35 Burst results for "Black America"

Why Is Black America Leery of the COVID Vaccine?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:54 min | Last week

Why Is Black America Leery of the COVID Vaccine?

"You have a sense of. Why black america is leery of vaccination us mandates we. We've had we've had the senile man in the white house talk about the tuskegee 'em and Which had nothing to do with it. I think he thinks that's the same as the tuskegee institute is it to do with fear of over the white man or is it more complicated than that when joe biden and comma harris ragged to their donors that they were going to diss of vow. All of the amazing achievements that donald trump did with vaccines and they did so knowing that the group of americans most sympathetic to them. Excuse me were black americans. It is no surprise to me that people hurt those messages. Listen to those messages and believed those messages so went went so when kamala harris actually says that if a vaccine is developed under donald trump's aegis she's not going to take it vats. Listen to and that's what we're paying the price for today harris absolutely. Let me just add by the way. There are friends and relatives of mine. That believed that she still hasn't been vaccinated and believes that that is part of the reason for some of the strange behavior. We witness where she had to go to the walter. Reed reed hotel up. Or walter mondale hospital. When those texans came to town For their super spreader

Tuskegee Institute Comma Harris Donald Trump United States Joe Biden White House Kamala Harris Harris Reed Reed Walter Mondale
What Slavery Could Not Do, Government Agencies Have Been Able to Do With Impunity

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:21 min | Last week

What Slavery Could Not Do, Government Agencies Have Been Able to Do With Impunity

"Since the nineteen sixties government agencies have aggressively interfaced with black america and they have promised black america that we can fix every single problem over a trillion dollars later. We now see things. In black america that never existed before government came and knocked on the door. Such as one of those is the prison rate for black men. You can look at the records of the nineteen twenties. Nineteen thirties forties and fifties. black american. Men were the least likely to be in federal prison than any other. Racial category employment black men were the most likely to be employed in america through throughout the roaring twenties even in the middle of the great depression and afterwards up through the nineteen fifties illegitimacy mo- black children in the twenties thirties and forties. Were more likely to be born in two parent households than the population at large. We are told big lie today. We're told if you wanna look at some of the problems and challenges that face black america you have to assume that it's all a legacy of the evil of slavery of course slavery was evil but founders understood that the principle of liberty that is based in the declaration of independence understood and underscored that important point. Here's the thing what slavery could not do what jim crow could not do. Government agencies have been able to do with

America Depression Jim Crow
Naquin Homers Twice, Reds Beat Marlins 3-1 to Sweep Series

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Naquin Homers Twice, Reds Beat Marlins 3-1 to Sweep Series

"Tyler acorn hit to the Reds three solo homers in a three one down into the Marlins Mike Moustakas broke a one one tie with a leadoff shot in the fifth inning feel good obviously you know did struggle a little bit at the plate and you know it's who are obviously hit a home run and just getting in general felt pretty good but that situation a go ahead Homer was a shoot for not only me but the boys black America chair as limited Miami to a run on three hits over seven innings as Cincinnati won for the sixth time in eight games Miami wasted a sharp performance by sandy out counter right in its seventh straight loss the outcome leaves the Reds one game ahead of the Padres for the second NL wild card I'm D. ferry

Tyler Acorn Mike Moustakas Reds Marlins Miami Homer Cincinnati America Sandy Padres
Discussion Simone Biles Mental Health Challenges After Winning Bronze on Beam

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | Last month

Discussion Simone Biles Mental Health Challenges After Winning Bronze on Beam

"So i just wanna start with a very basic question to both of you. Simone biles yes has won the bronze-medal in the balance beam which is actually an even greater triumph for her. Now considering how the past week had gone for her but professor carter friend zeke. When biles. I made that announcement of withdrawing from the team competition. I just was wondering what was your first reaction. How did you feel about that. What did you think was going on. My initial reaction was of concern. And while i don't know byles you know hearing that For any athlete they withdrew Were removed from lineup. Or remove themselves made me think that she had perhaps encourage some sort of physical injury in the qualifying rounds or because of the pandemic perhaps contracted cobra as we've seen many of some of our athletes not only from the us but other countries succumb to that Then when she continued to share that she would not be competing in those events she qualified for and that it was not due to anything. Physical in real concern began to overcome me and initial thoughts of mental health issues to pass sixteen months with those respective sort of restrictive parameters The combination of postponement of the olympic games wondering what it must mean to be in the spotlight to as i reviewed all her sponsorship ads but as well reflecting on what she may be navigating in the aftermath of the sexual abuse case that she was part of so things became of greater concern and really just just hoping and wishing her well through that process over the next few days

Simone Biles Biles Byles Zeke Carter Olympic Games United States
'Black America's Attorney General' Seems to Be Everywhere

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 4 months ago

'Black America's Attorney General' Seems to Be Everywhere

"I'm Julie Walker some call him black America's Attorney General his lawyer Ben Crump and he's been very busy taking on the case is a black Americans killed by police the Florida attorney has become a powerful figure in the movement seeking equality and justice a civil rights activist al Sharpton you check the general for black America because people can go to hell what application crop represents the families of George Florida Brianna Taylor long before that there was Trayvon Martin and Michael brown he's one multi billion dollar settlements push to ban certain police tactics and last year just after Floyd's death he told a congressional committee on police reform we have right now part two systems of justice one for white Americans and another for black Americans probably earned about inequality at an early age describing that in elementary school he found out a white classmates weekly allowance was as much as what his mother made in a week working two jobs I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Ben Crump George Florida Brianna Taylor Al Sharpton Black America Trayvon Martin Michael Brown America Florida Congressional Committee Floyd
Vernon Jordan Shares Experiential Nuggets on Business, Civil Rights

In Black America

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Vernon Jordan Shares Experiential Nuggets on Business, Civil Rights

"Vernon jordan. Junior has been called the rosa parks of american business born on august fifteenth nineteen thirty five in atlanta georgia. Jordan is a civil rights. Icon business consultant influential. Powerbroker jordan is a graduate of depaul university way earned a political science degree in nineteen fifty seven and howard university. School of law. Never want to sit on the sideline and nineteen fifty one. He helped desegregate colleges and universities in georgia from one thousand nine hundred sixty one to nineteen sixty three. He was the field secretary. For the national association. For the advancement of colored people in georgia and nineteen seventy jordan became executive director of the united negro college fund and nineteen seventy-one. He became president of the national urban league. He held that position for ten years on may twenty ninth. Jordan was shot and seriously wounded outside. The hotel in fort wayne indiana. This incident became the first story covered by cnn. And as we all know by now join me. Came close confidant and political advisor to president. Bill clinton this past spring. Jordan was a keynote speaker at the summit on race in america held at the lbj presidential library on the campus of the university of texas at austin. The following is an expert of that reason. Tation now let me explain to situation. You are in with me this morning. And i can only explain it by telling you a true story. I'm a member of the african methodist episcopal. Church all my life. And that was this young pastor who just graduated from seminar and the bishop assigned him to a church and a small town in georgia to begin his pastoral ministry

Georgia Vernon Jordan Jordan Depaul University Howard University School Of Law United Negro College Fund National Urban League Atlanta National Association Lbj Presidential Library Campus Of The University Of Te Fort Wayne CNN Indiana Bill Clinton African Methodist Episcopal
Interview With Rebekah Coleman, Newly Elected Judge

In Black America

02:17 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Rebekah Coleman, Newly Elected Judge

"Rebecca coleman the newly elected judge in the state of michigan stony to a district harper woods. First female managed to hold the position and the first african american just be elected at harper woods. Sixty nine year. History coleman defeated incumbent. Daniel palmer on third twenty during the june election. She won the judgeship. By four hundred and forty eight volts or fifty three percent majority vote the newly elected management with focus on community based programs including literacy programs alternative sentencing legal aid and civic and landlord tenant division as well as drug and survive treatment programs for residents. This is not cohen. First attempt at elected office. It was a second bid for judicial office. After running unsuccessfully for wayne county circuit court for years. oh yes although not endorse by the hometown. Newspaper the detroit. News coleman chance to eliminate dish. Oh rubber-stamping i'm john leo. Hanson junior and. Welcome to another edition of in black america up on this week's program. Judge rebecca coma the newly elected magistrate michigan thirty to a district in black america. It was a real grassroots campaign. And this was my second time running for rancher the county about four years prior And didn't really have a clear path. Kinda was just like okay. I'm gonna do this. It's my time. It wasn't my time. But i learned from there that time. You know you have to come up with a plan. You have to know what you're going to do daily and it's it's a real grind grindley like i said i was outside every single day knocking on doors when my brother had a plan on. My loss are going to go down. When miller's we're going now When i wanted to have different events. I did not plan for covert but You know we adapted and and stuck to. It and i said this time i was. I said to myself and my dad and a few others. I said i'm not running again. It's not happening. I this is the time. And i and i wanna put for every single thing. I have so that. I can't look back and say oh i could've you at this to

Rebecca Coleman Michigan Stony Daniel Palmer Coleman Wayne County Circuit Court John Leo Judge Rebecca Coma Cohen Black America Grindley Hanson Detroit Michigan America Miller
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

05:44 min | 5 months ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"From the university of texas at austin k ut radio this is in black america well a lot of different factors but really overall we can just say covert nineteen really was born out of the pandemic. But i'm need that. You could say everything. I feel like that i kind of went through in life led to that point meaning the nursing having seen the numbers haven't seen how much we spend in certain zip codes because people didn't have health care which means they were thicker. Sometimes they were using up more dollars or indigent care like it really doesn't snowball and a lot of things which i discovered. Well i mentioned in the letter from the editor in the magazine's is some.

university of texas austin k ut radio black america covert nineteen
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

01:57 min | 6 months ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"From the university of texas at austin k. Ut radio this is in black. America a lot of it had to do with her father. Yell knew that he had a daughter with this incredible talent. And the time. Very gordon with not who he is. Today motown was still a fledgling label. And i think he knew that he he wanted her to go with a big international company a really established thing and i think she she did too. And it's a good thing that they did that because motown has nikki. giovanni that would have a soul. Crushing artists talent destroying relationship. If she had signed. They're mad doc and author. I never loved a man. The way i love you. Aretha franklin respect and the making of a so masterpiece published by saint. Martin's chris in early nineteen sixty seven. Atlanta records introduced a legendary voice. Aretha franklin nationwide with the groundbreaking lp. And i never loved a man. The way i love you that contain all the first major hit songs and still continues to garner new listeners. Day the book anything been written about them so or from music. This book is the story of great achievement and clues scores of first interviews with friends family. And many of the album's contributors readers me first of a gospel so music industries major players at the time. I'm johnny hanson junior and. Welcome to another edition of black america on this week's program. I never loved a man. The way i love you. Aretha franklin respect and the making of a soul masterpiece with.

johnny hanson Aretha franklin motown Atlanta America first interviews this week university of texas early nineteen sixty seven austin k. Ut radio giovanni Yell saint. Martin nikki first major hit Today black america first
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

01:50 min | 6 months ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Owns this has been attributed to the legendary gospel recording artist bishop rance allen. Allen died on october thirty first twenty twenty. He was seventy one. Have you have questions comments suggestions as your future in black medical programs. Email us at in black america at ku t. dot org also. Let us know what radio station you heard us over. Don't forget to subscribe to our podcast and follow us on facebook and twitter. You've been in previous programs online at ut that o. r. g. Also you can listen to a special collection of in black america programs at american archive of public broadcasting s american archive dot. Org the using opinions expressed on. This program are not necessarily those of this station or of university of texas at austin until we have the opportunity again for technically co-producer day with alvarez. I'm john l. henson junior. Thank you for joining us today. Please join us again next week. Cd copies of this program are available and may be purchased by writing in black america cds k. Ut radio one university station austin texas seven eight seven one two. That's in black. America cds k. Ut radio one university station austin texas seven eight seven one to this has been a production of k. u. t. radio it is the season i as in if you need to curse all you have to yellows dim it real texans enchiladas so let's all have a tipple of eggnog to wet are any idea. Works for a poem said yours to the texas standard teen and listen anytime on. The typewriter rodeo podcast..

john l. henson next week twitter Allen today facebook k. Ut radio october thirty first twenty tw alvarez seventy one university of texas bishop rance allen k. u. t. radio two ku t. dot org american archive dot. Org texans one one university texas
Vernon Jordan, activist, former Clinton adviser, has died

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Vernon Jordan, activist, former Clinton adviser, has died

"Activists Vernon Jordan a former adviser to president Clinton has died Jordan's daughter Vicki Jordan Adams released a statement to CBS news saying our father died last night surrounded by loved ones he was eighty five Jordan was an unofficial aide in the Clinton White House but before that he was head of the national urban league becoming the face of black America's modern struggle for jobs and justice while in that high profile position he nearly died in nineteen eighty when he was shot outside his hotel following a speaking engagement he needed five surgeries and spent three months in the hospital recovering I'm Mike Kemp and

Vicki Jordan Adams Vernon Jordan Jordan President Clinton Cbs News National Urban League White House Clinton America Mike Kemp
Author of 'Reckoning With Race in America' Explains Structuring of His Book

Influencers with Andy Serwer

01:47 min | 9 months ago

Author of 'Reckoning With Race in America' Explains Structuring of His Book

"To influencers. I'm Andy serwer and Welcome to our guest Michael Eric Dyson, who is a professor of Sociology at Georgetown University will be going to Vanderbilt University MSNBC political analyst and author of the new book long time coming Reckoning with race in America Michael. Nice to see you dead red to see you as well my friend and it's great to be on your show. Thank you very much. So the new book long time coming Reckoning with race in America is written as litters. Mm ordered African-Americans. Can you talk about the structure of the book and why you wanted to do the piece the the the work this way? Yeah, you know, I wanted to write letters to these murdered Martyrs and incense not simply talk about them. But speak to them a kind of rhetorical munja. Intimacy through the epistolary form letters that allow me to speak out loud think out loud. How come talk out loud about what happened to them. We are to commune with them. So to speak not in the kind of loosey-goosey spiritualist way, but in an ancestral recognition way and many of them recently arrived ancestors, Brianna Taylor Sandra boss and the Reverend clementa Pinckney hadiya Pendleton and some much older like Emmett Till. So I wanted to think out loud talk about the issues that confronted them that issues that continue to confront us off. And in communing with them talking with them talking to them about what happened after they died too in a way give a progress report of the soul of Black America wage and to figure out how we move forward

Andy Serwer Michael Eric Dyson Vanderbilt University Georgetown University America Msnbc Brianna Taylor Sandra Reverend Clementa Pinckney Michael Emmett Till Pendleton Black America
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"You know i grew up in a family where even at my grandparents level whether education you know existed or didn't everybody everybody was ambitious and and to me ambition. It's not that. I wanna become a ceo. All right ambition is. do you wanna make an impact. Do you wanna make change. Do you wanna make things happen. That is aimed bishen. And you can show ambition in a number of ways in and outside of the workplace. So i was fortunate to indeed come from a family of people that were indeed ambitious. That wanted to improve their lot in life. Wanted to improve the the world for others. And i think having that you know growing up with that background and that history was played a part in my belief that i could despite everything that i could still make a difference. Understand if you're just joining us. I'm johnny l. hanson junior and you're listening to n. black america from k. Ut radio and we're speaking with shelley archibald former ceo of metric stream and i'll throw unapologetically ambitious take risks break barriers and create success on your own terms shelly. I found it interesting that the party that you wrote about your mom and not having a larger piece of pie in the dinner we see quoted to you that having a piece of pie. Wasn't that important to her. Give us how that has transcended with you in your life and that was a really really important laughing so just by just by way of backdrop you have to understand. My mother worked harder than anybody in our family She she made all of our clothes. She cooked all of our meals and by the way we everything from scratch and she made dessert. We had deserts. We called goodies every nice now. This is a family of six so it's not like smell little bit of food they we're talking a lot of food and then addition to that. She's getting us where we need to go. Right she's involved. She's in the pta..

johnny l. hanson six n. black america k. Ut family
Marcus Garvey: Leader of a Revolutionary Global Movement

Black History in Two Minutes

03:30 min | 11 months ago

Marcus Garvey: Leader of a Revolutionary Global Movement

"Over one hundred years ago. The Black Nationalist Movement in America reached an unprecedented level of popularity because of the efforts of the charismatic leader of the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Marcus Garvey. Born in Jamaica Garvey grew up in poverty. He came to understand race relations through the lens of British colonialism throughout the Caribbean and Latin America. As his thinking matured. He began to formulate a revolutionary social. Movement. In, nineteen fourteen he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Dedicated to uniting all the black people throughout the world. Two years later. He emigrated to the United. States. For his powerful message quickly gained traction. We walk you'd believe. This country we weren't ever get to work for walk up. By building. On the Great President of Africa for the public of pickering our industrial cocoa educational. At what it could go configure me arrives in an error where blacks are still being lynched regularly in the south around the same time that movies like birth of the nation are showing extra ordinarily racist depictions of African Americans as monsters. You have really charismatic dynamic individual and he's talking about look all places never going to be here in the states is never going to be in. Europe it's going to be in Africa we need to reclaim Africa. So Garvey is going to be preaching a philosophy of black pride. He's GonNa come up with a scheme to repatriate to Africa and he provides a huge sense of hope for millions of African Americans. A centerpiece of Garvey's program was the creation of the black star line a steamship. LAUNCHED TO TRANSPORT AFRICAN AMERICANS WHO WISHED TO EMIGRATE TO AFRICAN? The Black Star Line. Is this idea that Garvey can buy ships through the support of local African American people sending in money? So you can have a share in the Black Star Line. Any ships were GONNA take thousands of people back to Africa to the colony that Garvey was gonNA. Stab wish. But his advocacy for black Americans to move back to Africa drew the attention of the United States government and especially J Hoover's Federal Bureau of Investigation. Which Monitored Garvey's movement seeking grounds for his arrest and deportation. Garvey was growing too powerful Jagger Hoover is going hired their first. Negro. To Subvert Marcus Garvey and eventually they're going to say that he's been committing mail fraud with the Black Star Line Scheme. He's eventually tried arrested placed in jail nineteen, twenty five. He's deported in nineteen twenty seven and he's never allowed to return to the United States, he dies in London in Nineteen. Forty. Garvey's legacy as the father of the modern back to Africa movement cannot be underestimated. He created the largest popular political movement in the history of black America and would be an inspiration both to the anti colonial movement and black nationalist leaders throughout the remainder of the century.

Jamaica Garvey Black Nationalist Movement Africa Universal Negro Improvement As America Great President Of Africa United States Jagger Hoover Caribbean Pickering Latin America Europe Federal Bureau Of Investigatio Fraud London
Ice Cube defends working with Trump campaign on 'Platinum Plan' for Black Americans

Z Morning Zoo

03:07 min | 1 year ago

Ice Cube defends working with Trump campaign on 'Platinum Plan' for Black Americans

"Caught on politicians to sign his contract with Black America and laid out 13 areas for improvement related to police report on prison reform, they lending so much more The President's administration actually absorb some of this into the White House is platinum Plan with ice cubes. Help sell trumps platinum plan aims to increase access to capital and black communities by always 500 billion, creating 500,000 black owned businesses and three million new jobs for the black community. That strength, strengthening immigration policies, immigration and policy policies. There's a lot of good things. Okay, well, I have to give us back our information for you. Ice Cube gave the Trump campaign permission to tell the world that they worked together on this that they were working together. Then the world when they found out Twitter got mad and just trashed Ice Cube. Bring old lyrics. Old tweets old this old that in like, how are you dealing this? You're a horrible person. You're betraying the black community. It isn't this and this. And ask. You actually wanted to make it clear, he said. He asked both parties to work with him. OK, Democrats said. Let's talk about this after the election. However, the Republicans said, Let's talk about this now and do something now. Okay, so you gonna go play a little bit of what else he had to say. And this is him talking about the CW baby that you just mentioned in game is to get a candidate to adopt this plan because it's needed for black America. You know, we are. Got our favorite candidate that we wanna win, but that they as we need just done no more time to talk. No more promises. That's the endgame. Okay, so that's him trying to, you know, Look, he's got a guy here who's instead of talking about everything that's wrong. He's trying to make something happen. He's trying to put something on paper and say, Will you sign this? Will you enact this? Will you make this happen? And yeah, sometimes. Unfortunately, that means you got to work with people that maybe you used to consider the enemy. Because maybe they're the ones in charge and I feel bad for Ice Cube. You mentioned the old lyrics about people bringing up the song where, he said, I'll never have dinner with the president. I'll never have dinner with the president and the tweet that he tweeted in. 26 team says I will never effing support Donald Trump. My thing is and I'm just going to be on the outside of here. My biggest, I guess. Quote unquote Idol Air quotes is Michael Jordan and Michael Jordan came on TV tomorrow and I'm voting for this one. It would not change if you don't like what I see Cuba's saying, if you do like what I see, he was saying I shouldn't affect like there's unless he tells you. Hey, good. By the way, I found out from Trump that he has a cure for cancer and didn't give it to you If you vote. Yeah, I think the difference is Michael Jordan never came out and said, I will never support Donald Trump. Has there been anything in your life that you said I'll never do when you've done may be speaking out abroad. Hey, I'm never going to try that restaurant. I'm never goingto listen to this type of musical asparagus. You don't like people just like just if that's what he wants to do, let do it. Yeah, but But people are calling him a

Donald Trump Black Community Michael Jordan President Trump Black America Twitter White House America Cuba Cancer Cure
What Trump and Biden Plan for Small Businesses

WSJ What's News

04:42 min | 1 year ago

What Trump and Biden Plan for Small Businesses

"As election day quickly approaches, we want return to our ongoing election series. We're taking a deep look at how president trump and Democratic presidential nominee joe. Biden. Differ on major policy issues. Today, we're going to focus on small business. The pandemic has been especially challenging for them. Thousands of firms have already been forced to close joining us now for a look. At. What the candidates say they will do is Journal, Economics reporter Amira Imo Kway High Mira Hi thanks for having me. So both candidates acknowledged some strength with the paycheck protection program. But there are some distinct differences as far as involvement and approach. Let's first start with President Trump yes. So the main thing president trump has done is he's encouraged Congress to. Come together with the administration and reopen the paycheck protection program that program expired in August and so small businesses have not been able to apply for it since then so president trump has signaled his support for reopening the paycheck protection program with about one hundred, thirty, five, billion dollars in funding that was roughly the amount in unused funds that was left when. The program closed and what about Joe? Biden's view. So former Vice President Biden has really emphasized what his campaign characterizes as shortcomings in the paycheck protection program and his platform calls for overhauling the program and doing things like including more oversight of the program and also a provision that would make it so that businesses with fifty employees or fewer would be guaranteed. Funding through the program if they are eligible for it, and some of the experts I spoke with said that that provision would be really important because when the paycheck protection program I opened a lot of businesses were initially unable to access the funds because the first round of funding quickly ran out small businesses whether they are in a pandemic or not. Always. Face challenges when particular difficulty can be getting assistance even though there are programs available. What is Joe Biden? Vision as far as accessibility is concerned so Joe Biden's platform proposes something that his campaign calls the Small Business Opportunity Fund. So this is a fun that would receive thirty billion dollars in federal funding initially, and it would make investments it do things like. Direct. Ten billion dollars to state and local programs that provide the sort of venture capital that businesses need to start and businesses need to grow and the trump. The trump platform on this trump platform or pitch has really been sort of highlighting things that have been popular during his first term. So for instance, he has talked about tax cuts and his administration. Implemented a tax deduction that lowers income tax bills for many small businesses. His campaign has also focused on sort of the regulatory approach that the trump administration has taken and some small business advocates say that that deregulatory approach has really helped small businesses given them less burdensome regulations to work with and basically taking away some uncertainty and that has has benefited them. Within small businesses I WANNA. Focus on minority owned small businesses. This election is happening as the nation has an ongoing conversation about racial equality. What is the White House of you as far as specifically helping minority owned small businesses. Well what's really interesting is that this area is one where the trump campaign in the binding campaigns actually a common ground I think both campaigns have acknowledged that for instance, there are concerns that minority owned small businesses had trouble accessing the paycheck protection program or that minorities tend to have more hurdles to overcome when they want to start businesses because minority households tend to have less access to. The kind of wealth that they used to finance small startups, and so the trump campaign has proposed what it's calling its platinum plan for Black America and in that plan the the campaign is proposing, for instance, giving more funding to these kinds of lenders called Community Development Financial Institutions. These are financial institutions that focus on lending and other financing to minority communities, rural communities, and other underserved communities. And some specifics of Abidin plan. So Mr Biden proposes using that Small Business Opportunity Fund that we talked about earlier to, for instance, expand lending through state local and other programs that have had a successful track record of providing lending to minority owned businesses, and his plan also calls for expanding lending through those community development financial institutions that we talked about.

Joe Biden President Trump Small Business Opportunity Fun Community Development Financia Vice President Amira Imo Abidin Reporter Black America White House
Cardi B SLAMS Candace Owens After She Calls Her an 'Illiterate Rapper'

The Rubin Report

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Cardi B SLAMS Candace Owens After She Calls Her an 'Illiterate Rapper'

"It's blowing up right now. So this is candace owens versus Cardi B. and not just doing this to be silly I. Did they actually got into something kinda substantive here it started when. Canvas was on Ben Shapiro's Sunday special. Let's take look the clip. I completely agree with your assessment about Cardi B. It is one of the biggest insult if Black Americans are not insulted by the fact that Joe Biden who has been hiding in his basement you know for the entire year maiden appear to come up because he was going to do an interview with Cardi B.. We we have nothing better to offer. I. Mean this be tend to. Donald Trump saying I'm going to give no. Interviews, but he came up and he decided to give an interview to Justin Bieber right I mean I wish I actually just be I'm sorry. I know you are a Christian Man I. Don't want to put you in the same boat as Cardi B. but it it would be absurd white America would go what what is this why? Why are you being interviewed by Justin Bieber and it's because you're pandering right? You're pandering you look at Cardi's instagram easy. She has millions of followers and you think. Okay. This is an illiterate person, and if I if I appeal to this a person and she does a group like she literally did in the middle of this interview, they think she's cool. She's hip just by sitting here and and taking this interview walking will vote for me. It's basically saying black people you are stupid. You are dumb and you're so foolish I mean do you think what if she just said in the middle of the interview Joe Biden? Can you name one Cardi B. Album? Not Jimmy favor just one Cardi B. Lyric. He couldn't do it. Of course he's not because he's being handled and they're saying black people like this person this is what they're into, and so here you go talk to her. Okay. So Cardi, b. e. then heard what candy said and she hit back she did a couple of videos I think four videos on instagram shows on camera, but you could hear her talking in the exact quote that she said she's talking about. Canvas she says, she has an identity crisis just because she is black doesn't mean she gives a F- about blacks and you can hear also saying the candidates owns husband George. as part of a group that she like into an upper-class kkk of the UK now first off. I was at Atkinson in Georgia's wedding George a great guy they are a fantastic couple. The wedding was one of the most spectacular weddings I've ever been to and it was just filled. With love and there were black people and white people and there were straight people and gay people and there were Republicans and Democrats, it was it was a truly just a just an absolutely wonderful wedding with with a meeting of Families George comes from an upper class family in the UK. Candice comes from Philly from mostly lower middle class family and that everybody was just dancing and having a great time. So this nonsense from Cardi, B. But anyway, that's what her. Take on what candy said was, and then you know candidates. So she's not just going to sit there and take it. So campus followed up with a couple tweets and I'm going to read to you she said Malcolm X. warned us years ago about the puppetry of interviews like Cardi B. and Joe Biden, he always spoke out against the White Liberal game of using entertainers pawns. This isn't really about you Cardi B. This is about black America Waking Up to Democrat racism. She went on and another tweet to say never listened to a person that has private security but once the public police defended never listened to a millionaire that made it here in America but trashes our country. These Hollywood idols are frauds leading sheep down paths they never took when they discovered success. So so candidates makes what I think are pretty cogent salient points and Cardi B. Then jumps back in. Cardi visas well, paying taxes is something that as much as I hate, it's a reality I will always have to pay but I rather might tax money go to free education than police funding use my money on something useful your president us our tax money to fund is empty camp in ruts. So trump uses his campaign a. Uses the tax money to fund his campaign is that is that right? Well, can't jump back in and said one your tax dollars or ready to go already go to free education. Jesus. That is true to know campaign uses tax dollars for funding. That is illegal that is also true and three defunding police initiatives has led to two hundred percent increases in black men getting shot in inner cities stop supporting black people dying.

Cardi B. Cardi Joe Biden Donald Trump Justin Bieber America Ben Shapiro Candace Owens UK George. Hollywood Jimmy Georgia Candice Philly Malcolm X. President Trump
Joe Biden, Kamala Harris First Joint Interview

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden, Kamala Harris First Joint Interview

"World News Tonight Anchor David Muir and Good Morning America Co anchor Robin Roberts. Joe Biden laid out the stakes in this election, blaming President Trump for the severity of the Corona virus crisis. Do you blame President Trump for lives lost? I don't blame him for the current crisis. I blame him for wrecking wave. Not dealing with solutions. He hasn't listened to the scientist. And while Trump has attacked by then for campaigning from home, Biden says Trump's push for large scale in person events is dangerous, even deadly. Look what happens. What what's happened with his his events. People die. People get together. They don't wear masks. They end up getting cove. They end up dying with his running mate by his side. Kamala Harris asked about that pivotal moment at the Democratic debate when she took bite into task for his record on race. A lot of people cannot let that go the way you challenged him. So how did you go from there to here? I want Joe Biden to be the next president of the United States. I believe in Joe Biden. I believe in his perspective, and frankly, I think that's that conversation is a distraction from what we need to accomplish right now and what we need to do. Harris was also pressed on Biden's shocking comment this spring. That left critics saying he's taking the black vote for granted. If you have a problem figuring out what your Sameer Trump You a black, so when you have a running mate Makes a comment like you ain't black and lead some people to say just doesn't get it. Have you been able to speak truth to him about that? Listen, when Joe and I talked about and have talked about, frankly, over the years, But in connection with this race about Miss State of Black America, he has a deep sense of awareness and knowledge about racial disparities, inequities and systematic racism. Pushing back against Trump's attacks. Biden promised no new taxes on the middle class, so no new taxes $400,000 down. There would be no need for any Guidon, who has come under attack for his age, also shot down any suggestion that he limit himself to just one term. You're leaving open the possibility you'll serve eight years now. Looking ahead. Biden and Harris both say they are already preparing for their debates. Biden, saying he could hardly wait to take on trumpets. ABC News correspondent Mary Bruce reporting Come on news time 8 21. It's time to get to our propel insurance. Money updates so WalMart is filing a trademark application ahead of its upcoming

Joe Biden President Trump Kamala Harris David Muir Robin Roberts Abc News Black America Walmart Mary Bruce United States Guidon Scientist
'This is a crisis': National Urban League finds persistent racial disparities exacerbated during pandemic

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

'This is a crisis': National Urban League finds persistent racial disparities exacerbated during pandemic

"Urban League says its annual report on racial inequality in America explores various ways that the corona virus pandemic is exposing racism. NPR's Adrian Florido has more. The report titled The State of Black America Unmasked highlights how the pandemic has laid bare persistent racial disparities that the group has been documenting. For decades. It published data showing that African Americans and Latinos are roughly three times as likely to be affected by the Corona virus is white people. An African Americans, or roughly twice as likely as whites or Latinos to die from it. The reasons are complex but rooted fundamentally, the Urban League wrote in longstanding systemic racism. The urban lynx has decades of economic and social progress have not been enough to prevent much of the devastation that has befallen black and brown communities during the pandemic.

Urban League Adrian Florido America NPR
Could Kamala Harris Be Our Next Vice President?

The Nod

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Could Kamala Harris Be Our Next Vice President?

"Comma harassment history in two thousand sixteen when she became California's. Email US senator in the first Jamaican and Indian ancestry in the crowd at twenty twenty presidential primaries, she competed against other Democratic candidates, including Joe Biden to brand herself as progressive prosecutor, the face criticism for supporting tough on crime policies bar campaign had high hopes in a robust start internal conflicts poor decision making in fundraising. Plummeted her stock almost as quickly as it rose. I cannot tell you. That I have a path forward. If I don't believe I do now here's is rumored to be a top contender as Joe Biden's running mate, but as a former prosecutor, the right person during this time to represent black. America here to help us break down. How Senator Harris stacks up his Aaron, Hanes the editor at large for the Nineteen News Organization. So much coming back is so good to see you again maybe back since we last hot. Obviously we are still in the middle of global pandemic, but also we have seen protests erupt all of the country and all of the world focus on police brutality against black people, considering the way that this has become front and center this Joe Biden now half to choose a black person, and by definition from his own proclamation, a black woman to be vp the cause for that or definitely getting louder as we're seeing kind of what I like to call the pandemic within a pandemic kind of the dual ills of Corona virus and racism. What voters and I think in particular black voters and black women voters are the backbone of Democratic Party are looking for somebody who's going to be ready on day one to address systemic racism in America, right, a lot of black voters have talk to tell me that they are casting a survival vote in two thousand, twenty, literally putting their bodies on the line in the midst of a pandemic to be able to vote and participate safely our democracy and I think. A lot of people feel like a black woman on the ticket would go a long way. To making that happen today we're here to talk about one black woman in particular commonly Harris I'm curious like what makes Senator Harris. A contender for being Joe Biden's VP from the time that she entered the twenty twenty Democratic field last year is the lone black woman. She was a standout. People have seen her as somebody who has taken on this administration as a senator. Inches, talk we. Didn't keep note some of these things. Brian this committee with the notes that you did maintain. She is somebody who has been elected statewide, and who has executive leadership experience the thing that we can't ignore when we're talking about senator hairs is that she built her career by being a prosecutor does her history and even some of the positions that she's taken as a prosecutor? Does that disqualify her? In this moment I think it's interesting I mean it was certainly an issue for her during her presidential run right like she ran and really was trying to tell what she. She felt was her record as a progressive prosecutor. Right as somebody who was willing to make a lot of performs even preceding the black lives matter movement I created as Attorney General, the first in the nation, implicit bias and procedural justice training for law enforcement, but there were voters indeed question per record and law enforcement, and saw that as a liability, but now that I think we're getting into this vice presidential conversation Kamala. Harris it's actually being one of the most outspoken people are calling for the need to address not only system racism. Policing reform in particular while she and vice president, Biden may have some answering to do for for their past records Both of them are really trying to articulate a way forward in a ticket that could potentially look at kind of appearance, some of those harms in addition to criminal justice reform. What are the other issues that she is trying to lead on issue of maternal health writer, maternal morbidity, and we know that black women that disproportionately in childbirth, also some of the other systemic issues that have been exposed whether it is the wealth an income gap whether it's the idea that that black and Brown people are the majority of essential workers are really being voice for those. Those marginalized people during the campaign Senator Harris in one of her best, if not her best debate performance came for Joe Biden, she directly challenged him being racially insensitive for his record on blessing to you agree today that you were wrong to oppose busing. In America this was a significant moment. I'm curious. How will she and potentially the public be able to reconcile how much she critiqued his candidacy today now stand beside him at the time. A lot of Democrats were very shocked that she would gone at at the vice president in this way over the issue of bussing and and segregation. In retrospect. What we now see is that what comal hair was doing it alone black woman? In the race was was raising questions about his record on ways and how he will govern. The black people in mind that racial reckoning that is happening now. She really kind of initiated that on that debate stage back in June of last.

Joe Biden Senator Harris Prosecutor Senator America Vice President VP Democratic Party United States California Harassment Nineteen News Organization Kamala Editor Writer Executive Attorney Aaron
Noose found in Bubba Wallace's garage stall, NASCAR says

Get Up!

11:41 min | 1 year ago

Noose found in Bubba Wallace's garage stall, NASCAR says

"Now? Mike Greenberg Bristol with you this morning. And as I said right off the top of the show, I would have loved to have started with any of those today, and we certainly will get to the mall, but we begin with an absolutely despicable story coming from the world of NASCAR. In this developing story, a noose was found in bubba Wallace's. Stall at the NASCAR race in Talladega Alabama yesterday less than two weeks after Wallace led efforts to push NASCAR to ban the confederate flag NASCAR announced the news last night well after the race had been postponed due to inclement weather, and said it was launching an immediate investigation here. was there statement late this afternoon? Nascar was made aware that a noose was found in the garage stall of the forty three eighteen. We are angry and outraged, and cannot state strongly enough. How seriously we take this heinous act! We have launched an immediate investigation and we'll do everything we can to identify the persons responsible and eliminate them from the sport. As we have stated unequivocally, there is no place for racism and NASCAR, and this act only strengthens our resolve to make the sport open and welcoming to all while himself tweeted a statement last night, which read in. In part today's despicable act of racism and hatred leaves me incredibly saddened, and serves as a painful reminder of how much further we have to go as a society and how persistent we must be in the fight against racism. As my mother told me today, they are just trying to scare you. This will not break me. I will not give enor- rely back down. I will continue to proudly stand for what I believe. In Allah Marty Smith is covering this for us in the scene in Talladega. He joined us an hour ago. The News in Bubbas garage stall was actually seen by a member of his team. Darrell Bubba never saw it. He never saw it personally and win. That team members saw it. He alerted NASCAR. And Nascar immediately had a meeting of its senior executive staff, and they made the decision that they were going to remove this person from the sport as quickly and rapidly as possible. This was not a situation where a fan might have meandered in on this because there were no fans in the garage. So what you're looking at is you're looking at team members. You're looking at officials. You're looking at potential security. You're looking at maybe cleaning personnel that have access to these garage areas. Again! That was Marty Smith with US earlier. Lebron James among many who posted messages about this. He tweeted sickening Wallace, my brother! No, you don't stand alone I'm right here with you as well as every other athlete, I just want to continue to say how proud I am of you for continuing to take a stand for change here in America and sports at Nascar. I salute you as well. Well Sprint Cup driver Michael McDowell added. God help us the level of evil. It takes to do something like this is disgusting. This is enraging and heartbreaking all at the same time Dale. EARNHARDT Jr. tweeted simply a hope of a wins it tomorrow again. The race will be run today. It was delayed by weather yesterday, and as I bring Steven A. and Marcus into the conversation here I'll. Repeat that the area in which this was discovered, there were cameras all over it should be. Relatively easy investigation for the NASCAR officials to conduct, and we are standing by for any information live from Talladega Marty Smith will bring us anything as soon as there is any further news with that thought in mind, Stephen. We've not yet had a chance to say good morning to you I. I just want to give you the floor here. What are your feelings and thoughts as we see this story developed from last night? Well I. Mean I think that for me? Personally I'm a little bit different than the kind of sentiments that have been expressed by a lot of people, because obviously you find this reprehensible and disgusting, and it's incredibly sad, and we get all of that but there's a forgive the the figurative smirk that might end up covering my face or draping my face because to me. Me It's just folks displaying the ignorance, and the more they put it on display, the more it enlightens a lot of people in White. America about what Black America has been telling them about for so many years decades spanning centuries for crying out loud. This is not new. This is something that we've known existed for all time. This is something we know we'll continue to exist. And there is no way around it and so this there comes a point in time where you have to accept that reality one of the things that I would encourage everybody to go watch. If you get an opportunity, you can go on Netflix. You can watch that documentary thirteen by EVA do vernay along with others, sensational job of address mass incarceration in the United States, of America one of the things they highlighted. Is that under the Nixon? Administration where you're literally talking about you know White folks that are hippies and you associate them with marijuana and you associate black. Black folks with crack cocaine, and as a result of that will ultimately galvanize folks in your favor, because they'd be scared to death, and you'd be hearing words like law and order ad, nauseam that was in the sixties for crying out loud in two thousand and twenty, and we're hearing the same thing now. You just have to open your eyes. You have to pay attention to the parallels you have to. You have to pay attention to the correspondence. That's taking place right before your very eyes throughout history, we have had people that have been adroit at light laying low. Controlling the narrative, manipulating the narrative switching things to their favor, all in an effort to maintain or to retain power. It's something to kind of thing that has been taking place in. Usually they've been incredibly skilled at remaining in the dark and saying it's then it's not us, it's them. It's not us well guess what are coming to light more and more in this day and age I find that a cause for celebration, not a 'cause. You know to be saddened by anything. The I find these to be. Beautiful tops as difficult as it may be the fact that I nation appears to be becoming more enlightened than ever before and ultimately as a result. We're coming together. I find that to be a huge plus not a minus. If the ignorance has to show itself, and if the ignore, it has to showcase themselves in order for this to happen coming out of the dock to me. That's of course was celebration Marcus. Stephen. That's what I alluded to earlier man just come on out. Show us who you are, so we know how to deal with you and everybody. That's four. Right knows how to deal with you. Look listen, this is. There has been. We've been having this conversation for a long time. I mean we had this conversation we had. This conversation went capped kneeled about police brutality. We talked about racing all of them and man you. You look if you look around and social. There were people literally Oh twitter last night. Say A BUBBLE! Did this for attention? What what are you talking about like? It's not. It's not unfathomable that someone could do that. We sold Jesse's me. Make reference to that because people can conjure up things to create narratives to make people overreact. That's why saying earlier. Estimate I'm not doing this emotional. Rollercoaster I'm getting off of it right like I'm nuts and bolts to was going on. There is progress that needs to be made in this country I'm focusing on that progress that needs to be made. That's what bubble wireless is focused in on a by making his statements in Nascar. That's a lot of athletes are focused on a lot of people in society in general of focused on making sure that we draw a line between racist people and people that one good for everybody. That's the bottom line. Look for as much as this is egregious and the things that have transpired for low type. I grew up in the south light. It's not. An uncommon for me to see racist people are know what it looks like or even even be surprised or shocked about certain things that tend to happen. The bottom line is this. I'm often emotional roller coaster like if you racist just be that come out publicly and be that enlist separate that and you be a part of the minority port society that we want to get to, and we think we already are at so all of that being said I'm with Steve Day like in this bringing a lot of people to the light, and the hateful ones are fighting their battle because they see slipping away. Score you're not GonNa hear me say this very very often, but I wanNA give major major kudos to a Lotta. White folks out there in America because if it wasn't for them, protesting and marching with black individuals if it wasn't for them, you know engaging in the kind of of of you know resistance to whatever level of oppression we as black people have been feeling this nation I. Don't think some of these folks will. will be coming out I. mean listen the back. In the day. They used to wear the sheets and used to cover the identity and their faces that we didn't know who the hell they were by virtue of that now. Some black people, a lot of black people will tell you they exist in corporate America. They could be the very people that you're working for the very people that you're talking to I happen to be. Be Blessed we happen to be blessed to not certainly not have that at this company is because we've seen the actions on the part of our executives. And what have you over continuous basis? Elevated level of sensitivity that this place has shown throughout the years deserves to be commended. There's always work to do. There is no perfect place. Make no about it, but I'm incredibly proud to be a part of the Walt Disney and And specifically the ESPN family in that regard having set all of that I'm in the minority, because the reality is vast people, there's a vast number of people of African. American descent in the United States of America that feel subjugated I wouldn't go so far as to say enslaved, but feel subjugated by bosses in corporate America people that say all the right things when the cameras are rolling, but behind the scenes they engage. Eight your and the conduct. Subjugation that they devote their voiceless. They don't have a voice in that regard, green. Marcus knows exactly what I'm talking about. And so because of that because of these times that we're living, what we're seeing is a populous within the United States of America that sees the dramatic shift, and there's so appalled, and and put and taken aback by what they see transpiring that they can't hide their vitriol. They're coming out of the dock because they're being forced out of the dog. We as black people. People have to appreciate the fact that couldn't happen without a vast number of white individuals in our society standing with us and saying you know what we see where the hell you coming from. If we didn't see it before we see it now, and we're with you, so you have that other segment of the population saying wait a minute we lose some of our own here. Some of our own alternative guests and the poor in this noxious. We gotTA speak up and as a result. Of the dock again I find that a cause for celebration doesn't bother me at all. If we wore, we wore. Let's get it on. I liked that. I want to leave it there for the moment again. Marty Smith is standing by Talladega. If there is any further information on the investigation, we will have it for you immediately, meanwhile, Steven as going to stay with us here for a few more minutes, and we'll get some football conversation as we go his feelings about the Dallas, cowboys have been well documented. This should be a very big day in Dallas. We will talk about it and why and then Lebron and other NBA players have until Wednesday to decide whether or not they're going to play. What should we expect? Woge will answer that question as we continue this out. GET THEM ON ESPN. GEICO. GETS YOU ACCESS TO LICENSED AGENTS? Twenty four

Nascar America Marty Smith Talladega Bubba Wallace Marcus United States Lebron James Stephen White Steven A. Mike Greenberg Bristol Alabama Michael Mcdowell Dallas Darrell Bubba Black America Netflix
Buffalo officers leave emergency response team

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Buffalo officers leave emergency response team

"Know in Buffalo. They pushed that guy yesterday. It put that guy down seventy five guy the cops. I don't know what the the guy was just going up to them to talk to him about something. And, and they pushed him down onto the cement. He hits his head he his head starts bleeding. It looks like he's he's barely responsive. And they cops just keep going. Wow? So they suspend the two officers that pushed him. And in solidarity with their fellow officers, the other fifty seven buffalo police officers on the emergency response team they resign from being part of them. Urgency Response

Buffalo Police Buffalo
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

15:51 min | 1 year ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Published his narrative on his own without deference to why energy publisher or sponsors his life and the intimacy candor and no holes by realism unparalleled in the famous antebellum slave narratives during that time mason in the same vein as the late Alex Haley at her stories about our great great great grandfather. William grinds following clues or my aunt. Catherine she embarked on a fifteen year journey. She Related Partner With William L. Andrews to publish a new edition of his Piney. Work in two thousand seventeen documentaries may combining two stories Mazen journey to discover and trace the steps with our ancestor and grime story as a slave at his thirst for freedom. I'm John Henson Junior. And welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program Genus Journey the search for William Grind with Sean Durant and Regina EMESA and Black America William Grimes himself. You know we read his narrative all that he endured and live this cruelty abuse at every turn. He was reminded that he was nothing but he never bought into the status quo. In fact he defied the status quo at every turn just the fact that he had the notion that he was capable of writing his own story. Without any assistance from white people speaks to who he was and how self assured he was so his example of perseverance and endurance. Gays me. The will to just carry on and see this project to to the end. Regina Mason is a remarkable woman. She spent fifteen years of life research alive for Great Great Great Grandfather William Grimes with nothing to go on with the connection to the underground railroad. She spent countless hours in libraries reading books. Looking Michael Film and Census Records grinds was changed so when he was sold away from the mother to Afaf Plantation. Here grew up in this and motherless with apparently no surrogates slave family or loved ones to embrace him. No one even to look after him. Grimes was the first person to go through slavery in the South and write about it. This was the first time dozen slavery with exposed from the perspective of one who had lived it and he was the author to write about the harsh realities of the north. Despite the nature of his being freedom land. Recently in Black America spoke with Sean Durant to produce erect of Genus Journey. The Search for William Grimes and Regina. Mac Okay. I was born and raised in Oakland California and I went to elementary school at Saint Augustine and went onto public school at Berkeley High School. My roots go deep in California back to shortly after statehood eighteen fifties and part of my being. He in the bay area is a result of the narrative that we're gonNA talk about in how I discovered those roots there and connected myself to this extraordinary man. William Grimes I have two daughters married to my husband for almost forty years out of the process on that life journey I Worked at the University of California Berkeley and I Fell in love with the libraries there and they were instrumental in Helping me uncover the story that your audience is about to hear and to authenticate William Grimes whose words so I was in the right place at the right time to This story materialized in a way that had never been done before understand. I want to tell our audience that mason had sent me an email back in twenty thirteen and I had yet to respond to that email until twenty nineteen and that email articulated that she had listened to a podcast that I had producing. It led her to think about her family lineage. And you can take it from there. Miss Mason. Yes that Podcast we were you were talking about was on the subject of Alex. Haley's roots you all were Sort of revisiting. His remarkable work and how it changed a nation in terms of Our mindset and how we looked at slavery. It was the first time that that slavery was talked about from the vantage point of those who endured it and I was just. I enjoyed that podcast so much and it it it maybe reach out to you to want to tell my story because it is a story very similar to Alex. Haley's story and Yes I I reached out to you and obviously didn't hear back right away but thank goodness you circle back to it. Regardless of how many years later and here we are today to tell the tell the story and at the time. I think it was twenty thirteen when I wrote you and we were. I we were in the middle. I believe a filming Genus Journey. The search for William Grimes at at that point. How did you Miss Mason get together Well it is more or less started with a family Barbecue in finding out that. Uh at Regina had actually completed The book and And then continue with Being atty book signing And just seeing all the scholars and all the people who were involved in this was You know right across from Berkeley and then realizing that that material Her Story William Grimes Story. The book And everything around it in all the research would make an awesome film and at the time I was You know coming around as a as a as a filmmaker at already produced a film Back in two thousand and I had been making music videos at the time and I was doing a lot of music videos that were on TV and bt most of it was hip hop. So I kinda knew my way around production but I hadn't actually directed a feature yet or produce something of this magnitude but I expressed to her that. I think this would make a great film and she said well. I don't know how to get a film made and I said well I do and once I kinda spoke those words I was we were kind of set on a destiny together to make this film. We didn't know how we're going to get it done. We didn't know where we're going to get the money And putting together the structure of an independent feature film is so complicated such a complicated machines such an expensive art form that it was really just a a wild dream but over you know the next years we were able to develop it and put together a enough pieces of from people who were kind enough to help us out and from our own will to get together. An actually after three years of development do four years of production and somehow through that new journey We made a film on the sand. I'll Miss Mason was William grinds the initial interest or you some of the some of your your grandparents and aunts and uncles were. They initially your to research their lives. I'm glad you asked that question. Because William grinds was not on the radar at all. But I wanNA tell you how I became interested in my roots and started way back in nineteen seventy one. When I was in fifth grade I was giving classes. Simon. In fact the whole class was given the same assignment and it was to be an oral report where we were talking about our country of origin and our roots and it was the first time that I had to face slavery front and center because it appeared in my family tree and up to that point I had not heard that we had that there were slaves of the family. In fact nobody talked about it. We talked about other things. of the Family history that had nothing to do with slavery for instance. I had always heard about CECELIA Victoria. Who was a tragedy and in the San Francisco Bay area and that she performed to in to integrated audiences so I had not expected to hear anything about someone who had been enslaved my mother when I sat down to talk to her about the family story. She had told me quite casually that her grandfather Henry Fuller was had been born a slave in that she knew him. And that really struck me in a crazy kind of way because here. I am a kid. I had heard about slavery but it was in the abstract. It was those people over there from long ago. It was not in my family history so when we talked about her GRANDPA FULLER. I can since the uneasiness she. She told me that he was very tight. Lipped about his history. She had never met anyone in his family line and he was just sort of a sad individual in the sense and on top of that very stern so when we talked about his background It made me realize how closely I was too connected to the institution of slavery. It was just a few generations removed from me and My thought was. How do I present to the class? I really did not want to stand up to say that I descended from slaves. Of course we know. There's nothing wrong with that. But imagine a child. Listen before Alex. Heavy Story Kate O. And so. I just didn't process it very well. And there were things that she did say that were quite compelling but they just were lost because I couldn't get on the inherent complexity of this newly revealed enslaved heritage but of course that changed when I did see route and it made me want to Pursue my history and backing up a little bit. My mother could sense that I was having sort of misgivings about how I was going to present this story. And she decided to take me to see my aunt. Catherine who was the keeper of the Family Lore and Catherine was a gifted storyteller who loved to talk about the family history and of course she was talking about Sicilia the tragedy and one little sentence that she gave me stuck in my head and she told me she said someone in the family by the last name of grimes had a connection to the underground railroad and she said he was from New Haven Connecticut. That was just one or two sentences that she gave me and I thought my God the Underground Railroad. I had you know. I'm just learning about American slavery Learning about the underground railroad. So I knew that was a resistant story and it was a story that I wanted to hear. I remember to ask you Catherine over and over. Well tell me more about this. Grimes person in the underground railroad but she could not give me any more. That was all she knew so fast. Forward Twenty some years. I'm a young mother of two little girls and married and and trying to raise my family and I thought about this mysterious grimes person because I had these children that I wanted them to know their family history. But I didn't know much about it so I began the process of genealogy for them and for myself. I wanted to see what I could find and I wanted to see if there was a measure of truth in the story that and Catherine head given me so after a you know about a year so getting Records like From the senses vital statistics and those kinds of things. I realized that records were indeed out there so then began to shift my focus on this grimes character. Could I find him so I began reading every book? I could find on the abolitionist movement. And on the underground railroad and about American history in general and It was kinda crazy because I was getting nowhere nowhere until one day I happened upon a library book that was due and it needed to be returned. I remember some means through it and I turn to the Free New England section of the book because Catherine it said you know I root for from New Haven Connecticut and within the first few pages of this book the underground railroad by Charles blocks and I find a reference to a William Grimes from Savannah Georgia who stowed away on a vessel. That brought him to New York City and while he was in New York workers from the underground railroad directed him on foot to New Haven Connecticut. So those little three clues just jumped out at me and I had to follow them and the rest is history as we can say because I did definitely make the connection so to your question in a roundabout way William. Grimes was not on my radar. It was just a project to to find my roots and and present this my heritage too much children William bribes to fell into place on the stand. If you're just joining US I'm John Henson Junior. And you'RE LISTENING TO IN.

William Grimes Underground Railroad Regina Mason Catherine Alex Haley William Black America William L. Andrews John Henson William grinds New Haven Connecticut William Grind Sean Durant Mazen Miss Mason Partner California publisher Genus Journey University of California Berke
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"From the University of Texas at Austin K. U. T. radio this is in black America. Spoke up for myself on the three musicians or the six musicians turned that the one allowed to stay where I though we all not allowed to go. Swimming Pool is had nothing to do with anything except personal attitudes about certain the things I didn't realize that I was speaking for anybody else. Until nineteen late nineteen forties. Uh of course as I said I was raised by Very Miller some grandmother I think most of us have grandmother to now pass. Yeah and tell me that I was on my Lena Horne. Entertainer Pathfinder and civil rights as activists of Blue Vallis Horn appeared onstage in Hallo- when she was fourteen years old by age sixteen. She was singing the famous cotton. TATTON clue eventually. She made her way into them. Including the popular nineteen forty three musical stormy weather and cabin in the sky. per-performance performance in cabinet in. This guy is a guy who has one of the performances before career. She played Georgia Brown off. Ethel waters and Eddie Anderson. The the all-black production talent beauty and middle class upbringing Khokar practic color barrier in Hollywood. She's often remembered as a pioneer among among African American reformers also she became a pinup girl to thousands of African American. Gi's doing award to her active career spanned and six decades and in nineteen eighty nine. She was awarded the Grammy Lifetime. Achievement Award program was first produced in March nineteen a three. I'm John Johansen Junior and welcome to another edition of Black America on this week's program a black history month special the legendary in Dairy Lino in Black America Ono I stall since.

Black America Ethel waters Lena Horne Blue Vallis Horn University of Texas Grammy John Johansen Swimming Dairy Lino Austin K. U. T. Miller Eddie Anderson Gi Georgia Hollywood
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Series report on African America's at forty seven point eight million strong and the buying power. That's on par with many countries. Gross Domestic Products african-american continue to Alpay. I spending nationally this year's report title. It's in the bag. Lack consumers path to purchase focused on assisting brands and marketers understand the multi-facetted process that African Americans take to buy products. There were several drivers but culture is at the center of the mall. Also that I love with technology make African Americans. More Savvy and conscious consumers to report highlights several differences and shopping behavior and purchasing with compared to the total US population. I'm John L. Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of Black America on this week program is in the bag black consumers path to purchase show Grace Nielsen Senior Vice President of community alliances and consumer engagement in Black America. So what we included in this year's report was what the African American focused media spend is for like how much money companies are spending on the different platforms and you would think given the fact that African Americans watch so much. TV that the adspend would be comparable but not is actually at odds with our consumption habits which is sad to say there has been a decline year over year so cable television had a one percent decline digital advertising. Had A twelve percent decline. National magazines had a nine percent decline network. TV had a thirteen percent decline pot. Radio four percent and syndicated TV had eleven percent decline so across the board the platforms that are focused on African American media. Father Klein and that's not good. According to NIELSEN'S LAYERS REPORT ON AFRICAN AMERICANS OREGON SPENDING AFRICAN-AMERICANS. Want more for themselves and from Corporate America the report channel. It's in the bag. Black consumers path to purchase reveal that African Americans are more likely than the total population to agree that advertising provides meaningful information on most platforms but advertising dollars designed to reach African American swimmers that climbed by one billion dollars between two thousand seventeen and two thousand eighteen Nielsen Nielsen. Two Thousand Nineteen diverse intelligence series report on African Americans also include deeper insight into how culture social economic and business influence influence. How why and what motivate african-american spending and addition african-americans spent a total market on personal soap and bath products addicts by nearly nineteen percent? That's five hundred and seventy three point. Six million dollars. Recently in Black America spoke of show grey's his Nielsen's Senior Vice President Community alliances and consumer engagement and co-creator other this report. I live in Chicago. I was born and in raised in Fort Wayne Indiana and I've been in Chicago since I graduated from college so that's actually longer now than when I lived in my hometown. What college did you attend? Purdue University for my Undergrad. Oh so you didn't stray too far from home. No I did not I did. Not What brought you to the the Nielsen Company. So in two thousand and four. When I joined the company they were experiencing a little bit of unsettled? Unsettled Miss if you will. With the African American and Latino Population and there was an assertion being put forth at Nielsen wasn't accurately measuring people of color which was not true and I actually had experience working for television station. LOCAL LOCAL NBC affiliate in Chicago. And I also had a community organizing background and background in working in politics because because I had worked as the press secretary for the Chicago City Treasurer and so they were looking for a person with those qualifications specifically to Kinda on a help them navigate establishing a community relations and government relations department. And so I joined at that time. Were brought Nielsen to the point where it needed to produce these reports. Well actually in twenty eleven so about six years. After I joined the company I was heading up the communication before our global what. We Call C. P. G. Division consumer packaged goods division. which this is you know where people by the retailers where they buy their groceries? The manufacturers that make All fast and simple goods and I saw all of this data coming across my desk about multicultural consumers man. I knew I wasn't aware of the power that we had ad so I just assumed that the general population and our clients were also not aware of this and so talk around and started working with some analysts and we pulled together the first report on the African American consumer to kind of talk about what we watch what we buy in and watch watch and by what we do and it was such a success. That first reported actually won a number of awards that the company stepped back and said. Hey Hey maybe we should take a look at consumers who are Asian American and Latin American as well and thus the diverse intelligence series of reports were born the now we put forth at least three or four reports every single year on some of those diverse communities were. Is this information significant. It's really important. Because particularly multicultural consumers are rapidly growing. Our purchasing power is rapidly growing right now collectively collectively African Americans Hispanics and Asian Americans have over three point two three point four trillion dollars of purchasing power when you combine all of it and that's like if we were GDP there are only four countries countries in the entire world who would have economies that are larger the mat and that would be the United States it would be China it would be Japan and it would be Germany and so you cannot overlook that type of tremendous power and we need not only for our brand and clients and marketers to understand and value diversity when it comes to consumer and our consumption habits and behaviors. We awesome need the consumers who are making these decisions to understand what their power is so that they can use it accordingly. How did you go about developing developing the metrics to measure Nielsen measures? What Consumers Watch Comfort? Well consumers listening to and what we do is we just just simply pull together a lot of information that we already collected but we vary with different Lynn. So we very strategically pool out. The information mation on African American consumers afford African American report. So it's information that we're already gathering we just put it in a consolidated place so that that we have access and we can provide that to our clients that to consumers when you looked at the numbers. And we're GONNA talk about some of the numbers in the conversations nations. Did you have any a high moments from this report from the one that I did in two thousand eleven. Yeah so I think the biggest shift. There were two for me that I'm starting to see from a trend perspective and I've been doing report for nine years now. I can say that the biggest ship I've seen seen over the last few years wasn't how differently. The top twenty programs are that African Americans are watching versus non on Hispanic whites and what we have seen is historically there have been overlapping in content. From what blacks you're watching to. What the total market is watching? Generally about forty fifty percent of an overlap this year we saw a lot less of that so with blacks ax who are eighteen. To thirty four. There were only like two shows that they watch that the total market is also watching and that was empire and show called nine one one. I'm and when you're looking at blacks thirty five and over there were only four. Shows out of the twenty that crossover this is a Chicago. PD FBI and manifest so for me. That's significant because it says that if you build it or rather than reduce it they will come hab choices about what they want to see. They're going going to turn to the show that have cast and characters who look like them. It used to be that we would see. We were tuning into shows that that had diversity but especially for eighteen to thirty four year old their shows are almost all exclusively. African American cast asks not one hundred percent but but primarily black. And so that's been the biggest shift that I've seen. I've also seen this shift when it comes to view Wayne and we watch a lot of television by the way we watch more than fifty hours a week of television We're watching I think is close to fifty seven hours a week watching watching about eleven hours more than the total population watches. And when you take a look at the differences between the viewing habits I I think a lot of it is being driven now by people having options to network and cable shows so now they got streaming choices and those streaming streaming services are really providing a lot of diverse content so the network the cable providers have to keep up. So that's why you're starting to see not a lot of changes own. TV is driving a lot of interest for adults thirty five plus in for those eighteen to thirty four year old let's vh one is is nailing it the H.. One has so many of the love and hip hop franchises. That pop up on that top twenty list but the eighteen to thirty four year olds are really into reality. Television surprised this there as a television. Viewer Myself Jeff. I should be watching the program for entertainment purposes but I'm also watching it to see what commercials are are being shown shown in that vein does the viewership of that particular program dictate the type of commercials that are going to be shown our show for that particular program so what we included in. This year's report was what the African American focused media radius spend is for like how much money companies are spending on the different platforms and you would think given the the fact that African Americans watch so much. TV that the ad spin would be comparable but not is actually at odds with our consumption habits which is fat to say there has been a decline year over year so cable television had a one percent decline digital advertising. Had A twelve percent decline. National magazines had a nine percent decline network. TV has thirteen percent decline pot. Radio four percent and syndicated TV had eleven percent decline so across the board the platforms that are focused on African American media. You saw decline. And that's that's not good because radio ninety two percent of all blacks watch. I'm sorry listen to radio in any given week week and so that's the number one way to reach African Americans but still Christina decline and radio. We're seeing it. Climate television is just not. It's not adding out. was there any indication of advertising toys. The four or five African American cable channels that we have the T.. I did not pull the specific programs or networks where the ads were dedicated this year. Unfortunately fortunately I can look into but we didn't pull those numbers this year. Why isn't important and I'm looking at the report? That cultural role has a -nificant place in what African Americans purchase. Well you know advertising in particular resonates with with African Americans and we are not as averse to having ads for example pop up on our mobile phones but we find that at resonate with us and there's a certain reason why so like fifty one percent of black say that a celebrity pretty endorsement may influence them to consider or buy a product so celebrities are really important. I love keeping up with celebrity news and gossip forty four percent of black say that when a celebrity designer product. I'm more likely to buy it thirty five percent of black. Say that and I'm influenced by what's hot and what's not thirty. Three percent of blacks agree with that statement. These are like relevant because we again we want to see ads that reflect people who look like us but we also have this admiration for celebrities and blacks are actually considered to be very cool. If you will and we're trendsetters and so what you find is that when you're marketing and using African American celebrities not only does that appeal to African Americans. It also appeals to all of the other demographics as well I think it's seventy six percent of of of Caucasians and sixty seven percent of Hispanics say that they think blacks Dr pop culture and so when you're marketing into US he kinda get a bonus in that other cultures are following our trend so something that happens with us in our communities but generally generally six months to a year you start to see it happening across other communities as well so we're definitely trendsetters if just joining us. I'm Johnny Oh Hanson Junior. You and you're listening to N.. Black America from KABC radio is speaking with show Grace Senior Vice President.

NIELSEN Nielsen Nielsen Chicago United States Nielsen Company Black America Senior Vice President NBC Purdue University Alpay John L. Hanson OREGON Corporate America Fort Wayne Indiana
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Know. The greatest thing that I've learned from your class is that we white people need to really understand society better. We need understand our history and heritage and we need to understand. Racism is the one and and we generally don't get that in college but then the class like yours. We get get that and so. I think that you know that. There's a lot of pushback you have conservatives white conservatives who come and sit and I classes and claim that we are just viewing reverse racism and all of that stuff and But we weather the storm and you know I tell them from the from the from the first day. I'm sure that there's some people in this class. Were sitting here watching me to go back and report and saying I'm engaging racism but there's one fact you cannot get around I'm going to show you data data. I'm going to show you information. I'm going to show you scholarship much of it produced by white people who contradicts the point of view that this has been a land of equality and in all you have to do is one at work hard and so forth. And that we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA study this they want to study society and we're GONNA study groups and we're going to do it systematically. Go Use some the best evidence available Doctor Alden. Moore's Leeann forthwith of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University and president elect of the American Sociological Association. If you have questions comments or suggestions asked your future in black America programs. Email us at in Black America at K. U. T. Dot. Org also let us know. Would radio station. You heard is over. Remember to lock his own facebook and follow. It was on twitter. The views and opinions expressed on this program are not necessarily though that this station or of the University of Texas at Austin you can hear previous programs online K. U. T. Dot Org. On Julia the opportunity again for technical producer. David our is. I'm John non-euro Hanson Junior. Thank you for joining us today. Please join us again next week. CD copies of this program are available and maybe purchased by writing being in Black America CDs K.. Ut Radio Three hundred West Dean. Keaton Boulevard Austin Texas seven eight seven one two. That's in black America CDs K.. Ut Radio Three hundred West Dean. Keaton Boulevard Austin Texas seven eight seven one to this has been a production of K. U. T. radio on this song. PODCAST Lombardi soul from the Elian La. Santa Cecilia explains how much city Salsa Song helped her understand that. She's part of something bigger. I can feel myself connected to the earth and when she sings these songs I feel like the song she she interpreted are not just about love. But they're about love for the whole world. Is You can find this song on cutie x dot org or wherever you get your podcasts..

Black America Keaton Boulevard Austin Texas Julia Santa Cecilia K. U. T. Dot Org Ut West Dean America Austin University of Texas facebook twitter Doctor Alden Elian La American Sociological Associat K. U. T. Dot John non-euro David Northwestern University African American Studies
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"K. UT APP from the apple or yeah from the University of Texas at Austin K. Ut Radio this is in black America regret choir probably GONNA be a mega clan and by that I mean instead of the normal fatter we're talking about seventeen people sectors that's going to be some long jared.

apple University of Texas Austin K. Ut America jared
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

10:15 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Texas at Austin K ut radio this is in black America knew. I didn't want to be a dentist but I didn't have the strength to tell my daddy. I wasn't going to do that he. He warned me to be a baseball player and a Dennis and that's the only sport I I mean I. I resisted both of those because I wanted to be me and I didn't know who I was but when I left how I was was it going back we stopped in North Carolina and I ran to the top of a mountain just because I was frustrated and I needed to burn up some energy not well. My parents went to meeting and from the top of Kings Mountain North Carolina I I looked out in the world just made sense and I realize everything everything I saw. The corn had a purpose to sunflowers had a for the pine trees had a purpose the clouds had a purpose everything had a purpose and I said whoever made all this couldn't have made me with no purpose so it has got to be a purpose for me to the end of Andrew The J. Young Civil Rights legend former. UN Ambassador Congressman and Mayor of Atlanta Georgia in nineteen sixty young help change this country as a leader in the civil rights movement his legacy include being silly activists elected official groundbreaking Ambassador Social Entrepreneur. You're an adviser to presidents. Currently he leaves the Andrew J Young Foundation's effort to the BELVA `support new generations of visionary leaders who array sustainable global approaches to Economic Development Poverty Alleviation Ama- challenge of hunger young was a close confidante to the late Dr Martin Luther King Junior and a key strategist negotiated during campaigns that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and the voting rights act of Nineteen nineteen sixty five this past spring young was in Austin Texas to participate in the summit on race in America at the AUBERGE Presidential Library on on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. I'm John Leo Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program and exclusive interview with Civil Rights Legend the Honorable Andrew Young and black America Reverend Vivian was really the first one have a sit it in he was he had a sit in Peoria Illinois in nineteen forty seven that was way before Montgomery and and Martin Luther King we go into his ninety sixth birthday next month he still with us. He was a freedom rider he he worked with us from beginning to end and he's still on the case James Several Janesville genius but he was also very eccentric. Maybe crazy but Dr King being used to say that all of us a certify ably insane because you've got to be kinda crazy to think that you can change America America was no money no organization we had nothing but the spirit of the Lord moving in our hearts it it changed when one speaks with the honor Bell Andrew j young you can still see it on his face and hearing his voice the Passion and commitment he still has for the call for social justice as Executive Director of the southern Christian Leadership Conference in one thousand nine hundred sixty four he was on on the front line doing America's doctors days born and raised in a segregated New Orleans young. I attended Dillard University in the city then attended Howard Howard University and earned a vintage degree in one thousand nine hundred fifty five from Hartford theological seminary working as a young pastor and Thomas Field Georgia he he first became part of the movement when he organized voter registration drives and nineteen seventy s first attempt to elect politics he loss but with a new campaign campaign finance chairman in Nineteen seventy-two he was elected to Congress becoming the first African American representative from the deep south since reconstruction he was reelected in one thousand nine hundred seventy four and again in one thousand nine hundred seventy six and nineteen eighty-one. He was elected mayor of Atlanta Georgia this past spring in Black America sat down with young exclusive interview during his stay in Austin participant in the summit on race in America. Mrs Young tells what was is New Orleans like back in the nineteen forties and fifties. We don't strangely enough it was segregated but but I I had to deal with Sarah Gatien and from four years old on because you know the Nazi party headquarters was fifty yards from where I was born. There was an Irish grocery store in Italian bar and I was right in the middle and then I had to go to Lina See Jones school which was a public school in another neighborhood that was called the bucket of blood because it was so much fighting and stuff going on there and I was I was younger longer than everybody and smaller than everybody so My Daddy told me said look you never going to be big enough to beat everybody so you need to learn to fight because if you know how to fight you don't have to fight nearly as much he he said but you're not GonNa win. Many fights comes he said but you probably outrun run a lot of people but you feel good running from problems. I was GONNA ask you. I read that your father hired a fighter vital to teach you and your brother well he was he was a dentist and we we live near the coliseum where the boxes is trained so when they had need dental work and no money he would fix the teeth free but then he'd make them them take us to the gym to teach us how to box notion. was you need to know he said so that even when you get in a fight you might get beat but you need to let them know that they've been in a fight and you will have to fight right that much. What was your favorite subjects wagon school recess manual training I guess I a sort of like math and science. I didn't like school so but I like certain teaches and whatever they were teaching. I happen to like it usually those with teachers at like me and put up with me but a school school for me was learning to get along with other people. I mean I was again. I I went to school young and I was small and ironically you know Martin. Luther King went to college at fifteen and Maynard Jackson at fourteen I wanted fifteen fifteen and my buddies would just coming back from from the military and and so David Dinkins who came to New York was sorta one of my mentors he'd been a marine been office in the Marines Marines and came back to go to school after being in the Marine Corps and he saw kind of looked out for me but he I was fifteen fifteen he was about twenty five twenty four. You went to Diller for you then you transferred to Howard why the move because I grew up on campus my mother and father went to and I needed to get out of town. I needed to get away from there because everybody thought of is a little oh boy there and I wanted to be a man. You was -ticipant becoming a dentist but obviously you got to call. How did you know that you a sudafed administer well? I didn't know I was suited for the ministry and I still don't know that I'm suited to the ministry. What happened happened was? I knew I didn't want to be a dentist but I didn't have the strength to tell my daddy. I wasn't going to do that he he. He warned me to be a baseball player. Anna Dennis and that's the only sport I I mean I resisted both of those 'cause I wanted to be you me and I didn't know who I was but when I left Howard I was going back. We stopped in North Carolina and I ran to the top of a mountain just to those frustrated and I needed to US burn up some energy while my parents went to meeting and from the top of Kings Mountain North Carolina I I looked out in the world just made sense and I realized everything I saw the corn had a purpose sunflowers at a purpose to pine trees. He's headed purpose. The clouds had a purpose. Everything had a purpose and I said whoever.

America Black America North Carolina Andrew Young Luther King baseball J. Young Civil Rights Kings Mountain Anna Dennis Bell Andrew Andrew J Young Foundation Atlanta Howard Austin Texas Georgia Dr Martin Luther King Junior Austin K ut Texas Howard Howard University
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"From the University of Texas at Austin K. UT radio this is in black America. You're absolutely right about. That's not being first. First Name. First name was the four aims we wanted our name to be to signify we were about we were aiming for the moon the stars you know to to be top-flight to be one of the best groups we felt like we could be and so we kept that name from one thousand nine hundred eighty four we started to nineteen fifty six which was our first first real recording contract that was with chess records so we'll just about to record with down in the studio and feel chest came down. He said well fellas. I'm sorry to so you don't have to change your main group. They're calling for I say. Oh Yeah I've heard him say but people don't know the difference between Gus US aims and before pieces now you have to the change of name so our musical director. His name was Morris King Nine. You get the full. How do you get the forain how'd you you know that we start telling and all the things we look for receiving for the stars in trying to get on top all that kind of stuff and he said well what about the four thousand. Abdul Duke Fakir Founding Ending Member of the four tops the woken court chat for among the original stable stars that helped establish the motown sound before child was the main vocal vocal group for the very successful songwriting production team of Holland Holland one year after signing with motown they began their hit streak with baby. I need your Lovin which peaked at number eleven over the next eight years they made more appearances on the charts of memorable songs including aster lonely owning standing in the shadow of love and I can't help myself sugar pie honey bunch with went to number one this past spring Faquir took part hard in the summit on race in America and the opening of the Grammy Museum's new exhibit Motown the sound of young America at the LBJ Presidential Library on on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. I'm John Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week program Duke Luke Faquir of the four tops and Mary Wilson of the SUPREMES in Black America..

Black America motown Abdul Duke Fakir University of Texas America Holland Holland Austin K. UT Duke Luke Faquir LBJ Presidential Library Grammy Museum Gus US Austin Morris King Mary Wilson Faquir SUPREMES John Hanson director eight years one year
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

12:39 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"I know you remember him in the N._B._C.. Series Knight Collar also co starred in the nineteen eighty nine Eh A._B._C.. Mini Series Of Women Bruce Place as the boyfriend of Robin Gibbons and the H._B._O.. Series and one can't forget the statue of a saint saint comes to life in the music video for Madonna's Song lack of prayer if he's not acting was enough think again he's elite singer and songwriter for resolve bannon title Leon and the peoples. I'm John L. Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program actor Jersey Singer Songwriter and film producer Leeann in Black America the hardest obstacle. I've had to overcome to be where I am today. <hes> <hes> probably just being able to you know live to the beat of my own drum. You know regardless of you know my acting acting career C._N._N.. The else I've always thought it was important to be me and to enjoy my life and not let whatever I'm doing control me and you know run my life to the point where I couldn't enjoy my life and you know there's still a struggle today especially now that <hes> not just an active but I'm also producer and also in lead singer of a band and songwriter you know doing so many different things. I need to always try to find the time to do you know be me to enjoy myself to join my life to enjoy you know being a father. which is you know my favorite role and yeah yeah you know? I think that's the biggest struggle the biggest struggle to see you know maintain enough of self and not allow yourself just because you're a public figure to belong to the Public Leeann. Robinson is a triple threat. He's an actor singer Songwriter and film producer to his fans. They know him simply as Leeann. You've been doing this thing for more than three decades. In the entertainment industry he started in some of the most iconic movies of our time J._T.. Matthews in the five heartbeats heartbeats David Ruffin and the temptations little rigid as Little Richard Koo Running Russell and waiting to exhale once upon a time when we were colored it and above the rim just to name a few other performances include the women of brewster place and the H._B._O.. Siri is born and raised the New York City music was always around his favorites were reggae and R._&_B.. He attended Mount Saint Michael Academy and they tell me he was a really good basketball basketball player. After graduation he moved West to attend Loyola Marymount University Roster Rolling on campus one day a graduate student asks asked him to be in his film and the rest is history life in the big apple. <hes> it was <hes> it was great. It was great <hes> being being a melting pot of people you know all different races and nationalities <hes> that's the way I thought you know everyone's life was until I grew up with found out that was different. And when did you get the acting bug the acting bug. I guess the first time I had any kind of idea I wanted to show this is when I saw my oldest sister's this is <hes> High School class do a rock and roll revival yeah and <hes> I saw it and told the nuns of Catholic the grammar school that we could do something similar in and choreographed and created this little variety show where I play Chevy checkup played Elvis Presley good looking in girls played the Andrew Sisters and it was a big hit understand you the pretty good athlete while you're in high school. Yeah I guess so I was all everything basketball player had a lot of scholarship offers and went to Loyola Marymount University on a basketball scholarship. We that's what to Los Angeles and once you were in college understand that someone asks you to to to be his film never thought about acting yeah graduate films ranch as me down campus and asked me to be his movie called photographer and I was like well. Why don't you get somebody in the drama department sure they would love to be in the movie and he was like now just been watching you? There's something about you feel like you're going to be in the movies And how long ago did you shoot that. We shot that in <hes> July tells about your experience with the five heartbeats the five heartbeats while the five heartbeats <hes> is amazing experience Robert. <hes> Mick kept telling us the whole time he was setting out trying to make <hes> you know a masterpiece something everything you know stand the test of time time something that was different and you know we believe them and we would just you know trying to make a movie about five men five good-looking black men who new details throughout their trials and tribulations in life. You know still stayed together something very rare. He also played David Ruffin in <hes> the bio pic. The temptations tells about playing him well playing David Ruffin was <hes> you know interesting situation because after the five heartbeats oldest this Williams the original member temptations is told me that they were going to make a movie out of his book and he wanted me to play him and I was like great you know fantastic fantastic and so when the movie came about they called me for meeting and told me of you know Otis's wishes for me to play him and they just wanted to know oh before they moved further what role they think that I should play but I thought that I should play in the movie and I said that you know I 's always flattered that he <hes> always wanted me to play him but I thought I would best serve the movie if I played the role of David Ruffin and they were just like Oh my God. We're so happy that we were like Oh. We didn't know we get the pay day. Roughly you didn't WanNa Klay David Ruffin and so that's how that came about and also you play Little Richard. Yes I played <hes> rich penman little Richard any the research for those particular kind of musical figures. Oh yeah lots lots of research you know talking to people who knew them and <hes> <hes>. You know luckily for me. Both projects were based on the book so I had you know I had the techs to you know to always reference at all the times you know and and it helped a lot of times because I there were things that weren't in the script that <hes> you know I bought attention to the producers and stuff to you know to add into the script yeah because it was part of what happened medically would work and doing the research for this interview. I noticed that you say besides the dialogue. There's also also the physical part of playing apart and I was particularly. I was really in my mind about the five heartbeats and then when you play Little Richard and then when you play the temptations and I was particularly struck on the dialogue that you said I think when you and Eddie were getting back together US talking. I'm out your facial expression. When you said the data lot we are the voices two that is how important is it for the physical part of actor an character if no dialogue is actually propelling you in that particular sequence <hes> it's very important equally as important you know being able to act isn't just about saying lines? You know it's about your facial expression. Your body language is a very important thing I remember <hes> working with <hes> the great director Michael Mann <hes> an alley and he told me one of the reasons why he wanted me to play this role so bad that played is because awesome he's told me in this movie above the rim and he was <hes>. He loved the fact that that I did so much. Even when I had no dialogue you could see in my eyes and then my face. It's my facial expression what I was feeling and <hes> you know. It's very important. You know lots of times you know in real life you know when you're talking to someone. It's about how they look at you. How in their demeanor is just as important as what they're saying. You Know How many times you come up to the person that you know or even a family member or use your son or your daughter. They have a set of words like what's what's wrong song right. Why why are you this. Why are you that. Oh really you feel like that and he said nothing in the end. You've been fortunate enough not to be really pigeonholed. You pay the cast of characters yeah. I try you know I've been. I've been lucky enough to be able to play a lot of different roles. You know there's they often do try to pigeonhole me but <hes> you know luckily I've been able to do. You know flex my <hes> the variety of my talent so you know have I'm just thankful I can say. How has your seeing being talent assisted you in and getting roles that require a singing? We know the crazy thing is not much okay because you know in actuality you know the role that I've played at singers really came before I had my band or anything and so I wasn't known as a singer anything. It's it's just <hes> I just. I guess just looked like when you play one on T._V.. Tell us about Leon end the people's Leon and the peoples my band. I'm very happy to say that <hes> you know we're doing well. The the new album love is a beautiful thing came out <hes> this summer to great reviews and <hes> we've been on the road. <hes> you know performing <hes> currently in Chicago right now playing the change fests tonight at I have to do Salvo Smithsonian Saba Museum of African American history and tomorrow night at the wild hair and <hes> yeah the sponsors just been you know great great great to the the the new single. That's out off the record call. Sometimes I wish I was single and <hes> yeah you know. It's just <hes> you you know we we play music for the people you know. I think music should entertain make you feel good. Make you think you know and should be something that brings you down. Depresses you or people are not in this and <hes> that's the kind of music we play to bar questions. Why did you put the band together. And and what type of music do you awfully. I put a band together. Basically it says the first time I'm performed in a band really was with a group called the young lions in New York was your great great musicians from downtown. New York you know the played in bands like steel pulse and <hes> Bruce Springsteen's ban and sting and you know and it was just <hes> just amazing grunge guys but you know they were just playing covers and I wanted to play original music so I started <hes> my own band called the people's and then shortly after I had to put David Ruffin on them and call Leon and the peoples because he got his better gigs I understand and <hes> we play a mixture between reggae and soul music so play reggae souls where we call it in <hes>. If you listen to our record it's half reggae half soul oh or the soul music with a with a reggae drum and Bass backbeat and you know that's us. Was that one the your major major music influences while you're going to <hes> yeah without a doubt I mean I think I heard Bob. Marley's not to dread album twelve years old. Oh come out of the window and it was on repeat and I think I just sat there until I must new everywhere not just from that moment on that became kind backbeat in my life and <hes>.

Klay David Ruffin Leon Richard Koo basketball producer New York Leeann Bruce Place Public Leeann Madonna Mount Saint Michael Academy Robin Gibbons Loyola Marymount University Los Angeles John L. Hanson America Loyola Marymount University Ro Bob Black America High School
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

16:08 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"From the university of Texas at Austin, K UT radio. This is in black America fade, that musicians have a responsibility in general because what they're dealing with is to me. What I call the diviner, which is music. It's -bility.

university of Texas Austin America
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Black America from K UT radio. We speaking doctor Derrick arm rooms, associate professor of sociology and African studies at university of Cincinnati and author of being black being male on campus understanding confronting black male collegian experiences. Dr Bruins what led you to write? This book really grew out of my own schooling experiences. Okay. Being a professor I have a unique opportunity to not only read and study other people's knowledge. I also have an opportunity to create knowledge that hopefully has an impact not only people's lives, but on communities and institutions, and so as I continuously I mean, even to today reflect on my own schooling experiences K through twelve all the way through my graduate studies, excuse me, my college in graduate studies, given the types of schools that I attended giving some of the narratives and are out about black students in general black males in particular things such as they don't care about school. You know, the the over preponderance in and over support for athletic prowess as opposed to economic an intellectual skills. I thought about my experiences and going from one hundred percent black high school to a college that was four and a half percent. And I thought about some of the adjustments and some of the trials tribulations lessons and triumphs that I had. My own experiences. And of course at the same time. We we know that colleges and universities, particularly, you know, historically, and predominantly white is the tunes continue to be spaces that are rife for black students where regards to hostility challenges, discrimination, racism and cetera. And part of part of what I wanted to do was give agency to black men's experiences in college in particular, just happened that the schools that studied or the students that are partnered with attended schools that were historically white institutions and at the same time. I I wanted them to tell their own stories as opposed to people constantly talking about black men, but not talking with black, man. And is it somewhat different? You arrived at university of Louisville in two thousand twelve from the students that you are now encountering at university natty in twenty eight I wouldn't I mean, I I think that I used to teach at a community college as well. Prairie state. Yeah. Very state, right? If I think about my. Own teaching experiences within higher education. I think we find similar trans that we find students who are you know, incredibly talented, intellectual academically oriented online educational aspirations you on the other end of that Spektrum. We have students who struggle some of that is for personal reasons motivation some of that his family background some of it is previous schooling experiences. Some of it is the environment at that college. And we have a bunch of students in the middle who, you know, with various backgrounds are kind of navigating the negotiation negotiating college campuses, and and and trying to pursue their goals. I that's been consistent for me at each of those three institutions period state university level and here the university of Cincinnati. I think one of the things that you just you know, really kinda contributes to what you experience and how students try to navigate negotiate college. Is that college culture? No, you know, it Louisville during the time that I was there. There was a lot of. Focus and attention on the athletic prowess of the institution. Okay. Here's cincinnati. It just happens that the football team it really well this year. Maybe I brought a little luck with me. But they did really well, but you don't have the over dominance of athletics. Right. So here at the university of natty at least in the time that I've been here it's a bit different. And I don't want to scale it in different than the focus on athletics at the university of Louisville. And then of course, if I go to state where they don't have a football team right on this is community college. So they're sports Atlantic programs aren't funded in any stretch of imagination the same ways..

university of Cincinnati Dr Bruins university of Louisville university of natty football associate professor of sociolo America Derrick Louisville cincinnati professor Prairie state Spektrum one hundred percent
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"So when I'm connecting with people instead of right? In my notepad pet. You know, I'm spilling it for the world to see the toughest part. I think which took some time for me. And I'm still learning is that, you know, writing for print and writing for television is different. Right. So as in print, I could create a beautiful pros e leads right? I can give you a nice, quote, the second paragraph, and then have a nice nut grab it kinda explains it, and then I reinforce it down from the nut graph on MTV. It's like, it's the visual element. And it can't right? If you don't have the pictures, right and imprint you know, I could put the weight on my own shoulders. I find the person the sources I'm talking to I craft this thing off editor fixed. They need getting fixed. Now, it's done with TV. I'm out there on that sofa still talking to this woman there like all right? Stop get lights right now got the tape. Then we got four big dudes office in my living room. Right. It just changes it. So I've had to learn to stick with stick with the program. You know, still do what I always do. And just. Building some patients that I can't do this alone. Because I need my field producer. I need the executive producer to to feel me and believe in the store, I'm trying to I need to make sure that the lead in that a segment producer is gonna write for Chris Hayes, the host into my packages. Right. It's a team effort make sure the sound is right. And make sure that the the visual elements and the camera man or camera woman is doing their thing. It's a whole different ball game in terms of the team aspect, but the fundamentals are still there. Do you care about the way people live in die? The do you wanna t- up and put some context to the systems that control our lives? Right. Trump mainly correspondent for MS NBC, if you have questions comments or suggestions as future in black America programs, Email us at in black America at K U, T dot ORG. Also, let us know what radio station you heard us over remember to lack is on Facebook. And the follow us on Twitter, the views and opinions expressed on this. A not necessarily those of this

field producer segment producer executive producer Facebook Twitter MTV Trump America editor Chris Hayes MS NBC
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Many decisions to make recently in black America spoke with Dionne L HOGAN to give our audience. The inside look Deanna from the same city, Detroit, Michigan and ironically, I high schools had the same colors. He went to Kettering. I went to DeAnne Tele what was life like going up in the motor city. Very unique Detroit is special town has a vessel beat to it. You know, growing up there, you have a privilege of being a black person and pretty much predominantly black area. I was not really exposed to multiple coach Coulter's until I went. To call. It basically dominated all black student population until I got to the university of Kansas. Well, walked into a study hall or a lecture hall where we supposed to four hundred students, and it was like five of us sitting in there. And I was like oh my God. We had white instructors. But Deva's about it talk about living on the east side in the motor city. He sai- was unique in the fact that we my little city my little town there. My little neighborhood was Lower East Side, we close knit. We had a bunch of young men growing up together, we had some gangs in the neighborhood for sure. At that time, we had a couple of well known nationally known gangs that populated area and my highschool decided that they wanted to make the gangs neutral. Highschool neutral brought him into the area and that didn't work very well. And we had a lot of unfortunate shootouts and some bad things did happen. But we did have some good things to come along on it that as Well Detroit. Police department decided to create what we call the gang task force to tackle that particular entities. And at the time he may see the movie right boy, Rick is out. Now, he he was popular during that time as well. So we had a lot of well known nationally known things to go on that particular time when I was growing up. So you're the fourth of five kids, I am the fourth of five children, correct? Obviously there was no downtime while you're at home. There was always something going on pretty much. You know, my family was pretty busy. Fortunately, my older siblings were on the way out as I was coming up. So it was pretty fortunately for me. We grew up five children and a two bedroom. Home one bathroom, and we made a work, you know, right back. Then you didn't have a choice we had no air conditioning. And we we we survive. You know, my mother never worked my father had a one job. And we we made it work. You know, what sports? Prior to you going to high school at Kettering. Actually, I didn't play anything. There was very little sports availability to us at the time had maybe one or two track clubs peewee football was very little didn't have access to it. We only had one family car and mafia was using that for work and accessibility was not they are us. So Consequently, I didn't participate in sports until I got to high school, and what changed that all around when I was a deciding where I wanted to go to high school. I I chose a school outside of my neighborhood. Call finish highschool, which was predominantly. A mixture of white and black. It was closer to the suburb area. Okay. And I went out there. And I got on that bus. And it was a heck of a ride, and I had also qualified for another school, which was higher learning place. They call cast tech. And again that was another half an hour forty five minute ride from where I lived and studied on that bus during the wintertime bus bus stop in the city the Troy when you talk about zero degree weather instead on that bus. Stop for an hour is not fun. So friend of mine, but the name of Larry Smith decided, you know, hey, I'm going to this local highschool call Kettering. We got a hiccup attracting a heck of a football team. We can use you come on up here. And he decided, and I decided to go up there and try out and the that was history, man. And it was a good decision on my part. Something tragic happened to Larry it football. Tell us about that day. If you can remember, well, we were practicing football and we're doing some tackling drills..

Detroit football Kettering Larry Smith DeAnne Tele Rick Dionne L HOGAN Michigan university of Kansas America Deanna Coulter Deva Troy forty five minute zero degree
"black america" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"black america" Discussed on In Black America

"Deal. Anything. He's not. Goal. Yes. Goswell recording otter. Have you have questions, comments or suggestions as future in black America programs? Email us at n black America at k. u. t. that ORG also let us know what radio station you heard his over. Remember to lack is on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. The views and opinions expressed on this pro a, not necessarily, though this station or the university of Texas at Austin previous programs online at k. u. t. dot ORG until we had the opportunity again for technical would do David avarice on John l. Hanson junior, thank you joining us today. Please join us again next week. CD copies of this program are available and may be purchased by writing in black America. CDs k. UT radio, one university station Austin, Texas, seven, eight, seven one two. That's in black America. CDs k. UT radio, one university station Austin, Texas, seven, eight, seven one two. This has been a production of k. u. t. radio, you can support all of our k. UT in k. UT x. podcasts and programs through a sustaining membership, learn how at KU t. dot ORG or k. UT x dot ORG. Enjoy the program.

America Austin Texas university of Texas Facebook Twitter k. u. t. David avarice Hanson John l k. u.