18 Burst results for "Bixby Premier"

"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

Alexa in Canada

06:55 min | 2 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

"If you've been listening with us for the last couple of weeks you'll know i'm highlighting some of the voice fluency there's that have appeared on the voice thin and today is no different. I have the pleasure of introducing you to julie. daniel davis now as usual for this month I have a guest co host with me and it's ian utility Who you will know. Wealth in the last couple of weeks thrilled to have him along with us as well. Now julie is as you hear us. Talk about julia's one of those people. That when i think of interesting people that are doing fantastic work at the intersection of voice technology in education. Julie's one of those people that comes to mind immediately and in fact she's probably the first person so we get into all of the work that she's doing We get into her background and really fascinating discussion about voice education smart speakers and everything that goes along with that so Here's your chance to listen in. I hope you'll enjoy this interview and without any further ado here is julie. Daniel davis julie. Welcome through the show with you guys. Today it's a pleasure to have you any and hello again. Welcome back co host. Quite a basic awesome. Julie all right we gotta start off first of all Tell us who you are so for those people that are watching listening in have not met you before who are you. Yeah may miss julie davis. I am any educational consultant animals in faculty member at the university of tennessee chattanooga where i teach graduate level students about our educational technology in the midst of my prior job where it was the director of instructional technology innovation. Monroe was kind of keeping an eye on water. The emerging technologies that might impact education and one of those obviously was voice. And that's how i got involved with voice later became an alexa young bixby premier developer and i host. The voice in education are passed to help. Educators think critically about using voice for learn amazing and those that were on. The show will know that. I mentioned this. Then lamented again Because there was a great question somebody asked about being an evangelist and we had you on their answer that because you and my books are the evangelist when it comes to voice an education. You're the name that i think of when somebody mentions voice and education so anyway and released to have you here in questions fervor julie well with to be retired still be so busy long retirement and then they retire go. I still want purpose and passion and pleasure in my workday. You just feel up your day with being the evangelist for voice in education. So how is that transition. Because you did. You weren't evangelist for voice in education before you officially retired from your job vassilis couple decades so maybe can just talk a bit about that transition. What that's like. Maybe some surprises that you've experienced. The transition were investing. I became a grandma grandma. Don't you young for it. But not as of two weeks so that was a reason. I decided to actually a leaving. K twelve environment working forty plus hours a week and a was kind of wondering how long will remain relevant in the role of voice because one of my pet peeves are consultants that are in the space anymore as actually one of the things. That immediately happened which i never put any feelers out. But i've gotten a lot of opportunities to go into indicate trump schools and help them think critically and think about what's next with educational technology especially in this day and time that we're in where students are having to learn virtually so that those door started opening for me. I've also done some local for a local company. Here helping them get some of their product. Birsh will for people to learn more about in specifically elementary students. They teach students about tracy in safety with electricity. And then the door over for me to teach at the college where i have two degrees and bad just kind of fell into my lap at as well so the thing is kinda been. Wait a minute did i want to do all this stuff are. Don't to slow down at the. I was very like what you said ian about. What if like. I don't enjoy having all this time. But i've i think it's been a really good transition for me to go a slowly into retirement. I'm still hiking two days of way. Getting which i never had the opportunity to before so to me right now is the perfect sweet spot. That's amazing i love that. I love that so with with with this transition and the opportunity to work on new projects compared to what you were doing before what what are some things that you are most excited about these days when you get up and you wanna work on. Yeah the opportunity now for me to really think about okay is that i want to argue for the podcasts and i have time to actually reach out to a whole lot more people than i didn't ask because kind affinity to actor work interviewing people suggested a really good to really think critically but i think the thing i'm most excited about when it comes to boys right now is working with open voice network. We are currently. There is an educational steering committee that john stein has put together and this group of people. We've been meeting together for goodness every two weeks or what seems like forever. Don't even sure how long have been doing it. But we're right now in the process of creating lesson plans for teachers to understand what is conversational design. Help can voice assistant helped me with matt learning that type of thing so our goal is to do the new. What when where. Why.

julie davis Daniel davis julie julie. daniel davis ian julia Monroe john stein developer university of tennessee chatta matt Birsh tracy consultant director faculty member
"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

Alexa in Canada

08:03 min | 3 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

"Mark. So you appeared on The Voice 10 as the open Sorcerer And for those that may didn't that might not have had the chance to join us introduce yourself and tell us where that name comes from. Okay. So Mark Tucker, I've been doing software development for a long time but started doing voice Dev in June 2016 is when I discovered that existed and immediately I started creating things on GitHub for other developers as they started learning and and I just kept that going. So now what I'm talking about content on social media or you know things about my favorite framework, which is jovo or just speech mark down just number of different open source projects that are in the voice C that I've created or participated on and it just want to share information and get it out there and some open-source work amazing amazing. And anybody that spends any time off. And social media will know that you are extremely active on social media. Particularly Twitter is where I've seen you the most I don't know if that's the one that you've seen two most active on but you're always so generous with your help and helping people out and such a great spirit. And that's one of the things that I really love about the work that you're doing. And so so thank you I'll be have for the community. Thank you so much. I just like to share I think whatever we can do to get more information out in the community the I learn from you you learn from me and we can just make this so high grow bigger by everybody an effort into it. So sharing I think is the best policy wonderful and that's yeah, I agree with you a hundred percent. That's how we strengthen the community. So speaking of a great for you feel that way. Yes, we are young Eric because I know I know personally I've referred people to you cuz like they have a question. I'm not a developer. I'm not a developer. I know he's not a developer. He's he's got a lot of a lot of brains up their page. But not a you are not a computer scientist, correct? Correct me if I'm wrong and correct me if I'm wrong. I'm waiting for my honorary doctorate in computer science. One day I won't deserve it. I won't deserve it off but I might get it. There you go. But the point is that whenever I get those questions that I just simply don't know the answer to I I tend to refer them to you cuz I know that they're going to be in great hands. So thank you again Mark and Jacob speaking of that another way that you are reaching out to the community is through your podcast which is relatively new and tell us about that cuz that's really exciting. Yeah. So Alan first American I created a podcast and it's also available on YouTube. It's called to voice devs. So it's interesting that we've we came across each other down in conferences and just met each other but really just had small conversation and then it was the pandemic and voice lunch and then just getting involved there. We we talked more and we just discovered how long Some ways we're we're a lot alike. And in other ways we're completely different and it's just awesome. You know, he he likes Coke. I like Pepsi he lives in the Northeast. I live in the southwest. He is a Google developer expert and I'm an Alexa champion in Bixby Premier developer and we talked about voice stuff. So we just finished up episode 13 wage. It's out actually was released earlier to today and we just get on and we have such a great time. Nothing scripted. We just pick a topic and we start talking about it and we try wage Explorer. You know, how does Alexa handle this? How does Google handle it? What do we like? What do we you know don't like and we just talked and we end up most times talking for almost an hour. We're just kind of get into it and just a lot of fun. It's not you know, it's it's technical. It's not a you know code follow-through. It's just us talking about tech and and development from a voice developer perspective dead. It's amazing. And so when you sit down to do one of those podcast, do you guys have any type of agenda or is it really just whatever comes to mind? So we always have a segment at the beginning where we can talk about. You know, how long that we've learned or did during the last week something that's top of mind but in other than picking the topic for the week, we just have a shared Google sheet. And we said well, let's talk about this on Monday. And we usually record on Monday mornings and just get on with that the topic and go from there. Right? Right. Do you take questions from the community? Have you thought of that like Thursday? We're open to it. You know, we're still figuring out this joint podcast thing, you know cross country. We would love to have guests on or talk about a specific topics that people that are are watching have and and we started doing getting some of that feedback mostly, you know, DMS through Twitter or comments on on YouTube. Yeah, we're open 2 to talk about topics that people have our our share things that other people learn to. Yeah, right, right and speaking of you developing and things I'm working on. So can you tell us some of the things that you're excited about that you're working on these days. Yeah. So I've got stuff that I'm working on privately that that's you know projects that are just my thoughts. I've got some side things that I've working on with other people and I've got my full-time job so full-time. I'm work for a company called sore and we our goal is to uplift humanity and we have an Alexa skill and the Google action that allows you to listen to uplifting content and we're working on processes so that you can upload your own personal audio and so just you know, whatever it is that you want to listen to or you know scrape from a website and within a few minutes. It's available to play back on Alexa with transcriptions and. Searching capabilities. So that's what I do for my my full-time job and we've got lots of different features. We're building into that earlier this year released number spies, which was a game that I did kind of a genre. It's not just a voice app. It's goes outside of a voice app and I'm working on another one that's cross-platform the home we'll have ready in November, but that's still in the secret mode and then got a side company that I am working for. We created a bath Alexis killed called home number if you think about having your own, you know home phone number and being able to give that number out and and not necessarily share your mobile number where it can be bound or whatnot. You can create your own personal home number and you can think of your Alexa device as your answering machine. So any inbound voice calls that you get we record wage And then you get a notification on Alexa that you have an incoming voice message and you can go ahead and listen to that. It also can accept text messages so that you and you can do the same thing. You'll get notified when you get a text message that that number and then you can send outbound text messages and voice and phone calls. So all three relax advice. What do you go at Gian? That's that's I I he's how do you get the number like so there's a website when you go ahead and sign up on our website. We generate a phone number for you. And then you just hook up your Alexa device your electric bill with with that account. And now you've got that number. You also have your your own mobile number. So for example on the outbound phone calls, you can't initiate those through Alexa, but you can use your web-based address book to go ahead and make a phone call out to somebody and what it does is it will call your phone your mobile phone and the other person and make a connection, but the phone call looks like it comes from a home number. So all they know about is the home number that you give them.

Mark Tucker Lexi Ian Terry Fisher Irish Pub Lindsay Twitter LinkedIn Alexa Lexus YouTube Teri
The Voicefluencer Show with Mark Tucker

Alexa in Canada

08:03 min | 3 months ago

The Voicefluencer Show with Mark Tucker

"Mark. So you appeared on The Voice 10 as the open Sorcerer And for those that may didn't that might not have had the chance to join us introduce yourself and tell us where that name comes from. Okay. So Mark Tucker, I've been doing software development for a long time but started doing voice Dev in June 2016 is when I discovered that existed and immediately I started creating things on GitHub for other developers as they started learning and and I just kept that going. So now what I'm talking about content on social media or you know things about my favorite framework, which is jovo or just speech mark down just number of different open source projects that are in the voice C that I've created or participated on and it just want to share information and get it out there and some open-source work amazing amazing. And anybody that spends any time off. And social media will know that you are extremely active on social media. Particularly Twitter is where I've seen you the most I don't know if that's the one that you've seen two most active on but you're always so generous with your help and helping people out and such a great spirit. And that's one of the things that I really love about the work that you're doing. And so so thank you I'll be have for the community. Thank you so much. I just like to share I think whatever we can do to get more information out in the community the I learn from you you learn from me and we can just make this so high grow bigger by everybody an effort into it. So sharing I think is the best policy wonderful and that's yeah, I agree with you a hundred percent. That's how we strengthen the community. So speaking of a great for you feel that way. Yes, we are young Eric because I know I know personally I've referred people to you cuz like they have a question. I'm not a developer. I'm not a developer. I know he's not a developer. He's he's got a lot of a lot of brains up their page. But not a you are not a computer scientist, correct? Correct me if I'm wrong and correct me if I'm wrong. I'm waiting for my honorary doctorate in computer science. One day I won't deserve it. I won't deserve it off but I might get it. There you go. But the point is that whenever I get those questions that I just simply don't know the answer to I I tend to refer them to you cuz I know that they're going to be in great hands. So thank you again Mark and Jacob speaking of that another way that you are reaching out to the community is through your podcast which is relatively new and tell us about that cuz that's really exciting. Yeah. So Alan first American I created a podcast and it's also available on YouTube. It's called to voice devs. So it's interesting that we've we came across each other down in conferences and just met each other but really just had small conversation and then it was the pandemic and voice lunch and then just getting involved there. We we talked more and we just discovered how long Some ways we're we're a lot alike. And in other ways we're completely different and it's just awesome. You know, he he likes Coke. I like Pepsi he lives in the Northeast. I live in the southwest. He is a Google developer expert and I'm an Alexa champion in Bixby Premier developer and we talked about voice stuff. So we just finished up episode 13 wage. It's out actually was released earlier to today and we just get on and we have such a great time. Nothing scripted. We just pick a topic and we start talking about it and we try wage Explorer. You know, how does Alexa handle this? How does Google handle it? What do we like? What do we you know don't like and we just talked and we end up most times talking for almost an hour. We're just kind of get into it and just a lot of fun. It's not you know, it's it's technical. It's not a you know code follow-through. It's just us talking about tech and and development from a voice developer perspective dead. It's amazing. And so when you sit down to do one of those podcast, do you guys have any type of agenda or is it really just whatever comes to mind? So we always have a segment at the beginning where we can talk about. You know, how long that we've learned or did during the last week something that's top of mind but in other than picking the topic for the week, we just have a shared Google sheet. And we said well, let's talk about this on Monday. And we usually record on Monday mornings and just get on with that the topic and go from there. Right? Right. Do you take questions from the community? Have you thought of that like Thursday? We're open to it. You know, we're still figuring out this joint podcast thing, you know cross country. We would love to have guests on or talk about a specific topics that people that are are watching have and and we started doing getting some of that feedback mostly, you know, DMS through Twitter or comments on on YouTube. Yeah, we're open 2 to talk about topics that people have our our share things that other people learn to. Yeah, right, right and speaking of you developing and things I'm working on. So can you tell us some of the things that you're excited about that you're working on these days. Yeah. So I've got stuff that I'm working on privately that that's you know projects that are just my thoughts. I've got some side things that I've working on with other people and I've got my full-time job so full-time. I'm work for a company called sore and we our goal is to uplift humanity and we have an Alexa skill and the Google action that allows you to listen to uplifting content and we're working on processes so that you can upload your own personal audio and so just you know, whatever it is that you want to listen to or you know scrape from a website and within a few minutes. It's available to play back on Alexa with transcriptions and. Searching capabilities. So that's what I do for my my full-time job and we've got lots of different features. We're building into that earlier this year released number spies, which was a game that I did kind of a genre. It's not just a voice app. It's goes outside of a voice app and I'm working on another one that's cross-platform the home we'll have ready in November, but that's still in the secret mode and then got a side company that I am working for. We created a bath Alexis killed called home number if you think about having your own, you know home phone number and being able to give that number out and and not necessarily share your mobile number where it can be bound or whatnot. You can create your own personal home number and you can think of your Alexa device as your answering machine. So any inbound voice calls that you get we record wage And then you get a notification on Alexa that you have an incoming voice message and you can go ahead and listen to that. It also can accept text messages so that you and you can do the same thing. You'll get notified when you get a text message that that number and then you can send outbound text messages and voice and phone calls. So all three relax advice. What do you go at Gian? That's that's I I he's how do you get the number like so there's a website when you go ahead and sign up on our website. We generate a phone number for you. And then you just hook up your Alexa device your electric bill with with that account. And now you've got that number. You also have your your own mobile number. So for example on the outbound phone calls, you can't initiate those through Alexa, but you can use your web-based address book to go ahead and make a phone call out to somebody and what it does is it will call your phone your mobile phone and the other person and make a connection, but the phone call looks like it comes from a home number. So all they know about is the home number that you give them.

Alexa Developer Google Twitter Mark Tucker Youtube Eric Scientist Gian Pepsi Alan Northeast Bixby Premier
"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

Alexa in Canada

05:15 min | 3 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

"A podcast and it's also available on YouTube. It's called to voice devs. So it's interesting that we've we came across each other down in conferences and just met each other but really just had small conversation and then it was the pandemic and voice lunch and then just getting involved there. We we talked more and we just discovered how long Some ways we're we're a lot alike. And in other ways we're completely different and it's just awesome. You know, he he likes Coke. I like Pepsi he lives in the Northeast. I live in the southwest. He is a Google developer expert and I'm an Alexa champion in Bixby Premier developer and we talked about voice stuff. So we just finished up episode 13 wage. It's out actually was released earlier to today and we just get on and we have such a great time. Nothing scripted. We just pick a topic and we start talking about it and we try wage Explorer. You know, how does Alexa handle this? How does Google handle it? What do we like? What do we you know don't like and we just talked and we end up most times talking for almost an hour. We're just kind of get into it and just a lot of fun. It's not you know, it's it's technical. It's not a you know code follow-through. It's just us talking about tech and and development from a voice developer perspective dead. It's amazing. And so when you sit down to do one of those podcast, do you guys have any type of agenda or is it really just whatever comes to mind? So we always have a segment at the beginning where we can talk about. You know, how long that we've learned or did during the last week something that's top of mind but in other than picking the topic for the week, we just have a shared Google sheet. And we said well, let's talk about this on Monday. And we usually record on Monday mornings and just get on with that the topic and go from there. Right? Right. Do you take questions from the community? Have you thought of that like Thursday? We're open to it. You know, we're still figuring out this joint podcast thing, you know cross country. We would love to have guests on or talk about a specific topics that people that are are watching have and and we started doing getting some of that feedback mostly, you know, DMS through Twitter or comments on on YouTube. Yeah, we're open 2 to talk about topics that people have our our share things that other people learn to. Yeah, right,.

Google developer Alexa YouTube Twitter Bixby Premier Pepsi Northeast
"bixby premier" Discussed on Bixby Developers Chat

Bixby Developers Chat

06:58 min | 4 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Bixby Developers Chat

"Issuing an injunction against the trump administration in its efforts to change the schedule of the twenty twenty. K. In that was channel too. So that's a quick example, a stream player in action. Hey Daniel before the podcast you're talking any said I thought of stream player is a sudden into play videos, but you said there's not into above and beyond hang on expanding out of tell me about that yet. Absolutely, the first use other reported back with positive feedback were actually blind people people with disabilities with a site. So this is really huge base on the base, and currently we have a fifty percent of the users are using the stream player with audio. Only s yeah. Just listening in to the favourite TV channels on movies or series. And this is came as a surprise to me to be honest because I always think about the watching television, it's like visual medium but to be honest like fifty percent of the users, I just wanted to hear the audio of the TV channel is a surprising now. That's interesting. So Street player was the easiest way for them to start hearing the audio I think voices so powerful inclusiveness and open up new reality start enhancing inclusion and getting people who previously struggled to build a use technology. But that's like a serendipitous name wherever you built it not thinking that. But then the first users were people who are blind on that. That's an awesome story I. I love when that serendipity helps. A group who you didn't originally think about an it just all works out and makes the world a better place. So the job. I understand you founded digital style as voice in twenty, nine, thousand, nine hundred, and then recently joined Bego. Let serve digit voice tell me about the founding of digitization what type work you did. I, found it digitizing two thousand and nineteen after I traded voice experiences for brands on the party's. Already two years ago in two thousand, seventeen. I wanted to focus my work and be like my own boss and what really helped. There was when I got named Alexa champion or bixby premier development as this really brought some focus on myself and my work. So I. Did everything myself like the consulting develop man the support after a voice experience had launched? At also had some bright projects coming up which would scare did you voice I want to? Hire A. Develop. PA or and saves person but then the corona kid and in mid March like all other projects that I had lined up for the second second and third quarter of two thousand and twenty, they are put on hold So that was a pretty rough. He put a lot of business plans on hold or or disrupted a bunch of things but congratulations on taking the leap into creating your own voice as emcee and doing that I, know that's the dream of a lot of people and I. Think One of the challenges in the industry is still to this day is a making money and making that happen. So that's great. You went ahead and made that happen, and then at this point, the calamity hit the world which cow out bit of resetting. So you recently joined Betas ctl tell me more about joining NATO. So I met the chew CEO's of two in August of two, thousand nineteen when I was giving a talk in Berlin about West Commerce. And we kept in touch after that and we had already went ahead and wanted to do some projects together. and. In early twenty, twenty restarted talking about merger of Bay to the digital toys and then when they. Came to me with plants and project they had lined up for this year. I was very interested in, and then again, the coronal pandemic eight and I had a zero projects at this point. So. We started talking about emerging more in this when I decided. Might be a good way to. Focus our work together to merge and to become a big brand and big agency here in Germany. To build best divorce experiences in Europe, in Germany. So this is when when we officially merged in May, this is when I joined Betas a CTO overseeing the voice user interface design, the development, and all the other technical stuff. And is now is Beethoven one hundred percent focused on voice or is there other agency work at us? I know we are digital agency we are focused on boys not only will bixby and Alexa, but also on other voice experiences like built into a car or in your kitchen you may have. Indicated Voice Experience Voice Assistant in your fridge or whatever. We are doing consulting work strategic consulting work for all boys assistance for the sector and also development. Yeah I've heard there's an explosion of work on while called the independent voice assistance to Kinda. Director his belt voice assistance in. This is really. been driving a lot of agency work. There so a good job. I would also love to talk to you about you co-founded Luba and my little by. Dot, and that's a startup for educational voice experiences which gets excited just talking about it. So tell me more about Lavar. Live by first shortfall lauren voice in battle. Re Edit the second Ohio because us like a antibioticum in eastern Europe that is called Bar with one single. Oh so we went ahead and just edit the second. Oh This is like real focused on educational voice APPS and. Experiences for kids as. I have two kids on my own and my two co founders also have kids. And in early twenty twenty, there was an attack challenge by Amazon so we teamed up. With altria three of us and we came up with the idea for live Bouba and live about an educational voice experience where kids can compete against classmates from school when the are at home. So we came up with this idea even before corona hit. But the even better idea. Now, a kitsap sitting at home was closed and lockdown happening. So teachers can use our system at questions and quizzes for classes. Am The wild sitting at home can use our skill s or ski lists like the first ever..

Alexa Voice Assistant Europe Germany Daniel bixby NATO Bego altria Amazon PA Berlin Bouba Lavar CTO Luba Beethoven CEO
"bixby premier" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Radio

06:18 min | 6 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

"One German please I. Think I know what it's going to be but go ahead? Alexa conversations now I've just okay. I, wish so desert some data. So Alexa conversations a whole other thing. Yeah, we'll have. Six on my list, sorry. Number one is quick links and asked him task. Links <hes> so like we said before. You can start a skill by just saying the invocation name, or now an I. And launch it or you can go right into a specific intent by giving it more detail. That's exactly what quick links are quick links launches the APP. You can use that today. No additional work needed for anything. You just construct a url <hes> that you include what your skill ideas and it's got slashed launch on the end, and you can post that wherever you can have it in your. Social media you can have an L.. Yup your help documentation on your website wherever you want somebody to launch your skill from then just include that link and what happens is when you click on the link than it redirects you to a an intermediate page now if you if you're not logged onto your Amazon account, that's that's associated with. Alexa and you're GONNA get a log on Amazon. <hes> dialogue, so you can enter your user ID and Password, but then on this page it gives you a little header at the top that shows you. The name of the skill is skill icon. It's rating a little information about it, and then it finds the. Device devices that are connected <hes> that you own associated with that account and you've got a button for each one of those or <hes>. Or Button to send a notification to all of your Alexa, devices <hes>, and so you just have one of those buttons and next thing you know that devices talking to you saying. Do you WANNA start? This experience <hes> the specific skill on <hes> on this device, and it starts to run in your off just as if you were to have said Alexa open whatever your skill rotation name is. Yeah. I actually think this is a humongous deal for at the whole Alexa ecosystem. This would have been my number one to if I was power ranking him <hes> because I think that we've heard so much discussion around discover ability <hes> end. Just this dilemma that you know. How do you ever remember the invocation for ten twenty thirty? This idea where you're going to have this ever increasing amount, you don't have the skew more fic- interface like you have with you know the mobile web and you have your APPs and all that. So you don't have these reminders of what APP means what all this? You gotta just remember it and I think this is massive for two reasons. The first is the ability for marketers to. Effectively cross-channel market their skill I think is just a total game changer from a marketing standpoint. Because now you can think of Ho campaigns that the whole purpose is to grow the. Skill user base <hes> insight. You have a social media campaign. You have digital marketing. Google's Google ads banner images are websites <hes>. I can just see this becoming something where <hes> you know this is something we'll see a lot of where you get people to enable the skill I. think that's the big thing. Because again it goes back to what you were just saying about <hes> number two being the referrals <hes> if it is something where it is kind of like <hes>, it's a system. That's really largely dependent on what you've already enabled, but you can't necessarily remember it, but you know you have that movie skill that you enabled. Enabled through the you know you have the fandango skill or whatever that might be <hes>, but you know it's slipping your mind of how you invoke that, so then you can use this generic term <hes> and say hey launched my movie skill in. It's like okay. I know that that's Fandango in the reason that you were even enabling that in the first place was because of this really effective marketing campaign so I think that this is a massive development for the third party ecosystem because I think now. It solves a major problem where it's like. How do you get people to a get signed up so that you can open the skill without having to enable it <hes> and then be i. think it gives them the opportunity. If this whole referral network kind of becomes something where it's dependent on these suggested kind of. You know affiliated searches. At No, I. I think <hes> you say there's a lot. In there that just rings true. Because how do you get somebody in the skill? For the very first time, right, you might run an ad campaign. That's got a great graphic. You know. Maybe it's Kung, Fu, panda, and you've got the new country panda skill, and you just say Alexa Open comes panda. <hes> seems simple enough <hes>, but sometimes people just want tap it's there's that extra security of just tap this thing and I follow through the steps, and Oh, now I'm here. You know it's. There are multiple steps. Could you do your one to happen and you might have to log in, and you have the tap which device you want to go to, and then you start getting the the voice interaction. But, for for new users <unk> especially that are new to this idea of skills and want to be out there. Hand held a little bit more. It's kind of scary just to say something and. See if it works or not but to build a third USTA. Tapping people are used to <unk> touching a button <hes>. I can't even see. This is something that occurred to me is now. What if I were to take? One of the quick links and Dan saved at <hes> as an idea on my mobile phone so I'm I'm already in there and I got some sort of an APP and I just wanted to tap that. And then also it's <hes>. It's going to allow me to open that up on another device <hes> so. It's <hes>. There's lots of different things that you can do with that <hes> so I just love the idea of quick links and lots of different things going on

Mr Mark Tucker Mark Alexa Mark Tucker Mark Rogo sales training Echo auto developer Sandler Amazon officer
"bixby premier" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

Future Ear Radio

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Future Ear Radio

"The World Voice Technology Power, these worlds starting to intersect power these worlds starting to collide. What cool things are GonNa? Come from this intersection of technology. Without further ADO. Let's get on with the show. All right so we're joined here today. By the one and only Mr Mark Tucker Mark. Tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do. So, Mark Tucker. LEXA champion Bixby premier developer I've been doing. Voice Development for the last four years. Just been involved a lot of cross platform stuff. A lot of things in open source, but currently I worked for a company called Sore Dot, com, and out sore. We are trying to uplift humanity by helping people understand their strengths, and by providing uplifting contents and one of the platforms that we do that is voice assistance I'm so we have an Alexa skill that allows us to share that content of through our smirk speakers and also via a mobile APP. Awesome so with sore. Is this the type of thing? Can you give me an example of what that content would look like and You know? I'm just curious about the spot for him. Can you share a little bit about What the content looks like that? You guys are building in. How existed all that? Yeah so we in one case, we've partnered with the Sandler which is a top sales training company, and they have hours and hours of content for. People that are learning how to be better out. Sales leaders in sales, people and we are able to on the voice platform. Take their content. Run it through a content pipeline. Chains that into a format that Alexa can handle do transcriptions on that allow you to do searches and play that content whether it sound on your phone on on the go with your. You know Echo buds or in your car with Echo auto or any officer where we've got that content similarly, we have a product for sore uplift, which is a more general, which is uplifting content working with? Content providers to provide uplifting content, and you can set up playlists and and do other things, but it's you can search by keyword title full transcription whatever to to get to the content. That's important you. That's really cool. I love it and. So I wanted to bring mark on for this conversation today, because the purpose of this conversation is GonNa be to really break down some of the most I think key findings I guess our most exciting. Announcements that came from Alexa live which transpired on Wednesday I was pretty busy that day and every time I would hop on twitter I would see mark live tweeting it and he was doing a phenomenal job. And you know so Amazon released thirty one Alexa related announcements during this presentation mark covered all of it and so I thought you know who better to bring on to help us to understand. What are the most important things that we need to think about so I reached out to mark and I, said Mark. Why don't we go through the top five of your The things that were announced that your most excited about so that's what today is going to be all about just get started right off the top Mark Rogo, reverse order a hit me with number, five most exciting thing from Alexa live twenty twenty all right so great conference lots of things to go over. Half of the day, but it was a fast and furious on the on the tweeting and. But just trying to get your head around things as quickly as possible so just so much out there, that's going to help the voice assistant..

Mr Mark Tucker Mark Alexa Mark Tucker Mark Rogo sales training Echo auto developer Sandler Amazon officer
"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

Alexa in Canada

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

"I'm Steven, Arcana Bitch and I think most people know me as the developer of the big sky weather skill. But I have lots of other skills that nobody cares about, but that's fine I know resentment just. Out there how heels avid, altogether, it'd be idea. I have like six seven eight. I took some off like some of the really early ones because they just couldn't handle them, they were so. Atrocious okay, took them away from the market, but there's still a bunch of them out there all right we'll get. We'll get to that. What's your story so? I'm really I'm a philosophy professor. At Reed College in Portland Oregon and I do Alexa skill development on the side. So I'm of the, Alexa. Champions Program. I am are the bixby premier developers program, so you can get big sky on Bixby as well. That's the that's. That's what I do. So you know what questions coming next. How does a philosophy professor? Get into Amazon Alexa envoys technology. Right, then is the president well. I think it was A. Combination of a sabbatical where I really was trying to put off doing the research project I was supposed to do. <hes> together with a injury to my Achilles tendon that had me like boot and sitting in a chair for a long time. So those two things together made me like cast around or. Something else to do what I should be doing. and. I got an Alexa device early on, and I thought it was super cool. And I just started wanting to around with it and have a do things that it wasn't capable of doing at the time like play music through my stereo or even turn on and off the lights. It wasn't I don't think it was capable of doing that at the time so with IQ lights, so that's got into it. So what was your first device? Then because it's a this is a while ago, then was it like the big? The big tall cylinder. All, black cylinder. Gotcha Gotcha so. As, a philosophy, professor and skill developer. Those are somewhat somewhat different skill sets. Have you coded before? How did you get into that? Or what's the story there? Yeah, no I didn't I hadn't coded before. There are a little bit more similar than people think. They are just because the kind of law, Sophy I. DO is a little bit more technical. So you know it involves some formal logic, and so you know working in a formal logic and working in programming languages. You know they're not worlds apart. So that was helpful. and. No, I just got started because I've told the story before there was I wanted integration to my music server software I want to be able to tell Alexa play. A certain album was earned song that I had. I don't exactly remember. How would I got hooked up with? A an actual developer was doing some early Alexa stuff. And he's and he wrote some like really basic code to do that. Which I actually paid him for, but then I looked, and I looked at that code and thought well. That's cool, but I'm not paying you. You know that again to fix the. I'm sure I can figure out how to modify this, and that's just how it started like once I win started down that rabbit hole. I just couldn't stop

Bixby Alexa Dr Steven Stephen Arcana Vich Stephen Convict Steven Welcome professor Canada Reed College Oregon Portland developer
Big Sky with Dr. Steven Arkonovich

Alexa in Canada

03:49 min | 6 months ago

Big Sky with Dr. Steven Arkonovich

"I'm Steven, Arcana Bitch and I think most people know me as the developer of the big sky weather skill. But I have lots of other skills that nobody cares about, but that's fine I know resentment just. Out there how heels avid, altogether, it'd be idea. I have like six seven eight. I took some off like some of the really early ones because they just couldn't handle them, they were so. Atrocious okay, took them away from the market, but there's still a bunch of them out there all right we'll get. We'll get to that. What's your story so? I'm really I'm a philosophy professor. At Reed College in Portland Oregon and I do Alexa skill development on the side. So I'm of the, Alexa. Champions Program. I am are the bixby premier developers program, so you can get big sky on Bixby as well. That's the that's. That's what I do. So you know what questions coming next. How does a philosophy professor? Get into Amazon Alexa envoys technology. Right, then is the president well. I think it was A. Combination of a sabbatical where I really was trying to put off doing the research project I was supposed to do. together with a injury to my Achilles tendon that had me like boot and sitting in a chair for a long time. So those two things together made me like cast around or. Something else to do what I should be doing. and. I got an Alexa device early on, and I thought it was super cool. And I just started wanting to around with it and have a do things that it wasn't capable of doing at the time like play music through my stereo or even turn on and off the lights. It wasn't I don't think it was capable of doing that at the time so with IQ lights, so that's got into it. So what was your first device? Then because it's a this is a while ago, then was it like the big? The big tall cylinder. All, black cylinder. Gotcha Gotcha so. As, a philosophy, professor and skill developer. Those are somewhat somewhat different skill sets. Have you coded before? How did you get into that? Or what's the story there? Yeah, no I didn't I hadn't coded before. There are a little bit more similar than people think. They are just because the kind of law, Sophy I. DO is a little bit more technical. So you know it involves some formal logic, and so you know working in a formal logic and working in programming languages. You know they're not worlds apart. So that was helpful. and. No, I just got started because I've told the story before there was I wanted integration to my music server software I want to be able to tell Alexa play. A certain album was earned song that I had. I don't exactly remember. How would I got hooked up with? A an actual developer was doing some early Alexa stuff. And he's and he wrote some like really basic code to do that. Which I actually paid him for, but then I looked, and I looked at that code and thought well. That's cool, but I'm not paying you. You know that again to fix the. I'm sure I can figure out how to modify this, and that's just how it started like once I win started down that rabbit hole. I just couldn't stop

Alexa Professor Developer Bixby Achilles Tendon Steven Reed College Oregon Sophy I. Portland President Trump
"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

Alexa in Canada

04:48 min | 6 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

"Hey there and welcome to episode one thirty four of lex in Canada thanks for tuning in this week today I have a very special guest on the podcast Stephen Convict. Dr Steven or convict who is a philosophy professor, and he comes on to talk about his experience in creating skills for Alexa and for Bixby, and he also talks about his skill, Big Sky, which is probably the most popular weather skill available for Alexa, an capsule for Bixby. I'm so pleased to be able to feature him here on the podcast of a meaning to have on for a while to introduce him to you to the community, northern voice, and finally that day is today. So. Without any further ado, let's get right to the podcast. This is the talk with Stephen Arcana Vich. Steven Welcome to the Election Canada podcast. It's great to have you here. Thank you for joining us well. It's great to be here. I am a big fan of you and your skill and I've been aware of this for some time now and. Wanting to get you on the podcast actually for a while and I imagine a lot of listeners will be familiar with your skill as well, but let we'll save that. We're going to get to that in just a moment before we get to that. I'd love for you to take a few moments and introduce yourself. Tell us a little about your story. Yes so I'm Steven, Arcana Bitch and I think most people know me as the developer of the big sky weather skill. But I have lots of other skills that nobody cares about, but that's fine I know resentment just. Out there how heels avid, altogether, it'd be idea. I have like six seven eight. I took some off like some of the really early ones because they just couldn't handle them, they were so. Atrocious okay, took them away from the market, but there's still a bunch of them out there all right we'll get. We'll get to that. What's your story so? I'm really I'm a philosophy professor. At Reed College in Portland Oregon and I do Alexa skill development on the side. So I'm of the, Alexa. Champions Program. I am are the bixby premier developers program, so you can get big sky on Bixby as well..

Bixby Alexa Dr Steven Stephen Arcana Vich Stephen Convict Steven Welcome professor Canada Reed College Oregon Portland developer
"bixby premier" Discussed on The VoiceFirst Roundtable

The VoiceFirst Roundtable

16:20 min | 10 months ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The VoiceFirst Roundtable

"Welcome back to the voice. First Round Table Season two episode eight of ten. We're getting close to the end now. We're we're fortunate last week. Two weeks ago last episode two weeks ago to have atoms Samsung there was no episode last week as we had the voice. The car summit which a lot of people enjoyed might touch on that a little bit And now here. We are with episode eight alert Shea. Were very very honored to have you join us Thank you for being here introduce yourself thank you Bradley. Hi I'm Alana and I- Cardi situated at home in Cambridge. England has went on lockdown over. Here is being walking on voice applications for the lost. I believe freeze Nettie and I'm going to basically give my full perspective on how my journey has kind of grown from nor even knowing anything about four or five years ago two thou king of waste company like matchbooks. There's a lot of people working in various companies. There's few that have achieved your level of notoriety invisibly In your level of success so Kudos to you For everything that you've managed to achieve and It's pretty spectacular. So were honored to We're honored to have you now and talk now And we're honored to have you join us as the keynote of project voice. Twenty twenty one. Well that's going to be a special special event not only just because it is project it's going to be a special of debt because of everything that has happened this year and We've been denied the ability to meet in person and so we won't take it for granted Like perhaps we did Before separate discussion for another day Alana let's start from the beginning. What how did we get here? How did you get here? What attracted you to voice And what keeps you attracted to voice paints a picture? How did YOU Get to be where you are right now. Yeah so I've I've always been someone who was introduced technology. We're offer late. I I think it's combining Kylie. Because when I was at school they would. They wouldn't really introduce technology. Ict would be very very simple basic excel sheets and power points. And it wasn't until I was in sixth form which is like I think. High School for you guys About sixteen seventeen years old when I was introduced to a computer science as a whole and that Brady opened my eyes to various ways of communicating with technology and I fell in love with programming. And that's when I kind of realized that. Wow I can make a website amend. I went to university and I could do mobile apps and it was kind of at university. That's when I wanted to learn more about this whole world of technology and that's when I discovered the Alexis personally because they if that's an advert on the TV added it was this Little Echo added. You could say hello. You could speak back to you and not really amazed me. It wasn't really about voice. It was about the device that there was this device. That could talk to you because obviously we have assistance on but something about the the device really Mesh It was just really mesmerizing. Because I have that on in the kitchen living room and I fought a great present to give to my mom so for Christmas I got her that device and then I found out later on because all these APPs on there and I remember suss out replayed was a skill cold beat the trump and my mom got the skill cooled off things like boyfriend skill. Elect talking back to you AD. I was really amazed at these skills. One actually on the device already these were made by third party developers and I beat it. They wanted to be a part of that because I was like. This is so cool. I thinking what attracted to me as well with that with mobile apps you have to think about visuals and design whereas with voice you still have to focus on design for voice. Bought the visuals which was a big obstacle for me in the boss. Wasn't that so that immediately attracted me to start digging in and watching on this APP and I made my my my first voice skill called odds on which really simple it was mentioned this game where you would say one two three men say not the number and if you matched with Alexa you could bend do like a day or something That was that you didn't want to do so that I think we'll also helped with the documentation that the Amazon team provided in the first place because without that I really think that it would have hinted on the process of how far I go because they were so help me. Understand my oldest. I can do this. Because I had Zimmer experienced invoice technology I'd zero experience in some like Python Python experience but I didn't know how to with like sdk's or the cloud aws cloud so I had zero experience and just brew this voice industry. I've just not so much I've gained a lot of skills out and it's definitely helped me to get to where I am now. I learned more more software integrations and before so this was during university by the way so hadn't even graduated yet but I started making more and more skills and I kind of wasn't that mindset of I want the Swag I want the slack gave you so every month they had they would like have a free Hoodie. Have Afri Daw at acclimated like ten echo dots for the promotions and then when I got the rewards email the Alexa rewards. Email us when it was like. Oh so this could potential here for getting money with this. It's not just something to get cool goodies. So that was another motivation. Always like okay because I was in my final year university. I didn't know what I wanted to go down to whether it be web development will member applications and then oversee voice was another another game player and I think out of order. They're not score Interested in most so when I released the adventures which is something I'd made when I was eleven years old and for some reason I never put it on new cheap because these audio adventures and I thought I could be a perfect platform to put on because it was fairly new and this was before they accepted children skills so I got an email from them saying than allowed to do that yet but as soon as they allowed children's skills to go through. I was right in that put it. I put it on the platform and entered this competition that they set up the kids and because I was one of the winners I managed to basically use the winnings from that competition to really focus for a year after graduating on just focusing on voice of making legit apps so that whole year which was lost like last June of last year making voice applications and then I go introduce to Sam some bixby as well. Add again another interface with try which opened up my world voice and another platform which I had to learn about and understand how everything works and then towards the end of the year started working with matchbox who again our company that have made questioned the day which again I foot was one of those bus party. Invocation skills the electorate us but now it was made by by them and one of the big skills that are being used right now to be able to to be with a company that has so many amazing skills and applications are now on not just. Alexa Samsung and Google. It just shows how this is the start of a voice. This is not this is something that's just started and I feel like the training took the training wheels come off now for a lot of developers are starting to get down and get used to the whole voice industry and how it's going to operate in a few times so just getting to this. This pot has really. I guess especially with this year and how it's gone I think voices something that can really accelerate and probably has given people more of more trustworthy made them more trustworthy of technology. I feel like before people were very very reluctant to use technology. But now in this day and age it's made more open and actually Allows them to seeing the positives and I really do think that I think a lot of tweets of About people who are more welcoming having Alexis? Herman not worried about the privacy and I could see that this definitely. With the usage that people have seen with their applications voices Stephania forefront to. What's to come the future mumps as well so you had good permanent. That's what you're trying to tell me a nutshell. I basically. Yeah I had traveling. I love to experiment is well I was that. She just experimenting. Sprinting Something. Thank you for sharing all of that. I You know. It's it's interesting to me so I wrote this and this has been well received and for those on the podcast or watch the video. I'm holding up a copy of my book which is a bunch of Alexa skills and the criticism that I have received his been related to you. Know Does Amazon really need your help in promoting the skills the answer to that question is one hundred percent yes unfortunately but That's not really what they're getting at what they're getting at is who would go to bat for a trillion dollar company who would take sides with a trillion dollar company. They don't need people to take sides with them. They're doing just fine out of everything you just said. I thought I find it very refreshing. I don't share that opinion at all. My opinion is whatever the truth is is what the truth is and what the truth is for you and for voice. Is that Amazon? While they haven't done everything perfectly because they haven't they've done most everything well and they have absolutely blazed trail and they have made it possible through staying after thing after thing after thing after thing for people like you to find your way him and I think that is an ultimate compliment to them just the fact that you and I are having this conversation that somebody coming out of their school and their schooling has found their way into voice creating experiences for voice whether voice only multi-mode doesn't matter and thinking that there's a career here knowing that there is a career here you may not know exactly how it's GonNa shake shake out but there's a career here in their stuff for you to do here for the rest of your life As long as you're interested I pay a lot of respect to Amazon And it's refreshing for me to hear you do that because I think I'm care if it's a caravan. Rozan possesses a dollar that exists on the face of the earth. If they do good things. They should be acknowledged. I want to shift gears and I want to ask you. You know I would love to get your opinion especially somebody who got introduced to voice through Amazon and got in on that ground floor SORTA level. We're going through that again with what Samsung is doing Everything about Samsung's ecosystem and Google to for two different degree. Google is sort of in a different place where the ecosystem is more mature but the tools and the stuff in the ecosystem for developers has some more baking in the oven to do Samsung's out in front and they release a lot of developer tools. Light position. The question. This way tell me in your thought process your from your experience If you were talking to another developer. Who's coming out of school like you or looking to make a career change into voice. Tell tell me the differences from the depths the superstar Dev standpoint of these three voice ecosystems. And how they catered to developers so I would say like you said Amazon are the trailblazers. They're the ones that pay the way. For this whole new idea that you can get some sort of career voice so it's kind of you kind of WanNa let let like this. Samson is so fresh and new that a new people in town they that providing basically providing and trying to provide a best out the score that developers and for the people they want to make these boys experiences using the. I guess you can say the mistakes Amazon makes they can then turn those mistakes into like. We don't want to copy this when a copy that they have a chance to kind of help with maybe discovery which I feel as being a big problem live with a platform that's been oversaturated. With so many thousands of cat fact skills with something so I definitely think in a way. Sampson have that advantage to take you. Can you can bring in people to be like? Look you can make your voice experiences and we want to go straight to the top with making quality.

Amazon Samsung Alexa developer Alana Alexis Google England Nettie Shea Cambridge Bradley I- Cardi Twenty twenty High School WanNa Afri Daw mumps
How Bixby Premier Developer Ilarna Nche Got Into Voice

The VoiceFirst Roundtable

08:07 min | 10 months ago

How Bixby Premier Developer Ilarna Nche Got Into Voice

"I've I've always been someone who was introduced technology. We're offer late. I I think it's combining Kylie. Because when I was at school they would. They wouldn't really introduce technology. Ict would be very very simple basic excel sheets and power points. And it wasn't until I was in sixth form which is like I think. High School for you guys About sixteen seventeen years old when I was introduced to a computer science as a whole and that Brady opened my eyes to various ways of communicating with technology and I fell in love with programming. And that's when I kind of realized that. Wow I can make a website amend. I went to university and I could do mobile apps and it was kind of at university. That's when I wanted to learn more about this whole world of technology and that's when I discovered the Alexis personally because they if that's an advert on the TV added it was this Little Echo added. You could say hello. You could speak back to you and not really amazed me. It wasn't really about voice. It was about the device that there was this device. That could talk to you because obviously we have assistance on but something about the the device really Mesh It was just really mesmerizing. Because I have that on in the kitchen living room and I fought a great present to give to my mom so for Christmas I got her that device and then I found out later on because all these APPs on there and I remember suss out replayed was a skill cold beat the trump and my mom got the skill cooled off things like boyfriend skill. Elect talking back to you AD. I was really amazed at these skills. One actually on the device already these were made by third party developers and I beat it. They wanted to be a part of that because I was like. This is so cool. I thinking what attracted to me as well with that with mobile apps you have to think about visuals and design whereas with voice you still have to focus on design for voice. Bought the visuals which was a big obstacle for me in the boss. Wasn't that so that immediately attracted me to start digging in and watching on this APP and I made my my my first voice skill called odds on which really simple it was mentioned this game where you would say one two three men say not the number and if you matched with Alexa you could bend do like a day or something That was that you didn't want to do so that I think we'll also helped with the documentation that the Amazon team provided in the first place because without that I really think that it would have hinted on the process of how far I go because they were so help me. Understand my oldest. I can do this. Because I had Zimmer experienced invoice technology I'd zero experience in some like Python Python experience but I didn't know how to with like sdk's or the cloud aws cloud so I had zero experience and just brew this voice industry. I've just not so much I've gained a lot of skills out and it's definitely helped me to get to where I am now. I learned more more software integrations and before so this was during university by the way so hadn't even graduated yet but I started making more and more skills and I kind of wasn't that mindset of I want the Swag I want the slack gave you so every month they had they would like have a free Hoodie. Have Afri Daw at acclimated like ten echo dots for the promotions and then when I got the rewards email the Alexa rewards. Email us when it was like. Oh so this could potential here for getting money with this. It's not just something to get cool goodies. So that was another motivation. Always like okay because I was in my final year university. I didn't know what I wanted to go down to whether it be web development will member applications and then oversee voice was another another game player and I think out of order. They're not score Interested in most so when I released the adventures which is something I'd made when I was eleven years old and for some reason I never put it on new cheap because these audio adventures and I thought I could be a perfect platform to put on because it was fairly new and this was before they accepted children skills so I got an email from them saying than allowed to do that yet but as soon as they allowed children's skills to go through. I was right in that put it. I put it on the platform and entered this competition that they set up the kids and because I was one of the winners I managed to basically use the winnings from that competition to really focus for a year after graduating on just focusing on voice of making legit apps so that whole year which was lost like last June of last year making voice applications and then I go introduce to Sam some bixby as well. Add again another interface with try which opened up my world voice and another platform which I had to learn about and understand how everything works and then towards the end of the year started working with matchbox who again our company that have made questioned the day which again I foot was one of those bus party. Invocation skills the electorate us but now it was made by by them and one of the big skills that are being used right now to be able to to be with a company that has so many amazing skills and applications are now on not just. Alexa Samsung and Google. It just shows how this is the start of a voice. This is not this is something that's just started and I feel like the training took the training wheels come off now for a lot of developers are starting to get down and get used to the whole voice industry and how it's going to operate in a few times so just getting to this. This pot has really. I guess especially with this year and how it's gone I think voices something that can really accelerate and probably has given people more of more trustworthy made them more trustworthy of technology. I feel like before people were very very reluctant to use technology. But now in this day and age it's made more open and actually Allows them to seeing the positives and I really do think that I think a lot of tweets of About people who are more welcoming having Alexis? Herman not worried about the privacy and I could see that this definitely. With the usage that people have seen with their applications voices Stephania forefront to. What's to come the future mumps as

Alexa Alexis Afri Daw High School Mumps Stephania Zimmer Herman Brady Matchbox Amazon SAM Google Samsung Bixby
"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"With people trying to discover us also I wanna thank our sponsor of the voice podcast Samsung. Yes. A big logo brand once you all to know that they support independent media like voice about podcast, and that they're focused on serving the voice developer community. So Samsung sells a lot of smartphones. It's typically their first or second globally, in the number of smartphones sold. It is number one in smart TVs, and many plants categories. It is in the top two or three and it has the spark things I t who system. So all this translates into about five hundred million devices, the company sells annually that will be smart starting at twenty twenty it will ship hundreds of millions of smart devices this year, but. One half a billion in twenty twenty and beyond and all of them will have BIC speed voice assistant onboard. So Bixby Samsung's rival to election Google system. And after they updated technology last summer, it's starting to get a lot of positive consumer momentum next up for them is supporting a new developer ecosystem Samsung recently announced the Bixby premier developer program. If you have experience in developing voice apps apply, and I'm told you will have access to complimentary devices and drek support from the Bixby teams over his la- labs in prominent positioning in for your Bixby voice app. They're called capsules in the forthcoming marketplace. I think you're also going to get help potentially directly from Adam chyers, the founder of both Siri and labs, which became Bixby. So check out the show notes today and apply. It's the Bixby premier developer program. There is an application prop process. I know many people wish now they'd gotten in on early Alexa. Google assistant, but miss the formative days on those platforms. Bixby has a big platform, and you can get in early because they're really just building their developer community. So check that out. Many thanks to Samsung for supporting independent media like voice about podcast. Also, if you ought to become a sponsor of podcast, semi tweet, apper can Sela Twitter or you can reach out directly Brett voiced by that we are looking for people who want to support the work that we do here, so that we can bring you these great informative interviews every week. All right now to this week show it's all about sounded branding. Listen up. Okay. Voice nation..

Bixby Samsung developer Google Alexa la Adam chyers twenty twenty Brett Siri founder
"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"A new developer ecosystem Samsung recently announced the Bixby premier developer program. If you have experience in developing voice apps apply, and I'm told you will have access to complimentary devices and direct support from the big teams over his labs in prominent positioning in for your Bixby voice app. They're called capsules in the forthcoming marketplace. I think you're also going to get help potentially directly from Adam chyers, the founder of both Siri and labs, which became Bixby. So check out the show notes today and apply. It's the Bixby premier developer program. There is an application prop process. I know many people wish now they'd gotten in on early Alexa. Google assistant, but miss the formative days on those platforms. Bixby has a big platform, and you can get in early because they're really just building their developer community. So check that out. Many thanks to Samsung for supporting independent media like voice about podcast. Also, if you ought to become a sponsor of podcast, semi tweet, apper can Sela Twitter or you can reach out directly Brett voiced by that we are looking for people who want to support the work that we do here, so that we can bring you these great informative interviews every week. All right now to this week show it's all about sounded branding, listen up. Okay. Voice about nation. I have a special guest today. Audrey are beanie is an EMMY award winning executive producer and creative director that also happens to be the founder of audio brain a leading sonic branding agency. I think I'll call deleting sonic branding agency and, and challenge. Anybody to come up with a competitor that matches what they've done? I think you'll be clear to you after we get through today's discussion. How much background and experiences group has so sonic branding. That's brand strategy and production based on sound. And for those of you not familiar with his territory something around the long lines of sonic branding audio brain does is strategy original compositions sound design, audio identities on the look music supervision, licensing research, and usability voice casting..

Bixby developer Samsung founder EMMY award Alexa Google Adam chyers Siri Brett Audrey executive producer director
"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Learn how you make decisions over time to help shorten user experience in certain cases and things like understanding preferences and all that's all that's been made available to developers as well. Now, they're ways to set preferences proactively for users, or is that all just divined by the system while I think it software. So when you implement something you, can, you can pretty much code anything you want in there. But the but the preference learning feature is something that the system does on its own, and as a developer, you really don't need to do much to enable it, you really have to. To do a small annotation in your model on, on a property and the system, just picks up. Right. So if you're building capsule are there, any specific personalization, tools, you have at your disposal? Or do you leave that to? The Bixby system to figure that out for you. Well, there, there's two types of personalization technologies that you have direct access to as developer one. We call selection learning and the second call preference. Darning selection learning allows you to do things like provide the system with essentially things that feel like rules that it can learn on, so that you can teach the system, how to make decisions and it will learn which of the rules to trust. So, for example, it's kind of like the developer, adding hypotheses in the system will validate through through user interaction. So the effect on the user is something like this. So let's say, let's say, I take a lifter Hoover to the train station every morning, and I use Bixby to, to book that are, so if I say something like get me ride to the train station, the first few times, it'll ask me what type of ride, do you want? Do you want the taxi? Do you want the? Cheapo on do you want to, you know the expensive one. And let's say I always say the cheap one in the morning during the week after a few times using this slurring feature. It'll just stop asking me, it will automatically choose the cheap ones, but it's sensitive to time in location. So in this case, it can learn that during the week, I pick the cheap car, but on the weekends I might choose the more expensive one on Saturday nights, and the system will will adapt to those differences. Interesting now, if the developers suggests a rule around personalization in turns out to the system determines that that's not a popular or that's not a great user experience is based on user interactions. How does that does that rule just getting Noord or does, this is the that's all kind of internal the technology you mentioned a moment ago? This concept of one assistant Adam dog everyone talks about this frequently. And this is a great sort of macro concept going on in the market today. So there are many assistance out there today. There's no question about it. Jeff Bezos very famously said in the spring of twenty sixteen around the time that about is actually one month after diagnose presentation that, there would be many assistance, and that they would have all sorts of different functions in our lives. And that won't be a problem because people are used to that. So two things. One is the, the November formal launch of, of Bixby developer tools. The one assistant was was clearly a core. Part of the messaging Bixby is coming into a market, where a lot of consumers have already adopted devices, have some experience with other assistance. So because you're coming in afterwards becoming the one assistant might be that much harder. Because some experience in loyalties already been built up. What is when you say, one assistant, what do you mean do you really mean? Like only one assistant or only one assistant per certain type of context because that would if it's only one assistant, that would be saying, okay, adopt XP and get rid of everything else. And there's a few ways to interpret one assistant, and I think certainly in just in the market. It's as somebody who's been working in this almost ten years now. It's hard to imagine I think probably for atom. It's even harder to magic because he's been doing this stuff for over twenty years now twenty five years, but I still do believe it's early days in these assistant worse and just the notion of products coming to market. So I do I do think that, you know, things will change over time. But if you think about one assistant another way to interpret it is just around around the user experience and having a natural conversation. Right. So if you think about it with some products out there you. You need to kind of keep the name of all the services up in your head. Right. So you need to say something that sounds kinda like open at seven do command ex and I think for users that just adds a bit of cognitive burden. I can only keep a few of those things up my head right. My fingertips kind of it's kind of, like advocacy great. I end up using only the apps that are on, on the, the first screen on my phone these days. And so one way, interpret one assistant is that you, you want to really create an prioritize the idea of, of natural language. Right. So rather than having to say something like open app, seven do command X, maybe I can just say, do command ex and through personalization and other techniques. The user gets the service, they want and accomplishes the task look into complete. And so over time you'll see with Vicky platform of real focus on. Literal anger, instead of having to invoke services specifically by name. And that'll that'll roll out that roll out over time as the as the product starts mature, so you're not necessarily saying that there won't be other assistants like people might have certain assistant for things that they do, maybe certain devices or contacts, and that might be different from their primary system. Well, I think like any other like any other product or platform, there's multiple platforms out there, there's user choice. And, you know, sometimes people have, you know, phones, different phones that run different operating systems, and that's still true with every new paradigm and years ago, I had a windows computer within rent explorer in also had a MAC with with safari on it. And so I think that's true than a new platform. So I like to focus this concept of one assistant on, on the user experience of having this ability to use natural language, and then also some consistency in what you get back. From from these capsules. Right. So having a really strong set of design, principles and around user experience, that you can share it, developers codify into the system so that when eases one service at a second, they'll be familiar with it similar to like, you know, when you get used to your phone, and you go in from one app to the next, you, you can kind of Intuit, how use the application designed guidelines will be consistent and into this is this is important in particular, this concept because Samsung has such a broad portfolio. You mentioned that earlier in terms of devices was announced last fall that by the end of twenty twenty Bixby will be integrated into five hundred million devices sold annually. So to get to that billion device number very quickly won't take long. It's in fact, you'll get there very quickly anyway, updating the existing Samsung galaxy phones, no phones, but as you think about all these different contexts do, essentially have a baseline Bixby that it it's got the certain features and capabilities in method of interaction that's consistent and then you do optimizations by surface, or is that not necessary. Right. Because the dishwasher, the refrigerator the smart TV the phone, the car. They're all very different terms of context threat. So when you're is a product manager, how does Bixby manifest itself as it just like the idea that you're building one thing, and it's gotta be adjustable everywhere, or do you do these, like, sub op do these small applications, as, as you know, you're going into a new surface, I think what you learn from different devices is, for example. You know there are devices with screens that you can touch in their devices screens that you can't touch and their devices. No screens, and it's really hard to try to build. Let's say a one size fits all experience because you're gonna go some often on one of those or a number of those. So I think you have to look at the problem by the, by the device are by the type of device, the class device, and try to figure out what's optimal, and then try to get try to get as close to that optimum experiences possible. But also try to try to make it easy for developers. So one, one thing we're doing which developers will will see in the documentation is this product Bixby views. And it's a set of API's around creating visual experiences in Bixby, and there's like a pallet of components that you can use to, to construct layouts, and the great thing about it is, if I build something. Layout, with Bixby views for the phone. And then I go to another device. Let's say I want to target my capsule for another device type it will automatically reposition or auto layout, these view, so that it will provide a reasonable basic spirits on that second device, and as developer, I can always go in and customize it and I can tweak things on a per device basis, but we're, we're gonna excel at you by automatically giving you something that will that will be reasonable to start. Just so I make sure I understand what you said, see if this base lay out, let's say designed for the phone because Bixby launched with a multi modal in face initially, right? So you have that. And then if it's being accessed through smart TV for example, you create basically, in auto translation to that different screen type. Yes. So maybe like, what is a photo gallery looked like on a phone and that the team our team defines that and then they'll also defined what is a photo gallery look like on TV, for example. And we define that as the same component with the same API and it's just whether your viewing on, on a on a phone or a TV you get the different rendering, but we give all the control we give all the controller developers. Fair enough. Okay. So. One of the things I think it's sort of easy to be critical of in terms of apple is they've really kept developers out of using Siri. There's certain ten domains are gonna expanded June, but they didn't really they've got a really robust IOS developer ecosystem, but they really didn't open Siri up to that until a couple years ago in may was very limited. One of the things I think it's come from that some of the some of the momentum behind Alexa, and Google assistant. Is that these robust developer ecosystems are really important. And I can see that sort of pre those, those examples docking atom the other founders had that vision from the start for. So how do you see this playing out, going forward in terms of developing the developer ecosystem and what role it's gonna play. So one of the one of the things like to say is that we don't we don't think that Samsung, we don't think that we're going to build the world's best assistant. We want the world. Developers to build the best assistant, and that's the philosophy. So everything we're doing is, is being being approached from the perspective of how can we make this possible for developers? How can we give developers creative control over the experience? And how can we try to open up as much as possible to let that creativity in, and if you think about it back when mobile is just getting started? You saw Android. You saw IOS come out these, these ecosystems started with just a few a few applications shipping on on those phones, and it didn't change the world until the, the case came out. It didn't change the world until the developer platforms came out and developers could essentially harness these devices and delivered deliver their services through this new channel. And that's what we're trying to do with Bixby create that new channel for developers. Okay. So let's let's talk about. Sort of the most recent announcement, you Lou to at the beginning. So what are the key components of the Bixby premier developer program in what, what qualifies someone is a developer today to be part of that? Sure, so what we're looking at is you can go onto the onto the website, developer website, and you can apply to this premier developer program, and we will select developers to participate in marine looking for developers..

developer Bixby Samsung twenty twenty Bixby Cheapo Jeff Bezos Intuit Adam Vicky Lou apple Alexa product manager
"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

15:09 min | 1 year ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"They help defray the costs. And so it's always great that we're able to give them that. Shoutout. In recognize them for the support of what we're doing here now to this week's interview, Marco of vivid labs in Samsung Bixby, okay? My guest today is Marco Kono. He's the COO and head of product at vivid labs. And VP of mobile are India Samsung, now, vivid labs is the Samsung acquisition that gave us Bixby to Dotto that was introduced last summer with the galaxy note nine launch which many of the listeners here voiced by podcast will be familiar with Markelle was previously, a product manager for Syria. Apple for Iowa's car play apple watch all relevant to what he's doing today into the types of conversations. We have each week on the podcast. Really excited to get Marco's perspective on how the voice assistant world has evolved over last few years. Marco was previously, a product manager or excuse me. He was previously worked at P WC, and he started out of school is a job engineer. It Dulcie here in his Bs in computer science from Syracuse university in his currently a member of the advisory board for the department of electrical engineering, there, Marco Iacono, welcome to the voice by podcast. Brett, thanks for having me thrilled. The hab. This is pretty timely to we talk about expe- quite a bit on on the podcast. But not that often because it's sort of a newer entrant in the field, I had Ataman last fall will put that in the show, notes people wanna listen to Adam Shire, who's one of the founders of they've and Siri before that, but was really interesting talking to you for couple of reasons. One is. As you just launch the Bixby premier developer program. You've got a bunch of sessions coming up over the summer slake, sort of the long-awaited, Bixby, momentum introduction, building out, the Debbie go system is finally here. Yet, we're just getting that going, you'll see a lot more about that over the summer and yet, we've got the people developer program just getting up running. Now, we wanna we wanna make sure that the best voice, developers out there are on the platform early. So we're doing something a bit special for them. So if your voice Felber out there that's been working with other platforms, and you've got a really highly rated voice application. We're gonna do a little bit more few, we wanna we wanna be able to feature some of those developers in the store when it comes out. We also want to give a little bit of extra support some white glove. Evangelist support to those developers, and we're also going to be giving loner devices to developers. We know sometimes it's, it's tough to get to. Get your hands on devices so will be, we'll be working with developers on those three areas. That's great. And so we'll consider a little bit of teas. We'll go into that in more detail a little bit later, 'cause they do wanna start back to give the listener some context about where you come from. Sure. So you started out in ceus and your job developer early on. So what were you doing? Then in how does that influence the way you think about the voice assistant landscape today? Also, it's kind of funny. I, I started out getting into computer science and data by mowing lawns, actually. So I think I was twelve or thirteen and I was mowing my neighbor's lawn every Saturday. And it turns out he was a professor at a local university in computer science and also one of the world's I'd say best data models that was doing a lot of work with oracle at the time Matt consulting firm that I ended up interning for for longtime all the way through college started pretty young. So one day, I think he, he needed extra hand. And, you know, asked me, if I'd come in and help, build, some, some screens in oracle forms. That was my first introduction and really got the ball rolling for me. And then after that, it just kinda lead into focusing on computer science as undergraduate and then than after college working in measure consulting for about nine years and doing doing big data work before it was really called big data. So a lot of lot of analytics tactical software development, things like that. Right, right. Well, let's, let's go back to the lawn mowing story. So it wasn't like you had a big lawn mowing business. And you were trying to buys the number of times you were cutting the lawn. This was just serendipity you happen to be cutting along for a neighbor, and he just had this, this type of role that, you know, had some influence on where you took your life really, really is certain tippety, and allot to that guy spent a lot of time with me show me, the ropes teaching me, how to code. I even sat in on on his classes when I was about fifteen or fourteen go over to to the university. He taught at evening database class on Tuesday nights, I go over there after wrestling practice and sit in listen into his lecture. Okay. So what university was he was teaching at writer university down in Lawrenceville. New Jersey time absolutely in. So, so you you're in high school. You're on the wrestling team you finish up and practice you price stink. Did you shower first? Of course, you gotta shower you showered and then you went to basically audit, a college class essentially did all that did all the work and didn't get a great. But what were you what type of sheen, where you working on these days, I think back, then I had a sixty six megahertz Pentium with a gateway machine. And I think it had sixteen megs of ram which we paid any normal amount for because at that time, there is a silicon crisis and the prices for Rams shot up astronomically. It was certainly top end at the time. All right. So your introduction programming is oracle forms, and then you learn other things you learn database side. Your job, developer you work at PW. See we we're gonna big systems in those days. So what we were doing was essentially going in helping companies that were involved in regulatory issues. So we would go in and get access to data in their systems. Huge volumes were talking about millions tens of millions of records, things like that. And then we would perform some data analysis to try to find issues, things like that for the businesses. And so that led into using live statistical modeling and a lot of rule vase techniques doing risk analysis really got deep into data. Analytics for for good longtime there. It is interesting. We went through that area of big data in. That's totally been subsumed with the new jargon. But a lot of it's the same we have new models. But I. I assume that that background that you had in, in data modeling data analysis has been useful as you move forward in your career into the voice base. Sure, I think anytime you, you work in a technical field, or you essentially, get a degree like computer science degree. It just kinda rewires your brain a little bit. So I think that sets you up nicely to attack technology problems. Even if you're not at the keyboard coating it leads you to relate to the engineers, a lot more and get deepening discussions yet. So is there anything in particular, that you think you took from PW? See that really influences the way that you think about product management of today, a little bit. Yeah. Towards the end of my time, view see I started working on building a new business with a couple of folks there, and we were doing a lot of user experience research focusing on customer experience and design. King, and that really gave me a early in deep appreciation for thinking about user centered products, and making sure that you're, you're measuring the customer experience thing. Another another introduction to that had at PBC was there is a huge push for everybody wanted to do six sigma process, improvement fact. Absolutely. But when it comes down to it, it's really just problem, solving, and you see the same techniques. I think in six medic the stages. It's demet. Eric, define measure, analyze improving control, but it's really the same process that you see repeated in design thinking and other areas. So it gives you a gives you a nice basis for how to attack a problem create a problem statement in and, you know, think about things with metrics data so many of these frameworks are essentially just repackaged for new new coaches do audiences. What's old is new again. It's right. Or is one of the famous, TED talks is everything's derivative. Right. Right. So, so okay, so that's great design, thinking very useful for in user experience, very useful for the voice base. You've got the data side, very important, obviously, from a voice assistant standpoint because of the way that they're used in in optimized. So European of you see how did you wind up at apple on the series team? So it was actually pretty fortunate. I had it actually been thinking about making a change specifically working out in Silicon Valley for a little while and than the financial crisis hit. So I think everybody at that time hunkered down, but coming through that towards the end of twenty ten an old colleague from WC had moved over to, to apple and was was working on the ipad project at the time the unreleased ipad and she heard about the Syriac. Mission and knew that they were up to something pretty deep there. And she reached out to me thought, I would find it interesting. I'd already been using the Syria. -plication was fascinated by it or you were. You were using it on the is the mobile app. Yeah, yeah, I tried it a bunch of times. I think I think at first, you, you look at it like a novelty, like, how does this even houses even possible, but, but it became evident to me that this was going to be important. And then just again, another serendipity kind of thing I was invited out to Tino to meet some of the folks in the team met Adam meant few others and a few weeks later, I was quitting my job and packing things up to move out west, where we living at the time I was in New York City for about nine years Dada in, so I don't want to sort of lose that train of thought just a moment ago. So could you explain what the capabilities of the initial Serey app where this is pre? Acquisition before was embedded in Iowa's. What could it do so before before the acquisition? The advocation was a lot more focused on doing and working with web services as I recall. So you could book table, reservations, and buy movie tickets. You know, a lot of a lot of linkages with with third-party API's the do engine the do engine. That's right. So it could recognize speech, but it was really much more this transactional, get things done type tool. Yeah, it was really focused on service orchestration. And if you ever talked to Adam, Adam chair, you'll know that he's had a really long history working with this notion of assistant, and even from early in his in his career at Serai when he was doing some research on this. He always thought about the problem as coordinating services. Not really having all the data having all the information, but coordinate. Eating this assistant that would go out and get it for you from from various sources and do things on your behalf. So you can really see that in, in the early version of Siri. Absolutely. Okay. So you're in Cupertino you are offered a job. You join the team what were you doing it on the Siri team apple? So I joined as one of the early engineering project managers working on on Siri not the time there. It was just me and my boss. And we were cutting getting working with all the different engineering teams design team marketing up and down just getting everything defined in ready. Ready to launch later. Twenty seven. Okay. So yeah, so you joined what ten months before the launch. Yeah. I think about. Yeah. Just about ten months before the launch. Okay. So I think of serious sort of the first modern voice assistant, you know, is, is manifested through through s. You guys are writing new playbook for launching this. So what, what did it look like preparing for launch of voices system in that in that time when there wasn't really a playbook yet while it was it was very exciting. I'll say I think you're right. It's serious, really the first time that people in the world got to use this kind of technology at scale, and it was one of the first services back, then, that was such a real time service that required such huge scale on infrastructure side, and it was a completely different interface. So worked with ton of just amazing smart people over there, just thinking about user experience, and, and how, how could you take this kind of technology and deliver in a way that made sense to somebody wanted to use the phone? We'll, so let's talk about infrastructure. One of the things remember the information wrote about last year. Was that the volumes of, of serious when? When it first launched were much higher than maybe the team hidden -ticipant in. So then there was like the scrambled to create a more scalable infrastructure as a lot of people forget, this was before, we had sort of elastic computing everywhere. Is that true in like how much of the time got sucked up into just focusing on scale ability? I mean, I think whenever you launch service you run into run into unanticipated things. But I think the at the time everybody worked through I don't think anybody thought it would go as viral as it did, as, as quickly as it did it just it spike. I remember we would other set of commercials that came out when the product launched, and whenever those commercials would air we would see enormous spikes in traffic almost like people were. I would imagine people sitting in front of their TV with their phone, they'd see the see the commercial and they pick up the phone and try the exact same thing. Absolutely everybody. In the entire the entire country. So I still don't think that problem is is solved for any service today. If you get that much traffic insane time, the other that peak volume problem and people forget about the idea that particularly company, the scale of apple or Samsung for that matter of the big marketing budgets, can run a lot of commercials. And these are devices that are with you all the time..

developer Apple Samsung Siri Bixby Marco apple Iowa Marco Kono product manager Adam Brett engineer Marco Iacono oracle Syracuse university Rams Ataman
"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Learn how you make decisions over time to help shorten user experience in certain cases and things like understanding preferences and all that's all that's been made available to developers as well. Now, they're ways to set preferences proactively for users, or is that all just divined by the system while I think it software. So when you implement something you, can, you can pretty much code anything you want in there. But the but the preference learning feature is something that the system does on its own, and as a developer, you really don't need to do much to enable it, you really have to. To do a small annotation in your model on, on a property and the system, just picks up. Right. So if you're building capsule are there, any specific personalization, tools, you have at your disposal? Or do you leave that to? The Bixby system to figure that out for you. Well, there, there's two types of personalization technologies that you have direct access to as developer one we call selection learning and the second called preference. Darning selection learning allows you to do things like provide the system with essentially things that feel like rules that it can learn on, so that you can teach the system, how to make decisions and it will learn which of the rules to trust. So, for example, it's kind of like the developer, adding hypotheses in the system will validate through through user interaction. So the effect on the user is something like this. So let's say let's say I take a lift or Hoover to the train station every morning, and I use Bixby to, to book that are, so if I say something like get me ride to the train station, the first few times, it'll ask me what type of ride, do you want? Do you want the taxi? Do you want the? Cheapo on do you want to, you know the expensive one and let's say I always say the cheap one in the morning during the week after a few times using this selection feature. It'll just stop asking me, it will automatically choose the cheap ones, but it's sensitive to time in location. So in this case, it can learn that during the week, I pick the cheap car, but on the weekends I might choose the more expensive one on Saturday nights, and the system will will adapt to those differences. Interesting now, if the developers suggests a rule around personalization in turns out to the system determines that that's not a popular are. That's not a great user experience is based on user interactions. How does that does that rule just getting Nord? Or does this is this? That's all kind of internal technology. You mentioned a moment ago. This concept of one assistant Adam dog everyone talks about this frequently. And this is a great sort of macro concept going on in the market today. So there are many assistance out there today. There's no question about it. Jeff Bezos very famously said in the spring of twenty sixteen around the time that about is actually one month after diagnose presentation that, there would be many assistance, and that they would have all sorts of different functions in our lives. And that won't be a problem because people are used to that. So two things. One is the, the November formal launch of, of Bixby developer tools. The one assistant was was clearly a core. Part of the messaging Bixby is coming into a market, where a lot of consumers have already adopted devices, have some experience with other assistance. So because you're coming in afterwards becoming the one assistant might be that much harder. Because some experience in loyalties already been built up. What is when you say, one assistant, what do you mean do you really mean? Like only one assistant or only one assistant per certain type of context because that would if it's only one assistant, that would be saying, okay, adopt XP and get rid of everything else. And there's a few ways to interpret one assistant, and I think, certainly in just in the market, it's as somebody who's been working in this almost ten years now. It's hard to imagine, and I think probably for atom it's even harder to magic because he's been doing this stuff for over twenty years now twenty five years, but I still do believe it's early days in these assistant worse and just the notion of products coming to market. So I do I do think that things will change over time. But if you think about one assistant another way to interpret it is just around around the user experience and having a natural conversation. Right. So if you think about it with some products out there you. You need to kind of keep the name of all the services up in your head. Right. So you need to say something that sounds kinda like open at seven do command ex. And I think for users that just adds a, a bit of cognitive burden. I can only keep a few of those things up my head right. My fingertips kind of it's kind of, like advocacy great. I end up using only the apps that are on, on the, the first screen on my phone these days. And so one way, interpret one assistant is that you, you want to really create an prioritize the idea of, of natural language. Right. So rather than hanging to say something like open app, seven do command X, maybe I can just say, do command ex and through personalization and other techniques. The user gets the service, they want and accomplishes the task look into complete. And so over time you'll see with the platform of real focus on. Literal anger, instead of having to invoke services specifically by name. And that'll that'll roll out that roll out over time as the as the product starts mature, so you're not necessarily saying that there won't be other assistance like people might have certain assistant for things that they do, maybe certain devices or contacts, and that might be different from their primary system. Well, I think like any other like any other product or platform, there's multiple platforms out there, there's user choice. And, you know, sometimes people have, you know, phones, different phones that run different operating systems, and that's still true with every new paradigm and years ago. I had a windows computer within rent explorer in outside a MAC with with safari on it. And so I think that's true than a new platform. So I like to focus this concept of one assistant on, on the user experience of having this ability to use natural language, and then also some consistency in what you get back. From from these capsules. Right. So having a really strong set of design, principles and around user experience, that you can share it, developers codify into the system so that when eases one service at a second, they'll be familiar with it similar to like, you know, when you get used to your phone, and you go in from one app to the next, you, you can kind of Intuit how, how to use the application designed guidelines will be consistent and into this is this is important in particular, this concept because Samsung has such a broad portfolio. You mentioned that earlier in terms of devices was announced last fall that by the end of twenty twenty Bixby will be integrated into five hundred million devices sold annually. So to get to that billion device number very quickly won't take long. It's in fact, you'll get there very quickly anyway, updating the existing Samsung galaxy phones, no phones, but as you think about all these different contexts do, essentially have a baseline Bixby that it it's got these certain features capabilities in method of interaction that's consistent. And then you do optimizations by surface, or is that not necessary? Right. Because the dishwasher, the refrigerator the smart TV the phone, the car. They're all very different terms of context threat. So when you're is a product manager, how does Bixby manifest itself as it just like the idea that you're building one thing, and it's gotta be adjustable everywhere, or do you do these, like, sub op do these small applications, as, as you know, you're going into a new surface, what you learn from different devices is, for example. There are devices with screens that you can touch in their devices screens that you can't touch and their devices. No screens, and it's really hard to try to build. Let's say a one size fits all experience because you're gonna go some often on one of those or a number of those. So I think you have to look at the problem by the, by the device are by the type of device, the class device, and try to figure out what's optimal, and then try to get try to get as close to that optimum experience possible. But also try to try to make it easy for developers. So one, one thing we're doing which developers will will see in the documentation is this product Bixby views. And it's a set of API's around creating visual experiences in Bixby, and there's like a pallet of components that you can use to, to construct layouts, and the great thing about it is, if I build something. Layout, with Bixby views for the phone. And then I go to another device. Let's say I want to target my capsule for another device type. It will automatically reposition or auto layout, these views so that it will provide a reasonable basic spurious on that second device. And as developer I can always go in and customize it and I can tweak things on a per device basis, but we're, we're gonna excel at you by automatically giving you something that will that will be reasonable to start. Just so I make sure I understand what you said, see if this base lay out, let's say designed for the phone because Bixby launched with a multi modal in face initially, right? So you have that. And then if it's being accessed through smart TV for example, you create basically, in auto translation to that different screen type. Yes. So maybe like, what is a photo gallery looked like on a phone and that the team our team defines that and then they'll also defined what is a photo gallery look like on TV, for example. And we define that as the same component with the same API and it's just whether your viewing on, on a on a phone or TV you get the different rendering. But we give all the control we give all the controller developers. Fair enough. Okay. So. One of the things I think it's sort of easy to be critical of in terms of apple is they've really kept developers out of using Siri. There's certain ten domains are gonna expanded June, but they didn't really they've got a really robust IOS developer ecosystem, but they really didn't open Siri up to that until a couple years ago in may was very limited. One of the things I think it's come from that some of the some of the momentum behind Alexa, Google assistant is that these robust developers Koh systems are really important. And I can see that sort of pre those, those examples docking atom the other founders had that vision from the start for. So how do you see this playing out, going forward in terms of developing the developer ecosystem and what role it's gonna play. So one of the one of the things like to say is that we don't we don't think that Samsung, we don't think that we're going to build the world's best assistant. We want the world. Developers to build the best assistant, and that's the philosophy. So everything we're doing is, is being being approached from the perspective of how can we make this possible for developers? How can we give developers creative control over the experience? And how can we try to open up as much as possible to let that creativity in, and if you think about it back when mobile is just getting started? You saw Android. You saw IS come out these, these ecosystems started with just a few a few applications shipping on on those phones, and it didn't change the world until the, the ST came out. It didn't change the world until the developer platforms came out and developers could essentially harness these devices and delivered deliver their services through this new channel. And that's what we're trying to do with Bixby create that new channel for developers. Okay. So let's let's talk about. Sort of the most recent nouncement you Lou to at the beginning. So what are the key components of the Bixby premier developer program in what, what qualifies someone is a developer today to be part of that? Sure, so what we're looking at is you can go onto the onto the website, developer website, and you can apply to this premier developer program, and we will select developers to participate in marine looking for developers..

developer Bixby twenty twenty Bixby Samsung Cheapo Jeff Bezos Intuit Adam Lou apple Alexa product manager
"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

14:44 min | 1 year ago

"bixby premier" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"They help defray the costs. And so it's always great that we're able to give them that. Shoutout. In recognize them for the support of what we're doing here now to this week's interview, Marco of vivid labs in Samsung Bixby, okay? My guest today is Marco Kono. He's the COO and head of product at vivid labs. And VP of mobile are indeed Samsung, now, vivid labs is the Samsung acquisition that gave us Bixby to Dotto that was introduced last summer with the galaxy note nine launch which many of the listeners here voiced by podcast will be familiar with Martha was previously, a product manager for Syria. Apple for IOS car play apple watch all relevant to what he's doing today into the types of conversations we have each week on the podcast really excited to get Marco's perspective. And how the voice assistant world has evolved over last few years. Marco was previously, a product manager or excuse me, used previously worked at P WC, and he started out of school is job, engineer, it Dulcie here in his BS in computer science from Syracuse university in his currently a member of the advisory board for the department of electrical engineering, there, Marco Iacono, welcome to the voice by podcast. Hey Brett, thanks for having me thrilled. The hab. This is pretty timely to we talk about expe- quite a bit on on the podcast. But not that often because it's sort of a newer entrant in the field, I had Ataman last fall will put that in the show, notes people wanna listen to Adam Shire, who's one of the founders of they've and Siri before that, but was really interesting talking to you for couple of reasons. One is. As you just launch the Bixby premier developer program. You've got a bunch of sessions coming up over the summer slake, sort of the long-awaited, Bixby, momentum introduction, building out, the Debbie go system is finally here. Yet, we're just getting that going, you'll see a lot more about that over the summer and yet, we've got the premier developer program just getting up and running now, we wanna we wanna make sure that the best voice, developers out there are on the platform early. So we're doing something a bit special for them. So if your voice Felber out there that's been working with other platforms, and you've got a really highly rated voice application. We're gonna do a little bit more few, we wanna we wanna be able to feature some of those developers in the store when it comes out. We also want to give a little bit of extra support some white glove. Evangelist support to those developers, and we're also going to be giving loner devices to developers. We know sometimes it's, it's tough to get to. Get your hands on devices so will be will be working with developers on those Athar areas. That's great. And so we'll consider a little bit of teas. We'll go into that in more detail a little bit later, 'cause they do wanna start back to give the listener some context about where you come from. Sure. So you started out in CS and your job developer early on. So what were you doing? Then in how does that influence the way you think about the voice assistant landscape today? Also, it's kind of funny. I, I started out getting into computer science and data by mowing lawns, actually. So I think I was twelve or thirteen and I was mowing my neighbor's lawn every Saturday. And it turns out he was a professor at a local university in computer science and also one of the world's I'd say best data models that was doing a lot of work with oracle at the time Matt consulting firm that I ended up interning for for longtime all the way through college started pretty young. So one day, I think he, he needed extra hand. And, you know, asked me, if I'd come in and help, build, some, some screens in oracle forms. That was my first introduction and really got the ball rolling for me. And then after that, it just kinda lead into focusing on computer science as undergraduate and then than after college working in measurement consulting for about nine years and doing doing big data work before it was really called big data. So a lot of lot of analytics tactical software development, things like that. Right, right. Well, let's, let's go back to the lawn mowing story. So it wasn't like you had a big lawn mowing business. And you were trying to buys the number of times you were cutting the lawn. This was just serendipity you happen to be cutting along for a neighbor, and he just had this, this type of role that, you know, alternately had some influence on where you took your life really, really is certain tippety, and allot to that guy spent a lot of time with me show me, the ropes teaching me, how to code I even set in on, on his classes when I was about fifteen or fourteen go over to to the university. He taught at evening database class on Tuesday nights than over there after wrestling practice and sit in listen into his lecture. Okay. So what university was this? He was teaching at rider university down in Lawrenceville. New Jersey time absolutely in. So so you in high school you're on the wrestling team. You finish up breast practice. You price stink. Did you shower? I. Of course, you gotta shower you showered and then you went to basically audit, a college class essentially did all that did all the work and didn't get a great. Now. What were you what type of scene where you working on these days? I think back, then I had a sixty six megahertz Pentium with a gateway machine. And I think it had sixteen megs of ram which we paid any normal amount for because at that time, there is a silicon crisis and the prices for Rams shot up astronomically. It was certainly top end at the time. All right. So your introduction programming is oracle forms, and then you learn other things you learn database side. Your job, developer, you work appeared abuse, e we we're gonna big systems in those days. So what we were doing was essentially going in helping companies that were involved in regulatory issues. So we would go in and get access to data in their systems. Huge volumes were talking about millions tens of millions of records, things like that. And then we would perform some date analysis to try to find issues things like that for the businesses. And so that led into using live statistical modeling and a lot of rule vase techniques doing risk analysis really got deep into data. Analytics for for good longtime, there, yet is interesting. We went through that era of big data in. That's totally been subsumed with the new jargon. But a lot of it's the same, we have new models but. I assume that that background that you had in, in data modeling data analysis has been useful as you move forward in your career into the voice base. Sure, I think anytime you, you work in a technical field, or you essentially, get a degree like computer science degree. It just kinda rewires your brain a little bit. So I think that sets you up nicely to attack technology problems. Even if you're not at the keyboard coating it leads you to relate to the engineers, a lot more and get deepening discussions yet. So is there anything particular that you think you took from W? See that really influences the way that you think about product management of today, a little bit. Yeah. Towards the end of my time, PAC, I started working on building a new business with a couple of folks there, and we were doing user experience research focusing on customer experience and design. Cking, and that really gave me a early and deep appreciation for thinking about user centered products, and making sure that you're, you're measuring the customer experience thing. Another another introduction to that had PBC was there is a huge push for everybody wanted to do six sigma process improvement Baghdad. Absolutely. But when it comes down to it, it's really just problem, solving, and you see the same techniques. I think in six medic, the stages, it's Demet define measure, analyze improving control, but it's really the same process that you see repeated in design thinking and other areas. So it gives you a gives you a nice basis for how to attack problem create a problem statement in and, you know, think about things with metrics data so many of these frameworks are essentially just repackaged for new new protas do audiences. What's old is new again. That's right. Or is one of the famous, TED talks is everything's derivative. Right. Right. So, so okay, so that's great design, thinking very useful for in user experience, very useful for the voice base. You've got the data side, very important obviously, from avoi- system's standpoint because of the way that they're used in in optimized. So European of you see how did you wind up at apple on the series team? So it was actually pretty fortunate. I had actually been thinking about making a change specifically working out in Silicon Valley for a little while and then the financial crisis hit. So I think everybody at that time hunker down. But coming through that towards the end of twenty ten an old colleague from WC had moved over to, to apple and was was working on the ipad project at the time the unreleased ipad and she heard about the Syriac. Mission and knew that they were up to something pretty deep there. And she reached out to me thought, I would find it interesting. I'd already been using the Syria. -plication was fascinated by it or you were. You were using it on the is the mobile app. Yeah, yeah, I tried it a bunch of times. I think I think at first, you, you look at it like a novelty, like, how does this even houses even possible, but, but it became evident to me that this was going to be important. And then just again, another serendipity kind of thing I was invited out to Tino to meet some of the folks in the team met Adam meant few others and a few weeks later, I was quitting my job and packing things up to move out west, where we living at the time I was in New York City for about nine years 'Data in, so I don't want to sort of lose that train of thought just a moment ago. So could you explain what the capabilities of the initial Siri app were? This is pre. Acquisition before was embedded in Iowa's. What could it do so before before the acquisition? The application was a lot more focused on doing and working with web services, as I recall. So you could book table, reservations, and buy movie tickets. You know, a lot of a lot of linkages with with third-party API's the do engine the do engine. That's right. So it could recognize speech, but it was really much more this transactional, get things done type tool. Yeah, it was really focused on service orchestration. And if you ever talked to Adam, Adam chair, you'll know that he's had a really long history working with this notion of an assistant and even from early in his in his career at Serai when he was doing some research on this. He always thought about the problem as coordinating services. Not really having all the data having all the information, but coordinate. Eating this assistant that would go out and get it for you from from various sources and do things on your behalf. So you can really see that in, in the early version of Siri. Absolutely. Okay. So you're in Cupertino you are offered a job. You join the team what were you doing it on the Siri team at apple? So I joined as one of the early engineering project managers working on on Siri not the time there. It was just me and my boss. And we were cutting getting working with all the different engineering teams design team marketing up and down just getting everything defined in ready. Ready to launch later. Twenty seven. Okay..

Apple developer Siri Bixby Samsung Marco Marco Kono engineer Adam Marco Iacono product manager Brett wrestling Syracuse university Adam Shire Rams Ataman