35 Burst results for "Black American"

Lee Elder, 1st Black golfer to play Masters, dies at age 87

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 7 hrs ago

Lee Elder, 1st Black golfer to play Masters, dies at age 87

"The the PGA PGA tour tour says says golf golf pioneer pioneer Lee Lee elder elder has has died died at at the the age age of of eighty eighty seven seven golfer golfer Lee Lee elder elder broke broke down down racial racial barriers barriers as as the the first first black black golfer golfer to to play play in in the the masters masters paving paving the the way way for for Tiger Tiger Woods Woods and and others others to to follow follow a a native native Texan Texan who who developed developed his his game game while while being being a a caddy caddy during during segregated segregated times times elder elder made made history history in in nineteen nineteen seventy seventy five five at at Augusta Augusta national national that that had had been been in in all all white white tournament tournament until until he he received received an an invitation invitation after after winning winning the the Monsanto Monsanto opened opened the the previous previous year year elder elder who who was was forty forty at at the the time time missed missed the the cut cut his his best best masters masters finish finish was was a a tie tie for for seventeenth seventeenth in in nineteen nineteen seventy seventy nine nine he he also also won won four four PGA PGA tour tour events events I'm I'm Shelley Shelley Adler Adler

Lee Lee Elder Elder Lee Lee Tiger Tiger Woods Woods Texan Texan Golf Augusta Augusta National Natio PGA Monsanto Monsanto Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
Wall Street Journal Editorial Board Explains Joe Biden's COVID Failures

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:55 min | 7 hrs ago

Wall Street Journal Editorial Board Explains Joe Biden's COVID Failures

"First, these statistical numbers, I mean, The Wall Street Journal editorial board writes President Biden may not recall what he said during a 2021 campaign debate last fall, but Americans should, anyone who's responsible for that many deaths should not remain as president of the United States of America. COVID deaths this year have now surpassed the toll in 2020. Wall Street Journal points out it would shame that mister Biden has done no better than Donald Trump in defeating COVID. Despite the benefit of vaccines better therapies and more clinical experience. The left politicized COVID by holding mister Trump responsible for a disease that was always going to be hard to defeat. Biden said, if the president had done his job, all the people would still be alive. The Wall Street Journal says that was his false as anything mister Trump has ever said. But most journalists and experts agreed with the basic premise, mister Trump had blood on his hands. The world's top medical journals called for mister Trump's defeat. The Wall Street Journal writes about Biden's COVID death milestone. Because of the Trump administration's preparation they say, the U.S. led most of the world in vaccinations. Yeah, mister Biden had no plan to deal with a large numbers of vaccine holdouts other than to deride them. He missed his goal of getting 70% of adults vaccinated by July 4th, but proclaimed victory nonetheless. Biden blamed Republican governors and unvaccinated conservatives. Yet blacks and young people have also shown resistance reluctance to get vaccinated. They don't tend to be Republican, see Nicki Minaj and Kyrie

Mister Trump Wall Street Journal Mister Biden President Biden Biden Donald Trump United States Of America Trump Administration Nicki Minaj
Vice President Kamala Harris Defends Joe Biden's 'Disgraceful' Africa Travel Ban

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:16 min | 7 hrs ago

Vice President Kamala Harris Defends Joe Biden's 'Disgraceful' Africa Travel Ban

"Then another tweet said Trump further diminished the U.S. in the eyes of the world by expanding his travel ban. This new African ban is designed to make it harder for black and brown people to immigrate to the United States. It's a disgrace. And we can not let him succeed. So riddle me this Batman is Biden's presidency and disgrace. Is Biden disgraceful in banning, travel? From South Africa? My gosh. Here's the vice president Kamala Harris defending what Biden used to say was a disgraceful racist, horrible thing that diminishes us in the eyes of the world, and that is to ban travel from other parts of the world. Travel restrictions. We'll take it one step at a time, but as of now, we've done what we believe is necessary. Perfect. Thank you all so much. Yeah, we're back. We're taking the steps we think are necessary.

Biden United States Donald Trump Riddle Kamala Harris Batman South Africa Travel
The Hypocrisy of Joe Biden's African Travel Ban Versus President Trump's Travel Ban

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:29 min | 7 hrs ago

The Hypocrisy of Joe Biden's African Travel Ban Versus President Trump's Travel Ban

"Just confirmed that everything you think about what we're witnessing with the Biden administration is true. Headline, President Biden mocked for restricting travel from African nations after he attacked Trump for doing the same. This is so ridiculous. This is beyond satire. We're at a point where it's not even satirical anymore. You know the news about this new army Kron variant and South Africa. So what's Biden do? He bans travel from South Africa. Do you remember what he said about president Trump? Who did the same thing? President Trump trying to protect Americans from COVID. This is a tweet from Joe Biden. Trump further diminished the U.S. and the eyes of the world by expanding his travel ban. This new African ban Biden said hell of a difference. In March of 2020, is designed to make it harder for black and brown people to immigrate to the United States. It's a disgrace, and we can not let him succeed. Yeah, that's what Biden said last year and now he's turned around and he's banned, travel from an African nation.

Biden Administration President Biden Donald Trump President Trump African Nations Biden Covid South Africa Joe Biden United States
Salvation Army Releases Racism Guide, Telling White Americans They're Racist

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:34 min | 7 hrs ago

Salvation Army Releases Racism Guide, Telling White Americans They're Racist

"Is right everything they touch. They ruin. And now you must have leftists in the hierarchy of Salvation army, shooting themselves in the foot over. Why would they do this? Why do organizations think this has to be done? I just wish I could understand the thinking the mindset the destructive nature, the impulse to say, hey, white people, apologize. And incidentally, the Salvation army has put out another statement sort of denying this. I've seen the study guide. They can try to spin it. I've read the guide. It does say we recognize that it's a profound profound challenge to sit on the hot seat and listen with an open heart to the herd and anger of the wounded. And incidentally, I don't want to be oblivious to people who are hurt by racism. I just don't think ripping down a statue fixes it. I don't think burning down at McDonald's is the answer. I don't think letting violent felons out under the streets is the solution. Call me crazy. And I don't want to apologize for something I have no control over. I shouldn't apologize. I shouldn't apologize for being white any more than somebody else should apologize for being black or Hispanic. Eurasian. Or whatever you are. Why do they do this?

Salvation Army Mcdonald
Brothers to take center stage in Jussie Smollett trial

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 16 hrs ago

Brothers to take center stage in Jussie Smollett trial

"The the trial trial of of actor actor jussie jussie Smollett Smollett gets gets underway underway in in Chicago Chicago today today one one the the defendant defendant is is remembered remembered for for his his work work on on and and being being fired fired from from empire empire the the two two brothers brothers that that prosecutors prosecutors say say jussie jussie Smollett Smollett hired hired to to help help him him stages stages on on hate hate crime crime are are expected expected to to take take center center stage stage the the siblings siblings who who work work with with small small light light on on the the TV TV show show are are expected expected to to testify testify that that small small that that paid paid them them thirty thirty five five hundred hundred dollars dollars to to pose pose as as his his attackers attackers on on a a frigid frigid night night in in January January twenty twenty nineteen nineteen so so that that is is charged charged with with a a felony felony for for lying lying to to police police about about the the attack attack in in which which he he claimed claimed that that he he was was set set upon upon because because he's he's black black and and openly openly gay gay the the crime crime carries carries a a sentence sentence of of up up to to three three years years in in prison prison but but legal legal experts experts say say even even if if convicted convicted small small that that will will probably probably end end up up getting getting probation probation and and or or perhaps perhaps community community service service I'm I'm Oscar Oscar wells wells Gabriel Gabriel

Jussie Jussie Smollett Smollet Jussie Jussie Smollett Smollett Chicago Oscar Oscar Wells Gabriel Gabriel
Up to 30 people conduct robbery at Best Buy in Burnsville

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 d ago

Up to 30 people conduct robbery at Best Buy in Burnsville

"I'm Black Friday it wasn't just shoppers grabbing up deals gangs of robbers were also hitting stores in the Los Angeles area police say there were several incidents of mass robberies Beverly hills police say they arrested four people in a car Friday night after a home depot was hit by thieves who stole items including hammers crowbars and other tools the LAPD arrested three people after they stopped a car and spotted merchandise inside these had just rushed into a designer store and grabbed goods police say in another incident an employee was hurt after an altercation with a thief involving pepper spray and in yet another three people with a handgun robbed a high end Melrose Place store and it's not just happening in LA around the country in Minneapolis a group of twenty to thirty people grab numerous electronic items at a Best Buy store in Burnsville and ran out according to police I'm Julie Walker

Beverly Hills Police Lapd Los Angeles Melrose Place Store Best Buy Store Minneapolis LA Burnsville Julie Walker
Kyle Rittenhouse Is Exactly the Kind of Enemy the Left Wants to Create

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 2 d ago

Kyle Rittenhouse Is Exactly the Kind of Enemy the Left Wants to Create

"If you show up to a rally or you show up to a city burning while the National Guard is not there and the police have been told to stand down and you defend yourself because someone's trying to kill you and that someone trying to kill you is a child rapist? You're gonna get tried for first degree murder in your family has to go into debt to try to defend you, which we're seeing right now with Kyle rittenhouse. And by the way, if this was 1892, and it was the KKK trying to take over a city, and it was a black 17 year old that took a gun to go to the burning city. We would have like a national holiday to that young man. Seriously. Not saying that's what we need for Kyle, not saying we'd like a national holiday, but I'm saying that it would be everyone would say this is the most amazing heroic thing I've ever seen. But instead, let's just be let's just be as blunt and honest about it. Kyle rittenhouse tracks a box of the type of let's say enemy they want to create. And we saw this earlier with what happened with the Nicolas Sandman case. You guys remember that the Covington kids? Remember the Covington kids? Where Nicholas Sandman on the steps of the capitol with that lunatic came up with the drum and started banging it in his head, and his head was his face, and we were told that the young kid was the one that's provoking and saying racist things, total lie. Totally exonerated one his lawsuits. But no, the thing that Kyle rittenhouse did wrong is that he fit the perfect type of archetype where Joe Biden came out and said that Kyle rittenhouse is a white supremacist. Said that on Twitter, hope he gets sued for that one day in civil court. There is no evidence of that. But instead, here is the essence of it is that there was a picture, the same thing that happened on the southern border when you had border patrol agents on horseback, and they said, oh, they're using whips to go after migrants, total lie, it's called a bridle or saddle. You ever ride a horse before New York Times weirdo, right? And of course not. Never even west of the Mississippi River, let alone ever mounted a horse, right? No, it's a whip. No, but all they have is the narrative. So Kyle rittenhouse, they had the picture they wanted. AR-15, mouth wide open, young, white, Trump loving, a green shirt and hat backwards, looking like he's kind of playing the insurrectionist. Boom. Put him in

Kyle Rittenhouse Nicolas Sandman Nicholas Sandman National Guard KKK Kyle Joe Biden Twitter Mississippi River New York Times
10-year-old among three shot at mall in Durham, North Carolina

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

10-year-old among three shot at mall in Durham, North Carolina

"Hi Mike Rossio reporting a North Carolina police chief says three people were shot Friday in a fight at a mall a shooting during Black Friday shopping at a mall in Durham North Carolina left three people shot and wounded and another three people injured as panicked shoppers ran for the exits one of the shooting victims was a ten year old child who was struck by a stray bullet during police chief Patrice Andrews told reporters the shooting happened around three twenty PM inside the streets at Southpoint mall the chief said an apparent fight between two groups who knew each other led to the shooting and one person was detained Andrews vowed there will be more arrests hi

Mike Rossio North Carolina Patrice Andrews Durham Southpoint Mall Andrews
Stores kick off Black Friday but pandemic woes linger

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 d ago

Stores kick off Black Friday but pandemic woes linger

"The nation's largest retail trade group predicts a double digit increase in holiday sales the national retail federation expects sales to increase both in store and online in November and December somewhere between twenty five and ten point five percent Catherine Cullen is the NRF senior director of industry and consumer insights she says after dealing with Colbert restrictions last year many people are anxious to return to the stores this holiday season people like shopping in stores for gas because it let them touch and feel a product key it in person Kelen says an estimated one hundred fifty eight million people plan to shop either in store or online over the thanksgiving weekend I'm Mike Hampton

National Retail Federation Catherine Cullen Colbert Kelen Mike Hampton
Waukesha Suspect Darrell Brooks Shared Pro-Hitler and Violent Anti-White Posts

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | 3 d ago

Waukesha Suspect Darrell Brooks Shared Pro-Hitler and Violent Anti-White Posts

"We have to close the loop on the walka Shaw story. Isn't it a tragic set of circumstances where we're only allowed to talk about or care about a tragedy if the color of the skin of the attacker is something that the regime actually wants? So the attacker and walker Shaw, who has now killed 6 people a young boy died last evening. So it's went from 5 to 6. Ran over 40 more people. A black terrorist by the name of Darryl Brooks he is a pro Hitler anti semitic black supremacist terrorist. It's been wiped clean from the activist media. You've got a CNN dot com. No mention at all whatsoever. Nope. Nothing. Instead, if you, if you looked at any of the headlines that happened, they're not even saying that this is a terrorist attack. No, they just call it a car crash. They say what happened in Waukesha Wisconsin was just the car crash. It was like someone that got off on the wrong exit. Play cut 56. Bank worker. We were also hearing from the uncle of one of the 18 children hurt in the crash on Sunday. David begnaud reports on how one 11 year old girl is doing. The crash on Sunday. This was an attentional attack. But because it was a black assailant who's a child sex trafficker and pedophile, it doesn't fit the

Walka Shaw Walker Shaw Darryl Brooks CNN Waukesha David Begnaud Wisconsin
Dine-and-Dashers Abduct, Assault Waitress Who Tried to Stop Them, NJ Police Say

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:12 min | 3 d ago

Dine-and-Dashers Abduct, Assault Waitress Who Tried to Stop Them, NJ Police Say

"I was just reading about something that happened in turnerville, New Jersey, Washington township. And this is going to get me in trouble for saying this. Because we need to have a serious conversation about race in America. When Joe Biden talks about the thugs at the at the capitol on January 6th, what about all the violence we're seeing in the streets of America today? Chicago. How about Saturday at the nifty 50s, in turnerville, New Jersey? Police are searching for the suspects caught on surveillance video who are believed to be involved in the attack. Now, there's no mention of the suspect's race. No mention of the waitress is race. Here's what happened. There was a table of 5 customers who were attempting to skip out on their $70 bill at this diner. And the waitress sees it. And she goes out into the parking lot to try to confront the 5 suspects. They abducted the 20 year old, they dragged her into the car and they beat her. Mercilessly. The vehicle headed north on route 42, made a U turn was headed north south toward Monroe township, and then they pushed her out of the vehicle. Somehow she was in killed. She was beaten badly. Because she's a hardworking young woman trying to make a living waiting tables. Now, I'm reading this article, and I'm wondering, why is there no descriptive descriptor of the suspects? Well, we know the answer to that. The media never identifies black suspects anymore as being black suspects. And yeah, these suspects are black. And she's white. Now, I don't know that bad people are bad people. Criminals are criminals. But we do see a dish proportionate percentage of crime being committed in the streets of America by black Americans.

Turnerville New Jersey Washington Township America Joe Biden Monroe Township Chicago North South
Every Symbol of American Patriotism Is Under Attack

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:04 min | 3 d ago

Every Symbol of American Patriotism Is Under Attack

"Was reading an article this morning online from The New York Times entitled redesigning America's flag. What if we redesigned the American flag? Why not? And so a lot of woke people came up with different designs for the American flag 6 different takes. On old glory. They want to redesign the American flag. It suggests this article suggests, and I need to apologize to you because the other day there was a conversation about the the him lift every voice and sing. As an appropriate pregame anthem if you will, it's often referred to as the black national anthem. It's a beautiful Sean. And I told you that I didn't have that big a deal with it. And a lot of people were offended and I was ready for that. I figured you might be. I just felt like it wasn't that big a deal because it wasn't replacing the national anthem. It was going to be played or it is being played before the national anthem. But there is only one national anthem. And when I read about idiocy like redesigning the American flag I'm reminded that every symbol of patriotism every act of expressing our love of country. Everything that we believe in America as Americans is under attack. Then there should be no wiggle room. At sporting events, either. There should only be one Nash anthem.

The New York Times America Sean Nash
Ahmaud Arbery's mom: Thankful for justice and son's legacy

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 d ago

Ahmaud Arbery's mom: Thankful for justice and son's legacy

"The mother of the black Georgian man slain in twenty twenty after being chased by three white men says she feels blessed this year despite her loss AP correspondent Norman hall reports of Montgomery's mother says her sons if the thanksgiving chairs a symbol of justice and despite what she says is an empty spot in her heart she is grateful I'm thankful because his first thanksgiving that would happen saying that we finally got justice Ramana wonder Cooper Jones spent the past six weeks away from home since jury selection started October eighteenth she moved away from Brunswick after her son was killed she says the coming days will be a time for rest and for reflection on memories of her son such is his favorite foods I'm not like butter beans you like butter beans and pork chops I Norman hall

Norman Hall Cooper Jones Montgomery Ramana Brunswick
Reuters Is Suddenly Very Concerned About the Spread of COVID

The Dan Bongino Show

00:58 sec | 4 d ago

Reuters Is Suddenly Very Concerned About the Spread of COVID

"So Reuters is very concerned about the risk of COVID Reuters you know fake news agency They're very concerned about the risk of COVID From Cubans protesting in the street of Cuba You know the same Reuters it was extremely concerned about COVID spreading during the Black Lives Matter protest Just kidding Of course they were in concern About the Black Lives Matter protests in COVID Again they like communist BLM or communists so they want to support them So you want to throw kind of water on it and say hey listen there could be COVID spread during the BLM protest So they did nothing But here's a headline from Reuters Cuban protests risk exacerbating COVID-19 spike all of a sudden are concerned Interesting because when you read some of their own headlines about the BLM protests thousands joined Black Lives Matter protests outside the U.S. embassy in London There's no mention of that whole COVID thing Because as I said to you opening the show you know the media They're communist sympathizers

Reuters Covid BLM Cuba U.S. Embassy London
EXPLAINER: Trio guilty of killing Ahmaud Arbery. What now?

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

EXPLAINER: Trio guilty of killing Ahmaud Arbery. What now?

"What now for the three white men convicted of murder in the death of a model armory Travis McMichael his father Greg a neighbor William Roddy Brian all face a mandatory sentence of life in prison after a modeler Bree was shot dead in Georgia the judge will decide whether the men ever have a chance of parole there's no sentencing date yet the judge said he wanted to give both sides time to prepare the net Michael's plan to appeal the verdicts Brian's lawyer says he plans to file new legal motions after thanksgiving separately federal authorities have charged a man with hate crimes saying they chased and killed armory because he was black that case is scheduled to go to trial in February I'm ready to fall lay

Travis Mcmichael William Roddy Brian Bree Greg Georgia Brian Michael
Get Yours and Gift a Copy of 'American Marxism' for Black Friday

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 4 d ago

Get Yours and Gift a Copy of 'American Marxism' for Black Friday

"By the way you got to watch life liberty and label in this Sunday 8 p.m. good lord it's part one of the Trump interview You want to see this great interview two big huge personalities and a lot of news was made actually in this interview So you should watch that It's this Sunday on Fox part one of the Trump interview and of course you know Black Friday is coming the day after tomorrow right That's when you're supposed to check off all the boxes on your shopping list And you know there are people in your life that need to read American Marxism It's a great book It's the book to define the era that we're living in right now I'm drawing off of it as we speak for the first two hours here Many of the things that I've raised and brought up about how there's an intent to divide and change and deconstruct this nation it's right there in American Marxism and more importantly in his final chapter in its epic That final chapter could be a book in and of itself It talks about where we go from here and what we can do about it That's what I love about Mark

FOX Mark
Former Officer Brandon Tatum Describes the Driving Force Behind the War on Police

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:51 sec | 5 d ago

Former Officer Brandon Tatum Describes the Driving Force Behind the War on Police

"We obviously see a war on police and it's going in different in every community. What do you think is the main driving force behind that? Because it's not even that popular in the black community to get rid of police. Well, you know, I think that it's political. A lot of people like to promote something that make you feel good to get you emotionally charged, and it has no real positive effect. There is no rational reason to defund police in any circumstance. If anything, they want to fund the police for the things that they complain about. You want to get them better training. You want to make sure they're equipped, you want to be able to hire more police officers who are qualified, who represent the community. So I think it's our political, man. I think that when black people get killed by police, there's an emotional charge, and there's an emotional financial benefit. You get people charged up, people make a lot of money that's invested in race hustle. And I think they use that to get leverage to votes and but they don't have a solid real perspective.

"black american" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"black american" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The courtauld gallery, the museum attached to the court old institute, one of the great international centers for the study of art history, is reopening to the public after a three year closure. One of those remarkable institutions built for a belief that enjoying an understanding art improves society, the courtauld is best known for the founding impressionist and post impressionist collection of the textile magnate Samuel courtauld and his wife Elizabeth. But it was later joined by other collections that added major works by cranach, Botticelli, Rubens, and host of others. They much loved in London, the old courtauld Gary didn't really show art in the best way. But now, after a beautiful and sensitive renovation by withered Watson man architects, its reopening, with spaces repurposed and opened up, new rooms created a new commission from the painter cecily Brown, and a series of displays which bring fresh light to its magnificent collection. I went to the gallery to take a tour with its director Ernst vegan fem clear burgund. Ernst, we're in the earliest part of the collection here. And this is in a way a kind of problematic part of the collection because it used to be kind of hidden away, right? That's right. I mean, it's a wonderful part of the collection. And that was the challenge really to bring it back to prominence. It used to be displayed in a single gallery on the ground floor. And what tended to happen was that people walked straight past it, drawn by the great impressionists on the second floor. And so what we wanted to do was really to create a situation where people could really for the first time enjoy an encounter these pictures in a very sort of high quality setting. This is really one of the most important collections of early netherlandish and early Italian paintings in the UK. Indeed. And I'm going to focus on this amazing work attributed to Robert compound. It's a triptych. It's an altarpiece. Tell us about it. One of my very favorite pictures in the collection full stop painted by Robert compound. We believe who was a contemporary of January van Eyck, worked in tournai. It's an absolutely extraordinary sort of miraculous survival across more than 500 years. It's relatively small scale, probably used for private devotion in the home rather than on a church altar. In the center panel, we see Christ a lowered into the tomb after his crucifixion on the right hand side is his resurrection with a group of very exotic leaves dressed as soldiers sleeping at his feet as he rises out of the tomb and an angel sitting on their lid of the tomb that has moved aside. And on the left hand side is the donor who sits next to his little white dog rather touchingly. At the head of a path that winds through the landscape in which we also see the three crosses of the crucifixion. He remains unidentified rather intriguingly. And coming out of his mouth is a white scroll on which one imagines originally there were the first words of a prayer a prayer which is sort of enabling him to visualize this extraordinary scene..

court old institute great international centers fo Samuel courtauld cranach cecily Brown Ernst vegan Botticelli Rubens Ernst Watson Elizabeth tournai Gary London Robert van Eyck UK
"black american" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:32 min | 2 months ago

"black american" Discussed on More Content Talk

"See that mentality. That's the history of this nation. Will you know he's up the he's not tim. He doesn't have good temperance. And you know he's always. She's always talking at a turn. Oh my goodness it's awful actually thinking about it. Masters failed to exert prudent in proper attention often ran into trouble with hired slaves. The hired south carolina. Slave charles blacksmith by trade was proud of the fact that there was no white man around him when his owner announced he was moving to mississippi. Charles refused to accompany him unless the master retakes wife at different times he shoved one white man to the ground threatened another told the third that no white man ever had or ever would master him. When the owner overseer when the owners overseer attempted to whip him he took the whip away and struck him and went on his way even when the slave was subdued and flogged. It had no effect on him. He would curse his master soon as taken down. Apparently dudley hired field hand in madison parish. Louisiana felt the same way ordered to work by overseer deadly picked up his ho and slash the overseer in the face besides the great physical suffering and loss of time occasion by said of said slave. The overseer was impaired for life. Well how do you do for some hired. Slaves resistance was more devious following the death of her master. The twenty six year old slave ellen who is described as a good hand in a very good looking negro. Isn't that cute very good. Looking knee is very good looking new. Grow watch what happens. Was hired out to family. Davidson county tennessee by the minor hairs of her former owner as a hireling she cleaned wash made beds folded linens swept in cooks after being with the family a few months. She gave my wife roasted apple to eat. George mcmurray the slave owner who had hired ellen explained upon cutting. Open the apple to divide between my children. My wife discovered that there was something unusual placed upon the inside of the something unusual was mercury. Where quicksilver ellen had taken a knife scraped mercury off the back side of a mirror carefully poked a hole in the core of an apple. Poor the mercury into the whole and roasted the apple. Well those are only some of the bad ass slave stories In my new set on more content. Talk that i'm going to be doing Because these people were bad ass they're just not written about probably because they don't want the dear little white by children to hear about such things. But hell i'll just put it on the radio and then when they grow up in their eighteen. They'll just hear it on my radio show and then they'll be like our podcast pug Excuse me excuse me not radio anyway. I don't know why that but These are bad asses and they deserve to be remembered. God dammit so. I'm getting the word out. I have a bunch of stories like these this This goes on and on and on is a big big big big long long long thing. So i can't all of them one episode menendez here These stories are awesome. Please spread them around the world In resistance to the taking over of schools and In in order to spread a real history to people remember again this. The oxford university press. This is snow. Whatever the royal whatever people say okay. Runaway slaves rebels on the plantation. Look it up our at everyone I really appreciate you tuning in. I'm not gonna plug the show on a very important episode like this so i hope you have a phenomenal day evening afternoon. Fiesta siesta downtime. Showtime time lunchtime party time whatever it may be an remember when life ditch down. You could always laugh at something else farewells..

Slave charles blacksmith ellen apple George mcmurray south carolina dudley tim mississippi Davidson county Charles madison Louisiana tennessee menendez oxford university Showtime
"black american" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

13:26 min | 2 months ago

"black american" Discussed on More Content Talk

"black american" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:25 min | 5 months ago

"black american" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

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Americans <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the existence of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> slavery in this country <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brand <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> republicanism <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as a sham <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> your humanity <Speech_Music_Female> as a base pretense <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and your christianity <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> as <Speech_Music_Female> a lot <Speech_Music_Female> right. <Speech_Female> That was a reach straight <Speech_Female> from the library <SpeakerChange> of congress. <Speech_Female> I <Laughter> would have been like. Yeah <Laughter> and your wig. Lugubrious <Laughter> your <Speech_Music_Female> petticoats. <SpeakerChange> Malek <Laughter> horse balls <Speech_Music_Female> and you would teeth <Speech_Music_Female> got her mice <Speech_Music_Female> which you <Speech_Music_Female> all dying of consumption <Speech_Female> ass. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I know <Laughter> when. I see it <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> but <SpeakerChange> then <Speech_Music_Female> the civil war <Speech_Music_Female> happen <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it completely <Speech_Female> flipped the script on july <Speech_Music_Female> fourth <SpeakerChange> especially <Speech_Music_Female> in the south <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> because now <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lack people could actually <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> celebrate freedom <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and white <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> southerners were in no <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> move to celebrate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the independence of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a country that had <Speech_Music_Female> just what there <Speech_Music_Female> s so suddenly <Speech_Music_Female> independence <Speech_Female> day became an <Speech_Female> almost exclusively <Speech_Female> black holiday <Speech_Female> in the former confederacy. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Black people <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> have picnics. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> They watch fireworks. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> recited the emancipation. <Speech_Female> Proclamation <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> could actually <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> celebrate freedom <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and white <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> southerners were in no <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> move to celebrate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the independence of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a country that had <Speech_Music_Female> just what there <Speech_Music_Female> s so suddenly <Speech_Music_Female> independence <Speech_Female> day became an <Speech_Female> almost exclusively <Speech_Female> black holiday <Speech_Female> in the former confederacy. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Black people <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> have picnics. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> They watch fireworks. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> recited the emancipation. <Speech_Female> Proclamation <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> thirteenth amendment <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> would sounds like <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> spun except for <Laughter> remodel documents. <Laughter> I <Laughter> <Advertisement> don't know maybe if they put <Laughter> <Advertisement> like a veto <SpeakerChange> it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sleep <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> involuntary <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> servitude <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> except as punishment for <Speech_Music_Male> crimes. The <Speech_Music_Male> putty show <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> shall exist within <Speech_Music_Male> the united <SpeakerChange> states. <Speech_Female> Now <Speech_Female> it's no surprise. <Speech_Female> That racist whites didn't <Speech_Female> like black people celebrating <Speech_Female> their <SpeakerChange> freedom from <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> racist whites <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> so they decided the party. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Add to stop. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> starting in eighteen. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Seventies <Speech_Music_Female> white mobs began <Speech_Music_Female> attacking <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> black gatherings on july <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> fourth and stone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the state <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> legislature passed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> laws banning celebrations <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> near black neighborhoods <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> pushing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> parades out <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of city limits <Speech_Music_Female> and even forbidding <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> street vendors <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> from setting up foods <Laughter> saw the black areas. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Do <Speech_Female> you know how raise this. <Speech_Female> You have to beat <Laughter> a want less donald <Laughter> cake. <Speech_Female> Basically these racist <Laughter> lawmakers were the <Laughter> original barbecue <Speech_Music_Female> back <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> and sobbing black celebrations. <Speech_Music_Female>

britney spears congress
"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

02:02 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"And housing grants and certainly business loans. And things like that so for me. It's not really that controversial. The the the issue is. How do you pay this. What period of time do you do this. And what forms. But that's something. Several lots of us are working on constantly and there are numerous models around this. And so i would say Check out some of the writing on reparations certainly sandy dirty myself and others Throughout the country working on this and But there are many ways many different models that we could take but we should not stop because there's debate about should it be Cribs or should it be a native american or or different groups of black people. Yes there should be different programs for different people and we leave it there unresolved but the conversation continues. It will certainly continue here. Andre perry senior fellow in the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. He also has a book called. Know your price valuing black lives and property in america's black cities published last year. Thank you for having this conversation with us. Dr perry we really appreciate it. Thanks for having. Brian lehrer daily politics. Podcast is an excerpt from my life. Daily radio show the brian lehrer show on. Wnyc radio ten am to noon eastern time if you wanna listen live at wnyc dot org. Thanks for listening today. Talk to next time..

Brian lehrer Andre perry last year america today ten am Wnyc radio brian lehrer perry noon eastern time wnyc dot org brookings institution daily politics lots american
"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

05:52 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"Doesn't mean that that's exactly right. So there's like burdens and benefits that comes from systemic racism and many white americans in regardless of your lineage benefited from systemic racism and as evidenced by the ten to one wealth gap It's it's also evidence in homeownership rates. And even you see the the effects of all of this in-depth rates because the cove it that that systemic racism provided a layer of protection that black americans on average do not have or did not get in the same way tanya in east new york. You're on wnyc with dr andre perry from the brookings institution. Hi tanya thank you for calling. Hi and thank you for having me. Let dr perry my thing with the systematic systematic racism. Do they really wanna give us reputations. Everybody knows about black wall street. We know how you take things out sis. Racism take things out of the africa black america and co communities. And things like that. My thing is that we do not want to intrude on anything with white people. Have we want our own fin. We weren't going in neighborhoods of your kept the resources and our neighborhoods like having your we need to go to your school. It was fair all we want is for to be treated like equal people who helped build this country just like the white americans who took the country from the native american. All we want is reparations. It's not hard black people. Have you know we black when we go on for these loans so hard for reparation. We black accounts to get red line for houses. I get a higher interest rates and all this stuff like that. And then my house devalue because you guys we cut systematic. Racism says this area is not east. New york is my good now because people say is not good but soon as other coaches come in the neighborhood then it's going to get the resources and get developed and then it'd be a good neighborhood right. My thing is that we went on able to be good when we're in there because we won't come to yours if you leave us when we supposed to have we will not bother you come to other races other other areas. And that's why reparations five you want say what's interesting we you know. I do a lot of research on housing. And it's and it's fascinating to see home. Values increase white poop. People move in the community and which robs so when when white people aren't there. You're not seeing the kind of infrastructure. You're not seeing the kind of funding and that schools you're not seeing a everything from the streetlights being fixed to the potholes include and and and we don't need white savers..

New york ten africa tanya east new york five dr andre perry one america black brookings institution white dr perry street american americans
"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

03:16 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"The federal government paying for the reparations for the descendants of the enslaved of americans and so we would not be paying for members of the diaspora who were descendants of the enslaved in jamaica or the caribbean or in africa It would really be a american descendants and we could achieve that number way. Actually we have a lot of records physical records but then you have now Genetic testing and lots of other things. We can work that but for things like housing. We redlining what it wasn't that long ago we actually know who lived in these areas. That were red. Line and so a municipalities would be responsive states and municipalities ended. Federal government will be responsible for those claims and so It somewhat confusing but really not. I mean throughout history. We've given reparations to groups including nine eleven victims for injuries caused by things that were out of their control. We've seen asian americans who were in. Turn receive reparations. We've seen native americans receive reparation. Of course internationally. We've seen jews and other groups receive reparation. There is practice in doing this. This is not coming out of the blue. So what i think people get caught up on. You'll hear often hear people. Say i didn't because i didn't own slaves. Why am i paying. No you're not paying the federal government paying just like there's lots of services i don't use That the federal government pays for because just this past year. What's interesting is that. After two weeks of being socially distance you you've had businesses demanding the federal government repair for asking them to shut down their business. Now imagine what. It's like to be socially distance for generations. What kind of repair would you need. And so this idea that people get hung up on reparations. I just don't buy it. I think that people believe in reparations. Most americans believe in reparations. They just don't believe in reparations for black people and then the questions come because when it comes to americans and cova or nine eleven victims or other incidents which say hey that that's the right thing to to have some former reparations but when it comes to black people people say oh i didn't own any slaves. I didn't do and it doesn't hold up. Well the distinction. I think white people need to look at a speak personally. I didn't own any slaves. My answers ancestors didn't own any slaves. My four grandparents all were immigrants in the twentieth century. so they certainly didn't own any slaves but does that mean that. I didn't benefit from systemic racism..

jamaica africa twentieth century caribbean nine eleven victims federal government After two weeks four grandparents this past year cova american asian jews americans
"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

03:55 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"Fifty percent of federal contracts that the executive branch controls up from ten percent which the white house estimates would mean a hundred billion dollars in investments over the next five years reparations or not reparations meaningful dot meaningful. I think that biden had the conceptualization of equity that is one of that defined as fairness under the law and in many the actions in the fact sheet that he The vitamin station. Put out this week. we're really Address fairness under the law. Things that government should have been doing in the first place Making sure that peculiar cure mint or contracting services would black brown and agent businesses are going through the federal government making sure that there is investment in in black businesses. And so i think it's important to remove the drags of racism. I'm from the federal government. And and that's what i think This latest attempt is doing one that i'm very that's a personal issue of mine in the fact sheet. They're going to look at appraisal. So a lot of my research has shown that homes and black neighborhoods are underpriced by twenty three percent about forty eight thousand dollars per home cumulatively that about one hundred and fifty six billion in lost equity in black neighborhoods simply because of the concentration of black people in the area and so that's one hundred and fifty six billion and i just want to put this into context one hundred and fifty-six billion would have finance more than four million black owned businesses based on the average amount. Black people use the startup their firms. It would have paid for more than eight million four year. College degrees public degrees. Replace the pipes in flint michigan. Three thousand times over it would have covered all the hurricane katrina damaged. It's it's double the annual economic burden of the opioid crisis. That's just one hundred and fifty-six billion can you imagine if rep Some type of reparations package that will cover the racial wealth gap which it would require around Up anywhere between five to twelve trillion dollars be Different estimates and so a lot could be done but but the point is that i do think removing racism from federal policy encouraging state and local leaders to do the same. We'll help but even if you make everything consistent under the law you won't necessarily close the racial wealth gap and that requires some form of stimulus so before we go to calls in our lines are full and tanya in east new york see you online one. You'll be the first caller who would qualify as you imagine it. Because i think the concept of reparations is overwhelming too many people who don't know how to figure out who would qualify. How much is owed. How could they be fairly paid. How much of a difference could they make. So this is one of those As do like descendants of enslaved people in this country who could demonstrate that lineage somehow personally or also other members of the african diaspora like immigrant family members from the caribbean or africa itself or only people below a certain wealth threshold today. How could that question of eligibility be handled. Because i think to be frank. A lot of white people get hung up on this. And there's different claims for different injury so for slavery in for the enslaved in america. You're talking about the national..

ten percent Fifty percent america one hundred and fifty six bill twenty three percent one hundred and fifty-six bill five more than eight million more than four million africa twelve trillion dollars about one hundred and fifty si first about forty eight thousand dol east new york today caribbean this week Three thousand times hundred billion dollars
"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

03:03 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"Your home build wealth passed on to your children and it's hymning contributes to the ten to one wealth gap between white and black american. Bet you you spoke of earlier and so for me This is something communities should be doing institutions should be ruling. It's never too late to the right thing. You quote a pro reparations critic of the evanston plan these twenty five thousand dollar grants to black homeowners to buy maintain mortgages You quote a pro reparations critic of that plan Evanston alderman cecily fleming. Who called it merely a housing plan dressed up as reparations. What's the distinction. She was trying to make and is it important. There is a distinction that a lot of people really do believe that reparations is an act of congress that acknowledges a or a sense for a comprehensive approach to redress the injuries caused and so it would be eventually. Hr forty that the reparation studied they went caught with the plan that plan what essentially be enacted by congress and then you would see essentially true probably trillions of dollars to progress of reparations problems at is nothing really comes from washington go to washington and so for me. It's reparations thing. Reparations won't come from washington that will go to we. We are starting to see communities. Local leaders acknowledged what the and by the way. The federal government wasn't the only entity to cause injury to black people in the housing market. Housing is a product that confronts federal state and local entities and all of those things essentially Polluted to harm black people and each has a responsibility to pay back so it is small. I'm no question is not enough like i. but it is reparations. Reparation plain and civil is repairing the damage us by an entity in this case evanston evanston had the role to play dr perry. What about the proposals to reduce racial wealth disparity that the president announced in tulsa. There's one to help black. Americans by and keep homes that i mentioned and the other main one that i've seen is to increase federal contracts with minority owned small businesses to.

evanston ten trillions of dollars washington twenty five thousand dollar congress tulsa each black one Americans Evanston government dr perry evanston plan american forty
"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

05:31 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"Talked on wednesday show after the commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the tulsa race massacre about the controversy. That broke out there last week. Over reparations for survivors and descendants of survivors of the massacre so much wealth was destroyed. When the so-called black wall street neighborhood in tulsa was targeted and destroyed that it has affected the prospect of specific people who can be identified as individuals and tulsa and have never been made whole now beyonce's entering the history for more public awareness like was done this week beyond ceremony and a lot of media conversation. What does tulsa. What does america. Oh those families in actual dollars and cents. We talked about that in terms of tulsa on wednesday. now we'll take it on nationally. Now here's part of the problem. Conventional approaches to closing the racial wealth gap have only worked to a limited degree. Here's president president biden acknowledging an example of that in his speech in tulsa on monday shockingly the percentage of black american home ownership is lower today in america then when the fair housing act was passed more than fifty years ago day. That's wrong were committed to change that. So the president's proposing a new program to help black americans buy homes. It's one of several measures. He announced in his tulsa speech intended to close the racial wealth. Gap we'll talk about some of the others with our guest. Andre perry from the brookings institution in just a minute but equity in a home. Think about it is just one example of the gaping wealth disparities. That simply shouldn't exist any more or certainly shouldn't be as big as they are if the civil rights laws and affirmative action and other measures instituted way. Back in the nineteen sixties. Were working well enough right by measures. I've seen widely cited. The average white family in the us owns ten times. The wealth of the average black family not ten percentage points more ten times. Think about that. If you're white think about that if you're anyone else the biden measures we should say also mostly conventional. The president avoided the word reparations in that tulsa speech but there are examples of reparations around the country that are worth talking about in march the city of evanston illinois passed a small one twenty five thousand dollars toward mortgages and other home ownership for black residents also in march the virginia legislature. Passed and governor. Ralph northam signed. A bill called the enslaved ancestors college access scholarship and memorial program..

ten times tulsa last week Ralph twenty five thousand dollars monday march nineteen sixties this week wednesday black wall street fair housing act evanston illinois today tulsa race massacre one one example ten percentage points Andre perry fifty years ago
"black american" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

01:55 min | 6 months ago

"black american" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

"June twenty eighth to through thirtieth hat lowly historic house and garden in woodside california with an extended conversation. I'm excited to share with you. Please meet april lee horticulturist speaker and founder of the media platform called conquer soil based in atlanta. Abra says she is a self proclaimed horticulturist extraordinaire. That is half country. Bumpkin half buji occasionally extra at inherently southern. She writes the opportunities. I've been fortunate to experience during my career. In the garden industry have far surpassed my ancestors wildest dreams educated at auburn university college of agriculture in auburn alabama with a bs in horticulture and a distinguished leadership in public horticulture fellow from longwood gardens in kennett square pennsylvania abra takes notes on plants and pop culture and shares her observations across her blog and social media con abra to bring her distinct perspective to horticulture popular culture fashion celebrity and the history of black gardeners her impressive professional path began as a city arborists which led to landscape management roles at two major international airports in both atlanta and houston and as a university of georgia extension agent years of research into the history of black american gardeners propelled abra to collect her research into a new book scheduled for publication in the fall of twenty twenty two. The book is called conquer. The soil black america and the untold stories of our country's gardeners farmers and growers conquer the soil profiles forty-five hidden figures of horticulture. The black men and women whose accomplished careers in the plant world are little known or untold among them are warmly hughes enslaved african american who was head gardener at.

Abra atlanta auburn april lee abra June twenty eighth houston forty-five hidden figures kennett square black both two major international airpor african american america alabama auburn university college of a pennsylvania of georgia california twenty twenty two
"black american" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"black american" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"For having me. Fry. it's a pleasure to be here so we brought you on to help us understand how to stay safe. This coming month as we go to public places with lots of people including polling locations rallies or marches for some people. What's the first step towards staying safe in these circumstances. Especially if you are women of color. I would say first and foremost obviously were still in the midst of a pandemic so we definitely want to make sure we're exercising. All of our very vigilant precautions to reduce the spread of covid nineteen. Having said that. I think we have to invest in our own individual personal safety that requires sometimes education right. Because we don't always know what that looks like and i do the same thing. We go along with our daily routine and sometimes we forget to stop and take pause. I need to be more mindful of the ps and qs that are necessary just for personal safety practices. So a couple of things when you're going somewhere if you haven't been there before do your research find out where you're going to before you get there. Just educate yourself. Let me take a few minutes to see where i'm going to see. Is there a gas station around me. My tank full. So if i need to be on the road for a longer period of time i'm not stranded depending upon the event you're going to whether it is voting whether it is going out to meet somebody at an event is based on your comfort level. If you know. I am not someone that is comfortable. Once the sun goes down then you find out the hours of operation for what you're trying to do. It's going to a polling place recognize. There may be line so that may extend the our somewhat plan ahead. Take someone with you if they're available and also tell people where you're going. I don't always do that. I have left the state. And i have forgotten to make those notifications and i have had my loved ones. They really is that what we're doing now. You know it takes nothing at all to let people know where you're going and also in an emergency. Where's my exit. People may laugh at me but a lot of times. I do look at that when i'm out at a restaurant or out at unfamiliar space. They may be illuminated or they may not be so how you enter a space be the best and most available opportunity if you need to leave there in an emergency. You can't always prevent something but what you can do is practice tools that put yourself in the best possible opportunity to succeed in. Whatever you're being faced with. Yeah you're talking. About exits reminded me of the days when i used to go out to the club and those days they were over before it happened but keep an honest it. It was over for me a long time ago. And let's just be real. You know we are entering an election season where some people fear that there might be violent said protests were outside of protest and there have been tragic circumstances like the one in kenosha at a black lives matter protests back in august. But if you do perceive yourself to be in a place where people are armed. How do you then process things number one time and distance what i tell people. Your job is not to engage physically with anyone unless you have no other alternative. It is literally life or death so if you are somewhere where it is too large. It just has too many people. You're just feeling like not even that you've seen anything. I'm just not feeling comfortable. Remove yourself take yourself out of the situation because what you don't want to do is feel like i'm uncomfortable here. I should remove myself. I don't and then a situation becomes more involved and now it becomes that much more difficult for you to extract yourself if you see something that is of concern to you than please. Report it to your local public safety authority for that area. But the goal for you as your personal safety is to remove yourself from that situation at every opportunity in less literally it is life and death and then that's a completely separate conversation that was holly drains. Ceo of elite strategy global inc. Thank.

kenosha elite strategy global inc.
"black american" Discussed on Necessary Blackness Podcast

Necessary Blackness Podcast

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"black american" Discussed on Necessary Blackness Podcast

"Peace and black power family is a host Shabazz and I am here for another episode of necessarily blackness podcasts and I am here with my lovely co host Mossy Lea. was going on. Man This week was monumental. With everything that we are going through in twenty twenty with Colville nineteen in. Bad. This has been a hell of a year been rough. Everybody will agree to that. And when I look back on twenty twenty, the highlight of my moment is going to be the foundation black American conference. Shot. Out To weeknights sheet putting that on and pulling that off. It was a lot that went into doing that because cove it was social distancing. On Great Lineup of speakers I was fortunate enough the speak I spoke on the school to prison pipeline. I spoke about what it means to be a foundation black. American, in how we have to separate ourselves as a distinctive class of individuals because. Everybody that's black. Didn't go through the Peculiar Institute of Slavery. They didn't go to reconstruction they didn't go to Jim Crow didn't go through the civil rights ever and a lot of damn showing going to struggle of fighting racism and white supremacy with us. Today we do love our African brothers in Ribian brothers, but we have a unique experience unlike anybody else. We don't subscribe to people of Color or any those of terms in terminologies. But enough about me, what was the highlight of your moment at conference I technically listening to your interview with Jane Yes. Shot out to the sister that hosted all very good sister. She interviewed me on stage live right? It was nice to see. Judge Joe Brown it was nice to see all of the presenters actually or two speakers. We have point. Of. Resent mom just hosa Professor James Small. It was a wonderful event in like you said, a lot of social distancing they plan this like almost perfectly. You know there was people had their masks line good interview good vibes, people were they seem to be a Happy to see one another happy to be there to build to listen to learn and once again, thanks Atari putting his whole thing together because it was a success, it seemed like. Another highlight moment, which is Brown judge Brown he spoke about manhood. He spoke about not just about manhood but the willingness to die like a man. And I don't know if any of Y'all of me with Joe Brown outside of his TV appearance on the long the longest running. Court TV show. But if you happen to catch them on you to. To a more Blau talk radio or anywhere on the Internet. The buzzer will be going in and he went in last night he went. Back. Back. If you are lucky enough to get a cliff or some footage or anything of what he talked about yesterday, you won't be disappointed I'll tell you what I'm GonNa do for. The listeners. I am GONNA insult a clip in here. But the clip will not be on video proportion that you guys will be viewing on. Youtube, it'll be an audio version where you can listen to us on items on Google play on spotify and I know a lot of the are starting to subscribe to our Youtube. Channel that we just started. Make sure you smash that light by a continue to. Subscribe to us, but you laugh to go to the Youtube I'm gonNA posted a clip of. Judge Joe Brown I posted a small clip of COBB. Ken Me Another Dynamic SPEECO and all my grand master teacher of Professor James Small. Professor James Small talked about African resistance and he talked about the struggle and the resistance down we fought. That is seldom mentioned in the history books some I did know about some I didn't know about, but I'm going to let y'all all get a sneak peek of that I. Don't know if they're gonNA on 'cause I did see some filming. We said that there may be. Some video they may put out a video, the conference so I may not be out of luck all way. What else you enjoy? The victors around a lot of unique vendors. So we saw a young man who was an artist I such little brother yet. Gerry Nice artwork we saw people had their own businesses. Even, the African American equivalent to. The food food drop off. You had the buzzers. Is called black in mobile and they all the black. You know I don't even want to say will eat but they do deliver in several different cities they are now in Atlanta. I seen the more CNN black enterprise covered them, and Israel. Nights to see when read about something, you see it in mainstream media in Iraq the individuals out. So shout out to them Brothers Day was here. Also you had a every majette. Who is a historian? Has a lot of Audifax millions of dollars of our history. This brother went in bought and he was there as well and he was you know showing off some of his artifacts some t shirts I know you said, you liked the. One of the t shirts which one was that year I love Angela Davis. Amid, to circle back around to pick that up, he had his it was it was a angela. Won The front with her mug shot in some you know inspiring worry. So it was it was a nice piece yet in the that he was on our podcast off make sure you go to our archives. You always view it on the Buzzer name is every Majette also see my brother Tj law in out there, and that brother he is out here teaching people about real estate about gentrification and he was out there. Who else did I see I've seen a lot of people I ran into Sanita from satellite TV Iranians alk. abandoned to offer. Rick, Mathis from black five day. I was just waiting. Yeah I ran into all Jefferson from let. just a of individuals man who? WILL WILL COOL One of the things family. that. This event did that separated from a lot of events that I attended? Is that there was no arguments was no debate no one was there was.

Joe Brown Youtube Professor James Small twenty twenty Peculiar Institute of Slavery Shabazz Colville Mossy Lea. Atari Angela Davis Jane Yes Jim Crow Sanita Blau Atlanta CNN Ken Me Jefferson
"black american" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"black american" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"When I don't see those a habit in the company for X. amount of years, not hold certain titles. The doubt in my mind, representative Al Green asking a pointed question two major bank CEO's if you believe that your likely successor. Will be a woman or a person of color. Would you kindly extend a hand into the air? Okay. That was his awkward. I mean from the way. Those Bank CEO's reacted at Congressman might as well have Austin to raise their hands if they'd ever seen Mike Pence eating flaming hot cheeto, not a single one of those banks thinks it's even possible that a person of color will run the company that says a lot. I mean if you ask me, every bank should be run by a black woman. Because banks out here losing trillions of dollars, credit, default, swaps, mortgage scams, and then after they screw up, average people lose their homes, meanwhile black women out in these streets every day figuring out how to make a dollar stretch into ten. I'll tell you right now if my grandmother ran a major bank. She would have been the one bailing America outs. You know the economy crashed Oh. Baby, let me see I've got two trillion here. Oh There you, go you bring back change now. If you're one of the few black people who have made it into corporate America congratulations, you're award is working every day with some people who have no idea how to act around you. Micro aggression described indirect or subtle discrimination, and if you're on the receiving end, it can be as hurtful as anything overt wiping music. You speak so well. And then. Or you very articulate and my own percents fans like you don't sound black like what it sounds like and sound white. Really mean you're not like the others and stuff like that, and you think about because it's like you're not like the what are the others near Sumptious is always gonNA lead in I'm I know less. My manager turns to me and says well. Is it your hair so big because you're all of your intelligences? And physically grabbed my air. Yeah, every day. Black people have to navigate workplace filled with people who don't even realize that they're doing something offensive. You're so intelligent. It must be in your hair. This is what you get from living in a segregated society. Instead of knowing black people and Black Culture You go white folks into acting with black people like they're making contact with et. Hello, my friend, do your people shake hands? Not Corona virus, and it's because millions of whites Americans don't have the first two of how to interact with their black coworkers. We'll just even be normal around them. That black people in Corporate America have to spend an inordinate amount of time. Making white people feel comfortable for those of us who have been in corporate America. We have to be able to exist and not only exist to really thrive in two totally different cultures, this idea of double consciousness. Our.

Corporate America CEO America Al Green Mike Pence representative Sumptious Austin Congressman
"black american" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"black american" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Everybody welcome to another episode of the daily social distancing show I'm Trevor Noah and it is now week. Five of the George Floyd protests against police brutality and month four of being stuck in my apartment, recording the show now New York. City, is actually in phase two of reopening, which means that many people can go back to their offices. However I am not yet going back to my office. Because that's exactly what corona virus thinks, I'm going to go. To beat the virus. You gotta think like the virus. Anyway on tonight's episode we speak to former police investigator, seth stauton about what policing can do to change its image, and the way they act in America L. Hughley is also on the show to talk about his new book and passing out on stage. We'll learn what it's like to be black in corporate America. But first, let's catch up on. Today's headlines Welcome to the daily social distancing show. From Trevor's couch in New York City to your couch somewhere in the world. This is the daily social distancing show with Trevor Noah. Here's A. Let's kick things off with immigration. It's the reason food has flavor. And how the president's met sixty six percents of his wives. When Donald, trump rife office, his platform was that he opposed illegal immigration, and I want people to come into the country, but I wanted to come in legally. That's right big guy. But after taking office, trump began restricting legal immigration to and now thanks to corona. It looks like he's taking it all the way tonight. A new round of immigration restrictions from the White House President Trump has signed an executive order blocking entry into the United States for at least four types of visas including the H. One B. Visa high skilled workers. They're going to press. Pause on. Visas for foreign workers coming into the United, states because of the high unemployment rate in the United States say senior administration officials saying they want to see an America first economic recovery that starts with Americans. That's right folks for the time. Being immigration into America is basically shut down. which is not just GonNa hurt new immigrants. It's going to hurt a lot of Americans, too. Because as a major study concluded long run, economic growth in America would be considerably dimmed without the contributions of high skilled immigrants I mean. Let's be honest. If you actually want to save American jobs then you should build a wall to stop robots. But good luck with that. Because if you've seen movies, you know that robots are unstoppable killing sheets. And as an emigrant, personally I'm torn by the story you know because on the one hand I think this is yet another example of this administration xenophobia. On the other hand. It gives me the perfect excuse to not let my African cousin come crush on my couch. Yes, sorry sees where you can't come. Stay with me from said you can't come in how, but trevor I'm just at tourist. This doesn't affect me but I just I. Don't WanNa. Take any chances you know I. Don't WanNa I. DON'T WANNA. Make trump angry. What what did you know? What is he not anger now? Moving onto technology news when the coronavirus pandemic began, a lot of Americans hoped that they'd be a way to use smart devices to automatically alert people if they had been in contact with anyone who tested positive for the virus. You know it would be the ultimate fusion of high. Tech and public health. Well we're not getting that. But we are getting this apple watches will soon be able to tell a user if they're washing their hands long enough to prevent the spread of cove, nineteen and other illnesses, apple says in the newest update, and I'll let you know how long you're washing your hands at all. Set a countdown for twenty seconds, which is how long the CDC recommends, we should all wash our hands The Watch will vibrate when the twenty seconds are complete, the watch will use motion to detect handwashing and then use audio to confirm it by listening for running water or the wishing of soap just when I thought apples best days behind them. They come up with this because I am sick and tired of singing. Happy Birthday every time I wash my hands mainly because it makes me hungry for birthday cake, so then I eat a birthday cake icing on my hands, which means I gotta go wash my hands again which makes me want more birthday cake, and now I have diabetes. I will say one thing that concerns me is how the Apple Watch is supposed to detect that you're washing your hands. And I mean it's gonNA use hand washing motions and squishing sounds. Seems like a lot of teenage boys are going to get interrupted all day long. Also Evil Villains are going to hate this new Apple Watch, and that's how we finally destroyed the world. A fifteen more seconds. Off..

America Trevor Noah apple president George Floyd United States WanNa New York New York City Trump Donald investigator CDC seth stauton L. Hughley United White House
"black american" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"black american" Discussed on The Heat

"You had several candidates who talked about Healthcare Liz Warren Bernie Sanders of course who recently dropped out. They're no longer in the race but early on it was a significant issue. It just wasn't laid out in such racial overtones that we have now and that's because it was a problem hiding in plain sight according to Bernie Sanders approach a rising tide lifts all boats. But that doesn't do you any good if your boat has a hole in it and there's another expression the black community that that comes to mind and that is when white America gets a cold. African Americans get pneumonia. And that is the disparity that we're seeing right now in real time going forward. We don't even know if we're going to have a presidential election and certainly the campaign has been truncated as you mentioned so. It's unclear how much this is going to rise to the top. Certainly a lot of white voters is foremost on their minds is going to be more of an issue for African Americans going forward and even if you look no further than the election Wisconsin. That happened on Tuesday where people were being asked to risk their lives to go vote either go vote and risk in corona virus or stay home and have your vote not counted. It's clear where the directions are lying on the Republican side and where the direction needs to go on the democratic side. The other problem I see. And it's something that you talk about your article in that you know there's been no national response to this in the United States. These fifty states sometimes act like fifty different countries in your article. You talked about the states. That have turned their back on the affordable. Care Act That's of course the healthcare laws that were put in place under the previous president. President Obama. these not even expanded Medicaid. Which is the state run or at least the federally? Federal Government runs Health Care Service. I mean. What is the reality of that for people living in these communities that we've been talking about this is where the chickens of Medicare expansion are coming home to roost? Mississippi again was among them and their community. Healthcare system is in tatters their counties entire jurisdictions with no doctors their entire jurisdictions where hospitals have shutdown were clinics are struggling so this is the bad wind. That's blowing off that decision. It's easy to discount medical care in good times and when you're not the person who needs to go see a doctor but if your health is on the line and you can't get to see a doctor. You're going to have to trace that decision. Back to your governor's decision to not accept. Federal money to broaden healthcare access. So it's really unfortunate but a lot of experts predicted that this day would come that there would be a catastrophe there'd be a pandemic and the decision to not accept federal. Money will cost people their lives as you say that day has now arrived Do you expect things to change? It's difficult to say. I mean not the least of which is because a lot of this is systemic but very much more of it is political. You have a chain of states. Ironically and tragically where thirteen percent of the African American population lives. Were Talking Texas Louisiana Alabama Mississippi Georgia Northern Florida North Carolina and South Carolina. Those are a chain of Republican led states that refused to take an affordable care. Act AS AN option. It's where a large number of African Americans live. It's also where a large number poor whites lift but for some reason it had been really difficult to mobilize and get people to reject the political leadership that would reject something like obamacare. So you have a big picture. Which is that there is a crying need for some kind of coordinated response and on top of that once. The pandemic is over some kind of national structure for health care and the small picture response. Which is you have very many states that have been Republican. They've been red states for a long time and is very difficult. Because of structures and different laws to overturn that power structure so nothing will happen on the large level until the smaller level understands that. This is what needs to happen. Do you know if these kinds of disparities exist in other countries. It's hard to say. I don't think they do mostly because this is just simply a theory. A lot of countries are more homogeneous both culturally and politically in terms of their population. You look at a country like South Korea. Who was were very much on the spot in intesting for these diseases. They were able to get out in front of it quite a bit quite quickly because they understand having gone through the avian flu now you could also factor in some place like Iran. Which would seem to meet that criteria. But they had an awful response. But you don't necessarily see the disparity in healthier because a lot of countries in the United States. A lot of western countries have government subsidies or government run healthcare and that tends to tamp down a lot of disparities. Why isn't this a big issue in the whole power in Congress Joseph and we have people there like Jim Clyburn We have people like John Lewis We have an Andrea Cossio Cortes or the squad as they known those four Congress people. Why isn't this why they making an issue of this? They are making less Yokosuka. Cortez in fact was very much on the Bernie Sanders Bandwagon. As far as nationalized healthcare was concerned. The problem that you identified as all those members that you talked about who were fairly progressive. Who see the big picture bear in the house which is proportionate to representation in other words in the house? You have a lot more minorities? You have a lot more. People representing those kinds of interest because you're representing broader section of the country in the Senate however that's where a lot of these healthcare bills these movements to go fund healthcare. That's where they go to die because you have two senators for every state and that means a small population state like Rhode Island against the same matter. Representation as a large population state like California scattered in between. You have the red states that I was talking about two members for each one of those states even though their populations are somewhat smaller and less concentrated than larger states so that creates imbalanced that kills a lot of these bills because you have Republicans in charge in the Senate and you have Democrats who are in the majority in the House. They can advance a progressive bill that the Republicans will either refuse to pass or not take up at all and furthermore if the Democrats somehow ended up in power in the Senate. There still is enough Republican representation for he filibuster so there's kind of unequal balance of power and that's a lot of the reason. Why not many of these proposals have gotten off the ground? And to what? Extent all these inequalities being driven by the fact that the country's main system for healthcare is a private for profit system is somewhat argue that that's the only reason why these disparities occur because there is no incentive for them not to occur now after having said that a lot of healthcare companies are seeing it in their best interest to promote broad health for everybody but it is not in their financial interest to hand over control to the federal government. That was one of the reasons why obamacare was reasonably successful with the private sector is that they still got to have control. They still got to exist in the marketplace. It seems like they would not exist. A lot of people are suggesting that they would not exist or should not exist if we have universal healthcare. So you say if this has to change it has to change the local level. How will that take place? The big picture is that has been made much harder by different laws and red states that curb or curtail voting registration and voter participation in the name of preventing fraud so when Republicans had the majority and a lot of these states there were very good and very efficient about changing districts about changing voting laws. So that's one hurdle the second hurdle is organization in that you have a lot of people despair interest and a lot of people who don't necessarily agree they're not gonna go and lockstep like the Republican Party might so organization is key organization will have to happen in order to get some of these laws or return and once those laws over overturn or justed and voting is expanded. Then you might see more real legitimate substantial change justice. Thanks so much for joining us. Yeah my pleasure I've been talking to. Joseph P Williams. He's a senior editor at. Us News and World Report. The heat is produced by CG. In America I executive produce as a tear at H. And the producers John Gilmore Joshua Bala produces. Putt cost today's guest producer. Steven page director of Digital Development as Michael Shoe. Gory once again. I'm on a ninety. Thanks for listening. You have a comment or question about today's podcast. Send US an email. You can find a teapot cost at CGT. In America DOT COM. And please if you like the heat help spread the word by subscribing rating or leaving comment with your favorite podcast provider..

United States Senate America Federal Government Bernie Sanders Liz Warren Bernie Sanders Mississippi president Republican Party Wisconsin pneumonia Bernie Sanders Bandwagon Rhode Island South Korea Yokosuka
"black american" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

09:08 min | 1 year ago

"black american" Discussed on The Heat

"And there's another expression the black community that is when white America gets a cold. African Americans get pneumonia. And that is the disparity that we're seeing right now in real time. You've got layer upon layer upon layer of contributing factors those layers. They're falling away and they're exposing the very real structural bias. That's built in to healthcare in the United States the cupboard nineteen pandemic has exposed many inequities in US healthcare not the least of which is racial according to data released in the last week an estimated seventy percent of reported covered nineteen deaths in Louisiana and Chicago among African Americans who only count for about thirty percent of the population. Each area in New York City still a hot zone for the outbreak. The death rate among Hispanics and African Americans is round twice that of its white citizens as the United States continues to struggle against the deadly virus. What are the factors leading to these? Disturbing numbers are they. Biologic Cultural Economic. And what does government and society as a whole need to do to protect the lives of all its citizens during the crisis. Hello I'm on. Welcome to the heat. Podcast with us to talk about the racial health disparities in the United States is Joseph p Williams. He's a senior editor at. Us News and World Report and writes for the healthiest communities section. His April seventh article focuses on our black people are disproportionately getting and dying from covered nineteen. He joins US via skype. Just welcome to the PODCAST. Hi It's nice to be here. Thank you looking at these racial disparities. In the United States healthcare system they existed long before covered nineteen. What are some of the chronic factors in African American communities that contribute to these infection? Numbers that we see. Well I mean how much time do you have? I mean there are a host of factors not the least of which As you mentioned health disparities there are a lot of disproportionate chronic illnesses. That are found in African American communities as far harassed whites. And we're talking about diabetes. Were talking about High blood pressure hypertension cancer a a host of illnesses that tend to surface in african-americans more than whites. And on top of that you have socio economic factors not the least of which being employment African Americans tend to have jobs that don't necessarily grant medical leave There's a lot of people who work in public facing jobs. Think retail think restaurants think bus drivers think transit a number of African Americans who have jobs that don't allow to work from home because the forementioned factors they have to be present in order to get the job and you have to be on the job in order to get a paycheck because many of these jobs don't necessarily care what the medical leave. So that's layered on top of already existing health issues and on top of that is an issue that not a lot of people talk about which is how the medical community. How the medical industry sometimes discriminates implicitly against African Americans. There's been study after. Study that talk about how doctors don't necessarily take symptoms as seriously from African Americans as from whites. How pain management is different between white doctors and black patients? How African Americans are afraid? Sometimes or anxious about the treatment that they'll get from a white doctors so you've got layer upon layer upon layer of contributing factors. And what we have here. Is those layers. They're falling away exposing the very real structural bias. That's built in to healthcare in the United States so the reported infections among African Americans and other minorities huge compared to that of the white population. But that's just in what we know right now reported cases If we look at the actual rate could it be much higher because testing is not being? Optimal testing has been far from optimal for everyone. The United States still doesn't know exactly what extent the virus is taking. Hold here in this country because we don't have enough testing kissed. We have a very serious problem in. Not Knowing how many African Americans are falling victim to this disease and how many have died because many states aren't keeping track of that data categorized by race and in order to figure out what's going on. We need to get a broad picture in that. Broad picture only comes through information for some reason to. Cdc has been very very reluctant to categorized by race. Several states same thing New York only recently released data categorized by raise Washington. Dc African American mayor here has kind of swept aside the issue by saying all death matter which is not really the point. The point is you have a disproportionate number of people who are dying and we need to figure out why you can't define the problem or begin to address it until you know how large and how substantial about problem is and that's where it comes into play and why so important. Clinton Joseph We look at the response right now. And we see these numbers. Seventy percent in many cases of people being infected are African American The response right now has not changed anywhere has it? It has not one of significant factors here is that the government has been very very slow footed and responding to this crisis. The government writ large. We haven't even talked about some of the states that have not issued shelter in place orders. Some of the states like Missouri like Alabama Mississippi State with heavy concentrations of African Americans. It was shocking this morning when I saw headlines out of Saint Louis Missouri where the entirety of the cove in nineteen patients the cover nineteen fatalities were African American. So you've got a disproportionate and uneven response on the federal level where the US government did not issue broad guidelines for states to follow. You have individual states making up what they're doing on an ad hoc basis. You have a lack of data collection which eliminates one factor that we could use to kind of examine where the problem is and what the scope of it is and you've got a lack of testing everywhere which is another factor in figuring out how big this problem is who is spreading the problem and how to get a handle on it so we can contain the vitality rate and bring this problem to heal. Your article focused on African Americans but Do you see a similar sort of situation among poor whites low income white seminar wondering how much of this has to do with economic loss. Economics is a third layer on top of all the other layers. We talk about and among White Americans. It's serious and Appalachia in the coal countries of West Virginia. The difference there is. You don't have that layer of implicit bias in the medical system. You do however have problems with transportation in getting to and from the doctor not too long ago. I was down in Mississippi Doing some reporting there on health and they're federally qualified. Healthcare clinics are threadbare right now. You have several rural hospitals that have closed you have clinics. That are overstretched. Can't get federal aid and can't get the federal medicines that they need and these are where a large proportion of African Americans and whites are living so economics is a significant factor on this can't be discounted but the racial factor and distrust that African Americans feel in the healthcare system is something that whites would not necessarily succumb to wouldn't necessarily be a factor in driving up those rates in recent years. There's been a lot of focus racial bias in the healthcare system and intern. There's been a general mistrust About healthcare among minority communities. Can you explain that? Certainly back in nineteen forties the most obvious. Example is the Tuskegee experiment. That's where the government allowed African American men to contract syphilis and it led to a whole generation of people being mistrustful of the medical system It was an experiment in real time. Then you have. The Henrietta lacks protocol where African American woman who was dying of cervical cancer. In the nineteen fifties unknowingly had her cells harvested and replicated in a lab for research and development of drugs and treatments for cervical cancer cells. That are still in use today. I might add couple that with formerly segregated hospital wards with hospitals that would not treat black people with an African American might show up with an emergency. Mike turned away. So it's been almost built in the medical systems. Dna that this legacy has not yet been concrete. We addressed and hasn't yet been examined closely. So you have that ugly past and no one has really responded or tried to address it a real substantive manner just if if we look at the election that's coming up in November if there is an election it'll take place at that time Healthcare has been one of the major issues that have been talked about so far. Are you surprised that this is not a big issue? In the kind of healthcare that African Americans can get access to it has talked about but it's also talked about in broad strokes on during the early parts of the Democratic presidential primary..

United States New York City time Healthcare America Mississippi cervical cancer Louisiana Chicago pneumonia senior editor Saint Louis Missouri West Virginia Joseph p Williams syphilis Clinton Joseph Washington