was already adopted. How do you write that? Roll baby back from a doctor Pants and apologize and say oh we sorry. This is what we're dealing with. I read about a case in Chicago it was a young lady. She she had a hell of life on but she turned to life now and She was like the matriarch of the family and her brothers was in and out of jail. The rest of the families and she was taking all their kids and Someone reported I think it was someone might have been a schoolteacher and they said her house was too small and she wind up half in to get another big house as she wind up getting ill where she couldn't work and she wasn't making the money the Inorder to get. I think it was a six bedroom house. It was GONNA be like three thousand six hundred dollars a month. How many people could afford that? You know do you think they offered this lady help but they give forced to care parents how much you say. What is the pay them saying? Hundred about fifteen hundred ad. She had sixtieth fifteen hundred dollars per child to know where she could have did with that. That family intact but that is not what they want. You know we really lead Individuals like you sister that Can light the fire up on them and I know for fact something. Good will emerge out of this movement. And I don't know if it's prematurely to let them know but she was telling me about a big event that you wanted to. Have you WanNa talk about that? Or that premature choice. Oh I'm April is child abuse prevention in my organization which is criminal justice reform that work and planning to have a million families March against CPS IN DC in April of twenty twenty two. We're currently in the in early. Planning stages I'm coping has kind of got in the way of that. Frankly still gonNA push forward and what we WANNA do is is giving these families a platform for their voices to be heard so that we can hold out legislator legislative accountable to reform Is Necessary. Oftentimes people get swept up on diverse. Because most spoke believe that they actually abuse of people. Don't WanNa miss the people who they think have abused children. We get it but that's not the case here I'll let this is really need to know was going on and was interested in that we had to legislate as one out of Arkansas and another one out of Georgia in fact fifty district. That was working on major. I'm dcss fall. An interesting enough to women came up dead serious The The lady that was a former state representative in Arkansas. See It was twenty seven million dollars. That was Appropriate with S They trace the money back in. The money was found to have been Sipho to the Clinton Foundation and shale gas and in Georgia. She was exposing the agency saying that it was They were kidnapping children and just really breaking down the system and she came up there as well. Did you ever see that? I don't remember the of it and I watched this like about had to be more about two weeks ago documentary on net flicks about Cps Did you see a documentary about. I'm the Hernandez case. Yea Yeah when you when you when you propaganda when you were saying about Hernandez I thought she was talking about Amazon. This but this is the case. But do you see how. Cps was covering up for lying in the documents they was hiding and they showed the oversight that they have and there's no transparency in nothing that they do like it was almost impossible to crack that. Shell and get these documents and find out. What really happened with this young boy? Right if you look at that and you could see the deceptive nature of this our organization and what they're capable of doing and it took a whistle blower in order for that For that situation even come to the public that I think people missed that. Those are the cases that the S. loves real abuse cases that case that young man's mother said he did not. She did not want the child and so they force her to take child at. She says she did not want just so they can extend out the funding that they will get in for interacting with that family instead of really removing that child and find suitable putting the articles that wanted but then they claimed that the uncles were were were abusing them or something like that. They could quickly speaks that case. And so that was the case where where? Cps was extremely neglectful in a real abuse case with those want that they love and help keep the children back. Keep putting them back but in case when is not abused and it is the love and family they take they take the child and keep trying to keep the child from the fan because they want to break up the strong black nucleus of the family. This is what they WANNA do family. Let's call it what it is. Let's don't play no games about it. This is not a situation where it's a lone individual that's doing this. This is a system and they all complicit and I know there's some good people that probably work for uh-huh CPS but they have no power so before we close out. I just want to say sister I thank you for doing the work that you're doing I know that this has been a fight. It has been a struggle and it has been expensive for you and your family and there is no recourse as far as our lawsuits. I don't think because even if it is the tax payers is paying for but do we believe we got. He did the tax payer. Yeah the fight is not over for. Y'All is there a go fund me. Is there anything that anybody within hearing distance of my voice can do to help you and your family out most definitely definitely F I mentioned earlier. I am founder of the criminal justice reform that work. We do have a uncle on me and or seven on facebook page and also we're taking cash donations cash out which is dollar sign. I alliance cares. We're trying to provide a M- assistance or CPS parents that. I've gone through Kobe because what we do know that the system has not stopped but Koby and parents are losing their children because they can't get the services. They can't get the things they need to be able to go back to court and present to the court. They have breakfast out. Whatever situation and so Cobra is also aiding to the removal of children as well and and that is absolutely horrible so we're trying to provide parents with the resources that they need to be able to stay in compliance will order to make sure that CPS is not win the Ferret Again Mestalla sign or some kid the Go find me is on my On Our facebook page for personalise INC from woman justice reform network and. I'll put it on your page as well so people can easily assess it right. I appreciate that sister. So she said Criminal Justice Reform Network. Remember that name look it up. And where can they find that? Aren't they on facebook? Go to the facebook page for criminal justice reform and then she said dollar sign us. I'm not taking no phone calls of ICY said dollar sign. I alliance Kid Right now. Listen when I spell I write. I spent one S T. is it spelt out first alliance. Yeah Alright so is dollar. Signs spelt out. I alliance care. And that's where you could send your money to and this organization is helping individuals that Dylan where Cps and Also dealing with the Nineteen situation because as she said. It doesn't stop. You still gotTa have certain stipulations and one of them might be a job and they know. Ain't nobody hiring right now and let me tell you something else about that. One of the things they like to do is say well. You're not financially fit to take care of a child and guess what you could say. Well I give food stamps. I have a part time job. All you know you can tell them I get welfare and I'm a single mother. That's part time in school. You know what they tell you know where fair in food. Stamps is not enough. We need to know that you're working. You need to be working forty hours and you need to be making certain amount of money. This is crazy. Yes this is who is trying to control our lives family and this is not new. This has been going on for years and years and years but as we rise up and we fight against criminal justice and we ask for criminal reform. We got to have that same anger. We've got to have that same vigor. That we do their file children's in fact we need to have more anger we dealing with the babies and if we don't fight and save them nobody else will because we the holders and keepers of ourself in predicament. And that is the inclusion of this podcast on necessary black list podcast network sister. Is there anything that I should act you that I didn't you that you WANNA say last closing words now? We spoke about everything at this work. Understand that they are just one phone. Call a one dollars business away from CPS investigation. Please don't take this information might be. We are trying to save your lives and the lives of your baby. Mesa community and protect the children because CPS is not the agency and it's only our responsibility to make sure that our children face because we keep us say. I can't even say nothing after that men only thing I'm GonNa say this peace and Black Powell family. I'll see you next week. Same Place. Same time piece generation feeling my shoulder. Tokyo when it's all said and done they all know what I thought you were on the water to the seats that become rose Let me see Ya.

Cps United States Curiel Wadia Shabazz Child Protective Service Rahim Shabazz Black Society America attorney child Protective Services Depa Bcs CPS Black Paul family Child Abuse Hospital Ray Black Society Ryan Prison Industrial Complex
Ep. 30: The Fears and Joys of Raising Black Children

Parenting and Politics

1:24:32 hr | 5 months ago

Ep. 30: The Fears and Joys of Raising Black Children

"Hi parenting politics listeners. This is Diana before we begin today. I wanted to tell you about an amazing parenting support group that I belong to called on parenting support, which is something I found especially helpful during this time of global pandemic. Social distancing and self quarantine at home with kids. I'm sure if you're like me. You have lots of questions and anxiety about parenting during this time. Even more than usual. I've gone onto the group to ask questions about. Why am I children are all the sudden climbing back into my bed why they're picky eaters. How many Tantrums Day can my toddler possibly throw? And why am I all of a sudden getting SAS from my nine year old? I'm parenting support is a private facebook group where you can ask your questions about parenting and get an answer within a day from childhood development expert. Even more exciting once a week. You'll be able to call to get your questions answered directly by stopped parenting loans, founder Lena Costa Sundial who has been a guest on the podcast, and who's also an expert in child development. Parenting politics listeners can go and sign up for online parenting support at a discounted rate using the code parenting in politics. visit stop parenting alone, dot com for more information and to sign up. Tell them. Your friends at parenting and politics sent you. And now let's listen to today's episode. Welcome to parenting politics, a podcast for parents who want to make a difference where we look at parenting through a political lens. Donald Monje today. The day were recording. This is June six twenty twenty. We are in day seventy something of being quarantined here in New York City where I'm located on May twenty fifth, an unarmed black man, George Floyd was murdered by police officer Minneapolis. The video that has made its rounds around. The world, showed a police officer, crushing this man with his knee and the World Watch as George Floyd pleaded for his life. This event came right after we witness a white woman amy. Cooper call the COPS in an African American man in Central Park in New York City where it was clear that she was using her white privilege to put that man's life in danger. For over a week we pat protests over the United States the protests the vigils continue for George Floyd and for all the people who have been victims of police brutality. All the black lives that we lost due to police brutality. That's what's happening right now in the United States. I've talked about black motherhood before about racial injustice intersection -ality today we're going to have a discussion about raising black children. The United States because I think it's important for those of us. Who are not raising children to hear about what this means. Lack moms or less likely to be listened to while giving birth suffer higher mortality rates in black bays or more likely to die within their first year. Children are more likely to be expelled from school. Lack children are more likely to go schools that are underfunded and lack resources. They are also more likely to be seen as adults rather than kids. Twenty seventeen study from Georgetown Law, researchers found that black girls as five or already seen as less innocent meeting less support than white girls of the same age. What children are more likely to end up in juvenile detention incarcerated leader on. Of course there are other disparities that affect African American communities like living in food deserts, having higher rates of asthma, diabetes and other illnesses, and of course lack of access to affordable healthcare. These communities suffer from over policing in high incarceration rates. The list goes on and on, and there's no denying that the real systemic issues that affect lecture in black families. So that's the backdrop of conversation today and I ve very excited to welcome to guests today. I Bay. The founder of the blog Harlem lovebirds. Canada's currently living in Boston with her children and husband. And Vanessa bell the founder of this woman Ma a blog about creating legacy in raising multi racial children than episodes from California, but relocated to Costa, Rica last year with her family. Thank you so much for being with me. Having us, thank you. So I always the podcast with the same question when we talk about parenting in politics, what comes to mind and why should we be talking about these things together? For me, I almost had my own political awakening. Having been important New Hampshire in two thousand fourteen. In the wake of the election, the two thousand sixteen election so New Hampshire is a very political place. That's where the first. One of the first primaries happens so the. Candidates they come up there with all their stump speeches and making their rounds, but at the time when I moved there from New York City to New Hampshire I was grounded because I was home with my infant son, and my daughter was in preschool, so I had a front row seat to the candidates coming up. There were lots of events I would just take my kids with me and we would see it. Firsthand it was like a front row seat. It's I didn't go with any agenda, which is curious. These political events are happening here in this community. What's going on and I? Think? In that period of being a mother, being at home with my children, and being very focused on them, and having the flexibility to be able to pay attention to politics which I think, there's some privileges I was really able to engage in so in two thousand fourteen to where I'm at right now. I would say that was really the start of my political awakening. And and that's where I saw. My own. PARENTI politic intersection start to happen. I think for me it. It began The moment. I realized that by. Privilege can no longer blanket my. my children. And Living intimately with a black man with my husband, things that I had learned and studied in theory in college became real life experiences and There's something about living those real real life experiences that you cannot deny and becoming a mother amplifies that in ways in your heart and in your actions That transcends literature and Studies so definitely you know parenting and politics are intertwined. Pressure. So I thought about high wanted to frame this conversation in I wanNA give you the time and space to share. or not share what you're feeling. That, we need to know I. Think for those of us who aren't raising black children. There comes a moment when a light bulb goes off, the blinders come off, and you kind of understand to the best of my ability I'm GONNA say. That as a parent. What you experienced is not compatible to what the parents black children are experiencing. And the reason I really wanted to have the NASA on on. Today's because for me. That moment came and I. I wrote about the degrom on personal instagram page that moment came from me in two thousand, sixteen. Vanessa and I were rooming together and She was waiting for a call from her husband and she. Said something to me and then she said you don't know what it's like. To kind of wait for the and I'm paraphrasing, but the idea was. You don't know what it's like, do you? You don't know what it's like to like wait. And be scared that something might happen to your husband. And at that moment, it was like that was like my moment and I was like. Oh, no I don't but I could feel it I could feel the anguish that she was experiencing and dominant moment. Everything I think just just blew up for me, and my face was like Oh my God like you're right. I could never oh, my God. person who is a mother and a wife of black children is feeling this. So that that's kind of where I Where I had that moment of realization that Oh my goodness, these two things are not the same right and I couldn't imagine what it was like. To have that anguish every day you know every day your spouses go out and. You. You have. Interactions with people and you don't know what's going to happen. So I. Want to ask you two questions. The first one is have you been in situations where you feared for your partners life? I mean I'll go yes? Yes, I have you know in It's happened. You know in each town USA in southern California. It's happened in New York. City and fears a relative thing right for him. He might not have been as scared because his. He's been black his whole life for me. The wake ending that you're speaking of really did start A loving him so much that I don't want to tie you know and I think the The fear that ignites this type of unrest the uprising that we're seeing. is is based on that like the social contract has been broken you the deprivation of safety of. Economic Mobility like all of those things. Are Pivotal to our society that it continues to be peaceful and and grows in stable. My. Family immigrated from Cuba and. Cubans can be some of the most racist Latinos and it hurts me painfully to say that, but the truth of the matter is they left in the middle of this uprising within their own country, and they were deprived that population that's that society was deprived, and we see the outcome of that fifty sixty years later, and so for me to look at what's happening in the United States and understand that they broke a contract. We don't want to see our brothers and our husbands and our children dying on the street like that's just. It's not something that the United States is willing to tolerate. Yes I've I've been fearful since the moment I realize this man is is integral to my future into my heart, you know and Yeah I. Fear for him every day, and I'm sitting here in Costa Rica, and it's beautiful, and because of the pandemic the borders are closed, and he's there, and I'm riddled with guilt and I don't want to go back but that might be what we come down to so that I can continue to blanket him with whatever stupid privilege I might have. I continue to do you know we saw these videos of light people? Literally standing between them and the police officers and It's what I've been doing for. The last fifteen years of my life in various situations physically and very literally putting myself in between the man that I love father of my children. and. You know people that are sworn to protect us so. I think a lot of people are taking concept into. You know. They're understanding it because they're seen it. But. I've been fearing for his life. Since the minute, it became more important to me than being politically correct so. yes. I can share. That's really powerful Vanessa and I think. To your point, you know obviously this is a podcast, so it's You're not the listeners seeing us, but in me. We're all three various shades. Beautiful Melanin. Right levels of Melanin and I think there's something to be said for understanding the layers that there is to. Fear brained in White Americans that goes back to the beginning of bringing Africans to this stolen land and I think for me. In thinking about that in color is on and thinking what it's like married to a Nigerian American. My husband's parents are egeria. He's dark, skinned and talking to him. About what was that like growing up in New York City? He was born in Brooklyn and so having known prior to what's happening right now. Having known each other since we were eighteen in knowing his stories for context, I'll be forty in September, having met when we were eighteen, knowing his stories of police brutality verses what I experienced growing up in Columbus, Ohio You Know I. Never Heard My Dad who? He is, he has fair. Skin is mother Fair skin. They never talked about police brutality, and to hear the differences in my own dad in been my brother, and there was never a sense of. The fear of the police and then hearing my husband. And thinking about the robot color ISM in fear might play in the fact that. He and his brothers, his two brothers. That, they have really dark skinned in. What does that mean in context of police brutality in fear? Proximity to whiteness, and it's the way we speak English. Ray! There's so many layers, and so there's. Fear because I fear. What others may do a hell. Others may perceive him. He six foot eight. A former professional athlete. Now retired. And so. There's also the privilege that we give professional athletes. That, we don't give to. Other. Citizens there elevated in our culture, so there's that layer, so he he as A. Former professional athlete, she can move around in a way differently than let's say he wasn't. is a sense of confidence that he has. He'll get recognized a lot and there's a level of Oh. You're okay I watched. You watched your career. I've been a spectator. And, then I think of the role of black men is entertainers are black black people as entertainers, and if you're entertaining us, you're safe. If, you just throw the ball and not protest. You're safe to stick to singing beyond say. Don't protest finger safe. You're acceptable, so all of that I think is layered in my thoughts on fear. I fear what? Others may do in perceiving him. being taught being big being six fifty. Being dark skin all of that, so I think I. I'm always like okay. How are people going to perceive ham? And how are they going to respond fear of their response? I don't necessarily fear for him a mean. Brooklyn born and raised. He could hold his own. You know e moves about. with confidence, but he's. He has his wits about him. Living here in Boston Boston has its own history. Racism and I think what what happens for me I. Do a lot of what Vanessa said his waiting. 'cause now my husband wants. He retired from sports. He's in financial sales now and so he entertains clients in a lot of the time. You know that means it's late nights and sometimes he'll just say I'm going to hop on the train Please don't just take an uber you know. Be Safe and it just makes me nervous thought. Late night and walking through the neighborhood. What someone might say are perceive so I'm the one who's more likely to sit up. Wait a nervous are texting ETA update and it's like Oh! It's okay. I'm fine and I'm like you may think you're fine, but I. Just don't trust I. Don't trust other people other especially white people how they're going to respond. To his physical presence in so there's fear for his life generally, but he's I've never witnessed or seen him in an incident where I thought something was going to escalate are happen. On have there been situations where you have feared for your children's wellbeing. Because they're black. I don't think I have. feared. I feel the wellbeing of a lot of American kids I've never. They've never been in situations. They've been loved sheltered and those ways. They're still very young at. Ten and eight. They don't operate really into the world's independently of US But I just I I want for them what I want for. All American kids was just to be free right into Jewish to operate and to move into the world looking for their potential risks. Finding what what? Makes them excited about life and to giving them the tools and the resources to explore those things. I think that lack children as you mentioned at the start of the show My kids are very tall. They present older so I worry in those ways like you know. Seven s many will year old boys super active. He's a big boy. You know so I get a lot of the the expectations for him to be h-have or to be a good boy, and I could see how that I can, physically as his mother could see on his face how it? Kills his spirit a little bit in it, and it alters him in a way that I. don't I think it's a little premature at five or six years old So. I don't fear for their lives in the same way that I feel fear and had feared for my husband's life, but But yeah. I want more for them. That's for sure. You are with your children a lot and In a way. They've been sheltered because they're still little, and they're with you mostly right I, mean they go to school, but in terms of. How they move around in the world's. have you had a conversation about which I just learned in recent times? Like that talk where you need to tell your children. That the way that other children may be able to. Respond to the police or act in certain situations they. They, should they? Should act differently or do you know what I mean like? Have, you had to have those conversations, because you are a biracial or because you're a black child, or because you will be perceived in this way, even though you haven't done anything wrong. This is what I need you to know. With my kids being. Almost six almost ten at the time of this recording. We haven't had that discussion with them. We know it will be coming and I think kind of like what Vanessa mentioned what I said before, but my husband being tall Mike kids also present older than they are, so we had a situation at least with my daughter. On the train I think you can ride up until twelve like what you turn twelve. Maybe at the start paying for the train whatever it is, she was She was on the cusp of her birthday. In I think of her ninth birthday. And we were on the train and they were coming around on the Commute Terrell. which is different than like the trolley or the subway? We call t swiping and go, but the ticket taker was coming around, and they saw I would just be paying for myself like me. Never have issue, but this particular white woman. Looked at my daughter in like question like where's her? Ticket and you know we're sitting down and she's like almost up to my height. Even still and I said Oh, she's eight. and. She was like Oh. You mean twelve under her breasts. And I. I made a scene and she got all of the data and. Everything about how we treat black children in our country, and how we treat them older than they are in racism. I was like you don't know these oak to I. Love You, Girl! I might might phone was right there. We got pictures. Meanwhile, the other people on the train are just looking like what is happening I. Love is in I, said you don't get to do this. I said she's almost nine. And you you do not get to do this right now. You do not get to say that it stops here. You're not GONNA do that to my child, because he or she is only eight years old. She's going to have a lifetime ahead of her. She already presents taller than she has a. you're gonNA start this now at eight and she's GonNa. Remember this and you're implying that I'm lying. And you don't have to show your birth certificate or anything like that on the train. My daughter on the other hand. It's like Mommy. It's okay it's okay and I said it's not okay I said I'm going to stand up for you. That's my role There was no you know it's not like she wasn't armed. Train ticket taker, but. As someone in uniform who represents? The city in in a utility. Kind of way I was ready to escalate I was ready to go there and everyone's going to know about. I'm Mike. What's your? What's your badge number? I got the picture. In it just I wanted my daughter as much as she wanted me to calm down. I, not only wanted her to see that I stood up for her, but. The goal is not to maintain peace and I think that's white supremacist culture in action, and we see right now with what people are saying about the protesting and what they call looting, but I call a rebellion I think we want Oh. Just play Nice. Quiet down keep the peace down. No, because we do that. At some point, it's going to manifest in some other way back. White train conductors GONNA. Go about her life. Maybe there was someone he cheated her. Maybe there was someone who was. Older that presented who was younger, but are you know what I'm trying to say was trying to trigger with her size in her age, but not my daughter. I always pay. The ticket praise in there was. There was something that was very unjust about that moment. That really struck a chord with me. I've never saw her since then. but I think as far as having a talk. We had a talk. That centered around Matt and how you're treated authority figures, and do you maintain the peace in the face? In the face of injustice, so that was the I mean that could turn into the talk or police, brutality, preparation or anything I think just prefacing that in the moment that when you see something, you speak up and I didn't do it in a way. That I'm going to curse at someone. Make a fool of myself like you see those videos. No, I'm going to do it in a way that I'm going to loudly. Tell you about yourself with history facts in data. And then it's GonNa. Make you question your whole life, and so that's the type of. S. That's the type of movement movements I have with my with my children. They see it in action, and then we talk and we process. Yeah I. Think took you on his point That's exactly where we're at as well. We haven't discussed exactly what to do. once stopped by police, but just in positions of You know there was one thing where Alina my daughter in second grade she was. There was a racist encounter and You know, we went to a dual immersion school, so it was predominantly Hispanic and bless her heart. I loved her teacher, but she was looked her in the face and said you're beautiful. You Love Yourself. Look at me and her daughter was Probably the same complexion Dr but Latino and I'm like. No, you don't understand. This is racism. There's this is oppressing child oppressing someone the color of their skin. There's really no other definition. Call it what it is, you know and want to the counselors with my kid in my hand and I think showing up for our kids, and then processing those things Individuals like case by case basis you know I even wrote on my instagram this week, they we were driving through the mountains of California's Central California, which is absolutely stunning, stunning part of the of the state and And the COP pulled us over in the cancer in the background. Saying you're going to jail and they're like end at that moment. I'm like I am not doing. My husband justice. I'm not doing their future justice like. For me to turn around and grab them and say stop your escalating a situation. That is You know potentially could be super scary and that was that scary. It turned out fine. Actually the COP was. Really Gracious, and said Hey you know slowdown. Continue on your way you know and And that was that opened my eyes that. These little bite size pieces of knowledge real life, no hunch. That, they need. As. Adults. They need to come you know and whether or not it's like Han. Sending to this is where we haven't had that conversation. They don't drive. They're not going to be driving for a while But. The smaller life lessons that lead up to that are definitely in play right now, and and have been since they were young, unfortunately younger than than they should at if you're looking at their chronological age, but again because they do present older than they are. Because maybe they're loud. You know you can probably hear them now. You know their children and may demand love and attention and And sometimes living in. A white world. Sees that as a demand for other things so. Yes we talk mom, not specifically police brutality, but I have a feeling. It's probably going to happen sooner than later. So you haven't had that conversation about. You know navigating the world as Lack people means different things. Because your children are young, but what I've been seeing lately in the news and in conversations on social media is that. These conversations are happening when the kids are. My kids have definitely on that conversation and it's an. It's hurtful because you know most. We live in a predominantly white. Progressive White, environment So! Yes, not one specific to police brutality, however this idea that in my husband and I have this conversation in choosing where we were going to bring up. Our kids right 'cause you're going to be. The only black child in a group of teenagers. I'm always envisioning like teenage year where their rebellious. It's almost like damage control during those years. You know we all remember being a teenager, but. In, the only black child and a white group would probably mean something different than a group of five black boys you know, and so we did have that conversation early on. You know that what you can do is not what your friends can do. Like you've got to. With that length, so yes, that's specific. We've definitely had that conversation. We continue to have that conversation. But yeah I mean. I think the I think that's one of the most pervasive insidious things about this is that he's kids don't understand. They just left their friends. They just love. Their communities left their teachers, and for us to have to broach the subject of inequality when they really have. They haven't not on merit. You know you done anything wrong, but then to to educate them on this perceived. this perceived. Mallon tent that you're going to operate in the world eventually independently of us and you're going to probably make some bad decisions because that's what teenagers do, and you won't. Have the benefit of being used. so yes, those conversations have been in play in our family. For a while in various capacities, as it relates specifically to police, brutality or traffic violations. No, we haven't had that conversation, but as it pertains to just living your life in relation to a white family in relation to your white friends, being a teenager out on the streets and hanging out with your friends, and then doing something silly and. Being pulled over. Who are they going to point the finger at? You know and so understanding that we're choosing to raise our children in predominantly white middle-class areas About! It's lovely. It's also. Re feel. My husband and I feel it's imperative that we. Power them with that right Lens and. That's those are the conversations that go in our homes. For me I think a lot of it is at least with the. Seemed to be ten year old. Also, because of her cy soon, things of that nature of how she's perceived in, so we talked are generally about that that people may think of you older than you are, and she's used to that. I mean she's been in one hundred percent tiles since she was a toddler, so she's always kind of had that sense of like Oh. You're five like. Why don't you know how to say here? Do this Michael? She still only. A kindergartner cutters some slack. So I think I I'm pretty open about talking to her about that I think there's some ways in which she would say like mummy. Not Everything is about raise and and I'm like well. We would hope that not everything is about race, but I have to prepare you as a layer protection, so we have those conversations might. Soon to be six year old. We don't talk about that. I mean we're talking about things like let's let's creatively discussed the color of our skin and look how beautiful it gets more like embedding in him. That layer out the gate like you're a little black boy who is going to be fifteen Sunday, and people are going to be steady you. Know like right now we do things like even my husband is as his. He has quarantine fro-, Is, telling him. Your hair is beautiful. Like to hear him a father. Tell that to this black sun. Your hair is beautiful and I say that to him all the time. You Know Mommy Mommy near lobster skin. Look how smooth it is and like we we talk like. To him as a kindergartener and I think that's appropriate. 'cause we have to build them up as a world unfortunately is. Prone to break him down as as a black boy, it will turn into a black man at some point so I'm all about self esteem boosting. Its a preemptive tactic I guess versus like giving him scripts and telling him things. It's more just through day to day action so that by the time he gets to manhood. It's just ingrained in him like he grew up in an environment where his mother, his father and sister were just pouring into him as a base layer so that it doesn't become what it has become for so many black men that they internalize Byatti has. Has told them about themselves explicitly or implicitly, and so rather than say well. People are always scared of me. Let me shrink myself and make myself small were be extra. Nice. Make sure I hold the elevator for the white people coming in and ask them to press in almost like a old fashioned step, and fetch it Kinda way. Old Those old ways! I want them I don't know maybe in the midst of all these protests, some of that will get abolished, but all of that is gonNA take a long time and I'm not GonNa wait I'm not gonna see what's going to happen once. He exits are home as an adult. I'm going to do all it might powered to preemptively bolster him. I do the same for my daughter, but I think like Reno with the data and what we see with. Black boys and black men. I'm going to do what I can to make sure he has that base foundation before. He exits shelter and comfort of our home. So Vanessa. For our listeners Vanessa's in Costa Rica. So you're of Cuban descent and your husband's African American and last year decided to move to Costa Rica. Tell us a little bit why you made that decision and. Did race. Have anything to do with it. Well not explicitly And took Janas point like. If it did it's an celebration, and in search of and in desire to be more immersed in. lack culture around the world specifically in Latin America, so my kids attended adult immersion school in Los Angeles. and. They're bilingual, and part of that is really making sure that they know their by literate in within the the culture so. We chose Costa Rica for a variety of reasons one because it has no army and has had no army for forty years. It's super stable relative to the other countries here in this region. And and. It's got a host of cultural. It's just it's a beautiful culture so right now. We're in the Caribbean side where it has a strong. Jamaican influence a lot of. Lack and Brown bodies around here And it is a constant reminder to May children how beautiful and diverse Life people are right and it's. It's opening up. My husband's African American my in laws are from the south. You know and they. I'm they have that. That's their history. That's their legacy but in addition to that there you know Cuban, and they have the connection to Latin America to our language to our culture. That is rich. In in African. Values and culture and music and dance and food, and all of those things so. in that sense, yes, race was a part of it, but more so than that I wish all children again specially children black children to travel to live abroad to experience more than to see themselves in different light. You know like it's like people are everywhere. We speak every language. We're all over this world flourishing and it's. It's an empowering experience to see yourself reflected. Culturally linguistically it's everywhere everywhere. You are everywhere and And I want that from a kid, so we are in Costa, Rica, now you know before the pandemic we were set to spend you know April. All of April in Guatemala and I want them to be enriched in indigenous cultures like I. Want them to learn and to see Brown people doing everything in this world and can I know you guys are. Avid travellers and seeing her children traveling through Europe and like. I. Just want her to grab I want both of them to. To inform their identities. In a vast pool of options you know and I think that. Youth would benefit from tremendously I mean we are. We are everywhere where everywhere glorious beautiful, and we're farming and commute. Contributing to their communities and they're building schools and I don't think those stories and those images are reflected quite often in the United States. Narrative of what races! So for US moving abroad, for however long we do it. It seems I would love it to be permanent forever You know it's for them. To enrich themselves in this very like informative like I still have them. They're still mine I can. I can take them around the world, and they've gotta go willingly or not. You know in, so I want them to to see reflections of themselves and of their family and when we went to Cuba. Gosh! It was like almost three years ago now she's skipping through the streets and it's just out of the mouth of Babes like these kids really know. what they need in the world, and she just says like I fit in here and she was right because there's people that there was families with mothers that looked like me and father's look, my husband and the children are just they're just there. and I think that the narrative in the United States is so polarizing some times, and it's very white or very black, and the stuff in the middle gets lost and. and. I! Think that's what I i. get so disheartened and seeing Latinos just not understanding how? Much, we connect with black culture in the united. States in like how we're missing that opportunity to really align ourselves or I'm not everyone. Not all at the again were a huge. There's a huge spectrum there But to align themselves with our black brothers, and are black sisters, and the plights of because they're the ones that built this country you know, and those are the conversations I'm having with my family who? They, weren't even there? They weren't even in the United States. During the civil rights movement so for for us to come in, and to really even criticize or to. Have anything else to say other than to just sit back and listen. Is. It's so disheartening. We're in Costa Rica and I feel that. That guilt for tapping out my kids are little and so I'm doing it for them. but quite honestly. It's invigorating to see so many people talking however I, really WanNa. Remind Latinos like. WHO built this country? You know and and. It is very much, not us. You know it's definitely not Cuban immigrants. And other White Hispanic immigrants you know and. and to take a moment to sit back and be quiet. You know and learned something about their own. Immigration Stories, and like how how even even within the Immigration Hall, absolutely privileged are Cubans that have come in and perhaps difficult. My grandparents are absolutely phenomenal people they have. They have conquered and done so much that American, dream, they squashed it. They love they beat, did it? You know I'm so proud of them and to be of them. However, they were propped up by the American government. They were given a statement. They were given a home for three days, or whatever before they were moved on. You think Haitians don't get that kind of support, Dominicans or anybody else like Mexicans like those immigration stories just be quiet. Just be quiet and be compassionate and there's. If. There's anything that I'm experiencing. All this is just. I'm happy that they're here Costa Ricans. It's a small little company of five million people, and they are so pro people just the other day in the news. They have now made it a constitutional right to access water clean water. It is progressive. They just just last month. They legalize same-sex marriages. It's pretty remarkable what they're doing over here and I hope that it translates into more progressive compassionate ideals throughout the region. Yeah. It's not all about race moving here but it is, but it is always about race doing anything. And can't you've lived? CPI Data Mal, Ohio Harlem New York. New Hampshire. Boston. So, how has an you mentioned earlier a little bit about how for example your? Family's experienced in Ohio in you. Growing up in Ohio was different than like your husband's experience growing up in Brooklyn. Until how is being a black family? Different in all those places, or and how is it the same? A, probably talk for at least an hour on just about that, but I'll synthesize it 'cause I've written about it. before I have a lot of thoughts. I'm back in quickly. Share so I think what's really unique when I think of myself, and I was like to take an aerial view having that Midwest upbringing as a black woman. And then coming to the east coast. To go to school in Boston. was. Something that really flipped the switch for me. I think my husband would say I lived a very sheltered life. But my parents the way that they grew up. The was very different than how they raise me and my two younger sisters and my. Younger brother, and so I think from some of the challenges might parents had coming from Households with single mothers rearing them. Together. They were very intentional about the home they wanted to create. For me and my siblings and looking back now as a parent, it's just amazing at all. They were able to do and how they were able to carry each other through their marriage. they were, they were high school sweethearts. And so now being out here on the East Coast. I think from my education at Wellesley. There was another level of awakening happened at that point, and so being at an all women's College. At wellesley where? It had the legacy of Hillary Clinton Madeleine Albright in just thinking of the women who had come through that institution for me as a high school student. At first. I didn't WANNA go there. Because I was coming from a girl, a girl school ride been from eighth to Twelfth Grade but then once I arrived in learn of the legacy had visited the campus that I met the current students as it wild. This is the company that I want to keep. This is how I envisioned myself like I want to do something. And I think this would be the portal to do it and I think. Going to Wellesley. was probably one of the most important things that I've ever done. It was one of the reluctant things initially, but it turned out to be one of the best. Even prior to this podcast, I was on a zoom call with my wellesley siblings processing in talking meditating all of us together from all across the the world. And I talked to other people about that and I'm like well. How is your? How is Your Alumni Organizations Hauer? They supporting you during this time in. Are you connecting with your fellow alums in? I. Don't know anyone who is experiencing a network like what I see. Wellesley has. It, so that has really informed even how I raise my own children in how I interact with their schooling and the types of questions I asked. Vetting things. It just makes me really informed. Parent and I think Wellesley for that I think my parents were making the sacrifice. The sacrifices that they did put me in a girls school in Women's, college and I think similar to what I said about bolstering my son, and giving him all those layers of whatever protection affirmation whatever I think, there was something very beautiful about being in a single sex environment that Kinda gave me that armor so to speak, because there's a way I move about the world where I may not have the size and stature of my husband. Would I've talked about him moving about the world? But there's a level of confidence that I have and I think there's a level of humility to serve. That was instilled in me by my family, my parents. And I think that that's been A. That's been something having left Boston gone to New York, and then come back here. I got right back plugged in to that. Community and I envisioned that no matter where we go, even if we do someday like Vanessa. Up and leave the United States. That I wouldn't feel so disconnected that I believe in my homeland, like I have no ties to the soil. I feel so confident in the connections that I made in all the beautiful places that we've lived that I can bring my community anywhere I go and I. Make Sure my children know that and that's a beautiful about this digital space, right? And now the that's just being. Is just been amplified because now many people that haven't been in the digital space. Raw Force to be aerospace because we can't be in community together like in person. But I love what you said about. The all girl I went to an all girl, high school and I really do think. And that I taught in a in a Co, ed high school later on and I really saw the difference in how. In a roomful of girls, the leaders are going to be girls like those are the models most of the time. The teachers are all women so. You can only be inspired and like have this confidence because. That's all there is women to lead right I think it's a very different experience. When it's a coed experience I do agree with you. But when you were for example in New Hampshire. Were you the only family like what did that look like? According to the data like I, said. I'm a data nerd we were in Portsmouth which I don't know our fifteen minutes north of Boston when I was looking at it. I think there's like one thousand population of Portsmouth New Hampshire's twenty thousand. A. four hundred black people. Last count about four hundred black people so. I used to joke and say well. I'm GONNA just facebook friend olive on like. Easy task. But it was it was such that. Portsmouth. itself especially because it it. Does have. entered. There's like a spare or what type of army-military whatever community. They would have more so. Diversity. Lightweight, diversity compared to other parts of the state so that we would would not only be. We wouldn't be the only family of color to go out of my way when I was there to find other families of color and we were able. We were able to build a nice small little network. In that was through the church that was through Wellesley because there were a couple alums in A. Racial. Families that we were able to connect with so that my kids couldn't make sure the saw people of various hues on a regular basis. It was very intentional, I was like okay. We got schedule The black boy, so that my son is not only seeing white boys day in day out. Okay, it's been two weeks since he's seen a chocolate child. It's so different from women at right here, but the that was the type of thing it was like okay. We have to like schedule the Melanin. When we were up there I really felt torn coming from New York City, because valued the diversity in New York City, but the pace of life, and that constant vigilance in for me, because I have hypothyroidism I have destroyed lupus at thinking of stress triggers. Which is very bad for my? Bad for anybody's immune system, but I could see the physical manifestations of the stress of living in an environment like New York City always on guard. I think that was one of the things when we got to New Hampshire. I appreciate it the Sabbatical Soda speak for those two years of fresh air I was like this for like six months. When we I got there, and then it was like. My shoulders relax probably how you felt. On Mare. Yeah, absolutely. I feel it in my bones when you're explaining that that's exactly how. New York so I'm probably. Aren't you? That's fine. Aiding my feelings the true. Value each of the places to get to wrap it up. I value each the places that we've lived for different reasons almost like a hybrid so to speak, so I like the diversity that we have here in our community in Boston it's forty percent non white in our in our little microcosm in our neighborhood. I love that. But I missed the tranquility in the cleanliness and all of that pristine. Virgo type A so all of the pristine cleanliness of Portsmouth released spoke to me. And being like that quick access to the water, we can get to the water you're in. Boston but it wasn't like you know after school. You're done with school and the kids like Mommy. I want to go to the beach in new. Hampshire's going to go to the beach canton. Minutes. We'll just. Grab some ice cream, and then we're at the beach should ten minutes from the time the bell rings so that I I miss that. But. I valued the diversity more than than that. Vanessa to the beach after school. Check her out on his. Night we've talked a little bit about this type of How? You can like being up black family in product like predominantly white environments and I find that. The, way, we parent often a little bit different like how she's saying she's scheduling. No, you schedule, you look out for your friends like you find your black friends within that same community and it's It's something that brings you together. It's I've had that similar experience or even online. It's just like. Checkout this this. You know art lesson that she's doing and I think that's the beautiful thing. It'll spaces. You know you really have to kind of plug it in and make sure that your kids are. Represented within their daily life when you're living in an environment that's safe and progressive, and all of those things, but oftentimes not super reflective of them. It takes. Extra, work is parents I imagine because like you said you have to be super intentional. You have to kind of be vocal like if they go to a majority white school. or Even if you go to a school that has diversity but. A lot of times. The administration's are not diverse, so then you have all these brown and black children attending schools where? Their cultures are not being celebrated. In a way that. Really celebrates right not just like we're going to read this book about Martin Luther King because it's Martin Luther King Day week, but really really having those discussions. Which I also think is something that as parents were black children. You have to go the extra step if you're living those. Communities that. Aren't. Quite right that aren't. Predominantly. Absolutely so. Let's talk about joy as an act of resistance because. It's really hard to be joyful right now. But I love this idea. Of Finding Joy. Because I think that that kind of keeps us going, I was having a discussion with my husband this morning I, said. It's really hard. Like I don't want to think about the conspiracy theories and I don't want to think about all these. Awful things, because then what else is there? You know like I? WanNa think that there is a better future ahead man. I think that in the midst of all this chaos. Joy Or kind of taking a back just looking at our children and the way they see things helps us continue the work because. If you're in the space in your an activist near. Like. It's it can wear you down so easily so. Talk to me a little bit about I mean. Do you agree you don't agree? You could say you don't agree you know. How do you joy in? What do you think about this idea that? They can't take our joy I read that somewhere i. don't remember where but. I agree I think during this time I've been really open to my kids filling all of the emotions, and so when they do get angry or frustrated. I'm like yes I totally understand why. You don't WanNa. Sit On zoom for another hour and do your work like I. Yeah, you can be angry about that so this whole time I fully let my kids experience all the fill in even when they. They get loopy and they get cabin fever, and all of that part of the the coping mechanism is finding joy in those moments is is laughing, and there are moments where I sit down, and just cry and cry, but then I remember like you know Carol Baskin is they're still in the world, and just think with the Tigers, and you know all that silliness. I'm just like you know what. We can walk and Chew Gum. We can have our all of our emotions and frustrations, and we can laugh at the ridiculousness of at all. And so I think that is a form of resistance that I'm not GonNa, let it get me such. The situation put me in such despair that I can't see the humor in it all or even the fact that they said the murder Hornets were gonNA come I mean. I was I thought that was more funny than I was concerned like. What do you do account? You're really good about posting. On social media and the three of us have a presence meteorite. You're very good about. You know like. Resources and there's a protest and there's this and there's that and then you post. You know like I went out for ice cream. And like something that made you happy and that's like everyday life and. Do get to you get. Like somebody like called you and be like. Why are you posting about that? There are more important things. Post about because I feel like that is also something that because you're in social media posting. That is also a possibility. Right that people are gonNA be like. This like why are you telling me that you're posting? You know you're making cookies when the world's on fire. You know what I mean we still. Have you gotten that, and do you ever I think at some point loss? Just think it's my I'm just. GonNa post whatever I want. I mean I. Think I think I have a responsibility having been in social media like you know you think of my blog. I started in two thousand nine. I've always been very cognizant of understanding that my space on social media is kind of like a living room. That's I think that you can come in. You can come out. It's my space. I know I own nothing to you but I also have to be aware of perception. How I'm perceived in the impact right I may have my my intent of showing myself you know in my in my swimming pool on a day that I know the whole world is upended, and I'm posting myself in my swimming pool. And I'm saying hey, what's up for the weekend? Is Everybody going to have fun which? I saw happen with someone I know who was very in tuned to current events, and it was kicking off last weekend with the protests and I'm like. You might not WANNA post as people are organizing to take to the streets and risk their lives like. So there's a balance I think, and so there's been a few people who have followed me enough. The years or kind of like my auditors. And they'll tell me they'll say you know I really appreciate the levity bringing your posts. But now I'm like. What can I do to us? The bluff place for people to find me and then most of what I do is offline and so I'm very intentional behind the scenes you know about the type of content in the rotation that and Vanessa. How joy resistance! Yeah! I mean I think that was kind of the. The goal of this Emma when I started at ten years ago. was. What now I know. Is that intersection analogy of living Racially or multicultural a and to show that That, there is a lot of joy and being brown and being black and and There's a lot of values in which are conducive to American society like we are good people. We pay all of our taxes. and it was just a representation at that time, which is only a decade ago, there were not a law especially, not allow I mean a you know a lot of Latino. Bloggers out there. There was me maybe one other talking about our lives in interracial. Marriages and I wanted people to see this wholesome American perception, so yes, joy as a form of resistance. Absolutely do we have our? Challenges Yeah of course, but there will never be a time where you go to my social media pages, and not see some type of Honor in. I don't know I just. I let my kids know every day. My favorite colors black. Love being black. If I'm not Black Akito like I, want them to to find joy in in who they are not despite of it like Munich truly my husband is the most joyful, purely He's the most beautiful person that I know not even physically because he is gorgeous on the outside, but. Also That, resilience to endure what he has, and then to be a success, financially career wise, he's a wonderful provider. He's an amazing man and He does that with joy in his heart honestly like he is truly. A reflection of how I want my children to end up in so if that isn't indicative of joy as a form of resistance, what is I do think that in your. In everything you posted about your family, it's not celebrating who you are. and. Kind of showing the world like like you said we are a family like you know this is who we are. This is beautiful to the detriment of reality, though also and I think that. As, I was saying I've done a lot of sponsored stuff and I had already made the decision going into twenty twenty. That dot was very much going to be cut off because I think that when you give your power To one thing, which is income production, which is amazing, and the fact that we can do this digitally is empowering and I love it I'm not at all shape nothing about that, but for me were in the privileged opportunity that I don't have to rely on that and I could really start to explore some of these more provocative statements like hey, black lives matter you know It's it's an empowering part of where I'm at right now, so I looked Kiana and I looked to other activists that are Diana. You and That have been doing this work consistently. for years and I find so much. Joy In that right and I find joy in the intersections of getting ice cream with my kids, and still like. Hey, this is going on or my husband Golfing. You think golfing every day demands a golfer like crazy like he's out there, and then he goes right back home, and he's got to watch the news and he's hurt and all of those things, but he's also finding so much joy, and being out in the Greens and like just doing what he does, and he lives he's. Living and breathing. so, but he's also hoping for a better America and so there's those things Kansas I mean we can walk and Chew Gum like we can do both things we can be both things we could demand more and still be joyous in the skin that we're living in Absolutely joy is a former assistant. And also showing got. Like black people golf black people do all these things right? It's like. I think that a lot of people. Fear what they don't know, and if you've grown up your whole life and not known any black families. You don't know right you. Don't know and I think we're at a moment when a lot of people. are like. Oh. Why is this happening? Why are people in the streets? Why are you know and now? I think they're just starting to kind of be more open to following. Black activists are back, parents and learning more about. About something that know about before, honestly, people are in the streets and I was just. It's relative deprivation bright like we have deprived people. We are. This idea of living equally this idea of prosperity Saikia that we can get better and then to do what they done. They're showing this disparity on television in broad daylight. It, it causes. There's been studies after study. That when you deprive someone of the social contract with what you have agreed to. All men are created equal the American dream, and you can't even and that the police are there to protect us. This civil unrest is it's just it's happens in every country including where my pam lease come from including Cuba where you cannot set up a system. And then deprive a large majority of it. And not expect. Upright I think when big business understands, when Wall Street understands when the majority understand that it is best for our country as a whole. To continue to offer their end of the social contract contract that they. That these systems need to be repaired or completely reformed. I mean that's at least what I'm telling kids. That if you go and you willingly go into a contract and you agree that all men are created equal. That! Segregation isn't a thing that your place is my place and that is you. Work hard and pay your taxes. You have a chance you go to college. You have a chance and then to have to see people that look like you. Brutally attacked on the street like. This is why. It's not that unclear. America has broken its promise, and there's a woman on instagram. And she says it beautifully and I. Hope you linked to it to six minute clip and it breaks down. Exactly, everyone needs to see this. America's broken its promise to its people and to the people that built this country for free for four hundred fifty years as she explains and. There is really no other not. You don't have to understand anything else. Other than the fact that. Where do we go from here like I? Don't know I don't know in so if you don't want uprisings and you don't want rebellion, and you want peace, which is. There's a cost to that change perform. hold up your end of the contract. It's never been more clear than after watching that woman I mean just eloquently beautifully state and passionately explain for people that have not lived this experience or seen someone may love. Go through the experience of having to walk out and work in succeed and owned businesses and buy homes, and in invest all of that while being black. The problem is that it requires. People giving up power right. And that. Causes renewed, their white supremacy is alive and well young. So you not be are out on the streets I. Mean You know? How did this country start? Why are we so surprised? People are in the streets. That's something that I. I think about. A lot like this country started because people were pissed at the government because they weren't seeing as citizens because they didn't have rights because there were taxed without representation all these things and they went to Boston. They threw stuff. You know. They took property. They threw it out. And buy miracle of. A miracle and the help of some French troops. Probably they beat the British I mean. We are. This country founded on rebellion right and the enslavement of people, which is something that we've never come to terms with which is a whole other podcast episode about his idea that there hasn't been this kind of Sh- Ruth Bryan Stevenson from equal justice initiative. He calls it like he talks about Truth and reconciliation. How if you go to Germany if you go to South Africa? Everybody learns about that history. We still have confederate. Monuments and confederate flags, which to me is the equivalent of having a Nazi flag in Germany I mean. Data is appalling and itself, so there's just so many things that we haven't confronted. We haven't come to terms with the haven't. Done the messy work of acknowledged. You said, pushing down keeping the peace. Like why are we going to? Where are we going to open up Pandora's box and talk about you know. All of those things, but we has to because I think if we don't we can't. Move forward, So okay so I always on the podcasts asking. What you things number one like an action step. So what can parents do? Kennedy WANNA share kind of an action item. I think the number one action item is. To kind of step away from the screen I think were so enmeshed between. The distance learning on between the protests in watching what neck? What's next and what's going to happen and I think that connection with our families I know each state is kind of differently. Phasing out there are rolling out there fees of reopening but I. Think has at least connecting with the kids and finding the time to be with them in physical space, because as much as you may think that you're shoulding them from current events in the news. The kids find a way to pick up on all of that. We don't have the news running in the background at our house. I grew up in in a home that was very much like that. We're the news in the background and I didn't want my kids to be exposed to that Especially given the current state of affairs was. It can be very traumatizing. You don't know what they're gonNA hear what they're going to see. psychic being able to connect with them. Letting them know that I'm here for them. Being short to provide that sense of security and safety I think that's what our children need the most right now, Don't be addicted to the news cycle. Be More addicted to the physical time that you can have with your family. What keeps you hopeful? Agree with S.'s point about being bolstered and encouraged by people who are willing to also do the work, and not just this perform tive Hashtag activism. There's a place for that, but I think because I feel like for many years in inverness center were kind of chatting about at the beginning before the recording started. It's almost like you know I've been talking about these types of things. For many years consistently and now welcome to the party. Everybody else and I think there's an element of Capitalism and marketing in the bottom line and you know I. Understand I know how it works the business end of things, but for the long haul was really gives me. Joy is knowing that there's people like the two of you like the people who are really willing to do the work into educate in that the fact that that's going to go out. That's GONNA emanate from us all the people that we connect with a touch beyond our children. In the beauty of technology to be able to get that message out there, so I don't focus on the negative on the sound bites in the things like that that might cause despair. I'll check in because I want to be inform, but I don't dwell on that I think what gives me. Joy is knowing that we're out there. Creating opposite energy. And we're putting that into the world, so what I'm on social media next year, content and I'm like yes. Putting those disruptive images out there like you said Vanessa that are changing the narrative. Yes, I'm going to show my kids in Paris. Yes, my kid saw the Eiffel Tower. I'm going to show that. That's part of the resistance such changing the narrative. And so that's. That's what brings me joy in hope. So Vanessa. Should things to wrap up number one in action item. Is there something we should be reading looking at thinking about I love. AKINA said about. Getting away from the screen. I actually did that yesterday we went to a forest. So action item. and. What keeps you hopeful? One action item is to really For those of us that. Are Not lack. is to call it out in I. Think don't ever underestimate the level of activism that that single. Is When you see it, you name it, you know white supremacy is lives within our families lives on far beyond just the media in all those them. So. Call it out in. And of course. Go Walk in the forest. Those things practice self care absolutely, but this is. Understand the calling it out within the loved ones within the spaces. That are not televised. That's. A huge action step in its in itself. Hopeful what keeps you hopeful? Oh my gosh. What keeps me hopeful. Is that the social contract that we all agreed on this generation? Someone is that people are mad. You know and it's it's it's. Indicative of who you see protesting why people are pets, they're not happy there. They were taught in school. We were all taught that. The constitution says that we're all created equal, and we have certain liberties, and to see that to see what happened to George Floyd on television is not okay, so it makes me hopeful that more people are are showing for America under shown up for Black People on the basis of what. We believe in to be true in country, so that's hopeful for me. Okay and really quickly. How do you guys practice self care to you disconnect, do you? Ice Cream I left the country. That is huge self care. That's tongue in cheek. That you you one. Yeah. No I think I. Think for me, honestly is to slow things down into slow. The input! There's a lot coming at us all the time in. It's literally like tennis said just stop and to disconnect. Or a significant amount of time so for me, I needed. Time? To disengage with. You know not everyone can do that and certainly not right now. But at some point, everyone should should take a beat and. Cana. What do you do? You know I think no is a form of self care I'm learning. Of Self Preservation of not extending myself. Not stressing myself out when I think back to my health and some of the challenges that I've had. When are I? Just think right before Kovac's happened. I was talking to my grandmother, my last living grandparent. He's eighty two and. She's giving me so much perspective while she always does, but especially now from. The perspective but I was talking to her about how I was feeling overwhelmed and things were preparing to ramp than everything got. Stopped. But I was telling her at the time I was feeling really stressed out and I said I wish things would just stop, and nothing would keep moving forward, and I wouldn't get any new requests, and that it would just like the pipeline just like stop amend Kovin happened, and it was like almost like home alone I wrote about on the blog. I called at my home alone moment when Kevin will up like mom. And but that's not what I meant. I did it mean this big everything. Stop with. That's essentially what happened. It was like no new requests. Everyone trading lately I. caught up on. Reading caught up on shows. We played games like we just did so many things as a family and it was like. Who have felt really good at I? Think now that things are starting to open up a now. We have the protests in were talking about black lives matter across the board. I think now that energy of overwhelmed I felt before. I can feel it coming up again. Some trying to also stay on top of my mental health I- maintaining my therapy appointments. Making sure that I have that time on the calendar. Make therapist that I. don't push that off. As much as I would want to do more physical activity more workouts. I'm more apt to do something like Jesse dance with the kids are, or if I get overwhelmed, just walk around the block. I am still pretty. Tight on social distancing just because of my health, you know with my immune system being compromised, but I think I have been really good about finding the lease to move my body to bre- when I felt overwhelmed and just kind of like. Fill myself in that way when I need to take a break But I I find between the mental health, and the no those are made to tactics from a self care perspective that are working for me right now. I had the exact same way you did. Because I thought back to all the times when I was in bed, and I was like Oh, I wish I could just like. Stay in bed and not go anywhere. Not Do anything and then when everything happened. I talked to one of our gas. Who talked about decolonized parenting which? I am going to save. You haven't heard that episodes really good. and. She. Talked about a little bit about what even talking about here about like capitalism how we feel, we need tablet things and work all the time and be productive all these things. And then when this happened, it was like you have to be home, and you have to like okay, but this I met. I feel like I manifested this and this is. Like I we have to be really careful about the way we say we want things. 'cause visits is not the way. I pictured staying home in bad all the time. Where you know. But ladies, we could talk forever and ever. So I want to be mindful of your time. I got my husband's say hello. Hiding in the room and he's just like Hello are coming back out. He's holding on the fort with the kids while I am recording, so thank you so much for sharing your experiences for sharing your fears for sharing your joys for sharing your thoughts and your time with me. We are living in a time that. Sometimes you don't even know how to describe it. I think, but thank you for sharing yourselves for being vulnerable. So tell us where everyone can find you sure. I'm at Harlem. Lovebirds across the board I mostly active on Instagram, and it's just a little piece of what I do, but in my stories you'll find all sorts of resources. And, I am at this Suma Das. M. Ama all across the board. Thank you so much. Everyone for listening make sure to subscribe. Leave a review. Tell your friends about the podcast. Follow US also on Instagram, which is apparently and politics and I know this is a difficult time, and sometimes they want to fall into despair and hopelessness but we need to take the emotions and the anger and frustration, and do some things, so let's not lose. Hope I always say love Hope is our superpower, but now I'm going. Say Look, don't lose hope and let's couple it with action so hoping actioner the two things that I want to leave you with today's.

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Ep. 95 - 6-year-old arrested for tantrum at school

The Breakdown with Shaun King

14:24 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 95 - 6-year-old arrested for tantrum at school

"On this past Thursday at a local charter school in Orlando Florida a six year old girl was handcuffed arrested. Put an police car fingerprint had a Mugshot in jailed over a tantrum she had in class is despicable. I spoke with experts this weekend. WHO said that the United States may be the only nation in the world. Where such thing would ever happen? We just just learned that the same school and the same officer did this to another eight-year-old for a completely different incident on the very same day this is is the literal school to prison pipeline and we must interrupted this is Shaun King and you're listening to the the breakdown breakdown breakdown investigators say the six year old and an eight year old were both taken into custody yesterday yesterday on unrelated charges now. Orlando Police are launching an internal investigation into this case. The United States is the the incarceration nation. It's a crisis. Our country has been so criminalised in that criminalization is so fully baked into thousands and thousands of different systems that we've now reached a point where school systems are fully permitting police police officers to arrest and charge six year old girls with crimes for behaviors that should have received a note sent home home or a simple call to her parents. Now what I'm about to say will likely surprise you yes the officer in this case Dennis Turner of the Orlando Florida Police Department. Yes he is to blame we've since learned that he was once arrested for brutally beating his own on seven year old child and has been investigated over and over again for different instances of police brutality throughout his career so yes this man Dennis Turner. Ah Yes he's problematic. He's been problematic in my best. Guess is that where ever you put officer Dennis Turner in a home in a school on on the streets. That man is going to harm people but that's why I have to blame this Charter School Lucius and Emma Nixon Academy and all of their administrators for allowing such a thing to happen. Let me be clear not only as a parent to five children but as a spouse spouse of a woman who taught elementary school for sixteen years and as a train schoolteacher myself as easy as this is to put put off on the officer. This is a major failure of this school of the teacher of the Front Office Staff F and of the principal and even of the entire Orlando City school system what's happening. Here is exactly what we see happening. Opening in all types of facets of society police officers and police departments are being used as contractors for work that they have no skill or training for this officer dentist Turner. Not only has a history of beating children and adults alike. He's not an educator. He's not an educational specialist. He has not been trained on the psychological development of children. He has not been trained on behavioral. Oh Management for children and that the school co-signed this man arresting handcuffing in jailing a six year old girl and another eight year old child on a completely different incident. It is a failure on the part of the school itself itself now. The Police Department is saying that officers are supposed to get permission from a supervisor before they ever arrest any children under twelve well but here's the thing this arrest never should have been allowed to happen in the first place and shame on every administrator there you're who could and should have intervened before you allow this child to experience an arrest shame on you. I am so angry that this child was allowed to suffer such an abuse and such trauma but this is what we see happening all over the country in our school systems and with our mental health systems we see police officers being used for school behavioral problems. We see police officers being used for mental health problems and they ultimately end up up doing what police officers do. They ended up arresting brutalizing and sometimes even murdering people who didn't even need okay to be in contact with the police. Yes call the police if you have an active shooter but when a six year old girl has a behavior problem that they called a Tantrum. The police don't need to be anywhere near that situation never ever ever. They should not have been called. It shouldn't even be an option and before I saw a picture of this child. You ask me how I knew that she was black. Let me break it down. Bring it there. What happened to this young girl. Young six year old child is a particularly black experience. According to German Lopez of VOX DOT COM federal civil rights investigations have found that black students are punished more harshly than white students in schools even when black and white students engage engage in identical or similar behavior and that black children listen to this are seven times more likely to be sent home mm-hmm refer to police for identical behaviors of white children seven hundred percent more likely black children with disabilities are almost three times as likely to experience out of school suspension or expulsion as their white counterparts again for the saying behaviors and are twice as likely to experience in school suspension or expulsion although black boys face higher or rates of school disciplined than anyone else a report from Columbia law school center for intersection algae and social policy found that black girls listened black girls are six times as likely to be suspended as white girls while black boys are three times as likely to be suspended suspended as white boys again for the same behaviors. A black girl is six hundred percent more likely to be suspended suspended young girls young black girls rather makeup less than twenty percent of all young girls in America's schools but they are fifty four percent of the girls receiving the harshest punishment in schools. Let Me Repeat Myself Young Black Girls are less than twenty percent of all young girls in America schools but are receiving fifty four percent of the harshest punishments in schools research shows that adults particularly white adults all adults see black girls as less innocent than their white counterparts counterparts even as toddlers studies show that adults believe young black girls as young as five no more about sex no more about up crime than their white counterparts. Do you see this in the minds of adults in here's what happens these young black girls are then an astounding ten times more likely to go to jail or prison as adults because of the way they were treated as children when you begin criminalising six-year-olds guess what happens they become criminalised criminalized as adults and of course they do. This poor. Young baby already has A. Mug Shot already had had her fingerprints taken has already been put in handcuffs. Put in the back of a police car sent to jail this six year old girl has has already suffered criminalization ended not only damages her. It has criminalized her in front of of all of her peers. It damages all of their minds when they think about what's possible when they think about what's deserved where necessary for black children. They've seen their six year old ear sent to jail. It's enough it is too much and it leads me to our three action steps for today today. I have three action steps for you and I would love for you to take all three listen. All of these action steps take Jake Guts. They take effort but they're already making a difference tomorrow. I'll tell you about a new action. Step victory that we had this past week. Let's let this the school and the school district know how we feel all right so here's the first action step. I call the Orlando School System Office in let them them know that they need to change their policy. They need a new district wide policy on the arrest of children in their school systems. Young young children do not should not must not ever be arrested for any type of misbehavior of this kind literally unless people's lives are being threatened. A child should not be sent to jail. This needs to stop in the truth is at the Orlando City the school system in school systems all across the country could stop this right now. Call the Orlando School System Office at four zero seven three one one seven thirty two hundred call the Orlando School System Office and let them know that you want to speak to an administrator that you have a complaint. You'd like to file that you want them going to change their policy on the arrest of children in their school systems before you call just rehearse what you're going to say you want to go back and and listen to this podcast or if you want to search it online and read more about it before you call fine but don't talk yourself out of calling the next call is also very important. I'm GonNa make these calls just like you. Let's call the Lucius and Emma Nixon Academy and let them know that they have failed l. The students they on one day. We have no idea how many students they've sent to jail on one day. They sent a six year old and an eight year old. Oh to jail on a completely different incident we need to call the lucious and Emma Nixon Academy and let them know that they failed these students and these families by allowing saying their students to be arrested and sent to jail. You can call them right now. At four zero seven four one two six nine six eight again you you can call it four zero seven four one two six nine six eight and the principal there is Melanie Harp. You can ask to speak to Melanie Harp on born administrator and let them know your complaint now lastly this personal. I'd like for you to call your school system. Call your local school system and let them know that you wanna find out what their policies are on the arrest of young children that you are a local citizen that you you just want to see the school's policies on the arrest of young children have them send you the policies and let us know what you find out at the breakdown at the North Star Dot Com. Let's get to work Dan. Bring the great again. Thank you all for making it all the way through this episode of the breakdown in if you haven't already subscribe to our podcast we'll be right back here every single weekday breaking breaking down important news stories and issues and we'd love for you to subscribe on your favorite podcast. APPs like apple podcast spotify in please please shed his podcast casts with your friends and family because our next big goal is to get to one hundred thousand subscribers and we're not going to get there without you of course thank you so much to the nearly thirty thirty thousand founding members of the North Star who generosity even makes this podcast possible. We love you all on appreciate you so very much and if you love this podcast asked and you want to support our work or you. WanNa see the show notes and transcripts reach episode. We'd love it. If you'd consider becoming a founding member of our community you can do that right now. The NORTHSTAR DOT com they not only have all of our podcast but now over a thousand of original articles and stories and commentaries from some of the leading scholars and thinkers there's and journalists in the world lastly shout thrust associate producer Asandra podcasting director senior producer Willis for their hard work on this and every episode so take care providing income.

officer administrator Orlando School System Office Dennis Turner Orlando Police Emma Nixon Academy Orlando City school Orlando Florida Police Departm Orlando Florida United States Police Department Lucius Melanie Harp principal Columbia law school center Shaun King America founding member
Kristen Howerton On 'Parenting Without Perfection'

Fresh Air

47:43 min | 5 months ago

Kristen Howerton On 'Parenting Without Perfection'

"From whyy in Philadelphia I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today, learning the meaning of white privilege from her experiences as the mother of two logical white daughters and two adopted black sons. We talk with Kristin Halvorsen. Her new memoir rage against the mini. Van is about miscarriages, adoption, pregnancy, parenthood, marriage, divorce, race, and faith. Her father was a pastor, so was her ex husband. She left the church over issues related to women's Equality Lgbtq, rights and politics. Later David being cooley reviews. HBO's New Series Perry Mason a different take on the character portrayed by Raymond. Burr in the classic TV series. This version begins before Perry Mason becomes a criminal defense lawyer. Support for this podcast comes from the Neubauer family foundation supporting whyy's fresh air, and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation. Race became a central issue in my guest. Kristen Howard Tins life when she adopted two Black Children Howard is white. She decided to adopt after several miscarriages, I she adopted a six month old who was in foster care and later she adopted an infant from an orphanage in Haiti. But by the time the adoption went through, he was three years old. After. Being told she would never be able to have biological children. She gave birth to two daughters her new book rage against the Minivan, which is also the name of the blog she created several years ago is about miscarriage birth adoption being the daughter of a pastor, and then the wife of a pastor, and then leaving the church. And it's about race and what she learned about white. Privilege Howard is a licensed marriage and family therapist. She Co host the podcast self. Kristen Howard welcome to fresh air. Well thanks for having me. On twitter, you describe yourself as a skilled catastrophes her. Now that we're actually living with multiple catastrophes, the pandemic police killings of young black men. Economic disaster how you doing. Well. I was joking with another friend. WHO's also a skilled capacitor Pfizer and we were saying you know. We've sort of been living for this like we've been. We've we've been assuming that something terrible was lurking around the corner entire lives and you know once the pandemic happened. It's like here we go here we go. It's interesting I feel like while this is certainly stressful living in the middle of a pandemic, it does feel in a sense like well. I've been worrying my whole life and now here's the thing. Here's the thing to roll my sleeves up and deal with. And then in terms of you know everything that's happening with the race conversation nationally. I mean I definitely feel like I? have been waiting for that to happen to as a mom of two black kids and someone who is just been desperate for America kind of grapple with these issues that are very apparent to us. It feel like we've been waiting for this conversation to happen. So let's talk about race. You have to biological white children and two adopted black children. Let's talk about what you've learned. As the mother of two white two black children, let's start with the adoption. You adopted your first son. After having several miscarriages in being told you'd never be able to carry to term. So! How did you decide to adopt a black baby from foster care? Well I knew that black children were over represented in foster care and I also knew that black children were. More. Likely to wait for for parents in fact when we signed up and did our foster care classes, we were told that we were one of the few couples who were open to black children. Because you know when you go to adopt, you're given this checklist and it's a checklist that no, you know parents who gets pregnant has to fill out and you have to answer these very difficult questions about what kind of child you're open to you know. Are you open to a medical condition? Are you open to physical deformities and? It's A. It's a list that you you feel like. It's kind of a test of your humanity. You know like how good of a person Emma if I am not open to a heart condition but one of the questions on that questionnaire is race, and we were open to any race and you know we were told well, it will be likely than that your place with a black child because we don't have as many families who have check that box. and. I was open to that. I have nephews who are black You know I felt at the time. Like I was well prepared to raise a black child. Now I would later learned that I was very naive and clueless but at the time. I felt like you know we can do this and you know I think we can raise a black child and make sure that you know. They are experiencing their culture, but I had a steep learning curve ahead of me. You right at first having a black son was like a badge of pride, a badge of courage proof that you were a kind and caring person, and definitely not a racist proof that that you love all of guards God's children. Can you elaborate on that for us? How did you feel at first to to have a buxom? Yeah I mean well first of all. I have to say that it's really Kranji to. Talk about some of those feelings, but I put them in the book. Because I wanted to be really honest. I wanted to be really honest about some of the mentality that I had going in because I think it's journey. Of becoming aware of my own race that a lot of white people have to be on because I'd never been super aware of my own race. I. That's what we do as white people. We just kind of think we're default we. We think that other people have a racial identity and that we are just of like this void lists. Default were even worse normal. So when I adopted my son I felt very conspicuous. All the sudden, because I'm walking around with a black child, and it wasn't that I was embarrassed. It was more that I felt like well. You know look. The world that you know love is all you need were showing the world that you know a family could look like two different races, and I just did have this naive thought that transracial adoption would be one way of. Fighting Racism. You know that if our fee that if we as a family could show love. Across racial lines that that would somehow be like a beacon of hope for racism and I think that that's a very misguided way of thinking. But I think it was there for me. But eventually having a black sun. Made you realize. The optics of your own race for the first time and your understanding of white privilege. How did it help you understand what white privilege means? Well first of all I think I had to come to terms with white is a culture and a race. You know that that. Whiteness has its own set of values of behaviors of cultural norms. You know that that we are not just a default and. Even. Think of how we use the term ethnic and we use the term ethnic to describe something. That's not white, right? Ethnic food means it's a food from another country. And I think I had to come to terms with the idea that like whiteness is its own ethnicity and culture and I had to figure out what that looked like for myself, and then I had to recognize. In in the middle of that how many privileges I had as a result of being white and Those privileges could look like something small like the fact that. I can walk into a target a No. They're going to have a shampoo that works for my hair, but when my kids were younger now this has changed quite a bit over the years when my kids were younger. I didn't know if I walked into a store if they have a section for black hair. or it looked you know and these are benign examples. It could look like. I could find band-aid that matched the skin tone of my white kids, but not my black kids. But you know then there are much more troubling aspects of that white privilege which is that? I can reasonably assume that if I get pulled over. I won't be young out of the car and placed on the ground. Even if I got mouthy. Or that I can reasonably assume that I'm not going to be shadowed and followed in a store and thought of as maybe someone who's going to steal something and you know as my kids have grown and I have to white children in two black children, the disparity in the way that the world sees them and perceives them has become very obvious to me. You describe an incident where you were hearing noises in your backyard and you're afraid it was an intruder. You call the police, but then you started to worry. What if the police officer? Saw Your Son, one of your sons and thought. He was an intruder because he was black and you're white. Can you run through white? Your nightmare scenario was there. Well you know to be honest. The worst part of that is that I actually didn't predict that I didn't have that fear until it was too late I didn't think it through, and and this would be another example of me. Sort of being confronted with my own privilege is I called the police as one does. I heard something crash in the backyard I thought. Maybe there was someone back there. Instinctively called. The cops thought nothing else. The COP show up. My kids are still asleep. They weren't willing up by the noise. And? The cops go into the backyard. And then they decide they wanna come into the house, and they come into the House with guns drawn and my son. Here's this bolts out of bed and runs to my bedroom, and I just had that realization of if these cops had been in the hallway at that time, which thankfully they weren't. They were in the living room, but if they'd been in the hallway at that time with their guns drawn looking for an intruder, and watched a black preteen who was as tall as them. Run down the hallway in a house where maybe they weren't expecting. To see a black male that could have ended very badly and for me, that was a real scary lesson in thinking through how I interact with the police with two black sons. You know that first of all. Maybe I shouldn't have called the police, but second of all if I was in a situation where it really felt necessary that I should have described the makeup of my family to the dispatcher, and then again when they arrived like I should have that should have been top of mind. There are two black children in this house. so that everyone was on the same page of what to expect but I didn't do that. That was blind spot for me. Yeah. When you adopted your second son, you wanted to make sure that the sun was black so that your first son would have somebody who looked like him in the family Casiraghi, no white majority neighborhood and Your children go to white majority's schools, and You and your husband your now. Ex has been or white so it was that helpful to your older son to have a brother who was also black. I think it's been invaluable. And I just instinctively felt that I mean I knew when I adopted my first child that. I would need to give him a racially matched sibling some way in fact when I first signed up to adopt from foster care. On that list that I described before where you're answering all these difficult questions, one of the questions is how many children are you willing to take and I'd been willing to take a sibling set up to three. So you know I kind of thought, even at the beginning like maybe I'll just adopt siblings, and then they'll all you know then they'll all have each other but we ended up being matched with one child But I felt really strongly. I want to give him. A mirror you know I want to give him another person in the family who he shares this experience with and and I think it has made a huge difference. They're very close and you know they can talk about being adopted. They can talk about race. They can have that shared experience. And, they're actually at a Like Mexican majority school that they attend, which that's been really nice, too. Because you know their school while they while they don't have a lot of other black students at their school it's a it's a pretty diverse school and so that's been helpful as well, but I felt I I remember because the adoption of my second son. We thought that it would take about a year. and. We were matched with him when he was six months old, and he ended up not coming home until he was three and a half, so by that point, his older brother Japhta was five, and so he lived. He lived with US till he was five being the only black member of our family I remember it just. It killed me because we were we were trying. The adoption was just taking a long time, and it just killed me that he was the only black member of our family, and he would say things about that. You know he would say. I don't match anyone else. Else or you know because by then I had my biological children to kind of in the middle of all of that, and he would say you know I. Don't look like my siblings. Are you all match and I don't and I found that really heartbreaking, so I was really glad to be able to give him a sibling that he can relate to in that way. So. What do you think of transracial adoption now? Have your feelings changed about it? You know I still am a proponent of adoption, but I have a lot of caveats behind that and I. Mean I I think adoption needs to be ethical. And I think that family preservation needs to be completely exhausted so what I mean when I say that is I, think if children can go back to their birth, family and poverty is the only barrier to that then I think. You know we as a society as as you know, global citizens should be. Helping, facilitate kids go back into their families, rather than helping facilitated options but for children for whom that is impossible for children who do not have. Families that are able to raise them. Yes I think children should be adopted I think that an orphanage or foster home is not an appropriate place for a child to grow up I. Think kids need the love and attention of two parents or one parent. You know of a parent And in regards transracial adoption I. You know I have CA-. Caveats that are similar to that I think you know if if someone is adopting a child of another race. They need to make sure that they have the ability. To give that child experiences of being the majority, the experiences of being in if their child is black in all black spaces, they. You know people who are adopting need to understand that you're not just adopting. A. Child, who's now at transracial adoptee, you become a transracial family, and so for us what that looks like is you know? We are involved in the black community in our community and. You know all of us, not just my boys And I think parents need to really think that through when they're adopting that. The that this is going to be something that they have to add to their lives, but I I will say this for myself. adding that has not been a burden. It's actually. Brought a lot to us. It's it's. been. You. Know something that has I think? It's added a lot of value for us to to push myself and my daughter's into all black spaces and learning to be comfortable there, but also showing the voice like hey like I'm sharing this experience of you know myself being in the minority, sometimes but I think that adoptive parents really have to be committed to that, and if they can't provide, that should maybe rethink. When you say you've been involved in the black community because of your son's with the nature of the involvement. Well, you know we attended a black church for a season we at present, the boys are involved in an organization called one hundred black men. which is a fantastic mentor ship organization and they meet every other. And they get to be around other black teens, and they are mentored by black men. They're kind of motto of one hundred black men is what they see is what they'll be, and so it's really about black men showing up, and they have conversations on everything from finances to school success. It's it's you know occupational success so it's it's really great, and then you know we've just gotten involved in when they have family activities like the Kwanza Party or you know whatever it is, they're doing. We're showing up and we're rolling sleeves up and helping and just you know being a part of. The organization in the same way any other family is. What kinds of discussions have you been having in your home about race and about the police since the police killing of George Floyd. It's interesting because our conversations haven't changed on that as much because we were already having them and I think that's probably true for most families. with black children you know for either white or black parents of black children I would hope that these conversations were already. Happening and you know it almost is is like we're watching the world. Catch up with what we already knew to be true, which is that there is intense bias against black men and intense violence at the hands of police officers, not every not every police officer about very disproportionately and so we have had those conversations since the boys were much younger of just. What do you do when you're pulled over? And how do you interact with police officers? And what do you do if you feel? You're being accused of something. You didn't do and the things that our conversations always lead back to is. Coming home safe is the priority that's the priority, and that has to be top of mind in those situations and any interaction with law enforcement. I need to get home safe and I need to behave in a way that will get me home safe, and it's really it's. It's confusing because you know we are giving our children messages around, you know. In Life in general were most parents are giving kids. Messages of stand up for yourself and you know, be bold and be assertive, but for parents of black children we then have to say, but but right like but in these situations. Don't be bold. Don't be assertive. Be Compliant. Listen to instruction. If. You're being accused of something that you didn't do. Know just be kind and so you know it's tough. It's a tough balancing act of wanting our kids to be able to be who they are and be themselves, but at the same time wanting to protect them in these interactions. Have, you and your children, the protesters Oh. Yes, yeah, and we. Were involved in protests around Eric Garner. We we have been involved in protests for a long time, but yes, we've done several. Since the murder of George Floyd. Let's take a short break here and then we'll talk some more. If. You're just joining us. My guest is Kristen Howard. Her. New Memoir is called rage against the mini van. We'll talk more after we take a short break I'm terry gross and this is fresh air. Support for this podcast and the following message come from each raid. Trading isn't for everyone, but he trait is whether it's saving for a rainy day or your retirement. Each rate has you covered? They can help you. Check financial goals off your list, and with a team of professionals. Giving you support when you need it, you can be confident that your money is working hard for you. Get more than just trading with each raid to get started visit eatright dot com slash podcast for more information. Each rate securities LLC member FINRA SIPC? Let's get back to my interview with Kristen, Howard and author of the new memoir rage against the mini van, it's about miscarriage birth adoption, being the daughter of a pastor, then the wife of Pastor, then leaving the church, and it's about race and what she learned about white. Privilege Howard in is white, and has two biological daughters and two adopted black sons. You work so hard to adopt your son from Haiti. You thought it would be simple. It was not it took three years, but in addition to that in twenty ten when you went down to visit him because during that period when you couldn't have him home with you yet, and the adoption wasn't legal. You'd make a lot of crips down to Haiti to spend time with him so during the trip like that in two thousand ten. You were there with your baby daughter. and there was an earthquake. It was the big twenty ten earthquake, and so you were with both of them at the time. As. We've said you're catastrophes. You're always waiting for the worst to happen while it really happened. If. You're catastrophes. You always worry I think and when the catastrophe comes. Will you be equipped to deal with it? Were quipped to deal with it. Did instinct work for you or did you do stand? They're panicking. I think a little of both I. I did panic a lot and I I was under a lot of anxiety. I do remember once the earthquake hit, and it was I live in California. You know earthquakes are a part of our lives here. But this was like nothing I had ever experienced. It was so much bigger. It was so much more dramatic. and I remember right after it happened having the thought of like aftershocks, there's going to be aftershocks and I think that was probably the most terrifying part of that experience is that after the first earthquake, we were then having more earthquakes. You know every hour that we're still bigger than any earthquake I'd been through in California and so just wondering you know for. For really until I until I left the country like is there going to be a bigger? One is going to be another one that topples the House that I'm in. You know we. We were knowing that there was you know mass casualties, and so many people whose homes had crumbled and so much loss of life and so I don't know that anyone could be prepared for that. No I was in a in a state of real terror for many days. After the earthquake. Your baby daughter had a fever and you knew you had to get her home at the same time. Your son, who was not officially, your son yet was still living in an orphanage in Haiti. You couldn't take him with you, so you wanted to be there with him. During this, you know horrible and dangerous period. You ended up flying home with the help of the US embassy. Tell us a little bit about what went through your mind as you had to make that choice like what to do, and what it was like when you had to leave your soon to be son behind. It was devastating. It was absolutely devastating I mean to leave him in a country that you know. And there were growing fears of you know people running out of food, and would there be you know people searching for food, and you know coming into the house. We were staying in or they were. There were safety concerns. There were health concerns. There were concerns about you know more aftershocks, and my son was living in an orphanage, and the wall in front of their orphanage had toppled, and they were sleeping in the driveway. What a LOT OF PEOPLE IN HAITI DID! Did after the earthquake because they were scared to go back into the buildings. The buildings is what buildings were. How people lost their lives for the most part you know having a building collapsed on them, and so people were sleeping outside. They were finding the place they could sleep where they were away from any walls that could crumble and so when I left him at his orphanage, he was sleeping outside, and that was the plan but at the same time I knew that Karasin I. My baby daughter she was ten months at the time at the time. We were a drain on resources. We didn't you know we were visiting? And she was sick and You know I just knew that we were better off in the states but I also knew if I came back to the states I could advocate for kids like Cambay, who were just literally waiting for a signature to get their visas, and then those kids could come to their homes in the states, and then the places that they were occupying orphanages could then be available to you. Know what it was so tragic, which was so many more orphans that were created from the earthquake. You read about how when you were finally able to bring them home and. Make Him your legal son. That you know. You loved him. He didn't initially. Back and you had to learn how to keep loving him. When it wasn't reciprocated, he missed. He missed his friends from Haiti. The orphanage was the only life he knew, and and he missed it and again like you worked so hard to adopt him, and you get them home and he. He misses what had been his home. What was that like for you emotionally? I think I had to. It was a constant every day battle of reminding myself of where he had been and what he'd been through, and not taking personally, because the truth of the matter is a child who has always been in an orphanage he was, he was taken to the orphanage three days old than a child who has never lived in a family is probably not pining for a family because they don't even know what that looks like, and he didn't. He didn't know what all he knew. His entire three years of life was group, living and group caretaking, which meant you know? He had a rotating door of caretakers, and to all the sudden. Just have it be to parents. who were probably a little more involved in his life than he was accustomed to, and there was a little more connection and supervision than he was used to. He wasn't interested at first, and I had to just constantly. Remind myself of like you know. I'm not gonNA take this personally. As a parent I, don't deserve reciprocal love. That's not a part of the contract. I didn't sign up to adopt him so that I could have warm. Fuzzy feelings given back to me. You know and I just had to love him and keep loving him. In the way that he deserved to be love and keep reminding myself. This is a child who was an orphan. Who has you know a great amount of loss in his life and just keep pushing in and keep pushing in and. Today he is a lovely loving thirteen year old. Who you know, I mean just the sweetest kid I'm told all the time. How sweet can is. Just yesterday. He was a little rude to me. And he went off to skate with some friends, and then I get a text like mom I'm really sorry. I was rude to you. You know, but the thing is even if he hadn't. Even if he hadn't come to a place of being a reciprocal, really loving kid, he would still be deserving of live and I think that was something that. I learned in you know in the adoption of both my boys is that you know as parents? We'd love no matter what. And even if he had continued to have attachment issues and was not able to attach to me, he would still be kid where the of a home and a family and love. Did you expect your boys at some point to express gratitude to you for. Taking your older son from a foster home and giving him a permanent home and a permanent family, and your younger son, taking him from an orphanage who knows what his future would have been in the earthquake after the earthquake in in. Haiti did you expect gratitude, and did you get it and do you think? It was. If. You did expect gratitude. Do you think that that was a misguided expectation? I I will tell you I did not expect gratitude and definitely pushed against those narratives, because I had done enough reading from adult adoptees, and what I heard resoundingly from people with that lived experience. Was that being? told to feel grateful for their adoption was very painful. Because adoption is born of loss, no one is adopted without something having gone. Wrong I mean someone's lost a parent and both of my boys Both of my boys have lost both of their parents and so. I WanNA honor that I. Don't ever WanNa make them feel grateful because they lost both of their parents. There's pain there. My kids are all four of them are allowed to be ungrateful as kids are, and you know they're allowed to think lame, and the you know they're allowed to just be normal kids with a normal. Non Savior relationship with their parent and I've really tried to push against any of those sort of savior narratives that can be inherent in adoption unfortunately. Have you had friends or even strangers? White people who are over eager and trying to be allies with you in your decision to. Adopt black children and to have a multi-racial family. Where I've really noticed. The overeagerness is friends or teachers really wanting me to understand that their kids don't see race or that. Other kids don't see race, and so an example of that as I can't even tell you how many times apparent has told me like. was just talking about you. Know your kids and like she didn't even notice that they were a different race or she, you know. A lot of parents want to talk to me about like how their kid doesn't notice. As if that is some proof that racism is over and. That's always a little bit frustrating. Because I think I, think his do notice color. They may not understand genetics or they may not. You know they made it understand race as a construct. But they certainly understand color, and they will certainly understand inequity. As they grow up. So. I think that's the way that I. see that manifest or teachers you know me telling a story and saying you know I think that you know. This topic is a little awkward for my son, because he's the only black student in the room. And how are you going to deal with that? And then a teacher? Saying like well, you know none of the kids you know. None of the kids notice that or read has to be taught i. hear that one a lot, too. which I think is now I. Don't know if that's true anymore I. Actually think that kids can. You know can be xenophobic. Just on their own They can exclude kids that aren't the same gender. They can exclude kids who wear glasses. They can exclude kids who aren't the same race, and it doesn't mean their parents are racists or glasses, haters. It's just that kids. Exclude that's the thing that they do. And I think I've just seen a lot of people. Try to deny that that can happen. Does the expression colorblind? Take on new meaning for you. Yeah I, mean I think I was raised by parents? As many people were who were proponents of this idea of color blindness, because maybe their parents were racist, and so this wasn't over corruption of like will were not going to talk about race. We don't even see race like it doesn't matter what color someone is and I think there's a well-meaning intent behind it, but it's also very hurtful because. We're perpetuating the idea of color blindness than first of all were not seeing the fullness of other people and their experience, but then second it gives us an opportunity to deny real experiences of racism, and to deny that people of color are having a very different experience in the world than we are. So I I, think color blindness is very misguided. Going to reintroduce you here because we need to take a short break. If you're just joining us. My guest is Kristen Howard in her. New Memoir is called rage against the minivan. We'll be right back after a break. This is fresh air for James Look Bride racism in this country has been a disease as been the cancer that has been killing us, and now we want address the problem. I mean you can't address the cancel. Cancel to you know you have it. And these people are seeing the cancer author James McBride on protests, a pandemic and his new book listen to. It's been a minute from NPR. Let's get back to my interview with Kristen. Howard and her new memoir rage against the mini van is about being the parent for children to white biological daughters and two adopted sons. So you you married a pastor and you had children. Your Circle of friends was the people from the church, and then you start questioning the church in part of the questioning was because they. The Church didn't support Lgbtq rights and you. Did you question the church about racial issues about other like social and political issues? Was your husband at the time of questioning those things, too? I think he was questioning, but I think he didn't have quite the Nag that I. Did you know he was questioning but? I just had a personality that just I wasn't okay with things I felt I felt compelled to speak up and I was speaking up. You know, and so I was frustrated with. The way that the church was treating the LGBT community, and specifically my church, because there are certainly not denominations that have been affirming and welcoming the whole time, but my denomination was not and so I was I was vocal about that I was vocal about I was very frustrated about this marriage between Christians and the Republican Party. That didn't seem to always be in line with our faith I was vocal about some of the mission's work. Work we were doing we were building orphanages, and many of the kids in the orphanage were kids that had living parents at home, and so like. Why are we putting kids in orphanages? When we could be paying their parents, you know making sure that their parents have the financial means to care for their own children, and all of this was nagging me, and I was I was I was and I was a pain in the ass. What was it like for you to be an opponent of your churches point of view? Before you left that church. I mean if your whole circle. was from the church, and if they share the points of view that you were challenging that left you pretty much alone. It did it was very. It was very lonely time because I think when you start to unravel. Some of some of these sacred cows it feels very unsafe for the people around you and we're even taught that when we're in evangelical circles were taught about the danger of the slippery slope. And you know that when your friends are pulling you away that they could pull you away. It's a very insular way of thinking you know when you're in evangelical circles, you tend to look at people either as a project to be one, you know so a potential, convert or a Christian friend and There's not a lot of room in the middle and so I think people were pulling away from me because I was I was really you know I was batting at the sacred cows, and so I did feel very lonely, and then when we, when we did ultimately leave the church, and I'm S-. I still consider myself a Christian and a person of faith, but we left that church that we've been so entrenched in for almost twenty years. It was our entire friend group. It was are worship community. It was our community. And when I left I had a season where I really did not have close friends It was very lonely in a very difficult. What's your life like now? You know I think my faith life is. I. Think I see God. A loving presence who is always available to comfort me and I think I see Jesus as an example of love and I think Jesus was for the oppressed. He was for the marginalized. He was for the poor I mean his message was so clear. That the way that we share his love is spike caring for other people, and so that is really at the forefront of my faith, and at the forefront of my faith is social justice and I think my faith informs me. As I'm for racial equality or fighting for you know lgbt inclusion, or whatever it is, it's it's my faith is in foreign me me in those things where before I feel like I was in faith circles that said the opposite about those about those issues faith circles that were hasn't it to talk about race that we're certainly not. Involved in. LGBT inclusion efforts. And now I feel like it's my faith. That actually propels me into those areas so ironically as I felt like I was learning Jesus teachings, and following them closer I was becoming more and more offensive to the faith community that I had grown up in. Kristen Howard. Thank you so much for talking with us. And! You know be well and I hope your family stays well. Thank you. Kristen Howard Johnson's new memoir is called rage against the minivan. After we take a short break David in Cooley will review the new HBO. Series Perry Mason starring Matthew Rees as the character that Raymond Burr played in the Classic TV series from the fifties and sixties, but a younger version before. Perry becomes a criminal defense lawyer. This is fresh air. Hail fear is Berg. Empty MPR's asked me another this week Bobby Burke from the Netflix series queer eye shares the secrets behind the incredible home renovations seen on the show, plus he dispenses tips on how to make the most of your space during quarantine. Listen End. Subscribe to ask me another crumb and. Support for NPR comes from whyy presenting the podcast. Eleanor amplified and adventure series. Kids love here reporter Eleanor Atwood Crafty Villains and solve mysteries travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts or whyy dot Org Sunday Hbo Begins An eight part miniseries. That's a drastic revamp of an early TV classic. It's a new take on the courtroom series Perry Mason this time. The iconic defense attorney is played by Matthew Reese from fx. The Americans Raymond Burr played the title role in the original series which ran on CBS from nineteen, Fifty, seven to nineteen, sixty six. Are TV critic? David in Cooley says the original show introduced many unforgettable ingredients, beginning with its imposing no nonsense theme song. But David says this new version is very different and very good. A lot about that original Perry Mason series based on the novels by Erle Stanley Gardner was no nonsense. Perry was stern, STOIC and unflappable. He and his legal team Secretary Della Street and private investigator Paul Drake Rarely. We're seeing at home only at work. And at work, because Gardner had been a lawyer for twenty years before writing the first of his eighty Perry Mason novels, the law was front and center. His first novel in the Series Nineteen, thirty three's the case of the velvet claws, had no courtroom scenes, but those quickly became prominent. The first of six Perry Mason movies followed a year later in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and then came radio. But it was the TV series more than any other medium that codified Perry Mason as the quintessential courtroom drama. Perry face the same district attorney. Hamilton Burger every time and almost never lost a case. And usually, the case was one when Perry got a witness to crack under cross examination. But in that first generation of TV that sort of reliable formula was comforting and very popular. And Perry Mason introduced an acclimated a nation of viewers, basically to such previously exotic courtroom terms as objection overruled and sidebar. That was the old Perry Mason. This new Perry Mason which begins Sunday on. HBO reimagined the original source material aggressively and effectively. Some changes are made to give the characters, not only depth bidding creased relevance for a new generation. And the changes all work well. Paul, Drake, who was a white private eye in the old TV series, now is a married African, American cop, dealing with prejudice on and off the beat. He's played by Chris Chalk. and well Della Street played by Juliet. Rylance is still a secretary and white this time. She's a closeted lesbian and has aspirations for courtroom career of her own. When we meet her, she's working for a veteran attorney named E be. Jonathan, who not only supports her initiative, but also tries to help Perry, the son of family friends. But. This origin story of Perry Mason introduces us to a character virtually unfamiliar from the previous TV series. This new Perry Mason returns to the era in which Gardner Road and set the original stories, the Early Nineteen Thirties. It. Also imagines mason is anything but STOIC or successful. He's living outside of Los Angeles on the rundown farm. His parents left him when they died. The farm is in bad shape and so is Perry which e be played by John? Lithgow points out when he visits Perry to offer him some potentially lucrative private I work. At some point you got to admit this isn't working out. What do you mean? Let me. Speak for the dead and say parents didn't want this for you. Still Hair you got pans on their bed. What do you want to be? Herman bagger called me last night. I. Call You, you don't answer. Her money Bagley major player boil number real estate onto the fattest bank accounts in the city. Doing with you then. Have helped him in the past. Certain business matters which require discretion and finance twenty bucks a billable hour. Man has to eat I'd say we both understand that and you need me why. Because some friend of his is in trouble. The police are involved and you're good at your job three PM in my office, so is this Perry Mason drama begins. Its hero is a Gumshoe not a lawyer. But over the course of these. Codes as the central murder case develops and comes to trial. The stars begin to a line. That goes for the supporting players of this series as well as for the courtroom destiny of the title character. Matthew Rees plays both extremes of his Perry Mason perfectly. The brooding nonconformist of so many films wars as well as the emotional orator of those stirring some Asians to the jury. This HBO reboots Creators Ron. Fitzgerald and Jones take their time guiding Perry on his new career path, but it's time well spent. If, there's any wasted motion. It's regarding the primary mystery centered on a popular Radio Vangelis list played by Tatiana Muss Lonnie from orphan black. She's good, but the pace of her segment is a bit too leisurely and some are unnecessary. But on the flip side the pace of this Perry Mason allows for some development side trips and surprises that make it a delight. Yes there is a Hamilton Burger citing before the eight hours or over, and it's another inspired piece of revisionist history. And at the very end of these eight hours Perry Mason is about to be introduced to a woman calling herself Eve Griffin. who was the name of mystery woman? In that first Earl Stanley Gardner novel the case of the Velvet. So this new HBO Perry. Mason manages not only to Concoct and eight hour origin story, but to end at the very beginning of the original tales, which means I. Hope will soon be treated to some more David. In Cooley, is editor of the website TV worth watching and professor of TV studies at Rohan University I'm Terry Gross.

Perry Mason Kristen Howard Haiti Church Terry Gross David US Raymond Burr Cooley George Floyd whyy Kristin Halvorsen officer twitter Kristen Howard Tins murder Erle Stanley Gardner California Hbo America
#AOTR   With Special Guest Host @LADdowd & Guest @Jam1p

America Off The Rails

1:24:28 hr | 5 months ago

#AOTR With Special Guest Host @LADdowd & Guest @Jam1p

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Visit Fatherhood Dot Gov brought to you by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Ad Council. Taylor and radio has advertising rates available. We have rates to fit almost any budget, contact us at advertising at K.. L. Radio DOT COM. There's nothing more predictable in life than the unexpected lightning will always strike. Hale will fall on roofs. Fortunately, there's AAA AAA has been helping members stay prepared for over a hundred years. So unusual storms fallen debris or suddenly happen, you'll be covered check check and check get the home and auto insurance you need by talking with a triple a insurance agent today visit AAA DOT com slash insurance, or stop by your local Tripoli's door. In DC beneath almost. Used to six Lonzo. At the end of year old yet though those little ds nothing else in JC people in the in the JC Brendan. Healy, Rhino. I go pallister noticed. Them. 'cause UNC Marcus nationalist what does. This coupon is. Complex. APP You can. USA, radio. News, with Wendy, king, there's a spike in Gerona virus cases in Texas governor. Greg Abbott. There is a massive outbreak of Kobe, nine hundred and instead of Texas. Today, we will have more than five thousand people test positive. Once again, as well as have more than four thousand people hospitalized because of it, but he says he's not reissuing stay at home orders. Orders. Florida is another hot spot governor. Ronda. sent us what we're seeing in Florida is really rapping transmission in that eighteen to thirty four age group, and you're seeing a lot of cases come up and granted. They weren't being tested at this level a couple of months ago. But I also think they're testing positive at a higher rate. A few states feel they. They have a handle on the virus New, York new, Jersey, and Connecticut. They're ordering people coming from high infections states to quarantine themselves for fourteen days or face big fines. This is USA radio news. One Senator is speaking out after Democrats blocked a Republican bill on police reform USA. Radio. Networks, Timberg has the story so that Democrats blocked a Republican Police Reform Bill. Bill on a key procedural vote on Wednesday. Republican senator from south. Carolina Tim. Scott Reacts to Democrats Blocking the bill. Here's the Truth and Detroit Alannah Minneapolis. Los. Angeles Philadelphia. All these cities could have Banjo Kohl's themselves. They have increase police reporting themselves. They have more data information themselves. They have deescalation training themselves. They can have duty to intervene themselves Minneapolis as well. All these communities have been run by Democrats for decades for USA Radio News I'm Timberg during an event in the Rose Garden. President. Trump said the GOP ready for reform. You're listening to USA Radio, news a classic rock star says, he's not afraid of dying from covid nineteen with more. Here's USA's Chris Barnes. Walker Sammy Hagar was recently asked by rolling stone in an interview, how he was dealing with the pandemic and the former Van Halen singer turned solo. Artist says, he'd be comfortable playing a show before there is a vaccine as long as the pandemic was in his words declining. Then he added quote, I, would rather personally get sick and even die if that's what it takes to get back to playing rock and roll, and he said, he would also rather see everyone back to work and quote if some of us have to sacrifice on that. Okay. Hagar said we all gotTa die sometime man for USA radio news I'm Chris Barnes. The monstrous size of the Sahara Dust Cloud has made meteorologist heads turn the leading edge of the Saharan air layer. Dust Plume has invaded. The Gulf of Mexico satellite imagery shows to areas of concentration with dust stretching from continent to continent. The bulk of the first cloud has reach Puerto Rico and the Virgin. Islands. Not just clouding the sky. But turning it a milky white visibility at the airport on Saint. Croix. In the Virgin. Islands dropped to three miles and was limited to five miles in. San. Juan. Puerto Rico for USA Radio News. I'm Wendy. King. You've been camping in your backyard. Cycling? Your. Living. You've been enjoying rain showers and your bathroom. CAMPFIRES on? Your. TV. Screen. You've been counting stars and birds from your window and holding family cookouts in the kitchen. Now. Get ready to go. Go on a real vacation. Take the Wilshire nearest RV dealer or at go RV DOT COM. In does he was gonNA run. Yes. INOSITOL six Lonzo zone mass. Not the, only yet. Ds. Nothing. In. JC, people. into. The JC granted. I go Palestine. Like. What he does. Not. Seem fiscal burdens, the appropriate view viewers standard. Anyway. If you prefer real mornings, shouldn't you have a real breakfast at McDonald's we get real about breakfast. That's why you can have a savory sausage biscuit with delicious hashbrowns for only a dollar fifty. It's time to wake up breakfast. SINGLE ITEM AT regular price prices and participation may vary cannot be combined with any other offer or Combo meal. The following program. Coarse. Language adult themes. Listener discretion is advised. Not. Do. This is. Came in. Keep on doing what you do, Rick. You're my favorite beverage favorite. I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass. All audubon. It's time to hear the truth about America's biggest challenges you're listening to America off the rails with your host. Rick Robinson. Good evening American, welcome to the program. I am Rick Robinson. We are live right here on K. L. Orion Radio America's podcast network, and we do this thing every Wednesday night at eleven pm Eastern as we call it around here, chat lives matter night actually at this point is chat lives matter day because now, we have morning shows afternoon shows evening shows everything in between funny thing is this all started with a A facebook page like twelve years ago, and we are now with an Internet. International Audience Speaking of international audience. We have one of my favorite people back with us this evening. You may recognize her as the voice of the disclaimer, and if I would have thought about it, we would done it live again. But we have the one the only Mitch Leslie Dow, joining us right now. Good evening Ma'am, how are you? Cleave Ning wreck. Them if you got, I'm just saying. All right. So it's based been awhile Ms. see how is doing. We've been trying to get things. We've been trying to connect again for weeks. We've been so busy. So. Yeah. So okay. Thank. We've been so busy avoiding the. And avoiding the arson and looting and the Dacha top league, they can't you. Can't get around to podcast what the girl going to do. But it's funny that you said that about the disclaimer, I deliberately didn't ask to do the disclaimer live tonight because my guests that bring along with me is a clean talker. Eat so much. Are you telling? Much, cursing tonight. Are you telling me that I'm expected to behave? Is that what you're telling now? I'm just kidding. Thing. No just employees, but that's okay. Somebody should tell me to wash my mouth. Anyway, my wife does all the time. Doesn't do any good but she enjoys. Speaking of your guest, you actually we've been trying to get this pulled off now for about the last two or three weeks because everything's going on. So I wanted to introduce because technically you're basically the special guest co host, the nights who's actually the guest coming on with US tonight. Thank you. Thank. You first of all rick because you are always open to providing a platform for me on some of your shows when I would come on and think I have something important to say and when I want to bring a friend of mine on that I think can provide a really unique and interesting perspective on a topic at hand you've always been so generous with your airtime, and so I'm thrilled to bring on another friend tonight. This is my beloved friend Paul. He is on Twitter Act Jam. One ee Jam J. M., the number one e we've been friends for a number of years, and we talk almost every day and I wanted to bring him on for two. Reasons. First of all, he lives in suburban Seattle and he grew up in Seattle. Quite close to the Chaz zone, which he calls the Chasma my as zone. Bit of perspective about that that he wanted to share. But the other issue we wanted to spend more time on is they we he and I have been having a in creating frequently conversations from perspective of. He's a black man with multicultural heritage. I am a woman of Middle Eastern descent, and so because of what's going on around us. With the national conversations about race or purportedly about race, but the subtext is about. Really Insurrection, really about Marxism really about pandering and we've had an increasing number of conversations about that and we were saying. boy, it would be great for other people to get to hear some of this stuff that we're sharing with each other, and so we I thought I. would reach out to you and I'm sorry he's read to me. I'm messing up his his twitter handle. It's jam one p. j. m the number one, P. but we'll get to that. But so. Please bring him on He has to say and he's excellent excellent to listen to. I'll tell you that the floor is yours serfil. Free. Oh. Well, thank you very much in. Italy We've had some really interesting conversations as the as the crap has hit the fan and Seattle's known for a lot of things moronic. Very but but I think we've taken a to new low level in with the Chaz. Whatever they are today. Yet. No. You know just to give it a little bit of perspective. I actually spent about two years in Seattle when I was a teenager. I lived there from age thirteen to fifteen and you know. I The people, there were I mean. They were always really great people and just. Watching what's going on there? Now, I'm just looking at the entire city on how they have credited. Marriage is basically turned back on entire zone of the city is. What you want. Like Lord of the flies out there. Well. He the. Point. I've lived in Seattle or the Seattle, area all my life and and that's north of forty years. You know with a couple of laps to boot and the people are great. The the leadership is pathetic and and if you're renting long enough to get to know him. So again, I'm telling you what I know. That you know the is. Go firing away on twitter stating that she's in charge but. In reality she advocated. You know look major sections of property, two hoodlums and. She's more concerned about saving face with with the the Contingent that are extremely far left in the citizens that are trapped in zone. It's really it's really pathetic. I will say this though. Leslie and I were laughing when the president was speaking the other day at during the rally it. He mentioned something that we had tweeted out and I almost said it along with them. He said, should he helps Seattle or should he just let it? Simmer. Right and Pollen. Said himself like three days earlier texted the president just sat what I said. Let me ask you this Paul Have you seen because I thought I saw something that the mayor is kind of starting to cave. Since there has been one or more deaths in that zone and the other thing I wanted to ask you to share is that it seems that the Republican steady and county officials are perhaps state officials, representatives. Themselves are starting to speak up and speak out. Can you talk about that? Yeah. So the the the mayor. and. Let's be clear about this particular mayor, she's not mainstream. In who she is or what she's about. All right. I think she is Lesbian married to someone living on the lake Who's vowed whose net worth is well over two, hundred, twenty, million dollars so. The her perspectives of the average person in Seattle and with the average person is going through a mouth. The average person lives with the average person wants are not connected. All right. Excellent how she chooses to live her life as her business, how she portrays her life. needs to be reject I. Mean You just you just don't. You're not you're. You're not a working stiff. So let's let's. Let's put that off. You're saying the voters really. There was a poll like I believe this mayor is lake me. Kim related to me is probably wouldn't be a good pool. No no, no, no. No. I mean not too many of us. People who have or net worth two, hundred, twenty, million dollars. not, yet, not yet not yet. So. So back to what you were saying I, think that there's a big been pushed back at i. think that she's had some phone calls either from Washington, DC or elsewhere that is telling her that she needs to start. Making some moves in in a different direction because. It's drawing light that she doesn't know what the hell she's done. She's she's she's down to two choices either she knows what she's doing and she's an absolute. She's part of it or you don't know what you're doing and you shouldn't be there i. mean, it's kind of getting to that point. Right. And? The. Zeo Effect. Right. And so you're talking about. More than a six block radius on top of Capitol Hill which is kind of the artery in Seattle if you will. It's kind of the heartbeat area of Seattle It's always been a zoo. Capitol, Hill is always kind of been. But It's it's. It's a, it's a prominent piece of real estate. Let's put it that way, and so I think she's probably getting. Communication saying, Hey, you know you need to. Make some changes because this isn't going well. and which was then two or three two or three deaths already. So, and you go from these statements about Oh. It's the summer of love look I grew up in the sixties. You can. You can slap whatever name you want on it, and you know those weren't necessarily agree times either. In. My neighborhood they were you know fires and people getting shot and those types of things, and I'm not pretending that same neighborhood, which is the same same area, same area, same area. So. I'm not pretending that Seattle is the same thing as southside Chicago. That would be ridiculous earth south. La. But. You don't have to be in the worst of the worst to know that things don't work. Right so yes. So I I was born and raised in Seattle and I. Think you alluded to it a multicultural, my mother's from England, might my daddy's from Texas and so you know I've got different lenses. Lenses which I was raised and looking at the world but. I quickly understood that the world was going to see me as black. I'm black my family that I live with and that that I grew up around or all black So. You know today, it's kind of fashionable to say that you're multi Coltie of growing up, you have one legal. And you call yourself which you like. But that's you know that's that's how you're gonNA have to work through the world. and you didn't have a choice. You one didn't have a choice of what that label was. Correct. The label was was put on you. Correct. Depending on depending on your one's personal circumstances. That is correct. Yeah. So it it You grow up you learn an and you mature and you recognize i. think it really helped me quite a bit because. Because I do have different cultures and I participated in both of the cultures and I. Living with my mom, I was raised in a single parent household. That's that's fascinating. You grow up in the inner city predominantly black. Neighborhood with a single white mom growing up. And you learn you learn a live in A. Short period rate. But but but what's what's interesting though is you also see what works what doesn't work and a lot of what? Is taught or being spoken of as supposedly working for Black America It. It doesn't work right I. Think we were talking about that earlier You know these false dichotomies and? You're. Well, you can do this or you can do that, and then you you constantly given false. False choices and as Demetrius Bright, and the best choices are the conservative choices choices, but they don't want to give you conservative choices. You know I'm going to Malcolm X. I. Love Malcolm X's. Jim, by. Paul. Because I WANNA pause here for a minute and delve into this, you know false dichotomy false choice because you just. You. Know you just talked about a lot of information and I know one thing we wanted to get into. If we get time, tonight was a lot of black children, just the majority, the vast majority of black children growing up in single parent holds, but I wanNA table that for a minute because you were you were rare in that you're single parent household in the inner city was actually with with a white Lomb but I just let's just table that for a second. But you talking about the false dichotomy, which is thing that you and I talk about it very much from my perspective. It's well you either love. It if you? If you. Think that? Islam? Is Not, necessarily the way to go for religion or if you believe that Islam Islamic terror and Islam as violence is a real thing. Then, you're Islamophobic. Rate, and so I spent a lot of years when that when that was the deal when that was the big deal on the left I, guess I'm not in fashion anymore, you all are in fashion now with. His big deal safer in the. Two, thousand. Wyan Ted two, thousand, fourteen. Then you're Islamophobic, if you you know and an end to me and I got a lot of pushback on social media. You're. You're a traitor here identity. You're a traitor to your ethnicity. How can you? Oh, you're you're an Arab who can't bear an Arab if you're not a Muslim. Excuse. You excuse you. Ricky Ricky. I'm trying to talk clean because Paul talks clean. Usually, I they say excuse you. Shut mouth. You know at it and it is a excuse me. Excuse me. Sir. Excuse me Ma'am I have plenty of life experience. With people of that faith and guess. The even the peaceful people of faith. I, think have a moral delinquency based on my life experience and a whole bunch of other things. I've seen. Let alone the extremists and the terrorists and the people with the suicide bombs and the people who were blowing up everything and the people. Let's who's going to be hall of this show about me talking about is says. Pulling down all of the Christian monuments in Syria. Magnetically. The way. Some mother. Out Are doing United States right now. So I've gone through this and now, but now you're, you're the fashionable one, you know you you end black-americans are fashionable ones to say new. If you disagree with what we're doing, then you hate those people and this is this is what's Making me a little nuts. So you're talking about the false dichotomy this this is the false dichotomy and we you and I, have been talking about is you can say Yes, there has been racism. But The answer is. Not. Shutting down all conversations, the either has been racism. The answer is not saying that. Everything is moral at every action is moral except having As long as you're saying, it's against racism anything you can do is moral. You know. Their it's it. But it it was the same for. Me, it was the same. They used us. Until. They couldn't use US anymore. I'm I'M GONNA Quote Malcolm X. is you know I like? Conservative that loves Malcolm Right I'm GonNa, tell it like it is I. Hope You. All can take it like it is. Right and I. Think. I. Think the Black Community needs to think a quite a few of them are waking up. Thanks to king face and Candice Owens and some others, right? But. They need to recognize there be a a worm on another man's Hook. Right You know. Malcolm said you know? They, they take care of everything. They WANNA take care of, and then they bring up you every four years they bring up you. Right And they get everything out of the way that they needed to get out of the way, and then they bring up you right and they do it and you vote for him. You vote for. Democrats. Your chump. Political. Chop right, and so you can take a look at a time line with black lives. Matter is last time. He saw all of this stuff, right? Well as right before an election. Oh, guess what we get to try. You know have a parade. And Jen people. Up, let people out. Her Age. I was. On. We were I was at the dollar store, the other day. Believe it or not. This is funny. I was at the dollar store and. I was a few items I needed to pick up and there was some Karen in front of me. You know. Right, not a carrot. No, not to Karen. Rick. So. There's a line on the next aisle over because the lines are going back right now, the line on the next line line over is literally going to back of the store. Well. I'm college educated. I'd like to get the shorter line. So I get. Kid. Turns around to me and says, I don't know if you heard them you. They want people to go in the other line. And I looked at hurt. and. I pointed to the cashier in front and I said, no, I'm I'm going to choose this issue. And she did not know what to do with herself. She mumbled. Yourself and. You're. Right. Now. It's like you've gotta be kidding me not only. Do you want me in this line? Do you want me at the back of the freaking store because that's where the other line is? Right? It's these false dichotomies. He's false choices is is really ridiculous and I think we need to be able to say, Hey, look. There's other choices that are going to be better choices for me at that moment, being in that line made a heck of a lot more sense than being back with the clorox at the very back of the store. On the second thing is that. I think that. The. Black community needs to recognize that they're being played for suckers. Political Chops every four years. How many people will you mentioned the state of? Washington and the Republicans in the state of Washington How many people in the state of Washington. or Republicans are now starting to point out that it's the Democrat? Party. Has Been In, control it for twenty, five, twenty, six years in some of these locations. I mean. That that's really really really a tough tough situation people. is they need to recognize who's been in charge and they're trying to get you to. Be Upset. At someone who hasn't even been at the wheel. I mean Rick does that make sense? I don't know how to answer that question because none of this makes any sense to me. But I mean I think it's a you know it's a basic. It's. It's kind of like in looney tunes where. Bugs. Bunny would hit somebody over the back of the. With daffy duck or somebody, and then he turned around and point it was somebody in a different direction. I mean. That's what we see going on here and I think that people need to recognize anything. The black community needs to recognize it. I really am a fan of. Conservatives being a more activists. Right. So like a canvas owens like. a lower bloomer. Right really taking the conversation. To the forefront. and. Demanding, answers. Because that's not what we're getting into this place called Chas Chops, whatever whatever they wanNA call themselves today. They're not addressing black issues. There, they hide behind this these issues. But behind blacks and saying, oh, we're doing this for black people, but there's no value to black people for. You know. What's going on Chaz or chops or whatever it is? Let's. Welcome back Ms. Leslie. Sorry, we lost her for a second. So I was trying to get your bag in. A. It's not a show with Leslie. I don't drop off. It's Kinda like it's Kinda like Oregon is Alexa anytime. You mentioned Alexa on the show. He is Internet dies because I don't I don't think she likes. You likes having her name mentioned, but anyway. So yeah, we're. Like I. Ask Alexa. That's why. Totally, Asi there you are trying to use nice words again because usually you would have said something that rhymed with be. No like I always use niche for Alexa and Siri. But Anyway, I'm just messing with the. Israeli. Anyway. So. Yeah. So we we. Were We. Were we were talking about the I was sharing with Rick. furstration being in this line at. The dollar store where the the Karen wanted me to go to the very back, right? Yeah. Right and You know my my thought was You know. You could have challenges. You know you're you're not paying attention to the rules. But under the current situation, all you have to do is say black lives matter I. Guess they leave you alone. You're six blocks in Seattle see I'm just I'm not a nice enough guy because if I were in your position and somebody was like I, don't think you're paying anything you've noticed, but they really want you to be in that line over there. So you want me to go back to the back of the bus, is that what you're saying? Think. That would have been nice. I know I know we. We've just now. You know air quotes met, but I've never been accused of being nice just for the record. He can't believe I. Assume. That's that's the stuff. Look clean talk and has this stuff I used to pull. Remember the borat movie. came out. Yep Okay is late or early early two thousands, right? I went with my ex-boyfriend in his daughter. In, a theater in a small theater in eastern Massachusetts, and he's like from Lebanon, right? That's and that's my connection to the Muslim family because he's we're still. Close friends, and we still consider each other family whatever we went in there. And the only seats left in a small theater for Borat with with basically where the where they put the wheelchair. So we but there were no wheelchairs in there. and. So we sat on that on that. We just literally sat on the ground and we still see above the the Seats in France and the movie was starting to nobody else was coming in and they still came and kicked us out. Oh we. We. SORTA, spontaneously. Humorous because it was Borat. We all sorts funtasia asleep complained that we were being discriminated against because we were Middle Eastern. Why why is kicking us out of this movie? Where you kicking us at nobody's coming in. What we have to really are you sure it's not because of this man's accent, you know. because. It was funny then and it's funny. Now, the left mate is you know except it's not funny to the left is tragic to the left because they're using us as human shields for their own agenda. What I share the visual that I had was being a warm on another man's Hook I. Mean they're sitting there Fleiss. Yeah Right. I did I. Did hear that just before. Yeah. Yep. You know. It's important. That go ahead, polly. No. I was just going to say that they the Liberals Social, Democrats been the greatest threat prosperity in the black, community? I mean they use you as a political trump. And, the it is no wonder people get frustrated. But then they're just given false dichotomies, the false tortoises. And I mean, you look at Senator Tim Scott just today. I, hope. More and more people are picking up on this because I think I I barely been on On political social media today. But I think Tim, Scott was before the Senate yesterday today saying talking about. The opposition to the bill that he sponsored or cosponsored regarding real police reform. Seriously seen very little of this. So I hope I'm not wrong, but I do he. He said, you know what I just realized. It's not what's in this legislation. It's WHO's introducing this legislation and he's even saying like it's It's all political analyst is exposing themselves to to because they don't want results. They want their own. Larger political ends at even when when this. Great. Or who is also a black Senator Is. Introducing stuff. It's. It's. It's because it's a Republican. It's because it's sponsored by Republicans. They don't WanNa. Do it. Well, here's a great point you bring up. And I really would like to see and I think this is one of the reasons that Donald Trump is. So successful in the black community and a across America in at large as well is that he says what he means, any means what he says. And it's and it's pretty clear. Right I mean. I would encourage Tim Scott not to dance around the issue. And, say, it's not. The problem is I'm not. You're black man. Let them. Right. He said that, yeah. Right. Problem is I'm not your black men I'm not your puppet. I'm not in your camp. I. Wouldn't be surprised if he has if he has said that to be honest with you. Well I. think that we need to have more those conversations. I? mean. They don't have to be rude but they do need to pointed. Right I think you and I were talking about the We had a situation I'm on a number of I'm involved in my community. Part of me. ECHO. No, we had a little bit of feedback that I was cleaning up on the back end I. Apologize Keep going. To. The way. Please probably, please let me introduce this. Big. Hearing dear to my heart There we don't WanNa, talk about. These issues is if racism doesn't exist in the United States against against. People of color of all colors. Certainly, we all know what a rate it exists against white people for sure. But it doesn't exist against Black People Brown people Middle Eastern people for sure are. In one thing that we wanted to bring up a at least a interesting. Anecdote that Paul has about what about racism? That is quite literally. The soft bigotry of low expectations, but it's almost a weird. Perversion of racism, and also if we have time did experienced professional racism very early in his career. But if we're running out of time if we can't be. If, we can't have much going over. This is the most poignant conversation that he and I have had. That led us to conclude that these that that that weighty. needs to be, reeducated. A. Different, than I, would. I know that's what I'm here for. So so I. I'm on a number of different boards or community boards and I think it's important to be active in your community in an active in your world. Right I. Think you know you really have to. If you want a better landscape, it's important that you plant that you'd be involved with with the planting. And during this particular situation, the most recent situation with George Floyd. You know you saw. People marching and black lives matter is being activated. Yes. I use that word correctly. They were being activated today Ed activated At a number of different businesses, immediately have to go into their think tank and start rubber-stamping there we to statement and on one of the boards I I'm I'm on. They. came. Out with this we to statement. Well I'm not the only person of color on this particular board. I am the only black person on this particular board. Now, aboard isn't racist, they're great people I love these people, they're fabulous people. They did not ask my opinion before. Wanting to rush to the presses with their statement. And, they really felt that they were giving a terrific statement they felt from their position that they were. Being supportive. But they did not ask and. Woke and Walk Right, and they did not ask me what do I think now? I'm a conservative. I'm the most conservative black man. You know that you like period kit room I walk into. Right. I say that and just. Breaking the ice with people at times now, but but the reality of it is. I didn't. I didn't get a preview nobody asked my opinion. and. So I reached back out to the other members and I said, Hey, this isn't right I. Disagree with the statement and I disagree with these statements because I reject the premise. Premise. was and the premise was that injustices being done. Well, no justice is being done. We need to understand the turns. Justice is being done in the death of George Floyd. Okay. The the policeman has been charged. The other policemen have been charged. Charged with murder by the way, not just charged with homicide or manslaughter with merv right and You know this man is also going to his wife filed for divorce and you know he's He's probably not GonNa last long imprison either right and so. But Justice is being done. This is what justice does justice in our system is you have your day in court right and he's being charged? Well, this whole idea that justice isn't being done as ally. Now, you don't like the type of justice maybe you. But. My response back to them was I reject that premise and I reject black lives matter and I reject these other statements that are are. Woven into these black lives, matter types of media matter bullet points that have become. Gas slated into our society gaslight indoors system. Right? And I was speaking to a very good friend of mine. He's. Just a great guy. Right. and. Sharing with him, my frustration e, he saw my. my response and he called me up. He says, man I am such a I'm sorry I I. I, really failed in this I. I Apologize I. I should. We should have called you. He says the reality of it is. Is I don't see you as a black person. I just see you as. Soon. Right. And it's it's my response. Why? Shut your mouth. Right, and so my response to him was. But I am. Right. That's great and and if you can picture a triangle at the apex at the very top, we connect with people spirit spirit or sold the sole right where other thing on a disappear. Right. But it doesn't mean that I i. Am not who I am. It doesn't mean that I I don't have a history. And he said, well, you don't walk around like you have a chip on your sold shoulder, right? Right Way. Again this is where I losing my mind change because unlike who taught. These crackers. That that's how you figure out who's black and not black in your sub. Conscious. and. You know, and we know who taught them that the radical left for sixty years. And in? Yes, and I think that the challenges been. that. If, a person is carrying themselves or attempting to carry themselves. Let's say tap right because we don't necessarily want to self proclaimed are chievements, but if we try and carry ourselves whether you're Lebanese or whether you're. Jewish whether you're black. Right and but you carry yourself as a person who's focusing on dignity self respect intelligence education. You're not constantly walking out on love appreciation gratitude as yes. Yes. Yes. You're not constantly announcing that. You know you're a black person. I. Mean. It's self-evident. Right? You would think. Do you think. You would think and so Mike. On my statement to him was look just because they don't walk around with a chip on my shoulder doesn't mean that life hasn't given me media would. Right. Exactly right. And we hadn't had the real dialogue about that and you said, well, you know you're just not someone who's constantly reminding and okay, that's that's fine. And there's a lot of terrific. Wonderful. Black. We're talking about the black community here in this context, right? That aren't constantly reminding you that they're black. So Thomas? Soul Thomas Gang on. Martin. Luther, King. Right. No I'm Colin Thomas came. Oh He is absolutely. Okay. So Walter Williams, Walter Williams the. Fabulous Gentlemen Right. Talk. Reminding you that he's black. All right, and these people are at Clarence Thomas Right? It's not constantly reminding you that he's Black Chemo, certainly is. And we can. We can care for the black community we can care for our for. All people, we can have a special place in our heart for our people we can. We can want the best for everyone without having to continually reopen wounds. I mean that the the the people tend to forget that Martin Luther King's famous speech was talking about the wanting his children to be judged on the content of their character, not just they're not their skin color and. Little black cells run around with little white children, right? Right. Now. Is is their challenges? Yes. Is there a gap? Yes. Is there things that we can do? Yes. Is there racism? Yes. But you know what? This side of Heaven, there isn't a perfect world. And there's not another nation on God's green earth I'd rather live. Here. Well it's the same for all of these. All of these people acting like somehow or other Sweden is better. Sweden wouldn't take these guys. Are you kidding me three? tweet. In Black? People. Black people. would. Say the same. Time tending to be black people. Right. They. Don't say they don't care. They don't get. Inches, you know who else is interested in black people Marx's collectivist and Socialists, which is weird. which is the weird stuff that. I think I need to work more on communicating over here in Massachusetts. The the. Black, lives matter being aligned. So heavily with Marxists and. Day I mean they enslaved y'all they hate you all they eight you all. Know, what black? Marxists of black people are really good for for Marxists. Bullets, stoppers. Yeah. Exactly exactly. People to be on the front line, and once again, a worm about another man took. How many black people are. in prominent positions in Marxist countries can. Write. Your good. For one thing, you're good to catch a bullet. I don't. Ouch. You know. You. Know you know you know Listen I was at I was at a in a united talked about this. And African American symposium. So these big firms will have you know these different symposium, able women symposium, they may have. A. Different. Multicultural type of symposium, the African Americans symposiums. And they're. They're generally, they're good for meeting terrific people of like mind. They're not good and content. Generally, they're not and we'll be talking about this early in your career. No recently last five or six years right. And so you know I I met Lamont Hill what a jerk, right and skinny negative. You all my mouth. Ricky. Ricky. Attention and. He's talking about Marc Lamont Hill. Oh, on cable news all the time now. I'm listening next whiny little pump. I gotTa tell you and you know the first thing needed was race based in the first five minutes. Right. And you know I'm in Saint Louis, and you know the this firm paid for this guy to come out there and I thought to myself, you guys don't really know black people. You really don't not professional black people because we wouldn't have hired his ass for nobody. Right and. At the end, he tried to sell his book called. Nobody. I was so mad I wanted, they could have hired me. I would have given away a book called something. Right or somebody. Somebody somebody you are somebody on it, look at you. You're living your grandparents dreams. You're living your great grandparents dreams. You are the answer to their prayers. You Ain't nobody. You're somebody somebody praised for you. Cried for you bled for you worked for you. You are at the. Of their drink. How. Could dare they have somebody stand up there and say that you are a nobody. Wanted say that all the way back to Harvard part, right a, it's just disgusting and once again Just like myself. Nobody's going to tell me that middle, eastern people are. Nobody in this country again during during the time when they used US numb. Excuse me, Mo? Mojo. Excuse me mothers. and. Everybody Ricky knows everybody. Who knows me on twitter knows my family came here by Christian family came here at the turn of the Nineteenth Century Attorney Twentieth Century they they all went enlisted in World War. Two. some of my cousins went into Vietnam. nobody's GonNa, tell me that we're betty because of our ethnicity or race where America's and tell us and I wanna tell you something else my which I'm learning more recently. From my mother. Hashtag. Cable News with mom if anybody wants any comedy Hashtag cable. News. With bomb on twitter She more and more recently, she's been telling me how her her mother is said to us to say used to. kind of curse what had happened in the Middle East in the more recent years with the wars which were somewhat secular, but also more Islamic related. An her her mother. My SIDDHU. Used to just sit there and say an Arabic, and I don't remember the words in Arabic, but she used to say, let them bury h other. With a hand with the hand, pushing them all. Let them bury h other. Because she knew. and Oliver, science fought in World War Two. She knew that this was the future here. This was the future. This, we need the future. Let go let them idiots berry other. This is where freedom of is where opportunity is we're religious freedom is, which is, which is what happened with us with our culture. We got all our churches from Lebanon over to here. We literally brought our churches here. So. So let me share this with. You just said something that is so. Amazing and it it just it just came to me bright. Because, you know how you and I lead. Sometimes, we kind of mull things over in our minds for awhile. Yet. K. Wasn't fascinating at President Trump's. Dress. Presidential address earlier this year, right where the Black Caucus and the Democrats, would not stand. For Record. Black unemployment they. Listed Union. The Union, right. It would not stand for record black entrepreneurship. They wouldn't stand for the Tuskegee airmen. You Know Hundred Years of age gentleman end and they would not stand for that gentleman. Right? They would ask for anything except when you mentioned with women in Congress, and they got up and they jig I, mean it was really really kind of ridiculous, right? They wouldn't stand now. You WanNA talk about racism. They wouldn't stand for record black family improvement. What is in chains? WHO's in change for who who's in through, but wait a minute. This K. and I. Think people should run with this of your twitter. You should be running with us. Right. What are they willing to do? When, black families black business and minority businesses are thriving, what are they willing to do? They're willing to burn it down obviously. They're willing to burn it down. Poly I haven't seen I haven't. One member. Of? The Congressional Black Caucus? Louis tweets or put out tweet anything or put out any. Any type of notification letter, tweet anything parlor anything in condemning the burning down of black small own businesses. I haven't seen anything about this. Loosen I? Said absolutely not. Listen, actor Ossie, Davis address the Congressional Black Congress in night to your caucus in nineteen, seventy one and he nineteen seventy-one. Hold them to stop blaming white people for their problems. He said it's not the man. It's the plan. We need a map, not a rhyming. It. Since nineteen seventy, these people got in bed with Know Democrats. Liberal Democrats and they're not interested in black people doing well there in the poverty pimps. Their. Poverty. And takes discussing if if you're watching. What's happening? They're willing to learn stuff down rather than have. This country. Move forward and have black. Entrepreneurialism of black business ownership, black families do better lag. GLAC they are Eisley. They would rather burn the place down. Or to a flip on. My bad. I. My who he had. No sorry I was trying to click on something I. Thought was a picture and all of them started playing audio that it wasn't expecting. So I had to meteoroid. It good I hope. I. Hope it was. The I. Hope it wasn't. Me Try to seduce you wreck. If, it was that I would have kept playing saying I mean I'm not gonNA fad. Why would I mute that? Anyway. Era Going? Back. Nepali. So the it's like I. It's we're we're literally living in bizarro world. Lehrer the for the Congressional Black Caucus is supporting burning down black communities. You know we're we're in Bizarro, world. We'll see what they want is if they burn it down, they say that they still get to be the arbitor In the process of rebuilding I would suggest that they. It's going to be. The process of rebuilding. Of course, is GONNA be rebuilding in the image of Marxism? But I can't imagine why. Here's the question and I know you don't i. don't think you know the answer. Think anybody knows the answer. Is Are they really. Jazz today, really just WanNa, see it all burn. So a few people can be in tower do any of them. Have any heart. For Black Americans, or is it the fact that? Are. Really. The the Tower Hungary. Careless people that Rosa. And, and just for their own power. I'm still I'm still naive enough. Be Horrified by. That still. Listen, there's not too many people. Who? Are As pure as Malcolm. Malcolm had. Right. Gay. Malcolm. But he? took. ME. Now. Treats Riley free. Please go please go. Right. Would it mean Malcolm had integrity and really what he wanted to do as you wanted to take negroes black families out of the ghetto and put them in good neighborhoods and good houses sprite and he wanted. People to have self respect, and he wanted them to have responsibility. One of the things that he said is it. It doesn't make any difference whether you. Right? You know there's no empowerment in writing at the front of the bus the back in the burst empowerment and owning the bus. Right, and he spent a lot of time trying to talk about how it was important for black entrepreneurism in the black community so that they could be in control of their destiny. Right it's not enough to say how much money do you spend? When I was in banking many years ago, people would say, well, you know how many might how much money I run through your bank? And my response was. So it doesn't stay here. Right like somehow or other I'm supposed to be thrilled that you know you spending a lot of money. Right and There's I understand the. People of wealth really do understand. It's not the spending of money. It's the it's. It's the having of money. Have you ever noticed in advertisements? Having of money, it's how you use the money game. Sure say, for example. If. If you haven't, let's say. Let's say there's a nutrition company. I won't say their name, they're great company, I like them, right. Talking. About right. K.. And they'll give you a one time discount for mentioning somebody's name. Right? And if you don't buy anything from them for awhile, guess what they do. They'll start sending you emails. Would you like thirty percent off? Hey, would you like another thirty? Shipping on top of that, right? Yeah. The value is the fact as long as I got money in my pocket, I'm having the there are people or businesses are willing to make adjustments for me to spend money to them or or by the right. Right. And that's that's always how it is. I? mean the best box seats at a golf match. Will hold on. It wasn't a say as That that the the the best seats in a golf match or at an event aren't for people that are spending the money. Is for people who have the money. Michael. Jordan was playing against. Gary Payton here in Seattle and how they jack they, they draw on the court and Gary Payton was telling Michael Jordan Hey. I got money now. I'm buying Lamborghinis and porsches. To and Michael's response. was you buying us and he says, yeah, he goes I get mine for free. What people need to remember understand. Is that the power and improvement comes when you're an entrepreneur. And you have control over your expenses. and. Quite. Unfortunately. The black community has figured that out as of yet Selah. So what you're trying to say is to relate from business to To the the vote if you will to the power of the community, is that the black community? If they want change if they want change yet, the need to activate themselves to say, we're we're not gonNA, take this anymore. Yes, and Donald Trump I don. Donald Trump said that he said, Hey, look, you are taking. They are taking you for granted, right? Bright. Why don't you demand some things and I think I think this is happening. I don't. I. Don't think this is happening at a pace. That is I. Thought. It was happening at a great taste poly. But. Now. It has to happen at a pace to come back. This crazy lefty taste for them going insane, and I'm not sure that that's going to match that. I. Hope it does. I. Hope it does you know my my main focus is I want. I want the black community to question. Why they are activated. Every four years at the end of a four year cycle. in. In. In these, Democrat. States right. I'd like to see. conservatives focus on. Activism. Really being able to like. We were talking about earlier Give it back to them. Really take it to them rather than just focus on leftovers. Rate. Fan. Right. I'd like to see. People really be able to focus on the things that are most important in their lives and for me, and for you know, that's our fan. And is this good thing among bright, and what's what's good for our family long-term? What's good for the family long-term isn't necessarily what what we're being told or what Democrats would have. Be told, Hey keep me in power. It's good for me I. Don't know why it's good for me most of these places that are having these issues. Democrat run states. Yeah, I, think this is something actually I think is the number. One thing that most people don't know. It because. Actually is a very important point that has been brewing in my head. Coach. So many people on the ground individuals are just are so dumb and uneducated they. Just, they're educated by the stupid media and they don't realize the fundamentals of governance in the country. So, right. Most people don't understand that it owes historic racism and what we all know because where in this because we're in this. Game. We all know, hey, all of this shit where everything is burning has been dominated by Democrats for decades. That your average person doesn't know this. So I think there needs to be a renewed. Effort I just wish there could be like a nationally consolidated effort for communication about hey, is the soiling green is yet yellow. Hey, hey. Let me trademark this right out the soil. Green. Is You fucking people oh shit. Sorry Paul. You just doubled down with it. This only. People, and I think there needs to be somebody who has money say remond late. Like, remind all these children. that. On all of this crazy institutional quote. Unquote institutional racism stuff. Has Been. Managed, by Democrats four decades. Downs I think that's I mean I. think that. And I've always been one to say. A, we need to take this out from the roots. Everybody knows the triumvirate of laughed the leftist hold on our culture, the Hollywood, the education and media that you know. I'm trying not to be. Dad and depressed about our prospects. I'm trying not to be but. We'll see I think it's important to encourage people's that's kind of my style, right? We know that? Right And you know Malcolm said, you know you've got to be careful because they'll try and put your mind in a bag and take it wherever they want. I think. That's what the Lord said Do. You. Know which you know, right? Right, and I think it's important. You know for for people to recognize what's best for my family, Larry elder son a really terrific job. Over. Absolutely of reminding people that you know the importance of fathers in the home. Right, and if you really want to change your trajectory. Fathers Need to be active in the home. Right, and that's something that's a real challenge in the black community If you want to protest something protests planned parenthood. It's only you only find those minority neighborhoods right and I. I can't. We have no time to go down the road of planned parenthood you now that is it. Here's the thing there is still many. Leaks in the dam. that. Each of us wishes, we could put our one finger in you know, and perhaps we need to think about. We need to think about how to organize each person to put their one finger into their one leak in the dam. A major in boggling overwhelming, it seems overwhelming. Right? You know and how can each person but there one finger into that one league in that? Damn of crazy leftism leftist-marxist. Well I think the number one thing is fatherhood. And that's that could be a topic for another time and another place thanks sport I. Think it's so important. Right? Fatherhood has been under attack for years Fatherhood community, and also not for nothing also in the. In all of Western, Society for the old Westerns reason. Right. I mean and I think that. Leadership. As I as I is, we probably wrap up here I've had the opportunity to mentor. A number of really terrific young people. I mean, they're fabulous and one person individually. particularly said this, he said At Mister Paul. He said. Our generation and this is the word that he used is starving. For mentorship. Starving, from to ship. and. If we abdicate fatherhood or. Mentorship to the left. We're going to lose the next generation. We're, GONNA, lose ourselves in the process because the calming on all of us as leaders is leadership, the reward ganor ship isn't money. The Lord of leadership isn't fancy things that leadership Schwarzkopf said was the reward of. Leadership. itself, and so if we advocate our position of leadership. You. Know we were not only damaging the future, but we're damaging us now and that that that's that's something that we really need to Do we cannot abdicate I. Think Conservatives do a really good job of making the country work, but unfortunately, politically their. Culture. Culturally They're willing to let somebody else do the political or cultural work and rattler were. And it doesn't work. It doesn't work. Back to you, Rick. I've just kind of let you guys ran away with this. You guys were doing. Great. So I just kind of stayed out of the way and ran the buttons I in case you didn't notice. We also didn't take any break. So you've got a really long extended tonight. So. Thank you I didn't. Want to interrupt you guys were doing so great. But anyway, so got lots of great feedback from the. Actually both welcome back anytime. But we probably should start wrapping up because I have to be up. I have a morning show to do in a few hours. is so much first of all. Thank you so much for having US vote and thank you for letting us go over time. Now the. Big Doodo. Don't have don't have merely busy day tomorrow saying a few minutes later. Tonight won't kill anything. But. Again, why don't you guys go in and give out any contact information you'd like to give out while we start wrap this thing. So people can figure out where to find you. All. Right. Well, I am a certified raves. Sunshine has died. I'M ON PARLOR AT LA doubt. L. A., D. O., W. D.. and. I'm also on twitter over there. And I am at jam one P on twitter and What am I? Leslie. What am earlier? Under. Go over the parlor right. I'm at Jay, mocking? J. Two J mocking Jay to at Parlor. Realized I wasn't following you on Parlor Leslie. So how to fix that? It was like, wait a minute. We're all just building our own foundation on that. They're very much. But we're all. We're all going to be out there soon in out of. All right. All right. So that's going pretty much this particular episode of America off the rails want to thank everybody for taking the time to tune in for the chat lives matter. Extravaganza wanted to thank my special guest co host and my very special guests. You guys did great and actually I made a decision about ten minutes when you guys just took off with it. I. Those, we not in the chat, you might have missed it, but I basically told the Chat I'm gonNA produce as run with it because it was awesome. So we're GONNA, get out of here for the night. We'll be back soon. I. Actually. I'll be back. Seven eastern because I gotta do this all over again, and then That's going to be it for me until Friday night basically. But don't forget a Friday night. We have juxtaposition the every two weeks show where we take a break from politics and talk about everything weird kind of a shoutout to the old coast to coast. AM before George. noory kill. So make sure you tune in for us with that there. But at this point, we are going to get out of here because I know you guys hate to hear this, but this show is now officially. Over Over. Over. Over until decided this, was it over when the Germans bombed. How Closing time. Open all the doors and chew out in two zero. Closing less great. fucking. The plug. Dame de. Time for you. In Dizzy beneath. Innocent But. At the end of year building yet though those bs nothing nails in JC people into. The JC? Penney. I, Go Patterson. Like us. On those modesty interschool bonus, rich envious standard. Is. You join us, but they used to let. In Tacoma in, JC? Extraneous, inositol sixth. Mass but. At the end of. Yet though those bs nothing else in JC people in the when the JC Brandon. Memos, I go Palestine. Them, like I said. In this coupon is the appropriate view is standard complex. You can but Basin Latino.

Black Community Seattle US Donald Trump America twitter President Paul Congressional Black Caucus Malcolm Ricky Ricky USA Radio News US Department of Health and Hu Rick Robinson Texas Senator Tim Scott Jd Power Washington senator Carolina Tim
Final Word - Linda Brown

Words Matter

11:43 min | 1 year ago

Final Word - Linda Brown

"And. Welcome to words matter with Katie Barlow and now katie's final word. Linda Brown was in the third grade. When her father Oliver tried to enroll her in Sumner elementary school into Pika Kansas Oliver and his daughter Linda were denied admission to the school that day. The year was nineteen fifty Sumner was an all white school, and Linda attended the school for black children across town separate but equal ruled the day in America at the time the idea that states could educate black and Brown children in one school and white children in another as long as the education was quote equal. But the moment Linda was turned away sparked a series of events that toppled the idea of separate but equal and led her all the way to the steps of the supreme court of the United States. Linda's father was the name plaintiff in the seminal case Brown v board of education where the supreme court famously struck down separate but equal and said that. Segregated facilities deprived African American children of a richer fairer educational experience, even though that ruling change the course of history. It took years to take affect and some say the decision still hasn't fully reached every corner of our country, but Linda became an icon, a symbol of hope and dignity and the opportunity for so many Americans who were denied the full rights and privileges of citizenship and lend a use that status. She used her own symbolism to speak out about segregation. And she even reopened the Topeka case with the ACLU arguing that topeka's school districts were not desegregated, and guess what she won in nineteen ninety three when the court of appeals agreed with her then the school system built three brand new schools as a part of the integration effort. So today's final word goes to education pioneer and brave third. Grader Linda Brown. It all started for me on a balmy day in the fall of nineteen fifty in the quiet Kansas town of to Pika when a mild mannered black man took his plump seven year old daughter by the hand, and what risks four blocks from their home to the all white school and tried without success in role his child the child of whom I speak was I Linda Carol Brown, and my father the late Reverend Oliver Leon Brown that parents into PICO theft that the day of trying to enroll their children in the school nearest to their home was long overdue. Many were the evening smart. Father would arrive home to find my mother almost in tears because I get halfway to the school bus stop, which was a seven block walk from my home. I could only make half that walk because the coal would get too bitter for a small child to bear. I can still remember starting that bitter walk and the terrible Cole that caused my tears to freeze up on my face. I would return running as fast as I could. I had to cross the very busy avenue in order to catch the school bus, which would carry me more than two mouse across town to all black Monroe public school. These were the circumstances which so angered black parents, my father pondered why? Why should our children have to travel so far to screw facing? Unbearable winter weather waiting for the overcrowded school bus to carry them. Some two miles across town when there is a school only, four blocks from our home. Why why must I have to spend time trying to explain to my Chow that she cannot go to school with her neighborhood playmates who are predominantly white native American and Hispanic because her skin is black. In the face of this discouragement, he along with twelve other parents met with the local in AA CPA and their lawyer Charles s Scott, a local attorney to make plans for each family to try and enroll their child in the white school nearest their home during September nineteen fifty. After trying in Rome and being turned down a suit was fouled in federal court in February of nineteen fifty one doing the following July. The federal three judge panel heard testimony from my father along with several of the other parents who agreed that segregated schools for blacks were an equal. I along with my father head to appear in court, but unlike him, I was not asked to appear on the witness stand. The case was argued before a three judge federal court into Pika and was decided in favor of the board of education, and it segregated elementary schools into Pika. The issue was not so much integrating public schools to improve the quality of instruction. But rather the inaccessibility of the neighborhood schools that people were able to live all over town. On but could not expect to send their children to the schools coast to their home. At the supreme court level. The case was consolidated with similar cases and argued in terms of the psychological damage brought about by segregation in public education experts from the psychiatric community were pulled into examine whether or not segregation in fact, serve to break the youngsters morale and block the development of a strong positive self concept soy's -sential to educational progress. My family became last in the turmoil of than suing years years that scarcely touched test. We lived in the calm of the hurricanes. I gaze ING out at the storm around us and wondering how it all in. I don't think my father ever got discouraged. But at this particular time, neither I nor my parents knew how far reaching this suit would become. During the next three years while the now famous decision was in the making my father was called into the ministry. He received a charge in the fall of nineteen fifty three and the family moved to the northern part of the city where we became the first family of the Saint Mark AME church. I was transferred to the all that McKinley elementary school in north to Pika again facing the same situation of having to walk twice the distance. It would have taken me to reach the all white school, just three blocks from my home. Time stood steel as the highest court of the land pondered over Brown versus board of education until an afternoon in may of nineteen fifty four when I was in school, my father at work and my mother at home during the family earning and this Ning to the radio at twelve fifty two PM than nouncement Cain, the court's decision on ending segregation was unanimous. My mother was overwhelmed on returning from school. I learned of the decision which at that time. It only to me that my sister's wouldn't have to walk so far to school. The next fall that evening in our home was much rejoicing. I remember seeing tears of joy in the eyes of my father as he embraced us, repeating thanks be unto God that night the family. Attended a rally given by the local N double ACP and held at the Monroe public school. The following school term was so very different. But not for me because I was never to benefit from the now famous decision for during the fifty four school term I in junior high school, which was already on an integrated basis as were the high schools in the city. The latter. Fifties found my family living in Springfield, Missouri. Where my father held the pastor of bitten avenue AME church at this time newspapers and magazines began to follow up on me and my family because the significance of the supreme court decision. Which carried our name was beginning to really take whole throughout the country. It was during this time that I inherited Metcha the recognition that might have gone to my father had it not been for his untimely death in nineteen sixty one at the age of forty two. If he had lived. I'm sure he would have become a strong civil rights activists in the movements of the sixties. Little did he know that years ago when he stepped off the witness stand he stepped into the pages of history. I didn't understand what was happening then. But it was clear that Brown versus the board of education was a necessary victory. It might have been a little slang. But it served to set off a mighty fine. To me. The impact of Brown is best seen in the increasing numbers of black professionals today. These are the people that after nineteen fifty four were able to have some degree of choice. This surely made a difference in their aspirations and their achievements. I ran across a quote in a new book by one of our black women Arthur's her and her name is Mildred pits while tres that I believe says it all is not the treatment of a people that degrades them. But their acceptance of it. Thank you. And by the way, the lawyer who took Linda Brown's case to the supreme court that would be future supreme court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the first African American to take the bench. Thank you. For listening to words matter. Please rate and review words matter on apple podcasts and other podcasts providers.

Linda Carol Brown all white school Linda Linda Brown Monroe public school Sumner elementary school McKinley elementary school junior high school Pika Kansas Katie Barlow topeka Oliver United States Sumner America Saint Mark AME church ACLU Justice Thurgood Marshall Cole apple
The Hart Family Tragedy

True Crime Brewery

1:38:03 hr | 5 months ago

The Hart Family Tragedy

"True Crime Brewery contains disturbing content related to real life crimes. Medical Information is opinion based on facts of a crime and should not be interpreted as medical advice or treatment. Listener discretion is advised. Welcome to true, Crime, Murray I'm Gel and I'm Dick. The family portrayed on social media by Jennifer hearts seemed perfect, she and her wife Sarah were progressive and loving couple with six adopted black children. Pictures on facebook showed two MOMS giving their disadvantaged children. A Better Life never mind that the pictures looked very pose, and the children were rail thin. Real life for the heart children was actually far from perfect. A trial of abuse followed the family from Minnesota to Oregon to Washington. Until Jennifer heart drove families suv off a California cliff. Join us at the quiet and for the heart family tragedy. This is a case that is a disturbing example of on check child abuse failures in the foster care and adoption system and a society that doesn't value children enough to intervene on their behalf. In, the Final Analysis Jannine Sarah Hart were responsible for the children's deaths, but that certainly doesn't mean that there was no way this tragedy could have been prevented. And what have we got for today? Dick, we have a beer from one of my favorite California. Breweries it's called. The brewery and the beer is called. Mash Mrs an English barley wine. It's twelve and a half percent alcohol because van, so it's definitely super. The beers a pretty red colour Kinda Ruby, red, little tiny ten head. Nice Aroma of Biscuit Karen Mel, Burnt Sugar and Oak. The taste is wonderful Caramel toffee. Though Biscotti the Noah and Seneca which is hardly noticeable. This is just too big, beautiful beer and joy it. I really can't wait to try it of never had this one. Have you had this one before or yes, yeah you like it. All right well, let's open it up. Who It is pretty smells good Taylor. You'd like that, yeah. Well Hey. Why don't you bring it over here to the quiet into our spare bedroom, okay? Well moving who ten feet or so and now this is a case actually that I've been following since it happened when I heard about I was quite shocked as most people were. But you know what really didn't shock me. As the whole social media aspect because you know I'm not a real fan of social media. It's something that I do a little bit of for the PODCAST, but I'm not really a share on facebook and all the other media so. That's an understatement well. I just feel like it can be very exploitive is two children, and here we go, of course it could be. So, I think that there's a fine line. Between sharing some cute things your kids did with some friends online and exploiting children, and I feel like Jenn heart when over that line and actually fooled a lot of people. Yes, she did I mean I think if you just watch the entry? And here are the the friends facebook friends that are talking about her. You can see. There's a little bit a bias. Makes you, WANNA throw up to be honest. But why don't we go ahead will start from the beginning and go over this case for people who haven't heard about it before with do there. So John Hart and Sarah gangly. Both lived in small towns and South Dakota, while they were growing up. Jen was in oldest child. She had a little brother. From a young age, she was a leader. I can't take her. She really like being in control. Jackson Huron South Dakota. Sarah's from big stone city. South Dakota they in college. Northern State University in Aberdeen. Agenda in graduate and she'd been arrested once for shoplifting, two thousand and two Sarah. Did graduate with a degree in special education. Right so I think Jan had gone to another college for a couple years, maybe junior college, not sure which one and then she went to the university and still didn't graduate. So I think from the beginning, Hair Janice, the one that has more issues. And she continues to be the one with more issues. It seems although I'm not going to let Sarah off the hook either okay. As. We said they are a couple of before. They became a couple or became known as a couple. They call each other friends are roommates. When say come out Sarah claim that their families and friends were critical of them were actually disown them. And then in two thousand, one Jan actually stopped speaking with her side of the family. As we said when she was angry, she knew how to hold a grudge. Geno is said that she was disowned because she is a lesbian, but her family would deny that. They said they would support her and didn't mind that she was gay. For whatever reason Jenin Sarah isolated themselves from everyone and moved to Alexandria Minnesota. And they're they both took jobs at her burgers. She's alleged department store in the town. Yes Oh! John was the more outspoken of these two, and she worked Kidney Juniors Department. And Coworkers described her as funny, but maybe a bit caustic. General to break the rules and get attention. And once she complained about the nipples on the stores, female mannequins being sexists, so she took a hacksaw to them and remove them. which was of course, destruction of property didn't go over well. and. I don't know if that's because the male mannequins didn't have nipples. They did and most of them that I've seen. Your nutritious from looking at this at face, value with the problem is then unless there were no nipples on the men. Either happy, but you Sarah seemed to balance things out, and she was more compliant with the rules in very focused on succeeding in her job. I mean even though it was just retail, she did want to become management. So in Jenin Sarah were in their mid twenties in two thousand four. That's when they took in a fifteen year old black girl as a foster child. They applied to be certified as foster foster parents when a friend was having problems with the teen in their hair and Jenin Sarah decided they would be a place home for this girl. It's a little unusual for people so young I would think new tourneys. Yes, you're the lot to take on. Of course. We know they'll take on a lot more than that, but actually they didn't treat this girl very well. It would turn out. No according to people who worked with the couple. Shannon Sarah began complaining about the girl almost immediate. Now it really disturbed their friends to hear them criticized girl, saying she ate out of the garbage and things like that and according to Minnesota Child Welfare. The girl had adjustment problems with the hearts after being in their care for a few months. One of the breaking point issues get this, was it? The grill used wire hangers and is something that Chen didn't want her to do for who knows what reason, but she used wire hangers. Yeah I, read about the wire hangers and I said that just seems too much like mommy deer. Strike the movie about Joan. Crawford, no wire hangers, but actually if you look at the Minnesota dhs records, it's true it's in black and white was an issue. But it really seems like they're in their mid twenties. This girl's in her teens. It was almost like mean girls picking on her. So even though the girl had some high hopes hit turned bad. In an interview with this girl who's now a grown woman in her twenties. She said that Jen was the one who she argued with the most. and. Overtime their disputes became more and more frequent, and it was oliver minor things. She remembered so one day the three of them went to Lambofield for Green Bay packers game and they brought. Football's hoping to have them signed by a famous running back. Amman Green and Jen was really a big Fan. And when they approached Green after the game holding up, their football's green only signed the teens football. Which I think is pretty normal, right? They're going to respond more to a child than an adult assure, but generally held this against the girl apparently, and wouldn't talk to her. For days was mad at her about it, saying she was hugging all the attention. Your yeah, very immature, and and another could we say? His stick at this point, maybe her selfish at least, yes. So in later years, people would say that the heart children were kept isolated aside from music festivals and rallies that they did together, and this girl could relate to that. She said she was upset a lot because she couldn't leave the house to go. See Friends or do anything unless she was going to her job or going to school. When she asked the couple of she could see friends. It was always the no show always had homework or chores to do, and also the hearts told her that she had a home with them until she went to college, but then they really just dumped her without any discussion. One day they dropped her off at a therapist's office and never came back for so as you can imagine, this was really traumatic and hurtful, and she's already been a foster child and gone from place to place, and then they just dumped her. She thought she finally had a home, so she was devastated because they've been telling her that they were bringing home three younger foster siblings, so she'd have a real family. She'd be a big sister then before these other children moved in, they just got rid of her. and. So what? They feared that she wasn't in their plans anymore should incident with this new family. You know it's really hard to say. I would suppose but I think there's just a real darkness there that nobody knew about, and it was already there that point. There's something dark here certainly. Her interest, just the dealings with his fifteen year old in holy cow. It's bad. Sign the UP, and in two thousand six Jenin Sarah took in three siblings through the Texas fuster system. Marcus was seven. Hannah's four and Abigail is to now. These kids were considered hard to place because they needed to be placed together and because they were black yet. Apparently, there's just so many black children in the system that it's harder to find placement for them. And they turned to placing them. I guess with just about anybody I'd have to say his. These don't seem equipped, so there's really a flaw in the system there that we can see right away. But Jen did quit her job to be a full time. Mom and this left Sarah's the sole breadwinner. By you know. She didn't make a ton of money. But they did also get some adoption subsidies each, so you get money from the foster care system when you take care of foster children, and of course, their health insurance, and all that is covered, and then even after they adopted them because they were foster children, they continued to get money until they were eighteen. Which is something I? Didn't know I knew for foster children. You did get expense money, but I didn't know about after the adoption that that could happen. See we learned something. Yeah absolutely. So after they took, these kids in Gen became very active on facebook. And ten years later. She posted about her first night as a mother of three. Now in this post, Jen's very dramatic, and she's describing multiple issues with the children. Abigail urinated everywhere. And guest, Your Chin by falling down the stairs, Hannah smeared feces on the wall and gorge yourself with food until she needed the Heimlich and had episodes of projectile vomiting. Marcus she said hit his head on a classic wall, and in multiple voices claimed to be possessed by demons. But she and Sarah. According to her facebook post number committed to healing the kids over time. If not us who she wrote, yes, excuse me Ma'am but eerily setting yourself up as a martyr, right? Yeah, he also gotta remember. This is posted ten years later when the kids were teens right, which is even worse right and if they saw this post would be pretty humiliating for them. Share I mean you're basically an expert on teenagers. So can you see how this would affect them? If their peers saw at, or you'd be mortified? Yeah, it's their whole world really would be shattered by that plus I mean. Why does anyone need to know that unless you're trying to build yourself up to look like a martyr? Yeah. At the very least gen was over sharing well Yana worst. Making some big exaggerations or even lies. Yes yes, but not long after that Sarah and Jen had a photo of their family of five on an adoption agency site. And now they were asking to take in up to three more children of any ethnicity up to eight years old, so they would take in five year old devante and his younger siblings Jeremiah for Sierra Three. And this was in the spring of two thousand eight Sierra Devante Jeremiah had become wards of the state in two thousand five along with their older brother Dante. Who I believe was ten. Their Mom Sherry Davis had this long standing drug issue. and. She was addicted to crack cocaine. At the time. The stated documented several instances of neglect by Sherry. So it's believed by everyone involved that removing the children was probably the correct decision that point at least Sherry. Had lost custody of her two boys in two thousand four, when they were infants, and both boys went to live with Sheri's husband Faneuil Davis Nathaniel love these kids even though they weren't biologically his. His, and even though he was on disability, he didn't use what little money he had to take decent care of them, but then when Sierra was born in two thousand five, the Texas authorities took all three children and Nathaniel Davis would say it's because of his relationship with Sherry that they believed he might leave them alone with Sherry, or she had too much control in that situation and she was losing custody. Yes I, guess from. The Department of Social Services standpoint that in west. Sherry anywhere near these kids. Yeah which I'm not sure if that's fair, I can see that. She probably was not able to care for them, but sure I don't know I kind of feel like. Maybe they still could have some kind of relationship with their mother. Some kind of supervised visitation I don't know it just seems like the efforts really weren't put into keeping a family together, or at least keeping them connected. It was more like let's take these kids away and give them to this. Nice wait lesbian couple. So I'm not sure where that came from, but it might be the way the system is. Or was it that point although I have no evidence that it's improved. So over the next eighteen months Texas, child welfare services placed the children in foster homes and shelters, and then in June of two thousand six PRISCILA Selah Stein agreed to take them in. So. PRISCILA, the sister of Jeremiah and Sierras father filed a petition to adopt the children in May of two thousand seven. She even moved into a bigger home, and she was able to provide clothing and toys for them shed had a steady job. She wasn't into drinking or using drugs at all. Basically she was home unless she was at work or at Church. No criminal record whatsoever priscilla was a little older. She was fifty six years old when the four three and two year old children moved in with her, but she said. said, having the kids around, gave her energy, and kept her young and active, but then she made a poor decision, and this decision made by Priscilla. Just six months after getting custody changed everything, and she was never given a second chance. Yes, she had been called in for an extra shift at work, and she didn't have childcare arrangements, so she left the children with their mother, which is a no no, and by chance a social worker visited the House that day and saw that the children were in the care of Sherry Davis. So we're. We've broken the rules now later. PRISCILA would clan the. She didn't know it was a violation. Nevertheless, that very same day Sierra Davonte and Jerry. Meyer were taken into state custody. So you can see that Priscilla clearly made a mistake, but I. also wonder if the State's response was too much. Maybe they could have given her a warning. What do you think? Well, I'm not sure how the service is run, but it seems to me. That have a relative caring for these kids to pretty stable home. They've been there for several months seemed to be acclimating pretty nicely. I seems like a quick decision to take them and not give them back or not. Give her a second chance or anything, right? I feel like there could have been a warning or some education, or maybe some more childcare resources given to this woman. But then on the other hand, did they just happen to come on a day? When Sherry was watching them, or is this something that Priscilla had done before not sure no, 'cause my experience. You don't just catch someone doing something the one time they do it. There's usually leave. It's happened before although I obviously have no evidence of that, but I still think that this quick and dramatic response was very different from the responses to future abuse complaints against the hearts. Wasn't it? Yes, so was this difference? Because Priscilla's black in the hearts were white. A lot of people think so and I certainly can't believe it was at least part of it. COULD BE I mean if they had this nice young couple who already are adoptive parents of three kids? Wanting to adopts more yeah. I mean it's absolutely wrong. I think that the main goal is supposed to be to preserve the family if possible. So, if a relative wants to take care of them I think every opportunity should have been given for that. One would turn. And Priscila care quite a bit about them. She didn't give up. She hired a lawyer and she fought for custody. But the state of Texas was moving right along looking to find a family to adopt these three younger children. So they said the oldest Dante wasn't adoptable, because he needed placement in a mental health treatment centre, and this is according to Priscilla's attorney. However other articles I've read have said that the hearts didn't want the older boy. Because remember they'd set on the website. They wanted children eight and younger and Dante was at least ten at that point at the same time. He did have some issues, so that's uncertain. You ever to right I mean they had the issues with the teenager? And they didn't want an older kid shar. And I can see a lot of. That's control because you know once, kids are twelve or thirteen. It's really hard to maintain that control. Most of them are going to rebel. Sure some extent right well and kids that have had issues and been through foster care are more likely to have issues as they get older absolutely. So only a small percentage adoptions are across state lines, and when it does happen a caseworker in the state where the adopting family lives has to do like a home study and review the adoptive parents, criminal histories, their daily lives and their employment. You know how they're paying their bills. Then child welfare agencies in both states have to approve the placement. It shocked me Dick to find out that there's no federal oversight on out of state adoptions. Are you shocked by or did you know that I didn't know that? But I don't think that's a huge big deal. As long as Things are done state by state appropriately yet, but if the states aren't communicating properly right well, then you have a primary, and you have a big problem and federal funding for each state's child. Welfare systems are in part based on how quickly they move children out of the foster care system and into adoption to me. That's a huge red flag. Yes, it is. They're going to get more money if they rush these kids into an adoption. You're not good. So after placement, there's also very little. Follow up once. The kids are adopted. It's just like okay success. Your that's about. It shook him off. There's really no data collected about success and failure in these adoptions, which is another thing that kind of blew my mind. Just seems like a big shit show. Doesn't it? Family Resource Center was a small adoption agency in FERGUS FALLS MINNESOTA. They claim to specialize in adoptions of sibling groups and children of color. And, according to a report filed by the Minnesota Department of Human Services the Family Resource, center was put on conditional status after seventeen licensing violations. This action was taken just matter of months after the hearts adopted the three children one of the violations. Was Failure to do proper background checks on families. So once Texas had begun working on placement of the children with this agency. The process had moved swiftly and I'd have to say to swiftly. Haphazardly yeah and Priscila their aunt, your who did nothing wrong? Really? She made one mistake, but it's not like she was abusive or neglectful. She wanted to go to work. So within six months of being taken out of Priscilla's home, the siblings were moved to Minnesota so while their adoption by the hearts was still pending, but they're living with them as foster children. In September of two thousand eight Hannah, Hart told one of her schoolteachers that Jennifer had hit her with a belt. She had a large bruise one of her arms, and this was the first allegation of abuse that is documented against the hearts. The hearts told the school that Hannah had fallen down the stairs. And no charges were filed. So after this, the hearts took six children out of school for about a year. And then they did re enroll them the following fall. So, they were allegedly home-schooled allegedly here and you know how I feel about that. I'm sure there's some great home schoolers, but I really think that we have seen several abusers. Say. They're home schooling their children, so they have no oversight, right? There's no mandatory reporters seeing these kids on a regular basis. We can get away with more. Right, and I'm sure that's the rare case, but still. They never registered to be doing home schooling at all. No they're just said. We're GONNA Home School Yep. So despite the abuse allegation, the adoption went through of Devante, Jeremiah and Sierra. And it was approved. This was February of two thousand nine, then Jenin Sarah went on a trip to Connecticut and got legally married, because same sex marriage wasn't legal in the state of Minnesota at that time. Now in Houston when Priscilla got the news the adoption she is devastated. So, she asked for information on the Children's placement and she wanted to know about. The background checks done on stopped parents. To each request, she was told that the information was confidential. And was not going to be shared with her. Yes, so listen I. Really Am not a fan of the closed adoption. Why not have an open it up, Shen? Why not let these kids have a little contact with their aunt? Their aunts, not a drug addict. There just tearing them away from the whole family not to mention Dante. WHO's lost all of his siblings? For Good, you know you're no contact at all, so that kid had to be. You know just really messed up by all this. That poor kid! Early on you know. Relatives and acquaintances of the hearts were seeing issues. Right the children rarely spoke some described them as robotic and afraid. If the kids stepped out of line at all Jennifer would put them in the corner and she began withholding food as punishment. And then anyone who questioned her parenting, she would just immediately cut out of their lives, and that's how she operated right. She holds a grudge. You do anything. She doesn't like boom. You're out, you're out. Yeah, but she would then claim that the person had rejected her. Because, they're homophobic or racist, or whatever he and of course I'm not denying that homophobia schism exist, of course they do, but some of the stories she came out with which kind of seemed to just be to excuse her behavior. I think she made them up. She made up some stories about that. According to a family, they were quite accepting of her coming out. While, she tells a completely are potentially different. Really something to get sympathy to you know it's all about her. Getting sympathy and attention, and it just sickens me. So in November, two thousand ten teachers saw signs of abuse was six year old Abigail. She had multiple bruises on her body and CPS was notified. Abigail told the investigators agend had held her head under cold water and punched her because she thought that Abigail had stolen a penny. A penny frail on the penny honor and decided she must've stolen it and pretty much beat the shit out of her. Now, the police interviewed all of the her children. They did admit that they're often spanked. They were of. Not, given food. And they're often grounded up in their rooms yet for like ours don't leave your bed for five hours or whatever which is just excessive and cruel. So the Alexandria schools reported six incidents to the Department of Human Services including that the heart children were asking other students for their food, and they were also seen rummaging through trash barrels for something to eat. So, there's a huge red flag. Her guess, what are we going to get Outta there nothing nothing Sarah. Claim that she was the one who had hit Abigail, even though the child said that Jen had done it and Sarah was convicted of misdemeanor domestic assault, and was sentenced to one year of probation and one year of community service with a ninety day suspended jail sentence. But. You know what there was no follow up. It wasn't monitored. Nobody was concerned for their safety. After this of the kids were taken out of school permanently and Jen, said she was going to home school them. So if I was at the school I would be very alarmed by that. Something something with it right well. Why would you convict her and then still let her have these adopted children with no supervision. You know what about supervision therapy checking in you know. Something boy was nothing now so now they're out of school. And now they're isolated and completely vulnerable to these adoptive parents. Jen primarily and she took the children on frequent trips to music festivals and nature reserves posting these inspiring in quotation marks photos of these happy looking children on facebook. Just painting. This ideal picture that people were buying. Jen told people she had taken the kids out of school because they were being bullied, she told stories of racial bias against the kids and the same thing at the very least exaggerated I think so. Jen just seem to be very attention seeking. On the other hand Sarah was described as the quiet one. She didn't talk about family lack while she was at work. But she did mention the Chen was the full time mother and she was tired after work, but would have to take over the care of the children in order to give jen a break, so sounds like this tension going on between the two of them also. Share because it seems like Sarah was working a lot of over time, and there was a lot of financial stress, but another thing that disturbs me is that jen was into this online video game which she would play for hours a day, and not only did she play. She was like I don't know the leader of their chat groups and things. She was kind of really involved in it more than just playing, so she spent hours talking to those people online and playing that game, and she's supposed to be this wonderful fulltime home schooling mother. It's not possible. Not If. You're playing a game for hours on end exactly right so the whole facebook pictures are bullshit and you know I know I have the benefit of hindsight here. Because if I look at the pictures I can certainly see how staged there are. But. That's not the end of things because the hearts moved from Minnesota in two thousand thirteen, and rented a house in West Linn Oregon is a Portland suburb. And nothing was said by the Department of Human Services in Minnesota. They didn't contact Oregon, they didn't follow up on any of this. They might not have even known. Right about the move until they went to visit at the home or something, I don't think they were making visits. Thou unfortunately, but just so despite the mishap say mishap facetiously, but despite that mishap. In Minnesota the child, abuse, right and the involvement of the social services, nothing got conveyed to Portland authorities here to Oregon authorities now so they rented this House, which was pretty isolated out in the country, they did have some next door neighbors nearby, but they acquired a bit of land. They had goats and chickens in the yard. And Sarah got another job in retail and Japan continued to be the full time mother and most people knew the family strictly from social media, or they attended the same festivals. People, who spent any real time with? The family would notice some red flags. There when friend of the family told a story about how each child was only allowed one piece of pizza for dinner. The next morning, the leftover pizza had been gobbled up mysteriously in the night, so jen accused the children of stealing it. Ninety s steal food from your own house, right? Maybe, it was for her. It's heartbreaking, so she withheld breakfast from all the kids made them lie in bed with sleeping masks on for five hours, and there are also claims that the children appeared to be malnourished along as five hours for a young child for a six year old eight-year-old, hence forever forever. Yeah, so cruel, and this was because somebody was so damn hungry they snuck down and ate the pizza. So. It's horrible. Then in July of two thousand thirteen, there were two former friends of the hearts who did call the Oregon Department of Human Services, and they described that jen treated the children like animals and was kind of acting like she was. There Savior when social workers followed up on the complaints. They really had trouble getting an interview date with Jenin. Sarah, so they were kind of being voided for a while. That they were. The first visit, a CPS worker in a police detective showed up at the House they noticed that there are two cars or two vehicles into driveway that had Minnesota plates, but no movement was noted inside the House. No one answered their knocks at the door. Safely left a card with a note asking in the contact them. Then a few hours later, the detective drove by the home again. He noted that one of the vehicles was gone from the driveway. Then later, the CPS worker received a message from Sarah Hart Saint as she had found the card when she went out to take the trash. A worker notified Sarah the allegations against her and Jen. Explained the process of a Assessment, yes, I guess. Sarah said meeting wasn't a problem, but the Jan and the children were away at one of these festivals. She told them that the family was vegetarian, and maybe more slender than other families, but denied that the children were malnourished. She said that he was very petite, but she had her growth hormones, and there was no problem and Sarah said that the children were not home, but she called Gen and find out when they'd be back. So after nearly a month of this two social workers visited the family at their home. And as they entered the home, they found all six of the children sitting at the kitchen coloring, and when they explain that each child needed to be interviewed individually Jenin. Sarah seemed pretty hesitant about that. They did agree to it, but they wanted to be interviewed together as a couple. Now I'm sure they'd had a discussion with these kids prior to this assessment of what they were allowed to say, and what they shouldn't say oh positively. It would be so horrible. It just think of the things they could threaten these children with separating them, you know. You're horrible infective on those kids. So. Marcus was fifteen years old at the time of this assessment, he was in the ninth. Grade and home schooled. He said he was grateful to. Jet And Sarah offer changing his life. He said he had previously been abused in foster care. He said he thought there was more opportunity for him in Oregon and he was contributing to the world. He discussed that the family attended these musical festivals and went on trips and that's how they had fun. Now what the worker did know was that Marcus was very soft, spoken and reserved the former friends who had contacted CPS had described Marcus as targeted child by Jen, who was receiving more disciplined than the others. The former friend had reported that Jen once told her that mark tried to kill her, and that Devante had saved her. So Jenin. Sarah had reported that Marcus had come to them on psychotropic medications, but now he no longer needed them. If you listen to what you just said. On the one hand he doesn't. He admits anymore according to Gen. On the other hand gesture that Marcus had tried to killer sure, but this is all part of her martyr. Thing right because boy. He was just horrible when he came, and now he's just fine. She's fixed it. Yup, she sure has now the time of the assessment. Hanno is eleven. She was also very small for her age, and she had no front teeth. The hearts reported that Hannah had knocked down her to frontier. When she was running, and she fell face first on a hardwood floor. This happened about a year previously, Hannah said that she had seen a dentist, but was told that she needed to wait until she was seventeen or eighteen to get a retainer with teeth implants. So here's this little tiny kid. Anyway. She's missing. Her frontier. Shoe makes her look even younger than she actually is right and I'm no scientist. M No dentist, but they are able to do that at different stages. Yeah, they are yeah, so that was bullshit to know. Hannah's medical records showed her to be well below the growth chart, but was otherwise healthy. And despite her history with the Minnesota branch, the CPS, Hannity, neither any abuse by the hearts. Right, but she had complained of abuse when she was in school years earlier, right? So, Devante was now ten years old, and he was definitely the most talkative and outgoing child. Devante was small as well though and not on the growth chart for his age, but his doctor. The same doctor is Hannah's and Marcus noted no concerns about his health, and of course he denied any abuse by Gen or Sarah. Abigail nine years old was also small, but her health report said there were no health concerns. She was noted to be very quiet and showed very little emotion. Although Marcus and Hannah had been reported to be the targeted children in the family remember Abigail had had several reports of neglect and abuse win. They were in Minnesota. She was reported that she had asked other children at school for Food and she had reported Jen hitting her head against a wall. She had also been found with the bruises on her torso. She had also reported that Janet two hands around her throat and held her under cold water. And, if you look at a picture of this child, this is a tiny child. Your she is, and you know these women were put women. It's just very hard to believe that anyone could do that to this little child and believe me I know that you can lose your patience with kids. They can be tough. But you walk away, right? You don't do that, but despite this history abigail didn't mention any abuse during this interview with the CPS worker. Jeremiah nine years old was the only of the heart children to be on the growth chart when he was examined by the doctor, and he was again very quiet and denied any abuse. Sierra eight years old was the youngest, and of course she made no complaints of abuse, either she'd had a normal physical exam except she also was below the growth chart for her age, so I'm GonNa. Have you talked to us a little bit about growth charts and malnourishment because I think the doctor is wrong in not following up on this saying that they didn't have any records from before. Were you need records this first thing they have to be able to have access to old records, sake and look at growth charts. and see how the kids have been growing so being below average for growth by itself isn't a bad thing. As long as the growth is continuing or put it another way if they're below the fifth percentile for growth, but their paralleling the fifth percentile. There's less likelihood of there being a problem. At the same time, if they're falling off the growth curve, getting further and further away from the fifth percentile that usually indicate something's going on. Yeah so what I'm hearing you say then is the growth chart really is invalid unless you can follow it over time right if you have a point in time. That doesn't give you any real information. Exactly and they're going to measure. Height, and weight. For the growth chart on the younger kids up till two or so, you're also going to measure head growth head circumference, so you can assess those three parameters, and you can follow along. So again, it's essential to have old records in. It's essential to follow the kids at intervals. Typically. What I would do with his kid is depending on the age. See them anywhere from two months to six month intervals to assess their growth and go over. Thanks if you're falling off the curve, that's when you start evaluating. So you're GonNa do some basic steadies you know like blood count chemistry profile urinalysis things like that. You mentioned on one of the kids that she had growth hormones tested, and I have no idea. If you simply do a random growth hormone sample, it's going to be low because growth hormone secreted and kind of a pulse, it'll manner. So if you measure growth hormone unless you happen to hit one of those pulses, you're gonNA. Get a low value so typically what you have to do to assess growth hormone reserve is did stimulate production at growth hormone. Most commonly, give the Chanson insulin don't freak out. You're not trying to make them hypoglycemic. You just trying to make the blood sugar drop a little bit which causes growth hormone secreted, so the protocol used to be administering insulin and measuring growth hormone at thirty minute intervals for couple hours, and you can assess however net growth hormone. But you can't just simply do a random growth hormone sample and have any credence with that well. That's why I kinda feel like that Jen was just making that up off the cuff. Because it wasn't in any of the documentation of the medical records, as far as I could tell that I could see no, so let's talk a little bit about Jen and Sarah's interview which they did together with the worker. In her interview Jen claimed to have a degree in education. We know she didn't Graduate College. She talked about being very involved in the music festival community and said that she traveled with the children for several months a year. Now. She said she was vegetarian and tried to eat only organic food. And that would be one of the excuses for the children being slender Simon to tell you right now is a Vegan. I can get plenty fat right if I WANNA put on a few extra pounds. It's no problem for me. I don't have to eat meat or dairy or any of that. No I mean if you're trying to blame diet unless you're starving, trying when diet for being underweight doesn't work now, and it's not that uncommon for children, not to really like meat anyway, no. Your point was that you can easily get sufficient calories from a vegetarian diet. Yes, unfortunately, yes for me, but seriously for these kids. Yes, they could have a plentiful vegetarian diet and be very well nourished, and not be that thin and probably grow. Better probably, so you thinking is that they were just not getting the food absolutely. And I don't know if child protective services has access to their own doctor, but that would be helpful or nutritionist something. Because that might have helped, but anyway. Wilkins look this would definitely need to be seeing nutritionist. Yeah, exactly. We don't have any of that. So Jen said that she believed in homeschooling and Natural Pathak, medicine which I know, you're a big fan of that. Don't get me started. And she was adamant that most of the issues with the family were just from others, not understanding their alternative lifestyle. which is complete bullshit. Because anyone who brought up you know. Why are the kids so thin? Are they eating? Right boom there cut out in the life. Her cut out Yep so a chance request. To women were interviewed together, and as you might have expected. Jen dominated the conversation and she did come across as kind of manipulative and controlling. She said that she did not have a relationship with her brother or mother. Because of disagreements over parenting, she also admitted to cutting friends and family out of their lives when confronted with parenting concerns. She said that Living Oregon was her lifelong dream. Xi didn't work, but she did. Receive about two thousand dollars a month in adoption assistance. Jeremiah Marcus also received some social security benefits. Jan said she did not drink it all and she denied drug abuse. Yes Aw, Sarah of course didn't come across as being as passionate about their lifestyles did, but she did agree to all of it. She agreed that she believed in home, schooling and an organic diet, and although she did have a degree in education, she was working in retail full-time, so because she worked a lot. She wasn't able to travel with John and the kids most of the time. She had admitted to being responsible for Abigail Abuse, but she became emotional about it and had a difficult time discussing it. Shenley said that things had gotten out of control. Argue so. So overall, the children had given pretty much identical answers to the questions that are asked. The only one that seemed animated and having some emotion was devante. The! Doctors seen each child for a checkup and had reported no concerns, family, history and previous medical records were not made available, so as we are talking about a doctor head only this one point on the growth chart. But these children had been in foster care system and they had been adopted, so we know that medical records head to exist. That asked the question. Why didn't their pediatrician or DHS take action to get these records right? Exactly it would seem important I mean especially with these abuse claims, and especially with the withholding food accusations. It's essential absolutely. So Jenin Sarah said that they're being targeted. Because they were vegetarian and less been and the head, black high risk children and they lived in a small town. So, they believed that their lifestyle is misunderstood and the reason it moved to Oregon. was to find a more supportive community. He and I think the Portland community is pretty open. Sure what I've seen everything I. Know About Oregon is from watching Portland. And they're very open very open. In summary of the D. H. Assessment, the heart children were found to have no identified safety threat that crossed the safety threshold criteria that they had. So, this was despite the fact that they were completely dependent on these caregivers, and weren't having any regular contact with mandatory reporters because they were home schooled which I think if they're being home-schooled, you need to be extra involved. Well we've talked about this before. She's supposed to have. Inspections at intervals to make sure that the curriculum is being followed and something. He called an inspection, but there is supposed to be. You're supposed to sign up. Supposed to be some contractors criteria. Sure now. The children's physician did agree to send the case manager information to monitor the family and have some followup physicals, but not for six months, which is kind of a long time. If you're starving. Six months is a fuck of a long time. It is but again. They're not infants if they were. Under say two years of age I would wanna see them it two to three month intervals, the older kids. Yeah, but you're talking about kids that. Are Not Meeting their growth roof. You throw in the abuse. That's a whole other topic. Yeah, and not having ever seen these kids before I'd want to see them sooner. Rather than six months for a follow up visit and you'd WanNa get those damn records Gerda her essential sure so these social workers did have the right to implement an in-home safety plan, but chose not to which is super disappointing. The children's Center, which is a nonprofit interview session organization. That is willing to consult in neglect and abuse cases. Declined to follow up with the children. They found it unnecessary so without dhs monitoring a regular way. These kids were on their own with these adoptive parents. Who are clearly abusive here would seem. I don't have any other explanation for it now. While you know I think one of the things that was mentioned by a caseworker in Minnesota was that these women did look normal. They seemed educated. They seem to have it all together. And here we go about judging people. You know judging a book by cover. Right and then I know what you're saying. You've got these two women that are in their twenties maybe early thirties by now. Yeah, educated well-spoken. I, mean really they're acting like these socially conscious educated people, Jen's even lying about having a degree, so they're getting a lot of free passes, which Priscila didn't get for sure. No, she didn't know over the years Jen had put together a social media campaign that portrayed the family, happy, healthy and socially conscious. Her post were photos and videos of the children, various festivals, and on cross, country adventures doors in nature. She wrote long rants about her thoughts and feelings in the challenges. She faced as progressive nontraditional parent. To me, let's just so attention seeking nor cure you know and I. Guess People need some attention fine, but to me were getting to the point of narcissism her. Well and certainly continued to use her family in order to get attention. Sure I think that was her whole reason for doing it, Dick. She adopted these kids to impress people. Yeah and she wants all his facebook posts in media reports her to focus attention on her. And how great she is! Right right. That's what I'm saying. So. In December two thousand, fourteen, Devante, who had tears streaming down, his face was photographed, hugging away. Policeman at a black lives matter protest in Portland. He wore a leather jacket and had a Fidora on his head. And he had been carrying a free hugs sign now. This photo went viral and was shared all over the country and recognizes an example of racial unity. The policeman later told reporters that he'd said I'm sorry to Devante and asked him for a hug. So how do you feel about the free hugs sign? Exploited your and they've been having him do that for years. On his birthday. You know different events free hugs. And you know it really seemed like he was kind of terrified at this protest. The photo was seen by many as a symbol of racial healing, but other side is being very staged and fake. One photographer, who was there noted that Devante had been crying before he approached the police officer he'd been crying while he was with Jen and looked kind of afraid. Some people thought he looked like he was afraid to go over, and she was coercing him to go to the officer and give them a hug 'cause. She's thinking photo up here and Avanti's thinking I'm going to get hit again. Oh my God. It's just heartbreaking. So. The TV shows contacted the family 'cause they wanted devante honest guest. Chen refused. She said that she wanted to protect her son's privacy. Isn't that a laugh? Which is Aleph? Yeah, now many would see this is I'd right right since she was constantly sharing personal information photos of her kids on, social media. Many! People in the other hand would respect Jen for not exploiting her kids. She was. Almost a daily event. She has exploited her kids. Yeah so I think she's avoiding the TV and all that because there's something dark going on in that house more than we will ever know. Your was bad. So. According to co-worker of Sarah's Sarah had told her that the event had changed Gen, the event of the picture and Jan claimed that after that she was getting death threats, and she became extremely stressed, and then how ironic she warned her facebook followers against posting photos of their children online. So in two thousand sixteen Jan wrote on facebook. We've come to realize that some think our lives are next to perfect were human, and we struggle through life's obstacle. Course just like everyone else. which okay, that sounds fine to me? And then later that year she did take a break from social media. But. We don't know what's going on during that time with the family. NOPE, move broken or contact pretty much. Then she returned in two thousand seventeen with this post. And, I'm going to read that for you. This year slammed US hard. And she announced that the family had relocated to woodland Washington. She said they would invite people out to visit when the time was right, but they never had people out to visit. And no no mention of why they moved from Oregon to Washington. Now just they did. And Oregon was supposed to be this great place where there alternative lifestyle wouldn't be a problem for them. Jan is one of these people who's burning bridges. She goes through life so it since and she's taking these poor kids with her and I don't know really what to say about Sarah at this point, and maybe she's just emotionally crippled. It did seem like she really did love Jen. But Jen was definitely leading things, and she was not doing anything to protect these kids so I. Don't have a lot of sympathy for her. or any really know. In the late summer of two thousand seventeen, and they're in Washington now the hearts next door. Neighbors were Bruce Danny de. And they were awoken up at one thirty in the morning to their doorbell. Ringing Bruce opened the front door and he saw Hannah Hart. Standing, there wrapped in a fleece blanket. She was pretty frantic, and she pleaded for Bruce to hide her. She said they whip us with a belt. So Hannah rampage bruce up the stairway into a bedroom. She woke up Dana. You gotTA help. She said please protect me. Don't make me go back there. Racists and they abuse us. Yeah, the hearts live next door for about three months at that point, but the DEKALB's had never seen any children playing in the yard or anything. They'd said Ladas Sarah Jen, but JEN was especially not friendly so soon after Hannah got into the house, the dekalb saw flashlights outside and heard voices calling for Hannah, so bruce opened the front door to tell him that Hanoi was there and then without asking permission. Sarah and Jan came into the house to look around. They ran up the stairs and found Hannah hiding between the dresser in the bed. Yes Jen took charge of the situation and Dana was still sleepy and she agreed to let Jan. Hannah have a minute alone in the bedroom. Then a minute later, Hannah walked down the stairs kind of robotic like she said nothing and just stared straight ahead and Jen told her to apologize Dana which she did. So I don't know about this I very judgy today, but if a kid runs in and tells you something like that, you say. Wait a I'm going to call the police and sort this out. You're not just going to take her back home well. Yeah, I mean knowing the little that we know if we were in their ships at that point it just. Just seems slight. Yeah. If you're in the situation, you would call the police. Here's this little kid coming over complaining of being abused in the middle of the night, I'd WanNa have some policemen or or someone in authority. Investigate Cher at least to take a report you know. Maybe the girl would talk to the police and they could get her out of there. So, Dana said she did plan to call cps the next morning, but then at six thirty am. The doorbell rang again and this time. She ignored it super early. than an hour later, the doorbell rang again and this time she answered the door. And she and Bruce were faced with the entire heart family that morning they kids were lined up in a row outside the door and Jen talk to Dana at the door for close to an hour so apparently. Jen One of these people that once they start talking. It's hard to get away. Plus she's going to be doing some damage control. Oh, super damage control! It's all you know explaining how wonderful she is, you know. She told Dana that the children were adopted and that they'd all been drug babies. She said that Hannah was twelve years old, and that her biological mother had been bipolar, so Hannah Allot younger than twelve may be six or seven years old. You know she's the one with the missing front teeth to, and she's tiny, but Hannah was actually sixteen years old at this point. So, it's like she didn't even go through puberty, which can happen with male neutral? Nourished yeah. Yeah have to have certain amount of calories to go through puberty. So why wouldn't a doctor be concerned about that, you know. When you thank, yes, ma'am, yeah here's the other problem may be told her the doctor that she was twelve right and well. They don't have records. I guess when someone brings a kit. You doubt Yes for birth, certificate or anything no us for the parents to fill out the form. You're right. And look for old records, if I'm dealing with a twelve year old, who's tiny and prepubertal? That's a big different story from sixteen year old. WHO's tiny in prepubertal? All these kids were so small though Dick I mean. You've seen the picture there there were. These kids were in their teens when they died, they were twelve to nineteen, and they shouldn't look at it. All know their retuning, yeah! So, genuine explained to Dana that the kids had been bullied because they were a lesbian couple who had adopted these kids, and she said that they'd moved to Washington because it was the children's dream to grow their own food, raise farm, animals, and be self sufficient, which is kind of a weird dream for six children to share. And they all had the same dream, yeah, right, so she told them that Sarah worked as the assistant manager at Cole's, and she mentioned that Marcus was now nineteen. And when Bruce said something to marcus like Oh. You're probably getting ready to leave the House soon you know college whatever Jen said. We certainly hope he's not leaving. So, what the fuck! That was about I don't know craziness is all I can think. You're so of course Dana was still concerned, and she did ask Jan if she could have a moment alone with Hannah, but jen refused apparently saying we do everything as a family. So, at the end of the conversation, Hannah was instructed to hand over a note to Dana this was written by Hannah, but the words seemed very adult, and the note read Dear Dana Bruce I stopped this morning because I feel awful about disturbing your peace in worrying you. In the middle of the night. I was very frustrated with my brother and didn't handle things very maturely. And I'm sorry for telling lies to get attention. and working on being more honest and finding better ways to communicate my frustrations. I've been pretty sad about two of our cats dying recently, so I was just very sad and frustrated last night. Thank you for being kind Hannah and you know. She didn't write like a sixteen year old either if you look at the letter. So, these kids weren't being educated so Dana still had her doubts, but I guess she thought maybe Hannah's just a troubled child who had made up these allegations. It was possible, I guess she still did want to call CPS. But her husband Bruce decided he didn't WanNA start trouble with the new neighbors I guess they'd just gone through a year long dispute with the previous owner of that house. And Bruce didn't confrontation, but Dana did eventually tell the story to her elderly Dad, and it bothered him, but still he waited two months, so I'm not going to give him a medal. And he called nine one one he did tell the dispatcher that he was really worried about the children's safety at that point. at least someone called I now. But what do you think about the delay that's? or Shitty not impressive. Yeah. It wasn't an his the wife who says she wants to call CPS, but her husband said No. We don't WanNa do that. Let's wait and my will. You know there's the other side of the coin here which I don't really agree with, but that calling CPS set them off. And that's what they were running away from when the crime occurred. possibly. But. What else are you GonNa? Do you can't ignore it? No, you can't. So after the elderly dad had called someone from the Sheriff's Office did call Bruce Dana Dana. Talk to them and said that there had not been any more incidents, but she was still concerned. You know the children were always endorsed, and the family had bought blinds, so they had closed up all the windows all the time. So! She was told of course keeping the kids inside was not a crime, and there was no more follow up done. But. You is still worried. and. She started spending time watching the house next door. So she could see John's SUV and Sarah's car coming and going. She spent more time outside working in the yard where she could notice things, and she did notice how the would walk single file into and out of the house. Yeah, they were retired, so they were home quite a bit even though they were very outdoorsy and fun to is the only one who did any yard work. The other kids rarely even left the house. So how weird is this because jen? Had they moved to the country to be self sufficient grow their own food. How do you do that if you never leave? The House saw Horse Shit you know. Rather than a few briefed interactions in their shared driveway. Seemed to be avoiding the cobs. Then on March Fifteenth Two thousand, Eighteen Davonte approach Bruce is working on his truck. He s Bruce for some tortillas. Here's happy to give Devante what he needed. So that same day Gen posted on facebook that it was the ninth anniversary of divinely Sierra and Jeremiah's official adoption date. She also posted cute pictures and wrote that she has a better human for knowing her children. Dig. Way You smashing your headphones to bits. I just so frustrated listening to ads. Why can't I listen to my favorite podcasts? Without those annoying ads well I can't help you with other podcasts. However, true crime brewery now comes commercial free for our Tiger members. That's right. If you subscribe at any level, you get to listen to all of our new episodes commercial-free, and this is in addition to our bonus episodes each month, plus you get some great TCP swag mailed to you join. At least I can listen to true crime brewery Ed Free I. Really Wish other podcasts who do that. In jail. Yeah, do you know where the Lewis? Just pounded up my last pair of headphones. And Friday morning devante return to the DEKALB's house. He Asks For Bread Dana didn't have bread, so she gave him more tortillas. She said she gave him like a big GUK COSCO. Package of Tortillas, but he continued to come to the house and ask for food, so these kids were not getting enough food, and they noticed that Devante was shorter than Dana. Who was five four? And Super Thin then one day he showed up with a list. He wanted peanut butter fruits bagels cured meats, and he actually used the word non perishables, so we know that these were foods. He was trying to hide from Jenin Sarah He asked them to leave the food in a box near the back fence where his mom's wouldn't see it. So devante did finally confessed to Dana that they were withholding food from him and his siblings. He said that Sarah used to resist the punishment, but now she was going along with it. Davonte told them everything Hannah had told them that night was true. So, Dana was taking notes with plans to notify CPS. You know. She wanted to have facts. She wanted to have enough information so CPS would have to respond. Do something so i. give her credit for that. That was smart. devante still begged her not to tell anyone though he was afraid that he and his siblings would be split up, which is a valid concern, really unfortunately eighties really shitty position for a child. They all are yes. So in March twenty third after Devante had come for food at least ten times Dana called CPS and that afternoon. A CPS worker came to visit the heart home. And saw Jen's SUV pull into the driveway. Just minutes later. The worker knocked on the hearts front door and rang the doorbell over and over again, but no one came to the door. But of course, she knew someone was there here. She'd seen him yeah. Less than an hour later Dana Sarah's car come up to the House then that evening Dana saw the Red Kayak that they always kept on top of the SUV had been taken off then the next morning. The SUV was gone. And blocks from a retaining wall by the driveway were all over the driveway like someone had driven into it in a hurry to leave. So Dana just thought that they gone away temporarily. Of course, she didn't realize that they were running away and had left that house for good. So they're fleeing from CPS. Be were work was there and she said Jen says he came in, and then nobody would answer the door, so they knew the CPS was out there right? Yeah, so the heart cell phones pinged off towers down the Oregon coast. All the way to California on Saturday morning Sarah was expected to be at work. Opening Coles at six am. But at three am. She Texted Co workers that she was sorry, but she was too sick to come in then Sunday morning. Jen was caught on a surveillance camera at a Safeway store. She was wearing oversized Hoodie and she bought about twenty dollars worth of groceries paying cash for them. She is her Safeway. Club card to get her discount and she bought saltines. Cereal bars bread, some beef, Ravioli Bananas and carrots and people who knew her would remark that she was considerably heavier than they had ever seen her, so she put on a lot of way. And, that same day she went and bought eight toothbrushes and deodorant at a dollar store, so these purchases bring into question. If Jen's mind was really made up to drive over that cliff at this point, you know. Why would you buy these things? If you knew that certain death was coming, were wouldn't so on Saturday night there SUV's GPS was off and they'd never done that before. In the nine years, they had that SUV. The GPS was always on. Okay, so it looks like the decision wasn't. Wasn't certain until Sunday and that's when the kids were drugged, and Sarah overdosed and Jen got drunk and drove off the cliff. So how complicit with Sarah is murders and suicides searches about Benadryl overdosing then death by drowning through found on her cellphone he had she googled these types of things for a long period of time she had searched from just after midnight. On the Friday they took off until six thirty PM. Saturday evening, and both liquid tablets of generic Benadryl were found in the SUV. It had been purchased in Washington the same day they left. It was estimated that Sarah. Pick and forty two doses of the medication I. Mean Generic Benadryl. Twenty five milligram capsules, and one of those will be sufficient to help with allergies instead of forty two doses. Who definitely be an overdose? Unique like comatose. If I take Benadryl. I'm hung over the next morning. Yeah, well, it does have that side effect, and if you look at the over the counter, sleep preparations, they are pretty much. Benadryl or dyson hide remain the generic. It's a big racket. I mean it's way off topic here, but if you go for that Zeke Miller any of it, it's just Benadryl. Children also had high levels of the drug in their bodies. It seems to be clear that both Sarah and Jen wanted themselves and the children to die. I wonder what they told them when they gave them that medication. That just makes my blood curdle. These kids were between twelve and nineteen dicks, so they knew something was up overheard through. Yeah and ages horrifies me to think about what they went through. Did they know this is what was happening? He they'd give him Benadryl for car, sickness, or whatever before, but these were huge doses, and the kids had to know that these weren't little. Kids know I suppose it could come up with some excuse. Need you to sleep for a couple hours or something like that? I don't know I mean. I've lost sleep thinking about what happened in that car that day. For one about that, no, not at all, of course not, but imagine what people who cared about them how they deal with it. WHAT ABOUT PRISCILLA? What about Dante who's had nothing but shit his whole life really? On Monday afternoon Sarah had still not returned to work of course, and she hadn't answered any calls or texts, so a coworker at Kohl's called nine, one one and asked for a welfare check on Sarah he knows Sarah did not miss work. She was a hardworking woman. If nothing else. So it wasn't like her to. Miss Work and not respond to texts. So, it was just two hours later when a spotted the hearts SUV upside down down on the rocks below a scenic Pacific Coast highway cliff over hundred feet, yeah. Definitely no surviving that known as the wreckage of the SUV was recovered, Jen's body, slipped out of the crush vehicle and fell the impact from the fall, disfigured her face to the point that authorities were not able to identify her so three of the six children Marcus Jeremiah. Were found in the car with Sir Jen. Suggestions lead alcohol level was over the legal limit, and the car's computer would show. The Jenin stopped on a gravel pullout about seventy feet from the cliff, just moments before the fall, and she had clearly accelerated, she never tried to engage the brakes. There was no breaking you know they eventually did. Find and Sierras remains near the record site Devante is body has still not been found. He has been ruled dead. He was in the vehicle at the time of the crash and death certificate was signed for him on April third, two, thousand, nineteen, then ten days after the crash, the county sheriff announced at a press conference. I'm to the point where I no longer. I'm calling an accident. I'm calling it a crime, which is really shocking. Well I think about it. Yeah, who mothers with six kids right and if you don't even have any clue, anything's wrong, super shock, yes. A forensic pathologist said that the family had died almost immediately after the impact and died from spinal injuries. Investigators went through Jenin Sarah Hearts. Social media accounts their phones and their computers and one of the last searches on Sarah's phone as they were traveling through Oregon was his death by drowning relatively painless. Another one was. How long does it take to die of hypothermia in water while drowning in a car? So, we know that she knew about it. So it seem the homes interior was described as very neat and orderly, almost clean to a fault. You know for a family. There was some clothing strewn about like the family and left in a hurry, but the house had been remodeled to. They had new wood floor, and they had recently painted it. The weird thing about this was there were picture frames on the walls, but they were all empty. Don't know why that was. They had left their pets behind so animal control had to community take custody of the pets. A room where the kids had slept had two small beds and a mattress on the floor. There was nothing on the walls. You know posters or anything to personalize it. There wasn't much there to even indicate that teenagers had lived in the house. which is so sad there were a few board games and some library books. That's about it. Even though they had called themselves vegetarian, the refrigerator was stocked with lunch, meat, beef, hot, dogs and chicken. So the images on facebook account certainly didn't pay an honest picture of this family. Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Moment called a coroner's inquest on April. Third two, thousand, nineteen to determine the manner of death heart family now witnesses over the two days included people from Clark County from Washington Sheriff's Office. California Highway Patrol Investigators Officers Mendocino county search, and rescue a forensic pathologist to perform the autopsy and a deputy from Clark County think we got things covered there. Yes was a big thing. Of course. This is such a tragic thing. Sedate wine included interviews from officer Michael Covington who was on patrol on the coast on March, twenty, six, two, thousand, eighteen, also Dr. great sorrow, who testified the Jennifer heart, had a blood alcohol level of point one zero two, so that's over the legal limit in California. Pizarro also testified that Sarah Hart and the children had these high levels of diphenhydramine, which is the active ingredient of Benadryl in their systems, so a jury of fourteen unanimously found that Jennifer and Sarah Hart had died by suicide while Marcus Hanna Devante Jeremiah Abigail and Sierra heart died at the hands of another person other than an accident. Aka Homicide. Right. So a lot of issues to unpack here. After the deaths, there were several people mostly facebook and festival friends who were defending the hearts. The investigation shows. This was clearly a murder suicide. There was clearly no attempt to stop that car. Jen had accelerated. So why would we feel that? Sarah Jenner deserving of our sympathy, and did they get more sympathy because of how they portrayed themselves, because they were these middle class, white women who had portrayed themselves so well. Certainly. Easy. Now many facebook friends. Festival friends musicians. They were quick to defend Sarah and Jan after their deaths, friends and teachers from Jen's high school days posted on facebook that she was a compassionate caring person. Well, hell, that's fifteen years in the past. At least they were thirty eight I believe with this heaven or twenty years yeah. NOCCO bear one of JEN's favourite. Musicians tweeted that devante had a history of an eating disorder which explained his size. I'm sorry, but fuck you macabre right and I understand they cared about these women are eight, but it's not like the women just took their own lives, and then I would be sympathetic. They murdered six children murdered them. There's no other way to explain this. So I'm really annoyed with these festival people. If you can't tell, had no idea, okay. Now Festival friend and photographer Zippy Lomax told the Oregonian. Jen and Sarah were the kind of parents. This world desperately needs. Really swallow that one holy Shit. Another musician wrote on facebook that hateful manipulative new stories and hurtful narratives were being spread on social media about her beloved family. The hearts were known to many of these folks as the heart tried. And, even his more information was released about the deceit of both John and Sarah and what their children endured. Many, still continue to defend them. Interestingly when she looked at her own texts, zippy was really surprised to see this. She hadn't had any contact with the family for about two years. Said our back to the social media thing they see a picture and post on social media here and there and think they know what's going on. When you just don't your don't know. Nobody puts pictures on facebook of their most. Day. It's all about looking good to other people, and that's clearly what did. And most people, of course don't try to defraud. People are lie outright, but still no I mean you might embellish a little bit. Everybody wants to look their best right, but this was just deceitful. So I've thought a lot about why people would continue to defend these two people who clearly abused in killed six children. One thing I did try and consider was denial. I'm sure there's a certain amount of denial at least in the immediate aftermath sure. Another thing maybe they felt some guilt because they didn't recognize it or do anything to help. Although when you think about that. If they're just seeing these people at festivals, a couple times a year, whatever not even that much, and they're just facebook friends. I wouldn't expect them to recognize it. One interesting thing is that these people thought they knew the hearts better than they actually did of course, and for this I definitely blame social media. Many of these people who admired Jenin Sarah and believed this was a perfect family. Like zippy actually rarely saw this family and they thought they knew them by these frequent posts. But social media doesn't give you the whole story. Well No, it doesn't and just look at this as John was posting pictures of the kids playing outdoors reading books and painting, there are actually neglected punished and starved. Yeah? The cops never saw them outdoors. Playing her. Gardening is many of the posts were suggesting. They, just weren't doing their now. Jenner SOCI- Nestle obsessed. Portraying a certain image to the public. Yes so obviously. Some mental issues there. But overall you know the people who never really knew. The Hart family at all were angry at Jenin Sarah and heartbroken for the children you know as we are. Many recognized Jen as a narcissist and picked apart the stage videos and family photos. Looking back. It's pretty easy to see how stage they were. Well when you know the outcome, yeah! Well. You know when you take pictures of your kids. See Your family. It doesn't look like these. These are poses. And one example that's been talked about quite a bit is a video, Jen. November of twenty twelve on Youtube. with, the tidal Thanksgiving blessings, and in this for of the children sing a song with the lyric we are so provided for. Yes tough to swallow. and Jen would also post videos of Davonte dancing to Joni Mitchell and his underwear. City nature. It's not right, so many of these videos look just staged and exploitive. Now. The thing you might notice is how their pets frequently change. Like they went through a lot of different dogs and cats. Yeah something was really wrong that how her wonder. What's going on with their? Yeah right? A woman who worked with Sarah had the coals and Beaverton Oregon explained the defenders of the couple. Saying even if someone does something terrible, you views changed on them. You still have to grieve the loss of the person you thought you knew. I understand that I really do. It's just the problem. There is that rejecting the reality of the situation is allowing the false narrative power you now. Jen put that out and it's being perpetuated. By supporting that the, which I believe is really. And Dangerous Really Yep. So there's an issue that did invite additional criticism, and that the children had been taken from their black families and placed with white parents. who were decided to be better for them? And warning signs and abuse claims against the heart's not acted on as quickly, and they seemed to be given a pass more than once all over again. PRISCILA so stint as an example had no criminal record at all, not even a parking ticket. Yes. She lost custody because she allowed the kids mother to watch them. And afterward says she's working to regain custody. She gets largely ignored. There are allegations that some judges favourite non-relative adoptions over placement with family members. One afraid. That just seems clear to me that that was the case. In, this instance probably yes, if you look at this like a domestic violence case which it is. The disparity between the hearts public image, and their actual lives is typical of domestic abusers. Right I mean they have to do that to manage their public profile so when abuses alleged people have a hard time believing it's true and John was a master at that one thing I read was that female family Nyah laters suicidal often think they can't leave the children behind. So. They might see even his loyalty to take the kids with them. Although it, certainly the sign of narcissist who's not thinking about the children. In any selfless way at all. Right now they're also financial concerns for GIN and Sarah. They collected about two thousand dollars a month in the state of Texas. But the children were approaching adulthood and these subsidies are going to be cut off soon. Marcus in fact had already had his subsidy stopped. Because he turned nineteen. Sarah made forty five thousand dollars in two thousand seventeen, so support of Jan into six kids forty five thousand dollars, they about sixteen thousand dollars in credit card debt, which considering how much was coming in at a significant amount of money to go share. I mean they still. We're getting some subsidies, but less than twenty thousand a year, so it's still not much money to raise that big of a family. No. But Jenin Sarah really saw themselves as heroes and martyrs for years. It seems and each time they were reported to D. H. Ass. This image was damaged and I'm sure that bothered Jen. And each time something happened what they did. IS THEY RAN? They ran from South Dakota. As a couple right then they went to Minnesota to Oregon and then to Washington Ted. And then when they ran to California, either Jen or both Sarah and Jen had made this decision that driving off the cliff was the only way out. I'm thinking Jen Probably Convinced Sarah of this. Because she was definitely the leader, but you know here's where the complete selfishness and narcissism is really overwhelming, because instead of facing mistakes they've made and just taking responsibility. They decided to take only their own lives, but the lives of these six innocent kids. If you look at the adoption and foster care system, the United States does have a history of separating children. Especially children of color from their families. According to a two thousand eighteen report, the majority of children removed by child. Welfare systems are taken not because of abuse, but because of alleged neglect, and in some cases this is something that can be easily used against parents, just because they're living in poverty, the removal of children which has done in the name of protection, his lead to children, being placed in the foster care system where they get poor care, and no stability, and this system can allow on checked abuse to because we don't have enough cps workers to monitor these situations clearly. In. The Kansas City Star published a six part investigation into the foster care system in two thousand nineteen. They found that despite a forty year old federal mandate that prioritizes family preservation. Most of the thirty billion got three hundred billion spent each year in the US on child welfare, boasting foster care or adoption systems. Just think what you can do with that money within families. Right, leaving them where children to removed over neglect and abuse. More dollars is spent on investigating families Don helping to keep them together. While you know judges and officials have used the consequences of poverty like several siblings, sharing a single room or the heat gets turned off because they couldn't pay for it as evidence of child neglect. Also some parenting choices like leaving an older child unattended at home when you can't afford. A nanny or childcare can be held against poor families, and these are things that could be fixed with services that would cost a lot less money and be much better for families and children. Black families are way more likely to be investigated for abuse neglect, and to have their kids removed from their care. So turns out that foster care which is originally intended as a protective system. Is actually a risk factor. Oh Yeah. You Know How many foster kids end up in the prison system. There's a direct line between the two. So three of these six kids were Dante Davis's biological siblings and win. The hearts adopted them. They didn't adopt Dante. So like I said earlier. It's not clear if this was the hearts, decision or Dante did need to be in a mental health facility. But just days after that separation. Dante ten years old tried to kill himself then he was in the Texas foster. Care System for eight more years four of those years. He was in a residential treatment center. An for all those years until the day his siblings died, he was holding out hope of being reunited with them. Then by the time he was nineteen, he was in prison. While he was incarcerated. His siblings died, but he wasn't even told about their deaths until after he was released. So Dante's story. Very the failures of the child welfare system. It's so heartbreaking. Eight year old Dante had acted out violently when the state removed him and his siblings from their home in two thousand five, then he was set on a path that advocates call the foster care to prison pipeline. And the removal of children from their families means it. Thousands of children are separated from siblings. They go through multiple placements, and they enter adulthood with little or no support once in foster care, black children in particular, generally received inferior services and are kept out of their homes for longer periods of time. Some kids move dozens of times over several years. Well. That's why I said you know as white. Middle Class Women. Jenin Sarah Hart were given the benefit of the doubt and offer again. Priscila made one mistake and never saw the children again. So there's no way to not consider that race played a role here remember Sarah was convicted for child abuse and was still allowed to adopt three more kits route. Prematurely got to say since a messed up system system works. Yeah I think that final sentence sums it up. Sal definitely a lot of issues here that we all need to think about. Yes and this was a good time to do it with all. It's been going on nationally. Yup It does work out that way. So our sources for this episode were the Oregon. Department of Human Services Records Sonoma's magazine Article by William Callan titled Telling Lies How a decade of deception led to the heart. Families Tragic end on the Mendocino coast. There's Glamour, magazines broken hearts article which also was made into a podcast. There's an article in the Washington Post titled Abuse Neglect and a system that failed the tragic lives of the heart. Children by JOE HYME and Julie Tate in November of two thousand eighteen. Also an article online from the appeal, the damage done by foster care systems by Dea Bella, poly in December of two thousand nineteen, also that study that you talked about from the Kansas City Star. We are sending more foster kids to prison then college, and that was written by Laura Bauer and Judy. L. Thomas in February of twenty twenty. That is definitely worth a read. It'll shock you really. It's hard to even read. Yeah, if you'd like to send us some feedback, we love to get feedback. You can send us an e mail to true crime brewery at Tigr Dot. com or you can leave us a voicemail on our website. Tigr Dot Com. So let's move onto feedback I we have a voice mail were do Moose's from Sarah. And she has case suggestion Hey Dick and jail. This is Sarah I just received a back to guys. I had requested a case in Englewood, New Jersey I wanted to send a voicemail I'm eight hundred eighty seven days clean and sober so I haven't had a beer, but I did just listen to one of your past podcast. I'm going from the beginning all the way back to recent ones and I. I also wanted to suggest two things one about a beer. That's non alcoholic. I know dictate said they had some alcohol, but Heineken just came out with one that zero point zero percent all and it actually tastes like a Heineken, but I surprised at how much it tasted like a beer also had another case suggestion I grew up around the area of the ice man. I knew his son actually. And there's a lot of mafia stuff that went on as kids at UC here about and how we found him so interesting, because he was so dedicated to his family, and having his family, not know about this horrible life that really started in his childhood, and how he could really separate this horrible filling that he did and be such a wonderful father in his family they. They seem to be and I know it's not a normal case you do, but he did kill I. Think up I two hundred people, and it was always cyanide, and it was in a club that I know a lot of people had gone to thank you so much for everything I just became a member so looking forward to that hope to hear Mark Mutai Stephen Thank. Well, thank Sarah so before you and I were a thing, Dick I enjoyed a Heineken quite often so I think it's a good everyday beer. Well, it's it's not terrible beer. It's good to drink and I've seen a few people drinking the zero alcohol one, so it might be worth a try. I mean I. I certainly wouldn't be averse to trying to zero alcohol or low alcohol beer for one of the be reviews. I think that's a cool idea. Because he now people, a lot of people have had issues with alcohol and still enjoy the taste of beer. So this case of the iceman he now I have thought about this case because I think that the way that he could compartmentalize, his life is fascinating. It is and poisoning deaths. You know you're the ICE news. His name is Richard Kuklinski. And, he was. Basically a career criminal, a murderer a hitman. was sentenced in nineteen, Eighty, eight for murdering two people, and then while he was imprisoned. He confessed to the murders of anywhere from one hundred two hundred fifty people. That's hard to believe, isn't it? Yeah, well, he said he participated in Jimmy, Hoffa killing. Wow, so, that makes him suspect right there. He probably didn't but anyway. He died in two thousand six, still in prison when his a seventy year old. But would probably be an interesting thing to do the ICEMAN. I mean it's not our typical case, but why the Hell not? We like to do things differently. Of course. Sometimes, it's right all right so I am going to read an email now from Deborah with a case, suggestion Deborah Rowe. I've sent a few suggestions of cases that were big. In the area of Florida that I live in. I was pleasantly surprised to hear the mentioned. Here's another one. That was truly heartbreaking. Heartbreaking, it's the murder of Cordell, Richards. It was done by three teenagers and what they did to. This man was unbelievable. Peace, love and many blessings deborah, so she's right to the point and I know. You looked up this case. Though what can you tell us? Loose happened? In one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety nine, Cordell Richards was tortured, killed and set on fire by three teenagers. They were ages fifteen to seventeen. One of the TIN said Richards was killed because he is trying to has sex with her. One of them was a woman, a girl to of Moore women well. One Guy. So one of the girls in the boy who are I, think a couple. Were sentenced to death, and this was later changed to life in prison. And the other teen who is the fifteen year old? She was given a leaner sentenced because she testified against the other till and she served fifteen years. and has been since released. She's out on her own. and has not in living a life of crime since not that we know of exam, always concerned with these crimes done by young people. Are they just evil deep down where they going through a bad time, they can change. It's really. A question that's hard for anyone to answer. Is Yeah interesting stuff as you know, you can always talk about the teenage brain, which isn't quite right. You know well this all these studies. They certainly can lack impulse control so another case suggestion from Amanda. Hello I'm writing to request a story. Tamwe Horsfield was a forty year old black woman mother of six who was found beaten and murdered during a House Party of seven white women. The stories full of questions. I think it would be a great episode. I like the sounds of that. We have been trying to do more cases about people of color his. You know we always falling into the trap of the pretty blonde girl being murdered so would like to look into that one for sure where we can. was attending a football moms party. This is also in nineteen, ninety nine. It's been a tough year well nineteen ninety nine. Different Song and everything? But this didn't seem like there's anything racial about. It was a party. There was alcohol served marijuana. They weren't there with the kids or anything. It's just a bunch of ladies. And look like they're having a good time. And then the next morning or streets beaten body was found lying face down in the yard. Has An extensive investigation and ended up in a finding of accidental death. Express surprise which has been much criticized conclusion share. Had he accidentally get beaten to death? Well if she was upstairs and fell. Oh, but come on. We're beyond that we can tell the difference between fall and beating. That's what they got us. Probably be a good case to I would definitely like to look into that one. We will okay all right team. Right anything to add just as good to be back I know. We had a good time on our week off, but it's nice to be back in the saddle. It was weird to take a week off. It was only a week, but it felt like a long time. It really did a good thing. Glad to be back at the quite with. You think we ought to do another one later this summer. Take a week off well apart partly, take weeks off here and there may be dismissed extra bonus episodes. We'll talk about it. We'll see. Guys all right well. Thanks everyone for listening and we'll see you next time at the quiet and our guys but by. Only.

Shannon Sarah Jen Minnesota Jeremiah Marcus Abigail Abuse facebook Jenin Oregon Hannah Hart Dick Texas Jan growth hormone Sherry Davis Dante John Hart CPS Chen
Trish Miller, Founder and CEO SwemKids on the Georgia Podcast

Pro Business Channel

27:17 min | 6 months ago

Trish Miller, Founder and CEO SwemKids on the Georgia Podcast

"You were kicked though your family. Recording folks. You'll get. Drowning is a serious concern. It's particularly a concern for the black community. Why is that and what can be done about that? We have Trish Miller of swim. Kids in now studio today to help prevent drowning particularly children who are black. Welcome to the Georgia podcast, featuring the WHO's who, and what's new in Georgia made possible in part by global podcast studios, offering podcast studio, rentals, production and distribution visit global podcast studios dot com, and by our friends at serendipity labs, Co, working private offices and more true inspiration at work learn more at serendipity. LABS DOT COM. Now join rich cazenove broadcasting live from the pro business channel studios in Atlanta and worldwide across the PD syndicated networks. Hello, this is already Ruderman Co hosting or actually substituting for rich cazenove and welcome to judge podcast and today our guest Trish. Miller from swim kids is the CEO and founder Tristesse spent pretty much most of her career in the health industry. And of Mary. Impressive Education Degrees College of William Mary public of of from emory public health from emory What is two thousand? Nineteen spanks Sarah Obliquely. Foundation resident that sounds impressive to great. Yeah, already so I will I thank you just for the opportunity to to come on and tell you more about this issue that plagues our community so you give given a little bit of my background so I hail from Virginia so I went to the University of Virginia Undergrad where I then went to the College Women Mary got a NBA came here to Atlanta got in masters a masters in public health. And what you just mentioned is I was awarded as one of several women fellows That was awarded a Sara Blakely Residency Program. Where Sara Blakely who's the owner and creator of spanks? hand selected women entrepreneurs that she wanted to personally work with within so into and allow us an opportunity to launch our businesses Tajan Yeah. Thank you. When did you start swim? Kids so swim kids with started in two thousand seventeen We're so excited that with that journey we've built partnerships along the way, and it's actually allowed us to celebrate our very first splash of children, which is where children will will finally get a chance to get in the water. Bar Elementary that's right here in the heart of Atlanta. is title one Public School with the Atlanta Public School, district, they are the recipients of of a gift from our individual donors. Thirty children will receive free swimming lessons and Water Safety Instruction and we will be providing those lessons actually at King Middle School where they have a pool onsite. They're one of King's cluster elementary schools. Now you say swim. Kids started in two thousand seventeen. It did, but the vision for it. Let's say actually started with your own personal incident. That is so true. Thank you for bringing that up so. When I was nineteen I thought that I knew. Everything is every nineteen year old? Does and I grew up in an area rule part of Virginia? Where though we were close to the beach, swimming in the water, and and going to the beach was just not something that was in my culture. My mother is in her mid seventies I've never even seen her in a bathing suit, and we grew up literally thirty minutes from the Beach so I did not know the water, but my friends that I went on spring break with to a to a pool limited to the ocean front. They were going to teach me how to swim so though several times throughout my life friends. We're GONNA. Teach me how to Swim I. I had a belief when I was nineteen that this woman was going to be different, and so they showed me a few things in the water. I felt strong. I felt that. I learned how to swim just from that fifteen minutes that they showed me some some things in the water and I jumped in the deep end to be like my friends, and I was not ready. You're in a pool I was in a poll. Jumped in the deep end of the poll did not know how to trade water and learn very quickly. That's one of the most essential skills you need to have in the water. super scary and I will never forget that experience and from experience. It took me out of the water for a very long time and Intel in my story as As I got older and having children of my own, I saw that this was not a very unique story It's a story that a lot of black people. A lot of black females especially have, and it unfortunately has created the current state of drowning rates that we experienced today in our communities, and what what are the core reasons for that? The core reasons actually stem from Jim, crow and segregation It's something that we don't think about, but it did happen. In many of our lifetimes, where black families black children were not afforded the opportunity or access to public pools The stories we've seen. The photos of pulls being cemented over when segregation ended or bleach me, import into polls because a black person got into those kind of things created an attitude that it wasn't for us that it was for them, and so this skill of learning how to swim, then skipped generations of people of where they weren't. They literally didn't have the skill set to pass down to their children so many if you ask them, hey, how did you learn how to swim? Some people can't even think about it. Because it was second nature, they learned from a family member they learned from. You, know a parent or grandparent, and it was just something that they did. They go on vacations together. They go to pools beaches, and that's not most common lead the experience where a lot of our grandparents, a lot of our parents didn't have that knowledge to be able to pass to us in so unfortunately our first experience in the water, sometimes as a traumatic one, similar similar to mine or someone is thrown into the water, or where how brothers I'm the baby of three have two older brothers, my father. Who taught my brothers had a swim by throwing them into a lake. That's where a lot of a lot of black boys, a lot of black men of shared. anecdotally, that's been the story of them learning how to swim well. That's not really learning how to swim. Literally sink or Learning how to swim. And how not to drown and so that's not the experience that we want to continue to pass. We want children to learn a safe space. We want them to to to learn by people that also look like them and have the representation and swimming and that's really what swim kids aims to do by our focus on title on schools. In areas where children just most commonly either can't afford, don't have the access to or parents. Don't prioritize it in the same way as they may other things, so we want to reinforce that it is a saving skill, and it's not something that we can continue to Put off because the statistics certainly state otherwise well I can certainly understand that, and let's face it. If it's an inner city situation, there isn't much access to a portal to begin with, and if grandfather never bothered, learn to swim, it's probably his son didn't and the grandson. Henceforth didn't so you. If if your family skis and they take you skiing, you learn to ski absolutely, but if it's not as you said. The culture it. It's not going to happen, and so now they grow up and all of a sudden they're. They're near a pool and they see other people in it, and they say hey, I like you I can do that. And you just jump in, but just just with my background in Public Health I do think it's important because the numbers speak right so The CDC has reports out that. Every, single a child, three children, actually three children drowned from a drowning related death. That's horrible. Three children drown every day. But what we also don't here is number one seventy percent. Nearly seventy percent of black children don't know how to swim and of those statistics ten. Black children drowned ten times that of white children these are middle school aged black children, drowning ten times that of white children that is a public health crisis I would say show public health is all about prevention and the way you prevent. These drownings is to teach them how to swim, and that's what we focus on. We are a school based program. We did not make this model. They are states that have these similar programs, and they experienced drowning rates half of those states that don't so. They're tried and true they work. We transport the children during the school day to local polls, teach them introductory swimming lessons, and then give the families and opportunity to keep them in swimming We take it a step beyond traditional programs in that we also invite the families, because as we already stated the families. Families more than likely don't know how to swim as well and mothers tend to keep their children mothers especially I am a mother of two, so I know I can say this on behalf of others we tend to keep our children away from things that we're afraid of and we find that as a way to protect them, and in this case, the way to best protect them is to teach them and to expose them to an environment they. Have had experience in before. You know I'm thinking about environment that they haven't had experienced before. And you know we're talking about pools. But the ocean and lakes are completely i. mean if it's one thing to learn how to swim laps in a pool, another thing to learn about riptide site right, and so that's where our water safety programming encompasses all of that one of the reasons we, we bring that into the water safety part of our army, but we focus on teaching them in polls, because in Atlanta, we are somewhat landlocked, and so though they may experienced oceanfront and lakes on vacation. They more commonly will expose themselves or get exposed to pools, so we certainly want to make sure that they know how. To navigate all waters but for our focus really is on the safest environment to start. Your circumstances. I was scratching my head going well while you jumped in. Did anybody notice? I was nineteen. So you do things? When you're night, see but yes, fortunately, my friends did notice. They were there because they were egging me on to do the thing, and they had to come and grab me out so. I'm grateful that they were there and I still friends with them today However, it wasn't the best way to experience water and we've just really. WanNa to make sure that we can change that for others We ask for support for this program. It in I want to say that the city of Atlanta has been extremely supportive of this program in that they've given us access to the notorious. wow can actually transport children in the APS school district new their polls and we not only then transport them, but we issue a warm hand off between our program swim kids and the city so that those children can continue lessons with the city if they so choose so if I can get an idea of the scale, right you starting in two thousand seventeen and today to how many students have you? And what are the goals in the future that you're gearing up to yeah, so our first launches next week with? With Dunbar elementary that is thirty children that we're going to get into the water for that very first time since that time, though we have a relationship with Dekalb County Department of Youth Services of where we are planning to roll in three additional schools within dekalb county to be able to give swimming lessons to them as well. We have a very very aggressive goal of getting one thousand children introductory swimming lessons during the academic year, and over the summer and we have a lot of partners to be able to do that. So we're we're so excited in. It is a big goal. We know that, but it's an important one well. I'm glad to have you here and then to put your 'cause on our network and for you to Repurpose and upload it to your website. because that's what that's what needs to be done. but I also see that you do Ted Speaks I. Have had an opportunity a great opportunity to do a Ted Talk here in Atlanta where I was able to really talk to talk about this exact topic, and to change our thinking around swimming as being recreational, it is not just recreational. There's a lifesaving skill and that. In and of itself brings about a prioritization that has to happen. It's not something that we can continue to put off and continue to wait on I wanNA talk, though more so about the researches to why it's so important, and until and we've mentioned segregation and Jim Crow, those kind of things as being some of the reasons that have created the statistics that we see today, but however there's a there's a twenty ten report that was done. By the US swimming organization, and it stayed at three main barriers that keep black children, and their families from learning how to swim and being proficient swimmers We're addressing all three the first of the first two. is access to pools, and we start by getting the children to the polls during the school day. It's the cost of the lessons where our individual donors corporate sponsors fully fund these lessons, so that's not even burden that the parent has to worry about, and it's not a burden. Burden on the school system. We completely transport them and covered their lessons for free, but one of the barriers that the report brought to light which a lot of women no is hair maintenance, so for a lot of children in black females especially getting into a chemically field body of water is so damaging and such a pain point for our hair in that it prevents us from getting in the water as often as we want to or having our children into the water often they want to. So. Just to bring you into that a little bit so. With my Ted, talk, I did talk about having a thirteen year old daughter of, and she does have some very thick hair and she wanted to get into the waters. You want it to even swim for her. Swim team and. Thick curly hair can take a long time to do so. We have at least a minimum of three hours to wash detangle style her hair. That is not something that you WanNa. Do every day so even though she wanted to enjoy the water, Mommy just did not have the time or the energy to do that hair every day and it's beautiful. It's beautiful in the state, but there wasn't anything currently on the market to give her the hair protection that she needed to give her the freedom to be able to to enjoy the water like she wanted and so you. You mentioned Thera Blakely in that fellowship What I didn't say to you earlier is that has allowed me to move beyond just my experience in public health to actually develop a product that will protect my daughter's hair. My hair and other women's hair or men who wants to enjoy the water with regularity and not have to worry about their hair, either getting wet or damaged by the chemicals, so it is the first. Fully waterproof swimming cat that's designed to keep your hair dry while you enjoy the water. We have technology that we've patent or patent pending. That allows you to be able to do this, so you put the CAP on. You enjoy the water. Take the cap off, and you can go to work, or you can go wherever you were going to go before and thinking about your hair before enjoying the water is no longer an issue, so. That has been amazing. An amazing journey that's taken someone has a public health background into the world of product, development and being able to solve a pain point that many many have in. We did get an opportunity to to talk about that on the tech stock as well. You know you use the word amazing and I was holding off saying. That's what I love about doing. This show is I'm meeting. mazing people that do amazing thing. Well thank you already. But it's great. We we do plan to launch that product It's the scheduled date is mid twenty twenty and having a granddaughter who? Has Beautiful Hair. I would imagine that it's really could be marketed to anyone. It is marketed to will be marketed to those who want to heat their hair dry while they enjoy the water It was born out of a particular pain. Point that that myself and my daughter. however really it is hair protection while you're enjoying the water. And is there something other than the? You mentioned spanks other than the material itself. Is there anything unique about it style wise that all of a sudden might create a new look. Yeah, so spanks has definitely been instrumental in the design and the development. However, we are not. We're not a spanks product so They've been instrumental. However, this is this is a product that we own that we've developed. They've given resources and mentorship. The the key factor of this particular product is the technology that creates the barrier that keeps the water out. Caps that are currently on the market. Yes, are waterproof because they're silicone in their latex or water can in a trait, however, the issue that we have is water seeping through the hairline. This particular cap is a fabric based CAP, so that allows those with thick or more hair that has more volume to be able to easily put over hair and it's. It's a stretch to the to the point that they need as well as there is a barrier that adheres to keep the bare to keep the water off of your hair, and out of your hairline, and it protects your edges, so you don't have to worry about edges being pulled or anything like that allows you to more easily get us women capital one. You should see the dance that I have when getting a swimming cap on my hair on my daughter's hair, and and it's not very pretty so this fabric based waterproof fabric allows us to get the cap on and off very easy and allows us to protect our hair while we're enjoying it. I had no idea that this conversation. It is when all kinds of directions already. But. I also see of urine. You were recognized by the Georgia Senate for your work for reducing drowning in your community, which is a wonderful thing, I belong core I was recently appointed to the board of a profit auditory verbal center which has to do with. Teaching children who are deaf or seriously hard of hearing how to hear and how to interpret sound and how to speak fluently, and of course somebody might say well. How can a deaf person here? There are devices that allow them to do that, but it's takes speech and hearing therapy to do that. The region the mention it because I see what the Senate we have to kind of think outside. Funding and getting people involved. Really Needs like for instance Should be about four hundred dollars a lesson for the therapy an. I think Medicare Medicaid or Medicare gives sixty four dollars. Right okay, so you see where I'm going. So I was just wondering. What you were doing and I know what I need to do to start lobbying insurance companies. And pharmaceutical companies, medical health institutions, and of course, the government to kind of change things. Are you working on that angle? We are what we want. is similar to what other states have of where it is policy for children to learn how to swim before they are able to matriculate to higher grades. That would be the win for us so that would the school system per se that. That would be our state recognizing this as a priority and asking our school board to make it mandatory, because it would be through the school making it mandatory for our students to learn how to swim before they're able to go on a Minnesota for example is one of the states that its policy that the children must learn how to swim before they're able to go to higher grades. Great Program and That's why they're drowning. Rates are very different from ours. Georgia is one of the highest in the southeast. Awful, and for us being so landlocked that that is even sadder I'll bet that we have those types of statistics really were second. Only the Florida that is bizarre. Yeah, yeah, and so again all preventable and but the the the Senate did recognize the work and what we are wanting to do and what we are working with the city to implement. So the support has been great I was also in another fellowship and Residency Program that we didn't mention earlier. Call the center for Civic Innovation, which was really really the catalyst for a lot of this work. Being started that I do and so I was awarded a fellowship through them, and it was through that fellowship that my work was able to really be elevated and for me to be able to get the attention of Sara Blakely so that she also could see The work that I'm doing so there's been a lot of support within our local community. Has Been a lot of support within the school system for this type of program for their students is just a matter of someone needs to do it, and so that's us. And so we're doing that and we're. We're taking up the torch to show how we can change these numbers and. Were dated we're data driven society, and so showing that the numbers actually can change, hopefully will be what allows our state to see that this does need to be policy. What put! I'm going to do for auditory verbal center. Is You know we could only keep asking the circle of support so many times you can go to the well and the reason I'm mentioning this just a suggestion for you as well. What I really want to do is create a list of the skill sets that we need in order to market ourselves appropriately. And then ask for volunteers to an advisory council. and. The reason I'm saying this is the more people you get involved. You have their networks, and it just grows X.. potentiously that is so true already, and we need those advocates. We absolutely need those advocates. What we need are people to tell their stories. We have a section on our website of where we feature. Everyday people to just tell their swim story Tell how you learn how to swim, or if you had a traumatic experience, or if you had a great experience and you've passed along to your children. We want people to tell the story so that others can concede that in themselves and do something about it. We want them to get involved in this. We want them to support us. we want we. It's holiday season and so if you have if you work for. For a corporation and your corporation is looking for gifts, please think of child drownings and think of ways to send money to swim kids so that we can give these free lessons to the children that need it most and remind them it's gotta get it in before the end of the year low the tax base. Why not now go to swim? Kids Dot Com and you can donate their. You know you just got ahead of me, ask. How would they contact happy to repeat that? And please do and we're GONNA wind down. Great, so so thank you everybody for listening, but please do visit our website at swim. Kids that swim kids dot com, and that's actually spelled with an e, so it's s. w. e. m. k.. I., D. S. Dot, com and follow our social media at swim kids on. On twitter and Facebook, please S. W., e. m., k. ide- S. you know I know listeners out there going. How could S. W. E.? M. B. Swim and I think I'm going to ask you to tell them. Why well we? We wanted to pay homage to those that didn't have the same opportunity. Learn how to swim and so. Lee is the language of choice for swimming in it spelled S., w. e. and Healey, and so we wanted to add that to our name to pay homage to those that didn't learn. Thank you, thank you so much. Already enjoyed having you likewise, so this is already Reutemann substituting for a rich cazenove on Georgia podcast and I remind you that. Georgia podcast studios is a voice for the OPERETTA Chamber of Commerce. Goodbye. On behalf of the pro business channel. We thank you for listening to the Georgia podcast featuring the WHO's who and what's new in Georgia made possible in part by global podcast studios, offering podcast studio, rentals, production and distribution visit global podcast studios dot com, and by our friends at serendipity labs, Co, working private offices and more true inspiration at work learn more at serendipity labs dot com join rich Casanova for the next. Georgia podcast and download on iheartradio I. Google podcast, spotify and more.

Georgia Atlanta Sara Blakely Virginia serendipity labs Trish Miller Jim Crow Senate Sara Blakely Residency Program black community Ted William Mary Ruderman Co Sarah emory Intel US Georgia Senate King Middle School