19 Burst results for "Black Alliance"

"black alliance" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:18 min | 3 weeks ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm your host. Jennifer V. L. A. I have a PR company here in Santa Fe called the media. I am speaking with the Earth seed Black Arts Alliance to three founders of the Earth Seed Black Alliance. Sean Ahmad, Nicky Chabris anti great by Lando secret Before the break we were talking about you have is it? It's um, is not a mural, but it's some kind of Ah collective. Creative space that has been built up in the rail yard. That right? Yes. So the project is called Leo got the gay alternate project and it is the name Is the original Tae wa name for the place we call Santa Fe and that name was chosen by one of the collaborative members of the team who is Teyla and wanted To call that name back in a zoo away of the colonizing this place. Okay, Pogi, Right? Is that how you say it? Oh, is that right? Okay. Yeah, the pronunciation. Khun B could be tricky for Fernanda speakers. I'm still kind of learning how to pronounce it. But anyway, so it's a physical, altering its a four sided structure that we created that is made of adobe and reclaimed wood and natural branches and ceramic and As a number of collaborators. Black indigenous Jigen and immigrant collaborators have all come together and that is, yeah, As I was saying, it's It's a space that were really hoping for the community to engage with and for people to find. A place to connect two connected to their ancestors to connect to their grief to connect to their joy and just a cz away of rejuvenating our clip to struggle towards peace and liberation. Right. And so And what else are you all planning specific events and people join? Tell us a little bit more about the structure of the organization of Earthsea itself? Yeah. Yeah, So I guess in terms of people joining we are there's an open invitation to basically all black artists on DH creatives in New Mexico and especially northern New Mexico, where were all based And, um, you know, while there is some some aspect of a collaborative, productive aspect of wanting to create work together. Also, a lot of it is really just about creating community as we mentioned earlier, and so there really is an open space for people to come and to be able to just communicate and know that they're held. By other black folks who share you know some of their history and some of their love and their pain. There's an open invitation via our website, which is Earthsea Blackhearts dot work. Where folks can kind of fill out a little a little form about themselves, and then we can kind of bring bring into the community. Cool. Well, I know a Sean said earlier. You know about changing the narrative, and I think this is gonna be so incredibly beneficial for everybody. To see more of what's going on with black artists and the black community in New Mexico's Nicky Sha, You are creating something you're involved in a big project right now, right? Yeah, There's there's a lot of layers, Tio different projects I'm working on. I just finished last weekend, working with three other black artists on DH. We created of eight hour dance performance and more mourning ritual in the foothills of Albuquerque, musician. Another dancer myself, also a dancer. On a film maker on the whole process was incredibly beautiful, open public public performance, eight hour directional peace, and now we are utilizing the footage to develop and create a small film project based on on what we did. It will have another life of its own. So I'm in the process of developing and putting out that some project. I also have a large show in Santa faith that a big solo show that'll be happening in the spring at Foreman Concept gallery downtown in the rail yard. Almost 3000 or 3500 square foot space, where I'll be installing quite a large amount of work as well as collaborative work, which will be Announcing soon through Earth seed eyes, the open international call to African diaspora artists to create when I'm calling tools of the black anthropocene, which are are really it's another name for how tools for living tools of surviving tools of resilience. Asking black artists to conceptualize a hand tool that has helped support them through their physical, psychological and spiritual resilience as blind body on DH, then those tools will be shown in this large exhibition in Santa Say in the spring. So that call is going to be launched soon to our seats. It's a big project that is on the horizon. A cz well is incredible. It sounds so incredible. So that's going to be in March will probably also be wearing our masks in March, right? It'll be actually, April, April, May and June on DH. Yeah, we will, but we're also there's quite a bit The show itself will have multiple interactive ritual aspects to it. The show is based around the idea of ritual and remembrance and reparation and reclamation. I mean, so they'll be actual public and community events, even with masks were designing a way that it's going toe. Even you know, and with social distancing, etcetera, we'll find ways to be able to have people in her face. Right. Right. Well, we have to shut up. Give a shout out to Jordan. Eddie, Right. Jordan Foreman? Absolutely incredible Curator and dear friend. Yeah. And if you're just joining us, we're listening to coffee and culture here on Katie or see where a 12 61 of 37 FM. Always dreaming at Santa fe dot com. And today we're speaking about Earth seed Black Arts Alliance, New Mexico with the three founders..

Earth seed Black Arts Alliance New Mexico Earth Seed Black Alliance Santa Fe Sean Ahmad Earthsea Blackhearts adobe Jordan Foreman Jennifer V. L. A. Nicky Chabris Santa Say Khun B Albuquerque Santa Foreman Concept gallery Nicky Sha Jigen Tae wa Fernanda
"black alliance" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"black alliance" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"6 17 City of Allah and some others have succeeded in getting a federal court order to extend the census count through October. This comes less than a week before the countess due to end and the administration is expected to appeal. The attorney Mike Fewer, assure you we're gonna fight every step of the way to protect an accurate sense of sound on which all of us in L, a realized the political representation and for million to go. Other plaintiffs in the case include the National Urban League Black Alliance for just Immigration and the Cities of Selena's in San Jose. They contend, ending the count on September 30th could result in a massive undercount of the country's communities of color. The Census Bureau reports close to 98% of California households have been counted Rescue Takeya next INSEVENTY news radio. A lack of cooperation from the L. A area law enforcement continues to impede the efforts to put undocumented immigrants facing criminal charges in federal custody. At least that's according to the customs officials here in L. A. You say sanctuary policies result in the release of hundreds of immigrants back into the local committee after they're arrested the mayor, LAPD Chief Michael Morrell, a county sheriff, Alex, You know being away, Ava. I made it clear they will not cooperate with eyes. But the acting director of Ice says sanctuary policies create and a responsible safe harbor for criminal aliens. New STUDY finds a California voters ages 18 to 24 are three times more likely to have their mail in ballots rejected. For mistakes than the population as a whole. The research by the California Voter Association looked at voting in three counties in 2018 Foundation President Kim Alexander says the younger voters face problems from not being used to writing their own signatures to being unfamiliar with using the U. S Mail. We actually are producing an election's on a music video that's going to be released. Hopefully next week. It has all these tips in it, which hopefully, that will be something that will appeal to young people and everybody in the elections community. The secretary of State County elections officials, the nonprofit groups are all working very hard through social media. She says the ballot rejection raid for these younger voters is high, despite attempts by election officials to make the process as straightforward as possible. But LAPD officer accused of stealing cash. Papa Crow, now facing a felony burglary charge, in that case, also arrested for another time, second time surveillance video taken from that facility in January. Show the officer Louise Mota, taking money from an employee's back back now. He was originally charged with misdemeanor theft. But the county D. A s office has added this new charge based on findings of an internal affairs investigation. Motive scheduled for an arraignment in January. 6 28 days here Good morning with something new in the travel business. Hawaiian Airlines, the parent company of a wine holdings. Is announcing its offering travelers from some mainland cities, including Los Angeles drive through covert testing, so those how who test negative can be exempt from Hawaii's 14 Day quarantine requirement. MARKETWATCH notes The air carriers have the test will be available near the international airports here in Los Angeles, as well as in San Francisco and for results within 36 hours. The test will cost you $90 and will cause $150 for day of travel. Express service Elsewhere in the travel business, we see shares of the cruise line's moving higher today. A Royal Caribbean shares up about 4% after getting an upgrade at the Barclays analyst. There also have great in Carnival, as well as Norwegian Cruise Line holdings looks like the CDC might soon be making some announcements as faras. The resumption of cruises are concerned a new guidelines. The overall stock markets had a rough week and this week and what's been a rough month of September and looks like we're set for mostly lower start. Dow futures pointing lower by about 100 points. Check the money of 2050 each hour. Frank Biotech from the agent's capital money desk and lacks in 70. NewsRadio, latest on the Pac 12 and 90 Seconds at 6 21. Breaking news happens on its own schedule..

LAPD California Papa Crow Kim Alexander Los Angeles officer Census Bureau San Jose Selena National Urban League Black Al Mike Fewer Norwegian Cruise Line holdings attorney Dow Hawaiian Airlines NewsRadio MARKETWATCH California Voter Association
"black alliance" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

08:43 min | Last month

"black alliance" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"Of defense talking about looting and rioting as a as a almost an exhale of repressed people but you don't see anybody quoting Donald. We don't see conservatives or you don't see people on that side of the issue quoting Donald Trump's Ville because it's an inconvenient truth that went when people. Look in riot when it is convenient for them, they say were not people Saddam Hussein. Well, that's okay for them what you all are you all have no business looting rioting you're in America is this is this double standard that never ends and that's that's a big clans. If we're talking about like the. Double. Standard. Though is pretty consistent about America and the mobility you. But I do want to say a couple of things. One thing that will help and police brutality and harassment is to take away qualified immunity so that cops can't just with impunity do what they want and know that the law like black people only people this outside immigrants that have had laws on the books to stop progress like when people talk about immigrants in the. Black people own let that sink and we've had laws on these American books that have not only deemed us three fifths human being but have been on the books to make sure that we have not thrived. So that's one and the other thing I'm GonNa go to you because Sanjay and I like I'm go back to your point Jeremy About Olden, those people accountable in your station in the Dr. King said, we will remember not the words of our enemies but the silence of our friends and so for those who consider themselves allies like standing on the sidelines which little shirts and all that s cool. But you really need people in the finance for all of us. 'CAUSE I. US. Getting together we have our own biases and prejudices within our own and I do think black people need a collective time out that we can regroup and figure out some things. But while we're presenting ourselves to the world and I and I think while we have the world's ear, there are some tangible things that can be done obviously voting is on that but also think local politics and and doing some things for ourselves that can also be on there Sandra. Speaking of that 'cause I know you do some wonderful work in La can you come in on this conversation or what are some of the things? That you think could help remedy somebody's ills and I know you doing some wonderful things. Okay. I just want to start off by saying that survivor introduce me at eight forty, two to racism I- skirted through life not ever ever been directly affected by racism. Third Day. In the game you know I have people telling me, we're the Mexican mafia plus one Asian. Your days are numbered for me. I'd never dealt with that. It's A. Black man to stand up and really to give me courage to say this is now right and I'm here today because I did not want my nephews nieces experience that light. We're experiences experienced now I fight so that my nephew every other black kid has equal opportunities that the doors are open I pretty much live my life seen fruits of other people you know off the backs of Martin mccague but survivor really opened my eyes to truly young people felt about black people in that day that was fourteen years ago. So I stand here it's showing saying that it can work I mean. Take you know all of us working together because that season three black people stuck together and we made it to the finish line. No, we didn't get the credit that we deserve on the finale have showing hands. If Yemen was in this final three who would have voted for him everybody voted for him. We wouldn't have had a black alliance that actually made it through I. Mean you know I give dreams full credit because you know they've been Chris. is me because I had designer shoes on and other people out there head designer shoes on but it was something about my shoes that troubled them. And the fact that I had a retirement plan people said, you don't deserve the money you don't need the money you just Bro Dreams. Kotel. And so you know but I agree there was other people that was there that did less than I did but that he was able to call them out on day the re surely or within the first two weeks, I was able to stay. We were able to win that game and I think if we stay strong and united today can win We can make life better for everyone else. So you know I, challenge us as a group to get access to CBS. Yes CBS telling us this is what we're doing. We're hiring blacks hiring this. We have a mentor program. Why can't you consult with the Black Alliance or with these teams that we're working hard to develop to be voice to you as to where to go To, find the next producer, the next actress, the next actor I challenge you know CBS utilize us fully not just era one time and then come back until a Caesar. The things that we're doing, why could we be a part of that discussion of who you're hiring making sure they're representing who we are and I just challenged us I do I am a member of The ladylike foundation and we do amazing things we give scholarships. We're association that we work year round to show kids for me. What stem it's about what opportunities are there for our kids in different non traditional areas Science Technology Engineering, those areas that we feel that you know there's great opportunities but they're not enough. African. American professors, they're asking me, how do we improve that I? You have two African American professors before students of Color WanNa come here and second you know there is a base but you're not reaching out to that base. We have HPC used all across the south that can provide us what we need. In all aspects in all areas and so you know my husband's the proud graduate of Morehouse. College. Ucla but you know I do miss that I didn't have that experience but I think that we have to demand more we have to demand access and so. We teach girls about you know untraditional careers. We talked to them on a on a monthly basis given them the platform letting us know what a bothering them. I'm surprised at the number of our kids that are. Raised in houses that are you know their parents are on drugs? We help them get out of the system and to be productive people we take him under our wings we work with them on a daily basis. So you know that's why I'm here to really see not only do we. Go to them but we'd be a part of that and I'm hoping CBS and survivor will embrace us as African Americans that have played the game in. Lettuce in to let him be. Two things because onto. Thank you for that and. They still want somebody initiatives. I hope that my time foundation here in LA and your program we've talked off camera by our programs linking and working with. Children here in south central La specifically in hopefully, some of those initiatives will not only help us but other people who are doing some things I know brother Jeremy has to get off. So I want you to have some parting words as we continue. We probably got about maybe another ten fifteen minutes Jeremy I want you to you know it was a parting words. Yes I gotta I gotta run I just wanted to say thank you guys. This is awesome. This is really refreshing to hear everybody's story. This is awesome. Real quick. My Wife's that the army I just want to know the department does the old regime I don't want like all these people around foxborough running up to this police department saying, Oh you did this. How like? No that was the aubergine on it love now it's cool. Now because we they're our allies allies out there and we need to embrace these allies. You know what I mean. We need to get as many allies and bring them close. Because some people have pushing these allies away and we'd we this hate is strong and we need to multiply this love as much as possible. I real. Quick. I had this one.

Jeremy La Black Alliance America CBS Donald Trump Saddam Hussein Martin mccague harassment Yemen Dr. King Sandra Sanjay Color WanNa foxborough Morehouse head designer Science Technology Engineering
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

09:24 min | 3 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"I'm Margaret Kimberly along with my co-host. Glenn Ford coming up the Black Alliance for peace steps up its campaign to get the US military out of Africa, a scholar takes a look at Quetta music and young people's politics in South Africa, and a new article celebrates the life and work of James, cone the father of Black Liberation Theology. But I. The US political establishment is still reeling from the nationwide wave of demonstrations that followed the police killing of George Floyd We spoke with Monica Bandera. Veteran activists from Brooklyn New York who sits on the policy table of the Movement for black lives. Ben Daily says the ongoing protesting. In here's. That, this was not something that just suddenly you know exploded in the wake of the George Roy Murder, the Movement for black lives, which is a coalition of over one hundred and fifty black playing organizations from around the country, including black lives matter as a partisan move for black lives began back in two, thousand, fourteen, coming out of the Ferguson, uprising. And what we were able to do between two thousand, fourteen, twenty, twenty is to build and sustain an ecosystem. We traded the network of organizations that would link people who were in Brooklyn with lack led organizations that were in La with organizations that are in Madison Wisconsin or Saint Louis. And we were able to build out an infrastructure so that we could work together. You know support each other's campaign for also be able to respond and have ignited voice in the event of a national incident like George Roy. I think it's really important for people to understand that movements don't pop up overnight. There were a lot of things that happen coming out. Out of Ferguson alive that were good and powerful, a lot of ages of course whenever you try to bring together different forces who are on a cost why political spectrum but that are black, but we saw in June of twenty twenty was basically the culmination of building a lot of infrastructure over the past six years, and making sure that that infrastructure was blacklisted. Will also happen is in the past six years. We've been working with our allies organizations so multi racial organizations white organizations that have been saying also for half a decade. We want to support black lives matter. But as you know a lot of times, white allies, they'll come in not black readership. You know sometimes you things that aren't very helpful, but we've been very strategic and saying this is what it looks like to follow the lead of black organizations, so it was powerful. It was exciting. We knew that coming out of the first week in June where we had the first. Week of demands of sustained protests, coming out of George Floyd that needed to sustain that to June teams where there was a whole nother coordinated math mobilization. We knew that it was important also to have distributors events. You know like it's not about everybody. Converge On Minneapolis or everyone converge on DC a Ferguson, but that people build mobilizations in their own cities, and that we try to find ways to support one another. So that's what happened in June of twenty swimming wasn't just mass mobilization that really came off of six years of some. Tough exciting, but inspiring, organizing now one of the main demands, if not the main demand certainly of the black lives matter. Organization is De Fund the police, but not all black lives matter chapters seem to be actively supporting community control of the police. What kind of conversation has been going on about De Fund and Community Control? Yes I love this question, because even though Movement for black lives goes back to twenty fourteen, the discussions around police and prisons, and the abolition of those infrastructures go back decades. And so we all really consider our mentor are Bama the work of Angela Davis organizations like critical resistance that have been around for decades, my own organization, which is a member of the movie for Black Lives, which is probably Malcolm x grassroots movement have been in conversations about prison abolition about what it looks like have communities that are really safe, but that are not militarized, and so some organizations are police, abolition organizations, they are prison, abolition organizations, and they believe that we create completely new structures that will keep our community safe and make sure that you know. Know three being tied and all along the spectrum of people who fight for you know very specific reforms they they may not understand that they're Pindi safety without police, but they WANNA at least do these five things to change. What's happening now by so when you have a network over one hundred organizations, you've gotta come together and one of the things that we have all come together around. Is that police departments across the countries had oversized budget outside political power, and so no matter what laws people put in place, you know some states has special prosecutor some. Some states evancho cold. You know there's all this piecemeal stuff going on, but police departments and individual police officers are able to fly above the law, because they have so much power, and they have so much resources, and also on the flip side, not only do. They have oversized, but is the thing that we want funded. Are Stars in New York City where I live. They cancelled some of US employment program last month, but increase the police budget I mean increase the amount of police officers coming in the next fiscal year by over one thousand and you have. Have scenarios like that all over the country where these cut housing affordable housing with homeless and services. Yesterday's where they have no infrastructure for people with mental health issues, but yes, it something tens of millions in New York City case, six billion dollars yearly into the police force, so we were able to calm together under that marge message, and then people, individual cities were able to say well. That's the divest part before the police and for us to invest part is one cops out of schools or for us to invest part is we want affordable housing for? People who were at home and so people were able to pull what they doing doing already. So de-fund it looks noon, 'cause it's bringing together different campaigns, but underneath that is just uplifting the work that those black or let organizations have already been doing in those cities of another big one is to eliminate police from responding to mental health crisis. We see that in a lot of cities you know whether it's the Midwest the south you've had organizers on the ground and say when families call for health purposes, a health crisis of mental health crisis. There should be a health professional that respond not to lose, so we've come together in a way that hazards all these groups under the de-fund police demand because we want to divest from police investing communities. Host of black organizations agree in principle with de-fund the police after all who wants to give more money to the occupation army, but if defunding just results in a smaller police force, but no control over the behavior and actual scope in shape of that police force, then you just avid smaller occupation on me. Now I agree wholeheartedly, and that goes back to the journey that we're in a again coalition of organizations. You know you have some people that are there feel like abolish this week. We support that. Let's go right and then you have our folks who this is new to them. They're like I'm waking up I. I worked on this law that I thought in racial profiling, but now it's still racial profiling, so they kinda like on the road. We believe they're on the road. And then you have people who are in the middle somewhere, so I agree wholeheartedly that when you defined, and it's one lever in dismantling right because the money is the power infrastructure right, but you you go in on when you have common ground, which is that the budgets are oversized, and if that money can go somewhere else, then you kinda build your organizing billion infrastructure in a way that helps communities to conserve together so I wholeheartedly. That's every organization within for Bill Agreement with that not now. But you know again. We're network. That's six years old. and..

Black Lives US George Floyd Black Alliance New York City Ferguson Brooklyn Glenn Ford Margaret Kimberly Africa Quetta Ben Daily George Roy George Roy Murder Minneapolis South Africa De Fund James twenty twenty
"black alliance" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Can almost guarantee you were in the war rooms and in the courtroom and in the assembly halls as well because movements happen not overnight but by the collective will of the people. On June 18th the city of Decatur removed a Confederate monument that stood Indicator square. Molly Davis, co chair of the Beacon Hill Black Alliance for Human Rights and Fanta High, were present during the removal. They discussed their experience witnessing what high says feels like she gave birth. As we celebrate June 10th everybody was watching what was going on in Atlanta, Georgia, bringing down the Confederate Monument last night in the 80 l we have from Beacon Hill Black Alliance for Human Rights. The one and only font Ojai is on an attorney Davis's on. Good morning, Miss. Hi. How are you? Good morning. I am more than excited. Like I gave work last night, Frank. Tell everybody in your own words. You tell everybody what happened because you made it happen. So you give everybody the news. Well, Frank that people made it happened. It was a collective, a collective of individuals from Beacon Hill to other activists in the community. The community of city of Decatur. We watched the monument come down after three years of pushing since Charlottesville and 2017 thing the people should have the right in the local community, the self determine if we even want the statues and monuments and we said we didn't want it. And the city of Decatur. The county wasn't listening to us one which pushing back off to the other, and then they would send us back to the other and no change was happening. And then everything erupted in society. And there was the push in the cry from the people for Black lives matters and we took that Mo mentum when we pushed harder and city of Decatur, and we watched it come down last night. Tell everybody what monument came down because that's super important, Yes. This monument has been standing since April 1908 So if you ever come down to the square magnification is this huge Confederate monument this huge obligation that's been standing there for 112 years. Representing oppression of black people. The United Daughters of the Confederacy is officially down. Congratulations. What a great job that you've done. It's the people. It is the people Frank. It was sponsored by the United Daughters of the Confederacy is a gift that we've ever wanted that we should have never accepted as a community. There it is. I got attorney Davis on the phone as well. And I know you've been very busy, my friend. So thank you for joining us this morning, all man. Thank you, Frank. It was just incredible. Last night organizing work. So many of our young people from Decatur High School being a center for the last three years from the black Student Union Indicator High school. They were just a driving force. It was beautiful to see so many of them out there, so make a witness. History is well, first in Georgia to come down now, Attorney Davis You have been fighting for our civil rights to make sure we're treated the same. To make sure we're not abused and taken advantage of the country is in a movement right now. Has it gotten worse? Let me ask you this have people started, you know, making threats against you? Because you've been so out. Spoken now way have been good and safe. And making sure that we keep keep ourselves safe there. You know, we believe in the right to self defense, So that's what we believe both in my office and there are home and on my person, so that's why we're moving and, you know, we just don't want to be very clear about that. We not turn in no cheap. If somebody comes to us, we will defend ourselves. If it's been it's been crazy, though, Frank, it really has, man. This is a moment in history that we all have to Really do our part to get as many Ganges possible so that when we look back, we know that we've all contributed, and we really pushed this. Not just dialogue will push these opportunities for us to dismantle white supremacy and racism forward in a meaningful way. All right, listen, I just want to say font Ojai. Congratulations. Seeyou. Attorney Davis. Congratulations. You have truly made us proud. Thank you for calling in this morning. Thank you. Happy Juneteenth happy. Thanks for listening. For more, Go to radio dot com. I'm Marie appointed. Thanks for listening to Atlanta Loved clothes on news and talk. 13 18 W. A Okay and the people station within 103 For more. Info okay dot com or.

Confederate Monument Frank Molly Davis Decatur Beacon Hill Black Alliance for attorney Ojai United Daughters Atlanta Beacon Hill Decatur High School Georgia Fanta High black Student Union Indicator Indicator square Mo Marie Charlottesville
"black alliance" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:54 min | 3 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Avenue in Atlanta. A graduate of Riverdale High School, and you know, I was a member of the church for years, and my grandmother and my mom, they went back and forth so You're just gonna love now a year Army veteran. And now But be 1/3 year rising. See you at the Morehouse. Okay, Everybody is Reverend James What? All he is 26 years old. He just got into office a few months back in 2019. He is the youngest in double president in the history of how old is the organization of 11 years, still 111 years ago. Bottom line. What goes one of the hopes for this country's hopes he'll be able to live in a world that that we are able to agree reading, meaning? You've got glory because everything they have praised Lord it over me. Not only signal signal the lack of police brutality as a change of North Floyd and Eric Garner, but also the water that we drink the air that we breathe the schools that we attend. So the very breath that we breathe every single moment that we breathe is giving us an opportunity to get it right. Get it better because that means that God was thought that much of us to get give us another chance to do this thing called life. And so I believe that I'm committed to doing that work. And how long will we protest? We will protest as long as it takes. But when we protest protest is not a movement in and of itself. And so when we protest, I want you all to know that if you see in the DP on the streets, you can almost guarantee you were in the war rooms and in the courtroom and in the assembly halls as well because movements happen not overnight but by the collective will of the people. On June 18th the city of Decatur removed a Confederate monument that stood Indicator square. Molly Davis, co chair of the Beacon Hill Black Alliance for Human Rights and.

Beacon Hill Black Alliance for Riverdale High School Indicator square Morehouse Molly Davis Atlanta Army president Eric Garner Decatur North Floyd
"black alliance" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

04:12 min | 4 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"There's no place like it. Follow me. Nick Offerman as I take you on a journey through the history of home. An intimate look at houses of things. Henry the eighth, many homes. Hearst Castle Edison has this study and claim they haven't phoned the house like this before that required incredible genius. The history of home exclusively on curiosity stream. Time now for the O'Reilly update Message of the day. What the heck is happening to this country? Americans are divided, angry, sad, inspired in some cases and very watchful of the black lives matter movement. Last week, one of its leaders proclaimed on national TV that quote If this country doesn't give us what we want, then we will burn the system down Unquote Hawk Newsome. Continued, saying he might be talking figuratively or literally. Very much very provocative might be a threat. That you would think the national press will be all over this story. Trying to get accurate information about the Black lives matter operation to the American people. Who the press. Is supposed to serve. I mean, this is an important story, Is it not? Mr Newsome, who heads the New York City chapter of Black Lives matter is the new Huey Newton. Whom the 19 sixties media largely adored. Mr Newton cofounded the Black Panther Party. Do you know who co founded the current black lives matter? Organization that you don't Because the press is totally ignored The rials story regarding the bl and movement. Three women are behind the Black Lives matter. Global Network Foundation, which is the central organization that directs policy. Alicia Garza, 39 the chief strategic advisor, Patrice Cullors, 36 also a top advisor. Finally, Opal, Too many 36 is the third force. She works with the BLM foundation and is also the executive director of the Black Alliance for just Immigration. That group is associated with the Freedom Road Socialist Organisation on Marxist Leninist Group that as we see funding from the Tides Foundation run by George Soros. Ah, the plot thickens. Three women who essentially run the BLM Foundation. Keep a very low profile. No cable news interviews for them. No, these ladies are serious. In an interview with a professor from Morgan State University. Miss. Color said, quote myself and Alicia Garza in particular are trained, organizes. We are trained Mark, Sis. We're super versed on ideological theories, unquote. So do you think the protesters chanting Black lives matter in the streets? Understand what the black lives matter? Global network really is And then there's the 1000 Currents operation out of Oakland, California ever heard of it? I didn't think so. Because the black lives matter Foundation does not have tax exempt status. The 1000 currents outfit. Holds their money. And the IRS allows that giving anyone deductions. For donating to be a lamp. Karl Marx would love this capitalistic government allowing tax deductions for money earmarked to destroy it. So the marks is of a lot of money and a lot of power and the media ignores it. I'm Bill O'Reilly and I approve that message by actually writing it..

Black Hawk Newsome BLM Foundation Huey Newton matter Foundation Alicia Garza Black Panther Party Black Alliance Nick Offerman Global Network Foundation Hearst Castle Edison Karl Marx Bill O'Reilly O'Reilly Henry Tides Foundation George Soros IRS strategic advisor
People come to America for a dream

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:13 min | 4 months ago

People come to America for a dream

"Today we had the honor to talk to Nana Xanthi. She is an attorney and the executive director of the Black Alliance for justice immigration or. She's also the founder of the Community Legal Clinic and Transform Justice Center in legal these workshops as well as the founder of Justice Warriors Black Lives I. Hope you enjoy this conversation. Nana how are you today? I am well well, as can be expected in during these times and hoping you're well as well you know I am well despite everything, but one of the reasons that I'm grateful is because of the great work that women like you do in this country so excited to talk about the Black Alliance for just immigration, which is one of the organizations that the BG and wonder me a network which produces the BG podcast has been encouraging our audiences to support, so thank you. These organizations are critical in times like this. Thank you so very much? We appreciate that support and the support that we've gotten from black folks all over the globe. Appreciate it. Tell us a little bit more about the Black Alliance for just immigration, and what brought you to the organization? So the black lines for just immigration is a national black lead Immigration Rights Human Rights Racial Justice Organization. We are the largest of our kind in the United States. We educate we advocate. We organized on behalf of the. The roughly ten million Black Refugee and immigrant families in this country as well as black folks who are trying to come into the country, whether it be permanently or temporarily, and those who are seeking asylum. We have our headquarters in New York, but we also have offices in DC. Miami Atlanta Los Angeles and Oakland and we have staff in Houston, and in Minneapolis, so we pretty much are all over the place as well as doing work on the. Episode of the border in Mexico, at the northern border with Tijuana, and also we've been doing some work the southern border of Mexico in Chula where you have black asylum seekers coming to the United States through Mexico. In that way and the work that we do is national in many cases in terms of policy, and you know we've been very busy in that regard, especially in with this administration, we also do national work with respect to racial justice our. Former executive director open committee was one of the big three that started black lives matter, and so by has been involved in black lives matter since the beginning and we do that work, and then we also do local work regional work. I'm both on the policy side, but as well as more, and with even more vigor on the organizing side to make sure that we are pushing for racial. Economic and social justice with an right alongside our multigenerational African American siblings. So much work, such powerful work. As. You said you've been very busy with this administration echo, they're just keeping everyone busy with their foolishness, but I definitely do a suit top about Daca so for our listeners, who may not be familiar Dhaka's stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals and the Supreme. Court decision around Dhaka now allows immigrants who ever see Daca status sometimes referred to as dreamers so if you seen the Hashtag is sandwiched dreamers. That's what that means. It allows them. them to stay in the country safely without a threat of deportation, but one the things that we've been really seeing missing from mainstream conversation over Daca was that it also impacts not Hispanic and Latino communities that there are black and brown communities impacted by this as well other black communities that are impacted by this as well. So, what was your reaction when you hurt the decision? And what are our next steps in the Dreamer, movement so? It is really important in think I really WanNa, thank you for lifting up the fact that yes, there are dreamers who are not Brown folks. That are not Latin next folks. That are not black right that we have black Latino next folks as well as black dreamers from the continent of Africa from the Caribbean from Europe right we think about. Twenty, one savage right and how this came up? And he actually falls in the category that is equally as important that we need to advocate for a person who isn't a Dhaka recipient, but who happens to be undocumented, and obviously we're looking for permanent protections, not just for Dr Recipients because everyone. Coming to this country is dreaming. No one's coming to this country to be a nightmare. Faces are looking at the Supreme Court decision. I also happen to be an attorney of twenty six years. Doing movement work is it's a temporary relief. It is not the permanent protection that we want our people to have and that our people need to have in order to thrive, basically what the Supreme Court said is that the way that the administration got rid of Dhaka? Had No basis. They got rid of it that they have to have a reason. They have to show that they've thought about everything before. They come to that conclusion and they did not. And so, what does that mean? It means that just like the Muslim ban if you remember, the court ruled against the Supreme Court ruled against the administration on the Muslim ban, and said he pointed out what was wrong and. And so they just instituted a new Muslim bad adjusting themselves to what the court had pointed out, and that Muslim ban remains not struck down,

Black Alliance Dhaka Supreme Court Executive Director Nana Xanthi United States Daca Mexico Attorney Founder Transform Justice Center Community Legal Clinic Tijuana Caribbean Africa New York DC
People come to America for a dream

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:35 min | 4 months ago

People come to America for a dream

"Today we had the honor to talk to Nana Xanthi. She is an attorney and the executive director of the Black Alliance for justice immigration or. She's also the founder of the Community Legal Clinic and Transform Justice Center in legal these workshops as well as the founder of Justice Warriors Black Lives I. Hope you enjoy this conversation. Nana how are you today? I am well well, as can be expected in during these times and hoping you're well as well you know I am well despite everything, but one of the reasons that I'm grateful is because of the great work that women like you do in this country so excited to talk about the Black Alliance for just immigration, which is one of the organizations that the BG and wonder me a network which produces the BG podcast has been encouraging our audiences to support, so thank you. These organizations are critical in times like this. Thank you so very much? We appreciate that support and the support that we've gotten from black folks all over the globe. Appreciate it. Tell us a little bit more about the Black Alliance for just immigration, and what brought you to the organization? So the black lines for just immigration is a national black lead Immigration Rights Human Rights Racial Justice Organization. We are the largest of our kind in the United States. We educate we advocate. We organized on behalf of the. The roughly ten million Black Refugee and immigrant families in this country as well as black folks who are trying to come into the country, whether it be permanently or temporarily, and those who are seeking asylum. We have our headquarters in New York, but we also have offices in DC. Miami Atlanta Los Angeles and Oakland and we have staff in Houston, and in Minneapolis, so we pretty much are all over the place as well as doing work on the. Episode of the border in Mexico, at the northern border with Tijuana, and also we've been doing some work the southern border of Mexico in Chula where you have black asylum seekers coming to the United States through Mexico. In that way and the work that we do is national in many cases in terms of policy, and you know we've been very busy in that regard, especially in with this administration, we also do national work with respect to racial justice our. Former executive director open committee was one of the big three that started black lives matter, and so by has been involved in black lives matter since the beginning and we do that work, and then we also do local work regional work. I'm both on the policy side, but as well as more, and with even more vigor on the organizing side to make sure that we are pushing for racial. Economic and social justice with an right alongside our multigenerational African American siblings. So much work, such powerful work. As. You said you've been very busy with this administration echo, they're just keeping everyone busy with their foolishness, but I definitely do a suit top about Daca so for our listeners, who may not be familiar Dhaka's stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals and the Supreme. Court decision around Dhaka now allows immigrants who ever see Daca status sometimes referred to as dreamers so if you seen the Hashtag is sandwiched dreamers. That's what that means. It allows them. them to stay in the country safely without a threat of deportation, but one the things that we've been really seeing missing from mainstream conversation over Daca was that it also impacts not Hispanic and Latino communities that there are black and brown communities impacted by this as well other black communities that are impacted by this as well. So, what was your reaction when you hurt the decision? And what are our next steps in the Dreamer, movement so? It is really important in think I really WanNa, thank you for lifting up the fact that yes, there are dreamers who are not Brown folks. That are not Latin next folks. That are not black right that we have black Latino next folks as well as black dreamers from the continent of Africa from the Caribbean from Europe right we think about. Twenty, one savage right and how this came up? And he actually falls in the category that is equally as important that we need to advocate for a person who isn't a Dhaka recipient, but who happens to be undocumented, and obviously we're looking for permanent protections, not just for Dr Recipients because everyone. Coming to this country is dreaming. No one's coming to this country to be a nightmare. Faces are looking at the Supreme Court decision. I also happen to be an attorney of twenty six years. Doing movement work is it's a temporary relief. It is not the permanent protection that we want our people to have and that our people need to have in order to thrive,

Black Alliance Attorney Dhaka Nana Xanthi Executive Director United States Daca Transform Justice Center Mexico Supreme Court Community Legal Clinic Tijuana Caribbean New York Africa DC Europe
"black alliance" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

05:19 min | 4 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"Very smart thing to do. WHO. Is running the black lives matter movement. We know George Soros is financing it thirty three million dollars coming from his open society foundation to be am. Keeps these three ladies live in pretty large the first lady? Is Alicia Garza. Thirty nine years old. Oakland based right Ms. Garza is a Marxist. Second Lady. Patrisse cullors thirty six years old. She is based in. I can't find out where she's based in. She teaches at Otis College. Wherever is colleges? Don't even know I should know, but I don't know. She is a Marxist third. Lady Opel to Medi thirty six years old. She is the executive director for the Black Alliance for just immigration. Black Alliance for just immigration. That is a front group. For the Socialist and Marxist Group Freedom Road Socialist Organization. So! All three of these ladies are Marxist all right and if you don't believe me, let's get their own words on the screen. Okay, this is from Patrisse cullors in an interview, two, thousand, fifteen myself and a leash. La Salacious Garza in particular are trained organizers. We are trained Marxists. We are super versed on ideological theories unquote own, words. So the three founders, and they all are continue to be involved in the black lives matter movement are Marxists. Did. You hear that. On any news. Agency from any news agency. Cheered on Fox. News! You're at anywhere. You did not I didn't. I researched it. I had to go. I couldn't go to any media. I had to go to primary sources. Now. You've never seen those ladies before. They don't go out and give speeches and interviews. Because they don't want people to know. Who they are and who's giving them an enormous amount of money. Other quick break and we'll be right back. Support for this podcast comes from iheartradio. Casey I'm sorry, but staying on top of the news. Every single day has been really hard. I. Wish there was an easy way to get everything I. Need to know Hayes. I think you're forgetting about news o'clock. You know the daily podcast we host from buzzfeed. iheartradio. Oh right. I'm Haze Brown and I've Casey Raca and everyday on news o'clock we help you catch up on all the stories you missed throughout the day from corona virus updates the latest in pop culture with a little help from special guest like Isa Ray. I definitely won't be able to do a yeah party this year at an ethic mount my only chance to be life. Party Is your boat. It's your party they will. Get. My. News o'clock new podcast from buzzfeed and I heart radio that you need to keep track of life outside of quarantine listen to news o'clock on the iheartradio APP. Okay this is my final photos day. Yesterday was father's Day I hope all had a good one and GRANDAD's as well. It is obviously important. That the family remain intact tomorrow. I'm going to tell you about the black lives matter movement and how they see families in America is going to do that today, but we got caught a little bit long so tomorrow. Black lives matter. Organization, how they see the American family? I see it as a unit that has to work together and fathers are vitally important. The strength that a man can bring into a family, the responsibility the consistency of behavior. No fodder is perfect. But this is the most important thing that a man can do. Raise the kids. Nothing, more important than that. Nothing. was heard that. You hear that on CNN over the weekend. About on meet the press. Face the nation. You hear that. Nothing more important than. Being a good father for a man. Nothing! You gotTA think about it. You gotTA discipline yourself to do it. GonNa have the kids. You're the DAD. They depend on you. We'll see you tomorrow..

executive director Patrisse cullors Black Alliance George Soros Casey Raca Lady Opel Road Socialist Organization Oakland Otis College CNN Fox La Hayes America TA Haze Brown Isa Ray buzzfeed.
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

09:11 min | 4 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Because. Again they not understand that is going to be A. Of Resistance that would change US policy's and like I am with the moves of saying be made his last few days to domesticate the opposition to keep. It added a manageable level with. Is just being on so-called justice for joys floor. That joys Ford is dead. Justice for him, but what we can do is to a critical view on the system. They create the conditions that result the enjoys forwards alive, being taken, and when you put this, the folks on the system that you can make Joyce floor to the police, you can enjoy floor to the military. You can't connect yours floor to the system. And that is what people hoping is happens, but the authorities on using the question by caucus. Graphic chicken. Sharpton you know they are doing everything in their power to so a radicalization. This move and we're hoping that they're to be successful in that. Because you know the world but benefit when there is factors, people sent you us were able to shift power away from these these gangs back to the FBI. That was a jumble Baraka of the Black Alliance for peace. Gresham meadows with fourteen years old when she shot her abusive father to death in their home in Warren Ohio. Meadows was threatened with trial for murder as an adult. Her case was championed by a number of criminal justice reform groups, including the organization called, survived and punish Ms. Meadows was allowed to plead to involuntary manslaughter charges and was sentenced to a year in juvenile detention and six months in a mental health facility. Fresh meadows is now eighteen years old, pre, and looking forward to her future right now. Let's legally on off probation I'm not agip. On probation for about two years after I got out of jail in it, just actually I just got off in I. Think it was February March. Of this year with a lot of things in the world going on right now and Kinda like they still haven't noticed the injustice. I believe I'm doing okay with everything going on undistracted. Help everything trying to help out as much as I can. Able to get involved in the demonstrations in the past week. Yes actually in Warren Ohio. It was organized by Tana Pal. She'd be like a really really big peaceful protests and I like attended now it's widely credited that a movement is weren't kept you from spending a very very long time incarcerated. About Movement politics, and do you anticipate being a movement activist? Yes, that's what I've been. I've been talking to my friend. Kelly Hayes about it one of my collected members and Hourly have been trying to get out there to become an activist because I just feel like. There's something deeper waiting for me and I feel like that's like my calling is to help other people, because honestly if it wasn't for the activists or social media I don't know if I would have got out because a lot of that came from a lot of people requesting a judge led me free in raising all the money in the go fund made a paper paper doctor. Becoming an activist, but you have been a prisoner. was that your first exposure to the criminal justice system? Yeah, never been to jail or anything like that. And how would you describe the conditions do which you and the other young women were incarcerated. Event it was a juvenile, the juvenile justice center where two girls and the boys we were in the same building, but we were actually different pods. We were kind of treaty. We for the most part, but it was held because I couldn't see anybody I wanted to. You know what I mean. Divisions were just we only got visits twice a week, or if you were like really great, you got it three times a week, but it was weird for me from going from in the house every single day. Kinda trapped in the House to Oh. Now is like I'm trapped in. You know what I mean like in jail. Nobody I know, and it's not anything I was used to. And at the age of fourteen. It was really scary I. Mean I think at the time with the mindset that I had as a child at fourteen. I would say that it was probably. The best, but I think we make the best out of it. Do you think because of your experience that your activism? In the future you might revolve around the clinical justice system here. That's why I want to go to college, and I should be starting college here soon. I wanted to study criminal justice and Psychology, so that I'd know more before I go out and try to like into the community and try to do things I wanNA know more educate myself more said that way I can help, maybe find like different tactic or you buy college like use it against them, you know. That woman, little little sketchy, but I'm going to. Be Able to work with. I know this might be too personal a question. But how are you getting along? Would you family? My Mom and my sister and brother are really close. And what about the activists survived in punished? Are they more than just acted this to you now? Yes, they are definitely more dishes activist I. A lot of them, and so when I got needs, and actually it's kind of like a big part of what open mayes the one of becoming active in and want to go to school and study because when I went. They like really showed a lot of a lot of them. I can actually call in talk to like. Something's wrong as talked to them. Them and they actually with that like would everything that went on after everything was done. A couple numbers from the list of voices has put me into their in kind of and they like now organized with them, and like they're my collective, so maybe voices survived punish so they were very close together, and they've been working close together for many many years though. Most young people are adults who get into trouble with the law. Don't have organizations on the outside working on their behalf. How did you hook up with these activists allies? Honestly I'm not very short. How everyone began like conversation with him? My mom had talked to lead before. Kelly who is the person that I go through and as the head person the listed voices, but she talked to her I believe that's how everything started, but again I'm not really shorts about was in jail. I didn't really hear too much because it was too much to hear the outside world and be stuck in, but I don't know after when I got out. Actually takes the need, and then that's when I met everybody from the survival punished when I went to Chicago. What are the problems that lots of adolescent Sav he's depression. You sound very young. Yeah, handle a lot of depression actually growing up I want to say I think I realized. The age of like ten or eleven, and I know that sounds drastic. Because it's like it's really a lot of dogs don't understand like kids can be depressed and a Lotta Times. A lot of people would pass it and say oh. It's not just depression away. Just having a bad day, they use movie, but I wanted to settle at the age of ten, because then realize like I can get out of the slump and honestly I. Think I was of age of. Seventeen and a half. But honestly I'm more set free now so like off of probation so. I'm not really depressed. I think more so I mean. We all have our bad days. brusher meadows speaking from her home in Ohio. Structure Gabby Yearwood is a sociocultural anthropologist at the University of Texas at Austin he recently authored an article titled Playing Without Power Blackmail NCWA student-athletes living with structural racism. We asked Dr Yearwood can't a bunch of big muscular star. Athletes Take care of themselves right exactly so you take two sports, basketball and football, where the participants are regularly large, and so you think they cannot be harmed, but I think we all know that harm can come in the motion..

Warren Ohio Ms. Meadows Kelly Hayes Gabby Yearwood juvenile justice center US Gresham meadows Joyce Ford FBI agip Ohio University of Texas Tana Pal Sharpton involuntary manslaughter Black Alliance Chicago
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

09:11 min | 4 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Because. Again they not understand that is going to be A. Of Resistance that would change US policy's and like I am with the moves of saying be made his last few days to domesticate the opposition to keep. It added a manageable level with. Is just being on so-called justice for joys floor. That joys Ford is dead. Justice for him, but what we can do is to a critical view on the system. They create the conditions that result the enjoys forwards alive, being taken, and when you put this, the folks on the system that you can make Joyce floor to the police, you can enjoy floor to the military. You can't connect yours floor to the system. And that is what people hoping is happens, but the authorities on using the question by caucus. Graphic chicken. Sharpton you know they are doing everything in their power to so a radicalization. This move and we're hoping that they're to be successful in that. Because you know the world but benefit when there is factors, people sent you us were able to shift power away from these these gangs back to the FBI. That was a jumble Baraka of the Black Alliance for peace. Gresham meadows with fourteen years old when she shot her abusive father to death in their home in Warren Ohio. Meadows was threatened with trial for murder as an adult. Her case was championed by a number of criminal justice reform groups, including the organization called, survived and punish Ms. Meadows was allowed to plead to involuntary manslaughter charges and was sentenced to a year in juvenile detention and six months in a mental health facility. Fresh meadows is now eighteen years old, pre, and looking forward to her future right now. Let's legally on off probation I'm not agip. On probation for about two years after I got out of jail in it, just actually I just got off in I. Think it was February March. Of this year with a lot of things in the world going on right now and Kinda like they still haven't noticed the injustice. I believe I'm doing okay with everything going on undistracted. Help everything trying to help out as much as I can. Able to get involved in the demonstrations in the past week. Yes actually in Warren Ohio. It was organized by Tana Pal. She'd be like a really really big peaceful protests and I like attended now it's widely credited that a movement is weren't kept you from spending a very very long time incarcerated. About Movement politics, and do you anticipate being a movement activist? Yes, that's what I've been. I've been talking to my friend. Kelly Hayes about it one of my collected members and Hourly have been trying to get out there to become an activist because I just feel like. There's something deeper waiting for me and I feel like that's like my calling is to help other people, because honestly if it wasn't for the activists or social media I don't know if I would have got out because a lot of that came from a lot of people requesting a judge led me free in raising all the money in the go fund made a paper paper doctor. Becoming an activist, but you have been a prisoner. was that your first exposure to the criminal justice system? Yeah, never been to jail or anything like that. And how would you describe the conditions do which you and the other young women were incarcerated. Event it was a juvenile, the juvenile justice center where two girls and the boys we were in the same building, but we were actually different pods. We were kind of treaty. We for the most part, but it was held because I couldn't see anybody I wanted to. You know what I mean. Divisions were just we only got visits twice a week, or if you were like really great, you got it three times a week, but it was weird for me from going from in the house every single day. Kinda trapped in the House to Oh. Now is like I'm trapped in. You know what I mean like in jail. Nobody I know, and it's not anything I was used to. And at the age of fourteen. It was really scary I. Mean I think at the time with the mindset that I had as a child at fourteen. I would say that it was probably. The best, but I think we make the best out of it. Do you think because of your experience that your activism? In the future you might revolve around the clinical justice system here. That's why I want to go to college, and I should be starting college here soon. I wanted to study criminal justice and Psychology, so that I'd know more before I go out and try to like into the community and try to do things I wanNA know more educate myself more said that way I can help, maybe find like different tactic or you buy college like use it against them, you know. That woman, little little sketchy, but I'm going to. Be Able to work with. I know this might be too personal a question. But how are you getting along? Would you family? My Mom and my sister and brother are really close. And what about the activists survived in punished? Are they more than just acted this to you now? Yes, they are definitely more dishes activist I. A lot of them, and so when I got needs, and actually it's kind of like a big part of what open mayes the one of becoming active in and want to go to school and study because when I went. They like really showed a lot of a lot of them. I can actually call in talk to like. Something's wrong as talked to them. Them and they actually with that like would everything that went on after everything was done. A couple numbers from the list of voices has put me into their in kind of and they like now organized with them, and like they're my collective, so maybe voices survived punish so they were very close together, and they've been working close together for many many years though. Most young people are adults who get into trouble with the law. Don't have organizations on the outside working on their behalf. How did you hook up with these activists allies? Honestly I'm not very short. How everyone began like conversation with him? My mom had talked to lead before. Kelly who is the person that I go through and as the head person the listed voices, but she talked to her I believe that's how everything started, but again I'm not really shorts about was in jail. I didn't really hear too much because it was too much to hear the outside world and be stuck in, but I don't know after when I got out. Actually takes the need, and then that's when I met everybody from the survival punished when I went to Chicago. What are the problems that lots of adolescent Sav he's depression. You sound very young. Yeah, handle a lot of depression actually growing up I want to say I think I realized. The age of like ten or eleven, and I know that sounds drastic. Because it's like it's really a lot of dogs don't understand like kids can be depressed and a Lotta Times. A lot of people would pass it and say oh. It's not just depression away. Just having a bad day, they use movie, but I wanted to settle at the age of ten, because then realize like I can get out of the slump and honestly I. Think I was of age of. Seventeen and a half. But honestly I'm more set free now so like off of probation so. I'm not really depressed. I think more so I mean. We all have our bad days. brusher meadows speaking from her home in Ohio. Structure Gabby Yearwood is a sociocultural anthropologist at the University of Texas at Austin he recently authored an article titled Playing Without Power Blackmail NCWA student-athletes living with structural racism. We asked Dr Yearwood can't a bunch of big muscular star. Athletes Take care of themselves right exactly so you take two sports, basketball and football, where the participants are regularly large, and so you think they cannot be harmed, but I think we all know that harm can come in the motion..

Warren Ohio Ms. Meadows Kelly Hayes Gabby Yearwood juvenile justice center US Gresham meadows Joyce Ford FBI agip Ohio University of Texas Tana Pal Sharpton involuntary manslaughter Black Alliance Chicago
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

05:01 min | 4 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"We don't want to allow certain kinds of people into our stores. Then that's not even the Lai. Even if it's against the law, there's no one who we can go. Complain to within going to enforce the law. There's no police who's going to enforce the law. This would be the the private security force that will enforce not the law, but the rules of their boss at that is the police force. Imagine how bad it's going to be, but they don't even have to pretend to be following the loss. So that's one problem. The second problem is that if we have the this. A police departments happened either uniformly or even manner in other words in some cities. There's no police in other cities. There are then what's going to happen. When there is a organization of white supremacist who are inspired by Dylann roof roof of course was the young white supremacist murdered nine black people in the church service in Charleston South Carolina when the next group who's inspired by Dylann. Roof comes when they decide to go to a black church instead of going to the black shirts in their city. City in this town in their rural area, they're gonNA. See the two counties over. There is a majority black city with no police force. They're gonNA, go there because there's no police force and then when they go on, they suit up that search. If we don't have a security force already set up own private security force set up then who we gonNA call. We're not even going to have our own police department that we can show a community control department that we can call and protect some. Said this scenario. How would you solve it? Well having community control over the police, we'd have a police force that is directly represented by and ordered around by the community. All the police department that doesn't mean the police department has everyone. I've done it doesn't mean the police department has to be the same size that it is now. It doesn't mean the police departments job to protect property. It does mean that if a bunch of white supremacist comes to our town, we need a force. Ready to step up to them and neutralize them from attacks against us, that only happens when we have community control up. The police were instead of the police, being responsible and responsive to the White House structure downtown. They'll responsible to and response to the communities that can slow them, and that means working class black communities, then with intentionally at the disproportionately represented by women and. You folks music control over places. The answer you said that packer was not a successful in getting the year of local officials in Washington DC but that was before this exclusive moment. Yes, so this explosive moment has brought. A lot of attention also brought some attention to the de-fund. We have a lot of people in DC who are pushing for the defend police and we're very excited that they're thinking about. A society with police were certainly a society with a force at so substantially different than it is now can't even think about calling them. Police were engaged now in prosecuting gates now is in political education. Education as it were before with the members of our community to convince them that what we should be fighting for now is power apple reform of the existing police, certainly to remove him from power, and that could happen through defunding, but we think that the way it should happen is by shifting power from them over to our communities, so we're now stepping up our efforts to engage communities and political education to get us to agree that we should be fighting for power, and in this particular moment in history, which should be fighting for power and control over the forces of security in our own communities. Rape Education. Opportunity for all that was Max. Rameau a Pan African Community action in Washington D. C.. A. Jammu Baraka national organizer for the Black Alliance for peace recently appeared on a podcast for Code Pink the Antiwar Organization Baraka agreed that you advocates for peace overseas must also focus on police terror at home. To strengthen solidarity. There's no fixed gear there that that kind of chronology. Standard spirited what you're saying. Basically, we have a responsibility as citizens of Empire to put a brake on the USA. That's important so that that is a criticism boutique that we fully embrace that is our is. At the same time though we I saw ask, people are struggling around rose to speak shoes by that, so we stand with those of us like yourself was. Of the people of Latin America they have to understand that you there because you building opposition to us, policies of back in the is important from the US to see for his hand. On the conditions and the consequences of US policy, so yeah, we definitely have to do that that people are hopeful.

US DC White House Charleston South Carolina A. Jammu Baraka Pan African Community Black Alliance packer Latin America Rape Max Washington
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

05:01 min | 4 months ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"We don't want to allow certain kinds of people into our stores. Then that's not even the Lai. Even if it's against the law, there's no one who we can go. Complain to within going to enforce the law. There's no police who's going to enforce the law. This would be the the private security force that will enforce not the law, but the rules of their boss at that is the police force. Imagine how bad it's going to be, but they don't even have to pretend to be following the loss. So that's one problem. The second problem is that if we have the this. A police departments happened either uniformly or even manner in other words in some cities. There's no police in other cities. There are then what's going to happen. When there is a organization of white supremacist who are inspired by Dylann roof roof of course was the young white supremacist murdered nine black people in the church service in Charleston South Carolina when the next group who's inspired by Dylann. Roof comes when they decide to go to a black church instead of going to the black shirts in their city. City in this town in their rural area, they're gonNA. See the two counties over. There is a majority black city with no police force. They're gonNA, go there because there's no police force and then when they go on, they suit up that search. If we don't have a security force already set up own private security force set up then who we gonNA call. We're not even going to have our own police department that we can show a community control department that we can call and protect some. Said this scenario. How would you solve it? Well having community control over the police, we'd have a police force that is directly represented by and ordered around by the community. All the police department that doesn't mean the police department has everyone. I've done it doesn't mean the police department has to be the same size that it is now. It doesn't mean the police departments job to protect property. It does mean that if a bunch of white supremacist comes to our town, we need a force. Ready to step up to them and neutralize them from attacks against us, that only happens when we have community control up. The police were instead of the police, being responsible and responsive to the White House structure downtown. They'll responsible to and response to the communities that can slow them, and that means working class black communities, then with intentionally at the disproportionately represented by women and. You folks music control over places. The answer you said that packer was not a successful in getting the year of local officials in Washington DC but that was before this exclusive moment. Yes, so this explosive moment has brought. A lot of attention also brought some attention to the de-fund. We have a lot of people in DC who are pushing for the defend police and we're very excited that they're thinking about. A society with police were certainly a society with a force at so substantially different than it is now can't even think about calling them. Police were engaged now in prosecuting gates now is in political education. Education as it were before with the members of our community to convince them that what we should be fighting for now is power apple reform of the existing police, certainly to remove him from power, and that could happen through defunding, but we think that the way it should happen is by shifting power from them over to our communities, so we're now stepping up our efforts to engage communities and political education to get us to agree that we should be fighting for power, and in this particular moment in history, which should be fighting for power and control over the forces of security in our own communities. Rape Education. Opportunity for all that was Max. Rameau a Pan African Community action in Washington D. C.. A. Jammu Baraka national organizer for the Black Alliance for peace recently appeared on a podcast for Code Pink the Antiwar Organization Baraka agreed that you advocates for peace overseas must also focus on police terror at home. To strengthen solidarity. There's no fixed gear there that that kind of chronology. Standard spirited what you're saying. Basically, we have a responsibility as citizens of Empire to put a brake on the USA. That's important so that that is a criticism boutique that we fully embrace that is our is. At the same time though we I saw ask, people are struggling around rose to speak shoes by that, so we stand with those of us like yourself was. Of the people of Latin America they have to understand that you there because you building opposition to us, policies of back in the is important from the US to see for his hand. On the conditions and the consequences of US policy, so yeah, we definitely have to do that that people are hopeful.

US DC White House Charleston South Carolina A. Jammu Baraka Pan African Community Black Alliance packer Latin America Rape Max Washington
"black alliance" Discussed on Off The Hook

Off The Hook

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Off The Hook

"Number of the black alliance for peace. All of the countries that the United States has attacked have been people centered people oriented, whether you're talking about Iraq without getting into the internal politics or you're talking about Libya, or you're talking about Venezuela, it is a way to defeat the emergence of socialism and a people centered economy. This is listener sponsored WBAI, New York. Indeed it is WBAI New York ninety nine point five FM it's Wednesday evening, eight o'clock time for off the hook. And the very good even Ergen is off the hook manual seen here with you on this Wednesday evening. Join tonight by route p. firefly good evening. Kyle pay what's happening. Voltaire. Welcome back in Vegas. Thank you. A lot of talk about some of the things that went on out there in in the hour ahead and we'll be taking phone calls in just a little bit. Hopefully. So anybody else lose their security clearance today? Well, it's, it's, it's not a surprise. I mean, you know, I saw it coming, but. This don't criticize and you'll be alright, that's that's what we were. I wish he losses clear for. As for his torturing people and being. For go against resin, can't lose you clearance for torturing people. That's the job. Head of intelligence. That's kind of been understood over the past few years. It's hard to root for him, but in. Yeah, I hear that. I fully hear that. And you know if you close yourself off to to intelligence leaders, evil or good, you're kind of you're driving without headlights on, and that's that's probably not a good idea. Speaking of driving headlights on, they might notice a problem with, well, I guess you guys didn't us. You don't drive, but ways boys. There's something up with ways today. I'm not really sure how it how it is installed on my phone. We use ways occasionally just just to see sometimes it takes us down the back streets of Brooklyn to save traffic. How many times have we gone through? What? What's what's old face? I, we are so dependent. We can't not navigate without it permanent part of it. I'm just kidding. Q. e. is fairly. Sometimes what's that industrial area? We cut through sometimes which is really awesome. Not elmhurst. I'm trying to think of the name. It's the place it'll come to. Yeah. If you're in queens, you know, we'll be talking about we've offering in Brooklyn. Sometimes it guides us down these these one way streets and it's it's a lot of fun. It can be fun. Yes, today, though, something was different. First of all, this all these network issues. Whenever I, you know, I try to get bearings. It can't find the network. You're in the middle of the city and he can't find the network. It doesn't make any sense eventually, though it found the network except instead of the usual clip British accent women, women that we have giving us directions. It turned into this really rough sounding male voice, which scared the crap out of me, but only for one sentence and then it went back to her. And then something else happened where apparently a commas been redefined ten seconds because. She'll say things like in in three hundred meters and then paused, ten seconds and then tell you what to do except you've already passed by that point. So something weird's going on with that. I don't know if it's inside my own phone or if it's something network wise, but there's lots of ways to look at it. It could be the way the operating system on the phone. It self is working with the network or being handed. Yeah, handed off in in the progress of using those kinds of applications. And I think we probably do to test some other ones. Compare get some some perspective on how these sort of online ones that are run over the network versus other standalone ones that you sort of program in advance, and then it's sort of already got the math. Seems like this is having communication difficulty with whatever services is hosting. I like ways are like ways because it's it's.

Ergen WBAI Brooklyn United States Iraq Kyle Vegas New York Libya Venezuela queens ten seconds three hundred meters
"black alliance" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"black alliance" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Me and learn about let us make man and would hang Stewart foundation is doing to cabin double ACP national action network The beacon hill black alliance for human rights organisation they number or partnering organizations the clerk of DeKalb county in, our office United, youth, adult conference we, are trying to just do what we. Can so put this state of emergency because that's what we are in but that own yes scheduled for Thursday August second. From six to nine PM I'll be broadcasting live from there and we got to have some. Serious conversation and Dan got to do, something about it But let's go, back to this situation down in Pinellas. County was this murder and should it be that let's go to Charles up in the DC area Charles how are you Hey, Derek. How are you. Doing very well. Brother how. About, yourself. I'm doing great. I I am glad you're back and I pray your total. Lie success and? Your perfect thank you brother I appreciate that I received that you're welcome sorry, welcome? So marquees mcglockton What he did was very honorable and what every partner will want. A young, man. To do in. An effort to. Protect and. Defend, you. Know the daughter You know from my point of view that. Young brothers, a hero You know he you know he died defending the woman's. Owner right but the fact remains, that, he. Should not, have died and the fact is also Michael, Andrew Jessica Murdered our brother, the You know the video shows and know Sherman tells us anything, different and you, know People are tired of it I'm tired. Of seeing this kind of? Stuff in, the news people already seeing Michael Andrew dress could he'd be over it Eleven sixteen Charles street in Clearwater Florida three seven. Five five so you know going, for the community at large during, has no, choice but. To standard song ground against people like Michael Andrew dress go and when you read the statute you look at title forty six chapter seven seventy. Six, it says the deadly forces, reasonable if you believe, that, using or threatening to, use, such force, necessary to, prevent. Imminent death, or great bodily harm now from my point of view miss McLaughlin. Deal was hey pushing down. And say hey back up you know right you know let me let me stand up between. Here and do what's right Right, and. Then you down, on the ground or or Michael Andrew Jessica's down on, the ground he pulls out his his piece in Schuster brother you. Know these these people are so, damn arrogant to where they you, know they, want us. To believe that dislike when there is a variety seeing some video a clear case of murder and there's not anyone anyone whatsoever who can say. That, you know what dress could, be was was the, right, thing to do so, you, know the, news is, already. Reporting that, he'd be over at eleven sixteen Charles street in Clearwater Florida so Yeah he's campaigning hard so he might get elected there you. Go Appreciate your. Brother, Yup I'd fall for eight nine two two. Seven zero three Yeah we we we. Have, blood krypton everybody they. Like doing, each, other, but they In. A way I understand there's, go to let's go to Lee in Atlanta Lee? Okay, and get, that on tape how you doing Dr doing well how, you doing You know, I'm talking about what, I wouldn't that. Wouldn't answer the phone so I hope you didn't get there now no we didn't. Catch it. Whatever you don't, be the the the girl down Ed. The. Georgia Southern we talk about, her in a few minutes but, are black roommate So. This is you know how they, now the freshman again, they knew roommate. Assignments no apparently down there would go Georgia Southern great school too So the black girl tweets. Her white roommate and tell the well. Look welcome to Joseph we're going to be Rome eight so, the white girl thought. She, was re. Tweeting the third roommate would who was white And she said well I just met I roommate. She don't look to the word ish But she will actually sent that to black girl And so called. The real big call a big stink down there, I don't know if they go, have they said if what they're gonna do, it don't. They're gonna let the girl, in school the, low we'll. Take out too bad but, you know it's one they re tweet went wrong I hold, on one second so I can let you, get your..

Michael Andrew Jessica Michael Andrew Clearwater Florida murder McLaughlin Charles DeKalb county beacon hill black alliance Dan Georgia Stewart Pinellas ACP partner Sherman Derek Andrew Jessica Michael Rome
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Is among the keynote speakers was a jumble baraka the green parties 2016 vice presidential candidate and lead organizer of the black alliance for peace odds of the people i quit all of the judges it is more than a slogan this bit too power to the papal has debated the spy emission of our many have been involved in this this struggled this attempt to bail power for the masses of the oppressed people in this country around the world for quite some time we have been successful in fight boning it real power but we know that we have before us challenge but i was in a responsibility while we here this evening we understand them a little bit of progress we've been able to make in this country to span the writings of democracy coming out of the socalled civil rights struggle with the black liberation movements in answering want builders of the 1960s the 1970s that raise those spaces that we open up in many cases quickly reversed so we know how to use quadros campaign we know that because we ultimately the consequences of the counter revolutionary process the abortion in aging seventy the thing that reality today with the evolution of all uh all democrats in liberalism this is the of john trout this is reality because we were emperor that fifty years ago dr king said that that was up there in the center of the american spirit analogy that was maintained the us society threat to the entire world.

us civil rights dr king fifty years
"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"black alliance" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"I'm on the study about half of what it is that is actually happening there and it is something that i i want us to all just be on the alert not just from the language in general but colombia in particular i was there in two thousand fourteen and it is it is very important that we recognize where the peace movement and where the environmental movement needs to show up even in those places which aren't the typical type of coverage that you might get on cnn or msnbc or even in some of our traditional environmental and peace organisations because even of bombs are not being dropped the challenge and the front lines of the piece of environmental struggle are still there in colombia right now the peace process is being threatened and compromise by message gene communication and language which is being put out by the united states government even if the united states government does not drop a nuclear weapon then it still has an impact in terms of making space for those who want to to ravage the activists the peace activists the land rights activists those who are standing up in trying to bring together reconciliation in that country the doors are being open for the far rightwing paramilitary grants to begin to attack and so we have to begin to open up our minds in our perspectives to see beyond what the things that we might normally be looking for we're going to have answers that answer and solutions at solvent so i want you to stay connected with us the black alliance.

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"black alliance" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"black alliance" Discussed on KOMO

"And cloudy in downtown seattle a new law regarding police use of deadly force fail to pass this year's state legislature now call corwin haeck reports supporters hope washington voters will make the james themselves their proposed initiative would seek to drop language in the street statute that calls for proof of malice or evil intent before an officer can be charged in the deadly shooting a similar change failed in the state legislature this year meeting with resistance from thirty i district representative morgan irwin who is also a seattle police officer this bill is a hatchet being used to kill until housefly proponents of the change fear officers will be more reticent to charge to dangerous situations if they think honest mistakes will get them prosecuted but karen johnson director of the black alliance of thurston county says the changes not about prosecuting honest mistakes it's about when an officer unjustifiably negligently recklessly takes the life of a he'll be able to be charged that is our concern now those seeking change say they will mount an in should have drive the proposed i 940 would adopt a goodfaith standard for police shootings and require officers to receive deescalation training corwin haeck komo news the city of auburn hills to go town hall this week on the worsening opioid epidemic at the mirrors clearingup rumors that herself canecutting town tommy with a heroin safe inject inside use promo scotty giat's a program thursday is open to the public they'll be a panel of speakers to share information and answer questions about that toll of this crisis on families and communities not granted are we going to be come on out it it our friend and has plans move ahead for to save injections sites for heroin users auburn mayor nancy backus says she is heard the rumors that her town might be in the running for one i understand that when act and trying injection type care and bring that i can support personally aren't that are police department read on state senator mark bhalotia whose district includes auburn was not invited to the forum though he's been pushing legislation to ban safe injections sites heart i it it is a very important issue opioid epidemic.

seattle james officer morgan irwin director thurston county auburn hills scotty giat nancy backus mark bhalotia corwin haeck washington representative karen johnson heroin senator