23 Burst results for "Black Arts"

"black arts" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:26 min | 1 d ago

"black arts" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Just wanted to see more representation in a city in another mess, Cofer Black phone, and I just thought that as an artist, starting a black eyes, Clinton's been more importantly, honestly, just seeing other Seeing reflection at that moment, but not necessarily leaving practice lark just being in community back by racial folks. This is really important to me. So I was talking to grey tea. Very admission, and Keisha was feeling this thing kind of a similar. It's in my way about I'm winning the connect with folks decent sort of being an artist. Of talking connected who's really organic, actually. Well, it's really cool. I think it you know, at one point, you talk about that. So the ER seed is the new Black Arts alliance in New Mexico. It's inspired by the science fiction of the Great Octavia Butler and I, actually I did not know anything about her until I came to the Earth Seed website and then I started seeing some other things on Facebook. I'm quotes by her. So who who wants to tell us about a little bit about obtaining a butler? Yes. Ah, I mean, she really called that inspiration. And so Yeah, I know. She is an absolutely incredible and inspiring black woman that has completely trail blaze. She's you know, really? I even on our website I was trying to put in all of our members and I listed her as like our founding great grandmother, member like first member of earthy, You know, which is at But as a person, Octavia Butler has been inspiring for me my entire life and I think for generations of black folks that are interested in living otherwise, we're interested in the other world of Burning out from what would be considered marginal consciousness into one of these wide spectrum of science fiction, social commentary, a her books and her her teachings in her books. Are quite profound. Azi Yeah, for the world as a black reader as a black artist. On DH. So I wanted to call her in one of her books or book series called The Parable of The Sower talks about her seat, which is a foundational community of of people coming together to Um, yeah, to strengthen each other to learn together and to build communities towards liberation. Apocalypse? Yes else talks about the apocalypse and right now and so much a little bit of everything. That's right. Well, it's so interesting. I want to talk a little bit more about Octavia Butler. Who you say is your founding great grandmother, which I love. And we'll talk more about the Earth. See Black Arts Alliance and your goals. We are talking to Sean and Ma, who's an emcee, deejay and poet Nikki Chabris, a multidisciplinary artists and tea grew by Lando and they are the three founders of the Earth seed Black Arts Alliance in New Mexico, and you can find more information. About this group at Earth seed black arts dot org's You're listening to coffee and culture will be back in just a few minutes to learn more about this great new group. Hang on. Just will be back in just a minute. Steak two. We'll be right.

Octavia Butler Earth seed Black Arts Alliance Black Arts Black Arts Alliance New Mexico Clinton Keisha Facebook Sower Um Nikki Chabris Lando Sean Ma
"black arts" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:48 min | 1 d ago

"black arts" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm so excited today to be talking about Earth Seed a new black arts alliance on DH. I'm going to be speaking with the three founders. We have Rashad Ahmad, Nicky, Chabris and Tigre. Bye Bye, Alando. Welcome you all Thank you. Each of you have such interesting artistic careers. It's really incredible. Rashaan, You are an emcee, a deejay poet. You're also the new co director of Santa Fes vital spaces. How long have you been here in Santa Fe. I've been here about 10 Constantine years now. Why did you come here? What would I tell you? What is the sky and the dirt to think that's pretty much the truth of the matter in your city was living in Oakland before I moved here, then my clear kind of taken us more. Overseas, so just needing to be close to an airport. It's going to find a place that I really loved in Santa Fe is just amazing. It's one of my favorite places on the planet. That's so cool. So you you have garnered critical acclaim from worldwide press. Your albums have Gained worldwide attention and earned the admiration of fans and you've toured feverishly throughout North America, Europe, Japan, Australia and Brazil. Wow, that's incredible. So how did you What? What? How did your artistic career develop? Wow. Um I don't really know how that start started. It just is, um, hip hop samples. Yeah, Yeah, exactly Pretty much. I don't know. When I actually considered it started. My dad was a deejay. He's apply some of his records behind me. Um, call my big brother was a great dancer. So everyone in my neighborhood just did. Music and art and culture wasn't with your separation of Of myself, so I don't really have a starting point kind of one day. I didn't have a job that I went to anymore. So right, that's cool. That's great. So Nikita, You're a multidisciplinary artist, and I know that you moved to Taus from Portland. But you have family that were part of the black dumb community and said the new mix goes out right? Yeah, Yeah, I'm one of a descendant family. My great great uncles were a great great great uncle's where some of the founding families of black Tum in Roswell. But, Yeah, I came from Portland. 21 years ago, and so are you in Santa Fe. Now your insanity, right? I live in a house to live in a house. Okay, so Cecilia cuff was on the show. You know, Cecilia do Yeah. So they're doing great work with the capsule project up there. So s so we tell us how you came to know Tigre and Marshawn. Um, I degrade and I I connected with in both arts community on DH within a practice community in Santa Fe, we seem to have you know a lot of different people that we've known in common on through. To the arts world. So we connected when Tigre Kane on DH, then I just actually just recently met Rashaan, which is so surprising because we've worked in collaborator in kind of parallel spheres for seemingly many years, but we just just met. So you what? What is your work? What is your artistic practice? Like right now? What do you focus on? I have a pretty robust interdisciplinary practice from performance Art Tio visual our oil painting sculpture. I Yeah, I just gotta situational performance art piece in Albuquerque. Yeah, really touching on a lot and working on a few large exhibitions at this moment Well and so and you did work with wise full for a little while too, right? Yeah. Was it a director with life's full for a period of time? That's such a great organization. And so t great. You also Oh, my gosh, interdisciplinary artist. And you've only been in Santa Fe for a year. Is that right is correct. And why did you move here? I always ask people that because I think it's really interesting and ah, lot of people would be like, Well, I was driving through and I stopped and I loved it, You know? But so how did you? Why did you What? Why'd you move here? The short answer is I moved here to save my own life. Good. Yeah, and and I'm still alive. So it worked. That's good. You needed. You needed some space. A different scene. Yeah. You know, I had just been Going pretty hard with the art hustle for several years, and I have been in Oakland, which is an amazing city and I grew up in Philly and then Oakland's kind of just was no longer the right place for me, and I traveled around the world for a while, looking for places trying or Lynn and I tried l A and all these big, vibrant You know, international cities and just realized that I missed the land like I missed the earth and I felt a disconnection from it in the urban landscape. I had never really that never really bothered me before, and I started having dreams of the Southwest and dear friend and a mutual friend of Nikita and mine started introducing me to some really beautiful practices that she was studying out here, and she had moved here maybe a couple years prior. And it was just really inspiring. And so I came out. Um, just to spend a couple months kind of in my downtime in my off season two. Just heal and reconnect, and I just fell in love with the place and it just so like home so immediately, that's awesome. Well, you have an incredible CV. All three of you are doing so much interesting work. It's you do installation sculpture. Right. Some different performance art and send the three of you connected. How did the idea for Earth seed? Which is the new black arts Alliance? How did How did this idea come to be rich John? What country is this kind of finicky seem tio kind of manifest that of magic. I had been Um, personally with the George Floyd. Of our presence has been happening in China. Cigarette howto have been implanted artists in Santa Fe specifically since I live here, this is really in my head..

Santa Fe Oakland director Santa Fes Nikita Tigre Kane Cecilia cuff black arts Alliance Rashad Ahmad black Tum George Floyd Albuquerque Southwest Nicky North America John China Rashaan Portland.
Seattle's Lady A files trademark countersuit against Lady Antebellum

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:00 min | Last week

Seattle's Lady A files trademark countersuit against Lady Antebellum

"Singer known as Lady A has filed a countersuit against the country music group that used to be known as Lady Antebellum Variety reports that I need a white, the local artist whose calls herself Lady a filed a trademark infringement. Countersuit against the Nashville trail that now goes by the name of Lady A. The group changed their name three months ago amid the ongoing unrest triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. She spoke with Cuomo news earlier this year. They left their name is Lady and development would've been fine. Nobody really thought about they, but they brought it up and they couldn't They professed to wanting to be allies and be an ally ship. With people of color and black people and and indigenous people of this land. You can't do that. And, you know, excuse the expression, but it's true and step on the neck. Put your knee on the neck of a black art. According to the band, they applied for a trademark for the name Lady, A for entertainment services friend for the use on clothing 10 years ago. Come on

Lady Antebellum Variety Lady And Development Trademark Infringement George Floyd Cuomo Nashville Minneapolis
"black arts" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:36 min | 2 months ago

"black arts" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"If you're super fan, you get the prize. If you're not, you're just there to your fan. You don't get it? Yeah, well and then you know, I if you Google because there's been guests that said that they didn't like her. And people that have. There's probably been that well, the most recent one that I remember that we talked about because Dakota Johnson last year Glass. December she was promoting that wonderful movie. People can love that. Believe love that man is a wonderful feel Good family. Marie Jarrow may I mean with water, so she was on promoting peanut butter, Pelican. I don't know if we'll be able to pick up the tone with Ellen by not seeing it, But Dakota wasn't having it because Ellen Well, let's just take a look. It's good to see you happy. Belated birthday. When was your birthday? It was October 4 till before you turned 30. I did. And, um how was the party? I wasn't invited. Actually, no, That's not the truth. Ellen, You were invited last night. No. Last time I was on the show last year. You gave me a bunch about not inviting you. But I didn't even know you wanted to be invited. Could I have been invited to a party where I didn't even know you liked me? Of course I like you. You know, I like you. You've been on the show many times and and don't I show like But I did invite you and you didn't come. So this time you invited me. Yeah. Are you sure? Yeah. How do you know? I don't think so. Ask everybody. Ask Jonathan, your producer. There you were. I want you there. Why didn't I go? Oh, him. Was it was it Oh, yeah, I had that thing. It was probably in Malibu. That's too far for me to go to. Yeah, yeah, yeah. No, I think I do. I'm just having secondhand embarrassment. I mean, Alan was just even being mean looking around asking herself. Why didn't I go to this birthday party? I mean, And you wonder why people in like that that example out loud on the air? That segment didn't go as planned, Really? Yeah, way so you could still hear the tension, But I'd also like to add that L And I think was out of town at a certain football game Was that the woman she was with Bush is that way. She didn't want to name because that number how mad people were about that. Yeah, that was ridiculous. Yes, it by wherever you want. Yeah, but that's what she was doing instead of going to Dakota Johnson's birthday party and I would have rather gone dizzy in Malibu with Chris. I mean, I mean, that sounds like fun. And then it just went on. And it just got so uncomfortable. It really did. I love that. That Dakota, though she wasn't having it. No, She really wasn't all right. He really wasn't Julia. If we're not going to watch peanut butter Falcon this weekend, and we're going to maybe watch a movie here and there. You're going to be our little movie correspondent right now, and we need to hear from you. All right. First of all, the reviews are in for the Beyonce say movie black, his king on Disney Plus On rotten tomatoes. 15 critics gave it 100% but 1424 people gave it a 98% so people really loved that. So you've here finishing? You bought a one month subscription to Apple Apple. Plus because Hamilton came out in July 3rd, you can watch this and palette your end of the month..

Ellen Well Dakota Johnson Dakota Jonathan Malibu Julia Marie Jarrow Google Bush Beyonce Apple Hamilton producer football Alan
Re-Dressed: Black Dandyism: a Cultural History, an interview with Monica L. Miller

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:38 min | 4 months ago

Re-Dressed: Black Dandyism: a Cultural History, an interview with Monica L. Miller

"We turn our attention to the Harlem Renaissance very exciting time and place in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand New York and a place in which black Danny's played in especially pivotal role within black modernism and the making of the so-called quote unquote, new, Negro, where other scholars have argued that black dandyism during this period stood in direct opposition to black modernism. And what ways do you actually think it defined it? It's something that you coin as a freedom dream. Yeah I mean I. Talk About kind of Dan Black Dandyism and And Freedom James as different ways, in which the the freedom dream manifest right I think over time, and over historical time I mean. The renaissance is an amazing period in that regard. As I mentioned before it's the first time large numbers of black moved to urban areas and and are able to establish really large scale, black communities, and what that means is people had been working in their home communities in small ways, some small and large ways for striving to do better striving for more right in various ways, striving to be different right to. To not be defined by the ways in which blackness have been defined for them during slavery and its aftermath reconstruction. I mean it's as constant struggle for black people to get out from under in some ways the waste black people are being represented the ways in which they're being treated by various institutions. Right, it's it's always about moving toward the ability to self define. And it becomes Harlem in the nineteen tens. Twenties Early Nineteen Thirties becomes this place where that for the first time for many People Harlem in Chicago and Boston and other places in Detroit Washington DC around the same time become these places when it seems possible for the first time, it seems possible because let people are gathered in community large community, in which all kinds of ideas about choice about different kinds of choices about how are we going to be black? However, we going to be black women. However, we in what how do we think about? About blackness in relationships sexuality, how do we WANNA do like? How do we WANNA? Do any of this? What about black art? What does that mean right artists, or are we black artists, right? What kind of responsibilities do we have to our communities? What kind of responsibilities do we have to ourselves? Can we actually afford to have responsibility to? These are all kinds of questions that people were able to ask individually, and with each other for the first time, so the dandyism comes into this kind of fascinating way, because on the one hand. Hand there there are some actors right in the renaissance. Who who want to there's this constant riffing that goes on in American culture that has to do with black representation in black people, so on the one hand black dandies come in as a critique of Minstrelsy, right. They're like. Oh, you think a black dandy. Is that? Let me show you right. The another way of Black Dandy can be right. I can have this fancy clothing I can have this education I can have this kind of like social life. I can have all of this, let. Let me. Show you that right, so there's one that's one version of it. Then there's a divorce version of it who is completely much more interested although it slide sometimes in respectability culture, it's I am going to respect my people and I'm going to be respected by majority culture, and this is the way that I'm going to represent myself right and and my aspiration. It's not just about pleasing you majority culture, but it's also about pleasing myself and understanding that I have a right to this. That's not just about a response to you. Then there are other kinds of people who are just you know really exuberant about the ways in which blackness maternity can go like. It's a huge time of experimentation again one of these moments of social upheaval, or in which we think about the jazz, ages and swaying like renaissance in Jazz. Age Are Co terminal. WHICH PEOPLE ARE EXPERIMENTING WITH GENDER? They're experimenting with sexuality. This is a period in which immigration to the US is experimenting with with class boundaries right so so there's this way which all of these things come together to create multiple kinds of black dandies who are in some ways conversation with each other and in conversation with both black culture right as well as majority culture, asking the question. What does a modern black person look like? What can that person embody? How is that person's embodied? And what relationship does clothing play to that? As again is kind of social semiotics that is constantly capable of being read and sending out messages

Harlem Renaissance Dan Black Dandyism Harlem Early Nineteen Thirties New York United States Danny Minstrelsy Detroit Boston Chicago
What is Blackout Tuesday and who is taking part in the social media movement

Scott Sloan

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

What is Blackout Tuesday and who is taking part in the social media movement

"Today the sound of protests and calls for change will be heard loud and clear as the music industry goes quiet several record label executives and artists have thrown their support behind the blackout Tuesday protest which aims to raise awareness to show solidarity with the demonstrations being held against police brutality the music industry as a whole will stop normal operations for a day in an effort to fight racial justice and support the black community a statement released about the initiative wrote the music industry is a multi billion dollar industry an industry that has profited predominantly from black art

Music industry calls for Black Out Tuesday amid unrest

Charlie Parker

01:17 min | 4 months ago

Music industry calls for Black Out Tuesday amid unrest

"Today the sound of protests and calls for change will be heard loud and clear as the music industry goes quiet several record label executives and artists have thrown their support behind the blackout Tuesday protest which aims to raise awareness to show solidarity with the demonstrations being held against police brutality the music industry as a whole will stop normal operations for a day in an effort to fight racial justice and support the black community a statement released about the initiative wrote the music industry is a multi billion dollar industry an industry that has profited predominantly from black art Jane Fonda is speaking out against white privilege in an interview with CNN the actress and activist called on white people to educate themselves and support the black lives matter movement fund explained to don lemon that white people should recognize their own privilege and use it to advocate for change she said we have to understand what it is that keeps racism in place Hosey is helping out those heard during the George Floyd protests in Los Angeles the singer stood on the front line of a protest in Santa Monica California this weekend and was photographed providing medical aid to fellow protesters who were injured all the shared on social media that she had to help bandage up a man who was shot by rubber bullets in the

Jane Fonda CNN Hosey George Floyd Los Angeles Santa Monica California
The Life of Audre Lorde born - Feb. 18, 1934

This Day in History Class

03:26 min | 8 months ago

The Life of Audre Lorde born - Feb. 18, 1934

"Day was February. Eighteenth nineteen thirty four writer and Activists Audrey Lord with born Lawrence was born and raised in Harlem. Her father was from Barbados and her mother was Grenadian. Her father was a real estate broker and was able to put Audrey and her sisters and Catholic school. She loves to read from an early age and she was particularly connected to poetry. She began writing her own poetry during her childhood and she published her first poem in Seventeen magazine while she was in high school. Lord graduated from Hunter High School in Nineteen fifty one after working and traveling around North America for a while she went back to New York to get her bachelors degree from Hunter College in Nineteen Sixty one. She got a master's degree in library. Science from Columbia University. At that point Lord began working as a librarian. She married an attorney in nineteen sixty two and had two children with him. Though the couple later got divorced Lord was still passionate about poetry and she gave readings published more perverse her first volume of poetry. The first cities was published in nineteen sixty eight that same year. She left her job as a librarian at town school library and taught a poetry workshop at to Glue College in Mississippi and her poetry Lord touched on social issues like race class gender. She related her personal experiences to broader societal concerns and she also spoke out on matters like sexuality some of her early collections of poetry include cables to rage published in one thousand nine seventy and from a land where other people live life published in nineteen seventy two the latter explored themes of identity and global issues and it was nominated for a national book award by the Mid Nineteen Seventy S. Lord was a critical voice in the rams of poetry activism feminism and Black Arts. Her writing became more political and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six coal. Her first collection released by a major publisher came out two years later her collection the Black Unicorn it was released Lord also wrote prose one of her most notable nonfiction works. Is the cancer journals. Published in nineteen eighty. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in the late. Nineteen Seventies in the book Lord documented. How it felt to deal with illness. She went on to help launch the publishing house kitchen table. Women of Color Press with a writer activist Barbara Smith and she helped establish a political committee called Sisterhood in support of sisters in South Africa which she remained active with until the end of her life. She wrote essays for left wing and black publications and she wrote the acclaimed novel. Zami a new spelling of my name. Laura continued to struggle with cancer for the rest of her life. Her Essay Collection a burst of light addresses cancer race. Parenthood and other topics related to her personal life and the world at large she went through experimental treatments in Europe and in her later years she lived in the US Virgin Islands. She continued to teach write and lecture on social and political issues until she died of liver cancer in November of Nineteen ninety-two.

Audrey Lord Mid Nineteen Seventy S. Lord Cancer Hunter High School Writer Barbados Harlem Grenadian Hunter College Columbia University Seventeen Magazine Laura Barbara Smith Town School Library National Book Award Virgin Islands Black Arts Catholic School
"black arts" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"black arts" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Your family safety is their priority three thirty now over the news rover one learns the news room the new seat not sure of the line I think it now in his new seat this doesn't change shares hold on I have to run to the news room thanks two separate bills have been introduced in this year's Maryland legislature of the leaders of churches and synagogues carry weapons one bill apply statewide the other was sort of a pilot program in Harford county Republican delegates Susan McComas of Harford county says her bill would like church and synagogue leaders carry weapons without having to go through the state permit process supporters of the redevelopment of the Pennsylvania Avenue black arts and entertainment district are throwing their plans for the project they're renaming the district the black arts district or bad and the intent to make sure the residents living in the district are able to remain and not be forced out by gentrification police say a thirty year old man sitting as harmonies Baltimore yesterday morning was shot and is listed in grave condition the shooting occurred in the four hundred block of east twenty first street in the city's Barclay neighborhood and police and fire up in Frederick confirm no there was no hazardous materials incident last night after all they're close roadways in the area about the two hundred block of east seventh street around seven thirty last night please re open the roadways after an investigation no further details on that incident are available sports your mother numbers traffic and weather data if you or a loved one is gambling as a way to escape problems it may.

Harford county black arts district Baltimore Barclay neighborhood Frederick Maryland Susan McComas
"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

09:49 min | 10 months ago

"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Healthcare spaces and I think part of odd is is the design of our system and what we're prioritizing uh-huh and where we place importance and again power in the system to your point we've covered a lot of themes across four different books I'M GONNA go around the table. Why are these themes important now? Nikki Giovanni because We've kind of dealt with the first healthcare evolution which was Dealing with infectious this disease and antibiotics. The second was noncommunicable diseases and managing those and the third of the you know firmly believe is the next revolution of health and healthcare is is managing the social factors and mitigating factors that make us sick downstream by going up upstream to make a healthy society doctor Dean in Corona in Prince. George I think stories They don't have any time line. They've been around since time immemorial Oriole I think this book that goes into the truth about stories and the power of stories and the necessity of them. I use stories a lot when I'm doing presentations -tations whether it's to a group of medical students in like a dozen students or at a national or international conference the first question I asked myself selfish. What store should I tell? And part of it is sometimes conference. I don't even know I have an idea of what story but it depends on how the audience is are. Are they laughing. Are they engaged. Are they listening. Do I hear them cry. Line do I meet the eyes of some of the people in the back of the room and then I decide decide. What story am I going to have the courage to tell what story am? I just not up to sue sharing and I think it's it's so important to recognize it. Stories are are not a static thing they they change With all of those parameters but in the end they need to be carried forward because hopefully fully we've learned from them and we grow from them and I think that it applies medicine but more importantly it just applies to society today truly jury in Ottawa. Last word to you. You know from the ashes inspired me from the point of view of again the power of story people go through incredible journeys Sir so individual but there are so many characteristics that are also incredibly similar where we see where society were healthcare or the structures that we create in our healthcare curse systems are not affect where they're not supporting The public where they're not supporting patients families and caregivers and and we know what those gaps are. I find it quite interesting that we see these gaps in these challenges on a day-to-day basis. We tend to look at it and say well it's either too difficult is too expensive. We don't want to spend money to save money. And so we don't look at things such as you know the the upstream determines of how we don't look at things like our white clovinger settler privilege and looking at diversity and equity across the healthcare system and so. I think this this fearlessness in raising stories is helping us not deal to turn away and to really have to look at this quite closely in stories like Jesse's are incredibly powerful in that space. I think the other thing is that the climb from the ashes which is absolutely inspirational. You know no matter. The the healthcare journey for a patient or for you know the the family that's gone through that there's there's there is potentially late at the tunnel no matter the tragedy. There's potential to turn that into something. Incredibly powerful I think just. He's done that with his journey. All three of you have given us lots to think about lots of stories and Some books to read. Thanks so much Brian. Thanks so much. Brian Brian if this can be slotted in can you tell us what your final words are unbear- to lead the the final. My final words are in the words if I can if I can paraphrase. What Brunell Brown has said her messages to be vulnerable? Honorable to risk being. Vulnerable is to establish a connection with anyone. And that's what I swear by. That's what I live by. That's what I practice medicine by these. It's interesting Can I share with you guys a story so when I was in medical school my mentors name was for Shenda and she was not the physician. I don't think she was healthcare provider of any type but she was an incredible mentor and I remember going to her mentorship the first couple years of surgery residency and then things got busy. Life happened and I dropped off and I didn't attend for about a year and then I got a phone call from her family and they said that Russia wanted to see me so she didn't live that far so I hopped on. My bike have rode my bike over which was halfway off. Wait between my house in Vancouver General Hospital and I went in and I found her in her family walked me into the living room and she was in a hospital bed in the living room. palliative from advanced cancer and Her family left me there to talk to her and she didn't have a lot of strength I think the he'd you might Understand sort of the scenario that I was in and Her words to me were and I remember them so clearly. She just said nineteen quizzes. Always curious and you always wanted to know things So this is my last. This is my last lesson for you. You can't hat cure everyone except it. Physicians are human. You'll make mistakes. You will try and you will fail more times than you succeed. It accept it and just work as hard as you can with what you're trying to do but don't do it alone. The person that you need to take with you more than anybody is the patient that wants to game to get to the same destination. She died the next morning. Well now I'm so glad you shared that because until you had you know I had a had a medical student Shadow me two two different medical students to evenings in a row and I was I was on my game the first evening and not on my game the second evening and I missed a lumbar puncture which you know she was there beside me and I went through all the prep and I didn't get it and Until you just spoke I was feeling ashamed about it and then I realized it was so much better that she saw me fail. Yeah but it's but it's conversations like this that allow there to even be a community like like this kind of community for health providers is so rare where you can even shed the layers of whatever you need to do to get through a day And just shed Those parts that are vulnerable And there are more and more book clubs. There are more people who are sharing their stories. If that's what the power of all this is really about if it brings people together and have conversations like this yes well. I think it's a really good day. I just love what you shared a dean and thank you for that. Because they can hear the emotion in your voice and that transparency in that honesty and not openness. That's what patients are craving. And you know we're not judging our doctors at every single turn. We know they're human. I mean you know. I've been very privileged to have developed extremely close relationships attention to the physicians that cared for my daughter and over the course of her life and we were a team and we were open and transparent. It took time to build that relationship and we need to build that time into into the the ability for for physicians to both you know be Be More Compassionate have time to be compassionate. Compassion doesn't happen like in a five five minute meeting and I think again it comes to how we structure our system that really. It's really limiting for patients. But it's is limiting doctors to we can go on forever but really. This is a great conversation and it was transcendent. Wonderful it was so great to connect with you guys. I can't wait to meet you both in person. Yes I was just thinking the same thing absolutely. Yeah I feel so close to you after this. I know it's crazy. Thank you all. Thanks Brian Thank you Brian. Thanks guys. Thanks Julie just thanks. I We started our discussion as colleagues. We left as friends a life lesson for patients and healthcare providers riders alike. If you WANNA be heard try telling a story. Thanks to DR A. He does Sani A palliative care physician in Toronto. Julie Drury a patient advocate in Ottawa. and Dr Nadine Koran a surgical oncologist and Prince. George that's our show for this week. You can find all the books discussed at the white coat. Black Art Book Club on our website. CBC DOT CA Slash White Coat. You can also find a bonus web ABC feature on the Oastler Emergency Department Book Club and how that's helped people at that Brampton Ontario Hospital delivered better healthcare right to us on our website website or email us at white coat at CBC DOT CA. I'm on twitter at night shift. MD and the show is that CBC White Coat. We're also on facebook. If you've missed any of our program you can subscribe to our podcast wherever you get your podcast or you can download the CBC listen APP and if you're looking for the latest in health news and analysis subscribed to the second opinion the weekly newsletter from CBS's Health Unit at subscriptions DOT CBC DOT CA. This week show was produced by Jeff goods with help from sogeti Berry digital producer Ruby Bouza and the rest of our digital team our senior producer. Is Donna. Dingwall that's medicine for my side of the Gurney. I'm Brian Goldman happy. Happy Holiday and happy reading. See next week.

Brian Brian white coat George Prince Ottawa CBC Nikki Giovanni doctor Dean CBC White Coat Brian Goldman Julie Drury producer Corona MD facebook twitter Vancouver General Hospital cancer
"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

08:22 min | 10 months ago

"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Incredibly powerful and it can be Incredibly hurtful it depends on how all that story is received how it's acted upon or not acted upon. It depends on the intent of the persons who want to hear that that story you know I've shared Different variations of our of our journey through the healthcare system. My daughter Kate and I and sometimes it's been incredibly powerful to share her story Tori particularly the success as I wrote about the last days of her life and the journey towards her death and I felt really empowered sharing that and I felt that I was helping people to understand and illustrating what you know pediatric palliative care and end of life. Look like and it was important to share. I've been other instances or situations in a no other patients. The families and caregivers have been as well where you share the story. And you feel that you've given a piece of your heart and your soul to your audience. And there's potential lack of respect backed or a lack of attentiveness to the story or that taking on that opportunity to initiate some change based on the story and that's really Lee Witt patients and families and caregivers want we want to share a story so that we can see change so that others might not go through what we went through. Or when you're illustrating you're really positive stories so that the learners in the room and they are learners. When you're sharing story can really understand this? This went really well. This is really a powerful we can continue on with US Navy. The He'd You've been on our program before you're a palliative care specialist who works with people who are disadvantaged who are homeless we Jeff goods goods and I participated in a healing circle observed healing circle. That was astonishing. You hear these stories don't you. Yeah Yeah you know. One of the things was going through my training. I I always felt that there was such an emphasis and focus on evidence based medicine and yes. Evidence based medicine is important and it's important to provide good clinical care but I I somehow feel that the pendulum slim has swung so far that we've forgotten as clinicians the art of the story the art of the narrative the ability to Tell the story of the end of one the sample size of one and sometimes that story story like Jesse thistles for example Can tell an incredible story and in a Healthy Society Ryan Majlis book We hear about maxine scene. We hear about Lisa. So you can actually be seeing things through the eyes of Dr Miley himself and I think that has great power to inspire change And sometimes it's not the book that you read it's when you read it I read a healthy society when I was doing my Palliative Care Fellowship where when I was in training and really was struggling struggling because I was clearly seeing a lack of access for palliative. Care for folks who are experiencing structural vulnerabilities in our communities. I was rarely seen folks who are homeless. I was releasing people who lived in poverty but I knew they lived in our city. It's it's Toronto and When I read Healthy Society I starting to realize that the barriers? Here's to access to Palliative care actually lied upstream which which inspired myself and colleagues to do the work that we do now. Founding the Peach Program palliative education and care for the homeless unless through Inner City Health Associates Mobile Palliative Care Program for Toronto's homeless if we're ever get a place in our society where we're able to not just focus on treating on this but treat the factors that cause illness to begin with which are often social then. We have to take into account the narrative we have to focus on stories at the end of the day. It's what makes us human too You're listening to the first ever white coat. Black Art book club Doctor Nike Dasani. Who we just heard is a palliative care physician in Toronto? And he's with me here in the studio jewelry. Jewelry is an Ottawa based patient advocate in our Ottawa Studio and Dr Nadine Corona courant is a surgical oncologist Prince George. We're talking about books but also about the power of stories to move the needle in healthcare. Something something Dr. Nadine Coronas trying to do in her work as CO director of the Center for Excellence in Indigenous Health Nadine there there are statistics as you've talked about in their stories. What do you think is the most important currency for you when you're trying to persuade people to change their lifestyles or trying to advocate? Okay for community. I think you need both if you have an amazing research projects and you've come up with the final data and analysis and conclusions agents. If you don't have a story to put to that data the media not gonNA cover they wanna see who does this impact. What face can you put to this at an it? It makes sense and and so what. I'm trying to persuade whether it's the government her health authority or a committee or board member or board. I I tell a story and then people can't walk away. He can't walk out of a room where you're in the middle of a story When the other people in the Rim are crying you have to sit there in this uncomfortable space and realize that this is happening in your hospital? This is happening in your province. This is happening in our country. You can't walk away from a story but you can brush over data and just say. I didn't do statistics in university or high school. I don't really understand this but you can't close your eyes and your ears and your heart to a story Julie. What do you think you know? And as I'm listening to this when one thing that comes to mind for me and I think we need to be mindful of is creating those safe spaces for story to be told you know right now We have third leading cause of death in Canada as patient safety for example in our country patients for patients can see. Canada is encouraging. Something called conquer silence. meaning that they're asking. Physicians nurses health care providers end patients and families and caregivers to speak up about the care of the receiving potential heirs and care harming care. That is an extremely difficult and challenging thing to do for patients families and caregivers Liberta as we're talking about story we're talking a lot about power. We're talking a lot about privilege. We're talking about the creation of safe spaces to to share story and I would agree with the comments that you know stories are what drive drive change. And what sort of offer framing around the data and the statistics and all the numbers and the ones and Zeros. The stories are absolutely necessary and they're often canaries in the a coal mine. The stories are showing you tip of the iceberg of. What's happening the system? The stories are driving us to share. have new perspectives. And what we're going to follow in in the space of practice policy and research but we have to create opportunity for story to be told and we need to create safe space and you know to my mind that doesn't exist right now. There's so many patients stories that are being told where unfortunately there are repercussions for those patients in the families and system or they're not being heard to Jewish point. I'm going to add that I. I think we need to create a safe space for one more individual one more kind of individual and that is the healthcare provider and I happened to read a book. the book I read is dare lead by Bernard Brown where she talks about the role of shame in corporate culture and armored leadership the people who who lead with their fears lead with their their shame and because they have unresolved shame and as I read I couldn't help but notice the similarities between what she was talking talking about and shame and healthcare. And so you have rising rates of burnout and depression among healthcare providers who I think I think we can make the argument argument that some of them have unresolved shame over there. fallibility the mistakes that they make the Faux Pas that they make Not being present in the moment with their patients and they need a safe space to talk about feeling vulnerable. And it's very very difficult to be vulnerable in in a healthcare environment to talk about Your your fears or to talk about the mistake. You might have made in and it's hard to tell those stories because of this fear that you're soon going to be the only one talking about your own mistakes and I would say Brian's it's Julie again that we've we've developed some contracts and some silos and some artificial structures within our healthcare system that don't allow stories to be told Ray we have an over reliance hands on risk management sometimes. Some of our healthcare organizations are.

Toronto Palliative Care Fellowship Julie Canada US Navy Kate Dr. Nadine Coronas Tori Lee Witt Dr Nadine Corona courant Dr Miley Bernard Brown Lisa Jeff goods club Doctor Jesse
"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

08:21 min | 10 months ago

"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"This is a CBC podcast. I'm Dr Brian Goldman. Welcome to white coat. Black art the showboat medicine medicine from all sides of the Gurney. Your doctor ever prescribed a poem to you instead of a bottle of pills when Irish novelist short story writer Colum McCann asked asked doctors that question at a meeting. I attended in Galway Ireland. Recently the room went quiet. But it's no joke a pilot project in the. US has palliative care. Doctors Prescribing poems to their patients to help them reflect on their illness and on their lives on the flip side. Have you ever thought out of prescribing. A book to your doctor far too often people like claim to be too busy reading journal articles and textbooks to read for pleasure this this week as the holidays. Begin changing that by bringing you. Are I ever Waco Black Art Book Club to help us out. We brought together three of our favorite the white coat black art guests from the past few seasons. Everybody should be able to say hi to everybody else So I have with me in Toronto new. He'd to Sandy. Hi Guys Hi. Great Heat is the lead Palliative care physician for peach the palliative education and care for the homeless run by Inner City City Health Associates. It provides mobile palliative care for some of Toronto's most disadvantage residents. Happy to be speaking with you. You're you're having a day a bit of a day. It's it's crazy busy. Busy jewelry is currently a patient advocate and the strategic lead for the patient partnership at Canadian Foundation for healthcare improvement. I met her on white coat. Black Art as part of our one more thing. MOM's group Julie's in Ottawa Dean. You're there. I'm here Brian. How're you longtime? I'M GONNA speak. I know it's been a long time doing doing well but I. Dr Nadine Coronas in our studio in Prince George. British Columbia Nadine is a surgical oncologist logist with the BBC Northern Medical Program. She's also the CO director of the Center for Excellence in indigenous health. The premise of our book club is simple. We asked each of our guests to bring a book. No textbooks allowed. It had to be booked touched each of our guests personally and says something about healthcare in Canada. And I'm just waiting for the go-ahead. I guess we've got a good level and Okay let's start by going around the table and getting each of you to tell us about your your book not a full summary Just just you know maybe in less than a minute and why you chose it for white coke for the white coat. Black Art Book Club but jewelry in Ottawa. Let's have you started off sir. Thanks Brian so the book that I chose to to talk about is from the ashes by Jesse the soul and I met Jessie at a conference. This past summer came association where he was a panelist as was I and I was very struck by his presence so soft so unassuming but something within him. It was so gently fierce and I learned that he wrote a book and Jesse's Book Doc was one I couldn't put down. He talks about His life as a young indigenous meaty child he really didn't know his heritage or his culture was sort of stripped away from him as has it has been with with many indigenous persons in our country. He talks about his journey. As a as a child as a young man and as a young adult in the space of addiction and homelessness and losing his identity has since a person hood and his connection to the world essentially and then unlike characterize this way in my own words like a Phoenix from the ashes. Jesse finds a way out and find a path back to himself and unto the world into society. And it's absolutely inspirational. Well we could spend the whole hour just talking about that but New He'd you you I'll have a very very different kinds of books. Tell us about your book. Yeah the book that I chose is called a healthy society by Ryan Miley. So imagine this you're standing at the side of a river ever and a child comes a floating down the river and you jump into the river and use you save the child you get back to the riverbank and you see another child. WHO's flailing in the river? You go in attempt to save that child does well you get back to the riverbank and another child comes down and another child comes down and another one and eventually hopefully someone says hey we we should go upstream to see what's causing this situation. And that's really what a healthy society is it's a view at the upstream factors that impact health and healthcare outcomes. Oh comes and in fact does a deep dive into what is actually causing us to be sick and Canada. Social factors how we live learn work and play around income housing education our justice system and social assistance to name. If you get to not only look at those issues but you also get to meet his patients you get to meet maxine a young women that Dr. Mary cared for homeless. Who deals with HIV and then has has situation happened in her life where she a substance use disorder and then actually it has to deal with their end of life journey on the streets and through the narratives it's really uplifting Argument about how we might be able to make society healthier not necessarily investing in our clinics in hospitals and doctors and nurses which of course allied health all that is really important but actually the social factors that are making us sick coast to coast. So that's a healthy society Nadine Caroline. We have not forgotten about you. Tell us about your book sure. I chose the book the Truth About Stories. First of all I love the author Thomas King King. He's a renowned indigenous author. That's the both in Canada and the US and as an indigenous citizen of Canada just it he resonates with me in multiple different ways. Absolutely the emotions. I read this book years ago. It was written in two thousand and three and I recall the spectrum of emotions from sadness anger. Frustration surprised surprised to just downright humor and laugh out loud. I can't recall how many times I've actually bought this book for the pure purpose of giving it away and when I was thinking about unlinked to medicine definitely this sticks out because there's a quote in this book that goes all the way through tied directly to its title. That is the quote that I've used the most most out of any book that I've ever read the quote is the truth about stories is that that's all we are. This book looks at the power of stories stories their role how we shape we are how we learn about others and ourselves and how we share them and what we learn when we listen and I think this is the foundation foundation of the practice of Medicine Mike Careers a researcher And personally Nadine how does it. How does how does this book make you a better physician surgeon? It is about the power of stories and Last week I had a medical student in my office. And they they I I was telling him about this fifty two year old woman who had just noticed a lump in her left neck And I said you know what are you gonNA do when this lady comes into your office fast forward a few years. You're a family doctor. The lady comes into your office. This is the first appointment slot you had open. It's a week after. She's noticed a lump in her neck. What are you going to do and the medical students so proud road? I'm going to do an ultrasound and you kind of go. Well you know what else you can do. Maybe before then well maybe I'll send them for some blood work while. What are you going to do before for them and ultimately they get it? They're actually going to hear the story behind lump. How was it found? When did they find it? Has it grown. Has It changed. They ever notice it before any family history. What's making them worried? What made them caw? And it's interesting because why do they not say that. Maybe it's because it's so intuitive it's it's so easy it's so natural that they think it must not be the right answer medical schools post we hard so it must be something different but at the same time. It's one of the things that it as a profession we get criticized about the most physicians. Don't listen wow Julie. When somebody like Jesse Jesse gets to tell his story and you've heard these stories told many many times when it's listened to what impact does it have on that on the patient and their and their family you know the impact can be.

Jesse Jesse Dr Brian Goldman Canada Dr Nadine Coronas Waco Black Art Book Club US Julie Ottawa Colum McCann Toronto Galway Ireland Nadine Caroline writer BBC Northern Medical Program Canadian Foundation Center for Excellence Inner City City Health Associa Ryan Miley Thomas King King
Inaugural Black Fine Art Month

Chicago Speaks w/Darryl Dennard

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Inaugural Black Fine Art Month

"Cannon Patricia welcome to the show hello good morning is good to be here with you dear always when we talk about. black fine art are we drawing a distinction between you know the plethora of black art that's out there. definitely. when we talk about black fine are we are talking about the creators thank you you're very familiar with the arts and there are artists who have been making giving their sweat their tears to making beautiful artwork and this whole celebration is about up lifting those are there and putting their work out there it it is very much a distinction between you know going and buying a poster are going to buy you know some other types of art but these are creative who have given their blood sweat and tears to make them feel all art and we want to recognize them we want to celebrate them and we gonna let them during this month yeah you doing this over at the do Saba museum and you have a fantastic line up what we talk about it I know that this past Thursday you had the projects sixteen nineteen to twenty nineteen of course a Chicago perspective and then next Thursday do you have Chicago's black arts movement talk to me about that yeah well the one thing we realized when we went down this road of of doing a recognition of black art with that Chicago has a tremendous history in the art some of the movement that came out of your work boxy ban on the black arts movement after a cobra the WPA have a great put hold here the put that PPL all across the country but the artists that came out of Chicago where some of the the premier artist of the WPA without that community arts center was founded here and it's still going after eighty year so there is a very substantial art history here and when we even commented today we look at from the pre near artists in the country like your agent Marcel group ran late the after gate our nic cage coming out of Chicago so we thought this is an appropriate place for it to launch but for it to go out. to the world so this is this is from coming from Chicago but it is about embracing placard across the world now I mentioned that on October tenth from six to eight PM is going to be Chicago's black arts movement then on Saturday October nineteenth from two to four PM is black card in public spaces what can we expect over to do Szabo during that particular lecture. well first off I want to make a give a big shout out to armor and that he meant that the Bible or in breaking up we went in to talk to them about that they said this is something we we can get behind and that that's exactly what they've done so when we talk about the one in public face it again you don't think about the movement that came here the muralist movement that bill Walker yeah. either way it kicked off in spread across the world they've learned from Diego Rivera out of Spain out about Mexico and I'm sorry yeah they brought that here to Chicago and then it spread to the world so we want to talk about the art in public spaces remind static is an amazing mural let's do that been doing work here in Chicago for many years that you know early in that when he was a young man he got arrested for attacking. and that is recognized internationally. so again Chicago it's such a epicenters sold so many wonderful things came out of here so we didn't want to recognize the outdoor art as well we experience that every time we drive through the neighborhood to particular about neighborhoods of color we you see these great murals whether it's in Pilson whether it's on the west side or the south side you see all these great murals that you know depict heroes in the community. right and it started right here with the wall of respective forty seventh in Langley and there have been books written about that happening fifty years ago so it just reinforces what we're saying is that there is a wonderful energy and excitement in Chicago around black fine already we just want to recognize that we want to celebrate it and we want to do amazing program that

Cannon Patricia Eighty Year Fifty Years
"black arts" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"black arts" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"I'm Lisa parental with the Bloomberg business report on W w j NewsRadio nine fifty right now. The Dow Jones down two hundred ten the NASDAQ off forty five points s and p down twenty no an ad from save money on car insurance. By bundling home and auto with progressive and cut. That was good. So are there any other things you need to talk about or I do an ADB for something? I really like like lotion. Oh, I am just nut for lotion. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents. But we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliated other insurance discounts available to situations. We got our deputies from work, and it was of shocking. It was like how can we make this much and still have debt? Right. Not to mention zero savings rate. It's a new year. So we decided get our financial house in order. So we met with a financial advisor who dug into our expenses and found two things that were killing us. The first was unplanned expenses broken water heater leaky roof and high interest credit cards used to pay for he graft out how getting favorable fixed rate personal loan. Let us pay off our high interest bills and start banking. What we save. He pointed us to best egg dot com, and he was right. Consumer affairs gave best five stars for their super easy. Online loan at it. Literally took us about a minute to apply with no impact our credit scores. When it's time to get your bills under control and your finances back on track. Visit best dot com slash radio. Upon approval funds can be deposited in his little as one business day best egg dot com slash radio. Best eg dot com slash radio. Nineteen eighty two Joan Jett the black cards. I love rock and roll was originally written and performed by a the arrows Joan Jett's on gay TV show while on tour with the runaways she versa. Coordinate nineteen seventy nine with the Sex, Pistols. She later re recorded with the black arts few years later. It was that I netted number one and stayed there for an impressive seven weeks. Perversion received many accolades who's a number three song. Tonight's eighty two. W w j new stack.

Joan Jett black arts Bloomberg Lisa advisor seven weeks
"black arts" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"There you go. Garin is right. We'll talk about this after we'll talk. Yes, I'm interested in houses are high that song. Remind me I heard on the VJ big forty today. Hey, nineteen from nineteen eighty seven eighty seven. All right. Give me give you the clue. Give me the number. I bet I can pull it. I don't remember. Now, they've been playing this one. What I like about the chart is that that you'll hear a song that they don't play otherwise. And And that's the that's thing about the that. thing about that trend. This is one I had hang on me. Heard it since nineteen eighty-seven. But I love it. It's a female vocal. But her name is in the title. But then there's also a band. So that gives you her name is in the title. But her name is not the title of song. I mean like. Gloria estefan. No because that's number thirty thirty eight I want to say, but that's that's what I mean. Like, it's a it's a woman's name end. And it's not Sarah. No star. It's a female singer. And that her name is in the song for her name is in the title of the band like it's it's blank blank and blank blank from from eighty seven. Yeah. The black arts. No. Not Patty Smyth and scandal. Nope, eighty-seven. Why can't I just listened to this countdown? Four hundred times this weekend. Got here pretty poison one more time, I could tell you that Samantha FOX full force or whatever. At least at least, at least culture. It is Lisa. Either head to toe or the other one I don't think full force was involved in this one voice before getting the or maybe my read out just didn't go that far actually said Lisa Lisa slash cult jam which I thought was weird. That's not how it was written. Really do have this screen. Scream, by the way. Nothing infuriates my son more than the way that those titles come up on the screen to the radio. Yeah. And if it's too long, then it has to scroll it's like look at that dead. It's the end before the beginning like view, if you look at the wrong time like yes, son. I know the mine doesn't scroll though, wait long enough. It will well. Well. Anyways. Thank your eyes off the road long enough, girl, girl. Lisa Leeson cult jam. We have the same car. I know, but I've never seen at school..

Lisa Lisa Garin Lisa Leeson Gloria estefan Patty Smyth Samantha FOX black arts
"black arts" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Is from wheels. Only totally what have you ever done? Secondly, Finally, I will say the song I'm going to pick. Tony is not a reference food who specifically, but the subject of the song has a great history voodoo practices as those the singer track. Ladies practices you practice. Voting. Black matte black arts, Shannon, stay with us. We're going to do some spells next week good. Magic woman Ozzy Osbourne. Mr Crowley is the track. Won't you ride my white horse? Like decade, the second Sabbath retired, rancher master reality. I'm like, oh, that's all. I need from him. Now. Okay. Pick by the way, I had the blizzard of black poster.

Mr Crowley Ozzy Osbourne Tony Shannon
"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"This week on white coat, black art, what caregivers can learn from public inquiry on how Elizabeth wet law for murdered eight residents and attempted six more. But on -tario nursing homes without anybody noticing. Diane, Shannon who no longer works. As a nursing home administrator says, long-term care providers need more money to recruit and train frontline workers. She fears that the Enquirer report will focus mainly on preventing wet law for did. She's as problems related to neglect or far more pervasive. Jane Mead is thinks long-term care is long overdue for a serious shakeup as a lawyer with advocacy centre for the elderly. The first legal clinic and candidates specializing in seniors meet us has catalogued many examples of poor care and complacency. She was at the inquiry on most days on behalf of the -tario association of retirement councils, the organization that represents -tario nursing home residents. I began by asking me what she thought was the biggest revelation to come from the inquiry. I think it was the failure to report. I think it was all of the things that could have been done that wasn't things that people new new things that weren't reported, whether it was people that she frankly confessed to in the community or things at the homes didn't report or the coroners not investigating. And I think that was the big frustrating things. People just didn't do anything. You know, there were numerous. Medication errors that were being made that really weren't being followed up very well. She was she would be called to the director of nursing who would say, you know, don't do it again and she would say, oh yes, yes, I'm a bad person. I won't do it again. And then of course she would do it again and then go back into the office. So this was sort of a continual thing that happened on and off over the years, but that's, that's her. That's Elizabeth wet law for would mistakes and lapses. By other nurses who aren't who who weren't intentionally trying to harm patients also be likely to be kind of brushed off and accepted in the culture of long-term care share in. I mean, I think that in any culture, I think what we heard was that it's an issue in long term care. It's an issue and I think in any kind of healthcare is that they want people to the one courage people to come forward and say, I made a mistake and you know, I need to correct it. This was the culture, but they went to too far. So they were always seemed to be accepting of these mistakes. There was an incident at the end. In fact, she got fired over where there was an insulin error made. It wasn't one of the intentional things, but was an insulin air she made. But it was made by number of different staff over a whole weekend and she was the only one that was punished because she was sort of at the, you know, they fed up and they wanted to get rid of her. But the others there didn't seem to be consequences for the other people. And that was the sort of thing that we were saying. You've been observing the culture of long-term care for a long time. Is there a sense that in long term care, one has to accept staff of somewhat lesser competence or quality compared to say acute hospital? I think there is. I think that this certainly seemed to be an issue at this inquires his, we definitely heard that. You know, one of the reasons that she was there was because they needed staff. They have to have a twenty four, seven r n. and you know she felt fit the Bill. We. Heard time and time again, that staff in our ends in especially in long-term care, very difficult to find, especially in rural smaller communities. There's also an issue around pay, and they're also looked down upon our long-term care is not a sexy thing. They don't learn about it. It's not fun and exciting. Like being in a hospital, the hours are lousy work, very, very hard. There's a lot of responsibility. And so they just accept people because they're do think that that more money would would solve a lot of these problems. I think it's part of the issue. I think we need to get more stuff when you're the only nurse on night, nobody's going to be overseeing.

Jane Mead Shannon Elizabeth administrator association of retirement coun Diane
"black arts" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That special Is it? Which, craft. Richard well yeah Five points for that it's any skill or. Procedure. That. Is undefined or hidden mischievous? Okay, yeah Undercover of darkness you would do this undercover dark. No. Yeah You're, going Specific that's done under the cover. Of Dr. Oh yeah Human, sacrifice Voting again No. Actually points very good voting is. Exactly, right no it says, counting votes scouting Being naked. It, has absolutely. Nothing to do with being naked. But, thanks for bringing that, up For whatever reason The first black art was very specific So you. Need, to find a woman in half now What Kodak film, development I'm sorry stealing how we're getting there and. It's absolute stealing that. Is. Exactly right. Arnold ten points I'm gonna give you. The ten points the first black art was very specific and very illegal was locked, picking lock picking and that is what you did under the, cover. Of, darkness flashlight yes they did this English and this is, eighteenth. Century burn man that's where. It comes from the first black art was actually locked picking. And finally Murray why would this be a nighttime term definition and derivation everything, in its place Nighttime turn it is in fact, a. Nighttime term when my kids. Didn't know that when it came time to put the toys. Away let me think first of all definition the first of all definition everything Tidy up yeah everything in its place is, yes things in. Order back in order, that's exactly right that's five, points Conforming to the natural order of things. All right so what so what happens is as things go back maybe creatures returned to their dens of their lives thinking more follow the. Money that it some mercantile. Term, because in shops goods were taken out and shown to people and. All that stuff. But at night This is a very human this is a very those making money that's the word everything in its place to do. With ancient bidding No. Not, really everything it goes back away I will say that but it's a it's, a pretty. Gritty origin I will have the origin. Yeah this is why you won't be. Burying then burying something to do with ghosts no bodies back in Food nothing place we were thinking. It's. At a time when it? Goes, back to. The time when you had. No other light in, that you had, to put everything in its. Place otherwise you'd fall all. Good, for you that has that has very much to do with it yes any, hope from the audience Nope not mining let's bring in shipping shipping is. Always. Good for one of these Things. Down before the night on this really has a lot to do with weaponry weaponry this goes back to early soldiers who when they went to sleep and right in that very dark condition better, put the weapon in the right place. So that when you. Are attacked at night you can get it in a hurry. You, went to. Sleep everything had to. Be in its place and that's the derivation Very interesting very good you guys.

Murray Kodak Richard Arnold
"black arts" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I started in the bay area in nine hundred fifty nine hundred sixty five enacted sixty six and there's a couple reasons for doing that because you had the confluence of the black arts movement and the birth of the black panther party but you also had the big lou and tracy can probably talk about that a little bit more too but biglou came to oakland via james brown james brown was a he was on tv a few times in sixty five and sixty six which is a national phenomenon because tv was new at that time and then some kids started riffing off of what james brown was doing and created additional moves and that was sort of the beginning of this book so subculture which was basically the beginning of hip hop dance and can you talk about sly and the family stone and their influence as well because this is one thousand nine hundred sixties to right absolutely well okay so james brown invented funk but sly stone was the innovator of fox sly basically changed the entire sound of black music he brought in the the the base in drum riffing off of that rather than the guitar and the other thing that he did was he created space within the music and there are a number of things that he did that were innovative like he was the first to use a drum machine in a record he did that little sisters record in nineteen seventy four timmy thomas did it on why can't we live together he was one of the first to sort of foreshadow sampling on the nineteen seventy four song small talk where he puts the baby crying in the exact same way that we see sampling today well we've got sing a simple song right now let's play a little bit.

lou james brown timmy thomas tracy biglou oakland
"black arts" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The black arts end of the ice simply only got one shot on that tower playing which justice in gut mouth and ears williams will the shot for the high swat rather ask for petroleum powerplay one shot total of that came from the second powerplay unit while conscious not feeling it on the power play that this moment has been a struggle all season long right now carolinas' gotta be feeling it having a free to lead all the road gave one one road game in the month of february as then like hammer of one off the end boards back up into a glove a brubakk carolina coming of this game two six in two of their last ten so they're approaching that desperation jeremy that you everybody was talk in order not to one of his team was in a pretty decent position all of a sudden started the journal wilder self inconsistency kicked into their game a draw one five win although the van range like right poiti carries down in the right corner shot from a sharp angle that hit a pact next to the net hopefully in the far quarter gave up the puck up the boards all battling with patrick came puts the clock down to the corner overly claims it handed in tight quarters beyond rhuna task of the right wing patrick kane kane was able to keep it away from a cutler hurricanes but walked away by mcginn down to the corner goals take any shortcuts may stop on plays point it's been difficult for the black box to find any time it's based in this thing diplomatically to peter's coach team presi through center steroids over the hot wind down the right wing of the half ports except the puck down london your behind the net around the far corner super tried to fire picked up by be just happy he fires from the top of the left circle that with what quite cave no passi at the right point pulp support to the right wing corner good point by gustafsen to take it away and pass up the rightwing cain at center ice in front of aventis harry's in over the hurricane lined drop passport gustafsen coming wakil a high flop murphy sodded breadbasket of darling he was kneeling down in the.

williams carolina jeremy patrick kane kane mcginn cain wilder cutler peter london
"black arts" Discussed on The Read

The Read

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on The Read

"You cannot do like one on one end you wanna be super black in its gucci gang in mob age doing cocaine and whatever the fuck elson you've got tired tigers and lions and bears and shooting near video and everything is late and you perform at all the festival's and all these things are common on stage which you and you get sign a million dollar deal is in all of this stuff in niggers are not only like supporting you they are giving you their dollars their coal signs and all of this and you will then turn around and show your white when it is convenient because as far as i'm concerned that manigat new there's somebody was going to come out and start to look looking in doing whatever as soon as you say the word blah like why did they high play why if you were like that spaced out that high whatever what was it that made you say to them they are black people coming into my house when you were talking about the air like how do you make your money off of black art imminent turnaround and should on black people and try to put us arnold's away any said when you antiblack but you still realize that you can make money doing black shit nba accepted because you whiten mediocre and the worst part about this is their first of all it's funny because he ended up getting arrested and it's super like embarrassing on his own part but a lot of like his peers won't pay any kind of he'll still be fine whatever i think he's already out or whatever and however far his career was already going to go it'll still continue that way because most of his here's a stray black man that are just bank thought to be rich and have as unlimited pussy and so they're not really even thinking about this honestly which is why off says dumb asset queers and moves like go.

tigers arnold nba cocaine million dollar
"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"You're listening to waco black art on cbc radio one and siriusxm and dr brian goldman this is the story of tim regan who had a doctorassisted death on december twelve two thousand seventeen tim who was diagnosed last june with liver cancer wanted medical aid and dying or made but there was one looming problem that threatened to scuttle the entire thing dr sandy buchan explains so a two or three weeks ago he starts develop episodes of confusion uh in in stage liver disease there's a condition called a pack and sepilok a thing where you can develop a confusion as a result of the poor liver function and he was still on insulin which could render him hypoglycemia can indeed he was showing but sugar's that were slate were were low so they could have been a cause of his confusion as well just to be clear there was a real risk that he would reach the point was he was he close enough that you were thinking he might lose the capacity to consent yes it was like me that is such a cruel twist of fate that you have my dad who since the age of sixteen knows that he wants medical assistance would that it finally becomes legal the year before he gets this diagnosis and he's given a cancer that's going to degrade his mind so we're playing against the clock were you know in what i really saw in the end it much caused me great anxiety was i did i did see him get confused there's medication that you can get for that died one on it worked perfectly they're confused amid to to clear up the garden as yet can clearly cleared his mind this is critical since confusion is a dealbreaker to assist to death under federal law which states that the patient must demonstrate competence at the time of the request and immediately before medical assistance and dying has provided that means tim's doctors say.

dr brian goldman tim regan dr sandy buchan liver disease federal law siriusxm three weeks
"black arts" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"black arts" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"The now really don't get experience alive lattanzio black art there's one choice i'll you won't last on black on tv we got wind show you know i even this is us was super black yes you know uh and then movies yeah girls trip commercials success a critical success uh specifically sitting around black women yeah get out racial horror movie kind of end slash somewhat comedy uh absurd as a model nodules anyway uh critically acclaimed you know jordan pay mate mehta sheet tunnel money for a very small budget um glad that was though uh black panther trailer black pay that though late like that trailer drop endured black christmas which is the nba finals ascertain continuing this out this done us for the rest of the year that was though yes sir uh an and lastly moonlight when an oscar that was not favour moment of the year moonlight went in at mother fuck an oscar pulling it added a cold clammy white hand of the la la land directives in writers uh off why k life be like it every day among uh that was so beautiful like i know blackie would i was upset by that shit nope give me all my wars that way if i ever win award if i'm at a banquet in aceh is the podcast wars and they go uh end the winner is uh the white guys podcast and i'm like fun we do wing came kale who got dressed up in dini wing shit oh well maybe another time and they say wh uhf split amid iq i'm sorry we read it wrong black guy who tips you one no i'm not joking you want i will come up a snatched that shit like mother fucking scorpion get over here a get my mother fucking awards out dance okay i don't dan.

christmas oscar aceh jordan nba la la