20 Episode results for "Bizet"

Being A Successful Coach Has Nothing To Do With IQ

The Coaches Corner

06:16 min | 4 d ago

Being A Successful Coach Has Nothing To Do With IQ

"In today's episode just wanted to remind you that your success has nothing to do with your iq. I'm really passionate about this. Because when i was out of high school. I honestly thought i was dumb. I finished high school. Go to college and go to. University did roofing framing Worked at a trailer park mowed grass and it went on the oil rigs. And when i thought about starting a business in the seed was planted. Probably like it. When i was twenty three or twenty four hours like a business and everybody laughed at me. You're going to college. What do you know about business. You know anything about sales or marketing or anything. And because i use my hands for the first twenty five years of my life slinging hammers in in in slings and pounding nails and drilling for oil thought. I was down. And if you can imagine i didn't have much self confidence or belief in myself. Now i hate in my life. I hated my life. I was depressed enough to get into entrepreneurship but the first year was a mess. Because i had no confidence. I thought i was tom. I didn't think i was smart. And everybody else. I saw in bizet's a held them on a pedestal man. And when i started getting around other people i started joining. Coach programs started joining masterminds. I started joining workshops. I started flying around and being like. I'm gonna really learn and master this game. I started really mean. I very quickly realized i could have a very intelligent conversation with someone who was earning multiple seven figures and that was unknown to me. It was unknown. I was like i didn't know people. I thought those special people who did that now. The people just like me with the same problems and when i started realizing hey could even help like through conversations. Solve some of the problems. I realized what am not as dumb as i thought it was an be when i've never taken an iq test. But i've spent hours our hours every single day for the last five years developing seven years developing myself mentally and spiritually and physically. And so i think sometimes people get this common a lot man. You're like you're like a marketing business genius or just these comments where people will put someone on a pedestal. And i'm like listen. I'm not i've just spent many hours. Well over ten thousand hours holding my craft and anything. I know now i did not know back then i knew zip zero nothing. I had the courage to invest in coaches and mentors and programs. When i was telling it up last time it was around one hundred fifty thousand dollars invested. I practice what i preach. I love working on myself. I love getting rid of the people who pushed me. But when i realized that my i q has nothing to do with my success but by perseverance persistance my commitment to following through my commitment to banishing perfection. And just being okay with not being perfect by doing instead of overthinking by creating confidence and conviction that hey i can make this happen. Transferring that conference that conviction onto others. When i realized that that's everything it gave me the freedom to let go of my past. And i record is episode because i've had so many conversations with people think of that they're too dumb to or they're not smart enough that it's reserved for someone else so someone special and i'm just so passionate about it. Because they see myself in that. And when i realized i mean out like what i realized was possible just a few days ago i was hanging out with someone. Who's doing four or five million dollars per month. They're human beings they just have another five six eight years in the game. They collect more information knowledge and they have more wisdom member. Knowledge is knowing wisdom is doing. They've done more. They've made more mistakes and in doing so. They became more wise. They weren't born with it. I wasn't born with it. No one's born with it. It's the willingness and courage to move forward and take action. I hope that this that this helps you in some way. Just let you know that man. You'd be amazed at what you're capable of amazed at what you capable amazed at what you're able to do if you just focus on one step one hundred front of the other learn aka knowledge and then do fail fall learn again get back up figured out and you become more wise. You got this. You're capable of absolute anything no matter where your iq scores at or how much education or how great at math or un. Great at math on good obviously english as well. I'm not the world's best linguistic mestre and you don't have to be either at all at all. I'll leave it with that. Www dot lucas dot com. If you're enjoying this podcast in any way shape or form reviewing items tunes you can learn more at how to do that at the website. Www dot dot com and check out all the resources we have on website again as w w dot com as always truly truly appreciate you. Let's make the next few days epic and if you're tuned to this podcast daily then i will talk to you tomorrow.

bizet tom un
Studying Your Sleep | A Conversation With Dak Prescott, Quarterback For the Dallas Cowboys

The Playbook

06:33 min | 11 months ago

Studying Your Sleep | A Conversation With Dak Prescott, Quarterback For the Dallas Cowboys

"Hey, everyone I want to let you know that on Friday July twenty fourth. I'm hosting the first ever two minute drill pitch competition. Everybody gets two minutes to make their pitch and I'll give you three minutes of feedback. That's right. First Places GonNa Win One on one coaching with me. second-place is going to Win Group, coaching, membership and third place is GonNa win a content package from me. Bizet de Meltzer Dot com forward slash pitch for more information to apply and compete. Everyone I got a great episode for you today while I was at the Super Bowl, I got to sit down with the quarterback of the Dallas. Cowboys. That's right Dak Prescott and the two of US discussed the importance of having a routine especially focusing on your sleep, come join me on Friday at eleven. Am Pacific two PM Eastern time for my free training. That's right. You can join me anytime. Texts me nine, four, nine, two, nine, eight to nine, zero, five or email me a David di Meltzer Dot, com or D. MELTZER DOT com forward slash training to register. Join me, it's free. It's me me and Dak coming at you live. This is entrepreneurs the. This Day Meltzer with entrepreneurs, the playbook and I am excited to be here with Dak. Prescott welcome to the playbook because as We, know, My, Business Partners, Warren, Moon and I always say more and have so much in common, but all three of us have one thing in common number one. We're all mama's boys. Right driven by our mothers in. You're your mother's memory as well. But the performance that you have on the field, and off field in your life, as a philanthropist and a player, one of the most key components that warning I have studied that most people don't asleep. Yeah, for sure and you know it's the biggest habit that we all share. We have that in common as well I'm sure it's the most hours that you spend every single day without thinking about it. HOW IMPORTANT NUMBER ONE IS! Is Sleep to you. Yes, sleepy, so important me when you do what I do and your in the NFL. You're always trying to get a competitive edge in me. I'm competitive person I want that edge on the field and off the field and you said it best sleep. Is the best solution. The best answer for any of your problems i. don't care if it's physical pain pain, anxiety stress whatever it is. Is. sleep can help, and there's some that I figured out over the last couple of years working with sleep. Number I'm just seeing this in every every morning when I wake up the differences in my body, and I can always go back and look at my APP, and the sleep number. It tells me it tells me my heart rate. It tells me how long ago was how how much of the night I was? Was Restless and so I I study my my my my eating regimen, the same way and my weight lifting the same way, so what would not with my sleep? One is going to help me improve, and being my best is amazing Warren Plate, so he's forty four, and I asked him when I turned forty. Four out of that I'm like how did you do that? I mean it's a rough game at your ass. and. He said because of recovery goes gave. Don't you have asleep coach? Utah I traveled two hundred a year around the world. Speak Coach and do this stuff and he goes. Don't don't sleep coach. I said unheard of asleep coach. First thing she said to me. What's your bed like I said Oh. You have this old bed that I've had for years and kind of way where we you drive like Ferraris and porsches in all. He spent all his money on her car and the biggest thing. How would you spend if you spend eight hours a day and a car? Would you spend that on a bed? And so then? She's the one that recommended sleep number to me as well. What is it though you know you've had personal? Challenges Physical Challenges, and then anyone that has the stress of. Starting quarterback in the NFL working for Jerry Jones. Both Jerry and Steve's. Those guys are friends of mine so I know that they like to win. Just put it that way. What do you think some of the key components are to to taking all that away and having that pure sleep where you're connected consciously subconsciously and unconsciously to all that inspiration that you're gonNA need for the next day to have a positive attitude. You ask him during the sleep. Does I think variables and that's what I love sleepnumber about it because he gives me those answers, it gives me the solution that lets me know my heart ready to let me know how long I was restless. lets me know how how long I laid in bed before I fell asleep. All those things are great components. They can help you. Improve Your sleep on as I, said I'll follow my workout regimen. Follow my my eating regimen down to the to the to the green. I guess you can say so. I WANNA do the same with my sleep, and for me I've got the coup heated the cohesion mattress, and there's nothing better than that I. Like to Sleep Dark Room. No TV's anything like that. Really cold Emma my bed, his the best. Best and thankful for sleeping on rhapsody for that, but as well as just getting getting to be here in Miami Yeah when you're on the road. Do you feel the difference in their disappointed I? Mean one of the big components of some hotels is. They have like heavenly better. Whatever I find like the only negative of having that bad is that when I travel? I can totally see a difference between my sleep. It's too bad things about being in Miami this week is I'm not planning the game and I'm not sleeping in my bed. With that being said I definitely can tell. There's a big difference. Road Games Games. Just anytime away from a bed, I'll spink sleepnumber. gave me bender and training camp and I can tell you how vital that was just in that period I mean that's one of the most stressful of the season and I think we would sleep number no matter when it was I was able to go in there and get and get my sleep that I need able to track it. So I'm a great great quick last question. What's the best pieces sleep? Advice that you can get. Your body's like your body is like a computer. Right and one computer needs sleep. It just goes off so for me it'd be. Don't fight that. Listen to your body. If you're tired whether it's ten minutes whether it's two hours whether it's the eight hours that you need at night, listen to your body. Get to sleep. We're all trying to have a competitive edge and as competitive edge. I don't care to tell everybody, but I'm here was sleep number so I will so get to sleep and get it in a sleep number bed. You hear it right here. He is a superstar on the field off spilled and in the sleep number bed. Of course, this is my man dot Prescott with Dave meltzer entrepreneurs the playbook. Hey, podcast, listeners, thank. Thank you for listening is always to today's episode. I. Know You've been enjoying the road revenue episodes. They are downloading at record paces, and I'm so grateful for you joining me not only on the podcast, but live every Friday at eleven pm Pacific Time Two PM Eastern make sure you email me at David at D. Meltzer, dot, com, or text me at nine, four, nine, two, nine, two, nine five. Thank you so much.

Dak Prescott David di Meltzer Dot Dave meltzer NFL D. MELTZER DOT Jerry Jones Win Group US Miami dot Prescott Bizet Dallas Warren Plate Prescott Utah Warren
84% Compatible by Jarod K. Anderson - Planet Raconteur podcasts

Planet Raconteur

04:24 min | 5 months ago

84% Compatible by Jarod K. Anderson - Planet Raconteur podcasts

"You heard you could save big when you bundle home and auto with progressive so you went online to check it out but then you saw a link for survey about which type of brag you are and now you're on question. Seventeen barely scratching the surface of your bread identity. You always thought of yourself as a ocean but are you actually more of a pumpernickel. Yes they said it was easy to save money bundling with progressive but they forgot about the rest of the internet progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discount not available in all states or situations. This is eighty four percent compatible. By jared k anderson on the gap between ted's front teeth opened onto a solar system buzzing with civilizations of light and power every once in a while it would glint and draw the eye of becky cooley the shy paralegal with the eighty four percent compatibility rating from the dating site. Ted found that trying to laugh behind. His hands was kind of awkward trying to tilt his head down while we spoke was awkward to. He lost dates to awkwardness into a bushy moustache. He had used a curtain his upper lip for a few weeks in june. So ted tried to talk with becky head on and her inevitable questions following questions about the twinkle between his teeth the sense of life than hope and industry in it ted felt his cheeks ears getting hot but he did his best not to sound embarrassed. He answered becky's questions. He even did his best to answer the question she would think of later. He said it's a solar system. It's been there ever since my adult teeth came in. I don't know if it's doorway or the whole system is actually bear in my mouth. I don't know if it will live on after i die. I'm not sure if the people there know about me or ever tried to communicate and yes the government knows all about. Becky went still and ted worried that it might have been rude of him to anticipate her future questions. The specter of awkwardness grew like an afternoon shadow. Baqi didn't quite smile as she pushed her long brown hair behind her left. Ear inn tilted her head. They're above her little gold earring nestled in the folds of her ear. Ted could just see a bluish glow in that glow was somehow the force of gravity held in balance amongst the of stars and planets and the countless souls. That spun along with them. ted smiled. He smiled with the light of three hundred billion stars. Becky smile back. The end for the ones who know a little late is always too late at that. The clock doesn't staff just because you're missing. Grainger offer supplies and solutions for every industry and our keep stock inventory management solutions help ensure you have the right stuff in the right place at exactly. The right time bizet grainger dot com slash keep stock to learn more greater for the ones who get it done. What do you wanna doctor. I'll let y'all wanna data not doll at the data. We could switch to progressive at all. We could switch to progressive mccaw. We could saw enough to buy some demographics doll and get some of the money we you saw no at all. These days is normal and everything is weird but you could still save big when you switch to progressive. It might just be the most normal thing you go to progressive dot com trump's billions.

ted jared k anderson becky cooley becky Ted Baqi Becky bizet grainger Grainger government mccaw
Michaela Juric Is The Bitcoin Babe

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

21:52 min | 2 years ago

Michaela Juric Is The Bitcoin Babe

"The show is proudly sponsored by tried to call dot com. The leaders in checklist based trading strategy. Yes, that's exactly how it sounds all teach you a literal checklist. So you can tick off autumns and be decisive very quickly. Get across to try to Cobb dot com, with as a bunch of free content their feud have a look at. And of course, if you're interested in having me, come to your city, click and register for the live events, coming up and feeling fast have a great day. Visit try to call dot com now. Hello, and welcome to the traffic. Crypto show today we a returning guest in Michaela Djuric. She is the founder end the bitcoin by. It's a pleasure to have you on the show again. Dank you very much for having me again. No problem. Look, as you know, we doing women's week here at tried to call and looking to speak to a lot more women that are in the space and trying to help the ladies understand a little bit more about the spice and how they can actually become more involved. Now you go quite an interesting story, going back quite a number of years. Do you want to tell us? How you go into bitcoin space. I yes, it's very interesting story. So I guess the tail DR of it was, I was going through a bit of a bad place in my life and got really depressed and actually turned to bitcoin to use it to poach drugs off than the so guard to ultimately Arvanitis commit suicide, obviously, that didn't come to fruition. I got the drugs in the drugs, ended up being fake. So that's, that's how I'm he in house, literally by chance of his leaves real a, a different place. Now. Net. So drugs ended up being fight when through a bit of therapy center at cetera ended up coming back online a few months later because syrupy those country was marginally working hours, just depressed. Again, it was, like, screw it. At least now, I know where to buy my jokes from next time when back on because I had a few bits of bitcoin leftover for my laws prejudices. Yeah. Logged on and from that point, but richly purchase a big bitcoin was fifty dollars H and then from there, it went up, and it was sitting around twelve hundred dollars age to this bitcoin. I'd like photo is a photos at full bitcoins lift, I, which was like two hundred bucks, which was then obviously, with four thousand eight hundred dollars. So as someone that was really sort of struggling with mental health issues not working on just living day by day United, sibling paid assembling pay to have overnight night hundred dollars appeal that was crazy. So from there, I was like, well. How did that happen? So you start getting into my research. What is bitcoin? How does it work? Why did the process go up it can't going up real? I get rich. Then for magic just sort of got into into day trading and completely the whole depressions, thing just fell into the back of my mind and he so bitcoin saved your life awful. They're saying, yeah, but that's what the story ahead and had the daytime of a before, but would glad that you filed we glad that you're here with us. When was that, that was in twenty th attain raw and what was the essence behind starting bitcoin by? Well, let me story actually originally when I started bitcoin is actually gonna started as a webcam service. So back in the day, they used to have on read it, it was. Some something it was like girls would priced up photos, and then guys would either say, yes, or Nouri than it's not tipping him in bitcoin Eudes, right money and czar was disliked. I've come from a adult entertainment industry backgrounds. And I was just like, oh, this could work really well. And I had a few friends that were looking to make a bit of money. I was ultimately wanted to become dislike virtual, pimp under the name bitcoin. It didn't it didn't end up eventuated but I had the name sort of save everything registered in all these places, anyway aren't getting caught up in a Ponzi. It was one of those ones where it was like. Oh, you know, we'll give you one percent day you invest this much. Sorry answer there. I ended up making a whole bunch of people because mostly based in the states, and we were discussing the, the massive difference between purchasing the price difference in purchasing bitcoin in America to a stray Elliott. Because back then you were looking at a spreads of like seven to fourteen percent. So it was just like, well how about this? You guys buy bitcoin for mayor. They're all liquidated on the local bitcoins market over here. And then I'll send the money back to you. Keep by Moody's Cape going around in circles like that. How does he profit? It'll be fantastic. So that's how it started. So ended up using it was like a one vertigo bitcoin by registered on might as well just run with it. So Chuck, if you all partners on the Facebook page Malek, hey, you like book of me by some big on. Then that's how it kind of came about all these people that I knew from Mary. They dropped off the United went and had their lives families whatever, and I just kept running with it found my supplies. And I got into it, we'll that way and five years later and still. Well, there you go. That's the way that you brought your own. I guess female touch to the whole thing. I mean you've you've used what you've got to basically attract your clientele. And then you've delivered with a good business. What will I mean? I can understand the differentiation the spreads in wad. That would have been profitable how much what difficult is it? These days. Look, I mean this certainly a bit of spread between the markets. He in the markets are disease. But I think once you really start looking into how much cost you to actually send that money or the sees that knows where it's a lot harder to do now near the banks have gotten onto new coin. Is it really restricted that financial market? But nowadays, it's actually pretty good. I don't think you really say anything over that two to three percent mock like on a bad day in, like the destroying exchanges compared to the ones that are essays amid how does have Jill Bizet had to sort of evolved to remain profitable effectively, for those who don't know, your services, basically brokerage, why people come to you and I wanna buy X, and then you go source for the best price. And you'd think is it more or less? How you would. Yeah. Pretty much. So obviously just to make things clean up. I have a set right. And then, whatever it costs may on the backhand been. Is sort of way that cost. So it's pretty much at least that way it, and that's where I think it gets a bit confusing for a lot of beginning. They come on the exchange books in it's like all these different rights and everything else in, you don't actually know what you're getting half time. So. A lease with using a brokerage service like mine. It's very similar to our off. Cana. The price you say, is what you get. So this, are you don't have to worry about face charges. You know, different order books changing or does not being filled you know what you're going to get an hey, gonna get an he's a question. What's been your biggest order to dight? Oh, gosh. A buying or selling only the one who okay. Boy. I'd say around two hundred fifteen thousand I was that during the peak of the book. Yes, it was. Oh, yeah. On our and our is couple. Sorry. Vividly too, because they will behind the bitcoin a drone on the mortgage to buy the bitcoin to invest in all coin. Yeah. Yeah. I know. I was like, oh, I feel for the now like, I honestly don't know now. Now. Oh, gosh. I would. Yeah. Feel is create people as always. The thing you'll ever invest in his understanding and education. So let that be a lesson to everybody else. So that aren't full into the same hall. And course you've been raveled quite some time and because you aren't attractive woman because the way you market yourself how you found the, the entry into this marketplace. I mean, you there's a certain way you do things and you are running a business. And that's what you hit a do. But if you come up a gang, some pretty big hurdles in the space living. Living. I have an probably like, I think people have, like a certain assumption of what sort of hurdles I might face. I think the Merced interesting one, I guess, biz in twenty fifteen on this is very early on in the space. I was trying to gain crypt, our stock bitcoin. So I'd have trading stocks to run the business of the better. So a friend of mine at the time, ended up putting me on to Batee. See BTC lending club and was pretty much like one of those pizza p lending programs. Work great in theory. But unfortunately they ended up dying off something about umbrella, Tori. You'll learn shocking. In the end, it didn't work out for them it. My help me get my business off the ground, which was great. Obviously, the whole spiel is you'd put up a line in you'd site on a this amount. This is what I'm gonna use it for you pretty much sell yourself inside. This is what I'm gonna do it either invest or darn. Now, one of the biggest hurdles I faced with that was painful not believing. I was a real person because I was an attractive woman. I would go on because apparently this website had problems in the past these attractive women coming out, signing up wanting a couple of hundred dollars here and there. The coin that ended up being some unite Nigerian scam run off with the bitcoin. You never see it again. So when I had sort of very little knowledge of that. So when I came on asking the like, you know, ten twenty thousand bowl arns with bitcoin, maybe we're very cautious about that which was fair enough, but I daren't the against the attacking or the scrupulousness of, of the situation, I didn't expect it to go that far down the line. It got to the point where I was having Bank employees who were apart of this light grew community, searching me up in their white banking, data bases, and posting up my personal information on and saying his wish she leaves someone go verify that she's real. And it was why thankfully, no unsure up. Well. Well, that mean that's that was the kind of stuff hard was dealing with back then. And it was just massive like I wouldn't say his cyberbullying, would be the way it was just this group of trio full papal that just went out at constantly, I just en-, even when I prove myself over and over and over again, they just kept going at it going at it going at it all because I was a female, and, like obviously United sticks in Stein's and became not launched my business. And when it was time to say goodbye, I said, goodbye and said. Living in that Facebook, cesspool grit. We got going over there, and we'll, there's plenty of those, and I mean, have you seen a change as we've come through two thousand seventeen bull run into two thousand eighteen bear now, seeing two thousand nine hundred have you seen more women become involved? I throw brokerage and also within the groups and a used starting to notice an uneven crease in participation. In my brokerage service. Yes. I'm seeing a lot more women come through there mainly because I've said this in the past, I think women are more inclined to deal with all the women because it's sort of like that trust aspect there. But in terms of in the community is a hall, I, I haven't seen much of a change, and I, I think that some it's, it's hard to say because I think that's just a the dynamic, and it's I think a lot of mass signs, those kinds of subjects, they've never really been women dominated subjects are. No, there's like a massive push to, to get women into it. But at this point in time I just I daren't say the benefit of what bringing more women into the space will give. And that's something that I've sort of. Been really confused about sort of battle with within myself because when I first came into the space, I was quite young was quite impressionable. And so I had like a few female mental who like all yet, go do these interviews with these news outlets, and we can market you as a new face for women in bitcoin, and everything else. And I was just like, yeah, let me be on a news article 'cause I'd never been on one of those before I felt special. And then it was sort of after that nervous to start Hannam at why am I doing this? Why, why I'm on this face a women bitcoin. They want me to be. But why like can I didn't understand the meaning behind that I guess I still don't really? We'll visit number of them look from Hewlett -gistically point of view from point. I mean, if we can, if we've got what fifty million bitcoin accounts right now. We'll crypto accounts. Yeah, that's such a small penetration into the greater investment community. Now if on a five to seven percent of those women, we can maybe we can get to eighty five million by just thinking to the women in our lives. You know, the men's big to their wives, the daughters sisters. They're all that sorta stuff if we can get more participation. We can affectively double the size of the mock up just by including obey more inclusive. I think one of the things that women do struggle with Doucet still in groups is the they'll put up a photo of a, you know, a very skimpily dressed woman to get attention to then get their message across which, you know, if all was going into a group that was a picture of a man in his, you know, in some, I don't know, something strange like a Jason or something like that. I'd be like, oh, okay. This is a big confronting. I'm not quite sure that I want to be involved with this. It would put me off. So I think it's about if we can bring more women in we can increase the market cap, an of course, look the fifty percent of the population. Why would not help build? Oh, one thing, I've sort of been curious to Nari as that. You say, oh yet so far, the five to seven percent of the thing is women, like those, they've been almost the same stats in the last five years that I've actually been in the market. Would the same thing was seven percent that recording for years ago, which was when our our visa that's been on starting bitcoin by because I looked into that. I've mytalk at Margaret kind of eight oh, well money, three percent of the market's men fantastic. There will Giardi the gonna like boobs unless they guy will sorry. But then I also think it really depends on way, getting you'll sources from because if you go into, like Facebook is like a whole bunch of women in crypto groups now, noon. And I think if you went into those in started show, Vang them will, then, of course, it's gonna come out and say, oh, yes, the, the market cap of women is this ninety one percent of women seven percent, men, of course because that's what you've exposed that survey to the. It's a lot bigger. I wouldn't say it's fifty fifty but I'd say it's sold certainly a lot bigger than seven percent. I just looking at the wrong in the wrong areas to get our information and possibly as well that, you know, a lot of about a bunch of group, some of the best tribes of got a women now said that very publicly on a stage of five hundred men on a continue to say, you know, women tend to make better tribes, I've experienced that I've lost eight years teaching people, but I think as willing to often, I know these women are in these groups, but they they sit back bit. I just read an and they're observant, and I think that you know what are the foot she? But you know what it would've makes you happy and gets you through the day. But I'd love to see more participation and more more involvement because it's on I must admit there is a lot of the maturity still in a lot of these groups, and let's be honest. You know, run by groups. It's facebook. Groups could grips slack groups. It's Twitter and all that sort of stuff, and it is fairly mild dominated. These groups and it can come out and be quite immature and not something that we want to have at that, if, if we want to have a big market, capitalisation. We want to have more people coming into the spice we need some mature money. And if they kind of these groups, and they see these silly posts bitching, and moaning and carrying on. I'm not saying that's what goes on all the time, not go. But if they if they do come into the tunnel, I it's like a right. Well, let's check out this funny incident money, and they kinda go. Ooh, okay, yeah, this is this is just silly. I'm getting all this, if that wrong closes up at the wrong time, it might cost them on the opportunity. There lost extra maturity would be really pretty welcome. Absolutely. And I think the other thing is well, as it's, it's almost not our K to be wrong in our in these is I could soon as you say something wrong. It's like your handed on with the force of a million trawls. And I think as a as a woman edge probably a lot worse with whether or not, that's maybe because we're bit more emotionally susceptive. Able kinda thing. But it it probably is a lot worse because it's are we, you say to a man like in all you got that trading advice wrong go back to the kitchen kind of thing. Okay. So it's the same all silly sexist things crepe in. But look at the end of the day, the only way we're going to have changes by strong women making change and strong men that believe in them being in the space and we'll set up and go, hey, this is not this is not cool. You shouldn't do this and collectively. They can make it better. We just need the involvement. What would you say to anyone who's, who's sitting on the sideline and considering getting into the spice for their Bates, you know, work in the spice, because we short on blockchain, developers, or whether allegis wanna get it in stop buying some bitcoin. Crypto currencies. Go to blockchain, inferred. And if you look up all the transactions there is nothing that is transactions made by men and transactions made by women. You can't actually tell what gender both is making a transaction. Don't worry about it. I just think it should meddle border between your legs. If you can do a job. Great do it couldn't agree more. A thing is spot on. And look, we'll leave it on that. I mean he just that little point, I wanted to get that one across. He said it very powerfully will done and what do people find more information about you? If people wanna get in the spice learn more about what you're doing. They can go to WWW dot bitcoin dash paved or com or you can check me out on social media Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at bitcoin bay excellent will it's been absolute pleasure. Toguchi again Michaela good luck with everything going forward. I really appreciate your time and guys hugging enjoyed that show speech against sing Boston. Now. This show is probably sponsored by try to call dot com. The leaders in checklist by st- trading strategy. Yes. That's exactly how it sounds all teach you literal checklist that you can take off autumns and be decisive. Very quickly. Get across the try to Cobb dot com. With is a bunch of free content. Feud have gotten. Of course, if you're interested in having may come to your city, click and register for the live events, coming up and feeling fast have a great day. Try to call dot com now.

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Interview with Marc Elliott, CEO & Co-Founder of GoMaterials

The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

23:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Marc Elliott, CEO & Co-Founder of GoMaterials

"It's robert thank you. Beardon david anderson with the commercial launch. Gamers podcast twenty something life to deliver some mazing business. Concept accomplish leaders to bring you value skill. Your business yourself. We hope you really enjoy the show. I encourage you to share with your network. So they can subscribe can expand these messages. We're also super excited to be supported by to ruin sponsors few tired of measuring property site week on off on fully automates measurements. You can folks and sales think measurements think saved me. The other sponsor is company. Come who make it dead. Simple to communicate document and problem. Solve with guys in the field macho where you are. Company cam rings documentation communication and liability protection together. One simple easy to use our view on your entire team company com is the only app every landscaper needs chicken out rubber clinkenbeard with a commercial landscapers. Podcast i'm really excited to be joined today by. Mark elliott mark is the ceo and co founder for materials marches on a monster construction company for roughly ten years. So mark some mortar. Biota your background please. so i started landscaping when house. Actually twelve years old. My father never provide me any money except for essentials than i wanted to have spent money in said find a job. I hustled. My way to get a job at a at a local business that was owned by my father. My friend's father. I'm kinda fell in love with it from then and i remember him asking me what he wanted to do when you're older and they don't want to win a landscape business. Oh about four years. After that i opened a landscape business with the with my older brother and He at the time he never he graduated high school and he helped me run the business while i was studying at university working fulltime gourmet degree. And then just continued with that coming out of school and by the time i graduated or company at had about twenty five thirty employees So it was. It was a good sized business for new grad. Be owning and i worked there for three years fulltime prior prior to leaving school and our company within those three years ended up growing from probably the thirty employees about sixty and as we started grow. We started getting bigger jobs. And that's where. I realized the headache of of sourcing materials. Because you're doing small jobs your local garden center and kind of picking up but On big jobs you need to be you need to be competitive and you need to find the materials at the right price and give them to the job in a timely fashion execute so when they started seeing that Problem you you obviously want to create a solution for it. And i kind of wanted to get out of the landscape business just because of the scale ability of it. I wanted to be in business. That can be a scaled way more quickly An and with a little east So i met mike and in in university and I approached them about wanting to start a business together. I just i just found the most very smart very good people and and your reacted both great. Must one of the things. I encourage as a coach coaches to faint. People aren't as smart or smarter than you so so. We launched company based is based in montreal also. The business is still running today. We had brought in a partner as well as when i graduated a university so we were three people running the business. I basically sold back. My shares of the company and with those funds go materials. And they're still running today in today. They're probably they're probably one hundred fifty two hundred employees. Yeah all all landscape construction. We did have a maintenance division that the they did sell off when i left the business and then and they kept kept the landscape. Construction in really grew that out. And then you i mean shaming do you close in june. The winter do snow clearance with the so we did And they still do today. Commercial and an industrial snow removal. There's also residential but it's kind of a different ballgame. I'm in terms of the timing when you need to get it done. So we really focus on commercial industrial Bigger contracts and a lot more value for the customer. Because if your job not being done properly. There's a cost. The company on if employees get injured walking the parking lot slipping on ice and stuff like that so we really folks on commercial industrial. And that's winter. Yeah i'm example. I mean congrats for i mean to be at school or college to grow the company that size nasa tremendous experience. You you must have. You must have gone through some real challenges with growing the company and not really having a great deal of experience. And how did you. How did you figure for me through that The best thing is you just have mentors and coaches. So when i was running a landscape business. I mean our new partner kate who came in and brought a lot of value. I there him and his family and had experience building a building a really really big business. They probably built the one hundred million dollar business And then when they got out of that he was looking for something else to do. He added a lot of value but before he came in. I had my My father was one of the great mentor to myself. And then also One of my friend's fathers would also mentor me a lot so i would uh i would meet with him probably four five times a year and we just grabbed coffee in disgust challenges. I was going through at the time and in landscaping really the biggest challenge to scale. This is your employees. And i think everyone goes through this game. Challenges skilled labor They're hard to find. You gotta pay them well and you've got to treat them right to keep them. Keep them in coming back in two important things areas surrounding yourself with coaches or mentors. I find that myself worth grammarians company. I felt as i needed struggled with financial park so early. Only brought on a fractional. Cfo but in the to have those people around to help you scale up your business. And then I think with You know employees. I hear that. Every single time. I go and meet with a company that they're challenged with employees. Love them rely too heavily on the each to be program you here but the challenge is nowhere. Companies are suddenly now beginning to grow again after couvert still not keen on leaving the home and so effectively employee's market. They're demanding wherever they want to do. So i can definitely relate to their. I see technology beginning to affect industries especially the degree in industry. You must see it from a different perspective these days so in the green green industry. If you wanna go focus specifically on the growers. I think the technology that start you start seeing searching the lot more. Growers really focused on inventory tracking inventories properly. And i think that's a huge piece to the puzzle because it's a communication tool. That's going to free up time now. The way it works. Is you have their catalog. You call them in its cage. You have the stock. Let me go check out on the field. It's a huge waste of time for for these nurseries so to me. The technology that is kind of getting focused on a needs to be focused on on the nursery side is the inventory management and keeping that up to date so it's a communication tool for their customers and the customers don't need to constantly hassle them Checking on stock and everything like that. I think on the contractor side. You see a big push for project management softwares to help keep them organized so that they can execute their jobs on time ensure that the levers ready materials already on site on time and i mean from from our front will. We're really trying to do in. Our sintus is just aggregate. Everything for these guys. So what we're trying to do is all that data all that information from all the suppliers where we know who has what and where. We're the best. we're the best. Nursery is to go to the contractor so we can get him as material on time and where we're pushing really in the future is on that aggregate inside where we get so many requests in every single bay for boats so we have a good eye on what the market is demanding or is going to be is going to demand in the next year for plant material so we want to have an eye on that as well as an eye on inventory so we are telling rowers will. Hey there's gonna be a big push for this in the next year in. There's not enough supply in the market. Maybe you should start growing this and pushing recommendation star growers. So that they're ready. I really think on the green industry. It's the inventory side of things. That's that's that's killing everything right now. It's breaking communication and it's causing delays everywhere. Now i would agree with that communication. Seventy something i struggled with with my companies that you know we would need law in a small materials all through the valley but there was no according to the approach to it ended out with you know. We were already short labor berber sending all these labors striving rent the valley to try and find his petito. Just complete time suck But you talk to one thing that i do think because of technology there's so much data becoming available and you mentioned You know i could should know. States are a lot of people. Just don't have that companies. Have that capability at her. You know. I suppose educating them on how to use that data you're talking in terms of our contractors. Yeah so basically. It's it's us utilizing the data for them. I mean we try in things as much as possible for people So we have the data and it's like they tend to quote. We know that it's could be going out in in some point in time We try and educate them to try and let us know soon as possible so we can secure that material for them but in terms of contractors if they want to utilize the data themselves. I mean it's it's really building up database yourself which we have a fulltime team doing that. So i'm not sure that contractors resources for Might recommendation would be to find a company that's as as reputable and as on top of their game as us you know or you haven't in house buyer. That's really on top of his game to help find those materials and We like said we see that to see guys. They have the jobber day before they need a bunch of material and they're sending is out driving around looking for it and eric. They're calling us and asking where they can find it so they can send their guys to go get it. But you're right. It's your labor should be on the job not driving around you. You can pay someone to drive around but a skilled labor needs to be executing for the company how one of the challenges i always used to see. Is that almost like the landscape. Architects are almost on a different planet. You know there. Dave maybe not in touch with what's going on the field so here they are designing all these nice clients and luke grin. People program should win. Ashley comes down. The pipeline against bid on in our love. Mchugh might not be there. And just how do you close. I got any expediency. I think there needs to be a communication piece where when contractors putting together his plans and you know you can build this into. I would say A lot of them use What's the design software the early popular. One i don't know why i'm drawing. Yeah how many of insure your honest. I forget this Communication of cad. Or yeah exactly. There's a lot of us the autocad and then they have their sketch up. And there's a design something you know when they're putting their plants and they're putting the specs it would be nice that these software say. Hey this is probably be available or is really hard to find so it sets. Expectations and architects have these crazy expectations. And you know we see louis come into and do our software for quoting and right away. Our sales maggots A notification and. He's got a call the contractor and say hey is probably won't be available but the contractor to is is worried when he's getting the job to offer substitutions because it could affect his opportunity on getting that job so he just bizet as is and pretends like everything's nice and dandy and then when it comes down to executing and getting the job done then you're asking the architect for substitutions and that delays the job because the architects. We'll no i think it's out there. Go find it So now you've got to spend another couple days trying to find it rather than actually getting material on site. So i think if the communication is wait wait earlier in the process and the expectations for the architects are set. They can kind of realized that. Maybe i should go with something a little a little less Little as large or some material that actually grows in this region. Like i've had. We've had projects in florida where they're trying to source material that grows in in northern new york. And you know. These guys asked the by this material and tom look. You're gonna get ten thousand dollars shipping in. It probably won't survive when you plant it. So i wouldn't warranty this job if i was you. I'm i think the expectation indications needs to be set from the beginning and not gonna help execute jobs at a faster rate now more than ever with the shortages that are coming in. I mean architects obviously are communicating with their contractors at the execution of the job. But they just need to be more aware right now until that technology exists that What's happening in the industry. And she a playing you this these huge shortages that you're seeing contractors are probably already put the pricing and win the bid two jobs so you know. Initially they were worried about our. I'm going to go in and be of my suppliers and try and get the best pricing but no the face with. I can't even find this star for him having to ship in from two states over however you see not play what we try and have been trying to do in the last little while is Either stuff that under job. Not everything is going to be. Shorted out so on the stuff. That's not shorted. We'll try and bring down the price on those where the stuff that's going to cost him more. It kind of offsets the overall budget the job but it does happen where he kinda completely get screwed on the job so then it's just trying to communicate with the architect during spector's that hey this the price we set for you for this material just no longer available. We either got to sub the material to to to get the price in Or sometimes the the contractors have to eat the bullet to which which really really sucks for them. Our whole goal for our contractors to as we understand their they're highly stressed and they got him either budgets so we push hard to do that for them but there is. There's been a couple of times where it's been a really really tough right. Yeah now challenging so your company now you know you you find it will materials. You're sourcing landscape tito man. They saw east coast thrown into the mid west. You just mentioned texas before this got. I've been used to dealing with you. Know expose brokers and more of a state basis occasionally regional basis but. Tell me a little bit more. Your company is making a difference and some of the benefits for contractors that you deal with so the like i guess we are similar to broker in the sense that they're sourcing material and putting a markup on it the way we like to work the number in the biggest differentiator for instance that we've got kind of technology in the back end. Help a source of much more efficiently and we're also going nationwide and if nation cross north america so from a volume basis doing a lot more volume on we can work off a lot smaller margin so often even if contractors having in-house buyer were able to get the material cheaper if not at the same price than what they're paying someone eighty thousand dollars a year to do so. That's where we kind of set ourselves apart. Is that even with the vendors we work with often times we. We work on a A transaction fee commission so even if the contractor is going direct generally getting the same price as we do. So that's where we differentiate is on the technology side and being able to price yourselves competitively with those guys that are sourcing big jobs and then being able to offer that service to them somewhere they don't worry about it they tell us what materially need when they need it on site and i would say give ninety five percent of the time we're able to execute and if we're not able to get their day they are like there's a communication process in between on to make sure that they're well organized. They're not scrape took off to crooked by that software element. I mean i. I've seen challenges or companies. Still right there. In the list of plants in need may be still using facts sending it through. I'm shiva you've streamlined. That whole process. So what we have now is. We've built in ho cr technology so we really want to change the process for the contractors as you know that the industry is is usually a bit late. Adopting technology and our whole goal is. These guys are crazy busy. They don't want to sit there and type something into system and redo the work. They've already done. Generally they have a list from the architect And it's already on the plans or if they wanna write it up a hand whatever. it is. Submit that list onto our website. We've built in honiara. Technology that reads the list a matches up material with what's already in our database. We have a team that just quickly checks to make sure everything matches up so we can process list but without any errors and then once that comes through than the bidding starts so we have a system that will match up certain vendors those items and then sometimes things don't match up because it's not available. So then we have a team that will come in offer substitutions and just review the list before it's getting sent So the estimate team does. That's we're trying to standardize and automate things with technology as much as possible. Be able to take on his much volumes possible but we don't want to change the process of the contract already doing because at the end of the day. It's a simple process for him. He sends his list wholesale nursery. And they'll send them back a quote but generally are going to be more competitive than what he's getting from his wholesale nursery israel to source it from many locations across the us at a much more much more efficient way or what type of Turnaround someday submits list won't be an average if they wanna listen. They want pricing back into generally for eight hours. At this point we're getting in I dunno to hundreds of listen. Hey it's your view the fluids coming in so generally it's forty eight hours promises to get back bracing to him and not just for the teams checking items offering any substitution Order generally like to say three to four days we want to turn around three to four days it all depends on the size of the order but the generally three to four days we can turn around orders and jumping back to touch sean. We'll wrap up here charlotte batum. It takes us. You know some of the challenges. We always have gone through some some where the challenges. But what you finding in the market right now will basically Frost killed a lot of things off. Especially the smaller plotted material. The cold hardy stuff is still still located about shocked a bit but a caused basically 'cause shortage in shortages probably across the nation. Right now that has any similar material to texas so From what i heard. There's about thirty to fifty truckloads a week just coming from florida into texas. Which is one reason. That's a lot stuff. Yeah we've we've shipped a bunch of lawyers and we actually kind of shoot yourself in the foot because you're sending out lodestar customers in texas on to help them. But then when we come around in need to order something in florida the materials not there because we shifted output either way it would have gone out because people need need that material but all ready for example florida. The there was a shortage of material. This dates back pre covid. So pre covid. The demand for material has been going up and up and up on the supply has not been going up accordingly A lot of farmers you know. They're they're generational businesses so either their kids get into or they sell it off. An expanding line and a lot of regions is not even Not even economically feasible. Because you're better off selling that land to developer that wants book condos So capitalism in economics doesn't really benefit a lot of these nurseries so the supply is dwindling. It's not really going up in a certain direction. Then we added cova that hit and a lot of these manufacturers. The guys that do the starting material had to close down. They went on back on a lot of their stuff. So guys that actually are in business and wanting to supply finished goods. One gallons of the three gallons and all that stuff on can't get material. There's some materials in florida very ginger. Three years ago was no problem to find now even define fifty sixty pieces. You're calling ten different guys and we're speaking or suppliers and they're telling us they're backward just for plugs for the next year So cova just put a damper on that on the potted stuff and now on top of it. We have the freeze in texas. That killed off. Who knows how many parts of material now these guys are pulling in material from all other states that That was already in short supply in those states so just put a huge huge dent in the entire industry. So i obviously some long term No damage being done. They're going to affect the market. What we're we're here's the opportunity in that nursing and your. I think not making money to start brewing plants or are also a definitely. there's going to be price increases. I mean it's it's zimba economics when demand goes up and there's not as much supply people are going to put their prices up so i think that might help the economics of running a nursery business and then more people are going to wanna get into the other day like the us. Canada were were capitalistic society. And we we kind of we want to go where the money is. There's gonna be more money in the nursery business People are going to get into. But i think in my personal opinion. I really think that governments kind of should step in and start providing subsidies for these nurseries to push the supply even further up because You know the demands huge in. It's only going up with with the environmental factors that that are at play. Two cities are planting so much material on commercial buildings Everyone's getting subsidies to plant material. But i don't see so many subsidies on the supply side of things so it's just pushing up demand. There really is an opportunity for governments to get in and get more nursery to. They're wanting to expand their properties or or more people wanting to actually get into the business. I like so tell. Tell our listeners. contract year. How they could find out by go. Materials so best way to contact us is through email. There's influx materials dot com. I do see a lot of those emails myself. I'm pretty hands on owner in the business it would save a bit of downside but i love. I love being involved in everything so you can. Contact says infiltrate materials. You can give us a call We have a a number. That's anybody's five one. Four two four seven four five eight or you can just sign up online. If ever you're interested in sending us a list going go materials dot com and sign up and you can get started by weights as simple as attaching plantlets and then getting pricing on that awesome. Thank you mark for your your insights there. Good luck with your your business. I'm looking forward to start seeing expanding nationally and even internationally so really excited for you to fill. The spell needed need within a company so thanks to mark. Thank you very much. It was really good talking to you. Okay you too thank you. Hopefully that was pure day. Brilliant for you today rates secrets for your business and your life. This rubber clinkenbeard along with david anderson and would love to get your friends to join us on our journey two quick things before you go listeners. Check out our websites. The commercial lonski dog call. You can subscribe. You can share with your friends. But more importantly check out our sponsors. We have signed. We can to help to capture measurements on your property and create a really streamlined process. And we have company come who make it dead simple to communicate and document and solve guys in the field. No matter where you are. Thanks everyone cheers.

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How to Build a Great Business, Reduce Distractions, and Get Focused with Brian Tracy - I Love Marketing Episode #399

I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

18:14 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Build a Great Business, Reduce Distractions, and Get Focused with Brian Tracy - I Love Marketing Episode #399

"So just as a quick aside. If thinking is the most important thing you do because of the consequences of thinking determine the entire quality of your life then the quality of your thinking determines the quality of your life and so the more time that you spent thinking thinking well thinking clearly the more successful you are. If you'd like to join world renowned entrepreneurs the next genius network event or want to learn more about genius network. Go to genius network dot com this week. We are revisiting a previous episode. Here are some of the best highlights. It's an honor to be here with you. I've dedicated my life to being a small and medium size entrepreneur. And i've devoted the second half of my life to helping other people to be successful small and medium-sized business owners. We say there's always a learning curve in anything. What we want to do is jump the learning curve. we don't want to spend years and years learning what we need to learn to a certain level of income and so. I have majored now in the last few years on doing seminars and talking and books and articles and programs for owners and would be owners of small and medium sized businesses. So i've got to try to bottom line. Several of the concepts one of the first concepts which i thought was interesting. Warren buffett and bill gates and bill gates senior. Were at a dinner party. And the three of them are good friends and they were talking and Gentleman came up to them. And said you know i was looking at you and you gentlemen a very successful. What would you say is the most important quality of success and all three. according to a bystander. all three broke off their conversation and turn and simultaneously said focus. Focus is the most important requirement for success in our fast moving world today. If you can focus you can succeed and if you cannot you cannot focus and fail fast. Learn quickly try something new. And i thought it was just passed that on. Because it's sort of what i have discovered over. The years is the faster you fail and learn the faster you succeed. You actually learn to succeed by failing you know. Thomas j watson's famous line if you want to increase your rate of success. She was w rate of failure because success lies on the far side of failure. What do you think the highest paid and most valuable workers that you and the answer is thinking. Thinking is the most valuable work now. I am the best selling author in the world and time management also on goals also some other subjects but but i began studying time management about thirty years ago and i came across a word in my studies and the word was consequences and what it basically said is it. Something is important if it has big potential consequences and something is unimportant if it has low or no potential consequences number one reason for success is people focus on things that have high potential consequences number. One reason for failure is people focus on things that have low or no potential consequences. Exactly what joe was saying earlier. The famous quote very worst. Use of time is to Work intently something. That need not be done at all. And one of the things is holding back entrepreneurs business owners is killing them by the way and it's wiping out an entire generation. Is this obsession with technology. I i see people that walking with the phone. It's almost like drug addicts that our mainline not stop staring at their screen. They cannot stop pushing their buttons. I hate to say there are people in this room. That had that problem but The fact is that this obsession with looking at the screen and staying connected killing people because it stops them from focusing. You cannot focus if you're distracted like an attention deficit disorder dog so just as a quick aside. If thinking is the most important thing you do because of the consequences of thinking determine the entire quality of your life the quality of your thinking determines the quality of your life and so the more time that you spent thinking and thinking well then thinking clearly the more successful you are when your mind is calm. You're your tired cerebellar bellum. The thinking and deciding brain functions heights level like turning all the lights on a dimmer switch. It's functioning like a christmas tree but when you get upset angry what happens is you're thinking reverts to your olympic or emotional system and your ability to think clearly diminishes dramatically and you make a lot of mistakes. That's why when you are facing a difficult situation you have to use every skill trick game whatever. It is stay calm. And that's why they teach you to meditate and they find that meditators in business are far more successful because they they can automatically trigger their mind into the calm of meditation when they're facing a crisis enables them to think with greater clarity. One of the things. I teach it which is in my book how to hire and keep the best. People is a simple rule that will increase your hiring accuracy to ninety percent and i've taught it to fortune five hundred companies and they make it a rule within their companies to use. Brian's rule is to this is the eu cannot hire except by doing this. And i didn't invent it. I studied the hiring practices of the companies that hire the best people and keep them the longest and they all at the beginning have a certain process that they follow and they follow it. Religiously no exceptions and so their accuracy and hiring goes up to ninety percent or better because they think more some of the best decisions that you make will be decisions that you will allow too steep for awhile. Light watering teeth. Remember anything that is important. That has long-term consequences is a candidate for slow thinking discussing it with other people sitting quietly going for a walk leading it ruminate. In your mind sleeping on it you know. They say it was a big deal. Sleep so you'll find that all successful people are are long time perspective thinkers they think into the future and then they back from the future like we talked about future orientation and they say what do i need to do today to create that ideal future. So there's three thinking tools. I wanna give you and then seven ideas The first thinking to which i start every single one of my mba programs. And i put together a three day. Nba for small and medium size business owners and called it the total business mastery the three day nba. So the three ways of thinking which i start off the first start off every seminar. Here's what i call zero base thinking and everybody who knows me for any period of time knows that i harp on this zero base thinking is comes from zero based accounting where you instead of increasing and expense in the next accounting period. You ask should we be engaging in this expanse at all zero base thinking you look at your entire world and you ask this question knowing what i now know. Is there anything that i am doing that. I would not start up again today if i had to do it over. This is one of the greatest thinking tools. I ever learned because in a time of turbulence. You always have an answer for this question. These are sort of like a tanker. You know that you drop it. And it drags it slows down the boat. How do you tell if you have zero. based thinking situation. The answer is stress is whenever you experience. Chronic stress is something that buzzes around keeps you awake at night is something that pisses you off is something that irritates you angers you and frustrates you. Whenever you have chronic which means ongoing continuous. This is a candidate for zero base thinking. So you ask yourself the question. If i was not now in this situation knowing what. I now know what i get into it again today. If the answer is no the next question is how do i get out. And how fast. How do i get out. And how fast. If every the answer comes back. I would not get into this again today. It's too late to resolve it. The only question now is. How long do you suffer. How much how. Much emotional suffering. How much financial suffering do make before you walk. And so the most important requirement for practicing zero based thinking which a lot of people don't like to practice is courage. I called the seaward. You need the c word. You need to have the courage to look at every part of your life and say. Is there anything that. I'm doing that knowing what i now know. I wouldn't get into the starting point of zero base thinking is always with your relationships and those are both personal and business. The number one rule for success in business personal life. Cut your losses when you realize you made a mistake. Bad investment bad higher bad relationship. Cut your losses quickly. And what are they saying. Las vegas you know. Cut your losses that your winnings right so in life. That's what we do in the faster. You cut your losses. Fail fast the Faster even start doing things that are much more productive and the only question that you ever ask is. Does it work if it's not working and you and you can tweak it then that's fine if it's not working have the courage to admit this isn't working and abandoned it because people fall in love with their ideas or with their product with their service or with their previous decisions and they don't have the courage and the ego strength to admit. I made a mistake. It seemed like a great idea at the time now. The third area has to do with investments in zero base thinking investments of time which people hate to lose. Someone said earlier that people hate to lose. It's one of the greatest emotions. We hate to lose time if we invested a lot of time and of course of action a project of business relationship. The second is is emotion if we put a lot of emotion into a course of action a product of course of study Relationship or money. We hate to admit that we made a mistake. The second thinking tool that i teach. People is w. p. o. Thinking which is worst possible outcome and everything that you're doing always ask yourself. What is the worst possible outcome of this course of action. And what can i survive it if it were to occur. And if not what. Can i do to make sure it doesn't happen. One of the number one reasons that we worry about anything in life is because of fear and when you ask yourself what is the worst thing that can happen in this particular situation and then if you could say if that happens i'll live with it. Then you're worried goes away and your mind goes clear and calm and now you say what can i do to make sure that the worst is not happen. And then you become proactive. And you take charge of your life. The third thing. He was called the principle of constraints. And it's one of the most important thinking tools ever discovered. It says between you and anything that you want to accomplish. There's always a constraint limiting factor or a choke point that sets the speed at which you accomplish your goal we find. The eighty twenty rule applies to constraints eighty percent of the constraints. That are holding you back from achieving your financial goals are within yourself and within your business. They're not on the outside. They're not the competition they're not the market. They are not the people in washington or the taxes or regulation. Eighty percent within yourself. So ask yourself what's holding you back and usually it's the quality of self discipline or it's a skill now. One of the things that changed my life forever. It was when i learned that. All business skills are learnable. You don't have to be a genius to learn any skill if you could wave a magic wand and wake up tomorrow morning superb in this area. What skill would it be. And you know when you ask that question. Everybody knows the answer. They know what it is. But here's the challenge. You don't like the skill because it involves a rejection embarrassment ego potential failure loss You've tried it in the past. You haven't been good at it but nobody asks you what would be an easy skill to learn. They just asked you. What skill what help you the most to w income for the seven the seven greats in business i'll give you briefly first of all Successful companies have great leadership and leadership is the ability to get results but it's also the ability to allocate resources which means it's the ability to make decisions and to make hard decisions because if it were easy decisions everybody would be a leader in everybody be rich so making decisions using thinking slow. Thinking using long-term thinking is the critical job of the leader Drucker says the first job of the leader is to ask what results are expected me and then i add to that of all the results that are expected of you as a leader. What is the most important result that you need to get to achieve the sales and profitability. For which you are responsible one of the rules. What we learned in bizet's we never complain about anybody or anything in our business because we're the boss. We're the ones who decided this complain about your staff because you hire the person if you don't like the person get rid of them. Don't complain about them. You just like at idiot. It's one of the marks of superior entrepreneurs is they're intentionally solution-oriented is whenever something goes wrong. They immediately go calm. They all right. What's the solution. What's our next action. What mediocre people do is. They say who did it. And who's to blame. How did this happen. They're going to witch hunt and of course that makes them become angry and frustrated but superior executives when something goes wrong problem with the customer problem with money probably with bills problem with product delivery or defects. They say okay all right. How do we solve this. What's the solution. Here's a wonderful thing. Is your success in. Life will be determined by your ability to solve problems. My friend colin powell said leadership is the ability to solve problems. Be intensely solution oriented. Don't go allow yourself to get bogged down negative upset unhappy about the problem. And who did it. Focus on the solution and the actions that you can take. Ninety percent of your success will be in. Business will be to have a great product in the first place. I say that the key to success is to get your customers to buy from you. I rather than from your competitor dubai again because they are so happy and to bring their friends and if that becomes your operating theme we could talk about this. All day is getting a buy from you. Buy again and tell their friends. Then you're going to be successful. You're going to be wealthy. You're going to be respected and more than anything else. You're going to be just as happy as you can be is nothing gives us greater joy than to make our customers. Happy number one is is is Become a great leader which means set clear. Goals be decisive. Take responsibility for results. Number two is offer. A great product and never be satisfied with the quality of the product is constantly strive to make it better in the eyes of your customers. And here's one of the great revolutions in marketing. Which i think is so important is the very best companies. The four stages of the epiphany the the lean startup are going to their customers. And say how do you define a great product. Would you buy this. Would you pay for it do you want you want more of what would you want. What can we do to improve it. so number. Three is a great business plan but a great business plan simply requires that you think through on paper the critical aspects of your business and especially you analyze what. It's going to cost what you could sell it for. What kind of profits you could make. Who are the people that you will need. So these are the things that you think through in a business plan. What kind of technology will you require. And what will cost to set it up and who's going to run and operate it. What kind of advertising publicity promotion we require. How much will it cost. What kind of returns will you get so a business plan many people. I'm sure you have lots of business. Plan models are quite common is a business plan forces you to think long-term and think slowly and you'll always make better business decisions. If you think long term you think slowly the fourth area has to do with having a great marketing plan and a great marketing plan is what you talk about all the time. My my point is that marketing means. How do you attract people to your product or service. There's a difference between marketing and sales is the marketing is to attract people who raise their hand who are interested in the benefit that your product or service offers and selling the conversion is to get them to buy from you rather than from your competitors number five is You need a great sales plan and a great sales plan. of course he's a sale that consistently and predictably converts customers are converts interested people into customers. Now there's two more points that i want to talk about in terms of grace. One is generate great numbers and this is one of the most important parts of business. All business activities and results can be expressed in numerical form. What is the most important number in your business. The number that most accurately predicts your success in your future. Okay the last of the seven and this is the one i love and this is the future by the way the front end of the first book end is having a great product or service. Start with the last is to have a great customer service experience. And i cannot tell you how important this is. So you'll find that the very best companies the ones that you really like. I want to go back to are the companies that make you feel happy that make you feel good. As a result of having done business with them they take good care of you and as a result you go back over and over again and you bring your friends so those are the seven great. Said we talk about here. Great leadership great product or service Great marketing plan great sales plan Great numbers great business plan and great customer service plan. And you have those. Here's the interesting thing. Is he missing. One of them is like diving to seven digit number. If miss one of them company go broke miss any one of them get or get them wrong. Get the wrong answer or miss it completely. Then you company goes broke so now we know scientifically basically more and more of exactly what you have to do to build high profit business and the wonderful thing is this all learnable. You can learn these skills. Anything i just explained to. You is as simple as dishwater all you have to just say and what is it. You think again that. I could do more. I could improve that we could do that. Don't miss another episode of. I love marketing. Subscribe today at. I love marketing. Dot com forward slash. Subscribe if you would like to get the full episode please visit. I love marketing dot com forward slash three ninety nine.

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Fix It 101 | Listen Up

Fix It 101

49:26 min | 2 months ago

Fix It 101 | Listen Up

"This is an mp think radio podcast to hear previous shows. Bizet mvp online dot org or download the mp be public radio app to listen on your iphone or android phone on demand from mp think radio. This is fixed at one. Zero one home improvement show to help you do it yourself. I'm jason klein. Here with pam ashi certified inspector and inspect it like a girl and licensed contractor. Jeff simmons from house works. Everyone knows that april showers bring may flowers flooding in. Mississippi is a thing when protecting your own from a potential flood. There're some best practices will share today along with an april maintenance checklist but as always we want to hear from you. Let us help you with your latest home improvement projects. You can join the conversation with this morning by calling. Eight seven seven impede ring. That's eight seven seven six seven two seven four six four or send an email to fix it one. Oh one at b. online dot org this morning jeff pam awesome figure get ready to pour slab. That's what's porn down right now. I was gonna ask him where he's teeing off from today. So it's worse than that we are. We are a love it We are doing a fairly substantial remodel and this particular remodel comes with a basement. I want you heard me. Oh yeah and and the basement is dug out right now. So oh fabulous. Yeah yeah but we we have sandbags. We have plastic. We have drainage put in place so our basement right now the dirtiest staying dry ads on the tomorrow. It could be a swimming pool right. No watching it's funny watching a bunch of southerners trying to figure out how to do a basement. That's right. I was doing inspection one time in a in a house. That had a basement. And i opened up the The war and was walking down the stairs and it was full water and i looked over and there was an electric water heater sitting in the water. And that's when the inspector said. I'm not going down there right in this basement. I'm also putting a full kitchen and a bath so think about how we'll get a water out of there you know. You shouldn't have a hard time getting in there so getting it out. You gotta have those like pressurize poop. Right yeah right. He's not talking about that. He saying there's not going to be a drop down there when it gets down there. Because they've sandbagged so what are you working on pam. Well i wanted to mention something up. You'll love this. So i get a phone call because these these folks were dealing with some issues. Let's just put it like that. So i went over there to look at the issues and the homeowner believe it or not crawled under the house with me. So we're crawling along. And he's showing me some things and i look up and there's rotten flooring and i was like well. What's that he goes. What do you mean this. There's some rotten wood right here. Was that from he goes. I don't know so anyway. We finished looking at what his issues are. We come back up. And i walked over. I said this is right. Were this was. It's under your refrigerator. He goes oh opened up his refrigerator. And i looked down on. The bottom shelf is full of water. I said he got. There's kind of an issue with the with the refrigerator going on. I pulled the shelf out. And it was completely rusted out and a big glob of ice because the refrigerate line which probably rican. And i told him. I said the only reason you're apples or cold is because of his block of ice. In the bottom of your. Wow so might be time for a new refrigerator. Let me just say this. If you have lived in your house over ten years you might want to consider getting home inspection. Good point very good point well Okay there's a great moral of that story. Yeah he thought he had an issue over there. But i know you got and then on top of that. Listen to this jeff. This was great. You can listen to jason. I appreciate that. Yeah so you can listen to so they were dealing with some air conditioning air conditioning on a crawlspace as a bad idea. Anybody tell you. That's a bad idea mississippi so they had some problems with that so i was walking around looking at all the registers. I went to the piano room and was like. Where's the register. So i use my thermal camera to try to find out where the air was coming out. It was under the rug. Oh so i pulled the rug up. All the floor was routed out even worse there. You mentioned there was a piano piano made of wood and if they've got humidity they'll they they brought out after they don't yeah and that reminds me another story. So goodness gracious. I was oh. I know was on our house one time and i knew that there was a dip in the floor so i was like i gotta get over their fear out. What's going on. So i crawled enthralled and cross and there was a piano in that and i get to the certain spot i was like. I cannot figure out what's going on here so you know what i'll do when i'm in across space and i get tired. Is i roll over and lay on my back for a minute and kind of gather muscle and i rolled over and looked up in the joist above me was split completely in half and i was like this is probably not a good place to stop end or lay down our lady. Yeah i think. I need to kind of move over but i found it. I found the dip in the full for you. Okay all right guys. We got it. We have to start the show at some point. So let's just go ahead and go to eiji mobile and she's trying to change the color of the tile in. I guess your restrooms that we're talking about angie. Yes there okay. So what's going on. Well i moved into this house and the bathroom was literally like five. Different colors right and and i've pulled most of it together but the bathroom floor has a pile that has literally three different colors in it right and I just wanted. I just want a wii i just wanted to change it but people have told me i have to get an acid was I have to just break up the towel and pull it out. And i've just heard a lot of random stories. Some just wondering what are you know non-professional person like myself can do to just kinda fix that I can tell you from one non-professional to another painting tile is is futile. It just it. I agree it. Just it's like it's never going to be what's in your head and it's going to scratch off it. Will that there there. There's something floating around facebook and all the internet of this brand new product Gonna stick to tile and you know what it probably will stick as long as you don't use it as long as you don't walk on it all right with that being said the bathroom is probably relatively small. Probably five feet wide. That's a standard tub and ten or twelve feet long. And i'm picturing this in my in my head so we're not talking. You know a great deal of labor to get this tile removed If if it were me. I'm gonna put some safety glasses on. Put some gloves on. And i'm going to remove the tile and i'm gonna go get some tile that i like and i'm probably gonna lay tile and let me say angie. I know. this sounds very daunting. Especially if you're like light Don't do this kind of stuff but you know what the neatest thing and you can do this now. You don't wanna start in the middle of your bathroom but you start. Maybe out on the driveway on a piece of wood or something. This is going to sound crazy but you can go to ruin the local home stores and on certain days. They'll even teach you how to put tile down and i know it sounds crazy angie but it's not that difficult as long as you follow the instructions. It'll come out just ride on every time if you do that. Yeah yeah you can. Actually people can lay tile i. It's not as easy as it looks on the home shows and it will not come out and fifteen minutes. This is the thing that you know. Takes a couple of days to get it right but You can save a boatload of money doing it yourself or you can hire somebody. And this is not big job. Angie so you probably the most intimidating thing is going to be cutting the tile. That's you know and if you're in a bathroom you're gonna have to pull the toilet. You better pull the toilet today and there. there's some. There's some specific stuff to do here. Angie but there is you know jeff. And i have talked many times about the hammer scale one to five and i would say you know. Put an entire was about a three to four. You know. it's not the most difficult thing you'll do an home improvement at all. You wanna do something really difficult. Go over your head edged. Ag cut tile put the tile in. if you don't like it call it. pull it back up. You know you're not. You're not doing this for a living. You're not trying to win a race here and at the end of the day you know i think your satisfaction level would be huge. Yes and don't let anyone sell. You can make your old tile work. Don't let him. I saw you that. I have one. More question is decided to pay. Someone my bathroom this particular bathroom probably is like a standard Approximately how much am i looking at to do. Just the floor. Yeah i just want the floor done. I will let someone who gets paid for that. Do that anyone who wants to talk now. Kim would be jeff. Because i don't get paid. I have no idea okay. Plumbers going to pull your commode and said it back. That's that's a minimum of two hundred fifty dollars to remove it. Let let someone do the tile and put it back remove the tiles. It's going to cost three or four hundred. Lay the tile back down five five hundred. You're you're you're you're you're you're fifteen hundred dollars real easy now. I know i've got some listener. Saying oh my god jeff. That's that's ridiculous blah blah blah. It's only two dollars a foot right. You're right but keep in mind. I'm doing sixty feet right. So that's why on a small job like this. I'm encouraging you to take your time and do it yourself. I it can be done. But obviously you've asked the question. And i and i told you so i would budget fifteen hundred dollars. If i'm willing to hire someone. Well i think i'll try it and the only thing. The only thing that can happen is that you do it. You boo boo would up and then you pay somebody the fifteen hundred dollars to come into it there. You go to fix it yeah track. Would you put your toe in the water. Okay thank you appreciate it. Hey let us know how goes good day. Thanks blue which say. Jeff say i said please please. Don't call in now and say well. It should be eight hundred dollars or it should be twenty five hundred hundred right komo guys. It's a it's a. It's a ballpark right. There you go. Okay oh i. Didn't you know what i wanted to mention this. Because it's is really good news right now or it's it's it's important right now. April is national national safe digging month I spent all weekend this weekend. My wife decided that she wanted flower bushes everywhere so she bought thirty of them or something like that so every time she would put another one on the cart i would say that's another whole a have to dig you know and like the hardest things you'll do in home. Improvement are vertical things horizontal. Things are easy if you're working out right beside yourself that's easy if you're working over your head or under your feet. That's where the labor really come. So if you're digging. Digging is a horrible thing that just wears you out and working on the ceiling does have you thought about our beds that way. You're not having been down you know My wife thought about that. I did not before i built them. Therefore i pay the price of doug plants. So that's what. I did all dig holes but anyway it reminded me that april is national safe digging month. Say digging mind that's right Failure to call eight one. one before. Digging causes damage is every six minutes. Did you hear that it's crazy. I've seen this too. I've i've seen a post hole. Digger goes straight into a gas line before it was crazy. Some dangerous by the way it's eight one one is a free call guys. It's free the federal fcc. Declared april is national safe digging month in two thousand five. It established eight one one national number to call to have a utility lines properly marked eight one. One program is provided at charge in prevents the risk of outages in threats to life and property. Really you can't put a shovel in the ground and goof up a neighborhood so take seen it. Look this is. This is a fact. I'm not saying they. They they do it. They can do it if you hit something big enough and what i mean by that big enough. Gasoline and naphtha contractor. Does it. it's automatic. You're getting fined. You're going to pay for the damage. Allow home own homeowner. does it. nine times out of ten. They're gonna slap you on the hand because you're gonna hit a phone line somewhere but they do have the ability to Find you very very With very very large fines now so this is nothing to play with okay. Hey hey and the danger you know. Hit a gas line or a utility line be injured very badly shrimp. I've got a couple of folks on the line. We're going to get to them when we get back from. Break time to take our first break. The our between home improvement questions. We'll take a look at our april maintenance checklist and share tips for entering a home after a flood. If you've got any questions that want to join the show give us a call at eight. Seven seven m pb ring. That's eight seven seven six seven two seven four six four or send an email to fix it one. Oh one at mp online dot org. We'll be right back. I'm alison walker. The lady auto mechanic host of autocorrect. If you're enjoying this podcast. Try my podcasts. Autocorrect we help. Steer you in the right direction with your car problems finding any podcast platform or at autocorrect dot online dot org. You're listening to fix it. Thank radio i'm jason client who pam. Hi vis achy. Certified inspector at inspector girl and licensed contractor. Jeff simmons from house works. You can join the conversation this morning by calling eight seven seven p be ring. That's eight seven seven in. Pb ring or you can send an email to fix it. One zero one at m. p. online dot org okay. We're gonna go straight to the phone. Tom's on the line and brandon working with smoke alarms going on time. Well be of the night when we had that Bad storm my power went out And then in the middle of the night it came back on and all six. My smoke alarms went off of course Of course i panicked. I didn't know what was going on and jump out a window or anything to my wife about threw out the window Because i couldn't get that alarm off quickly. So i had to bring in ladder and get up there and replace them all right now. Take out the battery. Disconnect them all so while. My my question is i remember previous show where you talked about replacing The smoke alarms After a number of years i have. Ac wire in ionisation smoke alarms Before i go ahead in the reorder some new smoke alarms is that true that After they've been there more than ten years now Is it true that i should replace the smoke. Alarms they they d- obviously they worked pretty good one one time. Yeah i would let our inspector answer. that question. who has a lot to deal with on there. I would replace them if they're ten years old. I'd go ahead and replace them. Okay i think that's pretty easy. Those in those honestly. I'm sure you've done some shopping for that but they're not terribly expensive To replace the whole lot more thing you want to keep in mind those units and now some of the newer ones are not like this but the older ones. It will literally tell you that it's only good for seven years on smoke exactly. Yeah that's a smoke detector. is it asya say the backup on there. Mind the woods. We put in our good Up to ten years it is time to replace it but make sure all of your smoked went off at the same time. And that's a good thing to make sure that you get the smokes that are are integrated together. So one goes off. They all go off right. And that is. That's the point of a wired system and for time. I know this is hard to believe. I've done many many fires. I did want a few years ago. The house is on fire. The homeowner did not even know that his house was on fire. The neighbor knocked on the door and said hey there's smoke and flames coming out of your attic. So wow it's it's a it's a real deal guys. It really is all right. Tom's help out that that just gave me the confidence to go ahead and replace them. Yes sir thank you. Thank you all right. Got an email in from anna and this is this is a great email very interesting. I don't know how this is going to end any experience painting vinyl windows. I hate the color of these especially next to the wall color. I just painted. But i can't imagine it's an easy. Undertaking undertaking to paint over them would love to hear tips or tricks or advice. This is painting on vinyl. What do you guys think I've got an opinion for this. This this happened to me Well it happened to a homeowner and they hired a fix. It went into paint over wallpaper. They used Base paints about two or three days after he painted it. They started getting all kinds of bubbles in the wallpaper. Does anyone know why moisture absolutely yeah. That's right you you have to pay over your wallpaper with oil and So so yeah. There's a few things who best gate before you just start painting over while i'm okay all right well. The releasing final window. Yeah the volume. We were paying wallpaper. No vinyl windows. They just painted there the interior walls and now they want to paint vinyl windows because they don't match all guess. Y'all know how much pay attention here. Don't you go back to your golf game man here in a minute. Okay wait a minute. Had Have you come across this. Have you ever tried painting vinyl window frames. I would think that would be quite difficult. I've not done well. I have experienced painting a storm door and also have experienced painting. Bimetal single pane windows Matter of fact. I'm in process of doing that now. Where took the storms off. And i've an scraping everything down. And i'm just gonna spray paint on the problem. You're going to run into in with the vinyl to your tile. I clad storm door. I'm gonna say fifteen years ago. Because i wanted. It was white. And i wanted it to be black so that because of the curb appeal audit. Because it's on my front. And i was real pleased with it. I mean it's i've gotten a few scratches on it. You know when. I've had furniture coming in the door but it seems to have held up pretty good. Be sure if you're going to do that is to visit with your paint folks and the one thing. I can think that's going to be a problem on a vinyl window is normally that window pane is in frame of Train and so if you're going to raise that window up and down is just going to scrape that paint right all bright okay. Well that's a good point. That's a very good point. And and i will say The the the vinyl vets used is not necessarily receptive to paint There's gonna be some prep here right. You expect it to if you want it to stay now. If you're painting the end saad you might be golden. And of course this is funny to me. But you're in the south you would think we would raise our windows more but it's hot out there so we don't you know i don't raise my windows a whole lot so i wasn't too worried about painting because it's not like it's going to be a moving window anyway. Now let me say this. Don't you put that hand on there and paint that window should because now let's go back to our caller about the fire can't jump out. You need to get out of the house so don't paint all your windows shut just even though you just said that. Okay yes i agree. Let's go to the phone calls real quick kathleen psycho and she wants to tell me about planning plants well for you jason. Okay well i just went with the busy life or they're older or maybe have an injury or illness of some kind of the quick tip for curb appeal. When you're planning for the front or back you get a plastic pot safe you get a twelve inch pot you dig a hole and you put the pie in the ground and all your little landscaping angles or whatever you get ten inch pot. Sit inside that and all you do you pull you. Gravel your mall to your book over the lip that way from the road. It looks planted my done. Those people worked fast. Yesterday was twigs. Now it's all flowers so when they start to fe all you do is push the the lark sack list of pot. Put it in the area if he wanted to rehab or put a new pot in there and change the whole color scheme man. You thought a lot more about that. Kathleen that i did. I just walked back to my shedding. Grab a shovel to manage the garden center at one time. So every little bit helps right. Jason it won't hurt you back sped. Thank you ma'am. I appreciate that my back will all right. Number to call is eight. Seven seven empty ring. That's eight seven seven six seven two seven four six. Boris time for another break. If you want to join today's show that's how you get in touch with us again. Eight seven seven in. Pb ring is eight seven seven six seven two seven four six four orson an email to fix it won an mvp be online dot org. We'll continue our discussion after break. We'll be back. hi i'm doctor. Jimmy stewart professor of internal medicine and pediatrics at the university of mississippi medical center on the original southern remedy. We answer questions about all aspects of your health and share some of the latest medical information in the news. You can listen to the show on wednesdays at eleven on. Mp think radio or you can subscribe to the podcast for seven rimi on your preferred podcasting app. You're listening to fix one on. Mtv think radio the home improvement show to help you do it yourself. I'm jason klein who pam piedras ashi certified inspector inspector girl and licensed contractor. Jeff simmons from house works. If you missed any of today's program you can always listen back by podcast using any podcast app or are empty public media app. You can also listen back to this. Show saturday at nine all right. So let's go straight to the phone because we've got an answer on the line guys. Victor is is on the road this morning and he can tell us how to paint some vinyl windows. What's going on victor We have a. i can't to mississippi. What sometimes twice a week. And i did everything. I can't pick up your show. 'cause i really enjoy it. Goes fun picking up. Is it fun picking out the things that are wrong or fun listening. The things that are right. I just enjoy listening conversations. You have okay sometimes now. Sometimes i got some ten myself especially about gardening but anyway the vinyl windows home depot's sells the pain and it has the pva that it's polyvinyl acetate and bonds real good divine will really and oh yeah and what happened is paid some windows one time and i kept paying them in the paint peeling off. Right there's gotta be a better way so this friend of mine. He's a chemist. He said well he's find something with a polyvinyl acetate in it and the and the vinyl in the vital bond. And i said okay. So i did they did. Gosh what would you say. Pva yeah polyvinyl acetate pva. Okay so look for something with oral vinyl acetate awesome. Yes thank you very much. And and it's bonds it bombs real good doors to windows anything that's got vinyl on it. It'll bond to it. That's fantastic i. I've heard of that picture anyway. You have yourself a great day. Y'all just keep talking. 'cause i appreciate it so i'm wondering if polyvinyl acetate paint work on time i'm sorry would polyvinyl acetate work on time. I don't think anybody or anything could because the polyvinyl acetate blondes to the tile or to the vinyl whereas tile is more of a ceramic or glass type product. Okay so now. We need the candidates to come up with polly glasses. Acetate right all right. let's go to Let's email here from chris right right. Okay this is a great question jeff. I know that you've run into the so far. Getting ready to rebuild my dag and he's talking about the price of lumber and he was he was kind of cool off but decided to think about tracks and he said what's the price of treks deck nowadays average or higher than normal. I'm in no hurry to build. So i can wait if it's too high but the question being and jeff eno you work with this. We know lumber has gone through the roof. I bought a now get this. I bought i pressure treated two by four eight foot long board the other day and it was almost nine dollars. Well yeah and. I used to pay at most on the worst day. Four bucks for that. So that tracks is about forty dollars board so it may be very very affordable. Now i thought about what what would tracks be Affected by any of the the would shortages that we've seen this year it sure should not and but there are so many rumors out there. Why the lumbers away. It is right but someone could truly consider treks these days if they're building a deck because the prices have changed. That's right that's right. And and i honestly think we're gonna see Some serious things happen in the lumber industry here in the next few weeks. I hope so because you know i had to take out a loan to go by board. The other day gets what you think. It's common down or going up jim. No i think it's coming down a. I don't wanna talk too much because i really don't know the facts right but i do know out of a jesus in the in the entire country looking at the at the price of lumber right now interesting okay. Hey that's fun to follow right there on online at talks about the difference. If you wanna compare your cost you can put in tracks versus good. And they're showing on the composite. You're looking at thirty forty five per square foot on would to twenty five per square foot. Now i don't know if this has been updated right so it's been updated because like i said i bought one board for nine dollars in. It's very common. Like i said to four pressure treated board. You can't build a fence without one of these things you know so i was just floored about how much it was but you know i can tell you this. I can buy three quarter. Cd x. plywood cheaper they're not bio Now okay there's something wrong somewhere. Yeah yeah all right so another email here. We go pam. I know you've done this before. So i'm gonna. I'm gonna go ahead and give this to you before i get into. I have a galvanized. Steel mill box. That i wanna paint. I did this before without researching paint options in all peeled off. So i'm asking for expert. Systems is so much like the vinyl one elite galvanized steel have you pam. I assume you've painted galvanized steel. Because i'm sure you've got this around you all over the place. Everything adds is you know i. I'm kinda weird. I love to paint bryce. Oh and the thing about paying you. Put it up there. You don't like it just buy it again But i've painted my box. I showed it and Joe i don't. I still doesn't have any problem with paint. Does it or was this guy. This person probably using the wrong paint. Maybe probably in the wrong paint a painting labeled right now you go into the big box store. Albin spend hours just looking at all. Yeah agree reliable. You go into the paint. I noticed the other day i went in to go. You know to kind of look around. Because i hang out the paint section well. I've been painting my fence to ride. Had to make sure. I got the right thing but you can stand in just the spray paint area and there's every kind of paint known to man new can spray paint your grill. You can paint your outside furniture. You can spray. Paint your storm doors. You can spray. Paint your mailbox and there will be a product specifically for that application. I've done it. I've taken that little mailbox. Had out there for twenty five years in every once in a while look over like oh it's time to paint it again and i'll just get some sprite thing okay. Yeah i've got Some galvanized Stuff in my backyard. That i've painted in. I've never had the paint. Peel off. But i i don't try it either. There's no application which. I have to scratch it in any reason or anything of that nature but i think the paint will come off if i did scratch it. Well you have to be careful on your on your mailbox to because your door goes up and down and it'll scrape if you don't get the right thing it's gonna scrape the paint off right there at the front. Oh all right all right folks to call eight seven seven m pb ring. That's eight seven seven six seven two seven four six four in we talked about Some proper things for spring in coming into the show. One of the things. I want to ask about as one or water. Run off and drainage jeff if you were to come and stand in my backyard you would notice that there is not an inch of fall away from my home and moving. That water is difficult because you have to build an incline of some sort in order to take the water move. Have you run into this a lot. Have you had to deal with it. And what is your. What do you do when my sitting on a flat piece of land. We see it all the time. Typically there you're going to have to put in some sort of subsurface drain strain or something right if the reason for that is Dirt dirt expensive the or dirt. Put on your head the higher you get your house the more the more it costs. So that's that's drainage issues. Okay all right. Yeah 'cause i cannot figure out how to move the water from one side of my house to the other without fall of course. Yeah you're you're probably gonna put a. You're probably going put a drain in right. Okay yeah dig down. And then you've got to figure out where it's going to discharge. That's the big thing on flat lot going towards if you've got a drainage covert on the streets brady you might be able to put it into that subsurface right but you can put in all kinds of drains but if there's not a way for the water get out of the drain all you're creating a little. Yeah and that's something that we're looking at where i am going to be something to deal with okay. Let's let's go to mike in mobile she's She's got a painting tip force. Let's go on Painting girl especially you girl. I should say Because hey i'm like you. If i can throw rug over it all better you know at least temporarily and this is something that i essentially through a rug over on My very old On this particular place Kitchen floor vinyl kitchen floor and if you've got even a half decent. I look for single polishes particularly when they are reduced and remember you can mix them like you mix any other eight and you can apply them like a painter to places where there are deep. Gouges deep scrapes. Whatever did you say they all polish. Mikey that's right like fingernails up. You know in fact right now. I've got a green thumb just to entertain the people in the stores. I go to so anyway. I hope you all it and thank you. This is payback for some of the wonderful information giving. Okay thank you appreciate it. And i need to to follow the actually had a give it in in Leno is anyway floor. And so i used clear. Polish went right over it and it just created a a solid surface. And i was like man. That's all and i'm also giving. There's a fingernail polish just clear finger fingernail now. I'm sure i could have gotten a color. But i just went with the clear and so it doesn't continue to laminate or cause any issues Color i'm just disappointed. I know i just. I know i was being boring that day or probably in her. And i don't know if you've seen my hands. We don't put polish only nails So if i'm offering apologies for something totally then the intended use but you can also put that on chip on your car. Ooh really fingernail polish fingernail polish. Yeah okay. I got that straight from the To the auto place. Because i had a little ding in the top of my pick-up it's on the top. Can't see it and he said. Just go get you some finger polish and put it on there and i was like okeydokey. Someone told me. I couldn't see it ain't growing all right. It's time for our last break. Our you still have time to get your home improvement questions answered this morning's call us with your questions. Comments just shows what project you're working on eight seven seven in pb ring. That's eight seven seven six seven two seven four six four or send an email to fix it one zero one at m. p. online or we'll be right back. I'm alison walker the lady auto mechanic host of all correct. If you're enjoying this podcast. Try my podcast. Autocorrect we help. Steer you in the right direction with your car. Problems finding a gas platform or at autocorrect dot online dot. Org this is fix it. One on one on mtv think radio. I'm jason climb here with pam hybris as she certified inspector and inspect it like a girl and licensed contractor. Simmons from house works while it's been a big day so far in i want to go ahead and start again Jeff this is right in your wheelhouse okay. Email from andy. Andy says the fan above my stove is too loud. Is it possible to replace the fan and motor without replacing the entire hood. If yes what do i by the fan in my condo is thirty years old jeff. You wanna take a crack at it. No year-old vin not putting more money in. No no okay all right so let me ask you this all right for those. That are listening. That have never even thought about this. This guy has been a hood Thirty years old in a condo on soon that this is a quote standard size because it's a condo and i'm sure the kitchen is not tremendous so are there standard size venue hoods jeff. Well there's nothing standard in the building industry right but is poor. Oslo ably thirty. Six inch would okay. Now there's a couple schools of thought any any hood that really works is gonna be loud so out of combat that you can get a end line motor so what you have you have a small motor at the at the cooking surface and then you have an n line motor. That's up in the hype somewhere right so when you when you turn your switch on the inline. Motor comes on as well and typically. You won't hear that one okay. All right And that will make that will make it so that the first line of defense isn't it was loud. I'm assuming that's right. Okay okay you know what what what what we're doing you know we're we're we're trying to suck the smoke out and in doing that. It's going to be noisy right. And i can't imagine thirty years of cooking is going to leave the current vendor hood in any sort of shape that you touch your guts. I'm changing that one out. Okay all right on where there well. Yeah we've we've made it. It's bits and thirty years too. So there's some advances you if you're in a condo is at a recirculating them or is it visiting ally are you cooking with gas or electric. Because if you're working with gas if you cook with gas and you have a recirculating vent all you're doing is pushing all that moisture up to your sealant. That's all you're doing because every time you burn gas to get water so it would depend. You gotta ask yourself those questions one of my venting and then if you have a An electric one. And you wanna put in an A recirculating vin hood. Then you're fine and in a condo. That was what what i was thinking. So what kind of condo is a condo in the middle of a building or condo that side by side. Does it have venting or is it just a recirculating. So there's some things that you can think about acting as far as replace one if it's a recirculating hood they're not expensive and that's not a hard project. Whoever if it is getting out now you've got to think about the thanks. Jeff just said 'cause you gotta make sure whatever it is that you're venting out gets out. I cannot tell you how. Many times i've gone into older properties and they have been hood and i'm looking at that roofing. I'm going well. Where's the vent and it's not there. So then i get in the attic and i was like oh there. It is so they've been vinton all that cooking stuff all that smoke. And all that grease and all that water and so in this nasty up their onto their attic insulation yes. It's just gross. Because they've been you know unless they've been taking the kids to mcdonald's you know so you know and they're not cooking a lot but if you cook a lot you just create accountable problem whenever i got this i got this email in from andy about this in my first thought as a as a southerner i grew up with my grandmother had one of these hoods that that You know they fried a lot of stuff so the venue hood was not a happy place. Necessarily it was kind of like you know it was like a almost an industrial tool to get rid of the all the fried -ness of the kitchen well and jeff. Yeah i guess. Well i'm working with a client right now. We're doing some mold remediation on this on this particular house and so we're looking everywhere where their problems and i was over there the other day and The folks that are doing the remediation they said. Look at this and we had taken. They took the grill off the venom hood a piece of cardboard behind it so it was from from when they installed it or something like that where it came from but it had been bitten nothing fabulous and you wanna talk about this gusting. It was so gross. Hang on jay. Say something about hoods i am. I've been trying to get mine replaced in my kitchen for the better part of four months. Really yes i have the home. The home appliance. Insurance thing right and i pay like fifty five dollars a month for something like that and already pay the seventy five dollar premium for the guy to pull the other one out and it seems like it was. I dunno symptoms eighty eight point and man. Everybody's looking for the part. I feel like. I could go to the ace a quarter mile from my house. Talk to earl or cliff or whichever one in like two seconds and it would be like. I don't know ten dollars. And i could go go home on a youtube video and install it and be done with it. But in the meantime paid seventy five dollars for the guy to uninstall it and have paid fifty five dollars per month for four months for them to tell me that they can't find it. Anyway eventually. they'll install it it stuck on the boat and this is connect right. Yeah it must be. It's on the A listen i i can tell tell. Y'all something it's it's probably true that they cannot find it now. Why can't we find it. That's a told another subject. But i said this on the show a few weeks ago. There's a product called roman tub valve roman tub. Val the delight this thing now. No it's it's it's your vow that mounts on the deck of your tub. So you can put your trims on. We have a lot of houses right. Now that do not have those vows. You cannot get a roman cabal. Nowhere not not just jackson nowhere while you get a roman bath real heroes product shortage a main trying to find this stuff right now. Here's the thing. Here's the thing that just irks me because the first thing they'll tell you oh it's yeah we use that for everything now right. That's it guys. We made it through a whole hour. Almost fix it went to one is production of mississippi public broadcasting. Think radio and is funded by the generous contributions from listeners. Like you our show is engineered by mr j. white are callscreener. Was liz gill for pam pilots. In jeff salmon's. I'm jason klein. Stay tuned for our wednesday ten. Am program with the guy. Who's running this program. Jay white never tech join us next wednesday nine for fix it. One zero one only p. think radio.

Jeff simmons jeff jason klein angie pam ashi jeff pam pam alison walker jason Angie Bizet mississippi kathleen psycho
How To Build Rapport Immediately With Customers For Sales Success | MAP73

Marketing Academy of Persuasion | Digital Marketing & Copywriting Podcast in English

07:06 min | 6 months ago

How To Build Rapport Immediately With Customers For Sales Success | MAP73

"He guys before you tune into this episode. I want to give you a free gift. Which will help you allot to convert your prospects into high bain customers. I'm talking about by free. E book which will be super duper valuable for you. The title of the uk's powerful words that said so grab your free copy now from the link mentioned in the description all right now to the episode for which you are here right after this intro. Hello you awesome and fantastic people you are listening to the podcast mopping academy off rationing. I'm your host of the pool. Child la lincoln sales coach. And this show. I will be sharing anything and everything about sales closing. I will also talk. About how roy on fossil brand through linda. Alright every episode will be garnished with business motivation and loads and loads so value for you. If you want to know how. I can tell you to elevate your business without spending a single door on ads than visit. My website got really good dot com so water. Best ways to bill apple with the linden connections. These will help you to bill lose relationships with your industrial work or lyndon all right so the first way is you have to contribute with unique gone and gauge your network by asking an industrial lebron question deem i'd like to provide an answer to provide a link to the corn taint which is featured on a professional blog of website. Are eight the second ways. You have to join the conversation. You can write a comment about an update written by one of your connections. Say something of value not just tangs or great posed pancheswore shielding this kind of stuff. All right mika contribution count by pointing out via taught the update is relevant and valuable to you all right third way. Is you have to give praise where it is do. Whenever you have enjoyed working with someone ride them in decision it can only two sentences but it should emphasize the skill set how they've contributed to the beams overall success and which specific ways they have impacted your career or your business right next. You have to help out when ever you can always be on the lookout to see that if a connection needs a little help they're providing a unique update help them increase their reach by sharing it with your own network if companies hiding check to see who you may know. That could potentially be a good fit. And they're looking for a new job. Offer to hell burri rob their linden profile or get that. Zoom makeover guinness goes a long way. Be generous with your time and you will feel like you have made an impact. It matters the most all right. We have good lead with give rather than need engaged. We do network as often as you had us going to end that and help your network the these things. Please make the conversation all about the other person. I'm permission to ask or talk about yourself. You can also show up. And linden groups. Vega industry hangs out and get into open conversation with your network all right. The best way is to share your expertise in an authentic way through articles of others but we deal added remarks or articles written by you. You will notice that people will be attracted to you know. edward b.'s. means need all right. See how amazing bizet's so. I hope this episode. What a lot of value for you today. I wish you all the best for your All right guys thank you so much for investing your precious time been the end of this episode. It really means the world to me tanks once again. I want to tell you that. I'm mostly active on linden and you can also follow me and be a part of my family. My followers blows for ten thousand people right now. One last thing if you're any value from content then kindly go to my podcast episodes or my apple podcast or dead judge right right that it you and kylie subscribe to my podcast to get updates about upcoming episodes as well all right. So that's it for disappear sued and i'm looking forward to have you on the next one. This is your host whipple signing off from your own show marketing academy of his wishing. Big very good care of yourself. And i love you

Child la lincoln pancheswore lyndon roy linda mika uk edward b Vega bizet linden kylie apple 's whipple
Your Last Decade #1: Aaron Ivey

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

23:35 min | 1 year ago

Your Last Decade #1: Aaron Ivey

"Hey friends and welcome to the happy. Eirik Jamie podcast. I'm your host Jamie and I'm so glad you're here each week on this show invited girlfriend to join me and we chat about the big things in live live the little things in life and everything in between happy two thousand twenty friends it is a new decade and I thought it would be fun to talk to a few friends about what life was like for them. Ten in years ago. How has life changed for them? What did the year two thousand ten bring them? And what has the last decade brought them. I'm also going to ask them. What do they hope for over the next ten head years today show is brought to you by apartment life? Ninety five percent of people living in apartments are not connected to a local church making it a very large local mission mission fields apartment. Life Brings Christians who are passionate about loving their neighbors to host irresistible pinchers worthy events and to care for apartment residents in times of need building relationships. Egyptian can open the door to sharing Jesus apartment. Life has connected more than twenty five thousand residents with the local Church Bizet apartment life dot org to find out more. That's apartment life dot org and tell them that Jamie sent you today. My husband Aaron. Iv Sits Down with me and we talk about our last decade. A lot has happened in our lives. Lives personally and professionally in the last decade and today we're talking all about it. Aaron welcome to the special edition of happy are called. Did your last decade. Thanks for having me it bill special to be on something called special edition. It is a special edition. Your last decade were doing it. Do Them January. We might do it in the month of February. We don't know you know. I think it'd be fun to do all twenty twenty but you know we'll cross that bridge when we get there but right now it's a special just like maybe six episodes where I invite people to sit down and tell me we're entering a new a decade like it's two thousand twenty so weird doesn't it it does and I didn't recognize until everyone started talking about recently and we are. It's been ten years right right. And we both are forty two in twenty twenty so ten years ago. We were thirty wine thirty two years old. But I'm asking people what is life look like the past decade and what had life look like for you and two dozen ten and how has that changed over the past ten years and then even looking forward when you think about another decade Acadia head what do you. What do you feel about that decade? So amazing we're doing the first one remember thinking about two thousand twenty being so far away. Yes I mean. All like SCI FI movies about twenty twenty and we're GonNa have flying cars and live on a planet like twenty twenty seemed so weird So here we are and here we are. We're starting the twenties. Yeah the roaring twenties roaring roaring twenty s and two thousand thirty is crazy like to think that seems. I don't even know how to think about two thousand thirty rights seems crazy so two thousand ten you and I were married. I was thirty one years old. Yeah in two thousand ten. What did life look like for you and two dozen ten thousand ten? We had just been in Austin for two years so it was a very new place. It was a new new career and life for me personally to because for so long. I've been in a touring band. That was his traveling all the time you know we were beyond the road. Two one hundred twenty days a year something like that and so moved to a new city. We've been living here for two years. I don't know that we felt settled. But we're trying to figure out how to do life differently. We were in the middle of adoption right and had just brought Amos home in two thousand ten because like a lot of life change. A lot of different kinds of ways of doing life seems so long ago. I know it's hard to think about one day. I do know about even if you think about your career as well when we moved to Austin in two thousand eight what what brought us here was free to lead worship at our church that were still at the community church but the job that you have now into doesn't twenty and the job that you had inch doesn't ten very different. It's very very different than so. Can you explain the difference a little bit. When I first came two thousand eight I was just part time and I was just one of the worship leader so I would lead worship with some of my guys moved here from Nashville? We would lead worship twenty Sunday's or something like that a year but ah I wasn't a pastor on staff wasn't an elder and you still traveled like traveling lot had just released My own personal album under my name. That was different different from the band that we were in and it wasn't also stone worship. You're sitting at that piano and yet scarf on Ya record that entire album by myself off into our. Yeah in that back little room. In that House we lived in North Austin Had some friends play on it for free and helped out and those songs were pretty pretty special. I mean they all came. They were all story songs from adoption. Were from leaving something you knew. Income into something brand new after hanging out with our friends lives as member. Remember that it. Yeah yeah that's right in Haiti We had been on a couple of trips when we're visiting our kids in Haiti and wrote some a lot of the songs actually were about Haiti or about that at time without saying it yet. But that's where we were knee deep in the. So two thousand ten. I mean I was not the worship pastor. There was no worship team really there. There was no team culture. It was just a couple people leading worship and stuff like that and then I started to get the sense of. I really want to invest in people's lives. I wanted to help build up people to do what. They're good at what they're called to do. And so it was a very slow process of kind of moving into like being a pastor there and and Gosh ten years ago I mean it was just so so different so different side. I feel like ten years ago I didn't have near the amount of responsibility etc.. GotTa have Right now. You know I remember getting on the bus outside of our house. Remember on Indian Mountain and I would just go into downtown and work on songs and and then take the bus back and everything was about just kind of creating things. Ten years ago now I still do create a lot of things but most of what I do is like helping other people become the creator and help other people do what they're really good at. That's probably a big change in ten years I can give you an example of your time in two thousand ten. We moved into the House that we lived in previous to hear any sauce and we lived in the house for five years. You Re did both of us the firehouse all the back house. The painting and You know demoted. That's we redid our lot in our new house right here. You and I didn't do anything. There's no way we could. Yeah so there's a lot more time into dozen because because I wasn't like a full time pastor at a church and so there was some freedom with that there was some some good things with that but I wouldn't trade it or go back to that in two two thousand ten if you can go back and even think then I mean you were leading worship at our church traveling still in that January two thousand ten. When we brought our final son home from Haiti could could you ever imagined then two dozen ten what life would look like for you in two thousand twenty? I could imagine parts of it because I knew I didn't want to just have have that kind of life or that kind of I didn't want to be that kind of creative person that only created for me so I could imagine some of it. I remember setting a goal data that in ten years I wanted to write produce released ten albums and ten years as a B.. Jiang Norma skull is John. Norman's I mean not all those were under my name not all those. I was the only artist on but in ten years I was like I wanna be a part of shaping ten albums and ten years that was goal. The number one goal number two I wanted disciple slash mentor. Ten people intentionally in ten years so I could see some of like where we're at right now can and see the whole picture and then you know two thousand nineteen. There's a lot of goals that I met in two thousand nineteen and to those were like looking back and seeing both of those met was a part of writing producing releasing ten albums in ten years and I went actually went back and started looking at names of who I had disciples over the last ten years news and it was ten people. It's crazy. Yeah you know it's always good to set goals like that are bigger than just like what I want accomplish a year. 'cause you can't accomplish like a lot of major ager major things in one year usually but if you're setting a goal for what you want to do in ten years you can do that and it can surprise you. What kinds of things you can accomplish over a decade we? We just started twenty twenty. I mean literally days ago. Have you thought about any big decade goals for the next decade. Yeah I haven't thought through like numbers like that. You know but I know I want to write a lot more books. I know that I want to empower lot. More people for leadership. I want to replicate myself and ten years where somebody could do exactly everything I'm doing and I could work yourself out of a job. I WANNA work myself out of job. I like that. Just go live on a beach somewhere can i. You can come. I'll let you come now. I don't actually want to be January but I do want to replicate myself in ten years. I think that's totally achievable. Yeah when I look back at two thousand ten for US personally. I don't know if you would say this. I've actually never ask you this. I look back and that is it probably might go down as the hardest year of my entire life. I think two thousand ten was the hardest year like I. I just got that little bubble in your throat I could. I don't I'm crying. I could cry thinking about how hard that year was we had lived in Austin for two and a half years like you said in January two thousand ten our our son Amos finally came home and we had been fighting for him and to come home from Haiti for two and a half years and so our daughter story at come home three months earlier in two thousand nine and so on one hand our family was finally finally complete. I mean something that we had been working and dreaming and praying and begging God for for two and a half years. Our family was complete on the other hand. We were now parents to four kids right two two of them who had been through hard things and you know it was much harder than we thought it would be. It was a million times harder than nobody could have prepared us for that. Yeah Uh and there were times in that first year where both of us were like. Did we do something wrong. like is this is unfixable. Ever be normal. We didn't know what to do. And and you know when to parents who are naive and don't know what to do and we look at our kids who golly like if you think about it. I remember in the past decade. One of the biggest things got ever taught me. And I've said this on the show before is I remember had a moment about five or six years ago when I looked at our our kids and for the first time. Thought this isn't easy for them either. like I I was always really concerned about how hard this was for me But if you imagine like weird being uprooted from where you lived in everything that you know that it's comfortable then showing up at somebody else's house in a totally new culture and indifferent trauma and wounds and all kinds of stuff and may guzman so good to our family in the past ten years and we are in such a beautiful spot with our kids. It's interesting that like in Tinton years is a long time. There's still things that aren't resolved and things that aren't fixed but there's so many things that have been I mean it's it's a different ballgame your house but two thousand ten I had my first panic attack. I had I had anxiety I probably have had anxiety in my life but the first lady I kind of big this is the thing. Yeah I remember you're with me. I went to the doctor's office and I said I I I cannot. I can't live like this so I got on some antidepressants and that was so so helpful for me but it was just a big adjusting near for us. We move into a new home that we redid. I mean so many things happened in two thousand ten. Yeah I think think we also in two thousand ten started learning that we wanted our house to be used for other people. Yeah you know. I mean the House that we had was like not very big It didn't have like this amazing amazing backyard that was perfect for hosting but we turned it into that. Yeah and we just worked really hard to open up our homes of people in our member like over ten years. You can look back to that Little Green House on the east side of Austin and seeing if somebody got engaged in our in our backyard We celebrated the people we had hard conversations around tables in the backyard with people that we're going through suffering and experiencing loss we recorded albums in net backhaus that we turned into a studio. That's where you started your podcast as we like major first demo for being a country music. Dj All in that the house like around two thousand ten or so. It was a major year for where we're at right now. kind of aiming towards agree when I look back on the past decade. That's a big value value of our family is hosting and not like throwing amazing dinner parties but inviting people into our home and when I look back on the past decade Even I mean this is only about your last decade but we could go back even further to see that God is always shown us and taught us about how it doesn't matter. How Big Your House's? How Big Table is if you have a game room if you have a backyard like people still want to come over to your house is? That's exactly right because of you because of how you make them feel and we learned that he didn't have like all the Nice things and our house on the east side. There was no game room. There is no formal dining room. There was no formal living room. It literally was. It was one room room. Yeah with a kitchen. The living area and a table that set eight people and we would cram fifteen people around the table with folding chairs and we just learned like that's what we want our home. I'm to be like yeah. You know sorry last decade held that for me personally to that was the start of figuring out like I have an amazing team that I lead lead here in Austin that. Are you know writing songs that are sung all over the world and are making amazing art. That's moving people and making amazing. MM films that are being shown. And that's an amazing team and I can look back ten years ago seeing the sparks of all that and it just started with people you know. That's when I met Kyle who now runs our studio and runs all of these albums that are released. And that's when Stephen Bush you know really really started sinking into. I want to tell stories. And now he's a filmmaker that's telling stories that are moving people literally all over the world. It's like this team. Now that I love leading by all started back in two thousand ten. So it's been ten years of seeing these people just like be unified. Use their art and creativity for stuff. That's mind-blowing now ten as leader. Which I think is interesting? I'm a big fan of looking back. And that's what we're doing here in this special edition shows of your last decade and so even when you're having that conversation when you look back over ten years it's where we can say. Oh God you were doing such big things and we were just here for it and then just doing live. It's a gate and so a lot lot of times. People they want this instant community. This instant amazing team this instant. Whatever and you're going we've been working on this for ten years? Yeah Yeah well people ask me the most common question I get is when they're thinking about like this team this this collective of artists in Austin that are just killing it. The most common my question is how do I do that. How do I be a part of that? How do I foster that? How do I build something like that? And my answer. Every time is will this took ten years And it's GonNa take ten more for what I'm dreaming about that. I want to see happen in the city of Austin next year. Just takes time When I look back over the past ten years a lot has happened for me Eh careerwise? Oh yeah I mean I remember thinking the other day in two thousand ten. We had just brought our son home like I said I was a full time. Stay at home. Mom and loved loved it like it was. It's what I had always wanted to be at always thought I'll go back to teaching school after all of our kids get in school. Stay at home mom and never in my wildest dreams KC imagined where I am right now in two thousand twenty right never in two thousand fourteen. I started the spot guest in two thousand fourteen. I spoke at my first conference. Prince six years ago It's within the past decade so much as two thousand eleven is when I went on the radio show just like just looking back to for me A. and going. Wow God you've done so much even in allowing me to have a voice speak into all these women's lives in such a short amount of time you I'm just kind of like holding on for I like holding on because it feels so fast to me. You Really Yep. But it's taking a long time a long time and I feel like a rookie in a a sense of like man. I'm still learning podcast stuff and I've been doing this for six years. My guess has been around for a long time. It just feels so big to me but I'm still learning something every single year about how to make this show better you know or even about people invited me to come speak of their churches. Like I'm still going. How do I do this well? And how do I do this right. And I can't believe you asked me really want me to combat feel so crazy and so it's been a crazy ten years for me as a career For sure a lot has to think about all the changes in a decade. I mean ten years from now. We won't have any kids at home and makes it cry. We're just being you. I mean we'll probably have people living with this because that's like we've talked about this a lot. We want to have our home. Always will people but like that's the kind of massive change that happens in ten years. I mean ten years really. We have a grandkid Kamar. Gosh we could cause twenty six. We've he'll be twenty six and ten years. We had children at twenty three now. That's crazy. I wonder what they the name American. Yeah Yeah but even when I think about the next decade like I wanna hear from you what kind of goals you have. Or what do you see in the next decade for me for the next decade. I think the the biggest thing like you just said is launching our kids. I mean it feels massive to me in the next ten years we will send all of our kids off wrote to do to do what they're going to do. Yeah and that feels big. It feels like every decade as a parent is important. Obviously but you really only have two And this one feels major. Yup Yep it feels super important and I want to launch our kids well. I don't WanNa be overbearing which I kind of want to be like. Please come home right. I want them to be strong and courageous and bold and combination. And I want if they want to go take a year off from high school. I WANNA say yes if they want to be a photographer offer and we're like there's no money photography and say yes. Whatever it is I want to say yes? I think the two biggest things I learned in my last decade was number. One don't implant safe like take risks you know like or you would say dream big. Just don't play it safe and we didn't play it safe over the last ten years. He did not play for the tenure. I don't I don't know if there was anything and that's probably part of our personalities like we just don't tend to do that you know but the the benefit of that is like. We didn't have a boring ten years. Here's you know like you didn't play it safe. You took a risk and became a music radio. Dj and started a podcast and stepped out. There wrote a book for the first time you. You didn't play it safe at all and I don't think I played it safe either. Just big risks of dreaming crazy things and trying new things creatively some work. Some didn't work but I learned earned like don't play it safe. Take big risks and then the I think the second thing major thing I learned in my last decade was distrust. Got Like think both you and I learned a ton about distrusting. Him Trusting Him with bringing home kids that come from hard places trusting him with even though you don't have money for a dream just trust him that he's put that dream inside. His timing will work it out. He'll make it happen. You know if he wants it to happen and they'll shape you along the way I trust him with the future like trust him with our kids and what's next for us and so those are two big things are less decades like don't play it safe and just trust trust I echo those things I say yes to both of those things. I can see that in the past ten years as well I think in the past ten years where at the age where we see people starting to go through more suffering You know people dying unexpectedly. I lost all my grandparents in the past decade. Even just we're at the point in our lives. She people's marriages contending your heart about right now and so. I think I've seen a lot of that in the past ten years and had to kind of come face to face with a little bit of faith things as well as okay. Here's what I believe on paper. But here's what's actually happening in my life in. Here's I feel in my heart. How do we put all these together and still believe God? You're good and we can trust you and your four ass and you're not gonNA leave us. I think we've seen that a lot in the last decade as well absolutely and I think that'll that'll shape like what the next ten look like. Because we'll we will lose. More people like there will be more suffering. That'll come there'll be more lost that comes but there's also more hopeful things that are going to happen more alcohol alcohol abuse see like a grandkid. Come in the picture one day you know it seems is it. Yeah well I think that this is going to be a fun series. Is that we're doing because you'll get to see people who think Oh. They've always loved this or they've always been great at this but actually what have you learned over the past. Yeah what would it take to get them to that. Yes yeah and I think that There's a tendency for us as humans and sometimes even as Christ followers to say you the passes in the past let it go. Don't let the past only look forward and there's a lot of truth that as well obviously but I think we learn grow when we evaluate where we've been. Yeah yeah definitely and what. What God's in our life the failures we've had the mistakes the awesome things successes and we move forward? I mean even for us in this moment to sit here and go while ten years ago. Parenting was really really really hard. The hardest person has ever been. It hasn't might ever be a hope. was that year. I hope that that year was were done. Yeah but then I look forward ten years later. I'm like man God. You have always been faithful in parenting and you've always been faithful in our kids lives. I mean we don't talk about about our kids that have been through heart places a lot and we won't right now either because it's their story but I can definitely look and say guide you have done major things people's lives lives in our home definitely and that school of back and see definitely okay. Aaron thanks for joining before the first edition of your last decade. Thanks for having me. It's fun that we got to do the last decade together. I know always loved being on your podcast. Hugh is two times unlike three weeks. So congratulations I know welcome. Welcome in all seriousness. Not to be sappy. But I've got to do these decades with you and I hope we get a lot more. Nobody else I'd want to deal with friends. Thank you for listening listening to this special edition of the happy hour your last decade our hope and all of these shows it you too can reflect on her last decade whether you were twenty three or ten or sixty five or twelve in the last decade look back and see what God has done in your life and where he has brought you. How have you persevered? How have you screwed up? What would you do differently? And what are you so proud of. You WanNA scream it from the rooftops also looking back always causes me to look forward. What do you hope to see happen in your next decade? Today's show is edited by Chris. With pod shaper organized by Lindsey Sweeney. The music is developed for the show by gram and the show notes. Written by archies lockers. We'd love it if you enjoyed the show if you would share it with your Friends word of mouth is the number one way people find out about our podcast and we say thank you for that.

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The Eat 4 Life Podcast-Episode 9

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1:03:56 hr | 2 months ago

The Eat 4 Life Podcast-Episode 9

"They talk rates episode. Nine of our own entrepreneurship east. Asian is owed marcus out. What's going on. Y'all i'm sebastian. Chosen are in good to see you for another one in back on even is right. Eaten a minister those were doing. He lied zo. Nine only use a bestselling author of war after bizet's breezes years experience or walk turning in eyesafe physicist did a hell gamers everywhere. Steve on excess. Johnny is in his own. Right name ran a Boozers on sunday numbers as gamer offers. zero this Zales market systems. Does your car article war. Winning is from new. So brad if i can ask you not to be on your show a couple of weeks ago if you built such a big audience unlike the gaming space for facebook like to present numbers there we'll get sat down the line but before we get there. Their background is law What is it like to to learn coming up like that you were going to go into law and then going through law and then what made you say one day. You can switch over to eastwards just a little background. I suppose sure the jury exactly law to gaming I bid to toll those getting. Remember that but i started the any s superintendence board based asian is fox on that When got to college. I haven't told is much higher than the high slivers new during this early early nineties early. Two thousands i was that i was leading a game or huge. Arenas least tired. All right we're getting rid like we've heard that and so i run off their. There's no future right. I have my errands. So i figured on life you get politics and so i have reverse engineer dazzling tomorrow college. I went to college and size needed with this. Laura bus ride but i got their colleagues. I got introduced crafts. And you laid down one. But i ain't my life in in call. It were crash. So addicted and i was wrong. Place of newsweek. Eight hours a day. I was reading leading related maintaining or a heart or reading skills and i like to say i really got my initial. Is this experience not necessarily like the lawn. Later initial stuff was warcraft. Iii energy knows you news but this is such need right. There's no way. I'm gonna put that on a resume. You imagine like show go ahead as they were perhaps russo. Rousseau continue down like there's no future gets it just reaffirmed it. so as of wasn't a really weird east very Class they brought him the biggest series professor. They had Orientation he looks at us all he goes. You're not children anymore. Do y'all video games. And i was in california. Did against right okay is on through. Who later tuesday and like the lawyer. And so i. I just buckled our focus on nothing but study. I graduated cum laude work. The united states certain appeals volumes. Will i research. I researched the intern As rapid on some were situations action. Credit and tax -tural Really focus on being somebody in the law and gone out and Which were coming courts county courts. I for part time walker because of my wife my last semester muscles even story busy started from nothing. Zero scrounge find. Jobs are down anytime. I couldn't county court Part time Within six months. I've been promoted to staff attorney and valence invested administrative of the entire county court system root for and managing staff and he's reviled properly an out of court secure and they don't teach you of that law school. Basically i played were craft. And i knew kind of how to manage people. Your husband lights run organizations like i my date promoted. You'll get inside. They have on the judge traffic. I said i was interested in politics. But when james was so i left that private practice and joins us a elderlaw for twenty long is nucleotide walking the licensed the whole year and within seven months i was so good at getting money from our clients in getting. Ill understand how we will help them. In closing these financed. I was a partner at age. Twenty seven minutes later your lock the youngest partner in the state of ohio on that i wrote the book on older law. The state of ohio teaching trees three years of age this topic of their literally closer to than i was. I have no business. He elderlaw hit shelters is what it is And i got two points here. At least part i was. I thought it was important and some started. We're gonna start our own practice. Recent elderlaw fuel accuracy. There for thirty years. Seen the same lease out in time science right. i didn't see alive. Some people are starting to law practice. My wife adds it. Didn't small businesses soccer's really knows what they're doing again. I've never taught business. And i had my self so come march of twenty if team. That's dollars a bank account. And i go ten thousand dollars cyrus and at this point i have you like jail jail and i have friends and i was trying the award. I had fever. add homes. Look guys. I've never chambers of commerce. We were doing everything we were supposed to be. And i have friends who also turning resonating classes like you know what you do. Have you ever heard of the facebook. Yeah right of as account We groups in there to take a flyer with your face on your phone. Numbers put it in their own start. Start reading i lose right side the district jail so okay to paint on my computer. I no limescale like to picture. My wife is hurting on the door. Number is put up there and three days late later. Phone rang and scheduled that client Up five as later on in africa Later rate yet and like i need to oppose. It grew back so within a year. And a half of that i post we have a research Three staff members. We had huge office. My wife is being created. Ramsey third is similar built a law. Practice Some real estate investors found us do is start having need presents them to buying south homes by investors all this digital marketing of walden's law practice and i've you earlier sebastian. I remember that question marcus. I do remember this meeting at this time that first month of after we had done the first flyer in three weeks thousand dollars of that never less than five figures thereafter until my daughter was born and of ice water month mature legal obligations of nearly died during delivery crash team sitting outside her room for six hours. Just waiting for the call from a doctor about the die out of situations like doctor down there. Otherwise you wrap is really serious situations but any comes out with her on a chest up to me. Because i never been attorney again bracket so. Why do it right Well unfortunately my wife was. Also nearly that repre- here daughter. I had to feed a once. You got out of the machines. Had either every two hours on the dots where she was dying as the doctors. And so i'm taking care curving here. My wife two months straight is like there's like to call were and at the end of it all. I finally kind of getting a little bit of back any like okay. How do we restructure ourselves. And that's when all medical bills are again and only tells you every single person that sees within the hospital sending their own bill because your health insurance needs nothing so I had no income because my wife had to survival off after says she knows what other businesses levy crashed because my daughter anders all the medical bills and it just devastated savings. And so what about you at this point. I'm like okay. i'm going to beat a jury as i was. I was behind the scenes in the writing under trees. Highly those their stuff. I go through a case at one dollars. Six urgently people came to needs to do. The hard work was being on our interest in doing that. Either because i never really one the internal politics separate story. I've tried that. You're i have. I decided i was consulted because not far from for business log detailing a fat law practice my wife law. We did that for like five years. And we'll go. This is consulted and so two small clients in town short added grow out of scale and it pretty much. It revolved around marketing united. You marketing your your parking enough and saw i went under. She looked at building and looked at it. And the land seved northeast. Ohio and said you know this is not a wassim opportunity here. Let's go somewhere. There's more opportunity so moved to las vegas they city or opportunities and of she kind of hit me out. Before she came off four-month he got here I lived with the sports illustrated swimsuit model for about three weeks as she told me Markian influence martin. I ever possible while i'm going out and doing all this and at one random network in one random guy he he is. I like you. Why don't you come meet. some other is that. I have a small business. Now's the extent what he told nothing about. Look visually sheldon office building. And it's these three rate hair old lions of business. One guy had rather you were city. La dallas acreage. Vegas will he run hundreds of millions of dollars of pledges style. Thousands millions of kids every single de other guy had managed. Hundreds of dollars of finances for people had up on a media. Ameriprise financial is really cool. Another guy brought us international coalition immigration laws hurt and so around the world thing. He added nine kids finger in. And there's knee. I wearing the smallest person's room but they haven't consulting for and so they're like. Hey why don't you just sit in. Watch what we do. Like how clients that. He's learns on the prompts. Yes absolutely will talk about their clients. They started keeping labor clients. And if you want to come back next week beloved like show you how it all went. Yes please yes. I only that out we to strangest. Not one of those guys does anything from their clients and not that enemy uses like my wife wanted to too hot amounts of the weekend or you know the cleanser care anyway. The clayton cares. Okay so business. So the leader again a radwan about next week. Have you about we three. We had so. I'm like is this not raise opportunity so is doing other clients again. Like i'll take that. I will do that. I don't even. That's her means out that too. So i think all the glamour and back online work as next week after that new president of company. And so here i am. Now the las vegas-based salting people sees and i'm showing is how to grow and scale at level. I never off pretty pretty. I think they know everything. They advertise on non-attorney anymore I jack and i thought i did. I really have education life with these guys. And i was doing like hundreds of dollars business referring i talks along with two and a half billion dollars of business needs various funders investors. And so i see it so much up a lot of people within one day. July august nineteen veasley. All their ages decided they retired at radley on his own again. So i this and the education. I got a i'm doing is sold in small businesses martin businesses. And i have a good. I had my family. They're all healthy now. That all of your las vegas inside. Every day i woke up august nineteen. I was miserable as i could put my finger on his right like a tight end. Run run. I had run a law practice. I build another law practice solely on my own. I'm here because i can't keep looking disciple so i don't mind coach in my coach adding to go. He other than something does he's a given he reverted had consecutive. Scientists was pitcher. Rupel hundred people every hour. Our where shooter had who those people have to be like. I was to never played the gave. Somebody looked john. Robb in having experienced for visit gamer this similar has jokes and easy to share his latch on can write cry and so his people gamers his again like. I didn't know there was a possibility. This from way back then so i started looking into offices of the entertainment industry is low. There's there's so much opposite Millions of people on twitter today have literally on the fact that is of actual fact like a swan for base. So start people for years. We're watching something right and i'm like. Hey here's a testimony of cyber. Here's all right. I love to work for you for a three foot in the door. Show you kind of how i word with myself. That sounds awesome celebrity rat. How many always you have us you get done. Because i never a member and so on only one work with me. He i was unproven in the states and is businesses universal. But is that okay instead of under i the play their again so i started brand and i look at the states atlanta. Pay a lot of people talking about each industry but he will talk about streaming in that industry caves as it teams and the players. I will and like no one's really talking about the individual who these dreamers these people really business owners who are gamers really where they hate how they got where they their asked challenges. They face you know seals. They think they needed were where they're at now. So i started on the back like the very narrow about the people were playing games and doing whatever and so i then said that one. I've become your trump program right now. Been filed filed motion by buy. Wave's this space but looking at all research done. I'm jeff i don't know if this is the strategy. So maybe i need to do is actually showed. What is it works. He studied and doesn't know money as i started at. Go out you buy. my first. Episode is awaiting is horrible. I three hundred dollar junkie laptop. Just have a junkie. Webcam simulate started with jump. I had a ugly couch behind me was covered property. That son was on my face and she. Your mind is really bad. But i found we will leverage guests of using ganic traffic methods client for matt able to invest advertising. The advertising announced hundred fifteen thousand dollars out. Facebook which is the only time i ever take it off on but as people are bat. That's so sad that was a journey. you know one of the liked to to to be like involved was like sports now that you're in it from when you were back in gaming when you're gaming years ago when you find different from then than what you see now in this industry for me right like me and marcus always talk about like like these was industry is a bunch of companies that are putting themselves out there as tools for gamers to either grow. The career can professional opportunity You know advance the east fourteen gaming space but we feel that allows them over funding. I think i can speak for Speaking markets. But i feel like that's something we always consistently talk about and And you know what you think about with these companies. These teams industry as today. What do you think about it from what you thought. It was going to be back when you were younger. And now you can't came back into after going to a professional career law like when you come back to it was it was it like to was was these streets day. Look like you as an entrepreneur attic. I remember getting your kid high school. Who have he will. My buddy were sitting there at lunch for the cables. I every podcast with a question. I asked us as everybody else you. How are you. And i asked that question because i think there's still a stigma at least in our own minds as in resent the are fighting having one hobby. You're the ones and so back. He was and e on one or three replay. Keep order sue starcraft warcraft. Three n careers. Hurricane you're right and When i was of workout the i team out there wasn't there wasn't much them and wanted to view so long came back and look at it. Now is a hugest. There is so much passionate there is some of driving it. don't it to at no does lightest people. Passion decided. they wanted to turn it into something without any starts and so their early says and the everybody has their arguable Insulting have as they know on everybody night event sports players themselves want wanna turn them in or did really well or song behind the scenes. I do that too. Had a little ministered smart to like get what they needed to the hustle into a real business started making money and now they're trying to figure out how to scale motor doing it. And i i think as agree agree with that That's my general consensus to give my consensus out too much stay neutral but i happen to be an entrepreneur in gaming on a game if you will and i feel like what i see adele marcus all the time i feel like. There's a disconnect with entrepreneurship and gaming right now where it comes from a sense of like the shark tank era. That is specifically chosen. One saying that there's no real shark tank era. I just believe that we are in an era where from like oh a marketing them started giving companies a bunch of money. It became culture to follow the silicon valley pattern. And so now we're in twenty twenty one where lots of companies don't have the fundamentals to prove that they deserve twenty five million dollars but they're getting twenty five dollars and you're wondering what's happening to them in the next year or why it's not working out and it's like they're they're not proving that the that the value is they're they're getting a lot of followers or they're getting a lot of They're creating a lot of content. Sure sure right. it's a lot of vanity metrics. But so i agree with you on that. And i think a lot of it has to do with organic nece and just keeping your content organic so i want to ask you with one hundred fifteen thousand plus followers on facebook What's it like to grow that. What's it like to manage that. And how did you find your audience and release zoom in on them so rolling. It's was easy. Honestly all the star said case by started its to oregon as easy as everything you light off or gangway engage talks eating constantly constantly constantly of. I think it was the time of day basically eight. I'm day on twitter. I was. I was connecting with the minimum on lead dingy. Every every single violence must. I possibly could just to get a little bit of traction as a little bit at dollars. I really like a on. Facebook wrote herath discussing by core vision. Statement of what used to be your game and said you know we're here to change the world. I didn't ask anybody to join us here we are. We're doing this. His your and that. Was i ready to see now since march of last year. And it's got me assamese five hours of just not a lot of dollars. I started with five dollars in iran navy eighteen. his heightens back down to buy. But i'm not too concerned numbers at the moment a bible now on those things that i want people. Just you mentioned daddy metrics. I knew i started under the bed matters in this but what really matters is have unity. You don't have a real business bass where everybody's all down. He's fad all the flashing because he will to of religion era my community downs. And it's great that you see that really great right like you can build the numbers money into facebook. Advertising machine will grow your audience. And that's where we go back to why i see. This space is volatile because a lot of companies have figured out what you figured out bradford. I figured that out riley as we scale your business you don't have a real community games. Change people change. Like that's not gonna stay the same. It's the strength you community and a lot of these companies are brand new so they can't have community good. The idea is the brand new so you can't have any community and that just means that without the community. What are you gonna be when you're gone. I mean look at something. Like i use an example of the overwatch really the overwatch league two years ago. Three years ago was the biggest thing in the entire space was the biggest thing right and now the overwatch league is something that you're trying to remember the name of some teams in your head right now. That's what's happening right now in real time and they're backed by activision blizzard's humidity at all. It's it's one of the most toxic immunities and eastwards. Today is a widely read. I wonder to eat. It really is issue. Either in the game specifically the ice off by Has you catching a cabinet inlets. Several hundred thousand followers or million rigging everywhere you go to any other industries. Twelve thousand followers. You're doing really good right but here you got four thousand. I'm doing okay right right. You have to have numbers. You don't have those numbers. You're not legit. I just as an example. Why show when. I out five hundred dollars and reach out to someone. Say hey he's gonna show and this is my mission are really trying to get these visas. Muller doubts witness. He will go. You get up now. You're digging up now. Like a hundred thousand. He were coming to me and the on my show. There's no real difference. Other than a number on i show. Is this content. So you feel like this industry say that again for the gem sakes again you still like the is in the issue this you see that you know the stop as a game for noor looking. Back from the landscape you can see lava ego out there in space but like the numbers all seating. You were just aging. You don't have actually the money. I thought that's a good. That's a good question. Good question old thing. In the game industry as a whole is not even just a sector of eastwards. There's a lot of its inches. Way is old boundary of a. You know numbers numbers numbers and we've seen people with numbers. Don't project anything which is numbers. It is no actual impact at all. And that's that's the problem as giving in the industry the is circulating into each forced because east forces like out saying brown. You'll right now that everyone see this ozark within everything else. Business wise is not really circulating. Way eastward is no actual circulation is just that in in out type of industry. Line o'hare teams falling. We see a warrant sectors of organizations gone right out. The tool is no is. No athlete is not their exposure building their marketing their business ackman light. All that is outdoor. Even they're out busy the ob the number one priority and then is no translation. Software actually a gaming athlete as so then when it goes into the overall spectrum of sports rule upon as well. You know we'll we'll see laugh in ten years or so so the app is is no definitive player in twenty do twenty thousand and they lumpy bright and the issue is getting lower and lower are listed on the money on that theories bidding is pro. Younger is exactly exactly. It's like it the problem right now. It really ties into private. Kinda real back to what we're talking about But to add to arrive was saying. Because i think it's just degree point. Is that like. It's not really anybody doing anything for longevity. Nobody's doing anything for longevity. It's like whatever it gets popular right now. Every number the topmost invested each sports teams or brands or anything related. They do whatever the most popular thing is out. I couldn't tell you how month ago. Marcus was preaching to us about nf teas and how many in the last two weeks. I've seen of your favorite eastwards team got a new carbonell. That's the hottest thing. Look at my care for look. It's true it's true. I can't believe it. I can't believe it and it's like it's like y'all got fifty million dollars invested before you profitable and that's just what we live in. It wasn't always like this. It wasn't like this fifteen years ago. It wasn't like this fifteen years ago. I really feel like the state of entrepreneurship and gaming is different and braford. I wonder what you would. you would think. And we'll get fired sports and get other radio and television. Wendy huma television first came out. You know what was on radios birth ads for soap operas. They've sue operas. They sold so during the warm and so it is it worth into them and all that. But i started was just those her usa as a little bit of civilians. There was no ashes of the deal added. We're all ended on it as so how raillard percent were so. He's worked for a start with it. Nobody's got the laws was out of us is it. That's why he wouldn't money in because they know was somebody of one person. The route of magic sauce like crackdown. Nuts making money. Yana follow at sports. That doesn't real walk past every radio. These were gamers through. Ju ran's rate aramon industry. You were were job. Injury disease isn't a household yet. is your were damaged. You drive down. Volumes nice was worth agree. That outraced pros is is really on the grassroots. Was well i with the problem is. Here's the problem. The problem with the grassroots level is that it doesn't need to be collegiate. See we've seen the ncaa for the last fifty years and we recognize the nc double a. Has monetize something that should not have been monetize a long time ago. Regress into that right so the key with east fourth. It doesn't need to be collegiate. The grassroots need to literally be a player to pipeline. But the problem is you can't have that with different genres and different game right. This is what we talk about all the time. You don't go into Shutout read to for earlier. You said that the mainstream when bradford was saying that the starcraft or the fcc in fighting games are a long time ago. Yeah archaic streetfighter so long long time ago but no matter when that started you know the thing is with east sports right like marcus on the money. You can't do it without community so if you're gonna if you're gonna because other than that it's multiplayer mode. How say that it's multiplayer. Every game comes a multiplayer. What makes it easy sports is. The community is the the communities. That's the part that he won't get right. So even if the publisher dump a bunch of money and gets non t mobile coca cola and this that third wasn't just wondering what happens and overwatch lee with no community will not work and so normal we're gonna be in the world. They lost that they own switched users. The base sloppy use of their. You're talking about the developed studio crucible game. yeah you can't do it without hearing live. Visited a lot like capcom is just now getting these Studios just now like allied these different companies just now getting into 'cause it's always been there is just that win. These into pending twenty owners wanted that support. They didn't get it. Get it all right. The publishers In inanimate is booming now was receded camp polly. Now understand okay. We'll community same way another round in check in everything else. I speak a lot about. Finding exists Eastwards a company's acetyl. Caving roll this with the canadian seen the communities the heart of every has anything or community burns. Gold shavers longevity. It brings in style. And then that's gonna be a reoccurring in obi so like he had to get like a hippie collegiate Separated itself into one spectrum. go mb. Everyone's one wiped out. Never right at all of the ones. I can see being household name like i can see that. It's just that will lead the height Shrink writing out this the aloe away with the highness in china may aid. Normalize is true true. A gem and when listen i want you to know the sonic boom comes in when you hit somebody with a fatal flaw. Somebody gets it. Oh i need to add that. That's what i'm missing missing the head. Yeah mission that beginning with the sonic boom for that jam. Right there It's just about the community man. And the end of the day we got a lot linked in people Got a linked in user. Doesn't say name. Christopher report we were just talking about you joins game preneurs joining us from vegas. So shouts reset quessy all the way from africa talking about the foresight of eastwards community or the lack thereof A lot of people in the building today interesting twist over on twitch see you thank you for showing up I mean. I feel like a you know what the point where any of you bradford. You included understanding. That community is important. Understanding that learning how to scale your business is important. What advice as all entrepreneurs here today. What advice would you leave for our listeners. Who are listening today. If they're into east sports ertak fintech anything new. That's what is important. When the fourth industrial revolution we got a bunch of new industries coming from sub industries. Like social media's fifteen years old and this is the baby inside of this so like how do we like. Give some good advice. I want each wanted to give some advice. You would give like a future person in your shoes. sorry mark. Who will remiss unique. Wait are your user. And that will. Natalie how did smart editor jerry view that you use us over. Brandon is how rand arcadia instances school were. Who said he though down-and-dirty agency says what was and still restore Brad lezama was up. I say changed even if your house plan. How many visits land know exactly how your is worse. Talk on if we're dumping money as you don't know how to make money guessing of your thinking at the other work you need to know. And that's the thing possible. Businesses fail is a they come on your loan. Hopefully in the future figured out now you extra release a higher the nba of the research for you to actually go out to you'll resource duets work at. Because it's a solid plan that shooting work contagion investor. His you worry have confidence. That is what i need to do. And you don't have to stay up every night worried enough that i forget is not about that. All banding organized. Okay gem for you guys again. Which springy gems. Here's another one read. What would you do because you've been very busy. Two three weeks. Couple gasping on jazz. We're looking for here. We saw on ratio dropping gems. So looking for you. I mean greedy example. I mean for me especially being a black woman in space is a billion of weights alliance times it. You see something that's missing. That's a great option soon. Needs to kind of fill and have a problem with the nest thinking and actually create something. that's not. There is a lot missing avenue in any in any industry is something is missing. That's your opportunity to actually created and build up on that in other people that also feel that same way the field in a with them. I think one of the Out of the saints whereas you don't know something or you knowing that you can hire a shot. Confederate was so my else to kind of help because at myself. I'm a one woman army with a lot of things that i do. That is why they want to do that on my own. But let's eight longer for this. Friday actually complete if i do all mound so Like for example. I said it is trying to avoid on days. You see a that is missing. Not being represented well and collaborate with people's actually get the hell because it is a village. They're of people. That ain't the way of me feel insult china. Bill john community even with that as well and be elected. Just want anything you see as missing in the industry or In that grants oh as You never know that in. Turn out jam derek. Hard to follow but so much. We know where the technology as technology is going anywhere. But not -nology keys advancing not be the ones that technology strip you. from years. Ability of advantage speed the process we eliminate people in our process And those people need jobs so people need to eat survived central of severe. We keep your eyes. Launched a technology worse but also understand that don't wild technology distribute Humanity to recognize it in space of a return about social currency the new currency. Everyone looks at how popular people do not think of those popular people s guys. Nath nagel popularity numbers as missile. Has it all figured out recognized. Everyone in the space any states need one of the maze as looser a popular people that you look up to struggle with is actually had eighteen that supports then so be willing to help the eighteen megan team member one needs to a team members. Israel by the value that allowed suit on the sideline while being valuable while allowing you to learn the space without the necessary residents seemed one out. There does allow you to see ren said of recognized. What's missing the space in. All the way to recognize was missing as in any industry that you're seeing they're able to watch it in any way able to watch it from a base of knowledge participated in any way out of risk of being out there alone. Because you don't know spaces are buying help to those are ins jam jam again again again. I hope you guys took a piece of what all these quite brilliant folks. I mean everybody. I've spoken to in this room situation. I feel like is somebody who's inspired me in some way or the other so i hope you guys are taken then because they're all professionals in the space that's the difference with the life podcast as we try to give you guys Professionals who do it on a daily basis right they build these companies. They schedule these interviews. They keep their agendas on point and they're constantly looking through the space and i'm glad that they all gave you advice that i wish i had when i was on my journey. Now the age Advice i wish. I had yesterday or ten years ago and that reminds me to save my piece of advice to you is to recognize that journey journey. That's the most important thing. I can tell entrepreneurs in the space Or in any other space really at this point Is that nothing it's easier you just give stronger. Think that's the most important thing. Nothing really gets easier right like somebody. Who's brand new brand new. And they go up to to track and they got a jumpsuit on. They went a nice fly. Jumpsuit and their brand new is the same as the person who hussein bulb in running for twenty years. They still got run the same mile same mile. Here's cold you gotta run. They both are gonna have to do that. Same mile the differences is that we've been doing it for twenty years so he knows what the come and he knows expecting. You have to give yourself time as an entrepreneur and you can make whatever you want read. Whatever book do the idol worship stuff that derek is trying to steer you away from and you can do all that if you want to. It's not gonna work. You got to put the time in an eastward the so new allow you guys are great fundamentalist right now. Don't give up on your dream. Keep it focused and brad. You're a great example coming from a different industry. Switching insists industry in already being able to make a splash. because it is that new. I smile on my nose out. There recognized that were in the new unprecedented times really. No bulk written this so You know really take advantage of your time and keep keep developing. What is your talented. And you can look at brad or even only number read. You're explaining how you know you got discovered on twitter like that just reminds me to tell you guys like cave making content. Keep pushing and I guess my last question. I have one more question for you. Brad. what are some of the. Because you've already given good advice. Organic nece like being organic. Reggie dropped gems on building community Markets you showed us. How really like e sports can't get into some of those nooks and crannies of like mom and pop shops and things like that because it's so like you have to be big react to be have to build a huge audience. Whatever right has to be the popular game. We know that's not true and derek. You really ties something today with idol worship. But what can we do now. Bradley dig into ads. Advertising explained somebody why even when you started with five dollars the power that gave your plant is easy so when i first started out i have saved thousand hours post something on facebook look insights posted it after roughly twenty four hours known really engaged with it i had hundred reese one hundred load my out evil thousand or visit shared at roughly one hundred fifteen thousand. I look at my insights. And i post something. Were hours if no one's really. But i still have one hundred reach. There is not rescue. Small being lars. On-the-spot boards they want your money advertising for your money at work so that your evil money order yourself. Dc by work you unless county up you. How crazy engaged audience and every single person seizures off reactive shares it comments on multiple times. If you have that you can spread it. You don't start now. What okay so that you can spread if you don't dollars give me three before we go got to give the audience. Jones three organic ways to grow a facebook page that you would go to organic matter no money today right now. I can't afford a kid toys. just gotta get. Somebody gave us this year. I can't afford to buy the us is. Tell me how you do it no money. How mission is something that you are working for her personally as you re other with you says not just the games can sit there. He blended watching. You have to have something to all ones emissions. You have to have a hell. Stories was the most common a about humanity's past years. We love sitting around telling stories. Long babbling bananas around campfires. Ls stories today. The do one issue so you take your mission Workers for is that you have and then you pick up hours where your audience is acts. Loon don't just start moving. In you you go your already is and intel the ugliest. It's hollander stories. Let them know that the enjoying you on this mission to accomplish whenever it is right and all the it doesn't matter can move is you have always been stores. Okay so would you say like okay. So i'm gonna ask you more directly like facebook group good tool like yeah like facebook facebook group facebook group. Good or bad can you. Can you build an audience with the facebook group. Yes there are ways to offer unless all holds rightful there before. Easter wins. The other evils. Is this court a good tool. Is that what you're used. I don't hurt. what what we're ganic cools. Did you use organically. I get the mission psychology. The mission keep people focused on whether as you can give them the psychology. And i love that too and i want to tell everybody was watching this. The tools will change right now in this little bubble. You're in. We're talking facebook media clubhouse all these things because that's what's around you in five years might be talking a laser beam ships from other space but the psychology is not gonna change so what bradford saying. Keep your mission. Tactics people can join having psychology. But what technology did you do with no dollars. What did you do to begin before you even put the five dollars a day up. Wh what went tools. I mean i know. Facebook groups are good. I know hundred followers in twitter. I guess sign on a street was in these better. He were offensively. Is you ought to be you be a real community people. The points of anytime arkady is just to walk visibly away sugar a alot in some way how you know. You are lending their contents. I we are now in up. Oh with this one they really are the new since you out and if you have all yourself their deeming resonate with that monster. Okay actually markets. You're talking very and unclear israel on facebook to talk different marriage you. They're awesome deals content. The no you're enjoying what they have their turn their eyes for you. There's a junket. there's a jump. I like that there's a gem now anybody got anything from your way. I'm getting ready to give me something to eat. But before we get out of here. And before i do that anybody with anything popping this week. The month of april showers bring may flowers. So you can tell about may two when you flowers coming out. I want you to know. This is your moment derek. You have the room. Set to drop the hottest mic drop of the year. So you have the row set right now. I feel like you're about to tell us all right now. The most even going this rs okay. Well that's all right our next guest we're looking at someone who ran already interviewed graydon. By the way on really learned the wild about the process of getting the two k-league from an insider bradford before going to Or anything else that you want to know working. They find you. Can they come see this robust community. Some of the greatest means. I've seen honestly i love your names Where can come find it. We're gonna talk to me. Talk made community is on basal delegator for newer athlete finance leader at big hurt scripts though real using loving people can subscribe you on using because some reason he will be on their the now. I get free energy. Why won't be so weird is simple. You have the right numbers right. Well the from youtube dot com slash that game for noor facebook dot com slash the game from instagram dot com slash. The real game for i remembered that c- Okay well listen. The game preneurs. We're gonna have it. Rich is going to drop it in all of our descriptions rich To you baby. We appreciate everything you do Read how about you. What's going on talk to us. Wanna know where we could find infamy. This week we do have As far more episodes coming up of a uncovering black women in east wirtz orcas also hit code. Do have one those of inc an native gang of words. Innovators in space so a episodes of that. I mean the knicks leagues. You're here i. If alive gave the first episode the hidden core new episodes coming of hidden code. Coming up right here. I you heard wash what time what day what time they january the orca usually while uncovering of women it is is probably gonna be fridays. And then as far as in cho's is gonna be on monday smart too on looking probably hopefully seven o'clock seven o'clock hopefully the catcher. Hopefully you could catch hopefully hopefully catch. The enemy is is just is having already everybody to see what what. We can't wait to see what you got going on top to us. Let us noble. We need to look out for matt arena. No michigan big things. Let us know please. On on winds now is Is is for our games byrd rule. Being as me ain't earned were recorded. we'll be live. It will be there in the aca side looks so even out only in gay oil is lost tomorrow. That wanted to be you. All they had was not just doing its knees on us. Top or fees used. Some of the more unseal is meantime. Grizzly doesn't it. yeah. I love e jam. I love jam yano all you all lincoln mark stage. Is your friend chosen okay. I'm here packing the page quick. You know you like gems. We drop gems. The gems gems call it jam. So i could be happy. Marcus gonna put all the polls out for you okay. Red light one dare liked. We all to stick jams. Show them who knows what's going on jumps. Put the poll out marcus. Let's they like we're looking forward to giving you guys that and give you some great rewards for that stuff we got some good partnerships coming up. We're excited about it. And i mean if nothing else if nobody else has anything to say. I guess we'll let these people so we just dropped on. What our way accent wait. Wait wait do regain Plane now on a healthy new How roller warcraft l. As far as in your career in House like it as long as elegant to even college and everything so new game are you playing. Let wow this is really helpful State better so i'm lost best. Gabriel workouts show. Answer some i go to a read on the side. Pretty syrian the history of off. But i have a three year old. Who i would Place okay. he's okay. Probably bills diesel games late in from real for real for real. Well if they i mean can somebody get marcus. Listen you guys seriously out then link day you guys love marcus over there on lincoln lincoln. Get marcus a copy of not. How city right please. Because mark mark knows is the reverse route This okay okay. Late role in a So i know you're big time in these days shoot man. Marcus will twenty spot on on a knockout shady. He'll be happy for weeks. Coming up all right because this guy loves knock. I'll see if i get one more week. I wanna play. How city okay bro. It comes out in may. Let's just hook them up. Let's make sure we all put in a pop to marcus. Have because the porch friend ryan alexander's at all day indeed scribbled on twitch. Just drop the gem in you know you know jam that needs to be our crypto currency jam. We are for life jam all right. Look lo vinnie rich. Says he loves what we're doing and johnson says driving the gems right. Well we love you guys. Thank you for coming to another episode. Get out of here. We'll see you next week. Got special guest comment You know from at we're all of course we're introducing are leaving ourselves now so i'm sebastian amazingly hot irving time. How how does that. Brad thank you for coming on the show. We had a good time having you. Thanks for being here and we'll see you guys next time.

facebook marcus Zales market systems las vegas sebastian Markian sheldon office building La dallas Rupel adele marcus ohio bizet
#639 - Food Lover Sells Granola to Hungry Google Employees

Side Hustle School

10:51 min | 3 years ago

#639 - Food Lover Sells Granola to Hungry Google Employees

"This episode is brought to you by slack slack as a collaboration hub for work that make sure the right people in your team are always in the loop and key information is always at their fingertips. Learn more at slack dot com. Hey, hey, what's up? Welcome. Decide us school. My name is Chris. Gil, pow. I'm so glad you're owning today for the beginning of a brand new week every single day. This week I'll be bringing you a different story of somebody who starts an income generating project, and I'm talking about an asset by the way, not just working harder and not just a part time job. There's a key difference there. That's why all these stories are about people creating freedom. And every one of these people is doing it without quitting their job by using a skill they already have and without spending a lot of money or if they do, they don't do that until they feel confident that they're going to have a good return on investment. I want you to be safe. I want you to be secure contrary to what you may hear elsewhere. Entrepreneurship is not always about taking big risks. It's often about being wise so that you can have more options for yourself in a future. That's what I'm all about here on the show. And today we're gonna talk about a techie who sells granola to Hungary, Google employees. I like granola myself, but a lot of foods that promote themselves as being healthy, really aren't yogurt to be filled with sugar whole grain. Bread is often packed with preservatives and much of the granola. It's sad to say much. Granola on the grocery store. Shelves belongs right next to the empty calories of many kids cereals, but it doesn't have to be that way. And today's story tech employee gets a vision to create clean granola that is full of nutrients, non GMO and taste delicious, which is also an important prerequisite. She starts out by selling this Colonel at a local farmer's market complete DIY effort, but it's not long until a long line of hungry employees at Google comes calling. What does she do next? How does she scale her business? And how does it eventually become a fulltime operation? Well, I'm gonna say, thank you to our sponsor. They allow the show to be completely free to you. And then I'll tell you the whole story. If you ever looked at your credit card statement and been shocked by the interest rate, lights dream offers credit card consolidation loans from pie point, eight, nine percent APR with auto pay, which is lower than the average credit card interest rate of over eighteen percent. APR listeners will get a special discount on top of light streams already, low rates. The only way to get this discount is to go to lights, dream dot com. Slash hustle. That's l. i. h. t. s. t. r. e. a. m. dot com. Lash hustle subject to credit approval rate includes point five, zero percent, auto pay discount terms and conditions apply offers are subject to change without notice Bizet light stream dot com. Slash tussle promoting information. Eric, Lou Williams and her husband tanked. The Super Bowl is a big deal. Can also be a time for indulging. So to undo all the junk food eating, they also do a thirty day cleanse each year after the big game. It turns out that a racing refined sugars alcohol in processed foods, post them to come up with some pretty unique and fascinating recipes a few years ago, one of these creations turned out exceptionally well. They couldn't stop eating it. Even after the cleanse was over. He became a year round, staple in their home. This creation was a simple granola friendly to multiple cleanses and diets. Non GMO nutrient packed granola wasn't long before this granola was a hit at parties. They hosted everyone loved it. And when Erica realized there was really no clean granola competition, the idea became clear. She would learn to make it in bulk and sell it. She made this decision in March with the farmers market season coming up in full swing by June, finalizing her recipe, figuring out packaging and getting accepted into a local market. And just three months would be a challenge, but it would also motivate her to get started right away. So she did the first action she took was filing for an LLC. She did it using legalzoom, and it cost a couple of hundred dollars. She was now invested in her new brand which she called great Nola, and it was time to work. Erica started making granola buckets and buckets of it. She had a regular recipe, but you went to launch with two others to provide variety and hopefully encourage customers to buy three boxes instead of just one. But thanks to an upcoming bikini competition that she was also determined to win. She wouldn't let herself actually eat a lot of it. That's when tank got his job in the hustle as chief taste tester because of recently updated cottage food laws in California, Eric was able to cook her product right out of her house. She couldn't sell online or wholesale, but she could sell it farmers markets speaking of what she needed to find one, the big high. Markets turned out to have massive waiting lists. So instead she turned to a smaller one nearby. She didn't have to have the best spot the best market. She just needed to get her product out there in the hands of real customers. Between the LLC insurance set up a quick packaging and twenty pounds of granola. She was down just two thousand dollars. Now it was time to make that back and she did in just one month, four trips to the farmers market later she had broken, even customers were eating up there granola and coming back for more each week. And then came erica's big, break. A friend of hers worked at Google and offered to introduce her to their food team food team asked for a sample, and then she got something in the mail that would change the direction of great nulla forever an invitation to present it at Google annual micro kitchen fair. It seemed too good to be true. She'd have the opportunity to offer samples to thousands of Google employees, and maybe even make a contract with the kitchens at Google and all things to someone in her network who saw her page on Facebook the week before the event. Erica in her mom baked all day long to produce a hundred and sixty pounds of great Nola packaging it into two thousand small bags. It was stressful but not really stressful as the event itself because despite having her best friend and tank there to help, they weren't able to keep up with the samples as Google employees kept walking up to Ruth to try it. It was a long day, but it ended up being worth it and very much. So because afterwards, Erica received notice that Google was going to make a large purchase of great nulla for its kitchens. She was going to be an official Google supplier that large purchase was four, fourteen hundred pounds of nutty whole grain. Goodness. It was incredible. And it was also quite the challenge. Erica's started hunting for a co Packer to help fill the order and other future orders. This would be a company that can take a recipe and make it in bulk. Once again, it was through someone Internetwork that she found a partner who was willing to take a chance on her recreating her home recipe for both packaging was also a challenge. She had to work with a co Packers are indeed apartment to get it all just right. They had to find some alternatives to ingredients. She was purchasing at Costco. They had to make tweaks to keep the flavor and texture of the same and had to adjust the recipe for giant commercial of it's. It was a long grueling process and it took another twenty thousand dollars to get it right. But when she field that Google order, she was proud from there. She picked up several other corporate clients including slack. Dropbox, Uber in Twitter, BT sales have become her bread and butter or her oats. In butter, we could say an all through network connections. So how does she find these. Stories. While since he worked in the marketing department at Intuit, Eric knew a bunch of people in the tech world. All she had to do was asked prince for introductions to whoever made food decisions at their companies. From there, she would basically pitch the brand and send samples. She really had to do any of this in person. Email usually work just fine because the magic wasn't the in person visit. It was the warm introduction, three years after starting on the side, Erica became a full time business owner. It was a meaningful transition. Her business alone could now support her, but the move didn't come without a few hiccups of its own excited to go all in. She immediately scheduled a new flavor launch Masha green tea for two months away. The co Packer said, the new packaging would be ready. So she scheduled a photographer NPR blitz. Accordingly, of course, the new packaging did not arrive on time and rescheduling. Everything wasn't expensive nightmare. Next time she says she'll schedule a buffer. Erica quake, these lessons learned to free business school because even if the mistake cost money, she continues to get paid through regular sales next up. She's launching another new flavor and considering how to grow into new product lines next year that post Super Bowl thirty day cleanse is now a lot easier. Thanks to erica's food for you and could tasting break note. Well, business is not a small project, which is why I'm impressed that we've been hearing from so many people starting one and succeeding at it. And especially when they do it on a low budget, I really liked Eric has attitude about the mistakes and challenges that she encounters about how they are essentially free business lessons. And even if they are business lessons that cost money, it's still going to be a lot less money than going to business school for example. So I think you and this time in this place in life, you're in the right place for a business school that is free. I don't just mean listening to this podcast. I mean in all the different opportunities that are available to you to experiment to try different stuff to see what happens. And as much as I try to highlight stories that have almost no startup costs or just a few hundred dollars start up costs. The reality is that even if your idea does require a larger investment, and let's say even your idea of incompletely fails, which by the way it might not have you considered the outcome, the actually succeed, but even so you're still out less money than you would be if you went to a typical MBA program, and in this case to get the business started, Erica spent about two thousand dollars. She spent twenty thousand dollars later, but that was only after she had that major order from Google. So again, as I said in the. Beginning, it's about being able to proceed with confidence, making small investments, and then perhaps making more that's what is required. But only when you feel confident that there will be a good return on your investment. I got a submission. The other day from someone who was really excited about being on the program, and they had a pretty good story except their start up costs were three hundred thousand dollars, and they even describe it that way. Like we only spent three hundred thousand dollars on our business and I thought, you know what? That's great like, I'm glad it actually worked out, but I'm pretty sure that the vast majority of our listeners don't have three hundred thousand dollars that they can just kind of put out there and see what happens. So needless to say, that's not a story we're going to feature because there are so many alternatives. There are so many different approaches, even if eventually you want to go full-time, which is what Erica did remember like everything you hear on the show. She started this project while she was working busy fulltime job so she can do it. Maybe there's something out there for you to that is my hope, and it's not just my hope. It's also my belief. I don't think great. Nola isn't a lot of retail stores just yet, but you can order it online and your choice flavors starting at just two dollars for a little sample snack pack. We're going to look that up in the show notes which you can find it satisfying school dot com. Slash six, three, nine. Six, three, nine episodes, six hundred and thirty nine as always inspiration is good, but inspiration with action is so much better. Thank you for joining me today. I hope you will continue to every day this week more stuff on the way and I couldn't be more excited about all the different possibilities to share with you. All right. Wherever you are in the world, have a wonderful day. My name is Chris Calvo. This is the side hustle school.

Erica Google Eric Chris Calvo Nola Packer Hungary Gil Nola California side hustle school NPR Costco Packers Twitter Bizet Intuit
Winding a Business Down

M&A Science

49:31 min | 10 months ago

Winding a Business Down

"Hello, America France this plant is brought to you by deal. Emanates coming back. Will you to void Western hundreds of hours managing axel traffic and building our reporters? Do you want to make a press fish? Shan't fly-half grain used view dooms name management software the time headaches and improved fabrications realized valley faster learn more at Bloomberg Dot net. Deal. That was my lovely daughter Shyla if you want to keep up with the latest on science are live streams. Now working advanced when you released new resources, Bizet M a science dot Com and subscribe to our newsletter. You can also follow are linked in page to catch highlights of our interviews and if you like our content lease, tell a friend so we can keep growing our community of forward thinking emanate practitioners. HR EMINI roundtables annual conference as gone virtual for twenty twenty. This world class of bent focuses on one of the hardest parts of. The human side join me a great lineup of expert practitioners as we share how to deliver a transaction value through the people leadership and culture elements of a deal. You can save ten percent on your registration when you visit 'em and a roundtable dot com and use the discount code science now onto the interview. I'm Sam Patel and you're listening to science. We talk with deal professionals and learned valuable lessons from their experience. This podcast focuses on stories. Strategies were actually happened during emanate deals. I'm your host Patel's Theo and founder today I'm here with the. Director it. Agile in technology. A jeep is an emanate professional with multiple years of experience leading acquisitions. integrations. divestitures is led dozens of acquisitions joint ventures divestitures end to end of diligence. Go to market strategies integration planning. Execution. Customer Partner Migration, and operational transition. Today we're GONNA talk about auto wind business down with minimal customer and people disruption. Isolated? Pretty. Good. Thanks for having me on pleasure to be here pleasure to have you. Can we kick off with just a brief overview of your experience with wind downs? Yeah, absolutely. So you thanks for the interest where that have been doing for awhile. Now, just like a lot of them and it professionals, you know being doing the divestiture though. But winedown something that just came you know an partly came to me and I actually a couple of them came to recently and it's something that I I'd try to figure out how the different you know Then the divestiture or something else and wind down is different. You know it's it's not a divestiture something like, for example, the business. Are Maybe You know trying to claim that they're in accompanying telephone PNL and for multiple reasons, there is a there is a need maybe from the long term strategy for the company, the wind on the business. So we are not divesting it'd be an unsettling, it's no carbon, but you know it has a bunch of customers maybe has some products some cases depending on the word to go that up manufacturing implication. Pretty interesting though it has a whole gamut of things that you've got to thinking account customers being long gotTa. Be Very careful when you're calling a customer and telling them that, hey, times for buying stuff from us. You know we have probably been on shutdown. Product under services that go along with it, and you know it's kind of an analogy, the dissembling and all that can do the also furniture. December. But has to be done right Now quite a problem experience. So it's not as simple as just turning the off switch and cutting it out there seems like there's more things to navigate and just sensitivity around it. Absolutely I mean. I wish it was that simple eight but I think the daily living to a lot of things in factor sent to did talked about around the employees eight that's number one you have to figure out what it means. For employees specifically working on that business unit on a product line that I think around the customers, how do you make sure the customer? As your transitioned them off to another window, another product or a better yet if you have something else for them to, you know take a look at and then there are things around you know look contractual obligation manufacturing complication you know the sites, the legal entity. Basically like running on every day but in that it was harder. So. There's a lot of things look at what are some reasons a company would do a wind down. Yeah. It's a good question depends on another thing I guess important thing is what what is that business unit or the product line? What are we trying to wind down and is it specifically to do with? You know let's say you do the democratization. Come Bay I mean you've tried everything you had tried to provide the the solution of the of the service or you're trying to bundle it existing product that you have. Maybe there is a change in market environment you know decline in revenue, you try to figure out any costs collection you can do right on maybe that doesn't go through maybe that is a completely comply switching of company priorities right company probably. Easing of which is doing that big wind down they red wings some some wanted to go and do completely different tangent and whatever they have. It makes sense for them to focus resources right place right. So that there that could be another reason. So they're not seventy reasons, right? I think the end of the day the year of company Cheer for for Company. You know you got really at some point and figure out what their goals are for three to five years and how do you Make sure all the resources that you need us in like way especially, if the business unit does bleeding cash, right? Tried several ways to try and course correct and go through. So I mean that's the reason and in many cases, you would see a divestiture but you try and see that possible if not, then you left the feel neglection but to wind down. So ultimately, you got a business line that's not profitable and that you may explore divestitures prior to looking at winding the business down. and. Even with that, there's factors that sort of drive that business line to be unprofitable via changes, markets, regulations, etc, and that Sorta seems to be the main drivers for ultimately coming down saying, Hey, let's just wind the business down is really nothing else we could do. Right, Jack me and I mean. On all add to it, I think from my experience so far it does it rate Locations all around and you don't want to go out to the market. Went on stop something. So all off about that either said. Once you figured out nothing of the always GonNa work out then you basically after the window. Yeah. How should you approach a wind down in terms of planning? I think as I mentioned, that is when I when this? Couple of budget for me to lead came up and I. You know went around and all the being industry on all the experts say perspective I think I do. But the delights of the world and all the you know management firms out there. There's no playbook that he will find for a non is what I Realize. So there is there isn't a playbook basically trying to decouple the business that what have you, but what really case might be. So it's like any planning exercise. It's really really important Dick file a critical part, right. So what's the critical if you want if you wanted to know what the scope of the wind down and watch the critical part for us to go there right it could be several things it could be you know customer obligation you might have. Contracts with customers, which basically wanted to allow you to just say, well, you know this is the GonNa wind down to be on. That ended up sale of life restriction on on the contractual documents, I that you have the customers and again I am in the customer here. I. Think it depends on the customer to if you're talking about the just off the company trying to wind down on a unawed trivializing software in any way shape or form but. I think it's not as compared to, let's say you're trying to wind down a business in lifespans Alabama because calm. The customer because there are gonNA tries customers running, and you know they have you know you can imagine millions and millions of dollars invested in not in the there. There's a reason why they're doing to kind of pull off some there, and that's why you have contractual contracts. I the legal documents which will make sure that you have to really care for look at. You know there are also in some cases depending on the school and where the employee and the manufacturing sites and the legal entities are you got to look at Labor Laws Right, employment laws and labor laws which are country and state specific and all. Media if I might say things are different than Europe were says issue supposed to United States? Those things that need to take the careful view on to what makes sense what what is are you know the critical path on each of them? Things which probably all in line with our regularly the Cairo thing but you take a look at. How long do we need to keep the data? Is there any IP that is involved in the intellectual property that that there that we to arrest and keep it for some other reason, right so what does that the our financial benefits I mean, the CFO of the company will definitely want to be and say, well, you know you do it this way there are some some benefits to be had so I think the finance team does have a big. last but not least I'm sure I mean those inaugurals critical but assistant change. A simple example depends on how integrated this product line. The business unit is with your comfort systems and your corporate architecture. Right so if it doesn't mean that you have to do something specifically where you you have to, you know how Charlie? Sof Anything for those. Accounted for him, they are their quarterly unwanted releases and I have an Iky background that plays heavily for those dying nine. So those are like the factors that would really think about when you talk about in terms of finding. Other. Table and think about. Okay. So what does it mean? How soon? How fast can I do this and what implications we have so I think it depends. On your. Factors it's interesting because it sounds like a lot of it depends on ongoing obligations used example of your customer agreements where you may have some specific clauses are terms in there that really obligate you to provide some extended prolonged service commitments. You mentioned employment labor laws because everybody's a big fan of the US labor laws a different you're being countries and so forth at made told you obligated if you you know in terms of some sort of incentives for for the staff that you're letting go and things like that, and then I think archiving is another general ones. So yeah, it's interesting how a lot of the planning it's actually. Not. So much of a you know here's a task list or like you mentioned the playbook just to go down, but it's a little bit more what are actually the ongoing obligations and planning around it is there a certain approach when it comes to the prioritizing that like is there certain things that hey, let's really focus on the customer aspects I or how would you just prioritize? Factors you mention day question I think depends on depends on those things that we talked about right. So you need to figure out I. Think I in my my case in my bumper, they need to figure out what that. Long for. The ten th. This is really the. This happened if I reached this milestone I, think I'm good from that I can't really been execute on my plan. So so I think the prioritization of it is dependent on you know doing a contract with your Customer contract number and you'll find clause in there that customers would mean twelve months. Before, you can tell them that you're not gonNA say this. Is. Then becomes. Your twelve months. You know decorate the you. Then you know that if I would now I need to keep everything going for twelve months and to keep my rnd going my production going my supports everything needs to grow keep clicking than than might be the case where let's say we talked about the labor union right in some countries from stance him in that case where you're really about. Okay. So what are those timelines? What other documents? What are the things I need to bring to the table? To satisfy you know what they need from their perspective but that's the big thing to and the end of you've got to do good with your customers you got to do with their employees. Then the because the in this case, it's not shutting down the entire business and the wind down we're talking in this context is about specific business unit, Pacific Product Line, which entails company is still bad. You're still selling products and services, but not in that space. So you still GonNa have some of those customers come in by your products are the Charles say. I don't love for those those kind of decisions again I I mean I wish I could just say that the other part is but it depends on so many factors I and which makes it much I think the project Would all of this is good. I'm looking forward to getting into the part about void actual friction because sounds like there's A. Forum to that. Before we get into that. Can we touch on what actual resources or functions do you need I think a lot of us are familiar with them and process where you bring in a multitude of operational functions and doing the deal? What does that look like from Your Lens when you're a business down? Yeah. I mean I'm a again going to use the length of Manet right? A normal I'm integration management offers that we set up. Deal or any acquisition that you're working on I mean seems that of functions broadly I think are required. To have your sales channel, you'll have your product marketing folks you'll have a child for sure because there there's GonNa be an impact on the employees one another. Then you also have your it you have your finance legal, all whole gamut of all the functions that you have when you are thinking of planning on doing acquisition integration rates. So those are all there. Again, it depends on that saying some cases there might be a car wind down you're doing which don't have customer yet. It's still in our in the. They just is doing product development and then becomes much easier. In that case, we don't mean sale you don't need you know you don't need your customer support and product marketing and all those things that are really after you are out there in the marketplace selling the product. So those are defying you know by what perfect is but you definitely need all those functions on the table I think the there isn't bit more different between I'm Oh and the functions that we bring in and This one here is because I think I would say. More. Exciting than more excitement write a letter you actually. Acquiring company that excitement on the target excitement on the or in this case little more not so excitement. And are things that you've got to be very casual about. So the thing that I'm trying to. Join the pilot would be normal, Emmy and winedown in A. Much larger group of people working on it as opposed to unwind on, you want to really keep it. I. Don't know really the minimum education keep giving. A. There would be behind the topic and you have to have certain hurdles that you need to buy for. You know that it's happening. So yeah, I mean all the functions I said I are definitely needed, and then there might be one example which is very critical in this case in my experience. Now as being communication they com is there but usually tend to use your normal comes that you have for. A nominal admission project. But in this case, you need different kind of comes. Comes that go to the to the market, but they lost three if it's the public company like. That I'll. Go with the employees that come that go to the employs one not affected. So you've got to have that piece which I quickly found out that bill has kids and had to go back and get get some head. Guys. comes. So structure not as intense integration similar in terms of people you'll get involved from various functions as exciting because you're not acquiring, you're winding things down. I do have an interesting question. The lines at this is the last function. That is shutdown who turns the lights off as a business as being shuttered. Oh Wow. That's a great question. So I think in ops cases, I think the last function if you're McCall. WPN The workplace services function May and they are really the ones who are looking at it as as an when they know that that's happening be put into the project they're looking at it. Okay. So what does it mean if you're not going to use the facility? The site is also going to be wind down and shut down if you're. So what are we gonNa do what the on whether the domes underneath when you buy site are the things that you put in there which now we need to assemble again right there are things in there in case of, let's say lifestyle. Company. Like Agile in for I work. In, both cases do have things like you know applications and different Jewish devices that need to think about. So where do I should documentation? So usually the workers. Who are the last you know? They, let them come back at the tail end of it and do a lot of work. But again, you know that is an eagle entity discussion which may get into later on but that's a separate topic which really that legal entity has so many different cross functional elements for everybody the but once functioned if. Only, search. Who Actually? On the lights and the keys and. What are some of the other obstacles challenges that you face, but actually a lot of challenges essentially You know if you you know you can plan as much as you can. Right. But then there are things that you don't see ahead of time and one classic example would be the pandemic situation beyond right now eight i. mean we like everyone else but I don't think that nobody has seen anything like this on the implications that come to right that I it shot him in. Human Implications placations around that are doing manufacturing. Better based on how much? You know it the uptrend, but then be the pandemic happened and nobody was allowed to go to work right for all those plans go in there. So that's why I'm that other. You'll be very careful. I mean you can on the best you can. But again, things which can go sideways especially around Pr. Back the other is something that you've got to be really really can't from far especially publicly traded company and for anyone to be honest but especially for companies, you know which publicly traded as well as they have to be careful about the education that I wanna be happening to play or. Negation. So you can plan for everything, but almost every time there is going to be something that's GonNa pop up. So you got to be very careful about it and the last is Beagle I mean the legal aspect of it I keep harping up in on it but I think it's something that you got to have a strong legal team otherwise especially because everything that goes out. Every com that goes out everything that a doctor employees, the customer hostility Richard Out from perspective, and if not can have on education which we don't want to get into. Where have you have you seen that happen where all the sudden there's some post you know lying down and then all of a sudden, some legal issues come out of it knocked in effect of legal issues by a have seen on things earlier eight, you got to look at all the contracts, their contracts, not just with the customers, but you tend to have contracts with the vendors as well. Right and in the larger company. Depends on the company. Again, it depends on the what they call you are but as much as a you're dependent on renders the windows are dependent on me was for those indications that you've got to be careful about Amazon you. You might be surprised I mean there was to answer question directly there wasn't surprised that we did not account for because they you know things meeting not know that popped up after we started talking to render and render clause in there where we had to you know by a certain amount of Charleston for twenty four months and that that was quite a bit of a number right? So that the. The cost of. But again, everything has a cost eight. So but it it does it does happen things that you wouldn't expect so. But again, the surprise are actually interesting because I feel like that's where you learned some lessons that you're not gonNA learn otherwise from or book would other surprises. Have you come across when money is known? This surprises I would say so you go down the straight. For example, you're looking at let's say employees who are really really focused on that specific wind down or think trauma claim. Obviously, the first thing you try to do is see that are. That we can have this in the skills of those employees can be somewhere and that's that's number one we try and do that, and we always not always Richard sessile unfortunately but then you go down the part and then suddenly does come on Oh, by the way no, and now we need. We need this skill those and then becomes another problem because when one wanted to announce about something the train has left the station. So to speak on the Lars integrations especially in countries and states where you have very specifically Balogh, Yukon pick and choose pick. An exemplary. So I mean, I can't go in more detail rounded but I think that those are the things that I think have surprised me but you have. As. Much as we think we have to do on it. There's always something that comes up and you'll have to be ready to roll up your sleeves and get out of the. So. Yeah. There's downtime. Then this of very very in another example, the comment draw our by the you do come across doing a lot of when you're doing a. Win Integration acquisition you do come across many times. I would say that you were set for the third day for integration completely degration but you sometimes you know that they never have and you postpone Polidori even in this case that is that's not applicable right in line down. Have to meet. Face quite exciting at says that his own for at margin for. But again, this kind of things that come up you have to be prepared and as long as you have very strong communication line with the executive branch off the company then you have. Good good support from them. Win Were We. Wind a business down. We talked a little bit about some of the assets but can we talk about the assets specifically that you're trying to protect and I prioritize that? Yeah. So so when when you talk about assets, you know there several be the biggest assets employees, your customers you know because you know I mean really I mean that's that's really the couple of. Those are the ones that want to be very careful about. Example I said you're gonNA probably going to have the same customer buying other products and services from you that are going to be distributed, who are gonNA be buying products. From you and then they have their own obligations that and customers. So the customer relationship I think is probably biggest answers when other facets find me so You look at all the customer contracts and you do all, you can do to make sure you're okay from perspective it all becomes very critical part. When you talk to the customer, you got to be very open and honest have a good communication a material available but say it's folks on walking them through all the different steps and why we're doing what they're. Doing and how we're going to kind of my bad. So that's critical for the customer relationship. I'm very critical. I would say no matter walking down share talking about that are also things like employees You've got to have a solid plan for enjoys trying to leave that are real. You can have them work on areas within the company and that's a constant. Dialogue. Between. Charter district facets of the company right so so not to. The ones that I think are very critical. Those are I P as an example, intellectual property. You know even the of funding product the that goes along with it. It's very, very important and. What happens I see? How do we make sure that? The knowledgeable on the company you're right. So you need to have your IP experts. We talk a legal teen and sugar out what does it look like what does I looked like after you know after we do this mine down do we keep dipy is that? Is that about community that began news from a you know obviously you know is to monetize any of the. They a lot of things that can come up with Ip and even even things where you need to keep by the you you need to figure out what it means. You know in terms of the cost of keeping the the you know because they had some some cost embedded in them. So it's a decision of it's a constant decision off looking at the pros and cons triggering on what's best. long-term. In some cases you just basically say, well be is not what we think that in in for example, you'll see that well there's a complete technology and science shift in the industry and the IT and the product that you have probably not. As valuable as it was, and you'll see this constantly in in. In many of those companies which have my big manufacturing sites and I beach is no longer living. Great. So then what does it mean and then tax comes in right from. What does it mean from writedowns respecting? What do we do from that point of view so some other kind of key assets, but you've got to be very mindful about. which you just have to write off, I mean. It's something that we cannot do much about. That assets Some big. Time, you become this position them and use it for example, that are things like servers and all those things again again, very he had for a second, the other thing that they definitely can be recycled so becomes literally going down the list of inventory say what can cycle what cannot believe cycle in on for the main ones? They got to be careful about the customer employees by being general got it sounds like those are the top. Priorities curious. What is communication look like when we're talking about the customers, right? 'cause you sort of added K. you do want to communicate this well, because there could be ongoing relationship with other products and services they may be purchasing from your company which makes a lot of sense as you don't WanNa. Give an impression. The wrong impression they. Hey, there's some real trouble going on and things of that sort. So could you maybe give an example even just? How would you rain that communication working with when your customers? Yeah I think that's when you need to have going back earlier point about the function rate. So let's say you really to have your sales people you know depending on the business or the business unit that you're trying to wind down, you know geography and but there are specific field folks who are knowledgeable around bad rate on the customers. So we're looking at the list of customers that you need to go talk to your do some prioritization. I, mean just normal that any any situation they want him in the day they're trying to be you can't have the same plan unfortunately for all you're. Going to have some kind of segment of how you handle your account and what it means your company, and then from there on you you go down the list and you know you can't have the same message when basically. So a doctoral, obviously, you need to give them I think as much as white gloves because you've. Got To go and unfortunately in today's world, we can travel not a lot people can travel even feel people can travel. I was reading of the day they pack on the travel industry but you know you got to talk to the customer at one on one and as soon as that announcement goes out you got to. You know bring the customer, I, think in it and then give them the whole. The the reason why we we are and what's the roadmap? So the transparency I think is King Casandra. Much. Transfer and you can't be a that point and then going back as I said. Try and see what you can do how can you level? How can you use the beam and the transition? If there is a way that you can give them extra product ahead of time they that they have enough time to transition to another window. That may be might be be something where you know you're giving them an incentive to discount. So to work with customers, but I think it's Better that way as opposed to just doing. Broadcast Operating on that side and say, Hey, this is happening right. So you don't believe in that. You're pretty transparent. You're basically telling them why you're winding down the business and just being really upfront K. This line hasn't worked for us and so forth and we made this decision why I'm communicating with you. I WANNA, make sure you're well supported as we make this transition the sound. Berate Yep. I think so I think transparency and again I think the key word is as transparent as you can't rape. So YOU GOT TO BE A. Part of that and having the same fields account people having that discussion with them. I think. Well, right. So it's as I said why you wonder then communicate it to people, but then the sales organization and they will then go to talk to the people they. So that helps as well having having that relationship. This kind of communication better to come from them, and then you have again, you have your executive stuff ready. If it comes to an collation, they escalate do happen usually and there are some people customers were would. Have a bigger pain than others, and in that case, and that becomes one off discussion exception. To, deal with that if you had to deal with them fist off customers luckily, no I haven't or at least it hasn't each to me yet but known luckily now. Yeah. Yeah. I like to keep it that way. When it comes to employees is a similar approach that you take with customers in terms of providing that as much level of transparency as you can really keep in that communication dialogue open to make the transition smooth. Yeah. The employees I think a lot of it is to do it. I mean, obviously, there is an impact on employees say they better than your winding down shutting down a specific division and other business? What have you been a company that are going to be employees who have specific skills which on the applicable to that particular product or the service? So they're not going to be. Employed for sure I, think what you do in those cases as you got to really really understand employees. Impacted them in some cases I. Think we notice that in them as well. You know sometimes. It's a lot of these guys have built a startup round roundup. Have Special. City. Do that to the customers sometimes it's not about them. It's not about, okay what's going to happen to me probably beyond that? So you've got to have, but the thing is, is that I there you plan father I come indication you go through the specific steps that outlined within the legal framework. Then I think am but these important and you're trying thieves who can really alleviate any as much as possible in this. Transceiver any opportunities inside the company and I think a lot of companies have really chart and good value right so that that helps I think but there is it's then it's not easy thing, right? But that's what happens sometimes. Right. Journalists light to make a story into provoking story. And I'm I'm curious because given the circumstances of wind a business down on his SORTA gets into the the media scope. How do you contain that from it being something of a more of a realistic nature versus getting blown out of proportion that a ship is sinking you know people are getting laid off. You know what I mean I I'm kind of curious because sometimes we hear the news, but it's difficult to know what actually happened. You may sort of get this impression that there's massive layoff and things are falling apart when the reality isn't as extreme. Great questions. So rallied in today's Day and age. And the media is almost sometimes control the narrative and I think it's about how do we control narrative and take the control back bay. So I. Think it goes along with having whatever they science is all about science is all get the truth from the fact this? happened. Exactly. Exactly. So yeah, I think the comes piece I talked earlier about the PR both things like come having a good communication plan thing is about amount and especially You know if you have your party on Gore I, mean our UNIN call each other publicly traded company or what have you read usually a. Solid. From team the department and I think it applies the same. We talked about what we talked to the customers, they whatever con content or whatever discussion that we have in the customer's always better to have that ourselves with the media they. So that is you know the trust or these that we do I think almost has the active in then and exactly say why what we thought Rayvey are and why we're doing what we're doing right. So those those are the things that really called out and opposed to the one thing you don't want to do is not press. Or keep it on down low and hope that nobody called your trade adoption or something that we had in mind that we have to really control the an and to be honest I think the if you have valid which in our cases the world projects that I've worked on had them. I, think that I think you're okay. As long as you know, we can make that case about it and what happens I think it's it's about I to thank to market the first to market for for the buffs call. If you are first to the market about what's going on then on. The Media Second Really. Has, the same impact otherwise might have a good so good good call I think the PR it's very, very critical. there. That's interesting. It sounds like clarity in the why is sort of the the best way to to ground reality I. I think the why is very very important because that's what happens. Then somebody announces something like this is why what's happening the ship is sinking Oh my God what's going on but if you have a very specific wide, it's not Just one when boo element within that. We have to. You have to cost and will be fine. You know for those kinds of things I think very important to be very, very transparent I. Think. So I think it helps because you know just. Seem to blow out. I mean no I haven't I haven't. Yeah. I'm now often you'll this questions on whether with no I haven't seen any. Any. Of those accounts. So. Yeah new happen. So I got a a good question here I was the wind down measured what is considered a successful shutdown of a business. Question I think a liaison when you're sitting down and planning and we kind of touched upon mobile when you're planning and figuring out what other priorities what's my long? down during critical part. That kind of tells you right. So if you are basically do you know seeing that business Is Not, getting your dog by the market has shifted only going down from there. So you know why you're doing it and then you know how soon do we do this based on that critical and? So. I swear you figure that out that the minimum. You know the badminton I need to shut down and if you can match that up the job shut down. So it's you know it's been a at least twelve months and if you're able to wind down in months, I think you really good job they anytime extra that you take on top of it is basically you're beating money if that's the case or whatever the reason you're winding down that continues to happen. So I think that is unfortunately I can't I can't think of any shortcuts because we should try and take short there's always gonna be something out there that GonNa catch you you. Think, that's being burden metrics of success. I haven't thought about it that right now, but I'm thinking about it as we speak but maybe that may be good way of measuring the success. So timeframe, also budget would factor in as well in terms of, Hey, we planned to budget for this wind down or does that and then actually yeah, I, mean and that point budget is for sure and in of dumping Saturday I, we found out something later on which we did not have plan for so he went over right but again, it's it to report expected. You Know How do we know? That in budget anyway. Right. That'd be really exceeded the budget, but you're right budget is critical. A lot of that I think you you can't. Be Is. Accurate about it. When you get into it as you start inning you slowly you get to know the law you got to know the customer obligation so and so forth. You kind of know what looks like and then you build on it but that's a look I, mean cost and time for sure he walked me through legal entity planning as part of wind down what that looks like. Yeah. So legal entity depend on the situation right so then entity you're talking about right now is Let's say. You know as an example. Company. You you did not. Moore's legal entity know as part of a Muslim cannot conditions interviews one of the biggest. Last, one of the last thing we do is we say, well, what's legal entity plot anymore legal entity with a the Acquiring company. or You keep it because you don't have any GONNA, end it in that specific region or what have you. In. This case if exactly opposite now you're the finger out. If she have degraded and Eagle entity or if you have not, she has not been I think the question about. Okay. So what do we need to do? We need to keep it what all the dependencies England usually you have your customers on that customer contracts on the legal entity, you have your payroll or the legal entity you have things like your it on the legal entity of manufacturing all those things on the legal entity. So as you're planning to our this start figuring out. Okay. So what am I dependent dependencies and? Slowly. But surely when you hit all those milestones, then I think I'm the point where you say okay. So now can I what do I need to do with this? Now I don't have any customer contracts that are GonNa have any payroll on it I don't have any manufacturing and what do we do would I be keeping their does it make to make sense to keep de WanNa wait to somebody else you know those are the steps I. Think you have a good tax team in most cases you do. They have to be walk through them to -cations one way or another day, but it doesn't stop until you really I mean I talked about the Blue Pierre as a large function to which of the light but Beagle entity I think is very cross functional initiatives that everybody's in world finance tax. Everybody child so. Then you decide what makes best sense for the company. And then you're. It. Are You keep it but that's the important thing down that you've got to plan for it's it's interesting. It's sounds like a lot of considerations I go into that and even some crossover without your planet. Divestiture. Yeah Yeah very similar divestiture to make it. Yeah. What What are some best practices you have for somebody that's going to have to go through wind down Well I. I can tell you from my experience I think to really getting having a solid I think it all starts with the executive really having a good support from the. Good clarity on what we're trying to do. It could be the senior Clinton. The president of that our business could be, it might be whoever's in charge for it. I think it's very important to have that clarity and support because all talked about so far has implications and that those implications and become a big ball of fire rate and it can have a big implication on the company as long as that clarity there from the top that number one having that you know you can't. You can't walk into something like this without having very good understanding of really need to do this. So that needs to happen because at any point, if you change that then the real problem secondly, once you have that having a good team assemble right because sales really know about that the customers as manufacturing folks really know about what can they do manufacture because some cases that becomes important criterias forward planning the wind down, they opt amount of factors to and so proud after that I can shut down. So that becomes critical. So again, I mean you have the right people I mean this is nothing new that probably applicable everywhere but. More. So in the case of wind on because I, think that's very specific project with specific I don't land I think those are the things that would have a very good communication have good communication lines with the executive give them updates on a weekly monthly basis for that. Dan. Are caught in the dark if you if you need anyhow go to them right right then and there, and if you think we need to pull up before we do any announced than that's probably the better thing then to go ahead and see what happens. I think having a clear line of communication having solid team I would say the other two things other things other than that. You know you probably GonNa dive and catch. Yeah there's a lot of learning on the go, but it sounds like I heard a couple good themes there around a lot of planning the legal entity, side the communication, and then getting the right people involved to execute. Well. Yeah absolutely. You know I gotta ask but was the craziest thing you've seen emanate. Yeah so I think being doing this for a while I think I wanNA maybe if you may have. Their different rates I think I, want I have. About crazy but I haven't feeding probably a lot of them have seen them as well. But a question I really is about you know the. The. Mystery show for them and. They I mean, why did I mean we all agree we all. Agreed that okay. It's about nine people seventy percent I. Think I call our business review study that they found it about seventy to ninety percent of acquisition. Feel and you know I, I'm a I'm a sports by myself and I'm thinking. If you ought to a major league batter may major league baseball butter you know few are betting hundred. I think two hundred, you probably a probably need to do something. You're not going to be playing in in a major league team for a long way but yet knowing this I don't know why we still. I mean, it's a good question. I. It's something that I always wonder I know that in. Fact for many many many years. People have been doing acquisitions but what do we need to do is it is it maybe the goal that we said? For the success that needs to be recalibrated something we need to differently and the times are changing quickly all the way to I don't know there's some something turned us food for thought I, always have. No any. Of this because. I'm from. The. We're still learning the science for this on how? The the success rate of a it's interesting I'll I have to post something about it but It seems like a lot of it does fall apart on the integration side and everybody complained much. But when it comes really getting that many people involved execute a high level of change management is the big challenge where what have you seen? What do you think are the big challenges that hamper the success I? Yeah I think I think offered probably integration you're right I mean there are so many moving part rate and happens over twelve to eighteen months on the average for the larger deal. from integration perspective. So there are a lot of things that can go wrong. I'm I'm not disagreeing with you but also maybe on the deal side to they were doing a deal and the you know you're creating an auto is maybe the there. There's something to that as well. So maybe that that could be something that we probably need to go back and look at what did achievable was that the right return on investment that we really thought we should how long do they? Factor I don't know on the show that people looking at this all the time but that's something that always wondered about. Especially when you talk about wind down, you know you know when things go down then unfortunate new you have to wind down because you know nobody wants to meet cash on something that's not working. So same thing applies. To acquiring companies and be very careful about. You know the they've done Westland on it and holly fans out to the employees for the customer. Then everybody across the board. So I don't have I don't know what we pay on that. Topic for us to even take some of the ideas from these interviews and consolidate. Thought did I want to thank you so much for spending time with me and covering a lot of great lessons about how to win the business line down. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much time. Thank you for taking the time to explore the world of a with our podcast. Please subscribe for more content conversations with industry leaders. He like our PODCAST, support us by leaving a five star review and sharing it I enjoy hearing feedback and connecting with our listeners. You can reach me by email. It's Qissan K.. I S. O. N. AT DEAL. Room. Dot. Net. Emanate Science is sponsored by deal room it project management solution for mergers and acquisitions. Additional educational content is available on deal rooms blog at deal room dot net forward slash block. Thank you again for listening to science. See you next time. Using opinions expressed on emanate science reflect only those individuals do not reflect the views of any company or entity mentioned or affiliated with any individual. This podcast is purely educational and is not intended to serve as a basis for any investment or financial decisions.

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Episode 158: Now Hear This: Christian Gormsen on Breaking Convention in the Hearing Industry at Eargo

MedTech Talk Podcast

1:10:57 hr | Last month

Episode 158: Now Hear This: Christian Gormsen on Breaking Convention in the Hearing Industry at Eargo

"Welcome met backpack podcast. This is your host and today. I am thrilled to have christine gums. And your though is revolutionizing the way we think about hearing access to hearing christian is new meteor doors lead the transformation of the company culminating in its public offering in twenty twenty. I should add as a caveat that my gildas in investor in year ago. And i have the pleasure of serving on christians board but with that disclaimer christian. Welcome thank you jeff. Thank you for having me. It's a real honor to be on the show terrific that dive into a lot of different topics And maybe as usual. I like to go back in time. A little bit with our guests and in this case. I'd like to start maybe with your entry into the hearing industry because you've now been in the in the business for quite a long time and to start with a curious as to what really appealed to to get into Dealing with patients with hearing loss in solving some of these problems our you make me you make me sound like i had had a perfect to disappoint you right. Away at is actually quite ironic. I was studying finance accounting. Of all the things i started my career in investment banking as a sell side analyst. Balas actually my first encounter with The hearing aid industry a hearing aid industry is for far for unknown reasons. Heavy sense at around denmark. Danish national three of the world's five largest companies not based out of denmark. So it was obviously something that got some attention also listed out of denmark. And i got a little bit acquainted with his industry that was sort of being considered division an analogy where people back in the forties and fifties. You were being made fun of if you will eyeglasses. That was all of the investment thesis and obviously change eighties and nineties. And you know vision today you know. It's a massive prevalence off of vision loss white. But the penetration is sky. High right and saying you know hearing is very much the same from a prevalence point of view because it's not a disease it's natural we will all lose our hearing you know. The penetration is very low. It's global penetration is probably around ten percent mature markets like us europe around twenty twenty five percent so the pieces back ended in the late nineties. so definitely caught a little bit of interest i. I didn't specific overhearing sector. I moved on from banking into to mackenzie started working as a as a consultant on moore's strategy covert finance and strategy and within mckinsey. We were doing some work within hearing aid sector. And i knew a little bit of out of from my mic prior life in banking. And what what. I really liked about the industry and the reason why i ended up doing a lot of work at mckinsey and been following joining one of my clients. Laws you know from an investment point of view you're looking at a tailwind macro trends that are driving long term growth and hearing is definitely a category with ad right hearing losses as we said it's natural it comes with age and a and a huge macro trend is an aging population. Right people used to have a life expectancy of about sixty seven where now in the early eighties and it continues to grow up the baby. Boom generation so significant tailwind significant is significant under penetrated marketplace by. Ben also makes it makes it attractive. And what i learned when i started doing work within the hearing eight sectors but profound impact that a hearing aid has on a person's life right because it is you know hearing is one of your five core census and you will let die from hearing loss but you will live a lonely life and you will lead live and less active life. If you're not doing well withdraw yourself. And seeing the impact that hearing had people like wow business actually even bigger than all my financial rationale this This impact on on on the quality of people's lives was was just fascinating to pot of especially. Because i kind of had the feeling that we were in the infancy of of an industry off getting ready to really take off right so so in two thousand three. I got the opportunity to join one of the clans but world's fourth-largest hearing aid company with a fifteen percent global market share as head of strategy and business development. I this is. This is off the best of all worlds. I get to work with the areas. That i enjoy working with. But i get to do it in a really meaningful industry. That is characterized by everything. But i believe in from a financial point of view. Yeah and this brings up a lot of questions for me. Maybe starting with sort of this under penetration in hearing loss in his Think of my own family. My wonderful father in particular who didn't hesitate to buy glasses when he was starting to suffer from You know say presby. Oh piano getting readers but When he started losing his hearing it was you know it was painful to try and get him to actually have a hearing it even today. You know it's happening. Wears hearing aids. Every day is is some you know. It's an exercise. So what what what. What is it about this condition given what you say. I mean incredibly socially isolating a. Why is it that so many people forgo hearing aids or postponed. Yeah no i think it's. It's something as illogical stigma right And that's why. I brought up the division analogy that you know back in the forties fifties post-second world war glasses. You were really really old are and as a younger person. You were guaranteed to be made fun of if you walk stigmatize category obviously that changed with fashion and i think you'll change it. Changed age in for for vision was obviously one for the fashion industry but then to also the fact that it was. Actually you're smart. If you wore glasses it would be a sign of intelligence if you walk glasses with hearing aids in we're definitely lacking that one because right now again it's as natural vision loss right but you know if i was wearing a hearing aid and we met each other people be saying what's wrong with this person i will. Why does he have at behind him. If you're at your dentist and your or your doctor and your doctor is wearing glasses. He's smart you know. He's taking care of his vision. He's making sure that he can do things the right way. But if you see that plastic casing hanging behind his ear you immediately want. i wonder what's wrong with the stigma. Say he's old that that would be that. And you immediately distrusted someone from episode. So i think. I think that's how we all feel and think. Hopefully people can recognize this. The other piece of this for the person putting on. I'm not that old i can still hear. It's not like you can't hear right you just here. S you have a harder time following. We did a study at my my my old company where we were sort of benchmarking buying experience of hearing aids and it was rated on par with adult diapers. That's how embarrassed that individual getting a hearing aid is considering the purchase fighter interesting interesting and the other thing at about just about. You know you're getting into this This industry The thing that i found interesting is you joined a company. It was really a traditional a hearing aid company. And maybe talk a little bit about that sort of the conventional wisdom of the business in what you know you learned or what you observe value there and maybe as we start to get into your ago howie kind of informed some of your thoughts about how to change business now no I joined. Because i i saw. You know how this biz landscape was changing quickly right. And i saw the benefits of the product mid need for the product. There right so back in the if it just take big step back back in the eighties. You had like two hundred. Different manufacturers technology providers of hearing aids but with the emergence of more sophisticated processes or digital chipsets icees federal massive consolidation. That's how i got introduced to industry. You know in in the late nineties energy two thousand. So you know. Essentially it's not a classic industry roll up from very localized approach. Many many different participants to what is essentially today five large players right. And then you know really. The importance of driving. Technology aren't the cost technology development miniaturization. All of those things. I found fascinating. Because you know things you can do with scale in capital right So it was. I felt when i joined the company. Biswas at you know we weren't early innings and was becoming it went from being a dusty old fashioned business to being much more technology. Lead business right. That's bows my focus vows. My rationale joining what. I quickly learned getting into it. All event was to embarrass a lot of opportunity and add in. It's been very successful industry. As a whole it's it's been a very attractive investment area for for investors with a lot of public companies. But when i started learning but i was only seeing a small piece of the total industry because this was classic technology engineering at b2b. All sale that we did through this technology company was into distribution right so selling to traditional hearing aid clinics or large healthcare contracts with hospitals. And so on so the actual patient or user interaction was not with the technology company but through a distribution rights. Those plastic B. c. of where i was participating in was to be to be side off the industry ammo. We saw the biggest barrier to driving. Change one cost viewing Typically not a covered. It's not covered in the us. It have a as some level of reimbursement across the world as a significant out-of-pocket item in in most markets at a cost. It's a barrier and ben distribution. These clinics have not changed in decades. So what happened in the mid two thousand as some of the manufacturers decided to follow it integrate so start acquiring clinics because bows out of the next level of up in industry structure and it doesn't mean make sense to buy clinics on working very well and is not a great user experience so at gm which was my company. We decided more. Let's try to build other ways of creating access to hearing aids find us assigned so we started working with vision companies. Somebody like spec savers out of the uk pharmacies Actually boots out of the uk as well the us. We started working with costco. Who had actually successful gone into vision and pharmacy rite and help costco built out. Cosco hearing centers. Right soft broaden the distribution because i if if the goal here is to have more people here better you know we should probably also address wave evian distribution of right so badly became an ice of spearheaded that strategy with engine and got to see how other types of get retailers is actually selling products. How can you leverage traffic How can you sort of get into this. Whole new world that as as a classic technology company you never really dealt with. It's so fascinating in one thing that i imagine. Now you go into a costco and it's perfectly normal to see the aid center but that that at the time must have been a bit of elite to go into these big box stores or was it was it kind of a. Was it an obvious fit. When you're starting this relationship wasn't costco had started already as you can probably tell. I'm a huge fan of costco. So impressed with how run business ovid headset said. Hey this is an opportunity given the success baker already experiencing. But i remember when i met costco back in two thousand five and you know the the head of cillari businesses. That's everything around but wall was telling me he said christian what i don't like biz industry. All manufacturers are treating me like the best of step child. They don't wanna give me their best products because they're afraid off the channel conflict with the classic clinics right. And i'm just here to have more people here better and you know so. And that's when we sat down and i was like well. Why are you so eager to get the best brands. Because nobody knows any products anyways nobody can mention a name of hearing aid. You're right but because we want the best for members. Let's the costco value right as well. What what all of your members know as vino kerpen signature. Why don't we create a curtain signature hearing aid. Why don't we do that because you know that's gonna make it easier for the manufacturers to sell to you of course hours on manufacturer at the same time and you will immediately drive trust and credibility with your members because they know if as a kirkland signature stamp on at costco's dan's behind it okay. So the next challenge. They had business to be successful as they couldn't really get conditions or because in order to sell hearing aids needs to be a certified to spend so on audiologist with Relevant state license in that given state and of course costco doesn't pay as well as private practices. Thus right big. They offer many other things so it was very hard for costco on compete on finding staff to staff the booths so the other thing we did is we actually built an education program university where we would train assistant costco employees to pass the relevant state exam for licensing right so we would basically take people off the floor different roles right train them up and you know is it like a one year apprenticeship program and then had them be able to to sell in bet given warehouse right became it sheared success. Lot of it. You know because this became employee development within costco and so and as an employee you could literally more than double your salary by going through this program and you would also been have staff at. Were very loyal to costco right yes. We were afraid early on a lot of people would leave to join private practices and make even more but given you know how cobb at costco had given a paternity at the health. Healthcare plans but benefits of being a costco. Employees seem incredibly little turnover. But you know. I spoke to to costco last summer and they have now graduated more than one thousand five hundred employees in his apprentice program right and created opportunities for them while rolling their distribution. So now costco has hearing centers in every single. Wow right across north america so it was just a great story. Great experience of building that up and you know obviously been very very successful to the point at costco. Is today the number one outlet over one number one distributor of hearing aids in the us. Yeah it's a fabulous example just innovation in in what in its own right was probably pretty You know embiid clock stores have been growing of course but to be able to accelerate that growth with the expansion into not an obvious of businesses. Just a great example of innovation and maybe that the good segue to ear go in and your shift two years ago and maybe talk a little bit about I for those. Who don't know that you're go. Product may be given overview of the air go product in business model. And then i wanna get into you know the state of the company when you got there and kinda your your journey with the company. Now thank you again like you said it was fascinating to to get to where i also work with all goebel retailers around the world and what became so clear as to be successful selling hearing. It's it's not just about the product it's also about the service end experience right at bets. bets made costco successful. A lot of retailers have tried to do it but they haven't been able to create service element so i had left. I left yen back in two thousand twelve On to pursue fervor a career opportunities at been into hearing aid industry for for about ten years and up you know to as advisor within private equity predominantly that was a lot of large-scale transactions. Happening at within be hearing aid industry worked on some a bat and sort of looking at you know. How do i get to work in general more service and you know the power of people that was really something that i found fascinating So two things happened. One did advisory and two. I got a job in one of the world's largest service organizations. I s not the space station but it's a lawsuit thing management company out of europe about half a million employees but running facility management services as global commercial director. So how could we built new contracts within service but in parallel. Obviously doing some advisory work. And i got connected through foam mckinsey colleague sued to ugo. He wasn't looking at making an early stage investment. They were literally Is still seed funding and he described as as you know it's a silicon valley based revolutionary begging a change. The world they have is unique hearing technology and make everybody here better okay. I've heard that pitch at least twenty thirty times. And i can tell you with guarantee it's not gonna work so my best advice to you is don't even waste your time. You know in in my career in the industry had been looking at all new startups in the space right and yes as a huge market opportunity but one bit technology the barriers to entry from a technology point of view art class one class two accent medical devices. It's really hot as a reason. Why only five players from a technology point of view. Even if you crack the technology which. I've never seen anyone do. Outside the big players then you got the whole distribution of servicing to selling appearing it's which is essentially owned captured by the big five. You know the perfect oligopoly. So don't do it while. He was pretty insistent that i met with the two founders of year ago when i i met two people at never met before I would say the post a child's of silicon valley triple degrees out of an incredibly impressive universities and an iq had never been close to seeing before but really knocked me out in. The first meeting was the presentation of year. Goes the asking. What is your alone. Yugo is an invisible. Virtually invisible comfortable rechargeable hearing aid that basically sits of floats directly in your ear canal. You can take it out like airpods. Recharge it airpods wind invented at the time and sense of the product and then the second piece of year ago is instead of selling through classic established distribution channels ego is a direct to consumer focused companies selling directly to the end user one delivering the product but also delivering all audiology care or will be now called tele care and support directly to the user so so jeff i met the two founders and you know the the one of the founders literally pulls its device out of his ear and i'm like one i hadn't seen it most hearing aids ninety percent of hearing Behind year right. And i was like i gotta see that does hearing In be ear are custom built. I fully including a hard plastic shell inside your year. And this was like a tiny silicone based device with a with a hot electric package inside with silicone and hours. I i pull it out of his hand. I jammed that into my own was like wow. This doesn't feel like an o'clock a you. Don't get routed sense. How did you do this. And that was so funny. It's actually my father's bench and a lot said this whole silicon piece which actually looks a little bit like a fishing fly over already iteration dead. It's invented by my father and he. He's an ent surgeon so he's been foaming obviously. Unc procedures tens of thousands of procedures and business. What he does. And he's so frustrated with people not wearing hearing aids or family wearing hearing aids. We're not using them to your father all are if that wearing hearing aids man actually jamming a lot of debris on wax the years and making your works wanted to create something that would basically enable a healthier at that would allow via the brief so it doesn't heat up we all know we wear our plots. Right are other had seven after an hour or two year heats up. Because has no ventilation has no airflow right. So he wanted to create that and he'd been invented this silicone concept his son on his co founder. Who were both out of stanford buyout assign. One was an md. The other one wasn't engineer. Out of petit right had been come up with tricks package which was essentially a hearing aid the whole concept bad as you can probably hear just blew me out right when i saw it as like business you you guys are doing what everybody has been trying to do but never made work. Thanks to the uniqueness autumn in obesity but father Original silicone invention so i ended up recommending the investment. I learned a little bit about silicon valley that even if you propose an investment. You don't necessarily get it but luckily the two founders called me up and said we'd love to get your your help you know building out the company but it was a prototype level met. I remember my first note to invest. It was. hey. I don't know if this is gonna work but i've never seen a more compelling business case of how to build a design a product from a technology point of view and the opportunities it would open up in terms of user experience. I just absolutely phenomenal. So i ended up being an adviser. And i bake base became a board member would win. The series was closed in twenty fourteen. And i had been with the company since then. And that's a really interesting in you know. Of course like every startup there's ups and downs said that That come with it and of course your goes in a in an extremely good place right now but there was some tough sledding in the early days now no for me as you can hear. I had been silica. I was living in europe. Right was the silicon valley dream. Rider is what you're seeing. All the tv shows right Super smart people lots of venture capital interest. You know and getting real money into a company with a great idea. And i would be as a board member at beat flying back and forth every two months you know and and just seeing these super talented people work. You know what. I always joke as men but my usual response when i talked to engineering teams and gm. We were running. Plus five hundred. Engineers is like no no no. We already tried it. It doesn't work and no right beds of your classic engineering answer. And whenever i was working with yoga though it was like oh yes but maybe we could do this in. It was so problems solving or and so agile so long story. You know the company went through. You know series aid series b ashby got. They made the product work. They built the quality system. They got a you know the fda clearance all of these things built the whole regulatory framework. And as part of the plan you know decided to launch as a dc company which. I wasn't fully convinced the was possible. I cannot claim credit for that but basically went out because of course one of the challenges being young companies. You gotta show constant progress And you get to a point as a technology company where you're to show commercialization right and they wanted to prove commercialized. Stations through dc and you know. The alternative was to start selling into captured channels which wouldn't provide same level of economics so we decided to go for dita see. Approach launched classic ecommerce website Ben i was really skeptical at. Can you get the senior demographic to consider a multi-thousand you know. This was a two thousand dollar purchase for health online. At as a reason why people go to clinics big believer in service but the company decided to go with his econ model and to my amazement. The response was overwhelmingly positive. Right big bows. And what i learned is for peop- for for health issues. People liked to do research in private. They don't talk about stigmatize products. Like hearing it but you of course you know if you can't hear and people do a lot of research online at echo could benefit fan. They got a lot of interest from people who wanted to hear more. Who interested in doing more. So we were driving. Leads being named individuals with full-contact who wanted to to try it for product or experience more at a tune with business biggest challenge for clinics to get traffic right so they were essentially solving for the biggest variable in terms of growing the hearing aid industry so surrounding exciting they decided to to launch product and does the series veep at like twenty five million dollars in the bank and at and went for it and this was super exciting and we all watching and then i remember a few. You know a a couple of weeks in six eight weeks in the founder calls me up and he's not christian. We have a problem. I know you haven't built a scalable supply chain. You can't really deliver products. Product level is not a good enough quality. As i yeah. That's that's all true like you know we can fix fat We just can't keep cutting corners on of course we are cutting between was cutting corners and that it. You know verification validation because they needed to show commercialization ends at the meeting the problem. I'm like well. What's the problem. Because i think that's a big problem while the problem is we're actually not converting all these with riding. I'm night what do you mean. Well you know. We're getting all of his interests. But we're only converting one percent. I said well all the plans are based on five percent. And that's what you're driving the spending on media dollars on and correct so that means you're essentially burning for million dollars plus a month and not getting any anything offset it and is like correct so what was supposed to be a growth plan. Became a cash burn. Plan running out of cash very very fast right so we ended up having an of the emergency meeting in january. No and is all saad topa and we were sitting without the founders me and the two sincere and a series b investor maveron in the al. And having this discussion about what to do because this was not work and abbas sort of i learned another startup experience at christian bizet's a classical silicon valley startup with you have a great idea great concept and not the best execution and you fail and bets benefit sitting there like this. This is just wrong. On i get it i understand it and i absolutely receive numbers but honestly this product is amazing. We know customers love it. Even vote product wasn't media working in there were failures and a people didn't want them money back. They wanted another product because they like being visibility to comfort someone so again you had amazing product market fit and those were for the few who sold and then had tried the product and then clearly just selling online doesn't really cut it but you know the interest is there so then must be something else than just having people convert on a website at you know that has to be a fixable problem right so I said that instead what what what would it cost. I don't know but we'd probably need to spend at least up to what's twenty million dollars just to get the product right and just to be able to have the company run long enough at. We could irritate on commercial models and both matt raanan yays stood up and said well where ready to to refinance company. You know where we do. Have one asking you to join in an operating capacity and but we agree. That's why we invested in the place at so so that's really what happened in the early twenty sixteen. I luckily adult life at a very very supportive and she could see how much i was enjoying my trips to california so like you said either. Something is happening in california. I don't wanna hear about or really enjoying what you're doing california. And why don't we do it before we we've lived in you know we have. We have three children born in three different countries prior to the u. s. So we were always said we would love to to live abroad again for the right level of opportunity and i think this had it right and So so we came to the summer of twenty sixteen and in the meantime the founders had sought of rebooted the company bay Shaved down to pure engineers pure survival as they cut about one hundred people down to fair to people when i joined So we were sort of in. We're sort of under reboot path and then in parallel funding up to my joining. We had sort of been looking at commercial models and had been introduced to sort of little bit of a out. Call them the renegade of the hearing aid industry gentleman colville brownie. Who's now our coo. Who had visited build an online sale hearing aid early. Two thousands where it wasn't possible that have been sold to industry leader. And and what he told me is christian you know. There's a lot of his verified that people research online but is that the way you make them convert or make him comfortable enough to purchase. Is that you need highly skilled. Know we call him hearing guides but consultative selling guiding people through the process and not just relying on web so basically an outbound contact center so so we launched that. I hired him. We built that team out of nashville tennessee. And we re launched a company in early twenty seventeen and you know we were you know out off the bat converting four x amount of people. We were on a bureau westmont. Sorry now at a long ramble jeff. None of that was that was great and imperfect and and so you know i want to really get into kind of this transformation of the company but before we do. I mean what's also interesting is you. You do see a lot of failures in the hearing aid industry as you referenced earlier earlier as you are talking about you know the reasons why This investors shouldn't invest in ago. But early in my career as a company called songbird the you probably remember the companies like sound hawk in make it what what. What were those dude to sort of the challenges of the distribution or the technology or how is your go really over to able to overcome these challenges that no both psalm burden and sound hawk. It was product related. Failures tried Because the thing is you know what people don't understand this know the technology's inside hearing aids a world-class hearing aids but big five. My my old world is all what's called. Ultra low power processor strike. It's it's very sophisticated. Basically you know it's a unique processing technology that isn't applied any other industries. What song bird and sound harbor doing sombor so early. It was actually an analog right but the sound hawk. It was a digital chip. You know the form factors that you build easy end up. Being very large right and sound hall was a beast right. Sound hard as it took over your ear right. Sandberg was actually quite small but the quality of the audio processing was just bad right so it is visible. But what. I've learned since then Is this classic. Met tech right at the barriers to entry from a technology. Point is so high right. And i think with year-ago one sign you but sits inside but year was. He has a lot of acoustic benefits. The you know the team and business. What i loved about joining the team broke all the rules right. Classic rules when you build acoustic devices is that you need to have all the sound processes on rigid flex to not create vibrations and then to create stability and ego. Did everything against the rules did it. Unflexible. pcp's the whole design process in business. Never gonna work but to the skills of you know bringing people who had not built hearing as before but with build up types of electric devices both in control. Monday healthcare they. Actually you know. I called the first year ago. The bumblebee right. But bumblebee is not not supposed not supposed to fly so it does it anyways. And that's what is so. It's really kudos to the founders. Engineers early engineers. We had in they. They manage sort of to defy conventional logic through experience right and an exit build a product that worked and then the have been other products that have worked out caged but they all run right into a walled in terms of creating distribution. And i think that's why you're goes. Uniqueness in terms of invisibility had actually allowed us to drive enough demand that we could actually stopped building a business on it. But the last thing i would say to. This one is Our early investors that we would never have survived. We would never have been successful if it wasn't for the willingness to to lose a lot of money right ethic the challenge of year. I think we burn through two hundred million dollars of capital business. Been an expensive bumblebee to get flying right early on right. You know business. Wherever availability of risk capital venture capital is is. What makes these things successful I would argue. It's great execution for the management team. But i must acknowledge you know what what what venture capital also bringing. It's giving us opportunities to run companies at a loss right because if we had pushed for profit early. And i think ego is undisputedly been best early funded hearings dot up ever and gave us vs opportunities to actually fail and pivot and come back again. Yeah yeah you said something earlier. That i hadn't really fully thought through or appreciated when you're talking about how the just the bb mentality of the traditional hearing aid industry and now suddenly you know you're not to be you are directly connected to the end user and i'm curious how liberating was that. How scary is that. How liberating was that as you got into. You know really this part of the business being directly connected to your To your customer you know. It was one of those journeys in italy super exciting and liberating because sunny. You're getting direct feedback much more quantifiable than what you get from from from a second party right because typically we would get feedback through the clinician and not from the end user so we would hear it directly we would also be able to work with the end users directly in terms of how we supported them to sort of help them. Better use the product right so we iterative so much faster on experiences right because we have that direct feedback loop bed but nobody else has so ala's like super exciting and we immediately build out the deck about you know how this data integration data luke can go and how this becomes an avalanche. That's gonna take over the world but that was one of the early days bennett. Got really scary. Because what what. I'm used to from my old world selling could be selling database when you open a door. You're pretty much guaranteed a certain level of revenue every every month every week every day. Every month right you know that door is going to continue to order from you if you do a good job right so you basically it's about building your install base of distribution points which is pretty simple. That's how most tech works but the scary thing about keita's is every customer is a new customer right on just because you just had one hundred customers buy new hearing aid next month you need to find another one hundred customers on top of the hundred. Y'all ready have right so you constantly. So service pressure of of constantly getting new customers. Plus you know nightmarish. Frankly because it's such a different approach right. I think now but we've really started working at the good news. Wet starts getting fun again. As you know hearing aids is not something you stop wearing right and typically you get quite a few cycles of hearing. Aids of industry standard is like about free cycles. going until they pass away. It's like three to five year renewal. We're seeing because we have running a high cadence of product innovation that he already after two years. We're starting to run meaningful upgrades right so now. We're actually getting the benefit of the install base but but not on a daily weekly monthly as most beat the b. Has it right. But we're starting to get that on onslaught of long-term matter you which is of course making it fun and we still have all the benefits of being in direct contact with users so we can much more taylor our approach to who they are our messaging so you know it is undisputedly the most powerful way but again it is pretty scary to get through that new acquisition meant to just got to be running at such a high clip. If that makes sense yeah no absolutely talk a little bit. About the destruction of the technology the destruction of the business model. Another thing that i've you know maybe disruptive is the wrong word but but the marketing around euro go is so clever for anybody listening if you haven't seen the commercial than or commercials yet the youtube it but tell us about that. Because i think you know if you if you look at other hearing aid commercials. It's a doctor in a white coat. Very kind of stayed and boring and then you flip to near go commercial and it's completely different. I guess another example of kind of breaking the rules in in higher market. Yeah no no. And i am i. I have to give credit where credit is the served. ugo came up early concepts. And you're right all hearing aid commercials today. Are you know grandfather grandmother light. Blue green white healthcare callers playing with the grandchild. Nothing that is really sort of setting. You free right. It's it's the safe approach And then you go comes out. I always loved the name of the right sort of creating that level of activity Round you're hearing baga the early concepts were you know misunderstandings things. You don't really understand you. Don't cheer if you don't hear well right. That was of know very sort of humor oriented. And i was. I was really not enjoying it. I was like. I think this is degrading. I don't think this is the right way to communicate senior spouse reading my approach until is said. Well you know one thing. I learned early in my career that i shouldn't trust myself. I should trust the real people. So i started talking to to a lot of senior sensing. What do you think about a year ago right. I i talk to my contact at costco. I talked to some of our investors right. And what they all said is i love it. I love the fact that. Finally i can see myself in this situation and finally it's something you smile about. So i remember talking It's one of our early supporters. Which is actually charles schwab Of all the people in the world and talk about a serious gentleman who's achieved a lot and he said christian that is not humor. Bet is making it human. This makes me feel like an abyss characterizes. You know what i'm seeing. And i think you guys are brilliant and i think you need to push it even harder in terms of how you do your marketing and i think we've evolved since And looting to the oval hurt campaign which is out of taking it a step high of and that right but but keeping the humor there because this is human. It happens to all of us right now. It's not just make it so medical. Do something that is memorable because what you really want is you want people to remember it and then activity do something about right and l. It starts with being memorable and i think where a lot of healthcare appetizing fails. Today is not very memorable right so again. Kudos to team for finding it at four again taking brisk right and i think my personal learning was. Hey you gotta you gotta know what you're good at right and my strength is not a. I'm not a creative marketing person. But you got to listen to some of the best creative people because what what what. I've really learned from marketing year ago. But it's all about consumer inside. It's all understanding. You know the emotional behavior off the usa side because that's what matters by Cobb you talk to those emotions and it's been such a such a great learning experience. Nothing where seeing results from it and it really gets to this whole theme. I think that is so central to era. Which is the stigmatization. You know these these commercials do make it seem human and normal and funny and the power of humor in catnip humanizing also really well done so if you were to look back then On the last few years what are there a few thing. What would you point to that really enabled your go to undergo this phenomenal. You know turnaround and just accelerate into a stage of growth. It'd it finds itself now. Are there a handful of things that you'd point to. Yeah the absence of that. I think the first thing is you can have the best idea. World ego definitely had a phenomenal idea. But but you need great people right. It all starts with talent right Because it's how you execute on a problem. And i think egos original talent was obviously the inventor of the you know. The father off found us fellow michel who came up with this concept worked on his kitchen right but then his sons and the early engineers who read it took upon how to sort of defy the conventional ways of doing things and and to your point jeff and thanks for pulling it out you know same goes to the talent of the marketing folks and so on so eddie ago. We've always had been that. We wanted talent to the internal. Doesn't mean that we have to do everything but we need people who are highly capable within everything we do inside the company right. We will not be lying on outsiders to to come up with a clever marketing campaign or to come up with certain solutions right. We we really had an amazing people. Inside zones of talent is first and foremost. Obviously you need an idea. You need to verify. Need to build a business plan. I was going to say it's hard to build a perfect business plan. You know you gotta be ready to correct so so really. How do you pivot how hard you try hot enough. But how the also pitted pot of what makes pivoting possible bows the second reason i don't is capital an access to capital and and i think that is one of the things that has been true unique from me as a european moving here into their silicon valley by that but has been be access to capital to access to to the okay to make mistakes. Because i don't think any company has ever been built without making mistakes and how you make up for that is by having the capital that will allow so. It's not that you die from one mistake but you actually have the opportunity to pivot so talent. it's been and i think it's been bad. Willingness not to get stuck right you know you know the best never a perfect plan and wherein dynamic world so how i you nimble and agile enough that you can react to changes and you know if something's not working change right. Don't don't try to make the one thing that's not working working because then you get stuck ride. I think that has been another key theme for year. Go and ben. But the last case because he's very tactical things but you can sort of control is having a very clear vision what you're trying to do right. What is it that you're wanna do. So it's it's back to vision. And i think from very early on what what was clear to me because i think you're go- wasn't a little bit trying to be silicon valley company. That's not a vision right. That's not gonna make you successful. And i think we were not completely clear on what we wanted to do. So when we of rebooted year is like business. All bowed head getting more people to hear better right. We need a very clear. On all star that cannot be financial metric you know. Financial metric is not enough star. You need something that has a bigger meaning and a bigger importance that you can way when you have tough decisions to make but you know. Hey is this going to help. More people here better in met could be lower cost more access. Different design different communication. Or you know or is it just gonna do something else so so far. I think one of the successes of year ago has really been vision because having strong vision has also allowed us again sought to make loop out of it to media tracked. Great people because a lot of people you cannot compete with facebook salaries apple salaries amazon salaries. So i had a google salaries but if you can offer them value proposition in terms of what you do. There's a lot of great talent out there who are willing to trade off cool cash with also making a difference So i think the you know the the circle i would be drawing around here the vision and the mission in the middle of yup. Yeah and it's a great segue into something. I know you think really deeply about which is team in culture and and actually something Discussing the which diversity. In at your go. This is a very diverse team from a gender perspective from a ratio perspective. But you also want you to talk about that but you also talk about something. I think is really interesting. Which is cognitive diversity. So maybe to talk to me about about this diversity why it's important this notion of cognitive diversity. In how that all kind of plays out within your absolutely and i think you know diversity of course it's the right thing and nobody can arg argue that and but but where where is also originated from was you know be being very definition of privileged myself You know being a six foot four. A white male free healthcare free education growing that way in europe at always having had access to everything else through banking mckinsey. You know life is pretty easy right. And i'm always been five personally. You know a competitive person. And what i learned what i read started learning. I've always been a team sports. But what i really learned that at mckinsey is people on different tried. One thing that mccain's it teaches you a lot about his personality at personal traits. And saying we're all different and it's not right or wrong yet. But and you know. The powell off combining different personalities. Right because we do different things right. I have very little creative sensing jeans. But i i am highly analytical right. You know for me to work with other people like me we will. We will not be able to get a touch of customer and business probably wiedeman. Cockney says diversity is so important. So what i've always looked for when i'm recruiting is the easiest to recruit yourself right on. It's also the fun thing but that's not gonna make you better. It's not going to make me better. It's not going to challenge me Personality point of view. And it's definitely not going to make the company better right because you're going to be very one-sided and bet that opens up a lot of weaknesses and as a lot of things that you do so i've always been very focused on. How do we find people who are introverts extroverts. How do we find all of that right because we need to be able to speak the language of our customers our employees. And you know one thing. The healthcare healthcare doesn't discriminate right. It doesn't matter who you are what you are what you believe in ride. It's impacting everybody. So i think very early on you know when we read been focused on building an executive team that is cognitive diverse. But by doing that we've also ended up with a very diverse team in thames off and not by design but probably more by being focused on what we need different personalities that we now are so i think we have four different raises right. We have different believes by mail. We have female and again. What i've learned and i wish i could say jeff at biz was intentional It was intentional to have cognitive diversity. But everything else wasn't but what what i'm seeing now is i have an easier. Time to recruit females and people of various colors because basically that represented within the executive. They don't feel that they're the only ones right. So the fact that you have diversity accident gives you the opportunity to recruit broader and becomes easier to recruit because you have a broader selection basis ride and innovative. We always been. We want to hire the best people right It doesn't matter who on what they are. We want the best people. Typically hiring females can be hard but if you actually have females hiring the females. It's a lot easier right and you're just broadening. You know the population that you can recruit from and i think what we also hearing being the business right. We're intact with customers. You can hear on a voice whether you're talking to young old you can tell on accent says a lot of things you can tell and it's important that you feel as a customer but you know the company you're talking to understanding so i think it's none of it has been intentional but i would say the power of it has been you know just incredible and i think for me. I used to be in a situation where. I could only recruit people because i was living in a country that didn't have any really didn't have a blend of nationalities right and we were looking for things and i think one of the benefits of being in silicon valley is that it's so diverse. Right where also in nashville tennessee. At bebbase best plenty of pools of everything right that you can actually drive that level of diversity and what has made me. The proudest of all of this is when we were awarded a in the last year. You know best company culture in america up right mike number one that you know the because people feel that belonging inside the company right and ultimately the most important asset we have the company is both people working and talking to our customers and the fact that they are you know excited about working at a year ago and rate culture as high of course off spills over. When they're you know taking customers through healthcare issues and helping them here better. That's not a pleasant thing right but but that comes across and i think that's probably the pop on the proud is. What do we project as a company right. Yeah it's it's. It's really been awesome to see that Play out you know. Obviously i don't see it firsthand. But but i at the still get the power of it through the conversations that we unite have and we happen to board level Mega the last thing will touch on Is is this transition to a to a public company and in particular. I be really interested in you know a now. I guess a couple of quarters since you've been public what is changed what what's Has there been a significant change in obviously reporting requirements and there is a sort of administrative legal aspect but in terms of maybe like the culture and what goes on with the company. Has that changed In this transition to a public company yes of course know yes. Things have changed and it was one of the things i was. You know concerned with right. How would visit packed up his. Obviously yes you need more compliance. You need more more structure Which are additional cost. And as a small company it becomes a significant percentage of costs right. But you're adding to the company however you know you can argue those processes actually good van the right things to do. It's hard to argue against a sox compliant end zone bows just good processes to have in place. The question is wendy. You implement them and as a public company. That's not a discussion. You have to be compliant with it so that was a little bit the tough part but what. I was really worried about becoming public company. Would we sort of lose because of confidentiality blackout periods. Would we lose connection with our employees and lose the motivation of our employees end. I must admit. I am so overwhelmed. Positively with what. It has meant to be a public company because actually been the opposite. I think we have an more dedicated workforce. Now people are very very proud. It makes a difference because people a little embarrassed to save a work in a startup company. you couldn't get anything else but to work in a public company we're seeing is something that gives people provide. You know the proud of what. The company is a cheesed in. We've always we've been. We've been having a lot of success also as a private company but the pride level has just you know it is like ten next as part of being public company and having of course being i think as you said we've had a quite successful public life so far been motivational impact. A lot of private companies do a lot of equity compensations. And so on. But what i learned. It is really only understood at best. Buy five percent of the employees. People don't really understand it. They don't really assess the value of it. Being a public company that becomes very simple. It becomes very easy and you know we definitely gotten a motivational boost from all of right. Which is super exciting right. So it's hard to point to negative sabotage. Probably saving grace for being a public company for our experience has been bet. Everything has been virtual. So we haven't been criss crossing the country in terms of talking to investors. Investors have been incredibly supportive and flexible. You know and and the fact that you can do these things through video. It's not even that much of a time sick right. You can do things very very efficiently for who you know. Our soom teams calls right. So i had been sort of dreading having to spend twenty five percent of my time doing all of this and that has not been the case because it has been so efficient and it seems like a whole public setting or environment is is all supportive of ad right. You know but you know investors the analysts so it can be done in a very efficient way one of the general benefits of covert here. Yeah yeah and actually just on. On that point i mean. One thing that i think was really an unknown. A year ago is how would you go. Perform a through a code and and the performance was exceptional. I mean really. Things just clicked for the company and it wasn't wasn't just kobe obviously because it's continue to To click along as as as kobe has ebbed a bit. but what what was it That in that that time period you'll go really figured out. Can you talk about just how it's been able to perform so well over the course of the past year. No no obviously we did not know right but but in syria we were sitting thirteen months ago with the feeling that hey this could be a real opportunity versus a real risk and it was a real risk but it could also be an amazing opportunity because the old point about business model is we sell direct to consumer and we deliver support for tele care right so it's not so through physical locations and obviously with covid very quickly proving that it was shutting down. Physical interactions one would slow down existing market which it did but it even though hearing aids are essential but it would also out of open people's eyes to maybe a different way or better way of getting getting the same kind of care and That's exactly what we saw right. You know we will again once again. We had the investor support to continue our media investments even though it was very very uncertain time so we kept our media so we kept driving the demand. I will always be saw from metric point of view views. Our conversion increased so more people vote willing to try. You know from your home and you know to try telemedicine and tele care and drove growth acceleration in q two of last year from a very strong q one and then you know when industry sort of reopened up and happened already accused three because hearing aids are essential business and industry actually bounded all the way back. We didn't see our acceptance all our conversion. Go back we actually solid maintained which you know probably makes sense because we know we're driving good outcomes clinics are right but i think just the fact that we got more people trying it it sort of you know. I think you know. I was listening to scott gottlieb right and one of the things he was saying out of. Kobe is like one thing. That cova has taught us Tele care is here to stay it because it makes sense and it's it's not saying that you can do everything for telecom but there's a lot of things that you can do tele care and at a year ago. Went up focused on covering all losses fight. We're focused on to mild moderate losses for majority of the population and not far Not clinical solution for your medical cases. We are focused on. You know age related hearing loss. Yeah well covadonga. The devastation of. Kobe can't be understated. But there will be things that come out of this era which which improve everyone's lives going forward and and That you're tied directly to kobe. But but this model this telecast model the the power of the innovation i mean. There's no question in my mind that it's it's going to open up this whole market for For so many people that have Put off addressing their hearing loss. So it's incredibly exciting. This has been really such a pleasure to. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. So i'm really glad we got the chance to have you on the podcast and can't wait to see what's next jeff. Note thank you so much and like i said it's it's an honor to be here. I think you this. Podcast has been exploration for me to to to listen to at screen outside back two year ago and co but i agree. I think we'll just getting started right. You know we knew with adidas e approach to healthcare with a senior demographic that we were early. Movers and a question pre code was where we too early. Could we really scale. Nfl covid has now sought of time walked things and a future only looking brighter because more and more people like except that unexpected and we know that wherever leader within veering space in terms of driving tele can driving online solutions. So thank you for having me. It's been a real loner again. Thank you for all the support that you and your firm exit have given to go as well.

costco aids denmark christine gums Balas jeff vino kerpen europe gm Biswas america mckinsey christian bizet Cosco
The GLEe Model

100 PM

12:47 min | 1 year ago

The GLEe Model

"Tom Welcome to one hundred. PM The show where we're interviewing one hundred expert product product managers around the globe to bring you all the actionable advice. You need to succeed in product. I'm your host Susannah product coach and founder of the Development Factory. And today you're listening to how to define your product strategy and exclusive multi episode series featuring Gabe give diddle former VP of product for net flicks. Today's episode is the Gleam model a long term phased approach to crafting a product vision as companies grow. There are a few common criticisms about the product strategy teams see and understand the projects objects but not how they fit together. Investors complained that. There's not a big enough product vision and the product team feels to focused on the short term. The Glee Remodel helps product leaders to form a product vision to address these three criticism. The model encourages teams to think big to think long-term in describes a phased step by step approach to build a product that dense the universe. The exercise also helps product leaders to avoid the one in done phenomenon articulated by Jeff Kagan a financial analyst who reflected on yahoos demise every successful company rides the growth wave until a crests and falls. The secret is to create the next growth wave before the first one collapse. The Glee model encourages teams to ask. What's next and forces long-term thinking to invent the future you have to be optimistic? And long term thinking enables anything is possible attitude by long term. I mean three to five years in this timeframe most things are possible but the glee model goes goes far beyond this to encourage product leaders to think ten to fifteen years ahead will lo is an articulation of the net flix product vision as described in two thousand five to understand why I call it the Glee Model. Look at the first letter of each word. Get big the G. The lead downloading the L. and expand worldwide. That's where the G Allan comes from so for Netflix. In two thousand five live the product vision was step one. GET BIG ON. DVD's step to to lead downloading and step three once your digital to expand worldwide. The model is deceptively simple. What follows is more about its derivation on thinking behind it? Netflix began as a DVD. By Mail Service but the initial business plan anticipated digital delivery in two thousand and two but streaming did not launch until two thousand and seven at this time Internet connections. Were finally fast enough to the move beyond postage stamp size video and by two thousand seven. Netflix could afford to pay the licence fees for reasonable quality streaming content. We expect back to each of the three phases to last three to five years. The first phase get big on. DVD's correspondent with both the launch of DVD players and the growth of e commerce two significant trans to serve the initial get big on DVD's phase and the net flicks to establish product market fit and for the time to build both a brand and economies of scale to critical hardcopy advantages the second phase to lead streaming began in January of two thousand seven seven and by two thousand ten Netflix started its international expansion with streaming only service in Canada global expansion required a digital only service as it would have been too challenging for Netflix to integrate its DVD by mail service with postal systems around the world during the streaming chapter of Netflix his life the company also expanded its device partnerships to nearly every TV game system DVD BLU ray player and mobile device nice in the world by twenty twelve. Netflix is finally established. A hard copy network effect through its device ecosystem in twenty twelve. The Fourth Chapter of Netflix life began original content in two thousand seven. Networks that experimented with exclusive DVD content via its red envelope studios but failed but in twenty twelve. netflix launched its first original content lily. Hammer the next year a one hundred million dollar investment house guards delivered a worldwide hit in twenty eighteen. Netflix is hard copy economies of scale powered. It's ten and billion dollar investment in original content like product strategies. These three phases are high level. Hypotheses they helped tell a story story of how a startup might develop over ten to fifteen years. You'll occasionally get the stages wrong but putting a stake in the ground enables teams to see how things fit together and to imagine how big the product might get the glee model also reinforces that. You don't have to do everything at once. Net flicks focused on its DVD EV. The by mail service for eight years before launched streaming and they needed to transition to streaming before they could expand globally last net. Afflicts needed the economies of scale that international expansion enabled to make significant investments in its original content when you look at the three phases from the glee model together with their product strategies. Things get interesting note. The importance of Netflix says personalization strategy over the four stages of Netflix grow as networks got big on DVD's personalization powered the merchandising of high quality high margin titles in the early the days of streaming when Netflix limited content personalization helped members zero in on a small number of titles that were just right for them as net flicks expanded. Globally personalization helped connect members with movies. They love regardless of nationality today with original content. personalization helps netflix right size. Its investments based on the knowledge of a hundred and fifty million members tastes. Netflix could reasonably forecast. Ten ten million members would watch Beau Jack Horsemen while a hundred million members would stream stranger things. Well informed forecasts let Netflix invest intelligently away presumably. They spent one tenth as much in. Beau Jack as stranger things. The ability to forecast dreaming hours based on member tastes enables net flicks to bill. Lots of great niche content as well as an occasional worldwide hit finding a high level product strategy that supports multiple phases says of accompanies growth is rare but if you accomplish lists as net flicks did with personalization. It builds a huge hardcopy advantage product strategy exercise number ten to outline the glee model for your product and company. Ask yourself three questions. What is the initial product product that enables the company and product to get big over the first three to five years of it's life? Are there trends that the product can surf much like net flicks looks rode the wave of DVD players ECOMMERCE. What are these trans for your company in product question number two? What will you lead? Read three to five years in the future. What is the next wave? Your product or company will ride the equivalent of Internet video for Netflix question. The number three once. Your product establishes a leadership position. How might it expand? Even further given the brand network effects VACs academies scale and unique technology or product will have at this point. What's the next wave of activity reflecting on your answers to the the questions above complete the glee model for your product and company? Fill in the blank for your product vision number one get big on blank doc number two lead blank and number three expand blank in the next essay. I'll share the Jama Emma model and how you can help your company prioritize growth engagement and monetization. So you and I when when we hung out in Australia we talked all about the glee framework in. I have been an ambassador of the glee framework ever since I when I talk about it with founders. I've discovered this people are scared to make these big declarations again and this is an example of on paper. Sounds really great. Get big on lead with expand into do you have advice for how the big or visionary this needs to be an. Is this something that belongs with the product leader or does it belong in the C. Suite to clean model. It does sort of get you in this place between product strategy and company strategy so I just acknowledged that on the first first question explicitly again with strategy. I'm trying to get people to think long term to be more thoughtful full about what's important or not to try to get out of the day to day delivery of projects which must be broker it up and so I'm just trying to get them to think bigger longer term. I do think as product liter if your job is to lead which is an inspired communication of the future Glee model helps paint a possible civil pathway. It helps organize people around big ideas that Mike go ten or fifteen years and frankly I think that people give you some leeway they understand its vision like in our family we have fuzzy visions like okay. My Fuzzy Vision is that at some year. I'm GonNa live in France learned French but my family's not like why haven't you been to France yet. They SORTA understand that. My Fuzzy Vision is I might do that over the next three to five years so they give you the leeway I would just nicely encourage those folks that are a little chicken to try it. I think that's goading. That's it's not nicely encouraging. Hey Chicken get brave. Because the other thing that comes with the is acknowledging that if you really encourage orig- companies to think long term you begin to realize that anything is possible. Look at Amazon. Who would've thought that a punk site would be bigger than Walmart? I mean they're getting close right. That's not possible two to five years but it is possible twenty so I'm just giving people licensed to think longer you're and if you can do it. Tends to be fairly inspirational I shoot. I got it wrong. Like my example. We're going to get big on textbooks and then we're going to go in the textbooks folks. Guess what I was wrong so I ended get big on textbooks Sept- to lead homework help we invented this new digital service. That's okay it's much better to have an aspiration and to try and then to learn than it is to have no aspiration that's the side of the monk WE'RE GONNA put up on that and if you're interested in more about the glean model go on over to the show notes and we'll link out to the previous recording with Gabe where he talks all about it at length and we've got some great Q.. Name and interviews. Well Gidel thank you so much for being here. Can you tell alert listeners. How they can reach you? Learn more. Stay in touch I am www gibson. BIDDLE DOT COM. I'm also Gibson biddle title on medium. All right you've been listening to one hundred PM with give bill. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks a ton Suzanne for having. It's been great. Thank you for listening adding to one hundred. PM The official PODCAST for one hundred product managers dot com. If you enjoyed the show. Please subscribe in the apple store at Google. Play or wrong stitcher or leave us a great new so others can help find us if you want to get in touch directly emails Suzanne at one hundred product managers dot com or. Were Bizet us on the web thank you.

Netflix Beau Jack Gabe founder Tom Welcome Jeff Kagan Susannah VP financial analyst BIDDLE DOT Development Factory Gibson biddle Mail Service Suzanne Jama Emma Allan Google Bizet
'A 5-star Hotel Told Us They Don't Allow LGBT Travellers'

Blinded Faith

31:44 min | 2 years ago

'A 5-star Hotel Told Us They Don't Allow LGBT Travellers'

"The capital ones saver card. Earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all of their purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to blind faith. I'm yes. It talking fates and beliefs and the impact they have on the world today, according to stonewall over, seventy countries, still criminalize, same sex relationships. So how does this discrimination affect LGBT travelers from the UK, does it change travelers views on visit some of the most incredible places on earth just because of their sexuality? I'm head into the hate Q of out of office dot com in sunny Farringdon in London to meet with the founder Darren, Ben my view is that if we don't travel to these places we don't go and explore these, essentially, if people on exposed to people like me, who are LGBT then minds went chain. It's analogy BT friendly. Look SRI travel company. Some hoping I can get a good handle a modern LGBT travel, and how countries beliefs affected. Hi, daryn. Hi, how are you? I'm very good. Congratulations on your offices, by the way. Thank you very much. It very nice. Thank you. Maybe a little bit. I'm going to get straight into it. Have you had a bad experience as a game on traveling abroad? Yes. Is this imbalance is a knowledgeable individual on the planet that hasn't felt some sort of discrimination when travelling to another country? And that's part of the reason we founded this business, I had a particularly bad experience with a former boyfriend of mine when we were traveling to Egypt. And you know, each Bizet known as being one of the most friendly countries, but we did at least think that we'd be able to be checking into somewhere Shamal shake with no problems is before the flying ban happened Shlomo foods, very tourist very touristy. And, you know, we got there and we instantly felt awful, we got to the check in desk, and we were basically told to go away. They wouldn't give us a double bed, while they were checking in other travelers, who straight and getting a double bed, you know, just made me feel so inferior, and it made me feel so upset wind up checking into another hotel. But it did really put a really solid mood the on the whole. The whole trip really just happened, the c walk into the chicken. You say you names. Well, they stay saw two guys. You could tell this. I mean, they were instantly uncomfortable about it, and, and it just made us think, well, this is the welcome reception like what's the rest of the staff going to be the other people in Resor going to be like, an actress? It's very rarely other people in the resort you feel from a hotel from its star. Yeah, they are welcoming ultimately end today in a lot of destinations around the world. Tourism is their lifeblood. It's what keeps them going. It's what supports their livelihood. And, you know, a lot of destinations on now very much comfortable with LGBT charters, but there's still a long way to go. You know, there are still seventy countries where it is legal to be gay, or LGBT, that is hopefully and is changing. But there's still a long way to go. And I don't think that seventy is going to reduce particularly quickly. Do you think is mainly the attitudes of people in the hotels, that will make you more comfortable? Or do you think it's destructor of how? Hotels are Bill in contrast like, Egypt, where it's illegal to be gay. I think is a combination of the two actually, I think there is an some international destinations a lack of training and lack of awareness amongst the staff. And I think what that means is it, it puts it puts the staff in a difficult decision because some of them are not doing it out of. Offensiveness. They're doing ignorance, so, for example, we know some travelers that went to India, and they were staying in a hotel over there, and it was, you know, when you go to a hotel, Mr. two, twin beds push together as a double, but it is a double bed. Right. And if there's knowing crack down the middle of miser crack down the middle. But that's the reality but every morning. The maid would come in and she would separate the beds, and it wasn't because she was homophobic, is because she couldn't understand why the couple kept pushing the twin best together when they were two guys. So it wasn't a homophobia thing. It was just an ignorance thing and actually, there is a lot to be said about that. You know, there are a lot of destinations, which just haven't ever been exposed to LGBT lives does in a way that makes them comfortable. But this even happens in five star hotels, it's not exclusive in, in the three stall overload chains. It happens in five stars, and big international changes to because there's some time, some of them don't have a global policy and therefore their runners franchises, or something like that. And, and it happens in places like that only this week, I got an Email from a five star hotel, which basically said they couldn't understand why we were trying to send travelers there because they were not gay friendly. I'll just read you what it said. It said, I thought it was an actual from this isn't actually from. A hotel that, that came just as I thought I was an, it's from their sales and marketing director's someone you think is, well, traveled and worldly wise because they're promoting that resort globally. Right. And they said, I thought I was quite clear in my Email, saying that name of resort doesn't seek promotion amongst LGBT society, because it is not gay friendly due to the size of our island and due to the lack of purposely, we don't support LGBT travelers that's incredible. I know. Right. 'cause totally incredible trying to sell the hotel exactly. And actually, you know what that does is instant means that we will not feel comfortable, sending our clients to tell and they are losing on viable, business and. The nuances in Email as well to say, because of the lack of privacy, it's almost them saying, we don't want eligible drivers in, in case if Ben's any of the other people that, but guess what most of the people travelling to our westerners in have a very good understanding that guess what? There are couples that gay men or two women traveling. Do you think is a point of, let's try and please our regulars? The are gay we have him coming on all the time. Our country, the people that don't contribute really view, gay people in the same way, the western world as you think, is because of that, or do you think is because they are she homophobic, potentially? There's there's, there's an element of that. I would imagine in terms of people thinking, well, you know, not everyone wants to see two guys holding hands two girls holding hands. It's a niche market. We're trying to please and actually, but the challenges there, Where'd you all the line if you're discriminating against LGBT, you suddenly discriminating based on someone's gender or someone's race or someone's disability. It's very, very unclear situation as soon as you discriminate against one repeat, you're affecting discriminating against everyone. I think high Jay, hi. How are you? I'm great. How are you? Very good looking. It's been offices. Now you have probably the best job on earth. And so I am a luxury travel concierge stay, I help clients put together that spectacular trips places for the very gay friendly places fo- for failed to really kind of match exactly what looking for what sort of things do you look for. So safe is a big five star hotel. What be let your first couple of things that you'd be on your radio? I think for me it's about how they differentiate themselves for LGBT clients. So his and hers dressing gowns for example, I mean, we'd want to his or to hers. Lovie is kind of small touches which just make it really personal, especially for our clients, who are going on honeymoons and going on once in a lifetime trips. These touches really do make such a difference. Have you had any bad experiences? I have had a few. I was actually in for Dominican Republic this weekend. A it was a really beautiful hotel. It was five star, but I actually had quite a few homophobic comments for me and my partner, we were being very respectful. We went holding hands and strangely enough. It was actually a tourist here were being homophobic, we happen to travel over spring break. So it was kind of a younger crowd. There were lots of Americans Canadians people from all over the place, but we were really taken aback by it, because we are asleep with frequent travelers, we are respectful enough countries, but it just really showed me, how important is to be doing this job and to make sure that we are sending people to places where they are going to be welcomed and see how thought people come from America Canada, the western world, you'd be open to. Yes, I would I guess it really does. Madonna, it just shows that you can't you come to you careful anyway, you go. That's what we come into play to kind of background checks, are they've been near the bud experience. You've had in any of the countries, I went to India a few years ago with my ex partner, we were in India was it was actually in goer. Oh, nice. Okay. Yeah. It was beautiful that we were going to celebrate of anniversary. So we expect to the hotel beforehand, we obviously look tint. Kind of making sure it was somebody who was gay friendly, and we specifically requested a double bed. When we arrived, we checked in to our room, and we had two twin beds, which was disappointing. But we kind of had a chat about it, and we decided to go and speak to a manager. So the manager came up to the room and he was quite confrontational and quite aggressive, and questioning why we would want double bed. And obviously, we felt really uncomfortable with us. We didn't want to answer we didn't know whether it was safe to answer so we kind of backed down and just spend a whole trip in twin beds, which we secretly push together. But it was really kind of intimidating experience net put a bit of a Downer on the whole trip, which was a real shame. Because we both wanted to go to India for so long. But I know it's improved massively since then. Stephanie on my list to go back to, and I'm sure it'd be a much better experience, when you are traveling about as well as the hotel list, but the hotels things out the way when it comes to restaurants when it comes to doing sort of your normal activity, you would do on holiday lying on the beach, things like that. What did you look for? I think it really depends on the client. I mean, some clients are wanting specific gay beaches wanting places which really dedicated to community, but me, personally, I'm quite happy to kind of integrate into every beach, and make sure of his lung getting four kind of pitcher place. So I think it really does depend on what for client, looking forward for VR going for kind of a gay or lesbian specific break, or whether they are just wanting to kind of go somewhere bit more cultural, whichever really long way to go still, but the other point is to not scaremonger too much either not worry too much as well. There are resources out there like our business that can help people travel to more tricky destinations. And like I said. Earlier, I want to travel to these destinations myself. I want to see the world is part of who I am, and I really want to explore. And I think it's really important that you're mindful and you take advice, but it doesn't stop. Hugh trying to travel and explore the world. That's out there. And does this vary country to country? Yeah, absolutely. So the laws are always changing one of the things we do on our website is to put in black and white. What the laws are that present moment in that country? So there are places where it is illegal to be gay. But we do send travelers till two still. And I think it's really important that we don't say, well, because it's a legal together you shouldn't go there or you can't go well, guess what? I'm gay. I want to be able to travel to some of these destinations. It's about how you do it now. There are some people who say, well, you shouldn't be supporting these nations economies. Will my view is quite different to that. Although I respect that view fully, my view is that if we don't travel to these places we don't go and explore these decisions if people aren't exposed to people like me, who are LGBT. Then minds won't change mindsets won't change. And it's really important that they do, and I also think it's really difficult with the argument to say where you draw the line. So, for example, full same sex marriage isn't legal in Italy. Does that mean you're not going to travel to Italy, because you haven't got fully quality won't of course, it doesn't mean you're still going to travel to Italy, because it's not illegal to be gay, but as a very difficult line to tread there. And I think as soon as you start saying, I won't travel, there, because of this law, then there's another counter law that doesn't quite stuck up with argument Juve think the laws reflect what the, the people think of that country. So, for example, Italy's saying is not legal for gay marriages, for example, but people were confirmed preach are open to gay people totally and obviously a lot of it comes on government policy. And, you know, I'm sure when civil partnership through introduced in the UK, and when same sex marriage was introduced in the UK the bulk of the population supported it well before that. But these things take time then you overnight overnight changes in, in a part of. Our job as a as a business is to support destinations and help educate them as well. So we worked with quite a lot of tourist boards. We are approached on a daily basis by hotel saying, we want to attract more LGBT travelers, and I'm like great. Why? And. Oh, well. And then it necessarily know why they just think it's the thing they should be doing, which is great. You know, get me wrong, and guess what? There is a very strong commercial argument there for people to say. Well, LGBT travelers do spend more in your destination. They do tend to have more disposable income. So it is really good to talk to some of these directors of sales, and marketing, and managing director of hotel just from a commercial angle. Because guess what they're trying to grow their business. So if we can go from a commercial angle and affects social change in the process, then happy days. It seems like it's gonna work. I hopefully. Do you think overall is again easier or harder for LGBT droplets, on the whole is getting easier? Do you still hear things like I need recently, the, the Brunei law, that's been installed in terms of stoning gay people to death. That'd been calls for boycotting hotels. I totally support people who, who wants to go down that route again. I don't think it's necessarily the right way to engage in dialogue. Yes, I wouldn't send people to those hotels. But I would still absolutely have a dialogue with those hotels about how we can try and make some changes in there will be employees of these hotels, who are LGBT, so imagine working at one of these hotels, you are LGBT and you know, that the owners are the Brunei, the Sultan of Brunei, and that country stoning you people at you to death. That's a really hard position to be in, but boycotting that hotel and not going to the hotel means you're basically throwing this people are do you know what I mean? Do you know what I mean? So how do we gauge those people? But how do you show companies like this, or people are made laws like that, that you are angry, though? If you're going to just talk about it talking doesn't always get you anywhere. It doesn't know. And I think you're right and not in the book, some boycotts can work is just not something I personally feel comfortable with. I want to try and effect change the dialogue, I want to chart you, I want to send people to places like the Moldes we know the hotels in the Modi's that have gay manages, for example, it's illegal to be in the Maldives, right? So I wouldn't hold hands with my partner walking through the mainland airport. Once I get to the resort knowing that there is a game manager at the helm of that resort. That's important that's impressive. And that's certainly the kind of resort. I would welcome staying and there again, twentieth LGBT employees in the Maldives, and it's not black and white. I don't think and I think anyone who says it is kidding themselves. We talk about the hotel experienced checking the experience. And you mentioned just briefly about holding hands at the airport in countries who are being gazed illegal. What are the other challenges you face you fill out when you go out from meal, you have differently? When you go out clubbing after differently. What kind of challenges, do you face that you wouldn't normally face at home? It depends. I mean he's still don't always come to walking down the street holding hands the apartment in London, let alone in a foreign country, I think is quite nuanced. It obviously varies from country to country. I think every LGBT person has felt nervous or discriminated against at some point in their life. Whether that was growing up, whether that is today, instill a lift reality for that person. So I think it's a case by case basis, there's not I can't say, would I hold hands walking down the street in Santa Monica. Maybe it would hold hands walking down the street in Jakarta. No, so it's, it's different and it's a case-by-case basis, and I do appreciate your website that you do have list of what goes down. You kinda pre warning people. How do you come up with that, because government policies? Very different seal. We choose to appointed before a very different to what the people of the country feel. So how'd you gaze there? How'd you judge that I think is very important to show what the government policy is because we we're honest with our clients about what is legal and what isn't, and then it's up to them to make an informed decision. There are plenty of travel companies out there. We've mystery shopped plenty of them where we kind of ring pretend to be a gay Cup. And we say, oh, is okay to begin the Modi's. And we regularly get back from the age on the other end. Oh, well, it must be because we send gay people there all the time. Well, no, actually it's not legal to be. However, did you know it's also not legal to drink alcohol in the Maldives, but in the five star resorts there you can drink alcohol and you can be welcomed. Insert not all resorts as an algebra decouple and, you know, our company actually office honeymoon benefits to same sex couples in the Maldives, because we've worked with hotels to develop that as a as a product of ring, and that's great that we've actually been able to do that because the mold is a beautiful. The nation. Yes. The laws are backward. But there are eligibility charges that want to travel, they're not everyone. But those that do we want to enable them to do in the safest possible way is really good. What you guys are doing. I think is brilliant, is really definitely needed, as well is quite new in the journey. Have you gotten anything wrong? So far has have any trouble has been so of not tacked birth felt uncomfortable in certain areas. Kef surveys from all of our customers. So we learnt very quickly, for example, in Sri Lanka, we had a couple of trouble social anchor, and we had a driver in Sri Lanka to women and a driver in Sri Lanka, who didn't realize they were a couple. And so he's flirting with them. For example. Right. So that was a learning for us. Absolutely. The had been identified by the supplies. There's not homophobic, and that that'd be fine. But they didn't understand the two females together. Rush honeymoon. So we got that feedback very quickly. We managed to resolve it. We changed the driver, but those kind of things are massive learnings. We will only ever be as good as our loss booking. And we are learning all the time. We still every single day are talking to new suppliers and talking to new tourist boards to find new products and test, new policy. And last year we sent four team members to different countries. Just on research trips just to go and explore that destination as LGBT travel, and open dialogue again with hotel chains, because, you know. We can then use that firsthand experience to offer more fantastic service to our clients. Some say nothing of God that the answer already from some some yesterday. You said before, but some say the best changed countries attitude is for LGBT travelers to go, there, rather than avoid it to send more people to educate him. I'm assuming you agree with this whole heartedly. I think like I said, I want to travel to some of these more tricky destinations, and I will travel to some of these more tricky destinations to try and change mindsets, and it won't be overnight, but certainly by not going places. They're going to remain sheltered they're going to remain isolated in terms of viewpoints. And the thing that really upsets me is that the Caribbean. For example, there are some amazing places there and there are some amazing pockets that are really LGBT fairly, like Aruba and Sal really welcoming. Islands Dutch Dutch run. But actually, there are other places that have still got British colonial laws in place. The from from decades ago, the have impacted society today. So actually it's the Brits, and it's our laws that are still having a negative impact on destinations today in terms of homophobia. So Jamaica, for example. We know a hotel there that has a game manager. We work with j flag witches the Jamaican forum for lesbians and gays. We worked with them really closely to ensure that if a traveler wants to go there, and we haven't sent a traveller there yet. But when if it went some wants to go to Jamaica, we can do it in the right way. So we can know the charity workers, we can know where the safe spaces are. We can know which hotels to stay out. We do all of that, work in advance, even though we haven't yet sent anyone there, because if someone does want to go there. I want I want to sit there hand on heart and say, we can do it in the right possible way for you. What are the common misconceptions of gay travel, for example? Is it all about sex is that were thinking, we don't want to get people to have sex in our beds, is that we do recognize what it is? I think gay travel has had a bit of a PR nightmare over the last few decades, there have been some very disreputable gay travel companies in the U K, but now no longer exists that went bust because they were focusing, solely on the grand Canaria Mickey NAS, IB short-haul market. And what that meant is that they were taking allocations at hotels that they couldn't fill and they went bust as a result. And they let customers out of pocket and people unhappy, and they were doing with short haul destinations which appeal to some people, but they weren't really doing long haul. Honeymoon destinations now at out of office, we cater for everyone, but the bulk of our clients our honeymoon travelers or people joining a gay group chip of like twelve guys or girls going to match peach, you, for example, a group group adventure now that kind of travel hasn't really ever been done in the market, Ford till we came along. I think unfortunately there is a legacy. PR issue with the way that gay trouble companies and LGBT travel companies existed in the past, and hopefully we change that perception. You, you have to look at our website. It's much more upmarket, and well designed than some of the incarnations of trouble companies that came before. And I'm really passionate about great design and great customer service and honesty as well. And I think I state my reputation on on all of my team and the products we offer in terms of providing the correct service to people in the thing. You mentioned about RJ holidays just about sex. Well, there's a signal the market that go on big cruises. And that's a very part of the industry, but there's a whole other section of society. And if the market that doesn't want is now same sex marriage being legally in those places going on honeymoon. When I travel with my partners places we don't go and visit all the local Gables necessarily on trip. We want to go and see a play or do something cultural. And we want to know what other eligib-. People recommend nuts really where we come in, in terms of offering that advice working, we've got private guides LGBT guides all over the world where we can do gay history tours in Greece. For example, we can even offer a gay history tour around the Vatican, which allows people to look in the Sistine Chapel. There is artwork. That is LGBT there is friscos that are LGBT within the Vatican, which is just fascinating. Because if the anathema there but. You know, those are the kinds of things that we really pride ourselves in that point of difference. Raw van it's a big party holiday. We're going to get to grand Canaria in a three star hotel. There's a there's a place for that. And there's a market for the opposite, Lutely, but we've moved on a bit from that too, because it seems like the misconception is the fact that they're going to have sex don't realize the normal people waiting to get away from their jobs or wherever they're doing just to come sit on the beach come taste the food from your country and things like that. That's why I'm kind of governing from your Chazal five feels like they need to be guided rather than let's fight these people for sure. And it comes down to training and it starts with the hotel, and it starts with a tour sports, and it starts with the government. It's their responsibility in a destination. It's not the locals, actually the locals needs to be bought on a journey that know that homophobia is, is led by governments. It's led by tourists was led by hotel chance when it comes to travel on media, correct, and perceptions, and actually if you've been told that for so long, you believe it? We've all been guilty of some kind of prejudice in our life at some point, and it's. Because of stereotypes, and it's because of prejudice. It's been built being portrayed to us from whatever that is. And I think actually, if we can engage governments, if we can engage tourist boards if we can engage hotels, then that's where it needs to star. Because then that will trickle down to the locals the local that works in the hotel will tell their family about Sora gay couple. And it was really nice and they weren't knocking each other's faces of public that just like to other people Jeremy, that's where it starts. And that's where you can affect change your even if we own, even if out of office doesn't exist in fifty years time, but we've affected change in one country by sending some people country. I'm happy. I'm happy. That's that's job. Well done because we've done, we've had a positive impact somewhere along the way, how does travel safety differ, from people along each area of LGBT, spectrum, for example, how does differ, gay men two lesbians, to transsexual people who basically you have to put on, if you're male or female on a passbook things can be awkward. It's, you know it's funny because the UK. Okay. Still has gender on possible on, it's binary is M F yet mine, but there are places in the world, really coming on, like multi, for example, has just removed the need for gender on possibles, which is fantastic. Right. So Malta is a really interesting case in terms of it was really really low down on the I l index which is international, lesbian and gay associations, index in terms of gay friendly eligible for any countries and is now a number one, and that's come about through a number of ways, that's obviously by effecting change by educating people within the government by changing laws, and the trans laws that are really progressive. So we still in the UK have a long way to go when it comes to things like that. So, yeah, there are different considerations to be made and you as a trans chapel. And you have to really consider how g present. Are you going to be okay? Going through the possible control in certain places. And unfortunately, there isn't very much vice out there for that. And it is a very difficult. I'm very personal decision to make and we try and support travelers where where we can in doing that. But unfortunately, there isn't a again, a one-size-fits-all approach on that it does vary by destination, and it could even bear. It could even very down to the person that is on the control gate when you get that, for example, so. Is difficult. I knew you have to be mindful of it again. Like I said forget, and let's be travelers, would you hold hands at the mainland airport in the Moldes? No, you wouldn't. Would you go through separately? You probably would just to make it easier for yourself. And to, to not raise any eyebrows. But again, it's nuanced. It's not black and white. Do you think it varies continued country, according to religion because I mean is everyone knows Dubai is very friendly. So do you think because it's an Islamic country? That's why is. It's a difficult question because there are people who are into including transpeople in this. Yeah, of course, they, it's difficult compassionate because there are people who are gay or trans over by or, or lesbian, and they believe in Islam, and they support Islam, but they are also gay, and then not exclusive there are there are plenty of people out there who are both. I think Dubai's an interesting example, is a huge underground gay scene. Let's be honest does. It's difficult. We've tried to reach out to some of the providers, we, you can find them if you search the internet. And we wanted to list them on Travelgate dot com, and they didn't want to be listed because of the danger to them and to their livelihood, and they still they thought they could market their, their business effectively underground, which they can. But it's a shame because there are some creep things to do in some of these destinations and not able to religions at a difficult one. It's not one, I want to particularly get into because it is, again, not very black and white in terms of. The one-size-fits-all approach, but I don't think the tour exclusive book, one of the most free countries on, and they're having all kinds of issues over trans bathrooms and gender neutral, toilets in different states. And you know. It still surprises me that even some of the most forward thinking, progressive countries, have these issues and but they do. And, you know, so how can we as a western civilization like try to get other countries to come on this journey, if we're not fully there ourselves, yet, imagine if they gave president in the US the what impact that would have globally and I mean, look at Ireland gap. Shock there and. It's making change. He went and stood next to Mike Pence in the USA. And you know. Mike Pence officially known as quite homophobic person. But he starts next to Mike Pence in his wife with his partner, these kind of things make a huge difference like anyone watching on CNN globally on Indian television network globally, or wherever they are in the world, seeing those kind of things that will be someone in that country, who is a teenager growing up and thinking, oh, guess what? I'm not allowed because they've had no exposure to other people like that in their in their own country. So those kind of things we've got to keep doing them. We've got to keep traveling these places. We've got to keep trying to effect change. Darren Ben there, he's surprised me, like I honestly thought he'd won LGBT travelers to avoid countries with these beliefs, but he thinks by going there. They can help change it. What do you think I love to hear from you feel free to leave a comment in the next episode of blinded faith conspiracy theories are nothing new? But the interesting earth communities online is. Knowing there's even a Netflix documentary on it. I'll be finding out why as I told Dave Murphy, an influential flat earth, and a former computer programmer who now lives off grid. Your fundamental reality and you live on a boat. So when somebody else questions, the first thing you do is your crazy. I'm Yasser thanks for listening and join me next time on blinded faith. The Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent all of their purchases. Now when you go out you cash in butts in your wallet terms apply.

India partner Maldives Darren Ben UK sales and marketing director Egypt Mike Pence London Brunei Jamaica Sri Lanka Italy UK BT Resor Bizet managing director Dubai Shlomo foods
Selling from Scratch: Foundations and Fundamentals for Building Your Sales Team

OC Talk Radio

23:39 min | 1 year ago

Selling from Scratch: Foundations and Fundamentals for Building Your Sales Team

"Welcome back everybody. Time to grab the Board Swim added to that Choppy fee out there. Right now it's It's rather confusing and chaotic. But maybe we can still catch your wave and we WANNA wave to Mannheim's WHO's GonNa join us here today. Hey Matt I'm doing good. The question is how are you doing? You're up in the center of the storm up there. You're in Kirkland Washington. Read about is Scary things in Kirkland Washington. I am Kirkland Washington I am. We are porting today. Sales Cycle and radio live from my basement bunker my heart than a Home Office I have. I have a basement which is kind of a man aged places. I look around. I've got my desk. I've got my office set up on a big screen. Tv down here got a little Whiskey library over in the corner. There you go. You're practicing social distancing as we speak here I have Internet access. I have a television and I wished I'm ready for whatever. Okay good for you. And today's conversation will be proposed. Like we're GONNA talk about sale or does talk about sales strategy. We're GONNA talk about getting through this together and knowing that there is an end to this sitting there will be an end to this and there will be a rebound. We need to protect ourselves. Keep ourselves healthy. Wash your hands fortunate that I am home family's home and we're taking care of ourselves In Our community. That need help as well. I don't know whether you realize you started a storm last week here at the station and on the channel here because you very delicately started to jump into the issue. Maybe people aren't ready to hear this. But what comes next after we get through this storm? Do we just exhale and go back to sales events and send and flying around the country like we did or do we adapt in come up with some new strategies that either replace some of that activity or add to that activity. I think that's a question. We're all wondering what what's the new normal coming out of this. It's a really great question and I think the answer and I'll look to our guest answered today as well as I think. The answer is yes. I think that we are going to rebound from this. We're GONNA learn some things from this. Hopefully we are smarter than the next time comes around but I think it's also going to make some smart adjustments creates. This run adjustments innovations to how we do business how we work as a community how we support each other through challenges in wealth and definitely interesting times when I think everyone for joining us episode of sales pipe on radio. If you're listening to us today live on the funnel meteorology network. Thanks for joining us. Making US part of your. What is probably work from work? If we're listening to the podcast thank you very much for subscribing very honored to have so many people can send you to listen to us. If you're interested in any of our past episodes our future episodes you can find them all past present future at sales pipeline radio DOT COM. Today we are featuring yet another great guests great smart mind in in the sales and marketing world. Very excited to have with US Jim Wilson. They're not writing partner. Fat Casino Up. Venture is Jim. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks net thanks for having me on. I'm looking forward to speak about the topic and I just want to point out before you guys take off here that he is operating from a phone booth in old fashioned style. Here isolating himself so he must be Superman. He must be getting ready to reveal himself now. That is a type assigned that I have not yet heard and I didn't know there were phone booths. This is true. We are today now. I'm in the coastal offices in San Francisco and we like most most of our portfolio company. We have these great sales telephone booths in the office that you can kind of wall yourself off and concentrate and speak loudly and passionately about whatever topic You so desire. I think you know what you know what you would ask earlier. I think maybe it's a good question was to start with. I think a lot of companies are sort of making adjustments right now. Did Not how they do work thinking about what keeps you might look like as a result of what's going on there will be a post corona virus world. We will rebound from this. I think as someone who spent a long career in sales sales management helping companies grow their business. How do you look at this? In terms of what companies are doing now in the midst of this. And how do you think about how companies should prepare for the next eight? It's a great question. I'm all reminded UNAFRAID. Stay calm and carry on. I think it's very applicable here. I would second would you said which is that ever going to come out. Fine on the other side but at the same time. There is a new reality that for sales people and sales organizations. They have to deal with that. I reality. Is that the in-person meeting for the near term is going to end and you need to look at being as productive as effective as ever but in a a number two environment. I think the second thing that people need to be realistic about is that in their pipeline. There are GONNA be certain industries and sectors that in the short term are absolutely going to be affected by this virus in this downturn in particular hospitality travel and I've encouraged all of our portfolios to just take a hard look at their pipeline as it relates to forecasting and predictability and be a realistic with themselves with what's going to happen and then the third thing I would say is a point of positivity which is a great opportunity to be close to your customers. Ask them how they're doing and Build great and deep partnerships. Because we will come out of it better on the other side and and you want to be a positive force in that not negative course. Now that's such a great answer and I think important to look at what you need to do now to really be focused on the business it is close at hand understand that some of your prospects are going to slow down decision. Making those deals. Many of those deals aren't going to go away. They're GONNA get delay. They're just GONNA pause for a while and it could be that depending on how this goes through what could be tight. Beginning of Kuching could be an amazing end of Q. Too but I think to your point about your customers and your prospects a healthy level of empathy and understanding of what they're going through is really important. The other thing I I literally talking to a customer this morning we WanNa make sure that things are that people are comfortable. They're taking care of themselves and their families. I had a custom this morning. Express some real awareness of wanting to make sure that they were investing in accelerating at the right point as they get to the end of this of this period. They're not caught to flat-footed when the rebound happens. Is that something? That's where people were thinking about. How variables exactly what you look for to make. Sure you're sort of accelerating ramping back up at the right time. I think it's a great question. I haven't had that conversation yet. With any of our portfolio my personal opinion is. It's probably too soon for no other reason that we don't fully you know the impact whether we know were at the bottom whether the trough is GonNa be a fee or a you. We don't know that said. I think that a lot of the basics still hold in terms of looking at leading indicators which would probably most likely be engagement look for events to start to come back online and be in person look for business to start operating as normal and frankly just be as nimble as you can be either up or down for the next few months Jim Wilson. He is a veteran sales manager. Sales leader he's an operating partner Noah ventures now a board member of many companies including Kenneth Security client of ours seriously as well. You mentioned sort of people that are doing face to face selling how that is particularly the impact. I think a lot of companies especially those that might be in the software business. They're selling telephone there. Selim remotely and so that sales process has been to materially change. Although you may have people that are working in home that you're trying to to make those little more difficult but I want to specifically talk about those field. Sales people like me got clients in manufacturing for example that count on bringing samples of their products to someone's office. That's obviously changing for the future. Are there things that people can do the try to replicate the value of the face to face selling individual environment way? That's a great question early in my career. I sold CAD CAM. Software Company called P. T. C. and I can't imagine what it's like right now for folks that really do make their sales living off of those face to face made into a samples. I guess the advice I would give people like that is number one and I start by showing empathy. Just simple question of your prospector client. Would you be okay meeting in person? Would you prefer something different? Just showing that classic sales technique of looking at it from the buyer's perspective. I think we go a long way. I think second is. It's an opportunity to be creative. Great sales people. I think are super creative. So possible to ship those samples and Fedex. Can you leave him at the doorstep with a Nice Note? And then tell them that you're gonNA call him from across the street in that proverbial but anything that you can do. That's creative that gives them the feeling that you are going above and beyond to take care of them. I think laws appreciate I. I would agree with that. I think I've seen people that are wondering what current period is going to do to their short-term numbers. I mean some people say we're GONNA sell our way through this where it is going to sell harder and unfortunately I'm seeing a little bit of examples already of the turning into more like people getting what seems to be maybe a little bit desperate price decreases some some flash sales humour phone calls people. That are not quite ready to buy on the contrary I've also seen companies. That are kind of the OPS. That are recognizing customers. Maybe in a similar situation that may they themselves may be pivoting and instead of saying I want to sell you something more quickly. They're offering help. They're offering sort of free services they're offering a little more generosity as a way of not only addressing the current needs but also sort of earning the business long term from those customers and some other examples that you can think of that in a similar way that sales professionals in sales teams might be able to be a service to sorta reinforced the trusted adviser status for themselves with those customers for short in long-term opportunities. Yeah you and I have exactly Fan Perspective on it. I look at things like this is less around doubling down around working harder but more doubling down around the human element and the creative element to add more value and that can be in the form of support. I think an outreach before it's ass on if people need support think of all of the industries that to virtual and digital work that are actually having the opposite problem right now. They're probably overburdened. And and worrying about scale issues if you have those types of customers asking them if there's anything you can do to help offering up resources and services I think is always appreciated. Frankly in my experience in selling even if they don't take you up on it the fact that you thought about it and you did it before it was asked puts you in the win column with most customers I would reiterate what Matt said to which is doubling down and calling people being preferably more aggressive is probably the wrong tactic right now. It doesn't mean that being creative won't get you the same result but barge into the front door when the doors being locked a couple of times right now it's probably gonNA have negative consequences. Do you think I mean from a from an adviser knew from a funding standpoint? Do you think that this is going to have a longer term impact on the funding market for for startups? I mean you just this week you know as as we see you know Cancel and everybody kind of shut down a little bit still seeing some pretty large funding announcements and obviously those in but in the works very long time. Is there going to be a bit of a saddle with air for companies? That have been trying to raise cash? I don't think so. I think that this is the short term Black Swan Event. Another venture firm coined. That recently sequoia. It's not something that is permanent downturn I think that people that are in funding cycles. Right now need to probably think about their cat. Physician whining else. I think the unit economics mean more than more than Are more important than ever to companies so your ability to spool up or down in short terms like this and know and understand what levers to pull I think is super critical but look companies that have great products that have great sales teams in great founders are GonNa come out just fine on the other side. I agree we gotta take quick break pay bills. We'll be back with more with Tim. Also we're talking about selling adverse conditions or talk more when we get back from the break about best practices from what he's seen working in modern sales environments as well or repair pipe on Radio. Her peers make buying decisions. It's a question on the mind of nearly every B. TO B. Marketing leader yet also one without the clearest of answers what's their involvement like throughout the purchasing process. What drives their ability to make better decisions? And where do you stand compared to them? Read the new research report from path. Factoring hines marketing to get inside the head of a marketing leader in the buyer's journey and find out. Bizet Hines Marketing. Dot coms resource section. That's H. E. N. Z. Marketing Dot Com and the resource. Tab for your free copy today right back to Matt and his guest thinking polly. I think about you think about you this week. So we like we talked about this here. We've talked about this idea of predictable pipeline us sort of the wave of the surfing analogy for awhile. So the book tentatively titled The Political Pipeline Have a contract with. Wow it's coming out in November about that. Congratulations she's thinking about. Thank you think about this week. 'cause they're they're already saying. Hey what do you think we should do on the cover and internally and brainstorm seen actually brought up so you know got to be a big surf pipeline that that cool image of you know the surfer entering that long tunnel of water here. Yeah well I mean the analogy. I think is interesting. I don't know if you meant this but I think if you think about the idea of having more predictability of the pipeline that you create the waves continuing crash against the shore by the principles you get an Clinton yeah exactly and you never know when you enter the pipeline. How long it's going to last and what you're going to come out in the end. You're going to splash. You're going to be still standing. You know there's that there's that wonder as you enter into the pipeline itself to so it's both predictable and unpredictable has both elements to it. Here I don't know might have to connect you don't know if you got New York district ability design so it may come back to you on that want to continue with our guest today on sales pipeline radio. Jim Wilson talking about sales in adverse conditions. And I want to go back. I mean aside current of our society. I'm talking about just the evolution of sales been in the game for quite a while. It sounds like you know you were in the field with a quota selling devices near now on the board of many companies that are offering softwares of service that are younger. Companies that have had the ability to in many cases sales organizations from scratch. What is the main themes you've seen from your early days of selling to today? And what are some of the really of most important themes in best practices from the higher functioning? Sales organizations are working with today. Thanks Dad I you know. I'm I'm really lucky at one I am older and that I've been able to experience a lot of different companies. I've managed inside sales teams outside sales teams and my job at Costa Noah. Running and working on the operating platform really allows me to do three things. Work WITH PEOPLE. Help companies develop messaging and help them ultimately turn that into sales casino specifically works with Boutique. Enterprise companies that are seed and series a early stage companies. We look for great founders. That are trying to build great products and a tackle huge problems. Some of the patterns that we see that we kind of preach pretty consistently all around building the foundation for sales. I like to talk about. What is your first higher. Look like how do you profile? What's interviewing like so that you can get the right type of sales people. How do you balance inbound and outbound prospecting to build that for nickel pipeline math? That you're gonNA write your book about. How do you enable the sales teams? So they are effective. And then finally I loved to just talk about some hacks around closing techniques that I learned in picked up over the years. I think that's where I think. A lot of modern marketing teams are lacking in skills. I love the advance of sort of social selling Tactics I love the advance of Challenger Sale Teaching Taylor type mentality but I think in our effort to create more value as trusted advisers. A skilled isn't being taught as much today is how to ask for the deal how to ask for the sale on how to close and so. I would love to get the double down on that and get a couple of examples of some ideas that you think are particularly pertinent. I used to call it the four CS of closing and this was usually the talk that I gave my sales team with about a month to go in the quarter or a week to go in the month. If you're on a monthly cadence and the four cs of closing our simple checklist of things that you should have an are progressing to feel good about a deal actually closing so the first of those is commercials in commercials is really a fancy word for saint pricing and what I used to always tell. Sales people look pricing. Doesn't mean oh I've given them a quote I've sent it to them and I'm expecting them to accept it and today's selling environment. Commercials are not actively being discussed. Unless there's a little bit of back and forth around pricing kind of hack and trick that I tell people is best indicator that you're entering into commercials is when they're asking you for pricing and asking questions about it if you sent them quote and there's no questions coming back that's not a good sign that means you're not really dealing with commercials. The second his contracts used to be that you were able to sell ill and if you're lucky enough to do it who where you can just send over a pdf and they sign it or you have something online. That's great that's not the way it works with larger Order contracts and larger sized deals. So you should expect that. There's at least some questions. Around contracts or some redlining going back and forth and then the last two are specifically around selling themselves the first is a compelling event. A compelling event by the way is not the salesperson in the quarter. That's the first thing right down the buyer as much as you'd like to think it he really doesn't care about your end of Quarter. He may care if you're putting an incentive in place the benefits him but no buyers that I know are sitting around wondering which sales teams have their into quarter so you have to think about this customer as what compelling about what's compelling to buy. Are they replacing something? That's running out of a contract. Do they have a gap in a problem? They're trying to solve your solution solves. What's the compelling event? It's driving urgency on their side and then the fourth C. is probably the most important which is champion. Champion is someone who has two things. He's he has power in the organization and he sells for you in the account. When you're not there if you don't have a champion that's giving you feedback and telling you where you're at in the process. You're probably not close enough deal. I love those foresees and I think that each of those could easily another episode of the program I think compelling event in particular I think a lot of people don't understand what specifically has created an perpetuating the commitment to change inside an organization. What does that outcome look like? When is it needed? What the opportunity cost of not having it in place in. When does that start understanding those things sort of arguing to keep something as a high priority to close really important? I loved that you focused on champion at the end. I mean you know the the Challenger always he talks a lot about having this buying committee in having multiple people as decision makers influencers and yes you know we need to sort of build consensus amongst that group but there needs to be someone or a group of smog above that subset of that group is maintaining that momentum in progress internally especially with these really big deals that you know we'll take months corners for sometimes especially if you know maybe federal deal. Let me talk an Olympic cycles to get something done you as a sales are going to be hard pressed to drive that momentum velocity on your own. I love your foresees. How companies put more of a focus on this and the organization is training issue. Is this one of the best ways for companies to get better that close? Yeah great topic so look one of the things that I think is the hardest thing to do in building. A sales organization is build a culture of learning and build a culture of sales enablement. There's a couple of things that are portfolio that I see does particularly. Well I would call out. Companies like propeller era and our portfolio. They have this great culture where they're all learning and they're building processes and they're comparing notes and there's no judgment when they do and and they were super creative about all their ideas. Here's some of the things that I've seen they do I. They really embrace tools as a way to help them enable and repeat best practices. And I'll give you the most simple example. I can think of today in this world right now. We're going to be doing more things virtually so we're GONNA do everything to resume or other virtual meetings. Just start to record this if you have a really great sales call in recorded and you can share that with the sales team and break it down. What's working what's not is great. Second thing is we think that it's obvious today but you'd be surprised. How many companies don't do it but you've got to put a crm tool in place. The crm tool is what people need to use and it allows you to document things and learn best practices but a tactical thing that goes with that is set up a weekly cadence and a weekly call and dedicate a period of time for that. Weekly call just to beyond learnings. What have you learned In particular focus on. What did you learn that were? How did you win? What did you learn? That didn't work carrier losing. And what messaging sticking to key I've seen is to keep it really simple and make it repeatable so everybody goes around the room with what's worked. What hasn't worked and some message sticking and you encourage everybody to share and then finally really focus on customers and customer knowledge again. I'LL GO BACK TO THE BUYER PERSPECTIVE. Most buyers today really don't care too much what the seller has to say unless what that seller says is customer story that includes a metric and a value proposition. Of How that customer benefited from using your product. Unfortunately we are at a time. These conversations always go to quickly but lots of great nuggets of the perspective on the current market conditions as well as some best practices on selling it Particularly focused on closing so. Why don't take our guest again today? Dan Wilson for joining us. If you like this conversation especially if you're a sales leader if you're working with sales teams want to share those people in your organization will have this episode of on demand at sales pipeline radio DOT COM. You're just a couple of days. We'll also as usual have a US translated summary of this conversation up on hines marketing dot com very shortly. Join US next week. We got an amazing lineup. Obsolete coming up here as we head into key to very quickly for today. We're out of time on behalf of my group producer. Paul this is Matt. Hi thanks for joining us on another episode of sales pipeline radio.

Jim Wilson Matt US Kirkland Washington sales management sales manager little Whiskey library Mannheim San Francisco Kuching partner Bizet Hines Marketing Selim Dan Wilson operating partner
Bill Cartwright

Huddle Up with Gus

1:01:38 hr | 3 weeks ago

Bill Cartwright

"People say treat yourself like you need a reason but mcdonald's streets are perfect for everyday like bold. Mika say is coffee get any size for dollar sixty nine or pick up any size. Sweet tea for dollar the largest served in an insulated cup. That keeps her tea cold. Feeling a little extra something something. Try classic bakery sweets like an apple fritter with so many ways to treat yourself. You don't need an excuse. Just come back tomorrow but papa. Prices and participation vary cannot be combined with any other offer or combo meal who and welcome to another episode of with gusts. I'm your host former. Nfl quarterback gus frerotte and welcome to the new sixteen thirty one digital new studio. You know some people say no news is good news. Well i say to those people. You've never read sixteen thirty one digital news dot com good a sixteen thirty one digital dot com. Get your latest news sports music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast with gus. Check it out today at. Www sixteen thirty one digital news dot com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match of right here. Sports fans whether you're game is on the great iron at the diamond or on the links we can only say to this week's potluck with gusts fifteen year. Nfl quarterback. gus. Peron passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches play for seven. Nfl franchises with one hundred fourteen td's under his belt gusts knows who the players are. And how the games are one if everything you get to hang out with. An antidote quarterback sports fans from the deck dow and plus sixteen thirty one digital studios. It's so snap your chinstraps off. Hey everyone welcome back to huddle up with gus. I'm your host gusts firat I want to thank everyone that helped him with the show. Terry and bryan. Thank you again so much for that. I wanna thank sixteen thirty one digital news and your studio for help me out. I wanna thank sounder. Fm for helps me on their platform. And also wanna thank manscaping goto mandate dot com put in my code gusts ferrat by some By some awesome stuff and you get twenty percent off and free shipping today We're talking with. Bill cartwright started where you really started growing taller taller that about the will get like. Let's say for example. When i was in the sixth grade. I remember this perfectly because i was six dong so it just kind of grew Pretty much every year. Did you have a lot of issues with iraq. Because i grew from like eighth to ninth grade. I grew six inches in my knees. I had I guess osgood slaughter like where your knees and your joints were growing so fast. And those tendons weren't keeping up. Did you have some of those issues. I probably did. But i was running pretty pretty good i always. I did a great job of norian ignoring that. Because i just love to go so a lot of fun that would be you know to go through high school and and to be seven one. What is it like like what is the hardest part about being that tall in high school for me and this. Why not think about this for me. I normal and you're not so that's my fun. I'm not really that tall but everybody else is natural. So this is my norm. So also your sisters. Tell my sister taller spring sewer between five ten and six two. But but the best your school. There's always some other kids tall and there's always taller get somewhere so i would just taller. But you're always gonna fight somebody who's got so kind of intimidating if you're on the pitching mound being that tall ron at. It's kind of funny. Because i really love baseball. I wanted to play. And then i can remember this guy. Dennis ferenza who is same age as they play minor league baseball this he hit like a and i remember standing there looking at that now. I guess it's basketball for me. Never in a million years to that right right so when you see real daland you replace basketball. Yeah it's kinda was with basketball right. Like i loved it. I played it all the time every summer and then just realized like oh. That guy could jump better than me. That guy can shoot better me. I'm gonna stick with football. 'cause i throw it harder than anyone else exactly exactly and you know portugal you know. When i was in high school we had a great great coach agri teammates. We had really tall he by another guy very software who was six eight. We were six four colon bill man and our report girl was since does really add a college team and but i think we lost five games. What other junior we thirty. Oh and unfortunately those guys graduated. I see here but we were still able to little elk grove california about this one northern california championships that year my senior year control with the us app so which was almost like a hoosier type story. Because how big is your high school. How many kids did you graduate with high school. Picking maybe in big but about twenty five hundred kids might be about cuts. You're acting like it's a little town like my high school. I graduated with hundred kids like if we we had. I was the tallest kidding four. You know you guys have to get guys that are over six. Say but you to remember that time. Bed area represented the elk grove area but represented south sacramento. So right now know. There's probably at least thirty is goals represent area now so it was. It was a big area and represented by just one ice call. So then you go on. What was the recruiting process. Free like in high school. I mean you're tall guy. You've won state championship. You're doing really well. You end up going to san francisco. Usf but i'm sure you've had opportunities to go to other colleges. What was that process like for you. What was great. It was probably like you got a lot of letters. There was leonard. I started getting those a lot of when i was a junior the cape read but i really wanted to go to school in california phelps bizet man for yeah so not not. Ucla never wanted to go to ucla. I did i did want to. Cla but ucla at this weird thing but they did start freshly. And i was. I was really digging that some sticking that we'll get mike almost forty a game and like an opportunity to go to start the so basically it was no so then i thought about going to sce's and there was a racial visit where kids walk you out skull agreement as well the three guys. I don't go to school. Care our coaches tail with me. So after that i really wanted to go to was was. Us out he had. He added to rate basketball tradition. Kind of client bad won the conference. Which was w as say now. The deputy say that his first second since nineteen forty nine saw after being able to see that. And it's words time. Eric verged camera standing. Still smith were playing easter guys to the nba. I was like wow these guys. These guys are good. So by bug on a uso which was which was a great school close visits it. Was it a perfect scenario or a of going to school. Now were you the. Where are you in the age group of your family. Are you the youngest middle or the oldest while sixers. I don't know going to all right right in the middle. So so i knew them. That's go that's so just better get out the house. Quick get way. So i read somewhere that you married your high school sweetheart. Is that right. Yeah yeah it's it's. It's incredible either crazier. I think it's her. Well i was thinking more like your sister's really liked her and you're like okay. Yeah they like to get in trouble here. Yeah yeah that too. But she's she's been able to put up a bed for or forty one years. Oh it's awesome. Yeah yeah so you know. I got lucky that way too so when you go to. Usf did she. Would she do with the school of fresno okay. You gave her period of get away boca's but she wanted to do was focused being a student and bland mask ball and all that stuff so it was great. So you're at. Usf you having a good career there. You're getting to the time where the draft is coming up. How do they work because the nfl they have the combine and you know they have pro days and things like that. What do they do in the nba to go and see you guys. I mean i've watched some of it on you know league pass and all that but kind of explain that to me how you look at it because you've been both the player and you've been the coach backup by thing really confused because the nba. They do they do scouts and they do put people on the curious about chip to kinda watch. You saw our scott especially when we were chicago. they're great. They spent a lot of time with a lot of detail. Either go to the games l. Before the draft. To get. But i tend to work is up. Yeah so if. I could work out three prospects. It doesn't take you a long time to figure out his. Yeah put through a couple of drills if you tested physically district character Afterwards you get the interview at. It's really revealing to find out who guys really are so it's not that tricky so get college bikes Dis- gives you an opportunity to see those kids not the kids but the second tier kits to give opportunities at the financial pay are in a competitive situation. Yeah that's true because you got to think about like If you go to alabama compared to you know alabama state in. You're looking at linebacker from each school how are you gonna compare them playing on film right so you have to do something else to compare them. So that's why they put him through all these drills that go on at the combine But in the nba. I would say like for you. How many years were you in college. You there three years or four for years. That was pretty pretty de anomaly. Yeah i got a couple of minutes. for born. they left early. You know we had guys like bill willoughby gerald dunkin's they left airway possible turley and believe me every single person outside of maybe bajic corrupt it software. You're you're you're just upgrading. The play because just physically To be able to adapt to players. Just don't change that rule. Do you think that like if you go to college. You should at least be there three years now. I think one year you're gonna find out your now. This is a different beast right now. I think you need at least a year is at least be back two years old now. I'm not a believer. That and the nineteen year old. Who's going to help lead a team to a championship right. But i do think that physical play and nineteen bootstrapped wise year. You're ready physically. But there's no way you're gonna watch it'd be able to play. Osu somebody extraordinarily special like magic birdman when he came out. Bergman was a year older than us. We were to save trapped so now you got edged twenty two years old. That's that's that's a pretty big difference. Oh came to see it now zion. Now he's been in the league two years right. he's got the draft. It's going to take a couple of years of figure it out so now that you're twenty twenty one when you're supposed graduated now you're wearing apply. Yeah so so. Tell me about okay. Now you're you're probably twenty two. You get drafted. you'd go to you. Go from california san francisco which is kind of a big town. Obviously san francisco's beautiful city. But then you go to new york. What was that like for you because that had to be a big went from. I grew up in pittsburgh. And i think it's people like mid west the tall sunday and went to washington. Dc which was all of a sudden in front of all the media and the press and annabi similar for you smell now used planes exactly from albro this place while is crazy but when it came down to it as a great Ready to go. I was waiting for the contact. You know i was raised. I could score on anybody defensively. Pretty sucky could guard anymore. That's true no so to be able to learn how to play. I think about it then. My first game was dirk dot com. Oh yeah bobble new. Was the league jack. Signal was in the league. They've caused league. Art is girl was blake. That's a bee's re rolling. He made a first couple played against the so All those guys were established guys and they were all different. It takes a while to learn out to guard because it's not like we had any help. Your honor all and probably not like you had the film to watch all them either. I mean you do. But back in the day i mean it wasn't like you could put all the clips together of win. Hey when he does a spin move. Here's what will do you know or when he faces you up. Here's way likes to do like they put all that stuff. Your film guys can give you that right on your ipad. Now there was no film was no less. How did you just figure it out like you just said okay. Did you take take mental notes when you play somebody. Yeah you or you would. There were veterans of the team mecca. I can remember when out. Scott jackson killed me. Playing against him is teammate. Was more webster was by teammate. Hit luck to safeguard this guy guys like truck robertson shelby out of use my form. Get guys opposition. Yeah dog don't let the guys at the bay and it's so as a put some tape. They were teaching you morning. Anything else down. It was great but it took a while a couple of buckets once. And even even if you do do you know you can still garden as the nyerere cup. Suppose alone who knows the quickest jumper in basketball history. You learn to just block block about because he's likely to mrs first shot but he was so fast it'd be back up on a second job. Yeah and you just have to learn how to play different guys. There was a bunch of guys who just really good at and had their own style. Did you have anybody when you were a rookie coming in. Like the kind of gave you some thoughts like hey bill. This is what you need to be doing. Here's how you need to work like. Did you have a veteran. That kind of sat you down. I had some with washington Darryl green did that with me. A couple of other guys Really appreciated did you have coming in as a rookie. I mean you were still you know incredible in college. You are number one draft pick but still your rookie. You know what i mean like. there's they're gonna. Did you have somebody that that was kind of like your mentor. When you came in the was metro aspira webster but barbara webster riper. He got sick much. What's being a play ton minutes But but he wasn't around a lot. So no i was really that first year really on my own figuring out myself and we had a young. We had five rookies on that. Yeah so it was a crazy guys. Mike array rich said rain williams and our veterans of the team. Were guys like joseph very weather and talk in a plant zach. The cool thing is that my first coach was rentals right and read. Just believe that you know you. Just gotta play it. You gotta learn to be back. He gave us a game opportunities. Just play the and and learn so It was it was great to learn that Good out there. So yeah i would. I would think it's pretty good like that. You play that many games right in the nfl. We have sixteen and we gotta wait a whole week. If you have a bad game you know or if you didn't feel like you had a great game or even if you had a good game you had to wait a whole week to go back out and do it again in basketball. It'd be like okay. I'm going out even though i didn't have the success. I wanna go out and try again the next night or two nights away. Yeah basketball's good back because you know brat. Born at time it was Basketball stall embalming so need stand the best hotels but didn't have the best facilities. You were pretty much all. I missed out like it as now where it got trainers. We had one trainer that six jobs responsible for your clip remember. We got our road uniform. It was ours so that road uniform. You had a game if you had a backpack back on the road for about in the sink here. The girl yes so man. I could just see some guys not washington at all and yeah i'm gonna be. Nobody's gonna meet exactly exactly what it was. It was a different time. There was no charter flights on commercial. So you're pretty much exhausted a lot. Just yeah yourself to where. You re injured It was strapped yup There's a lot of a a lot of his own hotel cold tub up if you wanted to do that like the trainer weren't doing any of that stuff. I remember like even. When i came in they were they would still be like. Oh yeah you want a cold up. Just put some ice in it and go fill it out exactly. I mean that was. That was nineteen eighty. So you're you're pretty much around is bobby. We're not smart as the guys. Now the guys out there hurt does feel like playing a perk us too. Smart were hurt all which is strap you up. Let's get you have bigger race. Exactly put a back. Brace on your fire then you can go sleep in a bed in a hotel that doesn't fit you and you gotta get up at six in the morning light. Oh man that's brutal. I bet there's nothing worse than a small dead. How'd you deal with that. I guess you just get used to it right and you gave to. But you're so tired and also was acting anyway in the nba. were yup. you're young you're twenties. He can he can do pretty much anything. You're you're going to bother you just you just want to play. Yeah how about bobby. I wanna play a big challenge this night and hopefully not gonna let anybody down scope my best effort and And just see what happens. May hey everyone. Thanks for joining me. On with gus. We talking to bill cartwright. Three time player champion right into time coach mazing. But we're gonna take a quick break. We'll be right back day head off of listeners. 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We wouldn't have that issue but it's probably one of the funniest pickier ball stories. I've ever heard or been around offers. So it's a great story but you know i always said there was no way to know no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy who is it was not good but it's a heck of a funny story so one of the best i've ever heard my fifteen years playing in the league but you know there's so many great things about manscaping what they're doing because guys you've got to take care of yourself you got great hair and getting older but you still have to maintain some sort of rumi right and so you know we all work out to me like we're going my yard doing those things. Now that i'm retired getting a little sweat on and everything you want to smell. Good you know you gotta take care of yourself. They got some great products. 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Everybody's spells me wrong spelled a program jersey. So you know. I gotta i gotta help you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that use these products take care of yourselves down below and have some fun. There's nothing closer to you than your little buds used along mower used the code gusts. Herod's save twenty percent and get free shipping and or some great man's came home We want to get back into your conversation about when you were in the nba. You were with the knicks. Now we're going on to your next step you get traded. What was that like for you. where you get traded from one team to another Did they talk to you about it or was it something that just happened. Why it's been nine years in new york app as you suspect i was back to get traded so my wife and i decided you know what we're just going to go to. Hawaii is out there for awhile vacation. So right where we landed in a wi krause once. The governor's guy. Oh yeah just traded for how long. That's not good. Go right now. I mean the white search through foods guy knickebocker odell aski- funny member. Jerry is very busy. Asterik might might apparently join. I learn allotted set of rate validation but in the ninety dollars in new york. I have four coaches last word With rebels brow last time and young guys got to killing jackson walker. It was a me there. So i i was a place much That year was like it was like god. I'm gonna go work out in work out the game and not play like while. It's getting straightening opportunity. The play again at play again out of really good team arcor already there. Michael bip scranton. Who was gonna play. It's okay love. Got traded for man. John paxson was already there so it was great. It was a great start. It was hard because doug was the go to that port giant our peasants after laptop felton. Over which activated text winner are dry activated johnny scheme so the foundation of our team was really set after after my second year so it took us two years the over coverage dreaded detroit pistons and and kinda grow up There there were off to the races. When i really want the guy who set the table for all we talk about jerry krauts. Whoa basically i other team exceptional michael jordan got it. That's coach. well jerry. I hire was sweater and alvin meal. Cousy always terrific addition coach to a coat ambient three sports football baseball basketball. Well really jerry. Art fell those in the d. league. Yeah so he. He got everybody there from stacey game williams guys let agitates up guys if she were to biggest so. I just felt like i was fortunate. Blessed baby destined to be part of that team. Yeah that was fun but blaming it wasn't easy. Who real like every every team has that. That one guy that gives you the. Look the leader veteran. Who was that guy on your team because you guys were all champions. You're all incredible players and you came together. And he played really well but there you said it before the veterans usually are the ones and the players are usually the ones that helped the other players out of wasn't coaching. Was this a different kind of thing when phil came in or was it almost the same woodville. Caveman give bob h play plan and basketball Now and that are really guard dominated the world one guy says the table so then now we've got an offense at the ball dictates of shock. Yeah and and it's so it's like our lisa's. Don't play calls so it's it's just a great way to play as just reading you. Just reading your. You're reading your plan. But the the big part of it is our guys early to one. So think about this. You're in a championship team. Your goal is to win championships. So of your goals weta championship championship now. Everything is senator higher standard. Yes the standard the practice. Law your steve. You're going to the game two to well had to win the game. You know what your tennis. Losing louisiana's a because we're supposed to win. Yeah and so you know. We just felt that at that point. It's wants a table set and your goal is to a championship in our. You gotta do that. You've got to discover what t- we were but just like your teams abyss birth. Just let your deeds that you blading But bear in minnesota where chicago bulls are day. People talk about all the time style bears. They've got score. Business score is defense indeed right. What are you talking about solve. we're able to establish a deputy. That's salzburg coaching staff. We know we've got a lot of first dog. Get back at all. We got this triangle offense if we got the best player on the planet. But that's who we are. that's our deputy. That's how basketball. Yeah so you're champion. You talked a lot about the intensity of practice in planning a games. Everything's expected when you're winning. But you're with guys all the time in the locker room. And there has to be some brevity there has to be some laughter. Because you gotta break it up. Who was the jokester who was a prankster in your locker room. Because you know there's gotta be a bunch of guys in the locker room narrow winning the there's gotta be some good times are locker rooms when that those guys are gonna because not that many of us like fourteen guys into their own group ago the old guy there so it was really hard to find another old guys in thailand. Got horse scott. Those guys are just goofy. So is that more being appraisers for being a fence it a lot. Don't hang out at the mall tonight. Go home rest standards rubble. Because at boarded a lot of our guys are buried in the single guys young guys who are trying to figure out hundred acre right so it's not like being a prankster goofy because yeah I always. I always like that with my thing locker room. I pick somebody in love to have some fun because we play once and we play on sunday so you know friday night saturday. You're old syria's but during the week you know it's a lot of practice and you and you try to break it up. I always played jokes guys because we had sixty guys in the locker room right so to try to create that. Trust that team. Lotta of times. You know to get to know somebody you gotta see him laugh and you gotta you kind of humanize them away. What would happen with our ours. Starts so after a game without practice next as so the starts could get thirty minutes. They were tired. So there was a scrimmage and i will usually scrimmages plagued come abed step out that second group always at a lot of energy so they would go slow and those games got to be a little aggressive grew. They were laugh. Owl airline apply. You gotta be kidding. Jetta comeback of display thirty five hundred too tired extent. Those kinds of crazy to go yeah. Bribes were allowed that way. So so you go through your this amazing career with the bulls you decide to play one more year in seattle What was that like for you. Because it's hard to know when is win. You know. I played fifteen years and you know you ask that question okay win. Is it time you know. How do you know when it is time. So how'd you know like a game. When i go to seattle and then give you know you just kind of figure it out from that point. I knew because i can. Roy got hurt failure. I was close a lot of times. Aware i would get. I would be like in the air. And i can remember house as a player. stretched a lot that i can remember almost see my muscles me. I suppose i was really torn my knee up tabs that year. So as like while you're kohl's and also where a man i can't react somewhere in maybe i would have to be Do a power boo as opposed to a quick Because of pulse upton you be academy know. You're you're you're right dirty up but thinking about it now. I play twenty years. I should have just kept trying to play more. You know my buddy ryan ryan fitzpatrick on his eighteenth year. And i'm like dude play brevard so i get it. Yeah we could have definitely done that. So like bob appears players like twenty years and twenty years itself. You always quit but doing something else. After i got up once again ups could it be business and ended up the right back the nba. So i know maybe it was just destiny. Yeah maybe it was. Do you think the nba has changed a lot since you came in. I mean obviously. I mean this man for the bulls now. I can't remember his name but he shoots like threes all the time. I'm thinking in my head. Like viewed have been taken threes back. When you were playing you can do like no no. That's our job while as you not slow confusing to wear basketball like every sport. Everybody's report shooter. Everybody's a home run hitter. Everybody's has the ball three yards off For guys like big heads. So i really talk traffic. Justify it because it's a because everything got back around to wear low. They'll start playing a more rounded type of games jump shots reports shops all this mess at usually run playoff support. They do that It's a little bit funky right now because of govan and because maybe not practice time that or at least that just yeah every sport i still is crazy and football and the end of the game i threw a sixty are past that does get caught. You a slag and get the ball there. I think that's crazy too. So what the hell happen at. What beating did that happen where you'll have against ball so we just crazy things that happen ever sports at route just bugged atari thought i just. I just tried to the watching the dreaded joy. maybe i'm gonna see special during the course of the game. That's what i'm interested in. Yeah yeah it does make it really really hard to watch. Three is gone out and pendulous. These lack of skills play Five gift basket roy. You play twenty five eight five eight. Yeah so you know it does. Look you guys played right. You guys were like the offense was waiting for you guys get set up and it was more of like big man block basketball things like that like obviously there was three point shooting in different things but today just like bring it down. Throw it up. Let's go and let's like the big man's they don't even give chance there just running back and forth you know it's like back in the day when you guys were playing. It was like a s. What i live to watch right when i love big east basketball like in college. I'd love watching all those guys play like. That was kinda how it was. Just a lot of banging. It doesn't seem a lot of that anymore. Skill your been sure. It may be a pick and your best both sky. Maybe your boy car slow or but if the patch dictate something bad match ups but you play basketball a year you know. It's it's it's rounded sport. It's not one type of game where what everybody baseball's how ready you got lead up guy. He's already entered. Its see. But i i always believe everything works. Its way out and comes back around. So now someone's gonna come. Hey we could bust up again. This guy's a genius both scored the basket and shoot it elbow jumper. I saw somebody shoot it. Elbow jumper like what they still not shoots that anymore. So is just what's going on right now but it's just wait for so i know you've coached different levels and that was hard for me when i went from the nfl. And i coach my son's youth football team. Like i had all this language in these skill sets in my head and trying to relate. It to kids was very difficult for me. How have you made the transition. Because i know you've coached at many different levels. Just go and lock. It's it's every kid's and say you all don't really high standard but to me that she's teaching a basketball so thank you I call jim. I could hall slow and also situation where they've been successful. Probably my most fungi. Onto what i ended opportunity i to japan for a year i took over to i. Nineteen we were able to give them for one thing at identity subs able to look at this team and Tell me gets you guys. You guys are back with scores but you guys are ever love chain so great defense we attack them at twelve gates a row justice the playoffs and just had a great time. Get those guys Get to know that team and and asako so that was a great time. Yeah that would have been a lot of fun live over there for year. 'cause i mean i've heard so many great things but i've never visited there. My daughter went there with an old boyfriend of hers but they had a great time and she said the food was amazing in japan. Great earn for healthy. You do a lot of walking there. You get that mistake. Culture everything is trained dictated not allowed people drive their you know drive anyway because it's so much congestion and it's funny to walk around. They're telling my wife who spent a little time there if you get off on the street you're debt because it's not like it's first-rate Third straight yeah as like long dame and there's no just lost huge. Yeah and then. You're just walking around japan and everybody stared at you like cisco they are so courteous. They're they walk. Do that though adult your baxter at stare but they will never be impolite. Just bor curtis extraordinarily nice people. Almost too nice very tricky. Because there's figure it out that they embed up you because they just kill you kind right right exactly exactly so bill before we end our show here. Tell us a little bit about what you're doing now. And how are fans can find you and follow you. Drector scored university in san francisco. I i've been bike years other. Our president gerald allowed me to come back and Able to participate with the school participate the development. That's been raising allows me to participate in Obviously sports are basketball. Really sports. talk to our A big thing that. I'm really excited about this. As the mccarthy center they are pitched claims Students are stint. That are gonna be our next leader. Certain ex- community leaders have. I'm just really excited to participate with them. Because they're they're just helping other people just elitism are our future so it's been great and we've got some some up as a force lamp. Basketball were both gonzaga and byu at saint. Mary's so get those three pm's a really really good every year. So it's it's a big challenge. Also responded that's really every sport but really proud of the school was about about their accomplishing. Got a lot of big visions. And i'll say i'm san francisco stole the. I don't care what people say. We're still the capital of the world right here so we do a lot of sets. It's exciting flutters. It is a. It's a great place It's a great place to live. I love coming to san francisco I wanna thank you I know that. I'll be on you. I think you have a podcast too. Is what all right. I do have a bike gas. It has the though car right show and you can find this yet. We're gonna speak to gentle betham. And i do what you're those stories about a sublime that's up to you. Got guys there so that's a lot more trouble than us. Yeah yeah yeah. I did a lot of things in in fifteen years and had a lot of fun and maybe that's probably why i played for seven teams. But that's all right. I good time at a really good time doing it. The bill it was awesome. So everyone You know. I wanted to sink. Bill car for us You know what a great story I appreciate you taking the time today to share some of your life with us and You know. I just love that. Are fans get to enjoy different people in the world and here all their transitions and and thank you so much for joining us on. Huddle up with gus. All my wife again my wife sherry have by the way i do have four kids and i have summoned grandkids grandsons. Wow which one's the best shooter other. They're young for maybe gavin right now. Gavitt traders sixteen thirteen so right now. They're they're number one but those others are coming along the way so does granddad take him out all the time and chew a so last sports Golf basketball golf tennis baseball. Football is tricky. Because gameplay in other concussions gotten away they look you're going to run the ball in the net. That's like emmitt. Smith co said told me on. Show that the coach told that look. You don't have to just run into the guy you can make a miss. And he said oh. I figured it out that those guys can't catch me talk. Run around him but yeah that's great invited. Say one thing. Tell him to play golf because they could play that for the rest of their life. It probably won't hurt as much. Yes yes but yet special. The beauty andropov sure sugar up and take him home right toys but they they. They've been awesome. I appreciate you man. Thank you so for joining me today. And i look forward to talking with you next week on your show Take care and enjoy that family. It sounds like a great one a report. I hate everyone. Thanks for joining me again. Another great episode of huddle up with gusts We'll see you next week. Thanks again to thirty one digital news. Thanks to sounder and especially thanks the manscaping where you go and check out the new law more four point. Oh i think it was three point zero like last week. Now it's four point also check it out a manscaping dot com get use. My code gusts. Rot. that's f. r. e. r. o. T. t. and get twenty percent off and free shipping. We'll see you next week and thanks for joining us. Thanks for joining the fun at sky studios. Ford never gus featuring fifteen year. Nfl quarterback just potluck with gosh is proudly produced by sixteen thirty one digital video and is available aren't anti-abuse. Hey imagine if all your frustrations about advertising your business could be solved right now. You should know that podcast. Listeners are more engaged in higher converting than any other advertising media so try at hope today and reap the rewards of spreaker self advertising platform. It makes it as effortless as ever to hurt by thousands regardless of the listening after us visit spreaker dot com forward slash at that's s. p. r. e. a. k. e. r. dot com slash at and start using your advertising dollars in an impact. Away is he was mcnugget. Mido can meet your give. It does my yours. Civilised bitten annexed east issue at the moment jack gibbons mcnuggets press reset that condi- nuggets deal deal from yet. Mcdonald's does komo news mcnuggets that he is a big mac when a quarter pounder with cheese oatmeal fish oil throw for orleans put immigration participating for the my runner.

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Bridging the Patient-Physician Gap with ML and Expert Systems w/ Xavier Amatriain - #316

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

39:00 min | 1 year ago

Bridging the Patient-Physician Gap with ML and Expert Systems w/ Xavier Amatriain - #316

"Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm your host Sam Charrington did you miss comecon at platforms. If so you'll definitely want to check out our Tamoil. All CON video packages featuring over twenty five sessions discussing expert perspectives on a scale and in production. You'll hear from industry you leaders such as facebook Levi's ZAPPA's and more about their experiences automating accelerating and scaling machine learning and AI in each video package your receive our keynote interviews. The exclusive team tear down panels featuring AIRBNB and survey monkey case studies. Eddie's Amore over thirteen hours of footage once again visit Tomo con dot com slash videos for more information or to secure. You're you're events purchase today already. Everyone I am on the line with Chavez Imatra Maria Chavez is the CO founder and CTO of curiae Chevy welcome back to the Tuomo AI. podcast yeah thanks for having me Sam so for those that don't recognize the name Chevy was actually our third guest after switching to the interview format so this was over three years ago and so much has happened for. Both of us We last had an opportunity to catch up at the. Aws Remorse Conference. was that back in June or so and I thought it makes sense to yea Chevy back on the show to get a little bit of an update as to what he's been up to. So when we last spoke to Chavez he was leading the Engineering Canarian team at Kura doing a ton of work on a recommendation systems and other machine learning use cases prior to that he led The Machine Learning Algorithms team at net flicks and again he's currently the CO founder of Curiae a startup in the healthcare space. Ace Chavez We just jump right in and have you bring us up to date on a cure and what you're up to their Yeah so here. We are using state of the art. Ai and machine learning flora very big and bold mission which is to basically bring and the world's best healthcare to everyone and of course that is a very bold very big mission. And and we are making it concretely. By basically focusing first on primary care so we wanNA billing bring the cost down of providing alighting good not good but best quality healthcare to everyone by using AI and machine learning to bring it down to a place where it can be affordable affordable and can be a scalable and everyone in the world who has a phone can have with like primary care in a very convenient and accessible and affordable weight and so when you're talking about allowing people to use their phones For or primary care we talking about Li- turning your phone into a tri quarter or we talking about using your phone as a kind of a vehicle for accessing in human physicians or something in between or something totally different. It's a combination of of of the above. And plus plus the something different but the the the realization is that you know a lot of what It can be solved in a primary care in healthcare it really boils down to having conversations between patients and physicians and of course providing input to those conversations from different centers and labs and other places right but the the core of what happens in any kind of like medical bizet is a conversation between the patient. A doctor and that's the part that can can be really Automated and not only automated but actually Brought to a point where it's it's you can do it from anywhere that you have a phone with them any kind of Connection and you can start having competition in chatting with a with a doctor. That's all you need and of course there's always there's always going to be things that you can do over the phone like you can get your medication over the phone right. But that's okay because we can always deliver medication to your home or we can always always refer you to allow that is near by and get the result from the lab and whatnot but the the really key issue in the the part where focusing on is in that conversation that happens between patients doctors and we have a service were employed physicians to basically be on the other end of the line to have those conversations and what we're doing is applying this Ai. I machine learning approaches to automate as much as possible this conversation so we can outmanned and scale the doctor so an important piece. These years were not replacing doctors with the machine learning. Would we're making them is. We're giving them. I usually say we're giving them superpowers that and in instead instead of being able to see say hundred patients a day that they'll be able to save ten thousand compensation to most of the easy stop. We'll be handled by the machine learning and they'll be able to focus only in the places that they're needed. The most is one hundred patients a day a typical metric for a practicing practicing physician. It really depends In primary care the the numbers are roughly about the. The average is think twelve minutes per patient. So you can. It depends on what the working hours are for for doctors. That's actually the that's in the in the US. Okay all places like India for example where it's much less than that in at doctors can see way Lee more than a hundred patients in a day and and the reality is they're not even seeing them the the nurses are taking care of them before they get to the doctor they they count as having seen the doctor. So it's yeah it's not a it's not a but but you can. Obviously you can imagine a doctor with fifteen minutes or less. Ask to see a patient and to remember first of all the history of the patient in what's going on asked the right questions. Get the right answers. Remember her everything they know about medical school and come up with a diagnosis in. Come up with a recommendation. It's really hard for any a Human being to do that at that rate right and of course. There's a lot of mistakes and all the things that happened because of this were trying to say hey hand that off as much as possible to the algorithms machines and then made sure that when the doctor comes in they come at the right time and they come at the point where they have all that information Asian laid out for them and they can verify the decisions and make sure that they're saying the right thing and at the same time that's what we mean by augmenting in writing Dr We are of course giving them information that is state of the art and based on real science and they can get that information mation in a way that they can parse it and they can say. Okay yeah this is the right decision I agree Instead of sort of like having to deal with all the messengers gathering that Information Asian parsing remembering things going through the chronic health records and then making a decision all of that in less than fifteen minutes right. Now there there are aspects of this. That sounds Very much like from a the kind of technology at expect to see like Other conversational agents where you've got some back end Resource our team that You you want to optimize the use of the time and allow some a system to handle the kind of easy easy response is. I've got to imagine that you know things get a lot more complicated And Messier differently more important and Healthcare side side of things. Can you talk about some of the unique challenges associated with applying this kind of technology in healthcare. Yeah yeah definitely There's there's a lot of challenges and You're right you could think the you know the typical approach to dialogue systems and all the AH advances that we're having recently on this kind of a chat boggs and things like Transformers birds DVD twos and and and things like that are useful. And they are. I mean we are using all of the above in different ways but the reality is in a domain main like healthcare medicine were the stakes are so high. You cannot leave things out to chant or or just to a model to rely on on on this kind of conversations. Do actually following the the right light path and there's a lot of examples out there where you can trick any of this model to say things that seemed reasonable For a any human being. But they're medically completely wrong And there's been a few examples of that and of course that's that's the that's the key. The key issue that we were attacking wave is like how do we combine prior knowledge about what's correct and incorrect in science and in medicine with some of this automation right we we do have a a a key insight here and very important thing of what we're doing is we we. We control the end to enter. We have both side of the conversation with meaning the patient and the expert Dr Writing this case so the interesting thing in in our in the way that we're buying this technology is that we can deploy them the compensation helpers In in both ways as we can we can decide to Serb something directly to the user if we want to but we can also serve it to the doctor and the doctor can use it the assistant and make a call whether that makes sense or not if it's being helpful that's a really important thing right because then you go. You're we're basically walking the line between a chat Bot and an assistant kind of like a g mail assistant if you will when you get an auto response suggested and the doctor can decide okay. Yeah this makes sense. I'll just take it as it is or this doesn't make sense but they're still sort of like Making a short. Aw that's medically correct. And at the same time we are getting training data on how our model the the model of the building are accurate or not in what way they are or not we we've we have actually An upcoming publication Asian in one of the works of Neuro which basically talked about this how to constrain the flexibility of this sort of like the normal? We'll dialog systems with expert feedback in order to make sure that the information is Rally UH Accurate for the main particularly in Madison. In this case so we need to combine the best of both worlds. And by the way we do the same thing. in other parts. Modelling strategies like diagnos- diagnosis in diagnosis. We're also combining expert systems. which is the you know old school day with deep learning and I think you cannot rely hundred percent on any of the two but you get much? It's better if you combine those two strategies in in some smart ways. which is I think it's a it's a key inside for medicine but it's also something I think that will happen in? Its being advocated for by many people in machine learning in general rights. Like you can't blindly trust models that comes only with with from the data with no prior knowledge or some form of knowledge constraints and a lot of people are trying to see like how you combine those two things right how to combine all all the power you get from models are basically just being trained from a lots and lots of data with knowledge that we have and structuring structuring that knowledge prior into the models right right that is a theme that continues to recur here on the podcast and in my conversations nations when interesting thought there is certainly on the probabilistic side. We benefited from a huge Recent explosion in available tools and You Know Algorithms and I and the like you've mentioned a bunch of those already Burt et CETERA. And you know we've got tools like ten flow and Pie Torch and many many many others his Whereas expert systems We think of as kind of a throwback to pre winter you okay A. and I can't think of You know not being deepen in that space. I can't think of kind of what the leading open source expert system software might be the. Is there a a tools ecosystem there or is it you know are people building you know and people have this realization that they need both and not one or the other. Are they kind of building. Get from scratch. Yeah I I don't think there is such a thing I don't think there's A. There's a expert system component for the attention floral fighters or should there be. Does that make sense. You know with something like that. Had benefited you or is it. You knows a basic it. Basically just kind of rules that that we know how to code them. Because you know it's not probabilistic. Not Really I mean in by the way they can be realistic right at the end of the day. What you have with these expert systems is is a graph and then you can do realistic influence on the grab and you can do different things on that graph? Basically a I'm thinking of generate to expert. System would be rather symbol in All you need is a way to represent Sort of like Graefin and make him for instance on the straps will be that complicated to sort of like half a component for Or for Basically does not for you so the key thing here is those expert systems systems Reliable laud still on like manual labor and disagreement exam example in the case of some the expert system. We're using we're using some that have been developed for over fifty years right. So there's a there's a couple of expert systems for medical diagnosis. That go back fifty years and we we're using both of them. Actually and interestingly There's a lot of knowledge in there and you can think about fifty years of a bunch of hundreds of really well trained physicians in coding and Knowledge and information about medicine in a graph runs. And that's really valuable and and it's really something that you can then injected into any learning system. You get away from it right up to your question. There's no there's no tooling for that on the other hand you can do interesting. Things like One of the things we've done is used this expert system to Basically a data generator to generate synthetic data entering learning models from the data that From the experts system right that's an example of something that yeah I think is very useful and really really valuable because then you can. You can even merge synthetic data with natural data and you can they tweak it in ways that you can learn a model that actually now has some prior knowledge that has been injected in the form of a ground truth data so to speak week. Can you speak to that particular point in a little bit more detail. Yeah sure okay. So in this case the the the thought process was like that right like that. We know that you know if we have very good data and we train the deep learning neural net We could get it. Took like a really high accurate diagnosis system. The reality is that high quality data does not exist if you go to electronic health records which we have used ourselves. I mean we have a project with stand for the where we have been working with them on using Health records and this. This has been something that others have done like Google in deep. Mind you you name it. It's like learning a predictive models from chronic health records health records. The data data quality is really really poor notoriously. So it's yes and there's a lot of reasons for that but one of it. Is You know they. They weren't designed For the purpose of diagnosis designed for the purpose of billing and to make sure the insurance companies got their money back. So there's a there's a ton of issues with him ABC so but again that they valuable. It's not like it's totally noise. There is something in it. So how how can you generate some kind of data that is more solid until I complete. Moore's ground truth while you can go to this expert system which again they're all they are. Is You know a graph and you can start. Activating note and generate data from That grab that basically basically become Other cases that you used to train your deep learning and that's what we we showed in this paper. We published last last year where we basically generated data from the expert system We injected noise to that data. Because an interesting and important thing is this you'll want to train a model that is robust to noise right. The problem with expert systems. One of the problems is that they're not capable of dealing with noise so in other Lord. If the if the patient doesn't say exactly the symptom they have and to make a mistake because they didn't understand the question or the doctor enters a wrong. Thank thank the expert system is basically doom and and it was going to give you any correct output. That's not the case for you can train machine learning models. Are you know relatively robust to noise. Because you can even do adversarial training and you can do a lot of different things to make them. Robust So how do you combine both while you can. You can also add inject noise to the expert system. That's basically what we did too. We generated data from the expert system. We injected different kinds of noise. One example I which I think will be is you can inject noise by saying. Hey I'm just gonNA Randomly Lean Jek. Thinks symptoms are very common right. I'll just add coughing to everything because you know. Coughing is something that people have general no matter whether they have one disease or not not right. It's like it's you will always can call for his knees or something like that. It's very prevalent and very common at is is a typical legal thing and can confused really confused an expert system. But it's if you train a machine learn modeled on ignoring cop. Because it's something very common. It's not very it's not going to help. Determine what the diagnosis while Daniel the robust model so we again again generated synthetic data from from the systems injected noise in ways that we made the learn model more robust and we also combine that intech data with natural data that we had from EHR's and other sources to also prove that you can you'd you'd need to constrain yourself to just one single data right. All you need to do is combining in smart ways to understand because because there's there's always lead value to training from real world data at all. You need to figure out how to combine it with more more Clean Data and data. You can trust. You mentioned the this kind of injecting noise via adding symptoms that are frequently recurring. What are some other examples of the kind of noise that you're injecting? And then more broadly. How do you quantify the value of the synthetic data in building out your models? Yeah so okay so the first question I I mean I think the key inside to adding noise in the main like medicine is you need. You need to have some knowledge right like when when I give you. The example of adding symptoms are very common. That makes sense right because it makes sense because we know about medicine like okay. Yeah they explanation makes up another Examples like well you can remove symptoms that are rare or are likely to be missed right. That's another thing that makes sense once. Don't you explain it right. But you need to have some inside and you need to talk to doctors. And that's something we do all the time right. This kind of strategies dome and come up By sheer imagination. They come up with 'cause we talk to our physicians than we've talked to them to. Hey what's How do you deal with these issues? Where issues are common in the lead to mistakes diagnosis? How can we make sure that our model doesn't make the same mistake so I think and that is a key and important things? You need to work with domain experts and that leads me to answer your second question. Let me just pause ause there. Because that's the kind of an interesting point. I think you know what I think of noise at least from classical engineering perspective. I think of noise as like this junk. That's in a on correllated from your signal. But what you're suggesting is that at least when you're creating synthetic data your noise needs to be correlated with your actual noise toys that you need to expect you can't just have you know purely random noise Because that won't help your model. Yeah that's pretty much it. Ah I mean here. It's slightly different rights and notion of Of Noise if you will but apt would you have it synthetic data that is strictly true. If you will because true in a scientific sense because it's been generated by kind of like an expert system it's been designed on on science but what you need to do is inject noise that mimics more the reality of major right. I and the messengers arrived but that noise yet needs to model some of the Natural messages that you see in real life and then you need to not injected. It's not white not right. In that sense. It's noise that tries to shine that synthetic data into to Something that is more real right. If you think about it I mean I use sometimes the metaphor of life having cards also using data that is generated from video games. And it's like well you can imagine that you're training your self driving model on data from from granted. Alto but you you need to inject clock and you need to inject rain and you need to inject things that are not maybe you're synthetic data and and they're adding noise to the collateral damage but in a way that mimics real Live situations right not just white noise And that's a a bit like the the concept of domain adaptation. I mean you you you could consider that that for sure and in that another sure it is a very Titian itself I mean we could go into that it. It's another important thing that you need to many in many cases because and and yeah you you you're right it could be seen as that right because sometimes you are training on ideal data. But then you're going to be faced with a real life data that is gonNA have to be interpreted in the context of the of the ideal data that you use for training so yeah it is okay. So you're about to take on that second question. The second question was about. How do you even know that? The the the data it is good or even the model. Your training is good and and and Beyond that the relative advantage of if you know how do you compare with an without using this synthetic data you know is it a is it a training time or is it a accuracy or some some combination of all these things it's mostly about accuracy right And the problem is that the definition of the accuracy is again really tricky and and not that obvious right accuracy In the context of medical diagnosis is very very tricky. thing to define particularly because you would hope hope that by asking a physician you would get a ground truth but that's not the case right There's studies Out there for example the human the project the publisher some studies that the on their data said the average accuracy of a single physician was sixty percent right. which is really look now if you if you take? The Consensus of twenty physicians sounds that got up to over eighty percent which is much better but then of course you need to have twenty two dishes agreed and you still eighty percent which which is a lot better but not necessarily comforting. If you're the patient exactly an and I think that's that's a key issue in like what do we treat as ground truth so in our case we I mean we use a combination of a lot of things. We use a combination of sort of like publicly known this. That's why there's not that many unfortunately for for this domain in there just a few of what's called medical vignettes that you can use is to evaluate we also use our own physicians through Qa. And we make sure that we have like several of them agreeing. Bring on The cases so we know that we're ride and then at the end there's also this kind of like synthetic data rights like you so you need to treat that intimidated as pseudo ground truth in the sense that I mentioned if you think about it that that synthetic data is the the result of as I said before fifty years of research from hundred physicians. Who have agreed that? That's what you know that particular disease should would be defined ass and that's those are the symptoms that are related. So it's it's as good as a ground truth as you can get in many other cases right so so again we. It's I wish I had a like a a great answer for this but the reality is I don't it's like it's a it's a it's kind of. It's tiff process. Were you like three one day. Ground Truth but then you compare it to your holiday you let your physicians go through into this is greg or it is not an and in your feed it back and you keep improving both overtime and I think that's That's another very important Lesson learn here is that you need to design all the systems as Really learning systems right. So it's it's not only about. What's their accuracy? See Today. It's more about how can you make sure that the accuracy and all the other metrics you care about improve over time right and in the meantime the important thing is like we always default acumen like we'll always default to human doctor and improve the model time and just tell that human doctor. Hey our model things that this three things are important. You WanNA consider them in. The doctor will say yes or no and it's they're called and You know we'll be as good as the as the doctors are But over time we we are pretty sure actually even in our outline allegation metrics. We think the were already are. Modeled are already at least as good if not better than the average doctor but even with that. It's not enough right. They need to be better than the best doctor to even make it feasible to rely on on them But they're good assistant and a good helmet nation and to the Human Physicians for sure. Do you have you made any attempts to benchmark the The third party expert systems with regard to you some allusive metric around accuracy or Yeah I guess the thought is that you know even if we were confident that each of the elements in this expert system was vetted by the twenty doctors or whatever required to you. Know have a consensus that you know has some sufficient isn't level of accuracy you know. Medical perspectives have changed significantly over. Fifty Years We may I don't know the extent into which this is tracked in this expert system. But you know there are diagnostic practices that apply not equally across different groups of patients. And so you have all the potential for all kinds of biases within a data. Set like that. Have you made any attempt at kind of evaluating that I mean we. We are constantly only about waiting that with our data. But it's really hard to come up with something that I I would dare to publish right. Because it's it's it's it's the problem is the same as like there is no no ground truth. There's a there's a couple of papers On evaluating different systems in different online symptom checkers and those are the ones that everyone is using as sort of like the benchmark. And there's a paper by semi Graham On evaluating symptom checkers and there are some medical begets. What's that she published which are commonly used by a bunch of people including some like Babylon in the UK? And so on where they republicans like well we use these yet. Because that's all we have at least it commonly available and you can benchmark against but they're far from you know something it's that you could consider sort of like has good coverage off medical conditions and and you can trust us as being comparable but that that that being said again. I think that the the reality is as harsh may sound. It's not too hard to be better than the average physician but again that's not enough at that. That's not convincing. If I told you like. Oh I can build a self driving car hard. That is better than the average teenage driver. Would you be okay like well. Probably not because the average teenage driver is not somebody I would trust On automated driving machine. So I think it's it's pretty much the same as it's not about being better than the average doctor is about being better than the best doctor and being able to men and always sort of like fall back on Humans and I think that's exactly I. I liked that comparison to celebrating cards a lot. Because because I think what we're trying to build is not a completely autonomous vehicle right. We're trying to build a automation as assistant to the driver as like many cars. Do Right now. But in this case the driver is an expert. Who is a physician at one more question for you? You mentioned earlier that that among the techniques cheer relying on you do make some use a transformers burt. PT To that kind of thing. How does that play out in in what you're building that plays out in in many different ways? I mean there's there's a lot of great things about those approaches that the one that I think is probably the most relevant in in our case is the fact that it's transfer is it's all about transfer learning right. It's what about if you have a great model that has learned in general Speaks You can then fine tune it on some specific domain to become better about speaking about healthcare. Right so a lot of the approaches we take Jake is we. Look at some of this Models we find them very specific data that we have that is focused on healthcare and then we can use it to do a bunch of things. I mean those. The output of those models can be used in the context of Calcutta or dialogue system. But you can also use them to generate features for anything for classify or or You name it right. And I think they because they build a representation representation of language in in in general. So we we use them as impetus to Many of the things we do breath but more directly we also use them as as I mentioned before to generate systems to the physicians as they're chatting chatting And they were talking to the patient right so if you if you think about that also I think I dare to say pretty common in many applications of just customer service. In general like we're customer service will have sort of like assistant actually three there. There are some papers I think. For example from Airbnb what they've done similar things for their customer service Where there's basically an assistant? That is the customer service suggesting things they could say so they can basically accept them or not and decide whether they they wanna Wanna tagged him out or just simply like that. That suggested respond. So that's an example where you can almost you know you can take one of this models fine tune in training on a very specific data that is more healthcare oriented and you generate like an assistant for a physician or an expert in any given the main while Chevy a It was absolutely wonderful. Catching up with you really excited to learn more about what you're up to their Karai and Definitely be Following along okay. Yeah great I would say that many of these things that with at mentioned we we are publishing and we are We have four papers in this machine learning for healthcare workshop workshop new ribs and if people are interested in blowing up in some of the details of how we use transform remodels or. How do we do diagnosis until on did that? All I mean they can go to our Taivon and find more details on some of this techniques however using them in trying to sort of like this huge you healthcare problems access so fantastic will Will include some links to those papers on archive initial national nuts. Great so great talking to you thank you. That's our show for today to learn more about today's show visit family. I dot com slash shows once again. If you missed we'll con- or wants to share what you learned with your team team. Be Sure to visit some kind dot com slash videos for more information about some more kind of video packages. Thanks so much for listening apiece.

Chevy AIRBNB AI Chavez Imatra Maria Chavez facebook Ace Chavez Tamoil Sam Charrington Eddie bizet Levi US ZAPPA Engineering Canarian Li Google CO founder boggs
What is Toxic Stress & Why is She So Bad? with Dr. Caroline Leaf

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

56:47 min | 2 years ago

What is Toxic Stress & Why is She So Bad? with Dr. Caroline Leaf

"Today's episode is sponsored by ADT real protection when it comes to something as important as your family safety, which is actually super duper important. You deserve real protection from ADT. Real protection means the nation's number one smart home security provider is there for you. When you need them Queen real protection means eighteen thousand employees safeguarding, a you and your two cats. No matter how you define safety ADT. Is there ADT real protection? Bizet ADT dot com slash podcast to learn more about how ADT can design and install a secure smart home, just for you. Okay. Cupid dating up as the only dating out that binds you someone based on who you are. And what you're into. Are. You obsessed with like cats and figure skating. Well, I sure him what about like, you know, long plane rides, and I don't really love those so much. Well, okay. Cuba. Dating is going to help. You figure all that out? So download the free. Okay. Cuba, dating up today. Yeah. Welcome to getting curious. I'm Jonathan says if you did not even know my name, that's what she is. I'm every week for about thirty minutes, or sometimes it's, you know, much longer for brilliant little conversation with an expert turn all about something. That makes me curious. I didn't mean just call myself brilliant. Honey, these conversations are gorgeous in my fault that we know how to chat around here. So this week I'm asking why in the world do we remember bad haircuts? More than the good ones so Android studio by cognitive neuroscientists. Dr caroline. Hey, welcome to getting curious. This Jonathan Vanessa. I'm very very excited for this episode. It's an episode of learning to do for a long time in your the perfect guest. So without further ado, I'm going to introduce you dodger Caroline leaf Honey. Welcome. Thank you. I'm central to be here. I'm I'm so glad that you're here author of many gorgeous books. Most recently think learned succeed understanding and using your mind to thrive at school the workplace in life. Exactly gorgeous. Okay. So here's the well, actually before I jump into that will really this is the crux of today's question. So I'll start with that. Then I'm going to go to figuring out what all your titles mean. Then we're going to go back to the question. So all right. When I did the short question is why do we remember like negative experiences more than positive ones? The reason I say that is because I noticed like pre queer eye, you know, pre game of thrones for me in my career like when I was in the hair or in the salon five days a week all the time, I could do ten thousand satisfied clients. But then like the one person that was like a little unhappy with their fringe tremor. Like, you know, wish whatever the thing was that is the client that I'm taking home with me losing sleepover. You know, I'm never going to get this. Right. Like, I'm you know. Oh, I'm similarly I've noticed that. Also kind of in that vein. Like, you could same thing for the clients like for everyone that you do an incredible haircut on name may send you one person. But for a person who doesn't have a good experience. They're gonna tell fifteen thousand people that you mess up their hair. So I've noticed that the that's like a thing. You know, then the other thing is like similarly in the last year, you know, my life has changed so much. I have everything in the world to be so attorney grateful for like my life is completely different. And it's and it has been a very exciting amazing. Right. And the I have noticed that through this ride like I used to have three people balked on Instagram. And now I have like ten thousand like not literally. But I I will go through the comments and ninety percent of them are like overwhelmingly, positive and lovely. And if I'm seeing people, you know, if someone is said, something problematic, and then a lot of people are kind of coming for them. And there's like an issue on my comment threat about whatever insta- drama the day. I will really. Find myself coming at people like I mean with facts, I mean, a lot it's not like, I'm belligerent Cussing. I mean, it's usually like a pretty thoughtful thing, but I'll find myself ruminating over that and going back to check it later. And it's like, I am too busy producing this podcast. Trying to be a good hairdresser on queer. I try to deal with the pressure of this world like trying to be the best man be the best. I can beat to like be wasting my time on like negative comments. So Queen how the fuck am I going to get through this just been son this struggle bus, and she's been taken I've been having half a Cup of hater eight every morning. I you know, what I'm saying. I just how do I shake off these negative Nancy cobwebs? Oh my gosh. This when I have to tell you what show inst-, we know what you institute and rejoins to him on you make me off you make me smile, you make me happy. So that's one really good thing is to meet and fund something that makes you happy. Because as soon as you happy you change the way that your brain functions. So you'll mind. Is changing your brain. And that's key. Join us in to what you all the things that you've just described. Now, what's really keys the realization that you are not your brain that you control your brain. So therefore, you can decide what you want to do with Nick situation. Because when I say, you control, your brain, you actually, creating an extreme -ality. So those negative comments and those negative people that are the one out of ten thousand as you say that can throw us in grab us is because naturally as humans. We are designed for deep meaningful relationships. We also find a lot of identity in being loved by this. So these a desire to accepted a nut by everyone, and it's kind of hard for us to not accept that. Even the nets everyone, that's universal. Or it's hard for us to accept that. So much of life is like our need for deep meaningful connection and like to be loved by everyone. That's no, that's that's normal. Becky, see what's hard for us to deal with as if someone is negative. Normal. Is you see we basically have an optimism bias in with brain within all body. If you look at the neuroscience behind how functional we wired for all the optimism. We wanted to think. Well, filmmaker choices deep meaningful relationships that's on norm. Jackass? I'm always like really like back in the day like before like a gay throws inquiry like when I would be on like like dating like like, or, you know, gaps. I was like I don't really need to put like that cute of a picture because like I'm just so adore like I don't need to put that like I'll just slap any old picture up there. Because like if you're too stupid to realize that I'm like studying hilarious. Gordon, come over just the your face. You're going to love her. I promise, but that was problematic because they didn't get you know, it's not as good if you just put a gorgeous picture of yourself up. But I just I kind of like a blind shallow. How confidence of like how do you? What do you mean? I'm not your type like a mentor like what do you mean? Exactly. And so they they you operating in your natural identity you which is. As we call it, basically optimism by Sawai for left. So we have every single celebrate in our body all literally designed for the positive. So that's our expectation we come into life with expectations or anything that goes against that throws us. And everyone's that way, everyone is that who said that. Well, you said that everyone that science just like that's just. Just like that's just how we all. It's it's just how we function. It's how we are designed it's how we wired so therefore we looking for that in every relationship in every situation. So when we don't get that. It's so it's not that. It's it's more powerful. It said it's wild. This is so abnormal that they don't love me that there aren't adorable that they don't think I'm perfect. So because we actually deep down inside that's our natural default mode authenticity, but we've been so shaped by the world on there, and what you supposed to be that we've had identity a little bit knocked. So we don't think like we should be thinking always. So we overreact to the negative because Ed normal. So instead of us thing the negative as as something that does us in because it's more powerful. We it's doing in because it's abnormal. It's not as powerful sucked. Hey, this is out of the norm. So that's kind of nice to know that the norm is is is the lab stuff in the the. Toxic is the not lobster. So how do we deal with it? That's the next question go, but what about the people who like what if you're the opposite of me? And it's like you feel like it's ninety percent hate in ten percent loving like what if you're norm is like all negativity, and like just it's constant like because like what you may not even have a choice in like like, it could be the ju- the geography of what you were born into or the financial circumstances where you were born into like, maybe you don't have like maybe have not a pot to piss in is like, you could maybe you know, what I mean? Like, maybe your life is just much more full of strife in like sorrow like, but then I feel like a lot of times people that you would think would have more strife and find their joy. 'cause that they don't have the the things that you would think that you would need to like be happy. Exactly. So there's a whole you've always look at the person story. So yes, the socioeconomic and cultural older be Vincent circumstances of not what we say. Jonathan is that you cannot control the Vincent's comes tenses you alive, but you can. Control your reactions. And you know, that's something that we not taught enough dot told how powerful mind is not shown how we can control a reaction. So we've become buffeted by the winds. So we see that negative combing. We have that negative the that negative state know someone's comments on as you said the negative. Hey, cut with something we sink that. That's everything. Now, there's a couple of things happening here. It's out of the numerous. I've said it's what we not expecting. But then draws attention because it's out of the norm. Then we start paying attention to the wrong thing. So now choices in bolt we can't control events and circumstances. You can't control the person's going to sell new Instagram, but you can control your reaction to it. So if we choose to go down the road of how could they do that? We don't know what they thinking. We don't know the circumstances. So we seeing it from all angle, and we tried to validate it from our angle, but they've got a not justifying what some we had the same thing. And only scrambles have Ben blocking think how can people be. So whatever, you know. But. It's they they put these story the angles. So we either can choose to react negatively, if we choose to react negatively, we cause brain damage own brain, we damage, the seventy five to one hundred trillion cells of our brain body, we create neurochemical CAL's, we can fix it again. Now, we can always since we get online rot. But as soon as we start going down that negative daughter here only PHD in communication, pathology BSE Lago pedic's and audio. Well, how do you say this L word this lug appendix seated at really what's logo pedic's and audiology will basically in communication pathology. They will kind of go together. I look at people's behavior. I'm trying to people's behavior and check it back to the thoughts and track it back to the reaction in this Otay from what's going on in the brain. So an intern help people to be conceptualize and relearn and manage if it's either a neurological damage with it's a trauma with some kind of mind issue. Hugh, mental health issue. So it's looking at the behavior and helping people to cope within that situation. God if all I would have met you like four months ago, anyway, I'm so that's really interesting. So one thing that we've learned before in this podcast earliest, I learned from Dr Santa can who wrote this book called your brain on Levin. He mentally packed heirarchy which is the physio biological approach to couples therapy. He kind of introduced me to the idea that like our brain is like a little pharmacy. Honey, she's like she's capable of making like all these different chemicals, and then like, those chemicals at the brain makes is like how we in turn will like feel because your brain can make like endorphin, and she can make like that adrenalin, and like that effort peripheral and the vastly precedent in the testosterone, etc. So similarly like when we're making love chemical feelings when you go into the negative comment space, and you decide to react negatively like you were saying you can start to create like brain damage. So there's like an opposite where we can like fuck ourselves up city. And this is way we put a real. Allows you not brain Jonassen, you control, your brain, your brain, the physical structure that is very complex. But it response to the instructions of your mind. So your mind is something separate from your brain. But it works with the brain and they interact with each other. Okay. So the big mouthful that's like some Eckhart Olean new earth shit. When I learning about the ego. And I was like bitch. I do not have an ego at car. I don't know what you're talking about. But I I do not have I'm from the midwest hunting. We don't have egos. They're all we do is. We work hard. We just and then I was like oh my God. That's my ego. I was like oh my God. My ego thinks that I'm from the midwest, and we were hard workers. And we're this similar that like so are still like them. Wait, right. The what is the ego like a separate thing from the minor? There's like mine, and then there's ego, brain egos. These these are words to describe the armistice speaking dive diving into kind of when you dive into those deeper things. So that's just the kind of mindset, it's a world view that you just described but he saints. You are Jonathan and you have your mind, and your mind is your you. On physical point of view. And it's the ninety nine percent part of you. And it's how you the simplest way to understand mind is it's how you think feel and choose. So those always go to the always thinking fueled choose you think you feel when you feel you choose, and as you do that, you're generating this amazing quantum energy and that moves into your brain and your brain response with me. Sideways lady hold on a second. Girl, you came to pull you get into Soleil today on this episode of getting curious. Oh my God. Yes, I'm telling you. So think when we think we feel when we feel we choose swimmingly think we feel when we feel we just this is reminding me of like when Elliot skating coach will be like pick up your inside leg. And I'm like pick up not in my end side leg makes no sense. But I, but it makes sense. Because when I think we just walk me through that. But like with the thought process or something like how does some? Yeah. When you when you skating, I've known or anything, I think I feel I choose I can see you didn't know. So you doing it at four hundred billion actions per second on the non conscious level, which is a wake twenty four seven which is the ninety nine percent part of you the consciously was when you're awake Surat. Now, you've got to non conscious level working angel conscious level working, which means that you as you sink feeling choose you pulling on all the experience of memories will use all the stuff that you've gone through Citra. That's. Moving up into conscious mind. So I'm saying things, and that's a signal you hearing the hearing my words you looking at my face you seeing the body language. So that's all coming into you. You're taking that into into brain. It's activating your mind. So your mind's thinking you thinking about what I'm saying as I'm thinking right now can see rot knock on senior hit. But I know what you're doing. You've got a whole bunch of sorts that are moving from Yunan conscious to conscious Monday move up kind of the speed of just my thing is on moving and move up and move down. They move up and move down and certain ones, you grabbing in your mind, which is you formulating next questions are you thinking, and you feeling you're getting an experience you use these same station going through whole body, and you making some choices and in this moment specific choice. They're going to be related to picking up on what I'm saying. And taking it to the next question. The next example. So you we do this twenty four seven I'm feeling really bad for your husband and your kids right now. Because they're sitting in this in this thing watching us. Right now, we're in this little picture, we're in like a little like box recording studio, and you're you're to kit your daughter to my kids yet to your four kids are here. Then you're you're is here in the businesses. Honey, you're like, so it's like, oh, mom. I was going to go to my friends to get. I was going to go to my mom's house to get or I was gonna go to my friend's house today. But how come you just look to the right and scratch your hair twice? You're lying. I can tell your I can tell body. You can tell your body language. Right. You can you can read a lot of you can you can saints from each other. So like this right now, we all generate energy. So like the Theron spun it's on easing weird. I mean, we generating energy and there's a positive relationship puzzle relations with my kids, whatever. So you feeling positive energy literally blow packets of energy your love in Ajoy hidden. Okay. So now, you're going to negative environment. And you just know that person doesn't like you would, you know, they've been gossiping about you, or they just horrible and you walk in and they'll small sweetly, but you know, that it's not genuine. So you don't know what they exactly thinking. But you pick up on the attitude because they have a toxic sort that they built into the brain which is on Jellison jealous of Jonasson because he's so cute. And he's this, and he's that not that I want what he's got the typical kind of in BG Lucy kind of singing these toxic. So they so as they as you walk into the room, they may be looking at you, and and you feel that toxic energy. And that's true. Because what if you thinking about and you feeling? Choosing you bolt into physical structure in your brain into a non political structure in your mind. When you connect with other humans that is the energy that you generating. So we feel the toxic energy. With lower just a little slower. So when you take the things that you're so you come to the negative room or whatever. And so you take like the the the toxic vibes that you're feeling in the room mixed with your life experiences. Exactly. And then you take those things on and then like your life experiences, and then that comes out until I how you're going to deal with that situation does. So you'll live experiences on moving up and you put them on like sunglasses. And so you view, you perceive the current situation through you experience. And that person is viewing you the interaction in the same way to they experience. So they coming up with what even if it's a jealousy thing was something they will they maybe speak heckler how you but what's coming through this paradox this conflict because even though they smiling you can see the eyes on smiling. The body language is fifty percent of communications not working properly and the energy that they generating. And this is why quantum physics sexy shows us that the energy way that's coming out is Jacob de ugly thing, and you feel like things hitting you. Was like someone's shooting little pellets at you, which is literally what is happening in the quantum world. So you feel it. So thoughts are real they generating toxic energy. Now that person who's toxic is damaging the own brain as well as hurting you. So we have to learn how to protect ourselves. So we have to put up shield and in mind, we need a block. So that Instagram coming right back full circle where? Welcome back. You guys this is like major life-affirming things, but calling he's like waving at me because I know that she's time for a break cutting. But I can feel it I'm going over. But I don't even care because it's so majors, but just listen to this break chew seconds. I'm sorry like advertising twenty makes the world go round. I know it's awful. Hey, nutrition is all about making you look and feel your best tiny h Pacific supplement packs. A gorgeous combo of potent ingredients designed for specific things on me like clear skin or boosted energy are fuller hair. 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It gives me a little immunity boos from vitamin C and citrus bioflavonoids complex, go to home nutrition dot com slash get started for your purse ways recommendations and get twenty percent off your first purchase with co JV N. That's nutrition dot com slash get underscore started and code JV at square face makes it easier than ever to launch your passion project for me between becoming a hairdresser doing getting curious and just becoming a very busy business lady. Did not happen easily. I really wish I could have had some guiding light to help me organize my brain. And you know, it would have been so great as squarespace. They really help get any of your ideas off the ground by helping you with templates to publish content, helping you sell products, whatever it is that your new business needs squarespace can help you get it together also websites. Hello. Yes. Squarespace. They help you with that too. They also have really powerful ecommerce punk. Finality that lets you sell anything online and analysts to help you grow your site in real time so head over to squarespace dot com slash avian for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch us, the offer code JV and to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com slash JV. An offer code JV end. Hey. Welcome back to getting curious this Jonathan Venice. So basically what you were just saying was is what our job is to do is kind of be aware of. That's what's going on in negative situations. And then coming back to the situation to Instagram negative caption as as realize that when we go and lean caged with because they leave the caption of like Jonathan how could you possibly promote like Ninna, Nick? And then I'm like like, how could you think that I feel like that? And then I'm like Zia responsible. And you'd even know things that I don't promote night could have all the money that I could've made that I don't because I don't want to promote stuff that. I don't think. So. Yes. But then like, I'm I'm fucking up my own brain. And they will say so there's a negative relationship. Because that even though they all they some way they since they want like you're not sitting very close to each other. It's so close so therefore even though it's coming through print because there's no real space ton dimension. In this energy mind thing, it's hitting you from the page. So you have to literally make a decision you have to sink. Okay. This. This is they don't know these people you have to kind of stand back and observe your own thinking, this is a very very powerful skill of very powerful technique and its like stick one of five steps that we need to use to manage your mind. Otherwise, we're gonna Mesa puckering. So we need to stand back and say, okay. Well, this is a stupid comment. I dunno where they coming from. But I'm not gonna let their victory send like a zoo embody feedings because your your body will go into talks extracts now that is bad for your brain in your body's. You don't want someone that you don't even know to me up your brain and body, so by focusing on that you're absorbing that negative energy intial brain in your body, and you actually damaging yourself very fuel at hugs extracts. What I do like, I feel my shoulders by feel also like my brain wants to go back and look at the comments read like it wants to go see like what what someone else said. And like, I feel like my body changes. My face changes. I lose like I bet you if you put in like a I I've lost hours to doing. This 'cause like prior to becoming successful like in this way. Like, I would have used of used those like loss does hours either on lake either internet dating like things that I can't really do now and like don't do because of late my current situation. But I just and that negatively you're feeling in that case if it's like dating it can be more like ruminating on like feelings of rejection or feelings of loneliness or whatever. So it doesn't matter like what the thing that you're ruminating on as you know, or the thing that you're going back to beat yourself over the head with of like comparing yourself or measuring yourself up to it. Okay. So all right noted. What about if in terms of grief like, you know, we're grieving things this is very much a season of people grief things all the time. Like people are going through loss. People go through what have you find yourself like ruminating in feelings of grief of all sorts of different types. Like, how do we how do you nurture that? Unlike let that go like, you know, like an pretty level Elizabeth Gilbert, you talk about like sending him eleven light and letting go. Well bitch. I wish you know. It sounds sure. It sounds nice. Okay. Would love it. So how do we do you do that? So what we do in Iraq. Currently we told that we must express things, but we mustn't express feeding. So we getting the the conflicting message of you know, you miss suppressor because it's any anxiety and depression, not suddenly you've got a mental health disorder over grieving for longer than you lose a loved one. If you if you know screaming for longer than maybe two thing, I think it's two months or two weeks to seventy clinical depression. There's a complete story of the mind management of life. So the human condition is full with grief sorrow tumor excitement. It's true. We know that and it's very normal that since the beginning of time we've all battled with dealing with the sufferings of life and the sufferings of life are part of our story. So we can't suppress it. Because as you're experiencing, something, whatever that grief causative is you sink. You feel you choose when you think failing choose you both something in your brain, you actually belittle structures made of proteins of chemicals. You mentioned some chemicals earlier on dolphins insert Citra that you build. These these thoughts trees that have the information of the situation and the emotions you've got slow physical thing in your brain, any of its toxic, the proteins, a weird and paint a phone tree, but very much alive and living and pulled with energy, but toxic energy, it rank on handle it when it's on the other side of it's the healthy, which is a healthy happy thing. Then it's good case. The toxic thing if we don't deal with that. It'd be done what I honestly silly to admit I quoted freaking out in the Leveson, you need to acknowledge need to gather winners, you need to express the motion go through this process and and deal with it. Because otherwise if you suppress it in don't doesn't go away. It's still the so then leads to the nagging executive the nagging depression. They may told them exerting depressions bed. I'm gonna tell you anxiety and depression on not bad. They are signals that your body is is telling you they discomfort zone telling you. Hey, this something going on in your life that you need to address across tumor some kind of toxic habits something that you haven't dealt with. So it's actually CU it's a it's a it's a reminder to be nearly brace that but not get stuck. Viewer covering on right now. Yeah. Well, it's like, I really it's like she's going the real she's been going through it. So. I'm sorry. So you said that before like the first step of like really managing your mind is being able to like kind of acknowledge what's going on. I definitely I think sometimes when you experience a certain amount of or a certain loss, it can kind of make you realize like all of the other things that you were like maybe like putting that thing on over to compensate for like, whatever the and like the last two weeks. I'm like, oh my God. I miss my cat. Oh my God. I miss my stepdad. Oh my God. I like I've just like there's been processing lots of like all right there. So once you step off, you're like, okay, she's a bloody scab wound. Like, I'm feeling like a bloody Scott the holidays are where a lot. It was just lots of tench. Was okay. So she stepped off the mountain now. Like, I got an issue. I'm a bloody scab wound. I'm feeling the negative chemical brain trees. How do we make them? Like, how do I make? I wanna make my negative brain structure trees that are looking. Yes, I want. Symmetrical much symmetrical. Exactly. So what we do is we gather them. We read them we literally grabbed him. So in your mind into your mind is so powerful you mind is ninety nine percent of for you on your physical is only the one percent. So that's happened. It's part of the story, but the toxic tree that is causing all those physical reactions in your body. So what you wanna do is grab it and shift your perception to like say grab literally second. This is how I'm feeling name. It the scribe write it down the find a kind of put it in a box a little look box with visual you want. Then you going to stand back, and you're going to observe that is not who you are. It's an experience you've head. It's part of who story. So you stick back into the power of of your mind of the spouse that we have to Reconceptualise so Reconceptualise is one of the most phenomenal concepts. Once you've grabbed it put it in the books, you stand back and observe you into thinking you start the analyzing what is this Willis's come from. What is? Said pain. And it's I mean, they sometimes it's very obvious. Sometimes it's not so obvious but bobbing so most objective about the situation. You not denying jig knowledge in it tonight. You said, okay. So that's toxic. It makes me feel like this. So non gonna make stress weak form. You're gonna make this pain work for me. So I shook my perception put on these other glosses and said, okay. So let's look at how we can redesign reformulate. What can how can I manage that? I don't deny that you never deny what you've gone through. It's part of you. It's part of your story. It's so important that you take it from that side to the side, and we start rebuilding a healthy new swoop pedals, actually happens you start building Vobis new billions of little quantum neurobiological computers in your brain. And as you shift your perceptions. Okay. I'm going to make this week me. Stay in the box. The toxic thing. I'm going to redesign you how I want you. It's gonna happen overnight. But as you do that your mind energy changes that the tree the quantum energy chemical, electromagnetic chemical flow, everything starts to. Shift you design, this you control, this genetic expression changes and you start building beautiful little healthy. Even though you may have tears and sadness, and you missing whatever you said you can't forever. These these a sadness, but you now going to start focusing on what are the joyful times? Maybe you head with that person. To that. You may be loss of you start redesigning it doesn't mean you stop crying. It doesn't mean you forget and suppress. It means you take that. So then when you think eventually all of us melts away, you literally Jonathan's most amazing thing as you do what I'm doing as as you do what I'm saying. Where you start re conceptualizing redesigning reformulating stinking asking onstream discussing working, this you create an energy flow that causes the toxic branches to literally melts the branches literally melt off. So that toxic thought goes away, which is causing damage, and now we had this beautiful new healthy tree which remembers the pain, you all gonna cry. But the it becomes manageable grief. It becomes part of your story becomes something. To celebrate. It is a choice of a decision whatever you pay attention to grow. So you keep growing that that creates a negative toxic hole, and it just goes constantly downwards. Whereas by redesign, I can then control how I'm going to yet to that situation. We both. Okay, saints a hundred percent. So you take a really quick break. I'm just going to get a little couple of water won't be right back with more getting carries right after this. Hey article as an online only furniture company that offers a beautiful modern well-made Brennan designed with Scandinavian simplicity in mind. Okay. So here's the thing. Article is online only which means that they're able to get rid of all that traditional retail overhead. 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That's article dot com slash avian to get fifty dollars off your first purchase of one hundred dollars or more. Hey book about you're getting curious. It's Jonathan Vanessa. We are here with Dr Caroline leave. We love so much. So okay. Let's say that you've got a negative thought pattern. Right. Let's say there's that person in your life who you blocked, and you are, but you still wanted you can't help. But look go back and you look at that Instagram. Honey, you block them at your like, I just I can't help it. I'm gonna I'm blocking is going to look at it really quick within your all nasty feeling like, you're you're minute yourself of the that click friends that used to be friends with you were always feeling left out of. So you kind of whatever your thing is, you know, because we all have like that that person that relationship that toxic thing in your life that you had to like go, and but you still want to poke the bear little bit. Yes. So how do we what if that? Yeah. Because I I've totes down with like the transformation this. So we put it in a box. We so I just kind of said it's like you felt like you were left out of a group of people. You felt like like you have this narrative in your head that you're you know, you're feeling rejected. You're feeling you weren't a part of this group. So you kind of work, you know, what I'm gonna I'm Apollo them. I don't wanna see that anymore. I don't need. I don't like the branch. I don't like the what. Yeah. And that just doesn't serve anymore. But then you still find yourself going back to kick the tires you still find yourself going back to go still feels like shit, but it's still doing it like on a weekly basis. What happened then? Okay. So there is a choice involved in that person said when you are Jews you think feel choosing field. You maybe time, you think film, choose, you course, genetic expression, and that means that you building something in your brain. So if I go back and relook at it. I haven't sitted of just been killing it. Now. I go back, and we look at it. So now kind of grow it again. And so what we doing is giving an energy. So we want to remove the energy from it. And that's why you have to reconsider July the to the point where it doesn't grab your emotions in toxic way. So you can still get maybe irritated, but the day will come in. You can look at that. Maybe go back in a few months when you look at what those people doing that rejected June goes to June did whatever, but they don't affect your anymore. Now that doesn't happen overnight. That's the whole thing of the key. And we're gonna stick with that. But also it's like the opposite of love is in. Hey, it's indifference yet definitely falls under that whole life completely Scipion. So what is it like, I just can't be on someone else's timeline for like what? Process looks like like, I like I wanted because mommy, I'm ready. I don't wanna I don't wanna feel those feelings. I wanna be I wanna be indifferent. And that's not good because part of being human is experiencing. Depress. You have to go through it have to go through it. Because if you don't go through its delay. So they in a day and age way, we get Medicated, and that's not going to help because the medication is brain disabling damages brain into open just stuff you don't want. What we have to do is take the responsibility for choice and choose to change it and think of it like energy viewed on feed if you don't feed that plant that you growing it's not going to grow. It's that simple. So the stink of these thoughts trees, and if you don't feed them, they don't qualify. Not looking at it. You not growing it. So tonight. Baton. I'm the the prong look at it. Look at it. Look at look at look at a yo so much better. If you look at it, you might feel better might feel worth. Now. Just take a lot look at it. The what is it like an opposite action? I just didn't like I'm going to look up. Need your mind? Do you need to realize that that that little voice in your head is conflicting mind signal this powerful mind, but you can override that signal. So you've got this veto. It's called the Beato power. You have veto power. You can decide a supermajority both houses. I gotta veto power. If you have exactly that's perfect perfect description. So you used to be part say, well, I know that's not going to make me feel good on may have an instant rush. But the rush will drop, and that's what you know, what toxic addictions and things do. So you knew create a toxic addiction. What happens is that? These things habits toxic addictions at Sitra happen over time. So it takes twenty one days to build a memory a long term memory. It takes sixty three days minimum to form a habit. So if you've constantly allowed yourself to look at every day over sixty three days, which is three months. Three six you have created a very strong. Talks. Don't no, no. That. No, no, no, no. We can. But you can even if you have you can you can unwind it. So if you've wanted in you can wire it out because your mind is still the other in the first place. Exactly. So you can get out sorts of choice. It comes down to the power of choice. The power of the mind in this day and age in just the way that signs has kind of manipulated a world views in terms of human behavior. We feel we've been made to feel helpless helpless, hopeless victims of autophagy victims of our genes, you're weak person. You can't get over. Meanwhile, that's an absolute lie. It's not science number one. It's not accurate. Number two. You're heaven incredible power to override toxicity. And the reason it gets attention is because it's a normal to what on earth know. So that's what I said in the beginning. So we had this veto power to be able to say, I don't want to do that. And it's hard maybe to not you might look at it three times. But you would have looked at thirty times. You've already achieved Mejia the harm reduction moment. Exactly. Yes dot. Controlling that. And just knowing that. Okay. I can do this can put this on the box. You are shifting the imaging your brand. New breaking down toxic trees, visuals of very good in your mind visuals. Yes, helps makes the moon may more accessible for one thing. I like about what you're saying. In general is that it's like, I don't for in my experience in life. Everything has been very much like three seven four two steps. Back three steps Ford. Like, I've always getting better. I'm always learning more. I'm always doing better. But that's not without setbacks. But when I step back and look at it like, I'm always getting better. You know, there have been a few nosedives, but I've usually out of Cup. A lot of it. And then I keep on my gorgeous little chorus. But how do you? I think when I've done that. And especially like when I've been on a little missions of like, how am I going to get better? You know, like have you ever heard of that book you can heal your life by Louise hay? Okay. Well, it was I didn't read all of it. But it was kind of like. You know, anytime anyone is too preachy, you know, and it can kind of make you a bit like. Because it's too black or white, you know, because like there is so many grey areas, and we had one one of my favorite podcasts that we had. Here was I'm Dr de Jeffey he is someone who really believes in like harm reduction doesn't really see so much wisdom in like, you know, in some absence ways because like we can use this absence as Nigeria like a curdle or cudgel to like beat ourselves up over. And then like, you don't really get to the healing. You know, you get so stuck in the pain and the guilt and the shame that you can't get beyond that. And that's kind of what you saying. They me need to realize. It's actually something the sounds. This is going to really son weird. But I think you'll you'll get the concept when you see that there's something going on in your life that you know, he's hurting you you can actually conciliate that why? Because you've got to win us. If you if you not a way Aucoin change girl. Stop the presses girl. Yeah. So you actually instead of feeling traumatized, and like, oh, I can't believe and I was so silly. 'cause like I was. What did again, and again in the shame and the guilt, and the condemnation and the edges of the counseling, and the whole whatever you just a, hey, this is cool. I celebrate this not the whatever, you whatever it is syllabi. You're lying. Exactly. The a win that you doing it because we design your Assange shows us that and that's part of the cognitive neuroscientists as well with the research on the mind, brain stuff shows us that we are able and this is so cool. We are able to control of thinking feeling choosing every ten seconds. So we designed to look very self regulated lives that doesn't make us in selfish. It makes us selfless makes us very humble. Because when you recognize trained to self to be like that you so way of what you saying in how you sang it in terms of its impact on others because it's not about me myself. And I it's about me in this world, and they something you can do that. No one else can do. So by looney just to love a self regulated life. You learn to control your reactions in terms of recognizing. This is breaking my. Down. This is breaking someone else's body down. This is actually sitting somewhere else. So you change the mix. Change your perspective. So wins is very very key now, meditation, we all know is like a big deal, and it's really great. It's cool. It helps you to become very wearing the non moment. But it's not enough. You have to go beyond mindfulness beyond. So it starts with awareness starts with mindfulness and meditations free. Good training us to become a way of how we are in the moment, but to create sustainable long-term changes in our lives. We can take that toxic stuff and Reconceptualise at that. We can remember that's how we were. But it's doesn't in sometimes a little, you know, leaning towards that. But we've got it under control, we are controlling it. It's not controlling us. So if we conceptualize that such get to that point of bullying that kind of level of sustainability in alive, and it's an ongoing process. Like, you said you keep changing changing to do that we need to go beyond just being away. We need to go to the next and it's like five steps, and I think we've got to we've got to going. Okay. So this is what I developed a one. So. Was dishonest this nine fullness isn't developing gathered, capturing the suit catching standing beckon observing unsinkable that kind of stuff so just to give you a very quick background before we go in into the other statuses us being twenty five years in clinical practice working with people with brain injuries, and Thomas, I also spent a lot of time in essay this to say that I have worked in the most shocking environments people in South Africa in the apartheid era and post apartheid-era people that were starving ripe to boost aids victims tomatoes victims, I would spend a large majority of my week working with people that had nothing the worst socioeconomic the worst everything. And I would teach these principles about your mind about how to control your reactions about how to learn how to bowl Joe brain, how to use your mind trial, and the trans I learned so much turn me into bid human because it I saw the Levin the connection and the meaningful. Deep thing points of deep meaningful relationships. I saw that in the worst circumstances. When we connect together. Me operating. Love me support each other. We don't try to fix each other. You know to puzzle that I can pick pieces. You earn puzzle? You've could have fixed, but I can walk alongside you, and I can encourage in show, you the power of mind it transforms communities, and this is what what I saw happening in. This is what I have been with my patients with brain damage, and when you become very direct and intentional about your mind. You can change the circumstances of your life because that is basic mental self K. I mean, so totally into of us face Moskowitz. Do the bubble bath we need to do. All those things we need to be mindful. We needed all month on this. But what next and that's way steps to three or four and five came in from mountain research. And what even I'm exiting clinical trials at the moment. We looking taking groups of people in different circumstances, extreme and different environments and helping them to a non pharmacological intervention playing citing the patients are no drugs, but teaching people about the power of the mind and hunting is teaching. In these basic five steps, can I tell you that like I'm really excited for steps tooth or two. But I feel like not knowing them so far. But I've never had the bulk of the punish is ever. Had the power of. Now, I've read a new earth. I've read the foreground I've read like I've I've read a lot. I mean, I was I was in a considerable amount of pain for a really long time. So I was really like trying to figure out like how to not live in such pain. So I'm here for that. But I've also noticed that like in my later twenties into now like I've had an ability to kind of manifest healing and like manifest good things. So I think I must be able to kind of I think. Mentally, controlling my mind or something sometimes. Visit other times I fuck up. I I fall into the hole a little bit. She falls into the Instagram hole, or you know, because in Buddhism. They talk about it's like Mara. Like, it's like this figure and like in in Christianity. It's like Satan, you know. But I do I imagine like the that's like this kind of. That's what they were talking. I was like there's a kind of spinning malevolent darker energy that we all can be susceptible to. And it's a part of all of us because we all have like a yen. But we will have a young there's both like there's good and all of us. But there's also like a little bit of like Mara that we gotta deal with. So anyway, one is awareness to is was other Reconceptualise. No. No, we conceptualize covers the risk of the four steps. It's the big word that covers the basically covers all five states because you re conceptualizing redesigning your mind neutrally. So the second state is deep analytical thinking, so it's getting into in by the way, I've got this in dips in this book Johnson. You mentioned such a writer. I can't help. But we're gonna be talking about this book blooming keep playing it on me. So they deep thinking will you ask onset and discuss with yourself at very very very powerful and analytical tool at the second step is. So the way the first step, and you've got it in the box and mindful and keep yourself calm and always a whole bunch of stuff that you do that the second step is. Okay. Now, what are we going to do about this? Just kind of me that's an easy. But it's difficult to read that book to get even to step one and be able to do that well in calmly, and because you are totally. Because you are totally talks a lot about how like your brain doesn't know the difference when reality and like you just saying story right is doing what you tell it to do you bring onto anything except what you tell it to do. But just the he's yes. But he talks about in the store. So it's like if I'm telling you like if I went through a traumatic thing. But then I tell you the story of what I went through. It was traumatizing. I'm retraumatize ING, my brain by re saying it because according to Eckhart totally like, your brain doesn't really tell the difference between you reciting story and actually reliving the event that's why you have to redesign it. So you have to take if you just keep talking about this toxic tree, you giving it more energy. And that's why you more experiencing tumor because remember those trees have got emotions and information, and at the time of Toma, whatever you state, if your body was in that moment, let's say you had flu and you enter tumor and you over the phone at six months later with six years later, and you recall that incident because it's dealt with still the in at something triggers it which is a typical situation that can happen. So not only does the information comeback, the emotions comeback and the. Physical feeding of how your body felt also because every cell of the body will basically absorb that. So that's why we have to not indulge that stay in turn we have to take that captures be aware of at be aware of all of our body sensations. Celebrate that you've been aware of it. So it's a perception shifted sustained beckon observe you're thinking when we do that the front portable brain fires up. Yes. Absolutely. The the frontal cortex and the whole brains always working, but you'll brain wish your brain is responding to mind. Okay. I think someone has recording here in two seconds to tell me what three s threes now writing done really quickly. So once you got one done too, deep thinking, quiet TV's not on people around at your house. You're having somebody. Like writing or journaling link with yourself your top seeing the situation then three as full the threes and fours like an eight process where you go and look at what you've written and five is an action now all five of those states, you do in round seven and a half to ten minutes. Maximum fifteen you did once a day, and what I've done that by shouldn't would an app an order f- that walks you through that process to which is which is in its final stages of development called the switch switch and that that person I'm telling you. It's a skill that I'll use in an in those states, I use all the time every day in my life. Not only just detoxing every morning when I'm getting ready to NAS dot like a I work on one issue. We're on one issue for sixty three days, and I'll show exactly how to do that in. One issue not jumping all over the Univer ream Ford. But when you work on issue like that like the benefits are not issue will seep into the other issues that you've had was so it's still going to be like collective and a similar to or it's going to assimilate into the rest of your life. You start seeing a absolutely ova impact is unreal. Because you start unpacking uniting us. What was that? But actually, it's there. Okay. Where's the iceberg? Straight ahead captain liquid coming right for her hunting. We gotta swerve telling you what iceberg is actually, you know, what this is not as difficult as it sounds. It's really all we are so popular it's so it's so it's based on iceberg, then because these five steps are the iceberg hitting another one of these. Your fucking genius. She's been so busy like how did you even know time to have kids, you, you're you're fixing the whole entire world will be all supposed to be doing, isn't it? I I guess that is kind of the role. We will play something you can do to fix the wool that. I contin I'm doing what I can do. So I feel that I've noticed in my thirties that I'll of my twenties was meat processing the trauma of like zero through twenty. So this is kind of feels like that. But like, more concise and make sense in gorgeous. It is it's simple, it's practical. And that's why I love signs because science shows you how to do stuff. And that's really what what what these five steps ought to take in the most complex thing in it makes it into something new my patients, we in such states of tumor. I couldn't give him a bunch of science and a bunch of techniques wouldn't remember them? So it's okay. Do this do this. Do this train them in the five states? And then show them that over time because we do have a quick. Fix mentality in this day and age quick-fix. Yeah. Give me a poll give me a quick on. So give me a quick this people don't persevere most people don't us and give up today full, whereas we could push through for twenty one days to break, the toxic sort and bolt a healthy new sort, and they may still go to stabilize ultimate times or tuned into a habit, and that's not for sixty three days, another forty two days. I think and it's very simple that it's only takes seven seconds a day to do it literally sixty to figure skating, the you go sixty you'll be a sixty three you'll be like you've created some experts like seriously experts brainwaves with both some beautiful green trees with your skills. New keep adding to them. I really do love. I really do love those trees. Okay. So what a for that. If you are going through it. If you're on the struggle bus of life. If Chris was hard for you it would. But if you're really feeling it right now, and you need a little like, oh like other people, it'd beat this before Dr leaf what are some things that you've seen people recover from heal from and go onto just like drive. I case say I do a lot with mental health. And we told me the health is on the rise. And it'll it'll help since scary. But it's not on the rise. It's actually leaking d I will take away the fear of what mental health scary. Schizophrenia. Bipolar, though, scary words, they not diseases. They not they are basically reactions they description the educ tubes of something that's going on in your life. So that's the first thing to know is that you quite normal and embrace that embrace that emotion, you think God, you feel emotion because you actually human then the Knicks step is to get through the whole one tree embrace that emotions to get through to win a stage the thinking states as. Five states in order to be able to process it information. But coming right back to a you. Where you also what could you do? Right. Not this moment right now at this moment, Anita he has a real a real simple. How do I start this whole thing going first of all you can control your reactions your mind is so phenomenally powerful that every moment of everyday you are creating sort that live fraternity. And even when you redesign the Mace little return ity, it's you might as well, make them worse something Secondly that when you are at the point where you can admit out of bed in the morning with anxiety in the depression of the psychotic breaks, the grief, whatever it is just got you like you off feel like you can't I want to tell you that you power your mind can actually override that that that is a Saint session physically in your body. But you're you the ninety nine percent of you is more powerful. So that knowledge is an little key another little keys to imagine. That is a huge building in front of you. And in that building these all these windows, and in those windows, they? Sealed you can't get in your on the outside you immersed in love with scientifically actually made of love and immersed in love. And maybe that's something. I talk a little bit about that in the book too. But we literally waves of love imagine yourself in a safe place validated in a safe place, and you are not in the windows than in the windows all these issues and put them in the capture them keep them in the window. And initially you can't even look at the window, but they will come at time over over days over with those windows will start clearing up. And eventually they've been transformed the situations. They stories the all those windows of the windows and stories of your life. But don't allow yourself to jump into the window. Stay out of the window. Stay on the outside. That is something that we in my patients were so bad. I would start with that. It's you've got the power and its practice that you can do that route nine you sitting here listening to me right now, you can actually do that put that in the window stand outside the window. Jake, typically, stand beckon observe how you thinking how you feeling how you choosing start celebrating that it's captured and that you can actually have. We have the power to break the toxic. So town in your brain and get rid of that toxic tree. There is no better way to podcast there just is not that is the best advice that you could have ever given. And I think you so much for your work in your time. I wanna make a gorgeous little Instagram content for the children for this. And at Dr killingly, I'm just grateful for your time. Thank you onset grade before you do thank you for having in the show in Sundays. Thank you so much queen's. 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Tony Whatley, Side Hustle Millionaire, Creating Financial Freedom  Episode 138

How'd It Happen Podcast

1:07:38 hr | 4 months ago

Tony Whatley, Side Hustle Millionaire, Creating Financial Freedom Episode 138

"Welcome to episode one hundred thirty eight of the happen. Podcast hosted by mike mallet testa in this episode. Mike welcomes tony widely known as the side-hustle millionaire where he built multimillion dollar businesses while being fulltime employed as an oil and gas engineer. Today tony is the founder of three sixty five driven where he teaches thousands of people how to pursue the lives. They desire instead of settling like the rest. Before he became a multimillionaire. He used to believe that someone had to be rich. In order to start a successful company. He proved that was a lie at three. Sixty five driven. Tony created a community that helps entrepreneurs who are truly driven to scale their companies and if they want position them for a successful exit members at three sixty five driven get access to amazing perks like live education videos online courses and support from over thirty five hundred members. You can also subscribe to the three sixty five driven podcast on itunes or anywhere else. You listen and you can also pick up. Tony's book the side-hustle millionaire on amazon. Mike and tony cover a ton of great stuff in this episode. Like how he found a niche to build his multimillion dollar businesses. How he found the time to do it while working fulltime. Why he believes. You don't have to invent something to be a multimillionaire. How he got good at building communities his passion for motorsports building cars in his garage. Some interesting aspects of oil and gas operations at most people know nothing about in asking yourself tough question. What is the life you really wanna live so you stop wasting time and start getting what you want and much more as thinking about this job that i had an wasn't really paying me the lifestyle. I was dreaming about. And so what i would do. Is i look at my supervisor. And i would ask myself a hard question. Does that person have the lifestyle that i dream about. Not the one that i would settle for or the lifestyle that would like to have just because it's better than mine. Do they have what you dream about and answer is no again. You need to start asking yourself. Why am i working so damn hard to get something from people. That don't have what i want. And they're never going to be able to give me what i want. It's gonna take you twenty plus years to make two hundred thousand dollars as an employee or you can go start a business and you might make that in two years to bring you a greater connection with our podcast guests and continue to reach and inspire new listeners. We've started recording and posting video episodes on youtube. Subscribe to the hundred happened. Podcast youtube channel. Click the notification bell. So you don't miss any upcoming video episodes and leave a comment with your favorite quote from the episode to help inspire fellow listeners. And encourage others to find and listen to the how did happen. Podcast and now. Here's tony wildly. Everybody welcome back to the show as you heard introduction. I've got tony widely with me today and this is kind of a return favor thing because tony was kind enough to have me on his podcasts. I don't i don't think it's aired yet. But we recorded a podcast and it was a lot of fun and he is also another person that justin breen has introduced me to and he to me so we just Some some Gratitude and thanks for that tony. Welcome to the show like thanks for having me on justin's a good. He's a master connector. Anybody that probably bizet already know him. Go look him up just in brain. Good dude. I think we talked about this on the show. But he's introduced me to so many people he you say master connector. That is exactly what he has. So i wish i were a master connector like him. I'd be much further in life. But anyway i started. Show the same way tony with a simple question. How did happen for you. Give me some specifics on what you would like to understand how how what happened exactly. That's what's so interesting about the question that you can answer it. However you'd like. I think most people that hear my story their best native with understanding that i became a multimillionaire with a part time. And that's the thing that really makes me stand out as we all know a lot of highly successful people in your your yourself are highly successful man and there's always different back stories on that but for me my passion around the businesses i created were in the realm of performance cars. I'm a car guy. I've always been even as a kid. I was car. Guide the only two things in my forty eight years that i've identified this passion of mine and that's one is business and to his cars. I was the kid that would go to the grocery store with my mom and actually read the hot rod magazines and then i would read forbes entrepreneur magazine's trying to figure all that stuff out rates. So it's kind of funny because it all kind of returns later in our adult life. But now i started a automotive community and it grew to three hundred thousand registered members. It was the number one general motors performance website community on the internet. And then i took that same business model and i created a truck website called performance. Trucks dot net. That one grew to over two hundred thousand registered members so ls one tech and performance trucks dot net to automotive truck communities that i built massive number one in their each and generated millions of dollars from added revenue and also live events racing events that we would have run the country. Now the thing is these were both online based businesses so i was able to maintain and actually work my oil and gas engineering career at the same time and a lot of people will ask me mike you. Why don't you quit your job and you know just do that full-time or the thing is i was already number one in my category. I wasn't going to get more market. Share being number one and i could build these things out with the team of people that i had about seventy five people on staff each of those. I build these things out where it was taking. Very little time was less than an hour. A day is all. I was needing to relate to visit the website. Actually actually use it as a user rather than as an administrator so just kind of look around and kind of get a vibe of how things were going and see were. The finger on the pulse was and where i could enhance areas of the thing. And what would i gripe about if i was a user going through this experience and we would just do in these enhancements and make things better for the community. Even though they weren't paying to be there i needed their eyeballs there to the advertising revenue. So this all happened back. Two thousand one a sold the company in two thousand seven. The thing is nowadays. People understand social media. We're all looking at facebook and instagram link. Dan guys none of those even existed. Even though i sold the company so we got to think about the same business model. I wanted to make sure my websites had content had reasons and value for people to keep coming back so i could still serve ads and make more money on the back into those so always about creating the value creating user experience making sure that they got some benefit from it and then the money would just come as a result so very similar to social media but these were forms format and so. That's a pretty incredible part-time side business success. How did you. How did the idea come to you. Originally where you just sort of communicating with other hot-rodders and you or was there something else that happened. That serve inspired you to do this. What so they. There's a funny thing about entrepreneurship. That may be listening to this. They think that they need to be an adventure. Got to be some visionary. Come up with something that'd be. Ilan must be the most successful type entrepreneur unite both know that vast majority. I'm going to say ninety. Nine percents of businesses out. There are just a better version of something that already existed. Yeah till something they complained about and that was my story because my partner who happened to be in chicago. I'm in houston. Which showed you even in the early. Two thousands we are running countries companies. Virtually in different states and he and i were members on another website who was formerly number one in that market category. I was driving transam. He was driving a chevy camaro and we were hanging out on another website that was being mismanaged even though they were number one mismanaged and the user experience was failing us. And we would log in sometimes and the skies site would just not even be on the internet like word the site go couple of days later reappear and it would be wiped clean of all the content videos and everything that we were creating for this website so after this happened a few times. We approach the owner with constructive feedback because we were some of the main supporters of his community. And we said hey guy. We got advertisements on the side of this. We know that you're making some revenue here. We know what you charge per month. Some of our friends our advertisers. We know what a server host cost. The rent is not that much. We know that the software license isn't that much. So where's the money going away. Aren't you paying your bill. Because what was happening. The guy was not paying his server bill and to punish them they were just hard delete thing because he had done it so often so he wasn't doing very good job at backing up the data so all stuff that we were creating users he was not being a good steward of the information. We are creating so the third time that happened. We went back to him and said hey guys you know what's going on and you pay your bill instead of taking that as constructive feedback from his most valuable customers it through an attitude and he said well if you think you could do a better job why don't you create your own website and entrepreneurial me and building things and my partner is. He's a owns a technical recruiting agency. He was okay being the cold caller to go fine. Advertisers and things like that got building websites. Must have a can figure this out okay. So it really wasn't even an idea in my mind until i was presented with that challenge. So think about these things. If you're listening to this understand that is there something about a service or product that annoys the crap out you on a daily basis. And you're like why don't they just fix this one thing or you know what maybe that one thing that you can fix. We'll be the viable business that you should create. that's. I'm i'm glad you said that because it's such a great lesson for all of us and for anybody who wants to be an entrepreneur. You know the the you mentioned eli moss. You know the people who have these meteoric rises or Can can raise a ton of money or sell a lot of stuff but maybe not make any money for a long time. Those are those are. That's a different spear. And i'm not sure it's a great one. The sphere of just take something that bothers you or just have just just try to make something a little bit better for other people is a pretty powerful model. I mean that's that's you think. Oh well that's not not much of anything but yeah that's that's a lot. That's that's a big difference and the bars not that high in a lot of businesses. Because there's there's hardly a business out there. I bet that doesn't piss you off sometime somewhere somehow. Right absolutely take notes of those things. It's annoying you on a daily basis especially if you're touching or using that product many times during the day and you would just think like while they fix this. Were wealthy react sooner. or why. don't they have a better interface. That i can get a hold of them. Easy or whatever. Those things may be understand that entrepreneurship nowadays especially in the digital space. Everybody's carrying out cell phones now were easily accessible those one little things that you can create even in the value chain or near them operations chain disrupt one little segment one little link in that chain you may actually have a complete new business model and scone back to High school or whatever was when you got your first car. What what what was it about cars. What was your first car. And what was it about cars that got you so and still to this day as you so has has them as one of your two passions in life i think for people that are automotive enthusiasts. Here's the thing. I love this the question. thank you for asking that. But let's go to a social gathering and they're like hey There's always like someone like justin as knows people right. He's so and so's a card guy. You what you guys that meat. And within the first few minutes. I can tell they're a car enthusiasts or their car fanatic and i'm a car fanatic so just by the questions people ask if they start referencing magazine articles like probably know that they're probably not as crazy about cars and i am so to be a car fanatic. I think it's something you're born with okay. I'm always been fascinated by mechanical devices and machinery. Even as a child. I was figuring out. Why does this work. And we'd take things apart. And i would put things back together and i just always curious about things. So that's what led them for becoming a mechanical engineer. Even my logo. It's a gear. You know the three sixty. Five driven is a gear as a throwback to mechanical machinery. I've been fascinated with years because there are some piece of an operating equipment. That's got an input and output at something. That's doing work being productive so for me. I was really fascinated with world. War two aircraft. Because i liked the character and personality of those aircraft and then that led into military equipment and army tanks and things like that and also cars auto building models and things like that kid. I was sitting at the desk for hours and build model cars tanks and planes and battleships and things like that so for me the fascination has always been mechanical six which read decor so. I think when. I was a kid i thought about. I wanted to be a jet fighter pilot or race car driver and so i didn't go to flight school so now i race cars and it makes me makes me wonder. Have you ever owned a tank. But that would be kind of fun. So yeah my first car was actually in nineteen sixty nine camaro and i still have a nineteen. Sixty marriage had several of them. They've been on covers of magazines. That i've built at a very high level so to describe the level of fanaticism that i get into i build entire cars from the up. I'll do every single nut. Every single wire build the entire cars. I've done painting and bodywork in the past. I don't have time to do that anymore. And i have people. I pay to do much better job than i can't at that so what i'll do is i'll take hollowed out. Shell sometimes the rust bucket. Have them rescan the sheet metal painted. And then i get this hollow clean. Shell and i've got a twenty four hundred square foot shop with multiple lifts in my backyard. And i'll just go out there and finish the entire car and a few months and even on the last one. I stitched the convertible ruth onto the car myself so i kind of like to try new things and learn new skills because it's a way for me just to really be focused and i think that there's a lot of analogies from building entire car as to building an entire businesses which i do to help other people do now. So it's kind of fun to just be really focused and monitor the task lists and it's kind of messing around the shop. Actually over the weekend. We had some nice weather here in houston. And i found the build list of actual task lists of the car. The nineteen sixty nine that are currently have and snap some photos. I haven't shared those people are always asking me. And how do you build an entire car like all those wires. Hundreds and hundreds of wires and nuts and bolts and as it gets task list. It's all about looking at the tasks. Focus on each individual tacitos done and drawing a line through it and going to the next one and you got to put in some kind of a sequence or logical order to build a car correctly but that has come from experience so there's a lot of similarities object. Love geeking out on that kind of stuff. Why am definitely wouldn't be. You wouldn't love me. In the car fanatic category. I would be in no time in a conversation with you. But i did. We do something in common in. That is that i. My first car was in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven camaro that i bought for one hundred bucks. I don't have the talent that you had. My dad had some some talent though. And so we were able to put it together into what what could pass as hot rod not couldn't pass his your hot rod but it passes hot rod for a sixteen year old kid in havertown pennsylvania. So i i wanna get another one now that i now that i can maybe find one. That's a little bit nicer but yours. You're kind of modest. Because i know they've been in magazines and you won awards and all kinds of things so it's not like you're just tinkering in the garage. You have something special about you beside your fanaticism this. Why go to you know. There's there's a time and a place to be. Oh c. b. and for me that's build cars. I cars are my mechanical canvas. My artwork ryan. So i have those. Ocd tendencies with a lot of different things in my life but also realize that those are a detrimental a lot of things in her business life. Because there's a lot of people that bragg. They think that they're ocd about everything and he never get anything done. Because gonna have certain levels of expectation with all these different avenues of business when that's marketing copywriting accounting all these bassett's a business if you're trying to ocd and every one of them you'll never get anything done. You'll probably lose a lot of money on profit. Because you're focused or hyper focused on things so find that creative that the be ocd. That's what you are but realize that that's not as important for a lot of the other things in your life. And i thought that's good advice. Thank you for that I guess i want to. I want to explore a little bit. you mentioned staying oil and gas and having this business on the side and generating revenue and selling it for millions as well which is just amazing to me. Still even though us kind of made it seem easy. I don't think it was probably wasn't as easy as you made it sound. But i i want to ask you a question about your oil and gas experience because you're the first person i've talked to. Who's been an engineer in oil and gas and particularly so in your chevron you you had a project for undersea subsea control system installation or something. And i don't think many people know what that means. Tony so give us some gas out a little bit on on that part of your life. Because i think it's it's it's just it's cool to know but i think it's instructive on how you think. An approach things as well as stuff. Oh when i turned eighteen. I actually started working and the downstream chemical refineries here in the houston area as a laborer says other grinding bevan's on pipes to be welded and stick rods and welding. You know staircases and metal structures and stuff like that so that led to me paying for my college going to engineering. School took me seven years. I worked fulltime. Went to school at night and then got into engineering. I got the injury level. And i worked in the chemical refineries maybe another year and a half on a contract job that job ended and then i got recruited into the offshore industry which paid substantially higher than the downstream refinery jobs. So cool so. I'm working upstream now. Building subsea equipment stuff. That's painted bright yellow poxy that sits on the bottom of the ocean. And here's the funny thing about it. Most people are familiar looking at a roadmap with all the highways on it but early in my house mostly focused on the gulf of mexico. And you were to look at a map of the pipelines and the gulf of mexico. It actually looks a lot like a highway map. There's actually hundreds and hundreds of pipelines below the water surface usually in shallower areas. But there's a little road map of pipelines and wellheads and things like that that are subsidized that you'd never know existed. So i was in charge of early in my career designing and fabricating those pieces of equipment. That would go get installed with these giant installation vessels with giant wenches. And doing all these things with remote operated vehicles are on these which are subsea submarines that are manned by pilots on the boat connected with an umbilical down to a subsea underwater. Really a a submarine like an anonymous summary. Yeah as we got deeper and deeper. Actually when i started in that career what we consider deep water was about fifteen hundred feet water depth and near the end of that career twenty years. Then we were doing you know mile and a half deep sometime pushing two miles. Just think about the biggest gains we had. So that was all done by technology. Advancements learning more about alloys can be lightweight and extra strong bill to take those kind of loads of the lowest installation depths and really challenging ourselves but when the oil companies comes as a lot of ego okay these oil companies like to be the first that stuff this is kind of like how they make their shareholders. Get the headline news. And so what they do. Is they bet their ego. So you're going against exxon and chevron shell and bp and they'd always tried to go deeper every year for about the last ten years of my career always trying to new record water depths new wells of new cases per one. They were proving out technology for the future. But they're also doing out of ego. And i realized that because he's products are billions of dollars in managing these things. So we understand that. There's ego mixed with high-technology would i like to tell. People is is a lot like space travel but going underwater because we're still dealing with cold temperatures extra cold at the bottom. We're still going with really high pressures at the bottom of the ocean because you've got the entire water sitting on top of it and we're also had all the environmental factors that we had to be concerned with everything had these double checks and went contingencies on top of contingencies and as the water got deeper the vessels got bigger in the winches. Got bigger. The products got lighter and stronger. It's as really cool to see the entire evolutionist subsea installations but all that equipment's below the sub surface. And it's really around. Most of the north sea got parts of africa. Got coastal often california. Almost every show which is called the shallow water. Up to ten thousand feet pipelines almost every aspect of the world and that pipeline is attached from a drill rig to refinery or some pipeline on chores at cracked or there's different aspects of the subsea construction phase. First of all the drill rig would show up. I if they're the first ones and then they would drill the wells and then sometimes it wouldn't find a reservoir. Sometimes they would in which they found when they chapped it and then they just kinda went to their next hole drilled more or somewhere else. Okay once those drill rigs out of the way people like me will come. In and build the infrastructure they the well head and all the pipelines and all the control lines. Back to subsea panel. And that's what we did. Is we run these things also to current production facility so there's some floating platforms that are out there. That are tethered to the bottom of the ocean but they float all these umbilical go right up to those two and all the control panels and everything all the gauges and everything inside those control station so they would operate these things that were you know. Fifteen twenty miles away wellheads twenty miles weather operating on a floating facility that has several these umbilical control systems on pipelines. Going up into the bottom of it the other way you have it is these vessels would come around and they have the. Gps ends of the subsea really. It's it's a floating buoy is what we call it and it floats about three hundred foot. Water depths are no boats can run into it. And these vessels know where they're located so come over there and park over the top of it. Wench that buoy. Into the bottom of their vessel and now the pipelines are connected to the vessel which is kind of world tanker they would pump all the oil and everything into their vessel and then they would shut it off and then lower that thing back down in the vessel would take an inbound into the land. So there's a lot of different ways to get the oil to the land. Most of it just had to do with pipelines. Going up to the land okay. Why didn't know that thing about the ship and the buoy that's good. That's thank you for that. That's brand new stuff for me. It made me. Think of the The the tankers. You know that fuel the jets. While they're flying you know it's kind of verse. Yeah that the tanker style with the boys are good. Because it's a hurricane. Prominent like the gulf of mexico you can just deploy that buoy and then get the ship out of there and it safer right so rather than having a fixed platform when you gotta floating out there and you have to abandon it and lock everything out. Make sure it's not going to leak. And you hope that they're not going. To push it disconnect the pipelines. It can be a risky situation. You know I wanna go back to the website for a second because one of the things. I read this quote of yours. It says it takes money to make money. What ally and i wanted to ask you what i what you meant by that but i also wanted to know. How much money did it take for you and your partner to get that website off the ground initially so the it's a fallacy that we hear that it takes money to make money while that is true in some situations depending on the business model. You want to create like example. If you wanted to build a ferrari dealership you're gonna need hundreds of millions of dollars and start that and by the inventory. That's something given so a lotta times. Entrepreneurs have the big dream. They want the big business and they go. You know what i want. Be jeff bezos at amazon. But i don't have millions of dollars or billions in his case so what they do. Is they shut off dream. They go ahead and possible. It's not gonna happen for me on never owned a ferrari dealerships. I guess it's just not going to happen for me. So they quit and go get a job. The right way to think about this. You gotta go build small companies and maybe build and sell those businesses as staircase step businesses. That will lead you to the businesses that you dream about. And that's what you think about. I talked about that and my book. Site is a millionaire and i grew up not understanding that okay because when i was small i used to think that you had to be rich to start a business because when you go through the public school system all you think about as they're conditioning to become an employee raise. Your hand can go to the bathroom. Can i get permission to do this right up on time. There's the bell time to eat lunch. Oh there's the next note to go to class or just basically treating you like lab rats and you're basically standing in line and doing all. The things like employees are told to do so. You never challenged because you just. You're being raised by middleclass parents. That have a job themselves that they're telling like hey homework is just like your job. Make sure you're doing. Your homework is just like your job. Yes they were trained. Yeah and when you think about okay well. What does this business ownership. I drive down main street. My small town us everybody with businesses. Not to be a business on her. I was going to have to buy property in the building and then put a sign on the front. that said. what does this something or sell this. And that's my idea of a business 'cause it was pre digital and you realize that now that's not really true like a business to me is like anything that creates revenue and therefore a prophet hopefully. So that's technically business whether that's a stand alone type brick and mortar or digital stuff. Something online and so. I've third sort of thinking about this. This job that i had and wasn't really paying me the lifestyle i was dreaming about and so what i would do is look at my supervisor and ask myself a hard question in. I'm going to challenge listeners here because you're working at a job right now. There's no shame in that but look at your supervisor and ask yourself a really simple question. Does that person have the lifestyle that i dream about. And if the answer is no then maybe look at your supervisor's boss. Maybe that's senior or middle manager depend on the size of the company. Ask yourself does that. Next level person have the lifestyle that i dream about. Not the one that i would settle for or the lifestyle that would like to have just because it's better than mine do they do. They have what you dream about. The is no again. You need to start asking yourself. Why am i working so damn hard to get something from people. That don't have what i want. And they're never going to be able to give me what i want. And so when. I think about entrepreneurship and the corporate level. Because i've done both at exceptionally high level. It's going to take you twenty plus years to make two hundred thousand dollars as an employee and that's if he gets that level i was well over two hundred thousand a year salary but it took me twenty years to get there or you can go start a business and you might make that in two years so i don't know if you want to waste eighteen more years looking at the corner cubicle sunday hoping to get the corner office person starting your own business and betting on your own skill sets in your own your own drive. It's pretty easy decision. So when i started thinking about like what can i do to pad my income and when i started that first business mike i was really only thinking about making five hundred dollars a month. A said okay. That's what my car note is going to build this thing for cars and it'd be really cool to be able to have a free air quotes car because it would pay me a five hundred dollars a month because i had an engineering salary and i thought it was a big boy and i didn't need anything else and just be cool right and so to ask the answer. Your question how started it was only three hundred fifty dollars to start that website because that was a as a software license and maybe three months hosting which was really inexpensive for server. Because it wasn't a busy website. At the beginning i think it was like fifty dollars a month or something to go rent the server for a quarter and as busy as the website starting to growing bigger and bigger and bigger over the years we just kept upgrading the server because it was a rental anyway so you would just see the data coming in of slowdowns processing speeds and we need to upgrade before it starts to slow down so it's really simple just to grow this engrossing grow this but yet didn't take a lot of money. Three hundred fifty dollars really to start that first company which ended up for a couple of million of the end and that's phenomenal by the way. Thank you So it makes me think about the future because it maybe the future's already hear from you so that's for you so i'll ask you mentioned when you started that business and sold it was pre social. Media will now. We're we're no longer pre social media right and you've got spliff operation of newsletter websites and news aggregation websites and all these things that seem to me to be kind of like what you were. Were doing particularly the news. Agar or on the newsletter thing is that is that type of business something that you are looking at or or would i mean it seems to me like you know what you're doing already and it's like maybe the trajectory on a business like that especially in. A good niche is with fanatical. People is pretty interesting. I think for me what i've come to discover a really in recent years is that my natural ability is building large communities. I've had that tendency to do this. Over and over and over built car clubs and then i built the to massive communities that i've talked about and start thinking about. Okay i love cars. I love business but most people would just see the fruits of my labor from my business success so they would see the drive where with ten cars in it. A fancy shop and they would just go. He's successful business owner but thing was is. I wasn't really sharing any of my business information outside of my friends circle or my family because for one i had a very comfortable life and to i never really wanted my co workers at my corporate job to really understand fully what i was into because i was making a lot more money on my side businesses than my engineering career. And so i didn't really want to rock the boat over there and happened a few times. Where sometimes somebody would catch a whiff of what i was doing our or make something and they would actually know of stall in my career path because they figured already had stuff and they didn't need to take care of me because now he's he's got things figured out right okay so animosity from people in the middle ranks that you know. There was times that i found that i was getting laid off in a downturn sooner because i had things parachute that i built for myself and all these other people were kind of helpless and they took. That kept them around longer right. So i didn't like being treated differently because i had money financial success so i try to fit in on the corporate level navigate that independently so i didn't put it out there and i was helping my friend bill companies. I've helped several of my friends build. Seventy eight figure companies just by giving them advice and encouragement and teaching them. The lessons that i've learned and they're always telling me mike. You know you should be doing this. Full-time tony should be doing this. Full time like look at these results are crazy. Like you're just telling us how to do this. And and i'd be like yeah man. I'm happy for him so glad. Look at the stuff like several. My friends have built businesses bigger than anything. I've created but i've helped them do that and at came to a point was like you know what i really enjoy doing this. I've always been a teacher at heart of always been that that kid that would learn trick on the skateboard and like master and then i couldn't wait to teach my friends how to do it themselves and that's who i am some a teacher but i didn't want the teacher's salary so here i am now as a business coach an advisor and helping other people and become business owners or helping business owners scale their companies and maybe exit and the thing is is that all this really comes back from experience for me hiding for really twenty years of advising in the background and two thousand seventeen decided that i was going to be more public about it because i had the results and i had the confidence now and i had invested myself to become the right person to be able to carry this message. So that's what. I did is higher. Speaking coach joins us masters wrote a bestselling book. And now i'm publicly doing that. And i've got thousands of clients. My group got several one on one. Coaching clients and corporate level clients. That i'm advising but they would have never known about me. Had i just been silent so there was a reason to come out and do that. So two things before we go get into into to seventeen two thousand seventeen three sixty five driven. Because i'm i'm fascinated by all of this i use. How did you become good at building. These because i can say for sure that i am not. I don't think that's a skill set of my but also can say that i don't really understand what goes into it so we talked about justin being a networker. I don't think that's the same thing as a community. But i want i want to hear what how'd you get good at that. And what's it mean. I think that first of all if you want to be a leader in something you have to crave. I think i don't think there's leaders are born i don. I disagree with that statement. People leaders are born. Bs it's not true. Leadership is a skill. Okay it's just like learning a new language and be able to be proficient or an expert at that. You have to study the art of becoming a leader. Whether that's finding the right mentors the help you become a leader or reading. The right books are observing the people he perceived to be very strong leaders to see if there's any tactics or skills or mindset or behaviors that they have studied it just like a student of some new language. Okay and that's what i did is because i didn't create this thing. One hundred thousand people showed up. I had to build this time. And when you think about confidence and leadership they go hand in hand but you have to actually take the actions to get the result to get the confidence. Most people think that they need the confidence to take the action. But i disagree. I think you have to take the action. Get the result whether it's good or bad. Learn from that and then you gain a little bit more confidence with each step that you take and has this thing starts to grow. That's going to challenge her leadership. And you're going to have to adapt and you're gonna have to figure out how to do things better and there will be failures and there will be successes but yet them stand. I'm gonna take this as a lesson roll into the next strategy or plan and just keep growing this so i grew it organically practicing and then i was able to really just duplicate that entire business model and duplicate it again. Some growing three sixty five driven as an entrepreneurship community. And that's my goal is to grow a entrepreneurship community. That's gonna span worldwide. Have millions of members because am comfortable in that role now. And i've got the confidence and i've got the history of building this large communities. It's just going to be a different subject. Now it's not gonna be cars. It's going to be about entrepreneurship. Okay got it and one more question about your first work. Experience fabricating welding. That stuff was so one. Was there a time where you thought this is what i'm gonna do. I'm not going to go to college making money because that can be a little. You know when you make good money doing that type of work working in refinery you probably make pretty good money and then second one was the first time tony that you saw a supervisor and went through that progression of to that the lifestyle i dream about because i think dahbi about you. I'll say i'll take it back even further. My first job was actually mcdonald's age. Fifteen was the very first. Mcdonald's a built in my town of friendswood texas and i was the very first staff. There you know my sister got a job there a week before me. She was sixteen and she asked the manager. Like did you hire fifteen year olds. And he's like. I guess we could. We put them on the counter instead of the kitchen and so she came home. And my dad's i go get a job so at age fifteen. I was riding with my sister to go work at mcdonalds. And you know the the labor job. I watched my dad do that. His career he was in the us marines and vietnam and after the military gotten to the chemical refinery jobs working for brown and root thirty something years and i get to see you the stress and anxiety and making ends meet. I grew up lower middle class and my mom was a cafeteria worker at the local public schools. And so i got to see the struggle. And i didn't like how there's always downturns you know when my dad's working these contractor roles. The job was only lasts six months to a year a lot of times. And there's this downtime waiting for the next gig to fire up and produce remember like awarding. My dad and i remember him coming home. And i was just avoid them for like the first hour because he was just a total asshole and like just angry all the time about his job and bitching about things about his job. And so when you're watching your parents do that and you start to question yourself. You start to think about know. Is that what a man does. Is that what. Amanda go to work every day and you get pissed off and you bring it home and you take it out on your family and i started to think. Maybe that's just what men do those mellow example of that and and i started making a decision. You really in high schools. Like don't wanna do that. I don't wanna like go to some job and get pissed off and angry and then come back and then have to calm down for an hour and then be social is like why do i have to do that. I can skip that whole process then. Once i started working in the chemical refineries aging team. I kind of see why it's very frustrating and it's high demand you're working with a lot of idiots and a store. Remember one of the first truck rides to the job site. My dad would drop me off. Because it was on the way to his. And i remember being eighteen. And he's like sun because you're going to meet a lot of grown ass men out here who act like children. I kind of laughed and he goes. I'm not. I'm not joking because this a series against butte. You're gonna see a lot of grown ass men out there forties fifties and sixties that act like fifteen year olds and it goes if you if you hang around with those people and don't take advice from people that know what they're doing. This kind of guys will get you killed in this job. News dead serious s it. Okay yes sir. I get it in and then i went out there and within the first week i was like mind blown because that was really the first time i've ever worked with older men because i was at fast food restaurants and restaurants prior yet it was working with older men and he was right. They were acting like teenagers. They're acting like more immature than me at aging team near playing grab ass doing stupid shit pranking each other just being idiots and i was like holy shit like he was right so when you start to see that aspect of like no wonder you. So it's like so angry or know upset about job. He had a manages clowns like all day long like behaving like little children and then coming home. It's like So as i was working in the chemistry finery and it's hot. And texans hundred degrees sometimes in summary alternate nomex suit. That doesn't breathe in a hard hat goggles. Gloves and steel toes. And like this sucks. Like you're sweating. You're covered with dirt. And like i don't wanna do this. The rest of my life like i'm looking at the the engineers walking in with their white button up shirts and the air-conditioned buildings and i'd go in there sometimes. There's some drawing reviews. I'm looking around and say and they got air conditioning here. They don't have to wear the stupid fire retardant suit in the hard hat and get a job in here. I need to move into this area. And that's why. I started thinking about any the engineering degree or do something to get into that office. And that's what i did and it's funny that that story about men acting like like children i I don't think i very well may not have ever become an entrepreneur or started a business. If i wasn't working for a brief period of time and thankfully it was very brief because i left a guy i call. I call his name. Is don so. I refer to people like him as dick's don because that guy you know be basic basically he would just do anything to to be a jerk because he thought it was funny and like throw all my papers outside on the ground so that i had to go out and pick them up or something like that and so i know exactly what you're talking about with these with people can be like that and i'm glad you saw your dad saw that and helped you see for what it was so you can get out of get out. I'm sure i'm sure you've got listeners. Right now they're nodding their heads like yep on others people. I guaranteed people like that are not listening to this show right. Yeah because they already know everything they need to know you. Don't so you mentioned toastmasters. And i i also have toast master experience. Mine was because I gave a speech. I worked for a big company. I gave a speech Worked for becoming early on gave a speech. I don't know why they asked me to it. Went horribly for. i think it went horribly. No one else. I'm sure remembers it. But then i for fourteen years tony. Fourteen years i would. I did not give another talk outside of maybe two small group at the company. Because i was so afraid and you mentioned you know take action that builds confidence because i had no confidence in that but i but i finally after all that time i said i have to get over this so i took action. I joined toastmasters and toastmasters really helped me get over it. Although i only spent a few years in toastmasters it was transformational for me. And i'm wondering for you. Was it the same thing where action you needed that action to build confidence. Or what were you thinking when you join them for. Those of you don't know toastmasters is like an international organization and but grassroots yes your local communities. You probably have a bunch of toastmasters around. You don't even know it and it's a basically a community and you've you you each other become better public speaker now. They focus on leadership public speaking. And here's the thing. I'm gonna hurt a lot of feelings. Okay go for it. When are a lot of archer and so they'll pull up a chair and listen to this story. Most of you out. There think that you are good at public speaking. Especially if you have a title with manager or maybe you're a founder or a c. You have executive type roles in you. Pat yourself on the back is you. Maybe do have leadership example behaviors. Okay but doesn't make you a public speaker and within the first one minute of somebody standing on a stage. I can tell. They've invested in themselves in their skills to become effective communicator. Or they haven't and a lot of times you haven't. Most people have not had public speaking training. Her hired a speaking coach or done. That kind of thing is you've got to do a lot of reps and that's what toastmasters cubs good for us because his weekly meetings where you can get as many reps as you want to based on how many times raise your hand so when you think about that. A lot of you out there going well tony. I'm pretty confident. I can stand on the stage and i've got a team of one hundred people at want guys get this. I used to say the exact same things as you. I would lead teams of seventy five. People built a company with the same amount of people stood on the vessels decks of millions of dollars of ships and talked about project kickoff meetings and safety stand nouns and all these different things i've given hundreds of slide shows in my career even sometimes their clients and other avenues. So i thought man. I got this public speaking skilled down. I'm pretty good at this. I don't need any training and all that. Yeah i can wait a bunch of bullshit bullshit. Because here's the thing is when you have a captive audience. Which is your employees or your team. They're not going to get up and walk out or go take a piss break during your air quotes speech. They're not going to judge you when you say on an an all these distraction things or you're looking around or you keep saying the same cliche phrase over and over in his annoying the crap out of people. But you don't even know what because you keep doing it. And they're not gonna really judge you on using the entire stage contact and vocal inflections and vocal variety. Different things to really make sure that your message comes across. Whether that's in person or a group vigil or on this microphone. These are all things are skills that we have to learn and most of us are oblivious to those strategies and tactics because we just don't know any better so we're the biggest fallacy. I see with most people as they think that public speaking is merely having the confidence to get in front of people and when you go through public speaking training and actually the reps you realize that that confidence to get in front of people is only maybe a ten percent value of actually being effective communicator. So don't pat yourself on the back because you have the occasional courage to stand in front of people say something that is not the same thing as performing or trying to influence the audience with your actual message especially when you've got thousands and the people in the audience like obstinate in front of who could pull up their phone. Start scrolling your phone because you're so boring or go take a piss break because you're so so you gotta go do this. You're going to invest in yourself. Do these reps. And you'll find that your bigger rookie than you think is. I'll tell you after being toastmasters for about three years now being the president of my local club for over a year of that we get people all the time who are business executives who think they have that same thing well. I got the confidence to go in here. And mike company makes me join host masters. I didn't even want to be here to get up there. And they are terrible at speaking terrible and they don't even realize it balic's go up there with their ego and say something or read a passage do something and we're just like holy shit. This guy sucks. Like he doesn't even know but he thinks he's great and then you start to evaluate them and give them some constructive feedback on things. They can work on in their minds. Blown like holy crap. I didn't know there was a lot of this stuff going on the background. Lee skill things and and that's when a loser. Humility starts to come down. Realize i have a lot to learn and now people at that level get excited. They're like. I got something new to learn new skill to learn and i go all in and they start to improve. I starting to see the results and then really within a period of two to three months you can be completely different level of speaking if you're just best time and believe in yourself and understand that you aren't as good as you think you are until you actually go prove yourself and for me dude. I stood up at a safety conference and the natural gas industry. I was actually asked by an executive to represent the company because he couldn't make use post to be their representative company and couldn't make it last minute and asked me to go because i live nearby and i was a consultant informs. Yeah sure i'll put the badge on sitting the front desk and hang out with a bunch of people and jig jag and and all these different things and and at some point during that conference thousand people in this room literally at these giant round tables so you can imagine thousand people with these giant round tables big room big hall and the guy on the stage at the moment was like. Hey we're looking for some ideas for safety things. And i had a pretty good idea from the offshore industry so i raised my hand and i didn't think he's gonna call me i but guess what he did and so i'm sitting there near the stage i'd say out my answer and he's like hold up. Let's get this gentleman a microphone so the rest of the audience can hear what he says. And so i'm like shit like i'm got to get on a microphone. Thousand people never done that before. I just feel the body core temperature. Starting to rise my palm started sweat started to get the cotton mouth. My head started to sweat on top. You know and like what the hell and of course the lady with the microphone was on the other side of the room and she was older and she was like walking really slow. And i'm sure it was only a few seconds but it felt like an eternity waiting for her to come get the give me the microphone. I remember taking that microphone in my cold sweaty hand kind of like chicken boys giving out the answer but actually committed tell me to stand up also introduced myself and what company there for dude. It was like a whole like business. Some fucked up stuff. I didn't expect this. I was just opened to blurt out the answer and have him repeating go. Yeah it's a great idea. You know so. I remember given out the answer and everybody in the crowd liked hurting big applause and i sat back down in for the next five minutes house grabbing that white cloth napkin and wiping my face and like open. My armpits weren't starting to swell up. Sweat was just thinking to myself really kind of excited and scared at the same time. I remember thinking what the fuck just happened to me. What the hell was that. A nerd experience before that stage right. what is at what. Why am i still sweating and wireless cloth napkins. Not absorbing any sweat this thing suck you know just thinking about that stuff and i just sat there in silence thinking. I have a new beer. That i need to go cocker or most people would just avoid that entire situation and never put themselves in that situation ever again. I'm excited by those kind of things. Because i am one of their devil and to. I like to find new things to conquer and challenge. Because i'm always challenging myself so i said i gotta go figure this out other people have done it. So how did they do. It will join toastmasters. they take lessons. They do videos. They practice practice practice and started to do that well enough. I started competing and public speaking events. Seven months later actually winning those. That's awesome. You know as you as you were telling the story. I swear to god. My body was starting to react the same way. Because i was going back to the time when i was that i described i was twenty five at the time i was in the bathroom. Doing exactly where you're saying. You know trying to myself down. You got pieces of stuff like stuck to your head because the clot convinced that most business when men wear jackets just can't see their sweaty armpits because they're nervous about speaking. It was horrible. I i feel you there. So i feel there but but but yeah so so. So toastmasters makes a difference. You took the action and now look at you. You're speaking speaking everywhere. You certainly have confidence that you didn't have before you went there. Not the same person at all right. Anybody that i've actually seen go through there and actually dedicate themselves within three months. That's how fast this can happen. Within three months. And i've seen dozens and dozens of students pass through that i've coached. They're not the same person three months into it. Yeah that's a huge testament when you understand that guys. It's only cost like ninety dollars for an entire year ninety dollars and one hour a week one hour and a half a week can actually change your life. Yeah that was my experience for sure. And you said the executive you know my company makes me go. Well that's a horrible reason to be there in the first place. But i i went on my own because i had heard so much about. I think jeffrey adam are actually kept talking about. I don't know if you remember that guy. But he's a sales guru. He kept talking about toastmasters. And finally i went and i thought i thought oh this is going to be silly. I don't need this. You know but yet as you said everybody in there within the within a short period of time became much better. Maybe they're never going to command the stage but they they could command a room. That's funny thing is. I would say that. Ninety percent of the people that join toastmasters have zero intention of ever getting on a stage. Yeah a lot of times. They're just trying to get more confidence speaking. And here's the other thing people think about that. Like why do i need public speaking trainings. I'm never going to go on a stage and us the mentality they have so they just shut off the idea but the thing is that this tactics that you learn actually applied anytime you open your mouth or that's one on one in a conversation one on one too many the group or even on a microphone. So anytime you're communicating with your words. Public speaking training will make you far more effective right. That's a great lesson. That is so true so three years ago. You're you find yourself at toastmasters and you're also leave the industry that you've been in for most of your life and you start three sixty five driven and your coaching you. I mean besides doing your podcast. Which top rated podcasts. You gotta bestselling book. I'd love to get into how you wrote that. But i don't know if we have time but wanna ask you this. I so again getting back to taking action to get confidence. How do you become and you know you mentioned you know. Sort helping your friends and stuff before. But how do you become the person who has the confidence tony to say. I can help you as an entrepreneur become better achieved the dreams you want to achieve has like your engineering help. You create a list to become a better leader and a better entrepreneur. How you can help build them. I guess is bottom line. I think that that's going to be a different answer for everybody. Obviously because we don't have a different skill set or a purpose that we are here from being on this planet. And i'll tell everyone listening your purpose purposes not to go work at that job that you work at may not even be the run the company that you currently run because sometimes companies are built based out of necessity for some level of income versus not some level of purpose. Maybe you can attribute a purpose behind the thing that you're building and that kind of satisfies it makes you feel more gratitude or fulfillment but for me. I'm a teacher at heart always been a teacher. I've always been a mentor. Even the corporate settings always mentoring people even though that wasn't necessarily my role is never even asked to do that. Just who i am okay. So that's my purpose is to be a mentor and help people and when you start to understand what. Your true talents are what your abilities are. You should start to gravitate those things. But here's some indicators. I'm gonna help you listeners. Out with because a lot of times people come to you for advice. Think coming to you for advice. And if they're not maybe not creating enough value in this world but that's another subject on its own so if you have the pattern of people coming to you for advice where that's financial or family. Maybe it's a marriage or maybe it's business advisor. Maybe just advice on fixing something or whatever the advice is i want you to start recognizing a pattern. What does that subject the people keep coming for asking you for advice because they regard you as an authority or an expert or someone. That's got a lot of experience in that and start paying attention to that because to me it was always business or cars. People want to go shop. A car biased sports car there. Hey what would you think about this. If you're buying you're looking at these two cars. Which one would you pick. And and it was always business. I am thinking about this business idea. What do you think about this. And so i started to take mental notes and said okay. I'm i'm actually kind of done talking about cars. That was first twenty years of my business in my life. I'm gonna focus on business now. So that's why i became. I am because. I have that fascination and passion around entrepreneurship and business anima teacher so the best way for me to serve this world just use my abilities and my passion so when people ask me what my purpose is now i say my purpose is to impact the generational legacy of millions of people by teaching them confidence and business principles. Because those are things. I'm meant to be here four and you said You have to think about creating value. And so i wanna get back to that when when you think you just kind of talked about it but i wanna i guess i want to get in your head you know what what was the trigger and then how did you come out of that thinking. Oh here's how. I can create value for people. Here's how i can create this community this legacy that you just talked about. Go more bid for a while here. Something important topic stood two thousand fifteen. There was an industry downturn in my wife. And i both were in that industry both got laid off okay and i realized even at that time because i was part of that middle management staff rob was having a pig. People replaced me and i was like. I don't really like this anymore. I've been through three downturns in my career. And as i climb that corporate ladder and those earning more i realized that i was going to be unemployed longer. And when you're doing what i was doing. Your typically unemployed. Six to eight months before another one of those roles opens up on downturn. So i said you know what is good as it pays. It's not cool to sit on the bench for six to eight months in between games. So i thought you know what on on do something else i don't want to go. I'm in my forties and i don't want to do this for the next twenty years because i know it's only gonna get worse. Ageism starts in san ant- people don't really talk about that you don't really even experience you're in your forties and so i said okay. What can i do differently. And i really start thinking about that and the wheels were in motion. And here's the thing. I go back to my racing. My cars and i've always been writing magazine articles and doing how to videos have been pretty well known for extracting record quarter mile times or lap times from some expensive hardware for manufacturers were parts dealers are speed shops at. Throw the keys and tell me to go get some laptops and writing an article do video whatever and one particular night. I was at the drag strip here in the houston texas area and a- shop was there and they're building a project car and they're trying to set a record for a gym five viper to go in the nines from the first time and i have a low nine second viper so i've got a lot of seat time thousands of passes in that car and they're like man you can do this. Can you get sports like sure. So strap in and i go make a pass and about the top third year. Something in the right rear suspension broke and on an independent rear suspension car when something breaks in the rear axle and makes the rear wheel. It doesn't just come loose. It's turning like like pushing a shopping cart backwards if you want to visualize that sounds. I'm going against closer and closer to that wall and a been in cars at that level of thousand horsepower. where an honest save. The cars have done that many times. he's gonna let off them throttled. Make sure you're you're steady with your steering no fast movements but the car steering itself with the back wheel and i didn't realize what was going on at the time and as the car went to that right side. Wallace grazing down the wall. And i thought okay. The worst is over. It wasn't that bad. I'll start to slow down now. I'm still doing about one hundred thirty miles per hour slowdown in a come off. The wall of in the wheel kicks back out and now the car takes a hard left. And i'm looking at the concrete jersey barriers in the other lane at one hundred thirty miles priority two-door sports car and it didn't take too much mental calculations. Understand that i got bad odds of survival. I'm about to go hit a concrete wall and a two-door dodge viper with hundred thirty miles per hour at my belt and in that moment it was really strange. Might because i thought i was going to die and you would think about like movies where people think they're gonna die. Always had that scared based on Are fearful bang and it was really profound because there was no life flashing before my eyes or anything like that. No dramatic stuff. I just remember being very peaceful. We hear like the phrase. Jesus take the wheel. It really was like that for me. Just peaceful a i. I remember as went hard left. I looked at the wall. And i said well here again said muzzle. What here. I go. And i and i had no regrets and i felt very peaceful in that moment and of course impact happens front of the car caves into the windshield and airbags deployed night as dark and lights are flashing. I'm here is crazy. Noises and things are fallen off the car and it's sliding and all i can remember was survived. The impact and my race training tells me. I need to get out of that car because most people die in a fire. Not the impact. So i'm like the karston sliding and i'm thinking like i get out gotta get out. Stay awake stay awake stay awake. I didn't know vows injured or not. Remember being conscious and stay awake is all i could think about. Car finally comes to arrest. And i had to pry the door open because it was caved in on that side and i got out and i didn't know if i was hurt or not. I remember taking my helmet and is looking at this wreckage of the car to reels or knocked offers fluid strewn hundreds and hundreds of feet cars every panels cab bashed in front of the cars having missing and i remember thinking like why am i still here. Like i don't know if i'm injured or not. It could have been drilling hiding that in the thing here is who's really strange is now the ambulance gets a track and my friends are running from the starting line. Four wheelers coming up because it was dark at the track. That couldn't see what happens like they reached me understanding my looking at wreckage. Really quiet nick. Put me in the ambulance and the paramedics my shirt off and she's looking around and zinni thing hurt like looking for any injuries and asking me questions and see having concussion and answering very clearly and and at the end she goes. I just wanted to point out something. That's really unusual. And i thought she was going to tell. I was injured or something rienzi. Oh great here we go. What what is it now. She's like people crash out here every night. You're in a very major car accident. But you're remarkably calm. She's like your heart rate is calm. They're answering all the questions. The right way and hall your vitals are showing like call the adrenaline shakes like most people. Have i said you know what i feel calm. I actually feel calm. Like a started thinking about. Even when i faced the wall i felt calm and and my friend drove me home. Just in case Blacked out or whatever. And and i just remember thinking about what what would if i would have died tonight. What a dime. That was the the question that kept coming through my mind the rest of that week. What if i would have died. Tonight's our last night for monday night. Or whatever night was and how would people remember me. And that's worthy mortality. Exercise comes in and we started thinking about that while we have to do is look at the friends that we had that past way before us. How are they remembered was a good. Was it bad for me. It was pretty simple. Nice guy with a bunch of cool cars is. That's what most people online or people that knew me was nice guy successful bunch cool cars right so i started doing the horde soul-searching thing is like. Is that good enough. An answer is no because that's super shallow. I didn't want to be dead guy. That was nice. That had cool cars so in that moment when i finally realized that is like i'm not doing enough with my life. I'm not doing enough. This job is holding me back even though it pays me. Well it's not creating any kind of legacy. I'm not creating any value for the world other than people that work at chevron and water my real passions behind the things and so the next two years the two thousand fifteen right. The next two years took contract gigs and did things and just kind of made my bills and and had money come in still ran my online business that i've had fifteen years and other business and i was just thinking and doing some soul-searching what am i going to do to impact people and and we start to get to that as like how can impact the most amount of people while i'm a community. Builder love entrepreneurship. So that was the combination that great. It's recent five driven. Wow that was. I don't even know what to say. That was just incredibly inspirational. Just way you walk through that and the way you're thinking was in the way you're calm and how you looked at yourself after that and said there's more yeah more to me than this. I challenge anybody. That's listening to go through that same exercise fewer to died today which literally could happen. Yeah how would you be remembered. And is that good enough. Well i think i'm gonna leave it there tony. This has been just fantastic getting to know you. Thanks so much for coming on the show. Thanks for doing your podcast. Three sixty five driven and everything. You're doing at three sixty five driven. You should check tony out there. Three sixty five driven dot com. How do people. How do you want people to connect with you tony. I think that's the best way three sixty five german dot com and if you are an entrepreneur and you're on facebook. We do have entrepreneurship group. It's free it's about thirty six hundred members and growing its got three sixty five driven entrepreneurs apply if you're not to spammy and you actually contribute value. You'll find an awesome awesome community. People that you can bounce questions from and get mentorship from and do some cool things with and is that for entrepreneurs no matter where they are in their experience of got multi-millionaire friends and people that are just starting their first business in their nice. Tony wiley thank you so much. There's been great. Appreciate you coming on the show. Thanks mike thanks for listening to this episode of the that happen. Podcast where we believe. That success doesn't happen unless you make it happen. You can subscribe to the podcast on apple. Podcasts google podcasts stitcher or wherever you like to listen and while you're there please rate it and leave a comment as well. I love to hear your thoughts about the show ideas for future guests for whatever you'd like to share and of course you can always find me at mike. Maladjusted dot com. See next time. Thanks again for listening to the how that happened podcast.

tony mike mallet testa justin breen Tony forbes entrepreneur magazine gulf of mexico eli moss houston justin havertown youtube Mike bizet chevron shell