23 Burst results for "Black African Americans"

"black african americans" Discussed on Run The Jewelz Show

Run The Jewelz Show

07:19 min | 3 months ago

"black african americans" Discussed on Run The Jewelz Show

"Were on lane. I'll be lazy and went out and won on folk. And i'm in my day to be in on a level playing field like i don't want you walking around setup and shredded up when i'm walking around. He never on thing right. Because i always talk about this was why of course. It's good that we're talking to you as a as a woman as queen especially on that is a serious about a competitions and stuff like that because like some some men on may be afraid to say the least or or may feel real Standoffish of dating someone. That may be more. Chiseled in nam or may be serious into their health and personal fitness more than the man even if he does go to the gym. Even if you may be athletic in so vast why those that are viewing They need to hear from your perspective. So so men that do possibly want to approach. You are another woman that may be or is literally more fitness or more than them like. Tell him that the waters are not that not that Treacherous when it comes to approaching a woman of your caliber Acolyte the discipline in my lifestyle points to for a disciplined man on anything. I think that's more intimidating than muscle that i carry. The weight of my life style is definitely. You know like i'm in charge three days a week. I'm a at four o'clock in the morning. You know these are the things i don't watch. Tv i don't drink like the weight of my lifestyle is way bigger than the month life after life. If a man is intimidated by the way that i looked and i know he would be intimidated by the lifestyle right so meat. That's a shutdown right there. If you're intimidated by the waves. I looked in. You're not gonna be able to be carried away with everything else. So maybe it is that treasures like maybe my is is. I feel like amanda will cower at a little muscle if you've animal biza bro. You got a whole lot lack of in a row conversation that not just in in our community. As as as black african americans are people of african the centers across all different nationalities. That i talked to because again we we. We are wanted to drop heavy. Jews were not just wanted to escape. Pass certain issue with anesthesia. A resource a bodybuilder. And she has chiseled her body over over the years since college in a literally made her body living sacrifice. We're talking about Relationships with talking about discipline talking about her regiments that she uses to continue on her weight. Loss journey and so If you have any questions for anesthesia whether you're women are a man that may be tuning in off feel feeder dropping in comments but Let let's pick it a little and talk about the legacy of because as you said. At the beginning you have a lot of family members that may be a big or possibly obese are like a lot of families on that may be represented that are having folks watch. This interview have also So like what is your legacy that you're trying to build for you personally for your family or even offer you currently right now in order to separate yourself from some of those Health concerns from other families I guess the legacy in this is their trust. The phase the the parts of the earns of the enduring slice. That's the legacy light anything. You actually submit to anything reminds. You actually can't if you believe it like you. Can't you know what i'm saying. Like i think solman we walk in so much doubt in fear legacy is like we don't have to live like that has to live in obesity. We don't have to live like that There is another way. And i just want. I want it doesn't always work like you know like i live with other people And i can't say that they eat like me all the time you i can't they you know whites. In the more i can say they. You know my mom and my grandma's don't eat white rice anymore that you've brown rice the that's just you know like we don't eat quite where we eat. We eat bread at all. But what. I appreciate that change. I appreciate you know like the little changes Nfl for me was little changes. Right itself is made thousands of changes you know. Let 'em typing keeping absolutely and as s a huge thing that i'd be talked to a couple of my friends and also Men teas that are into health and personal fitness because we all know that there are families that do struggle when it does come to health issues that derived from a lack of prioritizing their health impersonal fitness. And when it comes to who is watching. You someone's always watching you on your weight loss journey or your health and personal fitness journey and they are wanting to really see if you are about what you say you're about when it comes to your discipline in so Best as huge interesteing anesthesia. That you do want to leave that as a new legacy for your family which a lot of our our folks in our community who struggle with the lap in uh so when it comes to as we wind down before we allow you to give your final dude. I was just talking to a co worker. A yesterday that had her her grandmother passed away. she was obese and she was Basically still early. I think in her sixties or seventies Let let's talk about when it comes to seeing that affect own other family members that are either Not living the best life that they they have or that they could live because of their lack of winning to take their health or serious or their fitness serious. And like what would you should jesper. Those that are watching. That may have family members that are struggling with that in there Wanting to make turn so that they can inspire or help those family members throughout that process. What would you like suggest or tell them exactly that. They have to make time right You leave sample. And so i don't care what that is if you want for households to see something different you gotta do something you gotta be.

anesthesia solman amanda obesity Nfl jesper
"black african americans" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

04:02 min | 3 months ago

"black african americans" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"By now. San diego san diego. What do they do. Do you see what they do in that dugout. They're fun they're having fun now. There's no doubt and what he's talking about is that and there's always been that. Latin players have always been criticized hispanic. Latin chris for their flare. Right you remember the bad flip. Some of the other stuff right there were they. Were okay before we go quickly. I don't know if this if you were like this. But when i was growing young kid you know i lived in cincinnati. Obviously the cincinnati reds. Were huge we used to go to games. I consider like dave concepcion and tony perez. I consider them black. I know they weren't there latino but at that time i consider them black. Now i know in the in the official demographics they probably were considered latino players right. But i thought of them as black did you when you were. I didn't now. Because i just think it's a cultural thing. It's not just the color of your skin. It's the food you eat what you believe in. Do you know what i mean. It's more than just that. I think people can lump everybody together and just go by skin color. But that doesn't you came lajoie and black right my. I don't think he's black. Not black american. But he's black okay because they're of african descent day. Biceps tony period. But they don't. But i'm saying what i consider black african americans different than african afro-caribbean whatever but that's all right. I'm not saying that they're not. They are black skin but didn't know their beliefs in what they eat in. You know what i mean and what they celebrate. Different holzer right. It's a different culture that that's really what it is but my point is you know the padres like the whole idea of black played. I remember when people criticize ken. Griffey junior 'cause you wars have backwards. I thought i thought when they did a boss or they should've put on ken. Griffey junior would have had on chris. Backwards you know what. I mean like i really did. Yes i really did. Because he was known for that. Do you know what i mean. And they will play. I'll turn your hat around dude. This where's your show your store ups. You know like the old crotchety guys who was still a part of the old guard and things have changed. I i looked the other day. And i saw tat. Tease hit a home run. Twenty seven seventh home run and the way he went around the basis and the handshakes he did to everybody on into the dugout. And when he got there you see that big chain put on all the players. Yeah yeah i mean. It's a big padre. Gold chain that spill around eric be iraqi or not right in the late eighties. Cloud is going by leave but the crowd is going bonkers. i what. Cc saying we need more of that let people be who they are stopped trying to button up everything. It's a game my god everybody's going to have to respond and act the same. We come with different things. Don't we all bring different things to the party. chris. I i totally agree. And then let's keep your real. Obviously there's a ratio element to this. Which i don't want to minimize but bryce harper's has said the same thing right right down to make up on what happens rob and one that he could win. I are on these. I mean heck. We have a national radio show but we also have been on the tv debate shows for nearly twenty years now. We were on cold pizza. Debating with skip bayless. Okay and early..

San diego san diego Latin chris dave concepcion tony perez Griffey cincinnati reds lajoie cincinnati ken holzer padres caribbean chris eric bryce harper rob skip bayless
"black african americans" Discussed on The 3:59

The 3:59

03:49 min | 4 months ago

"black african americans" Discussed on The 3:59

"Reporter. Sharp ticket welcome sharp. Thanks for having me. So i offer a listeners. What is redlining it's a. It's obviously a long standing. Practice has been around for a while but folks may not necessarily know what it is and the impact it's had writing is kind of a term that we've heard but a lot of people don't necessarily really remember realize what it was so it was a practice by banks in the thirties basically to map neighborhoods in the country. And say this is a good bet for mortgage loan. This is a bad bet And it literally redlined areas that had huge communities of black african americans so it was saying that anybody who lives in these areas are a bad bet Not worth making a home loan and so people who lived in those areas couldn't get home runs they couldn't they couldn't homes. They couldn't get insurance They basically were cut out from this really way to generate wealth and paths that wealth onto future generations. So what we've seen is that you know it's really had huge impacts on the black community in the united states so only about forty two percent of black people in houses versus about two percent of white americans and the medium black household only holds about one eighth the wealth of a white household and then also in these neighborhoods there's lower life expense expectancy Higher rates of chronic diseases worse impacts from covid nineteen..

united states nineteen about two percent about forty two percent thirties about one eighth black african americans americans
"black african americans" Discussed on The 3:59

The 3:59

02:01 min | 4 months ago

"black african americans" Discussed on The 3:59

"We've been looking at the digital divide all year today. I want to discuss how today's broadband deployment mirrors illegal mortgage redlining practices for the past. Why would see similar devastating consequences down the line saying this. Is your daily charge here discussed. This problem is team at senior reporter. Sharp ticket welcome sharp. Thanks for having me. So i offer a listeners. What is redlining it's a. It's obviously a long standing. Practice has been around for a while but folks may not necessarily know what it is and the impact it's had writing is kind of a term that we've heard but a lot of people don't necessarily really remember realize what it was so it was a practice by banks in the thirties basically to map neighborhoods in the country. And say this is a good bet for mortgage loan. This is a bad bet And it literally redlined areas that had huge communities of black african americans so it was saying that anybody who lives in these areas are a bad bet Not worth making a home loan and so people who lived in those areas couldn't get home runs they couldn't they couldn't homes. They couldn't get insurance They basically were cut out from this really way to generate wealth and paths that wealth onto future generations. So what we've seen is that you know it's really had huge impacts on the black community in the united states so only about forty two percent of black people in houses versus about two percent of white americans and the medium black household only holds about one eighth the wealth of a white household and then also in these neighborhoods there's lower life expense expectancy Higher rates of chronic diseases worse impacts from covid nineteen. So it's really just something that you know. It happened in the thirties and the forties is kind of its heyday But it still having implications. Today

united states nineteen about two percent about forty two percent thirties about one eighth black african americans americans
Digital Redlining and Why Some People Are Stuck With Slow Internet

The 3:59

02:01 min | 4 months ago

Digital Redlining and Why Some People Are Stuck With Slow Internet

"At the digital divide all year today. I want to discuss how today's broadband deployment mirrors illegal mortgage redlining practices for the past. Why would see similar devastating consequences down the line saying this. Is your daily charge here discussed. This problem is team at senior reporter. Sharp ticket welcome sharp. Thanks for having me. So i offer a listeners. What is redlining it's a. It's obviously a long standing. Practice has been around for a while but folks may not necessarily know what it is and the impact it's had writing is kind of a term that we've heard but a lot of people don't necessarily really remember realize what it was so it was a practice by banks in the thirties basically to map neighborhoods in the country. And say this is a good bet for mortgage loan. This is a bad bet And it literally redlined areas that had huge communities of black african americans so it was saying that anybody who lives in these areas are a bad bet Not worth making a home loan and so people who lived in those areas couldn't get home runs they couldn't they couldn't homes. They couldn't get insurance They basically were cut out from this really way to generate wealth and paths that wealth onto future generations. So what we've seen is that you know it's really had huge impacts on the black community in the united states so only about forty two percent of black people in houses versus about two percent of white americans and the medium black household only holds about one eighth the wealth of a white household and then also in these neighborhoods there's lower life expense expectancy Higher rates of chronic diseases worse impacts from covid nineteen. So it's really just something that you know. It happened in the thirties and the forties is kind of its heyday But it still having implications. Today

United States
"black african americans" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"black african americans" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"She explains why the 19th of June is so significant. 18 63 President Lee gets the Emancipation Proclamation, which was outlawing slavery. But the state of Texas did not follow along until 18 65. And so black people in the state of Texas called this our Independence Day that when everybody all black African American slaves were then free. The federal bill passed the house 415 to 14. After a unanimous vote in the Senate earlier this week, Morgan says she got a bit of pushback as well. Well, I think two of the pushback statements that I had heard while I was running the bill. Was one is that the state of Washington Jan. Practice slavery at the time, and for that, I say that it benefited off of the $3 trillion made off the backs of my ancestors. We also want a state on July board 17 76 when the declaration of Independence was signed. Yet we celebrate that holiday proudly every year and then, too, is that it cost too much and again, when is the right time to correct racial injustice? And for me, this is just a down payment of what is owed to black African Americans. As for the 14, who voted against the holiday on a federal level, Do you think that's economics as well? Or do you think that there is racism attached to that? Of course, there's racism. Attash trip Who wouldn't want to celebrate Juneteenth? Stefan? Johnson. Tolliver is president of the Black Heritage Society of Washington State. The first recorded celebration of Juneteenth in Seattle was on June 19th 18 90. The black residents of Seattle met on Hike Street There was a big marching band, they marched through downtown Seattle to the train station. And then headed to can't where they met.

Stefan Morgan Seattle Hike Street Tolliver $3 trillion June 19th 18 90 Johnson Washington 18 65 Texas July Senate President Independence Day two 19th of June Black Heritage Society of Wash Juneteenth African American
"black african americans" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:33 min | 5 months ago

"black african americans" Discussed on KCRW

"Could have been committed to upgrade the water system and Flint and to get on a path of eliminating lead service lines. Maybe the half a billion dollars that's already been committed. Could have been avoided. The Biden plan is way overdue. That's Eric Olson with the natural resource is defense counsel. Olson says Lead galvanized pipes continue to be a problem despite being banned in 1986 lot of people think this is only a problem, saying Flint or a few Big older cities, and in fact, it's distributed all over the country, and it really is a major public health threat. Let can cause damage to the brain and kidneys. A particular concern is the effect led can have on young Children. Lead exposure may slow development and kids under seven years old, leading to learning and behavioral problems. Nation. Why the number of lead galvanized pipes that need to be replaced is estimated between eight and 10 million. The Biden proposal calls for spending $45 billion, but it could be more expensive. American Water Works Association estimates the cost could exceed $60 billion. Concerns on Overton. He's the pastor of Flint's Christ Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church. Overton joined others who sued to get the city to replace all of its lead service lines. Now he worries disadvantaged communities may lose out if more affluent suburbs Russian and deplete the federal funding. The Biden administration is proposing people in Brown, Black African American Latino communities. That we know are gonna have some disadvantages coming up the ranks anyhow, let's start there. Others question whether replacing lead service lines should be such a large priority. Lead pipe replacement makes up nearly half of what the bite administration has proposed spending on upgrading the nation's water systems. But by some estimates the U. S needs to spend close to nine times that much. David Love France of the American Water Works Association says it's been too long since the last major update to the nation's drinking and wastewater infrastructure. A large investment was made in distribution systems after World War two. Those fights are all coming of age, and they all need to be replaced. That's where we are. Today. However, even with federal support, there will likely be those who resist replacing old service lines. There's even some reluctance in Michigan, which has its own mandate to remove all lead service lines within the next two decades. In the little city of Mason. Some of the city's estimated 1400 lead service lines date back to the 18 hundreds. Mayor Rose Whipple says Mason was already slowly replacing old pipes during routine roadwork. Insist there's no need to Russia are led almost never reaches the threshold. When it does, it barely does, And usually we find out that the reason it did is because of a bad test. Despite his reservations, though Whipple says a federal funding becomes available, his community will likely apply. Just up the road from Mason in Lansing, the state capital. The city's water utility has already replaced all of its lead service lines. It wasn't easy and it took 12 years Take Pet Flea is the general manager of the Lansing Board of Water and Light, he says. Most Lansing residents willingly let utility crews inside their homes and excavate their lawns to replace the pipes. But some didn't and carefully says the utility had to use what he describes as tough love. We just finally sent off series of letters and listen, You know, we need to get your life service replace for your own safety and you know, we might be forced to turn your water off. And we'll turn it on. We put new service in. Yeah, that letter got their attention. The city of Flint hopes to soon join the ranks of communities that have completely replaced all their lead service lines. Flint Mayor Sheldon nearly plans to inspect the last 500 service lines this summer. This is a journey and we're completing that journey now. It's a journey that many American cities and towns will need federal help to take for NPR news. I'm Steve Carmody in Flint, Michigan. On tomorrow's show, The director Barry Jenkins, tells us about turning Colson Whitehead's novel the Underground Railroad into a new series. Listen, ask your smart speaker play NPR or just asked for your member station by name. Thank you for listening to us on your local member station. You can keep the conversation going with us on social media. I'm Noel King. You can reach me on Twitter at Noel King Rachel Martin is at Rachel NPR and Steve Inskeep is at NPR Inskeep..

Steve Carmody Steve Inskeep Noel King Eric Olson 12 years $45 billion Whipple Barry Jenkins Olson World War two Lansing American Water Works Associati Colson Whitehead Lansing Board of Water and Lig 1986 Rachel Martin Mason Michigan Flint tomorrow
Interview With Linda Johnson Rice

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Linda Johnson Rice

"Today. Linda johnson rice joins me skimmed from the couch. She is the ceo of johnson publishing company which published ebony and jet magazines johnson publishing helps give a voice to millions and chronicle the african american experience across the country. Linda has also served on numerous corporate and philanthropic boards including the chicago public library. Omni kong group. Grubhub tesla estonians national museum of african american history and culture. Linda thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Thank you for having me carly. I'm excited to be here and sounds to have you here so i think you know the first question. We start with the same one every show. Skim your resume for us. I most certainly. I'm happy to do that. I am still the ceo of johnson publishing company. So that is great and it. Is that the founding company for ebony jet magazines and fashion fair cosmetics all started by my family and for better or for worse i have never worked anyplace else and so i grew up in the business. Grew up in the in the magazine business in the publishing business and also in the beauty business but always surrounded by incredible people great parents but great staff who were very uplifting and all about aspiration and inspiration for the african american community. So i grew up in the business. I went to Born and raised in chicago got my degree in journalism from. Usc came back and got my masters in management from northwestern. And i got my masters in management. So funny i started out full time in school and then i switched and i went part time so it took me longer but i really wanted to work at the same time and i had the luxury to be able to do that. A lot of people don't have that. But i did because i wasn't looking for a job once i got my degree. I already knew where. I was going to be an actually once. I i got my masters in management. I actually became president a company like the very next day. But i do want to stress. One thing that i think is really important here and that is i have worked in a family business but it was not a given that i was just going to step into this role and if you know if you knew anything about my parents it was nothing was given. You've really had to earn it. And so it does seem like boy. That was a really fast. Reject re but This was decades and decades of work. I mean i spent more time at a copy machine making copies and doing all kinds of stuff that you know people do when you start out in in a company. I don't think that was any different for me. Something that people would be surprised to know about you that if not on your professional bio oh my goodness. Let's see on a personal side. I i love to ride. I have horses. I've owned horses all my life so that is sort of my luxury right now. I don't have one. But it's the way i can relax and i studied opera. We do you think. Please don't ask me to sing. But i did. I studied opera for for many years. Took voice lessons and loved. It absolutely loved it. We're gonna dive into the family business. Tell me about your family. Tell me about your parents so you know my parents. John and eunice. Johnson were part of the great migration of african americans from the south to the north. So my father came from arkansas. My mother came from alabama and very different backgrounds. This is so it's really interesting. My my father came from nothing. And when i say nothing his town great people but only six hundred and sixty eight people there. His mother believed in him so much and she just you know the love that she had for him she poured into just him and so for her. The best thing for him was to get out of arkansas arkansas and get education and the way to do that was you know they. They got on the train and they came to chicago. they had relatives in chicago. So a lot of people. With the migration from arkansas people came to chicago alabama. They came to chicago. My mother came from alabama so my father dirt poor came to chicago. Went to high. School became head of the debating team editor. The school paper graduated attended the university of chicago and my mother on the other hand came from a background. Where you have to think about this. Her father was a surgeon. Her mother was a schoolteacher in psalm alabama so obviously black african american back then prominent family. Her two brothers were surgeons. Her sister was a phd professor in english and my mother came to chicago to get her master's in social services at loyola. So now you've got these two converging people now completely different backgrounds you know and and they met ed dance. My parents met at a dance and my father. I remember him saying you know. Ask your mother. You know at the dance. Could i take her whole and my mother said absolutely not absolutely not it. She said. I'm going home with the person that brought me. And so for my father. Being the maverick entrepreneurs salesman was game on. That was

Johnson Publishing Company Jet Magazines Johnson Publishi Omni Kong Group Grubhub Tesla Estonians Nation Linda Linda Johnson Chicago Public Library Chicago Carly Arkansas Ebony Rice Alabama USC Northwestern Eunice Johnson John University Of Chicago Ed Dance
"black african americans" Discussed on DV Radio

DV Radio

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"black african americans" Discussed on DV Radio

"I. I take my history. 'cause I told grown man, and I'll told all a union most of. My family literally goes back to like Scotland-a's and when I say SCOTLAND-A's He was an admiral. If I'm not mistaken. of the Royal Scots Navy. And E fall a lot of luggage, warriors and so air battles in, and so that progressed further up until present day. And when I say I praise, my family prays my family history historical family because whatever they were fighting for at the time. They done what we would do at the current time fighting for what's right writer on? Right or wrong. Hello, hello. Testing testicles fast the hunter. So. That's what I praise I'm not a I'm not the normal average citizen that educated 'cause you know groman. Man I've I'm big on history and I do a research. So for me for me. It's not praising actions is not praising quote unquote events. It's not praising the dark history, although it is dark history and I do take an embrace it like I said there's too many people personally I. Think and I believe that when Shit like this comes about they are. Praising the wrong things whether they know it or not. They're idiots, their insurance. Their arrogance is praising and glorifying something that they probably shouldn't and if. A few of them were educated. They probably wouldn, but then you've got the other half of the quote. Unquote, one percent that probably doesn't give a shit and wants to glorify no matter what we say, no matter what they know, no matter if you took them in a time machine and sent them back and showed them how terrible they were. They're probably not going to shit so. It's it's it's a it's a fucking. Catch twenty two. Do it now. I think it's I. I see it more as a reminder of the shit that happened. And instead of tearing down the statues, kids there educate them. Hell them about who these people were and why they did it at that time. Don't just tear down. Don't just say wide. I don't like this person, so we're just GONNA tear down every single statute. We're just going to rename all the military bases because they. They have names of people that we don't like now. They have names with the losers. I'm not even being funny when I say that they have names of the losing side. Miro say no shirt. I haven't honestly for like Fort Bragg and stuff I haven't been watching paying attention attention to vie. They want to rename the basis, but I know that they want rename them because they're offensive or whatever I'd say like this. Let me me. Let me be ultimately ultimately clear with this. It don't need Shit. They really done. I mean yeah. We tore down a couple of that we NI NI, but the a couple of statues were torn down they might renamed the basis they they they're. Talking about getting of the confederate flag is isn't too bad idea on my part. You can be mad at me if you want whoever is, but honestly that's not even we're asking for. You you go to McDonald's and you get a you want you ask for cheeseburger? They you everything except the cheeseburger. They give you a Sunday. The machine finding that broke. French fries monologue I asked for cheeseburger well. He hears pickles I. DON'T Walk Pickles. I Shave Burger, so. I'll do my this site I. What my question is being given. Champ car, so we were on need. That's where we're at right grown man Yup. You're so my question is all of our cops and pods were named after something in America whether it was a base, installation or something of that nature Tampa right, and they're wanting to change of basis here and country. My my question is they're wanting to take all civil war names and change them. Are you going to change Fort Meade because Fort Meade is named after George Meade who way for was an. An army, general and civil engineer that served with the Union army of the Potomac during guess. WHAT THE CIVIL FUCKING WAR! Now are you going to change? Though they probably what but I guarantee you, they will if they do do it because he was in the civil war, and because they didn't do the fucking research I guarantee it just like Hbo Max who can go fuck themselves. temporarily temporarily mind. You got rid of gone with the wind. Why do I bring up Gone With the wind? Well like that. Move back up the bus up the bus. You're saying. Need was not a confederate bright. He was basically. Right, so so no, they don't want to agree name. They only want to. Nate renamed the bases named after confederate soldier, but you get my point right, but but you get my point right with everything that's going on, so hbo Max Temporarily Took Gone With the wind from channel. Because quote unquote, they use a they. They actually show the time that going with wind takes place a servant, a house, which back then were black African Americans. Being shown and scenes of the movie now. The irony of this is that the first black female to ever receive an Oscar was Mammy, the house servant from Gone With the Wind, her name was Hattie at the mcdaniel. Excuse me January. She got it in one thousand, nine, hundred forty at the twelve Oscars nominations HBO. Max. You're fucking retarded. That's what's That's the problem with. Country we don't do research. We do south to quote unquote show. Our of court grown man were showing her support for black lives, right or wrong. well that that's their intention right to show that they care to show that it matters to write it off a tangent. You are correct. It's Kinda Weird. It's getting when I when I saw net flicks. Although Oh okay, are you? If you turn on your net flicks, it automatically forces you to see African American movies in history nature with us. You know like honestly, yes, and no, because like I posted mine I one of my pulse was. was talking about the Thirteenth Amendment, and if you look at the documentary on thirteen, it explains the entire issue that in it shows it shows what we've referenced before Essex Democ Racism, and from the thirteenth amendment that was made during the abolishment of slavery all the way up until the industrial prison complex, and how drugs affect the black community how they were actually funneled in from CIA the fun of war Nicaragua yet. That's actually you can look up. It. It makes a good point as to what's going on. What the what has what has gone on now? Shit like. I, don't know some weird ass, black movie who the fuck cares about the whereas black moves right now. They're so fucking awkward. I do not care about love and hip hop I. Mean in basketball or love and hip hop. Matter I. Don't give a shit, but you know, but then like within three days. Hulu did it yet. I don't like all. Would everybody on then spotify spotify done their flick in black lives, playlist or something? I forgot what it was it was. It was something about black and I'm like Oh my God. I. Don't mind that you give me the choice I love that I. Love having choices, but when you forcibly seeded to me, that's when.

Scotland-a Fort Meade Oscar Royal Scots Navy writer spotify basketball Hbo George Meade Fort Bragg Union army Miro Hulu Nicaragua McDonald America Tampa
Protests in Atlanta continue after officer shoots and kills black man

Super Hyper Local Sundays

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Protests in Atlanta continue after officer shoots and kills black man

"Protests are happening right now in Atlanta where police shot and killed a man at a Wendy's parking lot last night the officer that did the shooting was white the person that was shot was a black African American man so far protesters seem to be the peaceful they did burn down the what a Wendy's but the police and protesters seem to be talking it out right now on the streets of Atlanta it's been going on for several

Atlanta Officer Wendy
Every Chapter Has a Lesson With Erica Courdae

Cafe con Pam Podcast

08:38 min | 1 year ago

Every Chapter Has a Lesson With Erica Courdae

"Without further ADO. Here's my conversation with. Erica Cordell Erica. Welcome to Gothic up. Bam How are you? I'm great thank you for me. Pam Thank you. I'm excited so we met back in. I don't know when at she pot gas in Atlanta. Yeah I WANNA say it was October. I swear like last year was a bit of a blurb but I think that they'd have been like over some time last year she had guys. Who Were there right. So that was a great event. I had a lot of fun. You're also one of the speakers and that was amazing am at home here with the war so so we might hear him when the mailman comes which I think it's about to happen. My listeners are used to. I happen to have a very special sauce for dougie. So we're good. Thank you so Erica. Tell us your story what gets through. Who Are you? What's your heritage? Where did you grow up in if I was to ask you like? Let's go back to the beginning. How did that happen? I'M GONNA trauma best to fill like answer it. I'm like wow. I don't even know how to fully answer if I don't dig into something. Please Hofer as because unlike I will dig for sure. Well I am black African American. I don't one hundred percent I'll be honest. I don't know that I have a preference between either term and the reason I say that is because I've had conversations with people that I know that live outside of the United States so African American seems like I don't understand right and so for me black and or African American both work. I identify as female. So she her. I was born in Baltimore Maryland. I have lived in some part of Maryland for the majority of my life. I am the oldest. I have a younger sister. Don't really talk to her very often but she does exist. Assault doesn't exist. He does. I are being the oldest always kind of puts you in that place of being used to having to replace of authority whether you want to or not and you're setting simple even if you're like can do what I wanna do and not have to feel like I'm I'm twelve. I just WANNA be a right. Don't think about this. I think it almost embodies those things into you subliminally. Because you're like I'm just so used to doing this. This is what I do so I always wonder how much of that is conditioning. Or if that truly is just who I am at my core but it's there I'm the oldest two so I relate it's things like I do I don't get it but okay it because people will say like. Oh what's different being the youngest or different being the oldest the middle and? I'm like Again I've lived here. Most of my life lost my dad when I was twelve. I was always a daddy's girl so for me I'll jump back. But the kind of surreal part of having lost him at twelve was that he was thirty seven when he passed away from leukemia. And so when it finally hit me twenty five years after he passed that I had been on this earth longer than he was first of all of. Oh Hell like it was. It was a little scary in that says saying time. It's like that means that I was given a gift and so it's very important to be conscious of what you do with gifts and so that was a big thing for me again. I was a daddy's girl. So it's like gotta make proudly do you. I mean I'm sure maybe you've worked on healing that part of you right the Lesser Dad when she was young so when Little Erica. That happened was it so because I've talked to people about grief end some people when they lose people young. It's like it just kind of happen and you don't. It didn't hit you like you said until you were older. You're like Oh yeah or was it like young at the time were hit you. It definitely hit me when it happened and it will still occasionally have a moment where I'll wake up from a dream minutes. Like oh he's around and it's like no he's not so occasionally reality. Checks will come in for me. I think it was like two days after my twelve th birthday that he was diagnosed and that was in September September eighth and it was January twentieth that he passed away so it was very quick so quick and so there were a lot of points that I had to figure out how to maneuver through it. Where like you know. He went into the hospital. It looked just like him nor his normal self and then when he came out of the hospital for Thanksgiving and I was able to see that this point my parents were divorced. My parents were divorced since I was five. I'm like youtube or crazy. Do not need to be together. Please do this. This is okay with me. So that's the contrast of that. I was like no. I'm okay with divorce thing that it's cool but when I saw him Thanksgiving and it's still something that is do struggle with the memory even to this day when I went to answer the door for him he was very loaded from all the medication and the fluids lost his hair and in that moment I knew who he was in yet. A didn't recognize him and that split second that it took for me to be like no no. No no no get it together. I think he caught it and it broke my heart that it was there. It wasn't that he wasn't aware but I think that he caught again. It was so quick. It WASN'T A. Oh my gosh what happened. It was just like and it was like it was just enough and so I definitely had those points where I had to come to terms with these things. I had points where I would still regularly call. But he could no longer speak sold. They would just hold the phone up. He'd have to hear me because he was on a ventilator so he couldn't speak to me anymore. I mean it got to the point that I you know I could see all of the things that had were that it wasn't him anymore and as a kids don't realize it as an adult you're like this is just a physical form but as a kid is just this is my dad so I just remember when that call. Kinda came through that Monday morning and it just so happened it was m okay day that year and I was out of school and so when it came through it was one of those where I don't know if I'm GonNa truly say it was a ghost thing but you could feel that the energy was kind of off and it was like you know you. Kinda knew something was coming ashore enough that morning. That call came through when the you know he had passed away and so. I remember being twelve and having my own grief and yet having to still comfort my mother through the grief because even though they weren't together I think they were each other's first love and there's a certain amount of something that just never goes away totally with that yes and so you know yes. I recognized it and I went through it but I've also kind of been this person that I'm strong enough to be able to carry the bags for myself and others and I ended up doing it sometimes to my own detriment but that was a moment where I couldn't even choose whether or not to carry them for myself and my mother. I couldn't imagine not you know right and being the oldest right so it just kind of like you know yet might Kinda suck but what do you do? Thank you for sharing sore and it was. Just you know comment the same thing even when my grandmother passed away when. I was seventeen because again you know what do you do? Do you watch those around you just? Kinda fall apart or you step in when you know that you can even if that means that you have to put your own processing on the back Burner Holy. How did you manage it to heal it afterwards? When did you because having carried maybe an old the oldest child to it's like you do carry the bags because it's you pick them up if we're if we're moving forward and they're dragging will you gotta pick up what's been dragging right exactly. I mean in some ways I think we all try to process as best as we can but there are some parts of is to an extent it never fully they never. He'll back it. It kinda will heal the La- certain amount of a scar so like any kid would has played on. Concrete knows what those brush. Burns feel like they scar. And there's little lump in the skin just looks a little different colors different. Whatever and so you can heal. You're never the same from it so I think the older I got. I was able to process what my relationship with him. Their relationship that I saw that he had with others around me even with with my own mother and just kind of seeing what it is to process somebody as your parent and what it is to process somebody as an individual

Erica Cordell Erica Maryland Little Erica Atlanta United States Baltimore Hofer Assault Leukemia LA
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 1 year ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"black african americans" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"black african americans" Discussed on No Agenda

"The machine is in full overdrive. If the Problem Ladies and gentlemen is the black vote and when black when I say black African Americans I personally would prefer to say eight us. Something we've learned here here the American descendants of slavery That's the vote that can make all the difference certainly Wall Street Pete has Has Gotten a lot of Heat Wall Street. Pete got the heat because the black people don't like him according to the mainstream I don't know if it's true or not even Saturday night live made jokes about it It wouldn't take much loss of called the black vote to screw up any Democrat crat and you recall that when the Comma Harris announced she was running the dos movement was kind of born and they started a twitter campaign and Youtube Kasriel people youtube campaigns saying hold on a second Eh. She's not African American. She is Indian Jamaican. That's fine but she's not going to represent us like we let Obama representatives who also wasn't African American and immediately joy Reid and MSNBC came into action. And what did they say. Oh yes these tweets are by bots. These are just bought this nothing real. It's just bought Russian. Bats probably just bought trying to bring down the black woman so they're back now even with camel a gone and it is The mission nation is to promote black women as being in charge of the vote of the household black men. The you know what you're doing you know the black women are the ones as we gotta go after and just last week. It's the same woman with what's her name again. The joy. It was joy Reid Reid with Sharon Mitchell so you know months ago they were talking about it being bought to were these Adolf spots against camera that now. It's box once again. Apparently what are the things that you talk about building reporting. I've spoke with you about this. Before is pushing out in negative information about a candidate that's been selected to be targeted to turn black voters against them but it's who they're using as the voice voice quote unquote the digital voice are supposedly also black people who were spreading that message. And here's what you write about these about fake accounts that are not necessarily really black people Commas a cop or this person is bad for black people quote fake accounts pretending to be black women matter not only in the disaggregation campaigns as but in every election there has been a constant number. You write a fake accounts posing as black women since two thousand thirteen these fake accounts which pretend to be black. Women seem to be real people with real concerns. They connect with the American black community online attempting to learn black vernacular and key issue areas. What will be the point of creating fake account to appear to be black women's specifically so so so this can't be real because of course no black woman ever would go against a Democrat and this cannot ought be it must be about and somehow they've learned it must be some of that I we've been hearing about? They've learned how to actually tweet just like black women it's astounding because we know as we've seen that the the ones were the most valuable to the Democratic Party is black women we have identified that at least five existing campaigns focused on getting black people. Did you only one thing what would not know for the Democrats and can you name one of those five campaigns means I mean we. We put up from the report that you're saying that this is a conversation about reparations that has to do with it. There's a criminal justice conversation. There's an immigration insulin reparations immigration and and sorry reparations immigration and anything that has to do with the criminal justice system so the reason that the targeting of Carmela around being a cop is important is because anything that's the hinges on criminal justice justice becomes a divisive issue. People are out of time. But how can people tell the difference between the real genuine thing. A black lives matter and the ones that are just pay attention designed to make you not vote. How do you even tell you? Tell right away by the by the language that they use most of the time. But if you see anyone who says basically tangible 's or or you're not getting our vote without us getting something back. I USA starts a pause and take a better look at those those accounts and seeing what they're saying so the term tangible 's is an absolute thing in the black community tangible. MEANS IF YOU'RE GONNA talk reparations has got to be something tangible not something you give to whole bunch of people and I know this because I do a show with most. I've learned this so she These are two black women regardless of their actual cultural heritage. The heritage doesn't matter they're black telling black women don't listen to those other blackhawks their bots. I mean that is what is happening. I'm did to me. It's very disturbing at this is on television sunshine in miss this was MSNBC thought what's her name was on CNN no joy Reid Msnbc Joy Reid it is joy joy Reid Msnbc being interviewed. Why wait is joy Reid is on? MSNBC I watched this all day. Yeah you do. Yeah well Georgia Georgia was on CNN. Where they never? He's never been on CNN. And the Shereen in Mitchell is she's part of the digital sisters now major support from Open Society Institute. Come on the we. We all know what's going on here but maybe maybe maybe maybe this election the American people figured out but I'm not holding my breath will you shouldn't brother all right guy thing else for around the cup is kind of funny clips. It's still relate to the impeachment. Oh okay I thought you had made some twenty twenty. Seven impeachment is good too well L.. Let's play cover these clips. This was This clip is just. Because it's it's been part of the I guess just a hypocrisy very think. I think this is uh Adam Schiff. This is Schiff Schiff early on this shift at the beginning of the year. I think this is in March before the anything anything started up and talking about how. You couldn't really do an impeachment if it was Democrats you need to have everybody onboard. Sure and he's he's very thoughtful about all this and he makes it goes on and on and it's just like a head Shaker cut through the trauma of a failed impeachment and impeachment. Bipartisan process. Would have to a extraordinarily Clear and compelling I don't foreclose the possibility that Muller investigation will produce that more than our own will but I think the speaker is absolutely right in. Its absence an impeachment becomes A partisan exercise doomed for failure And I see little to be gained by putting the country through that kind of wrenching experiences. I've often remarked in the past the only thing worse than putting the country through the trauma of impeachment is putting the country through the trauma failed impeachment. What an the idiot and then we have this one? Thanks Schiff on an idiot. This is unbelievable. Then we have this one which is Jamie Raskin skin the Candida. Oh yeah with that I would with A. I'm just going to say pubic hair on his head. I'm just GONNA say it. He is this. This is before. This is before the inauguration this you know people say well they you know. The Washington Post ran an article. You know three days. It'll be right right. After trump was inaugurated impeachment began. It was through two days later. This is before the inauguration. I I WANNA say this for Donald Trump who I may well be voting to impeach.

Schiff Schiff joy Reid MSNBC Reid Reid CNN Sharon Mitchell Donald Trump Youtube Reid Msnbc Obama Pete Washington Post twitter USA Harris Reid Jamie Raskin
"black african americans" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

14:02 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"If you go there you will receive this page will get to this page and it says that this starts in nine days from today and you go. What are you showing us this for? Well the contest as an started running. But we're giving away doing theology vandalism giveaway we're GONNA have a a a ton of basically a ton of different things for you to give away and if you want to give them away Or if you want to receive them there's going to be a whole whole bunch on as a whole bunch of things you can do to enter but I want to show you the list. Here's a picture of them but here is the full list that I just want to show you what we're giving away. You can see the picture there with with some of the materials. There's there's actually see here how to answer the fool. That's a movie a film there and behind a whole bunch of other DVD's CD's films and things like that. You have some flash drives from living waters and Justin Peters. You have a bunch of books here from Macarthur Greg Cocoa just impede. There's some heretic name Andrew Rappaport but there's a whole bunch of books here. We have over seven hundred and fifty dollars worth of books. Actually we just added into. Today is a book from Alan Nelson before the throne. His latest book is now included in this. So we've been adding to this and we'll probably continue adding to this and so there's a long list here so so that we got Twenty seven books currently being given away five. DVD's those DVD's actually more because one of them is a conference series that it has Several DVD's in there there's a bunch of CD's sixteen CDs and again there's a conference series in there so there's more the NAT and then three flash drives so this is all the stuff that we're giving away breath and again you can get to it by going to bitterly dot dot com slash C. P. C. contest. And if you do that you'll be able to to Get to this and be able to see everything that we're giving away. We want. Let you know that because you're saying but it doesn't start for nine days from today but on December number fifteenth you want to get in there gonNA be some things you can do to enter every single day and you get more entries for doing so and so each. There's different points that you get for different entries that and there's like over a hundred different ways to enter so there's plenty of options for you so so that's something we just WanNa give you there so I encourage you to check that out and in nine days and that way you can you you can see that so just trying to read the comments Someone's saying look on watching an apple TV okay But if you want to join us and ask any questions and challenges Recommend that you go to Politics Live Dot Com. That's where you get in. There's a link to join in and ask questions and so until we have some folks as usually folks don't come in right away which I recommend getting right away. That's when you can get your questions answered so what I'm GonNa do is I'm going to torture many of you. It and because some of you will find this to be torturous and others may not maybe some of you are going to be agreeing with critical race theory and Black Liberation Theology Someone's asking when the contest states start against the the dates of the contests are December fifteenth. But I guess what I didn't didn't say when does it end. It ends the end of February. So we're going to have all of You're GONNA have half a December but Christmas time you're going to be focused on family so so those of you who really want this are going to make sure you're sharing it over the holidays while the other people are going to wait until January to kick in. But you have all Walla January or February do this. It's a leap year folks that we're going to do it. On February thirtieth figured out. There is snow February thirtieth woods. So we'll draw. We will do the drawing on the twenty ninth of February so maybe some of you have heard of the idea of black liberation theology or critical race theory. Social Justice intersection out. These are all terms. You're hearing more and more and and these are terms. That are not going to go away in fact if you are watching the Democratic National Committee's debates you're hearing these things come up it is is kind of funny if you watch those debates. They just figured out that. Elizabeth Warren is white because the only black woman is out of the race now. And you're saying that the Democrats are they're basing attacking their own now. They're basically going after the Democrats in saying that they're not black enough because I think all of the black African Americans have now dropped out. Maybe the only one that may still be in this. African American is Unfortunately the senator senator of my state Yeah so we have A. I don't know of Cory Booker still in the race or not but So that may be the only one dono. But they're the argument that they're even going after they're saying that there's not enough African Americans who are running that somehow that is showing that the Democrat Party may be racist and this is a thinking. Maybe you you've heard around somewhere somehow. There has to be a enough African Americans or enough. You know if you listen to glad glad I forget what it stands for. But it's like gay lesbian I forget but it's like some action committee to promote homosexuality. And so what the you end up seeing is that they are saying there's not enough homosexuals in the In the marine industry and therefore for there. They should do something about that that somehow they're very got to correct that problem which I not the church exactly a problem but they. They were arguing. That there's only twenty percent representation of people who practice homosexuality inside of Hollywood movies. Now think about that. Twenty percent of the movies are played played by people that practice homosexuality or they're representing homosexuality in presenting it in the movie and yet when you look in America We had a recent census that came out and basically reveals that those who are in homosexual relationships are basically point. Seeing it was point zero three or point three. Forget but let's go with point three. That's higher point. Three percent of America so point three percent of America and yet they have twenty percent representation in Hollywood and they argue. That you'll hear this argument that somehow if you don't have enough females or African Americans or homosexuals or whichever the victimized group that they're arguing for if you don't have enough of them being represented somehow you are racist you're sexist or whatever and this is where critical thinking critical race theory comes in and where you start to see this You know you see this playing out and so we we. We end up seeing a lot of the what's called Black Liberation Theology. It comes from a man James Cone and what I WanNa do is give view some of what he writes so that you can see where this comes from and see a little bit about why. This isn't going to go away and there's no end to it. There's no endgame game so this is going to read the some quotes here today from James Cones Book. Black Theology Black Power Power And so what he's arguing for is he's arguing for a Basically for this black power that he says that we need to have and some of the things that you see. He's going to talk about things. Maybe you've heard people talk about white supremacy let's see And the the thing that you're you have to understand with this when you read his writings and you read what they had what they say. Their arguments are really stuck. I would argue in a century old arguments. They're arguing that African Americans or blacks black power that the reason for black power is because blacks are not treated as human. They are subhuman women in America and because of that that's going to be an issue there also not equally represented in their Voting which I I you know if you think about those two issues yes that was centuries ago an issue where blacks were treated as if they were not human beings almost almost no actually exactly. Shall we say like children in the womb. Today we're children in the womb are told they're not really human human their sub human by the way African Americans in at least in America are aborted at the largest number of any group so if if African Americans really were believing that then what we should see is we should see them being against abortion in killing off so many of their own so there's a whole bunch of quotes here that we could get into and I'm trying to not take the really long ones because that could take two to read so so some things you end up seeing here is here. Here's a quote quote that you have black power. What is black power mean? According to James cone quote black power means black freedom black lack self determination wherein black people no longer view them cells as without human dignity but but as men human beings with an ability to carve out their own destiny unquote no. Let's break that quote down in an exam and he's saying that black power is freedom lack freedom house. He defining black freedom as by self-determination. Well who's determining things in these blacks right now in fact son to think about if you look at this you have many African Americans that what they end up doing is they will will be conservative. And what do we hear when you have African Americans that are conservative. They're an uncle Tom. They're an Oreo black on the outside side. White on the inside because they're not voting the proper way will then. Is this really about self determination or is this about a political agenda because what you end up seeing here is that they're arguing for an end. Someone in the chat is is even saying and look at how they treat How they attack black American candidates own and that's a great example So Mats Madsen here saying that he texted me when I take a breath come in I said the the URL. He's gotTa check his texts right. Would you interesting. How do they treat candace Allen and anyone anyone wants to join just go to apologize? Politics Live Dot Com. The link is there When we get some folks in Andrews in here right now but we get he always lets me know what he's got questions but Oh here uh-huh Matt There we go and so if anyone wants to join an ask questions We can we can discuss those things so so let me let me. And we'LL SUV mess. Thinks about this quote met. Did you get to hear the quote that I read or now a little bit Has Thirty stations here okay. So so here's the thing you end up seeing with this Barack power when folks talk about this you have to ask the question of are they being treated or viewing themselves as not having human indignity. If if that's case where's that coming from. Where is it coming from that? African Americans are not not being treated the dignity. Now the the issue here that you see is this becomes a ever moving target because when you say that someone doesn't and view themselves as having a certain amount of dignity well they can just change once they get to one level of dignity. Change it and say I still don't feel like I have enough dignity because I need need something else. The argue that this is something that can realistically never be achieved. And why James Cone will say and if I can find the quote on quote him. But he's going to argue that it that they're never in in America. Will there be whites. Who will ever see African Americans or blacks.

America James Cone Justin Peters vandalism Andrew Rappaport Macarthur Democratic National Committee C. P. Elizabeth Warren Greg Cocoa Barack James Cones Book Alan Nelson Hollywood Cory Booker apple candace Allen senator
"black african americans" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on No Agenda

"He went to some of speech therapists and they taught him to talk normally and he talked about it afterwards. Saying apparently some people their brain to brain it goes too fast and so the brain goes overload in and be. Your Voice. Can't catch up and it's trying to catch up and it can't and that's Split Stuttering and this guy was a quick thinker. You could tell so. Brought Biden is trying to imply that he's a genius. I guess well I gotta I've I've gotta say I Because of all the incessant clips that are spewed in our face all day long over and over again of every little event. Joe Joe Biden was blamed for a gaffe that was actually spot on and correct. He even corrected himself while he was about to make the GAFF and was still excoriated and nobody. Nobody is saying anything about it because it's the third rail because because it involves race and I'm going to play the clip then then I will explain. Why just hit me? That Joe was actually right. It's I have more people supporting me. And the black community that amount for me because they know me they know who I am three former chairs the black caucus the only black American woman that ever been elected good to the United States Senate a whole range of people are pointing the it okay. So he says he starts to say the the first black woman elected to the Senate and it comes out as black African because he realizes that it was indeed the first African American woman in Senate and then Cory Booker and Kamala Harris. Jump all over this. That's not true. I'm sorry you're not African American Kamla harass you're Indian Jamaican and Joe. What was right and I think he was stunned? He was stunned because he did start to gaffe. That's why came out black African American which was funny by itself. He kind of slipped it in their black African American but then for these two to start laughing and making fun of him. Kamla Harris actually believe if she's African American just like Obama and Joe was right well L.. Unfortunately you're right. It's a third rail so he couldn't really defend himself even worked. He's not going to be the type of guy was gonna sit up there and say well you're not even African rigging American you big phony now not GonNa do that. Trump is trump. would but how phony is an. Ah I think Kamala Harris hurt herself with that. Black Americans is black Americans. No African Americans aid US know what she is and what she isn't as she's trying to get the the Obama coalition going again. Whatever that is the Obama Coalition Andrew? Young is is an angry because it's not fair..

Joe Joe Biden Kamala Harris Obama United States Senate Cory Booker Trump Young trump.
"black african americans" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Only black African American woman ever elected to the United range of people to be vice president was because my relationship longstanding relation the black community it was warm weather of the fact that he passed over camel Harris being a black woman like the scent of the fact that he says he came from the black hello I tried to find in this morning real quickly and I thought well I'm not sure what he remembers the movie the jerk when we have Steve Martin saying you know he began life as a poor black child this is Joe Biden last night all you did was as a bell bomb was something inside of a bag on the stoop to so long just amazing and then of course we had the the dustup between camel Harris for love their souls to govern this was marvelous this three was just what my favorite couple moments last night because was to individuals who are just going after each other and there were those were immediately on the Democrats Angola cat fight cat fight that's not the case you're too strong candidates who truly disagree with one another on a mission I think that it's unfortunate that we have someone on the stage who is attempting to be the democratic nominee for president United States during the Obama administration spent.

vice president camel Harris Steve Martin Joe Biden Obama administration Democrats Angola president United States
"black african americans" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Three former chairs the black caucus the only black African American woman that ever been elected to the United States Senate a whole range of people no I the other one is the first African American woman now he's lying he gave the screws up and then he lies another and that's a pretty much what he's done on the Ukraine as well David Axelrod was Obama's campaign chief I mean everybody knows it's over for Joe by listen Axelrod why didn't I wouldn't say they knew he was a house of fire in any of the debates that we've been been to and and yet he he comes kind of bumps along yeah my going is where I love that is still going Israel all these I we have all that we have more audio he you know he where it's all talk about coming from the black community and the after mentioned a run on comments were and we're in the middle he just drops out he just stop the well you know we're right we are very yeah terrible and then we'll get back to the Barclay comments yesterday Charles Barkley coinciding with Joe Biden telling us the way to stop hitting women is to punch down we have a four great guests including bill all righty burning and sit on a Thursday we rolled on NJ dot dot com studios information you frost from the capital of the world radio seventy seven W. B. C. news weather in a twenty three year old chase to his death thirty nine fair skies I'm never Valentine now what's trending on seventy seven W. A. B. C. and WABC radio dot com no arrests yet after a twenty three year old was shot and killed a second person also shot and injured this happened inside of a Bronx tobacco shop on east a hundred sixty seventh street late last night tragedy in Elizabeth New Jersey a teen is dead after being struck by a tow truck while riding a scooter it happened last night and so far a teen attacked instead near do what Clinton high school in the Bronx no arrests there and so far no arrests and that or in the stabbing of an orthodox Jewish man in Muncie New York Wednesday morning he remains in critical condition right now Dow futures down fifteen W. A. B. C. news.

United States Senate Ukraine David Axelrod Obama Israel Charles Barkley Joe Biden Valentine W. A. B. C. Elizabeth New Jersey Clinton high school Muncie New York Barclay NJ twenty three year seventy seven W fifteen W
"black african americans" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"All right. So I posed a question John. All right. So Sino five power five conference schools. If this was if this was college football, I know that number would be under ten maybe under five I think for basketball, it's probably between ten and twenty all guests fifteen it's seven. Wow. Seven out of sixty five black coaches in power five conferences, none in the big none in the Pac twelve one. What what's interesting is? I remember when when Mufid McGraw was going on that rant the other day. I actually think it's dangerous to do what I think you're suggesting and that is hire somebody just because he's black. To it. In other words address that problem by hiring a black guy specifically to address it. But Earl lots is interesting Earl was the head coach first of all, I think. Is throw one more thing this because this is staggering two. We talked about the number of men versus women there coaching women's basketball. Right. There are only seven of sixty five black African Americans coaching women's college basketball. Okay. And the player number would be somewhere north of sixty to seventy we're going to watch the NC double A tournament. Texas Tech's gotta bunch of white guy. They do they do. But I mean for the most part, it's a sport that's been dominated by thoroughness virgin years for African Americans. And so you're right. The disparity is is is unbeliev stupid now. But, but this is why I I think our Watson is an interesting choice. Greg. Unlike you don't say, it's no good. Earl used to be the head coach of the Phoenix Suns. And you you have to throw out how that ended because it's the Phoenix Suns in specifically. It's Robert Sarb who. If you interview anybody who ask anybody Mason all those guys were playing poker with the other night. If you would have thrown that around who all covered, the NBA if you would've asked them about rob busy losing money. Robert server, they would say, it's untenable. You can't you can't work for him. You can't win there. Because I mean, there's if you read the story, I can't remember who wrote it was an arnovitz that wrote the Phoenix piece that he's to burst in at halftime in like yell at Grant Hill right in front of Alvin gentry when Jerry was the coach. And so it's really bad down there. But Watson runs in AAU program in LA. So he knows where all the recruits are, right. And that to me is half. The battle is getting you know is getting Zion. Williamson and Cam, reddish and RJ Barrett to come to your school. Sure. Because in the world of college basketball, a lot of these guys are one and done. Right. Well, can also credibly say look I've been there. I can help you get there. Right. Which is the number one question that high school kids ask when you go into their house to recruit whether or not they're all going to the NBA is irrelevant. They all think they're going to the NBA. So I actually Greg don't hate the Earl Watson idea as much as it sounds like you, do I. Although I think it's unlikely I think we're going to get word today that Rick Barnes is coming..

Earl Watson basketball NBA Phoenix Suns Earl Robert server Greg Mufid McGraw Pac John Robert Sarb Texas Tech football Phoenix Rick Barnes Alvin gentry Watson Mason Zion
"black african americans" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Talking to Victor Davis Hanson, author of the national bestseller the case for Trump. As he turned out to be pleasant surprise than you expected. Yeah. I didn't expect that the economy would react so quickly. It was almost as a P release the animal spirits instead of the message of you didn't build that. It's not the time to profit at some point, you may not money your life. It was go out and make you know, be successful and help people to your own success, and that was a psychological methods. We hadn't had in a long time that helped I didn't think we'd be the largest oil producer. How we got three million more barrel oil produce per day in the last two years is partly Trump's encouragement opening Anwar said the believe so I've been very pleasantly supplies, and I haven't seen a David sooner or a nomination put up like Harriet Myers pass the bushes have done them a path. So I think as judicial picks have been better than than almost everybody including some Greg. So I've been really pleased with those I think foreign policy he's got Pompeo now and Bolton idea. Illogically operationally aligned with him when you add bar in the Mexican Justice is finally got a team that he feels comfortable was very competent. So and he's getting I think he's getting a little bit more self defecate story. Humor speeches are a little bit more interesting. I think he's better on the job. And I guess what I'm saying is his record is is pretty good. And he's getting better at what he's doing at a time. When the alternative is that we said earlier is going to be everything from reparation to the new green deal. And so there's going to be even starker choice in two thousand twenty because the two thousand sixteen we had an unknown person. The would be president without any political and military experience with first time in our history versus Hillary Clinton kind of campaign, the not quite a leftist or socialist. She went back and forth. But now, there's no veneer. This is hard-core socialism for two thousand twenty it looks like and Trump is proved that he can do the job. So the choice I think should be much easier for independence and people on the fence this time on. Who do you think poses the greatest threat to his reelection? I would like to use the conventional wisdom and say Joe Biden because he's a centrist. But I wrote an article about that he's not a sober editions. Kennedy. Never was this guy who you know, says to African Americans, you know, put you back in chains fake accent. Then the seventies and take combined and German beat him up. A lot of racists things when he described rock Obama. I think is a clean black African American that could speak normally. And and so he's not a he's not a careful person. He's reckless and he's going to be seventy eight. And I don't if if he's the hope of moderation and the Democratic Party, I think they're going to be in real trouble. Because the alternative to Joe Biden us Bernie Sanders. Elizabeth Warren, these candidates just don't have issues that resonate fifty one percent with electric. What about beta rock? Thinking. Even more feeble candidate isn't the person who in this density politics. At least Elizabeth Warren ticket DNA tests adopted, this nickname, and he's he's enthused with it. But now he's not running against Ted Cruz that left despises who actually was fantastic. Hispanic in Iran is and Beethoven and sort of ten authentic Hispanic now, he's running against Cory Booker Polian, Costco. These are people that are authentically. So card so-called minorities or margin is people don't think that battle things going to work with them. I think they're going to go after him and say, you know, what drop that you're whether you like it or not you're tabu white male candidate. We're not gonna fault. We're not gonna fall for that. So I don't see how he gets to the primary unless he drops at home bagels. Oh, and even then he'll be the problem with Bernie Sanders, and all these guys that they created this identity politics crank in Stein. And now, it's devouring them. Once you go down that line that you judge people by their superficial appearance or. Your race. Or your ethnicity is essential rather than incident to your character? Then that logic applies to you too. If you're a white male. They don't seem to get that they were exempt because they're so progressive, but they're not I just don't see that. They can get through the primary. Do you believe in your book? You mentioned the deep state. You believe it exists. Absolutely. I don't that was one of the criticisms show until but what was the McCabe Rosenstein on elected bureaucrats doing when they were gonna pull the cabinet to remove Don Trump. What was this anonymous op Ed September fifth? The two thousand eighteen whether it's Trump bureaucrat said that were deep within the resistance within the ministration. We're going to be the adults knew. And do we can what was John Brennan saying when he said, I don't think any person should necessarily follow an executive order if they don't agree with it. The president does that's well apart from the emoluments clause trying to get the electors not to follow their constitutional duty after the election, the twenty fifth amendment Logan act, we've been through all of these institutionalized or media driven some of them are political. But a lot of them are parts of people like Brennan and Clapper Komi Pfizer courts. Sally aches, Logan hack, all that stuff. So I think we created the group of people who are so self-righteous that they feel that if they have public support and competent demonic figure than they're entitled to use any means necessary to get rid of it. And that's what they tried to do take away. The fact that Trump won at not one. And there had we would know any they would either be for that behavior behavior in a Clinton administration. They likely would have been rewarded, and I think they thought that was going to be true. And that's why that's why they were so bold. And and doing things that were extra outside the law extra legal and. And without the dossier. If they had not fabricated that fake dossier, and and make that even before the election. We forget that they were leaking today with corn and Michael before the election. And they didn't have that salaciously stuff in that. They would.

Don Trump Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders Trump president Victor Davis Hanson Harriet Myers Hillary Clinton John Brennan Democratic Party Obama Ted Cruz Clinton administration Greg David Kennedy
"black african americans" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Will you please? Report to the office. Delvin was Bradley's cousin men humor. Then they're in boot camp together, they went over to the office where they met the major in charge of their platoon, and he was black and he said this birth certificate detonate, right, racial, right? Not at what I'm telling you. I've been this way for all of my life, and he's been no he'd you. You're gonna sit there and tell me that you guys are negro. What did he do after that? You never had to do anything. He was with the officers all the time. Rally can't say he got special treatment. But it sounds like the officer was moved to see a man who looked as white as Bradley so matter of factly defend being black. Remember this was in nineteen fifty eight in the south during the height of the civil rights movement. Now, the truth is Bradley, and Sarah like most people in these Jackson are mixed race. They got this much white black African Americans German Irish and native American people have been intermarrying for almost two hundred years that black ours. Everybody got along good, but the wave. Nothing to do with anything out of Jackson because you're messing with the black. The one drop rule taken to the absolute extreme in other parts of the country. You might not consider yourself black. If you only have a grandfather or great grandfather whose black, but here being part black, no matter how small the part makes you black. Let me say this the people in Waverly, if your last name would hair you could be as fight as that is right there. But if your last name wreck, okay. They think oh well Jackson black neighborhood. Yeah. And you always hear, you know, that they'll talk to you about the fact that these people have red hair and freckled faces as blamed Beekman who introduced us to Bradley earlier people perceived to be black. We're victims of discrimination in terms, almost as you think of black communities inside of a city, that's predominantly black area. Must be ghetto. People have always seen it that way or historically seen it that way. It's almost a an urban legend except it's not about their planes wife Fabienne in the eighties nineties juvenile probation officer. And I would go in these Jackson looking for kids, but I was always told not to or to not go by myself, a lot of times law enforcement wouldn't go if they were called out there because they had their own law enforcement. You just weren't supposed to do that. Which was completely ridiculous. I I was always treated, right? When I went out there, even if I was chasing somebody's kid the racism in this county started way before FaceTime as a probation officer Waverley was founded before the civil war by people from the south Ohio was a Free State. So they couldn't have slaves, but they took their beliefs with them. Nothing about by counties racial profile before the civil war was particularly unique every county in Ohio in southern Ohio. Anyway, pretty much had the same problems you had prejudice. You had issues. East? Jackson was saddled with double whammy of prejudice race and poverty..

Bradley Jackson officer south Ohio Delvin Waverly Beekman FaceTime Fabienne Waverley Sarah two hundred years
"black african americans" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"For details. Radio where we are wrapping up this program before Tony page comes in at two o'clock. Let's get back to the phones. Bobby on Long Island is next on the fan. I'm Bobby creek. How you doing good, Bobby? What's up? Aren't they got to the over time? Yup. All right. You ever coin toss? Yup. They have to take the ball and their own ten yard line. Okay. Go ninety yards. They deserve to win. Okay. And what do you think of that, you know, like? Seventy five yards is a big difference between ninety seventy five. So even in the regular season seemed like the best, you know, great defensive teams. They're going to the gym. You know, I mean, they're going to win the kickoff. Me. I don't I don't hate it. I just think they want to get it done quicker than that. I would rather see them get it at the twenty five score. If they score give the ball back to the other team if they don't match that score or surpass it. The game's over. That's all. And if they do the game continues for the ten minute regulation. So it would still give depending on how clock management works. A lot of it would depend on the clock. Like that first drive yesterday. The Brady had was eight minutes. So that would left only two minutes for the chiefs to come back. So that's not, you know, people would say, well, that's not overly fair either. Well, you gave up an eight minute drive. You got two minutes. Do something with it. I I never I guess my point is this. I'm never trying to get the perfect. Okay. I can't get the perfect. There's no perfect solution. I'm trying to get the better. Right. Trying to get the better. I'm trying to make sure both offenses. Have a chance with the ball and the best way to do that while keeping the clock. Keeping the game short as I can after the sixty minutes. Those are my two goals. I want both offenses to have a chance to talk to the ball. And I want the game to go fairly quickly. That's what they do in college. And that's why they do it the way they do it. They want both offenses to touch the ball. And they wanted to go quick. So that's why they do what they do in college. I'm not for that. But I respect I respect what they do in college. D in New Jersey is next on the fan. Hey, how you doing good up? Listen, I am unlike that guy earlier, I love what you're on. The world. Go round, brother. I know man. I'm really happy. You know, having a little seasoning. In your in your experience is important. I think I called because I'm a ram San, and I'm gonna talk about times that you've probably the ram vent back during the day, the Roman Gabriel. No, wow. Oh, my go-. I go back away. But I just wanna kinda, you know, share a little bit, you know, in honor of Dr king. I believe that the Rams are team of destiny I believe that the Rams are gonna win. I do believe that it's gonna be payback. Because of the you know, when the patriots feta back in the Super Bowl the last time, we win you know, that was the controversial one. When they had gotten information. They were they were, you know. And I remember that a lot of people don't remember that kinda came out that when they went on Super Bowl. Yeah. Kinda got spy gate. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. So I, but also I just wanted to drop on a few of the people who might not be aware. I love the Rams because as a kid, you know, I was aware of the fact that they were the first team reintegrating, you know. You know, black African Americans weren't allowed to play ball after thirty three. And it was a guy by the name of any Watanabe move from Cleveland. And one of the deals that they taught at that particular time if they wanted to ban possibility players, and they got your kid Washington reintegrated, the NFL nineteen forty six I believe and the dying in Woody strode. You may remember he played the guy that Kirk Douglas sporting black guy, grandma, if you remember that remember that movie don't. Yeah. Anyway, what he started eating play poured the Ramsey. Well, I it also gained parents both black quarterback to win a playoff. All those are reasons that has gone up. Yeah. And then, of course, we're not nameless. Got straight as you know. Like if blackout. Stop. No, there's gonna be reserved for the ram winning a Super Bowl because of what happened back in. There you go. Well, I wish you well on that. Because I think most of New York would be very happy to see the patriots. Not raise the Lombardi trophy again. Kevin in the Bronx. What's up Kevin? I just wanted to say, you know. You know, you get an opportunity to. Core down the field. A touchdown weird. I have no problem with the coin. And all that kind of stuff, you know. And it's just the way the game is played. There you go. It's the way the game that's played because that's the rule they decided on. It's not as if I love the way that people say, you know, that's the way it is as if no one sat in a boardroom one day and decided that was the way it is. That's how they decided to go. They sat there and said this is fair and at the time, by the way, the time the rule came out. It was more fair. Why? Because. The playoffs were routed with teams that were offensively minded and defensively. Minded it wasn't ten to offense. The defense. Like this year's playoff was ten offensive minded teams and two defensive-minded teams. They've changed the rules to favor offense. And that's a big factor in my mind as to why it is now on fair or more on fair than it used to be. Because it wasn't so blatant before that offense. Is easier than it's been and that scoring is higher than it's been. So that's a big part of that Jack on the west side next on the fan hijack. Hi regarding the overtime. I have an idea what the league does not want the games to go much longer than direct luck involved right with the costs. But you know, there are two point causes the first one. So why not keep the rules as they are notorious cross in over time and the team that didn't get the twin 'cause gets it for overtime. Well, because they defer so that's that. Because at each the first toss is not a relevant. It's not really a coin toss. In other words. It's a matter of choosing. Whether you get the ball in the first half of the second half. You're getting the ball. Both teams are getting the ball because whoever gets the ball to start the game kicks off. To start the second half. So it's not the same thing. In other words, you're trying you're trying to put a square peg in a round hole. There are three possessions. First-half second half overtime, two teams three possessions. Somebody's going to get the ball twice in that scenario. Someone's only going to get it once JR in Bronx is next on the fan JR. I up. Statements yesterday doing the regular season. There's all that they have a replay the referees replay. A know they any. But I don't see a in the Super Bowl. The second statement. I wanna make. You guys wasn't doing with the patriots. You. About the overtime. I hear people talking about Brady they don't like them because they like them. Like them because nobody the guy nobody gave up anything. He turned everything. Quarterback any aiming to many key G Gordon Geico. When they went up twenty eight twenty.

Rams patriots Bobby creek Bronx Brady Long Island Tony Kevin chiefs New Jersey Kirk Douglas Dr king Gordon Geico Roman Gabriel Cleveland NFL Watanabe Ramsey
"black african americans" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"black african americans" Discussed on Get Up!

"Ultimately, it was not good. We didn't win enough games didn't deliver. What the number one goal is nasty world champion. We did not get. Welcome back to get up. I'm Diane routine. That's my friend, Marcus spears. Who's in Orlando? Florida right now getting ready for the Citrus Bowl. But Marcus, I wanna talk some NFL with you right now, we knew yesterday that a lot of head coaches got fired. And it seems that the league is under scrutiny for lack of minority coaches. What's your reaction to this? Well. This is this is a never in vain, Diana. That's been going on for a long time. The representation of the league when you look at the players on the field as opposed coaches, especially hey coaches is just proportionate. Now, I am one who's been around football for a long time. If you're not getting a job, then I've always heard the saying that this is a what have you done for me lately business? But if you can't find competent, really good black African American coaches that be head coaches football teams that puzzles me it's a lot of guys out there that are put a lot of time in. I think a lot of these conversations revolve around the fact that you've had a lot of African American coaches in these organizations for a long time that just never get a shot. So that's that's been the case, and it's hard dealing with that in sports because winning is the end all be all in this league. But when you look at some of the tenures look at Wilkes at three and thirteen in the first year, he's fired in Arizona with with. Not such a comprehensible roster. Look at Marvin Lewis, the total opposite who was in cincy for a long time. No playoff wins. And was able to stay there sixteen years. So you look at each individual case by case, but you still as an African American player. And then now what I'm doing this business. You still see the disproportionate representation in the league for African American head coaches, and at some point we know about the Rooney rule, we know all of the things that were implemented. You shouldn't need that rule. You hire qualified people, and it's hard for me to believe that you don't have a lot of African American coaches in NFL that are highly qualified to at least get a shot. And then you make a decision based on what happens on the field point. We hear it all the time in the NFL. What have you done for me lately? You know, and it's a saying, and they apply the players the coaches GM, unfortunately, not to owners, but what's it gonna take for this? Number two increase for us to get more minority head coaches because right now, it's only Anthony Lynn and Mike Tomlin. Look, I wish I had the remedy one of them though, where I think you can start to to kind of change. This narrative is to have a legit I've always questioned because of the Rooney rule dying. And I know a lot of people may not see me out on this. I've always questioned are you bringing in these African American coaches just to do and do Justice to the Rooney rule or are they really come candidates for to become your head coach. Now that is something you can't gauge that is something you can't put a rule in the place saying these guys have to be hey coaches, so that part of it, but qualifications as far as being in the business alone time and having opportunity to be a head coach. It's been disproportionate for a long time. Brought it up before. But there's never been in the time a time of the NFL when thirty percent of the coaches were black coaches and remember seventy percent of those rosters are made up of black players. So you make some good points, Markus. Thanks so much into the Citrus Bowl to take you. It's the first day of twenty nineteenth. So we are looking back at the best moments from twenty eighteen images of the year coming up next. Tomorrow at eight AM, we'll tell you Dax and deliver against Seattle plus David Woody on if the defending Super Bowl champion eagles road will end in Chicago and live coverage from Alabama Clemson did up eighty stern on the ESPN and on the..

NFL Rooney Marcus spears Diana Mike Tomlin Marvin Lewis Florida Wilkes football Orlando Markus GM Anthony Lynn Seattle Dax Chicago ESPN David Woody Arizona
National HIV Testing Day: 1 in 6 people are unaware they're carrying virus

Charlie Parker

03:12 min | 3 years ago

National HIV Testing Day: 1 in 6 people are unaware they're carrying virus

"What's happening news radio twelve hundred who we need to listen w away president taking a victory lap over his first ever supreme court victory pepper fifteen months of legal battles high court voted five four to uphold the president's travel ban reaction from democratic senator chris coons of delaware who happens to sit on the senate judiciary committee supreme court may have ruled at the president's travel ban was technically constitutional but that doesn't mean that it's right or that it reflects america's values well chris it actually does their call the supreme court that's why they have rulings more coming up today national hiv testing day ever been tested for hiv yes how often just once just once how long ago right after i applied for this job kidding it was a while back right kerry yeah was a required test for pregnancy it should be should be required tests i never have really dave yes i have okay good why should you care the cdc says that one in six people don't know they have hiv over one million people are currently living with the disease and since it first surfaced in the early nineteen eighties is killed more than thirty five million people around the world now the good news modern anti retroviral medications can keep people with hiv live for decades according to new research a white gay man in america diagnosed with hiv today at the age of twenty can expect to live as long as any healthy man in the united states so who should get tested cdc recommends everybody between the ages of thirteen and sixty four get tested at least once women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant should also get tested at risk groups men who have sex with men intravenous drug users sex workers and they all or suggestions should be tested every three to six months gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men particularly young black african americans are the ones most seriously affected by hiv young people aged thirteen to twenty four account for an estimated twenty five percent of all new hiv infections in the united states every year almost sixty percent of youth with hiv in the united states sixty percent do not know that they are in ffected is not just a gay persons disease and the day big day for your sunglasses.

President Trump Senator Chris Coons Delaware CDC United States Senate Judiciary Committee America Kerry Dave Ffected Sixty Percent Twenty Five Percent Fifteen Months Six Months