29 Burst results for "Bishen"

"bishen" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

07:43 min | 2 months ago

"bishen" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"Where do you feel like you can make gains and where do you feel like you're being held back but you're not sure why? Because that was the theme with every single conversation I had last night. As they feel like there's more and they go to these events and they learn a lot of things and they went through a quest or they can't get themselves the finish raise your hand if you signed up for quest and put it off and procrastinate going through it. And so what what's what's what are the forces that are keeping you from making progress doing the things you know you should do because I don't know how many speakers need to say. To meditate or eat good foods good whole foods or to be able to move exercise but common sense is not common practice. So I, WANNA I wanNA give you the code that I believe really unlocks those things when I was going through my challenges and I believe that our struggles can become strengths that difficult times how many of you are facing some some adversity right now raise your hand, which is a commendable that you're here. That's why I feel like it's supposed to important this community. I'm always GONNA come back to community because that's one of the initiatives of mine. Valley is not only this this this radical evolution it's radical inclusion right that you're not here alone, and so part of this is getting inspiration instruction from each other because I find that for me people come to these events not only for the content but the incredible connections and shift in belief that somebody else in the room who's like them is making progress is sometimes more important than something speaker could say on stage is that fair? Now, here as you're thinking about the area that you feel like stuck for me, it was this label. When, when I was nine years old a teacher I was slowing down the class rate because I wasn't getting a lesson and. I could say what? What ended up happening you. You know that one of my teachers said you know that's the boy with a broken brain but I really feel like it wasn't coming from a a bad place. I think actually it was really good intention. It's because I started getting like a lot of negativity from my classmates towards me that I was holding back the class and may be made fun of. So I think the teacher was more coming to my defense maybe came out the wrong way but coming out saying that. Let's relax. Stop It. You know this this boy has some challenges right but that that. took out of it was completely different was label that I was broken, and so it's really hard to go out there and achieve something because every single time I didn't do well I would always go back to label to explain it because I'm the broken one. So that was my thing. So the first area that we need to address the first area that must for transformation to be taking place is this area of mindset. And Mindset I'm defining as what's possible in your life. Right think about the area. That you're not making progress in and mindset is the set of assumptions and attitudes. We have around something around how the world works. Especially in what we believe is possible. What we believe were capable of what we believe we deserve. You've heard me say this that we're not thermometers were thermostats. You know thermometer reacts to the environment a Thermostat sets it but you have an unconscious set of what you believe deserve in a relationship is fair and then your behavior will will set that. Will create that that level just like a thermostat will or how much you feel like you're worth in your in your job or your business. So for me, it was set at broken and that became a big challenge. Now when I went through this I, remember when I finally. Got Into College and I got into a local university because that's what I could qualify for and I thought I could make a fresh start because that's what I thought freshman meant and I took all these classes and I actually did worse and at this point I was like that's it. I can't I can't do this anymore it's been a decade and a half I work harder than everybody around me and it still it's just not for me because in the school system, the presupposition is ten percent people get as. Get Bs, and then everybody else the eighty percent you know they are failing in school as opposed to maybe the school failing them. Do you know what I mean and so it's not about how I learned in later on it's not how smart you are or how smart kids are. It's how are you smart and they're multiple forms of genius right. But at that time I didn't feel that. I. Didn't know that. So I wanted to quit school because honestly, I, didn't have the money to be there and so my friend. I told my parents said Hey why don't you come with me this weekend to visit my family gets some perspective. You know is a big decision right and how many of you notice that when you get perspective, you change people you change place gives you new point of view and you can look at it in different way for those of you have gone through Super Brain and and you learn about like. Six thinking hats and gives you permission to look at it from a logical standpoint and then emotional standpoint right and at critical. And then at a point at optimistic, what can go right? It's getting out of her own like habits of thinking. and. So I go there and the family is very well off. And the father walks me around his property before dinner and asked me a very innocent question, which is the worst question you could ask me. How school. and. All this pent up. Emotion. I, just star Bawling in front of this complete stranger and I tell my whole story and you know in all my stories about all the limits I have, and I always tell people if you fight for your limitations, you get to keep them right? If you're always saying I have a horrible memory I'm too old or I'm not enough. Your brain is always your mind is always eavesdropping on yourself talk and again if you've heard me say this before. Because, you're one of our students. There's a difference between knowing something and walk walking it like in your in your in your heart in your body, and so what keeps us from mastery sometime? Is this idea that Oh, I know this already. Go, get get to the get to the other stuff that you were really holding back. Right. But it's the fundamentals that the masters get really good at and so he asked me a new question I think questions besides perspective are the answer you learned from Bishen about these. These dominant. Dominant questions these questions we ask all the time that we're always getting answers for, and if you ask yourself how come I can never do this or how come I never be this person or how come I can't earn this money. You'RE GONNA YOU'RE GONNA find evidence to support that right because your mind if you knew how truly powerful your mind was, you wouldn't say or think something you didn't want to be true. I'll say that again in a different way. If you knew how truly powerful you are you wouldn't say think or feel something you didn't want to be true. All right and that's not to say you have one negative feeling or one negative thoughts and ruins your life going back to consistency how do you get yourself to consistently take action and.

Bishen
World hunger problem can be overcome: UN envoy

UN News

10:02 min | 3 months ago

World hunger problem can be overcome: UN envoy

"As one of Africa's foremost thought leaders and a powerful advocate for agricultural reform Agnes Kalibata is responsible for running the first ever UN food system summit in an interview with Common Lennon from you a news Miss Calcutta, the secretary general's own void for the event outlines the ways that food systems negatively impacting the world, and how she plans to use the summit to address these problems she began by knowledge that the term food systems is not widely understood and explain why it's important to tackle. The Issue Foods Seems Pretty Complex I. I personally did not understand the the whole complexity and breadth and. Depth. For. Systems until I started engaging on this, there's a tendency that. Across. The different areas that constitute food systems we each look at the areas that impact us the most I'm from an agriculture sector perspective. So I look at how we produce food and I focus a lot on on how would produce help boxes food but there's so many other perspectives of food systems we to produce food we used a environment and and this definitely environmental perspective one but. To to consume food, it goes through several stages several of puth several things happen this whole complexity of issues around food systems from how produce it to how we move it around detail it tall with techy to the folk at the to the table. And and how influence how think about all that? There's a whole lot of. Influencing the also INS in the food system arena with regards to to to how again how food is produced how is moved reaches the table that impact. So a behavior that impacts how we think that impacts our culture. Food Systems extremely complex. It's about people's beliefs. It's about People's cultures, but it's also about life and how we leave and so so about how interact with the environment and I think how interact with the environment is probably. The most important. Part of what has gotten us in this conversation, how we interact with the environment has resulted in a security from from a food production, assist him in impacting two things in impacting our climate. So because we do contribute to emissions but also in impacting by diversity and how diversity walks for us all and yet we know that they've they've versity besides having the rich life itself. We it's something that we need to be able to to live a full life. So those are two parts of impacting the environment, but there's there's another perspective of food systems are also impacting our health one in every three. People this. The let the biggest cause of today is is how eat the type of food we eat is on nutrition we still have. About six, hundred, one, thousand, nine, hundred people to. That even amidst the plenty because we do have a lot of food in this world. The plenty a still going hungry. And, then there's this whole challenge around. The fact that I talked about that, we have so much food being produced to the extent that one trillion dollars worth of food western every one trillion dollars worth of food. So so meaning, we could actually feed the people that are going hungry or with how much we stink. So that is another perspective and then I talked about the issue of equitable neighborhoods and access to food, and then the issue of just ensuring that we have resilience in food systems so that we don't have challenges as we've seen with COVID data result of. Our. Our reaching. Overreaching inability to to access food that ends up gritting what sorts of other problems. So in a nutshell. We have those challenges but I think the most important part of our food system, which is the reason we are having different systems summit. The most important part of all that is recognizing the. Despite what we able to do we are awestruck in all the digital set out the top to do with food systems whether it is reducing poverty. Or whether it is reducing hunger or were they tease nutrition and how nutrition for us whether it is how impacting our environment reducing West The the perspectives of our food system, that I'm putting impacted by this digits not working with and in many cases are truck. So so the whole complexity of all these things being of truck is really what lead to. The secretary general last year calling for Food System Summit Thou be able to look at the challenges that the summit. The I mean the food system is presenting, but also the opportunities that the food system does present if we if we choose to look at it from a different angle, and if we choose to do different things and this summit is really about helping US Open the world governing action and helping people choose to do things differently what for you a successful food system summit like? A successful food summit with first of all governor is all the people that we are looking to engage because a food system summit in each and every one of us. So for me, I see our ability to rich and NIA and be able to mobilize mobilize cautiousness around what is broken in our food system, and how often system should change would be point number one, govern ising energy, and stressed. in you will looking at food system. So that would be point number one. How would we mobilize or wild to cut our food system number two would be. Recognized that we are off truck, how will we set ourselves doucet ambitions for ourselves to do things differently, the number of areas where action has already been defined with look at parties. When you could digits most of the things I've already been defined. The question is we off truck. The question is we are not on missions and not much ink or our actions are not much inclined to have laid out to do. So the For me success would be that we raise the on Bishen too much what we have laid out as what we wanted to see we know what wants to see, but we are not raising mission high enough to be. Able to come through those things. So number three is that we when we do have some commitments around, we can do to raise those ambitions to the that will transform our food system to new type of system. So for me, those would be the probably the three most important things. As you say, there is enough food for everyone, but people are still starving the environment is still being damaged. How is this failing system evolved? We've we've built excesses within insisting that we probably don't need that for me that would be point number one again, I talked about the amount of westward within our system. Do we have to have that type of West? We've designed a food systems in ways that are not responding to what we need as people. Is it possible to step back and escort sims? What do we really need and how focus but we need more than what is good to have? So we already have the good thing is have that knowledge would did have a not a lot of knowledge are around what is good for us and what is good for environment also have a lot of merger on what we are doing wrong and also have a lot of noted including technologies around what to do differently. That's why talk about ambition that's why I took about committing to that ambition. So what we need, it's what we need to do is not rocket science. What we need to do mostly is about. Galvanizing mobilizing their level. Of Energy into our systems and red level of interest but also the right level of political commitments from within our countries where we need to do that. And but also one shouldn't forget is mobilizing the right level of engagement for more private sector because food systems. Much as impacts all of us, we also a different players in different places at different times, and we have a whole lot of of players that do do engaging in different places and the interest change and their willingness to change and their willingness to work with all of us to find the right pieces of the food system that should be going forward. When we agree on what needs to be abandoned is but is some is as much a public good as it is a private sector thing that must all come around around. An unreadable together and yes, it's true. We have a central group that is working to help us understand the evidence of where we need to be going and what we need to be taking forward. And these people are galvanizing. Evidence from one of the world and they're looking at a tweet has been working in different places and they're looking at what what would work for where we are going. So we are going to build a lot of Of what we take forward on on the evidence that the central could group that has been put together will provide for us as as what constitutes what going forward looks like what leap what what we leave behind looks like. So we are going to to really depend a lot on what descent sense group is going to tell us. Do you think it's going to be difficult few to hold together the

Food Systems Africa UN Calcutta Agnes Kalibata United States Common Lennon Bishen Doucet
Robotics: An Overview

Learn to Code with Me

02:44 min | 4 months ago

Robotics: An Overview

"Just explain a bit about like what the field of robotics looks like an is yeah, so a lot of the popular robots that you probably have seen in the news. They're based off of being able to have a robot. That's walking. We're very intelligent robots, not their robots are mechanical pieces. You know of junk. Put something into. Right and so yeah, you'll see walking robot to see dog robots. You'll see the facial expression robots you know that are supposed to women in some way, and those are yes, they definitely hardware involved in back can be very complicated, but what drives those is a I am the programming the software behind it and so in order for us to even get to that point. We're GONNA need a lot more about we're really not there yet. Yes, we have some degree of walking robots, but it's not a ubiquitous technology that you can just plug in play from being in some of my robotics internships. I definitely got the feel that understanding the field robotics is also looking at. At where what it's not doing what people are trying to do and you'll see some articles here there about ooh. Does this robot really what the company that made? It says it does he know like is it? Is it real and that's true for a lot of a more advanced robot, so you might be thinking of so you have to start small. If you were a robotics, intern added company. They most likely would have a narrow field for you so for me. When I was Zuma, robotics internships I always had very narrow fields where it was like maybe just mapping, Gimme a robot to be able to understand its location and navigate on its own or it's. Just being able to see and being identify objects like there's usually a barrier build when you go into robotics, and so you think bishen perception, you think of autonomy so being able to navigate on itself, and that doesn't have to be on legs. It can be on wheels, and then also just some of the use cases so not all robots are meant to do the same things. Some just look pretty and. Some. Just look you know they just walk in. That's all they do. And there is no real application, and then there are other areas of interest where it's like. How do we create an office about the delivers prince to you, so you don't have to get up. Or How do you tell presence robot so that someone can come into an office remotely, but they can't get through the. The door. How do they get to the door on their own? They always need. Someone opened the door for them. So those are some of the branches that you can go on and what anybody who's interested in robotics as a idea, just start going on the list of. How would they do this holiday that end in? You'll come to see how much further we have to go.

Zuma Intern
Alice Wu: The New Queer Rom-Com

LGBTQ&A

11:26 min | 6 months ago

Alice Wu: The New Queer Rom-Com

"I wanted to bring you this brand new conversation that we had with Alice Wu. Alice is the writer and director of the half of it. Now a net Flix and the movie really captures that special period and a clear persons in life. Where you have this attraction this desire you have not needling of clearness in your body but you very much do not yet have the worst language to describe it so you'll hear us talk about capturing on the page and then screen as well analysis first film saving face the now icon ick lesbian calm the just reminder our new season debuts on May twenty eighth you can listen to it on any and podcast platforms and if you do please help us. Spread the word on Social Media. Doing things like that really helps our show continue to grow so thank you so much for that all right without further ado here's Alison. I'm excited to talk because I find your career so exciting because it is proof of two things one that it's never too late to pull a one eighty and try something new. You quit your career at Microsoft to become a filmmaker and also your new film films coming out fifteen years after I and I think that's equally inspiring because there is this myth in Hollywood that you can't take a break that you can't pause momentum. Did you ever have worries about that? Yeah I mean I certainly got into that myth. I thought when I left industry ten years ago I thought I'd left for good. I never thought I'd be back. And I left specifically because my mom had some serious health issues that were acute side. Dropped everything to go to San Francisco to help her with that and it just took a lot longer than expected and I remember the conversation on my agent called me to be like. Are you coming back like what is happening and I just in that moment was like no? I'm not you know because I never went into filmmaking like I didn't get started to my late twenties and I had a different career and then I went to San Francisco. Take care of my mom which was home right like to be able to focus on my family As heading into my forties was felt right and so had I asked you at that time. Would you ever make another film? Your answer would have been like probably not. Yeah I think I in fact I got asked that all the time because there apparently is a very rabid group of saving face vans always very small. But they're very very determined. I didn't tell my second. Film got announced all these people came out of the woodwork. All over the world. I've been waiting for another film and I'm like this is true like I had no idea but a lot of my friends are also there either. Queer or Asians and so I got asked all the time where they'd be like this movie meant so much me winner he making another one and I'd be like probably never like I'd be like you know you never know but I think that time in my life that chapter might be over in at that time that you were a caretaker were you happy and content doing just about you know. It's a hard one to answer. Because in hindsight it's easier to say yes when it's happening. It's really deeply uncomfortable win. Those roles are reversed and granted. It's again I haven't lived at home sensitive sixteen so it wasn't like my mom had been taken care of me in any direct way but emotionally. She you know she was my mom you know. It was very stressful but it also is probably necessary because so why it seems great now is it was a few years of a lot of you know fighting and arguing and and those kinds of power struggles but I think those are the things you kind of have to go through to get to real intimacy and I think while my mom and I I honestly can't could love me more my mom and I don't have anyone more than I love my mom but I don't think we have the most intimate relationship you know because there are a lot of areas we just didn't know how to talk about and now we do when you say. Was it like rewarding. It was but it didn't feel like while it was happening. But in Hindsight. I can't imagine anything that would have been more rewarding in in my forties and I hope asking that is a judgmental but I just think like looking at your story of you know working at Microsoft and quitting her job to move New York City to give yourself five years to make a movie. There's so much motivation and I'm Bishen in that. That then surprises me that somebody could be like content putting all that aside a such an interesting parallels so smart. I think about it that way. I think the reason why I think those two things are linked though is I didn't move to New York to become a filmmaker. I moved to New York to try and make saving face which I didn't think would get made by the way like who thought that movie was going to get made right. Fifteen years ago I went. I wrote that movie for my mom. That's that's sorry that's really literally nuance distinction between the two that you didn't set out to be a filmmaker you set out to make one film. Yeah I wanted to make that bill. We got made but I also think sometimes you know it's similar to I'M GONNA go take care of my mom if you told me during that time especially in those years. You're fighting that like somebody you would have this wonderful intimate relationship. You're my your mom. I'd be like yeah that's never ever happening. That woman is impossible. I love her to death which is impossible right but you do it out of your love for that person similarly and trying to make the movie. I did it out of my deep love for that. I guess that script and just that desire to be like well take a one in a million chance but man if happens. That would be amazing. But if it doesn't I don't think I thought beyond Bat when it actually got me I I really was like you know like what is happening right now. This is not this is a so again. It was a fun but very disorienting. You know I become aware that I am the kind of filmmaker that isn't as much as I love directing I love you know. I think I need to love the projects like I need to love it. Like it's like almost a child for me otherwise you sacrifice a lot like this is not a field. That doesn't demand physical and emotional sacrifices from me right like there's no world where it's like. I'm off making my film and they have plenty of emotional energy for my best friends and my family like theirs. It's literally like a number of months. I'm pretty much checked out unless it's an emergency and not to sacrifice so I kind of have to ask myself. If I'm going to do that for something. Is it worth that sacrifice so you set out to make a film not be a filmmaker? When did you start to identify as a filmmaker has a really good question? Because I don't think it was maybe not until this movie because I always was like. I wonder if that movie was just a fluke. I was such a fluke. It was like a really lovely shoot and I really loved being on set and I think that was when I was like okay. I still have a lot to learn. I've only made two films but maybe I am a filmmaker. Maybe this is something that that I actually. You know. That is somewhere in my blood. Yeah and I think that the half of it walks this really compelling line in terms of queasiness that a main character. Someone who doesn't have it all figured out yet doesn't have the language describe or sexuality. I think what touched me was the respect that the movie had for her and where she's asked in terms of that process in your quickness and you as a filmmaker met her where she was at and. I haven't seen that many films yet. Oh thank you for saying that yes. That's exactly right because I think people sometimes I'll get asked like now is Elliott Elliott. This and what I ended up saying at least seventeen. I don't know what you're like at seventeen seventeen out to myself and I did come out to myself to my senior college and it was painful at once I did. I had crushes on girls probably since the fourth grade like I just deep crush on the same girl all three years of high school and I was not out to myself. How is that possible right? It's possible for exactly the reason you just said which is we. Don't have the language aways to explain our emotions and when it comes to something as scary as potentially ones you know whether we are clearness or even just your sexual identity at all at seventeen. I think just the notion of sex can be a bit terrifying because it's so confusing. Yeah and not having all the answers as very real for that age It's real for any age actually but it just interesting stage of the coming out process to depit. Did you originally set out wanting to explore that when you were writing it. Yes so so. It's it's interesting because I didn't actually a initially and I think this often forms like the kind of things I'm just going to write for myself to direct I realize now that it usually comes from some sort of emotional question that I may have been wrestling with in my life like saving face while the plot is nothing to do what happened to me and my mom. That very much was about you know. Is it possible to have both romantic love and your family together? No not then take way right and now something has grappling with and I think the half of it started as me really grappling with for a whole bunch of reasons but grappling with this notion of what Love was and how you know like as a society we really exalts romantic love right and I think growing up. I wasn't allowed to watch TV. But I was watch classic movies and I was allowed to talk to Chinese soap operas because we weren't allowed to watch anything violent pretty much meant like romantic dramas romantic comedies. So I totally bought into this idea. That like the whole point of those movies at the end these two people hopefully end up together right and once they do. It's like the happy ending like right. Like the whole goal is to find your perfect other half and I think sort of a getting older and realising like The to kind of weird now like in my twenties that made total sense but once I got past that I started realizing it will even if you do find someone who like I want to spend the rest of my life with this person. It doesn't really seem like and then your life just ends in this wonderful crescendo right. It seems like and then life goes on and all these other things come up and thinking about that and realizing that I naturally focused so much on like my romantic partner. But they're all these other relationships in my life. That are at least as important in if I think about like the breakup I've had I've had yes. I've had a couple of really difficult romantic breakup but I wouldn't necessarily say that are worse than some of the platonic breakups. I've had like the breakup that can happen in apparent in a trial right like when a one can't accept the other for some reason. That heartbreak is devastating. The heartbreaks that happened with your closest friends where and those are often incredibly quiet. They're not like we had a fight. We don't talk. They're more like someone move. Someone gets a relationship and then somehow you feel less connected in the less connected and then one day. You're like you miss that intimacy right like there's and because with romantic relationships put a label on it when that relationship and you have to have a conversation but for friends you can just fade

Microsoft Alice Wu San Francisco New York Alison Love Hollywood New York City Writer Elliott Elliott Partner Director
Martin Senn (Davinci Virtual) - Creating an Airbnb for offices

Wall Street Oasis

07:21 min | 10 months ago

Martin Senn (Davinci Virtual) - Creating an Airbnb for offices

"Martin. Welcome to the PODCAST oil. Good afternoon. Alex how are you doing today? I'm great I'm in La Urine Salt Lake. You're the COO. Of DAVINCI virtual super cool technology company kind of changing the way people work. But we'll get into all of that here shortly. Love to hear about who? You are how you got what you do now you know. You're you're an entrepreneur. Now were you were. You always an entrepreneur. Like how'd you get to this place in life? I mean my later fifties now. So it's been quite a quite a stretch but Today out of my office window. I'm looking at some snow covered peaks and Here in Utah but quite frankly that has a lot to do with my upbringing as well. I was born to Swiss parents in California. No snow covered peaks there but When I was about two years old we move back to Europe to Switzerland and spent my entire childhood and education in the tiny country of Switzerland. I grew up in a cow. Tom Literally six hundred and fifty people living their cows. Going up down the mountain every morning and night But then I Finished my studies at the University of Iraq and At the end of my program We actually had an opportunity to Work anywhere in the world For Global Business Program. Get additional credits. As I was a dual citizen with the United States I was able very easily to come back here and actually complete. My era ended up in Los Angeles where you are right now. Alex and I spent one year outside of Marina del Rey with a large travel wholesale company. thought I will be here for about a year. Go back to Switzerland do but good Swiss do which is pick a career for life work till they're sixty five get the Golden Watch and enjoy obviously. Didn't turn out that way I grew quite fond of the American way of life. But also the American dream and the American opportunity as I Finished my year in a had an opportunity to grow to work for two more years with a travel wholesale group that had offices in Colorado Hawaii in a couple of other areas I worked with him for the next couple years and started building call centers and call centre software for them. I really enjoy to that particular line of work but In in the early nineties we had an opportunity to acquire a competitor here in park city. Utah and At that point chose to take that position and moved here I thought it was going to be here for another year or two. Obviously now. It's been almost thirty so Things have worked out differently but You know I found you and I think I found my place not just From a personal perspective but also from a fresh perspective. Marin it's a it's a cool story kind of how you've go these different places and you say oh. I'll try this out there for a year and then you kind of just really kind of your very much open to you. Know seeing if you like it if you don't like it what's good about. It was bad about it and that's so unique I think. Can you hear from a country in Europe? Far Far Away experimenting. What you like what you don't like. What do you think is inside of you that you know allows you to just have like such an open? Mind as you're as you're going through this well a felt like part of the reason why I chose to leave Switzerland in the first place and goalwards internationally. Right was a felt. Probably confined wanted to expand my horizons. I wanted to see more of the world but also learn more in the business world and I think that's what drove me Kind of to become my guests a little bit of a traveling workman anyhow in the first place. I think the second piece of it is you know you find yourself Still without normally family responsibilities or large responsibilities try out different lines of work may be starting experimenting with certain things and I think one of the big differences here in the states whereas Switzerland this entrepreneurism and small businesses. Very much alive right. It's very much driven. There's literally millions of companies Back home things are big more traditional of ignore established and quite frankly small businesses still outside of the macro economist may be still Something that's not that much. Never did I really enjoyed it. Obviously that's why I'm here and You know I migrated from the travel industry down into coming mysteries worked extra for a very large telecom group here in Salt Lake City a for almost a decade and exited nine hundred ninety nine Because I was frustrated with The Red Tape. Maybe the lack of ability to affect change technology etc. And I wanted to regroup at that. Point was actually quite a pivotal day in in my professional career so I went back out on my own. I started my own consulting firm and actually that's how my business partner and Bill Nick in two thousand five and it was kind of almost an odyssey and a match of talent and Bishen. And that's when I truly felt we had something special and I wanted to get involved with that. Yeah it's it's interesting. How you talk about kind of your upbringing of thinking about you're always go work for a big company need. Just do that for your entire life. Get the gold watch retire but then it's what the cool part of your journey is is that you had an this open mindset to go see experiment see what. Martin was really put on this earth to do and you have this entrepreneurial spirit inside of you and so yeah you did the the corporate route and like many people. You saw yeah. I don't like all this red tape. Bureaucracy let's go. I can do this better out of my own all-star consulting and then we'll we'll see where it takes me. Yeah and you know it comes with With a joy and with pain obviously Alex you know that as well You know If you want to be an entrepreneur If you like building things from the ground up it obviously comes with without the safety blankets in a lot of cases right so you gotta have a risk tolerance. I think you've got to have the desire to really drive You know The notion of never quit the notion of being responsible for all it's really part of that journey and but I also feel that it is the most rewarding way to work if you have the ability to to truly do what you like can enjoy and push forward and grow something special. I think that's the most rewarding thing you can professionally aside from obviously you know Establishing a family and have a good family live and grow kids

Switzerland Alex Utah Europe La Urine Salt Lake COO Martin. University Of Iraq Los Angeles United States California Salt Lake City Martin TOM Marina Del Rey Marin Colorado Hawaii
Interview with Tommy Breedlove : Become Legendary by Participating in Your Own Rescue

3X Value Growth

08:43 min | 10 months ago

Interview with Tommy Breedlove : Become Legendary by Participating in Your Own Rescue

"I'm joined today by Tommy breedlove. Thank you very much for joining me here today. Welcome Tummy carry. I'm excited to be here and I will enjoy enjoy. Every drop of Maple Syrup have from here on out due diligence absolutely and tell me where are you calling in from I know thank you. Where are you today? I am in Atlanta Georgia outside so called Roswell and this is where I call home and it's my office but I spent a lot of time. All were the country and planet very fortunate to do that. I guess so well thank you again. Tell me for joining me here for the podcast for those. Who Don't know Tommy? Let me give you just a a little bit of an introduction tummy. Breedlove is a Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestselling author. He's atlanta-based as he said but he focuses focuses on business relationship and mindset coaching. He's regularly featured as a keynote speaker at global events. After twenty years of a corporate pro-career Tommy now guides people to discover a life of significance while building a lasting legacy. Welcome again Tommy. I'm so thankful to be your carry when I'm talking about seven questions. In seven minutes. The topic you gave me was to become legendary by participating in your own rescue. Are you ready to do that. In seven minutes. Let's crank it out. I got it so timing number one. Who's your ideal client? My ideal client is business. Owners is entrepreneurs and corporate executives. Who Don't have anyone to lean on lean into who are struggling with time management struggling to balance between life live in wanted to run a successful company and all of the things that come within bishen where we carry the success in burdens of our life? Because we're constantly driven to do more her and as I am I and has I have been my whole life and so I helped people lead a life of significance with time management with balance with since the film at but without compromising their financial success or their ambition. That was so detailed. I love it so number. Two what problem are you solving perfect. Then when it comes to business owners. I think the biggest problem we solve is a feeling that I'm alone that I have to make all these decisions. Asians and I have these pressures on me from employment to profitability to scale to vendor management. And how do I do this. And how how do I lead. And how do I control my company. But I don't have anyone to lean on and leaned into an so. I serve as a outsource Boorda director for them to help them with all things things profitability time management but also doing that without compromising their relationships at home in the human they were born to base. I'm one of those people that do believe you can have. Alan live without compromising. I love it so building on that. My third question is what are the typical symptoms that you see as experiencing or that you hear the high level amounts of stress. You know the balance again between time at home and when we're at home we're thinking about our companies and we're we're companies companies. Were thinking about home but also all of the things that come within the business itself is managing debt. Managing profitability is our system sufficient enough competition and a lot of times. We feel like we're a corporate executive in our businesses is that we're alone and we don't really have anyone to help us through the big times and the big topics and so it's a lot to carry as ambitious driven executives and managers owners of these companies. And so we you need to know that we're not alone. And all great leaders have leaders in their life. Alright coaches coaches in that. We need people to help us step in step up and be the best entrepreneur person that we could possibly bake absolutely. We can't be the best at everything that our business requires we needed to ourselves with those experts and as soon as people start realizing that their whole oh business and their life excels and flourishes stronger and farther faster indeed across the board regardless of the size of your business. It really does. It's proven true. So the fourth question I have that you must see a lot. What are the most common mistakes of owners who are trying to not look outside and trying trying to do it all internal he too fast? You answer the question for me. It's control issues. It's control and perfectionism and thank you have to carry the burden burden of leadership finance operations administration customer sales and everything in between and so one of the biggest things that I preach to corporate executives entrepreneurs and leaders of these organizations as you need to stay in zone brilliance. And that's why you got in the business. To start with their you stay in your zone brilliance and if you just just do that Zona brilliant sure God given talent for at least three to four hours a day and outsource the rest to your great team who has the same mission and passion that you do do you will ultimately be one hundred x more successful in the long run but the biggest issue is control and perfectionism and also trying to do it it all ourselves because at the end of the day our businesses are babies and not everybody has the same love for our businesses as we and so we try to do it all ourselves into burn out disasters. There's on multiple fronts. Absolutely I am going to take from you. Giving you credit the phrase your zone of Brilliance. Because that's exactly it. They need to focus on that. Do what you do best rest. I've changed my life exactly well. Therefore you are a testament to what you're trying to share with others. That is not just a theory. Something you've lived and you've seen the benefit from the results of the fifth question then is with that as a foundation. MM Dacian of what you're recommending. What's valuable free action that you suggest to our audience that they can implement right now? That indeed is going to help them increase the whole value. The business I would say you have to participate in your own rescue and so so many of us put ourselves last. I see so many of us ambitious types doubling down investing in the stock market will invest in our businesses will invest in our networks but we want invest in ourselves in order for us to be the best leaders in people that we can possibly possibly be. Is We have to invest in ourselves. I I'm talking about your professional education. Your mental education your emotional education in your relationship Education Gatien because once you become the best person in leader you can possibly be than all from your success to your network to your money but also to your happiness awesome fulfilment so in order to do that. There's a million ways to participate in your own rescue but you have to double down and do the metalwork physical work emotional work in the business work. You have to build those muscles each and every day of your life says spin at least an hour a day on some type of emotional mental professional and physical self-development. Because you're no good to anyone burned out stress and even worse not here. That's just it exactly. That's the bottom line definitely definitely. That's where you end up even if it's not your plan it's GonNa Happen to US hopefully later than sooner. We take care of all these areas exactly and you can't ignore any of them. You need to address all of them in their own balanced way so on that from you. What's one one valuable free resource? Tommy that you can direct people to is actually going to help them further solve this. I have a one page building and living legendary in daily life. It's everything from time management to all of the things we talked about. How do we regain our power? How do we become you know the master of our mindset because we all have that self critic Nick and so this is how I live my life every single day and it's a one page document and also offer a blank one so that you can fill it out and create one of your own so is that you can truly build and live that legendary life and also as a free resource related to that? There's a one page purpose exercise. A one page core value. Where you build your own personal mission statement not your corporate mission statement? And that's all things that help us hold ourselves. Accountable help us find more fulfillment life and ultimately more happiness and success. And so it's three very simple one page documents that you can you can take and fill out on your own one or all of them and so that's what I would love to give away to your audience in what's the web address for them defined goals. Yes you can go to Tommy breedlove DOT COM and just sign up and we'll send you all three of them. It's really powerful as cool. I was an advertising firm recently and I saw my my legendary live plan hanging up on all their cubicles. I thought that was really humbling and cool to see

Tommy Breedlove Executive Atlanta Georgia Roswell Bishen Boorda Wall Street Journal Usa Today Alan Nick Zona Director
The evolving photography industry, with Arlene Evans

Photofocus Podcast

08:11 min | 10 months ago

The evolving photography industry, with Arlene Evans

"Our topic as it will be how conferences and major photography magazines are changing in the industry. Now before we do that. I know you're an amateur photographer. So how did you get involved like this. Whole photography conferences in mm-hmm magazines? Well I was living in Los Angeles at the time which is where. WPI was headquartered in the mid. Two thousand cents and I was friends with the gentleman you know named Skip Cohen. He was he was president. WPI at the time and the director of WPI's left and he asked me if I would be interested in taking the position because he wanted someone on who wasn't really involved in the professional photography industry sort of a neutral party to come in with fresh eyes and little little. Did I know that fifteen years later I would still be in this industry but I said yes. So was you know. SKIP SKIP incredible judge of character. So that's a lot for you. Thank you know. And he always has a way of thinking outside the box and try to bring somebody in in a position. Bishen that you have that doesn't that's not a full-time professional photographer. I think speech volume. There's no ego involved old. You're looking at it with a fresh set of eyes. And I. I just think it's a great. I'm out of time. So congratulations for that. Well thank you very much I. Yeah that's great so let's talk about the events that are happening now. I'm you guys just announced a major bomb show. What was that? Yes we announced announced that the PDF brand was going to be retired. And with that was We were discontinuing the publication not not only magazine but range finder. As well you'll still have range finder the digital format. That's correct where we're we're going to be creating all the content now on range finder online dot COM We are actually in the process of redesigning the website to better. How's the information that we want to put on there now? We want to expand coverage we WANNA cover industry trends gear and not only what's happening in the wedding portrait world but other areas of photography as well so that we can better her serve our customers the photographers who have been very faithful to the range Finder magazine since the nineteen fifties. So that's a really exciting. You know it's funny because some people look at that as a negative. Oh my Lord. I can't believe this. PDF when they're no longer having print publication will think of all the major Magazines not just the photography world but outside of the photography world that are switching to digital. Just it makes sense. It's cheaper you can make changes to it immediately And we get things out to the public faster so I'm looking at this kind of a positive step. How do you as a content creator yourself? How does this? How does this affect you were were were you? How are you looking from your perspective? Well it it's going to be a big job because as you know putting putting out. A monthly magazine is very different than creating content on a daily basis. Where you're going to keep photographers will want to come? I'm there and learn the latest of what's going on in the photography industry and We really try to on top of that with both magazines. But now we were. It's GonNa be a fresh look. It's going to be fresh perspective we've discovered through surveys and you will know this as well younger photographers take in their information from social media or online whether it's youtube or the looking at facebook to see what other photographers they're doing the reading their news on CNN dot com. So we're just trying to be not cognizant of what our readers want and they want to get their information online hole that makes sense to pdf N.. What shift to different magazines yet? PD had range finder. That's what was the difference between the two well. PGN was focused more on commercial. Fine Art Photographers. It was a very different. There was Assam overlap but it was more Commercial photography whereas range finder started as a wedding republication then expanded into wedding portrait and as you know. Portrait now has really taken off a so many different genres whether it's boudoir pants. It's just not the typical family portrait anymore that you think they're just so many different areas in portraiture sure so range. Finder has also got along with those trends as well so it really was a different focus than PD N. Gotcha that makes sense. And then that's where you have the different groups which you have. WPI as a conference and then photo plus so you had WPI on the the west coast of the United States and then you have photo plus the east coast of the United States so did try do info plus on the west coast once a long time ago and they did at work so they is definitely the best place to have federal plus Gotcha Crepe I so without Canadian with that part of the publication gone. Where do you see the what you see that being integrated with range finder or other things? You're doing well. The content is not going to go away way What we're going to do is look at all the content we've had over the years from pgn and we're going to take what was meaningful meaningful from that and disperse it to the other side so whether it will live on photo plus dot com range finder online or WPI VPI that content will still be there as because it's still relevant and we WANNA make sure that people still have access to it? It's interesting you go back to twenty cornell for example you go back to some of his books he saying the same thing he said all all those years ago but he's saying the different and a fresher with a fresh voice and people are like. Wow I didn't know that in here thinking really. He's been talking about this. A how many years but but Tony has that way of taking the knowledge and disseminating it to a new generation as a a little bit. He's he's great at it and I think that there's something to be said for the teachers that have been around around for years and they have such an expanded knowledge base. And all they're doing is cultivating a new audience. The younger photographers is who may not necessarily have access to season photographers. Who have worked in the industry for years at know how to to apply these concepts and ideas that they're teaching? You can't get that necessarily from a youtube instructor. Who is going to talk about? Things is that they've only had experience with for two or three years.

WPI Range Finder Magazine Youtube Skip Cohen Los Angeles Content Creator United States President Trump Monthly Magazine Tony Assam Facebook Director CNN Instructor
Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

The Frame

10:25 min | 1 year ago

Director Greta Gerwig on 'Little Women' and Louisa May Alcott

"Start with a new film that opens this Christmas Day. It's an adaptation of Louisa May alcott novel Little Women and it is a lovely little gift of a movie yourself theory someday. So you'll need me. You'll wish you have behaved better. Thank you so much for your employment and your many kindnesses I intend to make my own way in the world. No no one makes their own way. Not really we civil woman. You'll need to marry. Well you are not married. Because I'm rich wjr. The film is from writer director. Greta GERWIG stars. Sir Sha Ronin. She played the lead in Greenwich Direct. To`real debut lady bird and the rest of the march sisters are played played by Emma Watson Elisa scanlon and Florence pugh Laura dern plays their mom and Meryl Streep is they're wealthy aunt March gerwig has been thinking about little the women for a very long time well before she even found out that producer Amy Pascal was developing a new adaptation of the novel. Here's Greta Gerwig little women and has been a book that I have loved my whole life in a very deep way to the point. Where my memories? And the memories of the March sisters were intertwined in that way that I think books of your youth can means something even beyond being books because th- they they're the they become part of your family I think that's that's the magic of Reading when you're a child is the the distinction between fiction and reality is thin for you or it. It was for me anyway But I hadn't read it since I was about fourteen or fifteen and then I read it in my early thirties when I turned thirty and I All this stuff came out at me in the book that I it not. When I was a child I can passion get so savage could hurt anyone and I enjoyed it? You remind me of myself never angry. I'm angry nearly every damn I li- reading as an adult. I heard all of these different things. I saw it as much touch spike easier and sadder and stranger and almost more triumphant in a certain way and also just is this kind of being aware of an author was another layer of it for me that Joe both wants to be an author but then Louisa as author and so even though Joe March march by the end of the book says she stops her ink well and stops writing and gets married and has children opens a school Louisa though wrote and she wrote that book and we know what. Because there's the book you know. I just sort of had an idol saw about well if I made this. I'd want to center center on this. I'd WanNa Center on all these themes that I felt I hadn't really seen yet about it which was ambition and money money and women an art and I heard in passing my agent said at a dinner. Oh they're interested making little women again again and I was like what I have to go. I have to talk to them. I have an idea and I hadn't made anything at that point. But he got me a meaning and I I went and I talked talk to them and I told them some version of what I wanted to do and And I said I want to direct it and they wanNA write in Iraq and I hadn't had nothing to really show that I could do that so but they very luckily hired me to write it. And then I wrote my draft in in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen and then I went away and I may lady bird and then by the time I was finishing that up they said well what what do you think about making little women and I thought I said well I knew you'd ask. I'm ready but it was a it was one one of those for two. It's turns events. I want to ask about that perspective that you had a reading the book as an adult versus as a young woman woman sure and the perspective you have as somebody who is a creative person gas writing movies and making movies because so much of the movie and certainly in the book as well is about the challenges of being a creative person and how you value your own art how you compromise with people who are financing it and how you find your voice even in those parameters that's right now there's a you you picked up all the cards I put down. No it's a it's funny. It's that the opening scene between Joe March and her publisher Mr Dash would which the majority of it is actually word for word from the book when she says took care to have a few of my sinners repent and he says people want to be amused not preach that morals. Don't sell nowadays. That could be me talking to a studio head about something. I WANNA do But it was. It was all there for me to be discovered. I didn't invent it like like I said that. That scene is a scene from the book but it felt too so relevant to right now and then beyond that when when I was researching Louisa Mail Cart and it became clear that that who Lewis male caught was was equally the subjects that I was interested in and then you learn about her life. Is You know unlike Joe. She never got married. She never had children and but she kept writing and she did keep her copyright copyright of little women which is a you know huge thing that she did and I mean there are so many things about her life and what she did. It felt eerily familiar and I think even even in the fact that Her publisher sure and even herself but her publisher truly didn't know what a hit he had. And I find that happens all the time that there's a constant underestimating of audiences that are not the same audience of the people who are in charge of publishing or whatever that may be the the first half of little win because it is really to books as written ends so group. The curtain falls upon big. Joe Beth and amy whether it ever arises again depends upon the reception given to the first act of the domestic drama called little women death. It's almost like she's saying I've got a a sequel but I hope people by the I know she's She's a business lady no she and and and it it. It's worth saying that the the initial printing sold out in two weeks and it has not been out of print for one hundred fifty years in one thousand nine hundred four. There was a story. Little women leads poll novel level rated ahead of Bible for influence on high school pupils. Yeah that's nice. I mean I mean it's just nice for her and it raises his other question like what people take away from the book because you can interpret it in very different ways. I'm going to give you two prominent women who have thoughts. That's about it. The first is Gloria Steinem. WHO said in Nineteen ninety-two? Where else could we read about an all female group who discussed work art and all the great questions or found girls who wanted to be women and not vice versa? Oh that's beautiful found girls that wanted to be women not the versa. And here's the author meal Paalea who says the whole thing is like a horror movie. I know I think if you have an idea in your head of the it can be of little women. It's usually from the first book. It's the kind of Christmas to Christmas structure. And the you know the second half of the book Louis Male jokes. She should've called the wedding marches. Because they all got married and truly British version is called good wise exactly zoo you know. It was in this to book structure which is part of why I is structured the film I did starting with them as adults Because I wanted to start with the second half but I also think there's two books embedded in it because if you you just read the book on its face value with this. Kind of pre Victorian morality of Domesticity in virtue tied to femininity communitty. And all of these kind of tidy bows put on each chapter. Then I think you miss what's really roiling roiling underneath and if you read it that way of course Camille Paglia is completely right. It is something that would be a horror show if that is all you're seeing but I'd the way I look at it is if you can take the ending of the book where she felt she must marry Joe off to someone because that's what the readers demanded and she made this economic decision. That's what she would do Because she had so books then if you if you read everything through the Lens of will she had to make it all kind of tidy for the time time then if you take away the tidiness what's left is a whole bunch of am Bishen and mess and anger and lust and craziness and things things that don't fit neatly into any box. And so what I wanted to do was not update the text. The text doesn't need updating. I wanted to take away the constraints constraints of the time in some ways. Because that's what was interesting to me and even in those constraints. Louisa really did do her best to try. I to imagine what what would in a gala -tarian marriage look like. What would something that was? Not Essentially INDENTURED SERVITUDE BE As a marriage and I feel that you know Gloria Steinem being one of them with a Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith Orlando Toronto or J. K. Rowling rallying. There's a long list of women for whom this book meant very specific freedom an ambition and what I wanted to do was make a film film that was in the tradition of why that inspired them. Because it's there's gotta be a reason more than she got married to Professor Bear Sogo to see you. Thanks for coming as really

Louisa JOE Gloria Steinem Joe March Publisher Greta Gerwig Amy Pascal Wanna Center Greenwich Direct Sir Sha Ronin Meryl Streep Camille Paglia Iraq Professor Bear Sogo Emma Watson Elisa Scanlon Joe Beth Simone Tip Avar Patti Smith J. K. Rowling Writer
Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:37 min | 1 year ago

Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

"My father was the first of his family to go to college he was a dentist so I mean all those things matter it's about creating a legacy and they didn't see that happening with art you know my father was a dentist my great uncle was Titian and my aunt's found a way to get their master's degrees at Nyu back at that time they have programs for that kind of stuff but So education was important there was there was a Bishen yeah it was a way out yeah how did you make your way to art and decide I want to do this. I'd say it just chose me I don't you know I had a great art teacher who really encouraged me even from high school to create images that were my own ideal and it's just I don't know what I felt comfortable doing I didn't have to interact with people I was super self conscious and you know I didn't do a lot that was interested in because I didn't want to be in ruins the people that I didn't know it was just like over the top self conscious so it was easy for me to do it and it's what I excelled at and the There's no conversation about visual learning them but I was a visual learner so it's just you know what my proclivity was to do this stuff or to be jeff that's what I was cooking and you were like the last pre internet generation as well I got my email address when I was twenty which which might be why you have the time inclination to do this yeah I mean I say that when when people ask me why do I do I think it's because of when I was born because I didn't I had a Tandy two thousand we had to pretty much coded ourselves like make the Games work and for me making art was I figure I really didn't know who Jackson pollock was Andy were haller you know these other craters and thinkers that were bending the rules so I this is what I thinking I was supposed to do and so that's what I did to be good and be really be good be realistic yeah did you ever have a a non representational phase I kind of did when I studied with grace hard again in in graduate school the paintings got a little looser little drip easier but ultimately never lost the figure and it just wasn't something that I knew I could expound on on for the rest of my life and so I knew I was still looking for what it was that I was going to make you seem like you need an armature or I'm going to do within this thing you need some kind of almost conceptual aesthetic structure maybe me you to make work yeah I mean like you're not doing changing crazily from abstraction to this to whatever well the thing is you know I mean if you know you're doing this kind of know what you're doing once you become known or something then that's kind of what you do like I could change it but I think at this point in my career that would be a mistake career wise then you can expound on that and and you know like I went from individual to these multi figure and I'll keep challenging myself to do different things but they will all tie into you know what I this body of work in a practical view yeah well you know I had friends who particular one friend who made really great work became really well known and didn't want to make that work anymore any stops making the work and he doesn't he didn't have a gallery after a while he ended up not being an artist one time he still trying to make his way back in do you ever like God I'm going to do a still life or landscape to the I'll just keep it secret no I had no interest I love painting this painting the figures Silvio bombs yeah are they the only a commission you've done yes you want to do any others really I mean if I could choose to people to do I would do Serena Williams Do Meghan Markle I could happen yeah maybe when it was unveiled Obama told this story of meaning you at the interview in the Oval Office now I've been in the Oval Office wants with no president in it just empty and it's pretty amazing justice the thing is you a it's a big job interview the biggest job interview and it's the Oval Office and there's the president and the first eighty what was in your heart and feeling ahead I was I was nervous the first thing that happened and I don't know whether anybody else notices when they walk in but the rest of the White House has like this really kind of strange fluorescent green light and then when you walk to the Oval Office it's like lit for television and that almost triggered my brain to think that it wasn't happening when it really was happening here for about five seconds hours like stuck in this moment of like am I aaa meeting or is yeah or or is Barack walking towards me and so I sent out of it and yeah shook his hand I was nervous life so if she had been you know Michelle Robinson Chicago Hospital executive would you why would the image be precisely what we see in the National Gallery that's interesting Probably Yeah because what I presented to the world I think is the real well her and not the the image of you know the millions of photographs that we have on with her on the Internet means private and that's the kind of feel that I wanted to to something personal in private and not a glamour shot or anything like that it's a painting and it's it's a sobering moment in history and making it exactly but at the end of it when I look back at it like those are the things that I that I think we're kind of circulating in my head in ten years it will just be one big thing did you look forward to that time when it's not all about that all about the Michelle Obama's portraitist yeah it's funny I went from the artist who survived a heart transplant to become a famous painter to the artist painted Michelle Obama and I'm pretty sure sure I could climb out ever and I still be that because she is still who she is and she has such a great influence you know worldwide and you know and I guess I'm okay with that I mean sure it has been a great pleasure meeting you nice to meet you meet you thanks thank you

Titian NYU Five Seconds Ten Years
Explainer 170: Will Mohamed Morsis presidency be remembered?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:51 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 170: Will Mohamed Morsis presidency be remembered?

"In a parallel universe. Muhammed Morsi is heading towards the end of his second term as the first elected head of state in a long history of Egypt in the actual universe. He has been buried in our Alam all cemetry in Cairo following funeral prayers in the mosque of Cairo's Tora, prison and news, the gyp Shen state television is reporting that the foam of president Hamid Morsi has died. He died on Monday, aged sixty seven after collapsing in court. Morsi had been a prisoner since his presidency was ended roughly year after it began by a coup d'etat in two thousand thirteen. Nothing about what happened to. Muhammed Morsi is much of an advertisement for the people who have been running Egypt since removing him from power. Back at the city, I there was the removal itself, whatever is available. One might reasonably have had about the prospect of Egypt being governed by the Islamist movement. The Muslim Brotherhood in which Mosey was a senior figure, Morsi and the brothers were the people's choice in two thousand and twelve year after a revolution ended the long dictatorship of house, new Mubarak. It was more see who won Egypt's first meaningfully democratic presidential election. Second. The has been more treatment, subsequent to being ousted from office and imprisoned on charges, including espionage, terrorism and others claimed by his supporters to be political put ups Morsi was held substantially in solitary confinement. And according to Amnesty International denied access to medical treatment for conditions including diabetes and liver and kidney complaints. Again, one does not need to be in accordance with the aims, and I'm Bishen of the Muslim Brotherhood to think this is no kind of way to treat a prisoner. The Christian now. Well a question. Now is what effect if any the passing of Egypt's first properly elected president will have on Egypt and or the wider Middle East. The regime now in place in Cairo will work very hard to ensure that the answer to that question is none. None whatsoever. The haste with which Morsi was buried was not in itself. Sinister under Islamic tradition. Funerals should be held within twenty four hours of death, but it was telling that requests that Moore sees funeral be held in his hometown. Sharqiya province were refused. And that reporters were not granted access coverage in Egypt's state-owned newspapers was less than extensive as we go to air. No large-scale demonstrations have responded to more sees death. Those that more see may have gotten the message by now that the best of doing it in private, or they may be saving themselves until after prayers this Friday, expect a large security operation around Muslim Brotherhood, sympathizing mosques in Cairo and Alexandria, especially in the Middle Eastern region, and indeed, the wider world. There has been very little. In the way of official response to Moses passing most national leaders seem to have calculated that annoying country as important as Egypt by paying tribute to a dead enemy of its present government makes little diplomatic sense. Among the few to have spoken up president, Richard type one of Turkey who described Mosey as a martyr, and his successes as tyrants, in mea, shake tummy, m- bin Hamad, Al tiny of cata made a pointed statement of condolence to more cease family and to the gypsum, people Egypt is among those Arab countries which seven diplomatic relations with cata in two thousand seventeen citing cutters support for the Muslim Brotherhood. In the short term. At least if Egypt's rulers have anything to do with it. Mohammed more sees presidency will barely be remembered at all. It will be interesting to see what the longer view looks like more sees presidency was far from a success. The manner of its ending rather a clued the fact that Moore sees time in office was one of almost perpetual crisis. Not all of which was his fault, but all of which was his responsibility, because that's the deal with being president and more. Wasn't very good at being president. He was dreary dog Matic. Un-imaginative uninspiring and appeared to regard his election as the end rather than the beginning of a new political dialogue with Egypt's people. Muhammad MO walls president. Chosen as such by his fellow citizens. And this makes him absurdly a unique figure in Egypt's history. He may not have done it. Well, but he did it and proved that it was doable. That may yet be a significant legacy. Twenty four. I'm Andrew millet.

Egypt Hamid Morsi Muslim Brotherhood Muhammed Morsi President Trump Cairo Moore Middle East Mosey Gyp Shen Amnesty International Alam Diabetes Mohammed Sharqiya Andrew Millet Cata Moses
"bishen" Discussed on Brown Ambition

Brown Ambition

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"bishen" Discussed on Brown Ambition

"Symbol directly at Brunton Bishen podcast at g mail dot com. Hire me and let Google to dot com. I feel like you know, people would like enjoy that. That's travelocity. I think speedy dot com. You're right. It is. I don't know who owns them. At travel out of the. Ex- expedient, and somebody out there all the saying, yeah, yeah, they're all owned by with Tripadvisor on some every company all the same. Everyone's. Like I, I didn't want Wayfair and Joson main like, wait a minute. Yes. And not just those two like all modern dot com, all the time good sites were all the same because we get the Email, right? When you especially when you're like, in the middle of renovation or for the house, like I would or something for one, and I will get Email like Wayfair I didn't order from you. And I realize all this. Okay. See you so very interesting. Sometimes, you know, it just you just don't realize like how many I'm sure like at one point they were different but they just bought one of them bought the other one out, which is mart. So that's awesome. Yeah. We do some boost breaks quite to close the show, the boost the brakes booth daybreak yet, I actually when a break for the first time in a long time. Okay. Preach on why. So I've fished we saw this, don't don't shave me on the shade room. And the title is don't get caught slipping abor knee does not like to be called auntie and one asset. Alleluia praise the Lord, many, I cannot tell you how many like you know, folks in their twenties are like L, Tiffany might ma'am. Thirty still only only way, I could see maybe if you still have had a teen or single digit, like, if you're like, oh, fifteen eight maybe but man, if you are well into your twenties in your thirties, or something we are made to don't do that. And even about, like forty five and you're thirty five now six we're. Lie. Don't do that. I that annoys unless my niece my neck, and then I love it, when they're like, anti-eta 'cause they call me my African name doce, so I love it, but they're also three and two years old. You're your thirty one so that we're not doing that happens. I'm always like. I'm not sure on like it, just I don't know if feels like slightly, and I know some met with shade. But don't try to distinguish like you're so much younger says you have five years on you. I'm not Jonty fezzet. It's. Was there guru like they're on T who like has the wisdom, you know, now we're cousins. Because like I said, twenty under outtake it. But once you once should strike over, like a certain way you're not doing that. You could have been. But we would've born in that same. I gotta south all you got a cellphone, I wasn't before, like microwaves came out or something. Don't do that. So that's my light-hearted boost that, like, you know, just being auntie. I saw bevy Smith has said that she was like grown, forty year old women. Call me aunty now. What about you? You got a boost. Are you gonna break do boost? I have to boost for this. I used to roll my eyes at all these, like pre K fifth grade eighth grade graduation ceremonies. But I don't know what I'm in my feelings about it. And I love I love like pre K graduation ceremonies. I feel like they're so magical, and maybe it's because now I have a gods. That will my husband's God wait. No, he's on his godfather anyway, my husband's nephew, who were very close to just graduate from pre K and they give all the kids awards in there. So proud of themselves, and I just wanted to boost all the teachers, and the, the educators who take their time and energy to make these kids feel so special and loved and feel like they've really accomplished something I think it's so beautiful. So out to shut out the teachers shutouts all the little kiddos who are graduating where whatever you're graduating to you could probably stop growing up, so fast because. It makes me feel old but it's a beautiful thing. I can't believe this kid's already five. It's insane. I know it is kind of the same. When you're gonna look like wait. You just came out the womb. Like, what are you doing getting older? I know it's crazy, but it's beautiful..

Brunton Bishen travelocity Google Tripadvisor Jonty fezzet bevy Smith Joson Tiffany five years forty year two years
For Competitive Edge in Womens Co-Working Space, The Wing Partners with HBO

Business Wars Daily

05:16 min | 1 year ago

For Competitive Edge in Womens Co-Working Space, The Wing Partners with HBO

"Business. Daily is brought to you by Dell this month. Dell is thanking small businesses with up to forty five percent off select computers with Intel core processors. Call eight seven seven by Dell to speak with a small business technology advisor today. That's eight seven seven B you ideal L for tech advice and one on one partnership. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday may sixteenth co working spaces are big business these days as the number of solo preneurs in the country grows, so too, does the demand for independent office spaces, but a lesser known phenomenon has been gaining a lot of steam over the last few years co working spaces designed for women most big cities have at least one or two born from the same entrepreneurial zeal. Shared by the audiences are intended to serve some of these companies have international ambitions, consider the wing, which now has offices in New York, San Francisco, Washington, DC, Los Angeles, and Chicago. There are more on the way including one in London. Now the wing offers co working features, tailored, specifically to women that includes offices that are, you know, warm enough cafes lactation rooms, Instagram worthy common spaces, and frequent networking events, but the facilities aren't the real draw. The wing is heavily marketing itself as a social club, dedicated to women's empowerment, it's even inked and agreement with time's up, the nonprofit devoted to safety and equity for working women. The wing is community first office space second founded in twenty sixteen. The wing has raised more than one hundred million dollars. That's a huge amount of the new women's co working market, but it's a far cry from we work, which is set to go public soon. We works owner sports controversial valuation of almost fifty billion dollars. If that sounds like a tough rivalry will look under the covers and you'll see that we work is a wing investor the company's hedging its bets, don't, you know, projecting that demand for women. First spaces is only going to grow. And as it does the wing is doing everything it can to ensure it's top of mind it's been entering into high profile partnerships, such as one with h. HBO the wings helping HBO promote the new season of the hit show. Big little lies. It'll host advance screenings in many cities and even a panel discussion with Reese, Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman and Meryl Streep, but the wing is not alone in cultivating starpower arrival. Women's co working chain called the Riveter has featured events with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg, and US Senator Tammy Duckworth, by the way, in case you slept through history class, the Riveter is named for World War two's, famous feminist icon, Rosie like the wing. The Riveter is well funded. It's raised more than thirty million dollars so far. It has seven locations and Embiid to operate one hundred around the globe. Both the river and the wing. Call themselves women Centric, meaning men can join it's not a philosophical choice before it changed its stance. The wing was sued for gender discrimination, and with membership starting around two thousand dollars a year. It's also been the object of criticism that it's designed primarily for. Affluent women, while the wing may be grabbing attention in the market. It is by no means the clear winner. In addition to battling with the Riveter, it's also competing with growing numbers of smaller local women's co working businesses, especially in trendy cities like Los Angeles. Denver in Seattle term success is far from guaranteed. But, you know, maybe that's the key to success, potent mix van Bishen and uncertainty that spurring innovation innovation. That's pushing the wing out the traditional co working box. From one three. This is business wars. Daily Haiti life are take on the news shares with a friend. And if you're a member of co working space drop line to your colleague. Thanks bunch. I'm David Browner will see tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by Dell. There's nothing small about your business, your impact on the communities made a huge difference as thank you during small business month. Dallas offering up to forty five percent off select computers with Intel core processors, plus get a free. External hard drive with select PC purchases. Call eight seven seven buy Dell to speak with a small business technology advisor today. That's eight seven seven. B. U. Y. D E L L for tech advice and one on one partnership, eight seven seven by Dell.

Dell Riveter Intel Technology Advisor HBO Los Angeles David Brown London Senator Tammy Duckworth Dallas Sheryl Sandberg Haiti Van Bishen David Browner Facebook Embiid Meryl Streep United States B. U. Y. D E
"bishen" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"bishen" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Of the week may fifteenth, and we are up in your bills for a year another shot at crack at that next kiss. On a follow Vichy. Go. Think about it. I wanna. Good every time. The. Faking google? Bishen? Pick me place. That you'd say. Decision. She says that she's never afraid. Just picture. Everybody. Naked. She really doesn't act. Now really into. Me. Guessing. Faking. Been. Take me place. Feud facing? Decision. Nice. Kid way too far. No, we'd be. We would be all right. If you mess that mood in the dark, unknown. We'd be. If we. Would it be? Faking google? Places. Facing? Mendez? There's nothing hold me back. I want to point seven kiss him. Good morning y'all midway through midway through the week. Very exciting. I was just reading an article about what's going to be trendy this summer in terms of wardrobe. That's my trending report. Yeah. Report that the tourists. The tourist look is the new look like there's been a lot that's been made a about dad bod's and dad fashion rain and then dad when he travels who looks like a tourist, yes, that's now invoke the Hawaiian type looking pattern and the flip flops and the fanny pack. That's now on Trent fanny packs are beyond like, everyone has a fanny benefit fanny pack around your chest. Yes. Not around your hips for ladies. I feel like we can get away with it for guys for sure on your chest. I'm very happy about tourist wear being on trend because I feel like in southern California, especially you can really wear Taurus where but you can look like you're on vacation with the climate every day. Like a tourist I feel do you think? So I wear mostly hoodies, and jeans though, like, remember, your vanish, you'd were all the time. It's not a tour shirt. That's local literally. Seen it in a long time. Shrunk so much. Get more meat for sure didn't know it shrunk so much like I washed it so many words so often so fast and washing. So frequently that the sleeves shrunk way up by the way. So I can't think I normally get my to my form on the inside on my veins here right there. That's a great spot. So what I'm doing? I'm doing extra like form curls too wide my formal bit. So I can put some on my form. Now, do you know what you wanna do? No. But I know the location. Good good half the battle. It's great. Isn't it isn't the perfect spot for dude? I love it because you can still covered up. If you're wearing a suit, exactly. And if you let's be honest if you saw me on the phone and you saw my forearm tattoo on his farm. He's got edge. I would love it. I think it's great. All right field, tiny, no opinion on this. I hate it. Perfect. I'm doing it. No. I'm over you getting too. Well, sorry. He was like no tattoos the new tattoo. That's that's what I read. Yeah. And that's what kind of agree with now. Now, I don't really want you to match me walking down the street my tourist where with some sort of saying on my form. I don't think you need edge. I don't think it needs to be lyrics though with lyrics. Not lyrics sang. But you can't read it unless you're really close. Design or a picture of something. Really? Yeah. All right. Well, actually drawn. Let's come back in just a minute. We're gonna.

google Mendez Trent fanny California
China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

"A summit this week on a signature Chinese foreign project was a big success. According to China's president Xi Jinping the multibillion dollar belt and road initiative. A two day forum some more than sixty four billion dollars worth of deals signed in China's global infrastructure program, the US is not pleased. Well, the BBC's Michael Bristow reports G is urging more countries to join in nearly forty leaders in Beijing. Summit to discuss the scheme to build ports roads and railways that will connect China to the rest of the world, many of the richest nations of being reluctant to endorse it speak in. Beijing. Britain's Chancellor of the exchequer Philip Hammond said the Belton road program showed truly epi Cam Bishen, but Britain is just one country expressed concern of issues such as debt transparency and the effects on the environment. United States goes further it thinks Belton roadies mainly about spreading Chinese power and

China Beijing Britain United States Belton Cam Bishen Xi Jinping Philip Hammond Michael Bristow President Trump BBC Chancellor G Sixty Four Billion Dollars Two Day
Weekend edition--winners and losers from the week

Talking Tech

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Weekend edition--winners and losers from the week

"Hiring is challenging, but there's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple. And smart that place is ZipRecruiter. Where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. Try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Hey, Jefferson Graham here the weekend edition of talking tech a winner's and losers at Bishen looking back at the week. That was I have to say that Amazon founder Jeff Bezos won the week. But at a huge personal cost in his heated battle with the publisher of the National Enquirer he exposed intimate. Details of his extramarital affair to defend what he says was an attempt by the company to coerce him. We're talking embarrassing photos and more texts Basil's accused the company of blackmail, any revealed Email som that he says threaten publication of revealing photos of him unless he agreed to their terms. He took on the accused extortionists. And I think it's a lot of credit for doing that. So he's the big winner the week other winners and losers winners podcasts, the burgeoning medium that we all know and love got a huge. Shot in the arm when music streaming service. Spotify said, it would acquire Gimblett media the company that makes popular podcast like reply all and start up as well as anchor, which is a tool to help people record in published podcasts. Speaking of podcast. Don't forget. You can always listen to the latest talking tech editions anywhere you find fine online. Audio other winners, Twitter and medium bazo. Use the medium blogging website to reveal the contents of the emails that were sent to him by the National Enquirer, lawyers and Twitter to send people to medium. Now. This was a huge shot in the arm for medium, which has become a site of choice for tech savvy. Individuals who want to get something off their chest without having to go to the bother of creating and feeding a full-fledged blog and for Twitter, which reported earnings this week, it was a traffic builder. That followed the announcement that had more daily users in the quarter at one hundred and twenty six million up from one hundred and fifteen million a year ago. Winners. Go pro struggling action maker laying off people hurting losing lots of money. And all of a sudden fourth-quarter earnings sales were up twenty percent. They've got a hit with the hero seven camera which I happen to be huge fan of now. Let's go to the fun losers. The apple store after the sudden exit of the woman running the retail division who had been discussed as an era parent to CEO. Tim cook many pundits this week took aim at the store itself. Nine to five max that it was too crowded. CNN said it was in need of a new retail strategy Washington posted it lost its wealth factor. I've got a simple request loved the genius bar. But it takes too long to see them. It should be hours not days to get an appointment. Other losers insta- cart in a blog post on medium. Of course, the CEO of the food delivery service admitted bad thing tips were not always getting passed onto drivers. So in this blog post shoppers are urged to keep tip separate or better yet hand, the driver a few green bucks. I give carte credit for admitting the mistake, but this is a bad flashlight on a burgeoning industry, the final loser. Amazon shareholders. It's great that bazo is using his position to fight back against the National Enquirer. But the question services, how should Amazon investors feel about the man who popularized a speaker that has the potential the monitor your home conversations. Hello, alexa. Yet. He's sending text and photos that he would never wanna see printed in a family newspaper should as those of known better. I think so and how has your week, I'm Jefferson Graham, you've been listening to talking tech. Please subscribe it a show where every listen to online audio police favored us on Stitcher, which helps more people find the shell. When it's always. Thanks, everyone. For listening in need of great talent for your business but short on time. You don't have to get lost in a huge stack of resumes to find your perfect hire. You just need the right tools smarter tools with ZipRecruiter you can post your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards with just one click then ZipRecruiter. Actively looks for the most qualified candidates and invites them to apply. So you never miss a great match. No wonder eighty percents of employers who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site in just one day. Find out today why ZipRecruiter has been used by businesses of all sizes and industries. To find the most qualified job candidates with immediate results right now. Talking tech listeners can post jobs on ZipRecruiter for free. That's right free. Just go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. One more time to try it for free. Go to ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire.

Ziprecruiter National Enquirer Amazon Jefferson Graham Jeff Bezos Twitter CEO Bishen Spotify Tim Cook Basil CNN Washington Publisher Gimblett Media Founder Twenty Percent
"bishen" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"bishen" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"But the am Bishen comes second to be the God. So if I say, my main ambition is to help this guy win, my second one is to be am bishops than I have to say, you know, what helping this person win cancels out my emission, I dislocated on and help them win. That's the most important one. And then the third is be positive. And we actually say, you know, there's a sentence behind each of these positive. We say an almost every situation we see the bright side. And I put the word almost in. Because if a tree falls on top of the office. I don't want somebody walk in and go on some night. There are certain reasons. Yeah. So they have to be in rank order, Ken Blanchard. Talks about Disney parks core values and their their first core value is safety. Right. And then they have courtesy. So if I'm being courteous to a customer, and I hear somebody screaming I need to stop being courteous to this customer and go with the primary value of safety. So really your core values are informing how people should live within the workplace. They're incredibly important. You know, I want to touch on something and then we'll move on. But I want to touch on what I think is a reality. And that some people struggling with looking at their business a lot of small business owners, you know, you know, where audience, well, so let's just pick plumber electrician or some type of trade. Okay. Now you and I can sit there and come up with eight reasons why that company matters tremendously. Yes. But I think some small businessmen and women they have a struggle going as the leader as maybe the owner. How does this matter that much nobody really brags on us somebody talks about us? We sell windows or whatever. It is how do they overcome this idea that well it having hard time coming up with? Why what everybody else doing matter so much? Well, let's talk about just a mission statement for a plumber Michika plumber might be we, you know, I don't know we help fix people's pipes or whatever. But I would actually come with something much better than that. I would say we fix people's plumbing and east attention of having a stranger in their home. Yeah. You should I just that actually motivates very different behavior. Yes. Our dishwasher went out two days ago, and we called six different plumbers. None of them could get to it till Monday. My sister is visiting town. We got dishes pun about any. We have ten people coming over for dinner tonight all family, and we need a dishwasher. So my sister who's a miracle worker found somebody sixty five year old man comes into our house, and my wife immediately falls in love with us guys the sweetest nicest guy, he says, look, it's actually he's brutally on. Honest. He says this is a three dollar part that they're charging us about two hundred fifty dollars for and I have to Mark it up. You can actually get a new dishwasher for about two hundred dollars more than what I'm charging. We can have it installed. It's five hundred bucks to fix this. And I just want to be brutally us. It's actually three dollar problem that because this this this is what we have to charge. He's brutally honest. And my wife said, I'll get the checkbook, you know, because I don't want this being a landfill. You're telling me it's going to last another five years, and it would cost me another two hundred dollars to replace it. And we don't have a dishwasher, and he said, well, I just wanted you to know everything that we know. Right. You think we're calling him again -absolutely? I'm an telling every until store you just entree leadership. That's right. And I don't know what their core values are. But my guess is one of them in that culture. Right. Is honest. That's right. They are honest with the customer, they consider them partners and solving their plumbing problems. Yeah. And we'll go again here is we had a similar story. Big giant planner falls off the front of the house. Middle of winter rips off five pieces of siding, my houses exposed can't get anybody out there..

Ken Blanchard Michika Disney two hundred dollars three dollar two hundred fifty dollars sixty five year five years two days
"bishen" Discussed on THE BRENDON SHOW

THE BRENDON SHOW

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on THE BRENDON SHOW

"In your mind and see your life where you want it to go and have him Bishen. Again. I was one of the best ways to change your life is to start expecting something from yourself again. My sister and Bishen is time to raise your standards to set your sights higher. That's what doesn't happen for people here, and that's often where they struggle. So all around this two things are happening one your level of ambition, and to this is the difference maker your level. Of. Command men known likes word, but I love it your level of command in life. This means you taking charge of your life. You when you get knocked back up saying, okay, I'm in charge. I gotta get back up and go when you struggle in life, you take charge again of life. If you don't have command of your life. If you don't take the helm, if you're not the captain of the ship all of this is just positive thinking man, the difference maker in people's lives is the embellishing they set and the command they take over their circumstances. Their thoughts their behaviors their actions their relationships the direction of their daily, focus and goals, man. That's it. Think about the importance of command. You know, another way that might sound softer to say, this is resilience confidence and self. Direction. It means listen, lots of people want things they have goes when they get knocked down. They don't have the confidence or the resilience or the self determination to get up and go again, or they let other people push them around. You know, everyone says, no. So they quit. Everyone says you can't. So they believe they can't. But highly successful people take command of their life. They say, you know, what this is the demarcation line. I am no longer. Everyone else. Push me around. I'm no longer gonna play small when someone speaks down to me. I was speak up to them. When someone tells me, no, you you don't have a chance you say watch me. When someone doesn't believe you realize that their understanding is not necessary for your progress is taking command over your own thoughts behaviors and direction in life and being able to do that in the most difficult of circumstances being able to do that. When no one believes being able to take command when you don't feel like it command is the same thing. Another word of another way to say it self-discipline, right? It's like, okay. I don't feel like it today. You might wake up and I don't feel like today. But you take command say, okay, brain, I hear you saying you don't feel like it. But listen, we're going to do it. Put those shoes on hit the road, you're jogging. Let's go command is taking control of those fearful or lazy impulses that shut us down or turn off our action command. It says listen, I know I don't feel like it. But it's my time. I know I. Oh, I don't feel like it. But if I don't care what I feel like what's important what is necessary. And I will say this has been a difference maker in my life. I can't everyone thinks printing, you them motivator. You wake up every day in a flowery mood as sometimes I wake up..

Bishen
"bishen" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Like, I would say that there's a certain Bishen and those kinds of things that I'd like to explore. But you know, this TV show thing is actually still kinda new. So we're kind of getting that settled. But once that stuff happens, I think these are the kinds of things that will be in a position to consider totally totally people did really enjoy the book club that it might be kind of fun to apply the same depth of the book club to another toxic given that we're not always going to be doing the book club, the book club can fill like a little bit more of a summer thing since we're able to get in really deep, but we are thinking of maybe potentially applying that idea to, you know, like an album more to, you know, films TV shows or something like that. Yeah. No. I think that's something that could be cool. Also, this is where we're like, I wouldn't say hamstrung. But since we do do this to towns of we want to give you a measure of consistency. But also try to bring other things in. So that's something that we could do we could only probably rotate him so many. But yeah, you know, I'm always down by good. Two other ones before we close this one out one person thought they want more rankings from you. They wanna hear you rank stuff, and that kind of folds into another segment, I that someone else had were they they would like recommendations from you. I think this folds into a previous idea that we've had about like playlist recommendations like maybe doing some sort of music playlists segment where you are giving out like, okay. Here's like a playlist that I've built out. Yeah. Maybe I'll tell you this. But whoever wants to rankings find who that is why can block them. I can't think anything. Yeah. They do just scream at you for. I can't think of anything less attractive than that idea. Well that concludes it for or deep dive into this. She ate all the suggestions for that one. Except for that one on the rankings boated. None appreciate that one. But I will give ample time to each one of them as we try to make the show veteran twenty nineteen. Thank you for taking the time to contribute. I was shocked. I mean, if you were willing to respond ladies gentlemen, thanks for joining us here on the right dumb thing..

Bishen
"bishen" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"So I figured I'll just keep these four together. So that just looking at them to a new lens, and it it's been it was a wonderful project to get I hadn't asked some of the questions about nice still don't know the answers where does embellishing come from. What just think about you? Do you happen idea where am Bishen comes from in? You ambition middle child. I was stuck between two brothers. And you know, that's one ambition also comes from my I think being a an immigrant family that we knew we were fortunate lucky. I always tell this story growing up on my family's family room wall on one side, we're black and white photos of my dad's family on the other side was my mother's in the middle was my grandmother, and my mother sites which push go, which is where her passport was and my two great hands. And those are all the relatives who never made it to America the pictures on my. My mother and father side from the holocaust programs, and that there's nothing subtle on a Jewish home as you know. And you had these is on you growing while you were down on the family room watching TV, and the am Bishen was to be told that you had to do something because he couldn't disappoint your relatives. Never. So I think there's a lot of stuff that comes into it. I also I will now fast forward. I used to say every White House would be more stable if you think of the president's walk from the east wing to the west wing you pass like four oils of Washington to of Jefferson three rows. Right..

Bishen White House America president Jefferson Washington
"bishen" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"He put nicotinamide on yeast, and we could measure the so to activity by the color, and if sorta was marked if they ten read and he walked into my office, one of his first experiments. We worked on to. And and he said they'd somethings. We had we didn't get activation. We got into Bishen. So the yeast gone Rydin. I said Kevin doesn't matter. What happens is expected that even better that led to a paper that said that vitamin B three high doses. Inhibitory of tunes now the labs around the world use nicotinamide as an inhibitor for certain I wouldn't recommend taking really high doses of nicotinamide. Why is that few answers by chemical answer is that a an volt pocket in this or two and structure that measures nicotinamide levels. And it's a feedback. Loops nicotinamide is to get nerdy is the product of the reaction. It takes a D cleaves it. Oh, I got. So just the negative feedback. Nave seeing too much be three and saying I have too much of my output slowdown on a doubt. Exactly. So we struggled with that. We couldn't get any going to sell to big in with mammalian cells difficult us, we were looking at ways to make more energy in the cell. That was our original. Thesis before is virtual was on the radar, and we would turning on and discovering the genes that made in dean yeast, and we clone some of the genes in that way. And there was one particular one that was called peon is called PNC one, and it had been studying the context of tobacco Lhasa's, and what we found was that when we Clark restricted e cells, this was one of the most highly up regulated genes in yeast cell, which was very unusual people had discovered this before in their own lab. But they will wondering what the heck is this a AD, synthesis? Parkway got to do with calorie stricture and got to do with stress, but we knew exactly what was happening. This is a stress response that was turning on eighty production and activating so tunes. So we had a offense nature paper actually on that two thousand two I think doesn't three and we found the PNC one could mimic collection and raise AD availability. And if we knocked out the PNC one, gene e so. Didn't live longer than calorie restricted them. And what's really interesting about that? I think is that PNC one doesn't just get turned on by Clark stricken, it's turned on by heat, low amino acids, salt high salt, and so this is a gene that senses the environment and turned on the to exactly what I was explaining earlier about those early lifeforms on the planet sent their environment. And through an in other ways, they can turn on these parkways defense. So where did you go from PNC one to receive neutral? Well, we we teamed up with company at the time they'll called by them all and they will making reagents for H essays, this kind of thing and Conrad Howitt's was a scientist there, and he had invented wasn't even available yet an essay force or to an activity in vitro. I forget why he reached out to me. But he said, hey, maybe I wrote to him. But what happened? He sent me some kits to test and they worked and it looked great. What was the gold? Pandered prior to these kids. Oh, gosh amid mix to an activity required western blotting, which is detecting Gilberto. It was horribly hard still is and this is a very quick way to look for molecules what Conrad did was to take that essay and looked through his collection of molecules BiMAL. They had libraries of these things and to the first molecules that were that were discovered by him to change activities sort one humans at one were couple of plant molecules now he found plenty of inhibitors. That was that was inhibiting wasn't the hard part. Exactly. But he called me up. And he said David this is a something's weird. We've got these molecules that seem to activate enzyme, and that that's great. That's what we need and goes, well, I don't know if it's real what you know..

PNC Conrad Howitt nicotinamide Clark Bishen Rydin Nave Kevin Parkway David scientist
"bishen" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Aware of him having feeling Somme throughout our teenage years, and I basically interviewed him over sky because he lives back in a stray Leah about why we never got into a romantic relationship and why the snow to failure. But rather why we chose friendship over any prospect we might have had as love is all you know, the loves of each other's lives. And what we do is basically encourage female attributes in each other. So I give him a safe space for being open. Vulnerable and I invite him out to brunch and we gossip and talk about our feelings which he may not do with his male friends all in fact. I know for fact, he does not do as as a regularly with his mouth friends. Whereas he encourages made babe. It more brash to be a bit more traditionally male of what we consider. Traditionally male attributes a, he makes me sort of on a shamed of miam- Bishen. He makes me talk about sex more openly. He makes me kind of increase my confidence in a way to pass a male would. So we sort of offer each other little glimpses into what it's like to be someone of the sex. And that has been really constructive interesting to me over a long period of time. So I think I'm, you know, I'm not suggesting that having one friend of the opposite sex in any way kind of gives you will already to speak on what that experience might be like. But it certainly kind of broadens out knowledge of what it's like. It's wouldn't gives us little inside. Science into what it might bay to be amount or woman. And I think there are so many different variables because of course, we haven't even spoken about sexuality because I think you know none of women when they had, you know, sexual orientations that don't match up can also have beautiful friendships and be really interesting, and there's, you know, one of my best friends in the whole world is a gay man. And I think we became friends so easily and so quickly and so deeply because there was no sexual possibility between us at all. So for me as a woman that was completely non-threatening and safe, and for him, it was non-threatening and safe for him to express his more feminine sensibilities. So I think that can be so many different variables once you take sexuality into account as well. But it's a beautiful thing. I like this freezing using the book where you say that. People say, you know, we're just friends and it's like the freight e you talk about how in your opinion and I like this a lot. I, it's the is really the other way around saying, you know, we're, we're friends. We're not just lovers right in that. We're friends. We're not just made in that. You know, if if you're going to do a trade off, you know, in your saying that you're, you're choosing one of the other, like these people to people who are able to be friends. And they haven't. They haven't made it just about sex or or just about desire between the two people they, you know, obviously in a relationship you won't have both. But if it's framed is almost like the fringe is the thing you're trying to avoid, which is odd and. You make a good case that even even a situations where people are friends and they happen to hook up in some way that it doesn't necessarily or often destroy anything, and it kind of it gets it out of the way. And if they're, they can be friends and just let it pass because it's a different type of emotional connection is a different type of of attraction to one another. And the that people aren't brutish that they can be complex and I dig it. I don't know. This is the I liked that section of the book a lot. Thank you. And I think I mean, I didn't speak to the point you made earlier about where flows belong. Those really nice. Thank you so much. I think one of the beautiful things that can happen when you're friends with someone of the opposite sex is you've actually disregarded them as a romantic possibility. So I have people in my life..

Leah miam- Bishen
"bishen" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Wait 'til. We're gonna talk about UCS. So let's inhibits the shelves. Get to keep all their cholesterol. HDL cholesterol should roof. That's good. FD me logically right? Turn first principles. It doesn't even make sense in light of what you just told us, but they didn't know that Dan either. Remember this whole HDL story has evolved to the weight so that. So that's interesting. I don't think I understood that so I should give them more credit. Are you saying that absolutely was not known theories on guys like Dan Reiter was always talking about it, but you don't know how much you're interrupting assists with debt and everything. You know, they're so heavily focused on basic lipid biomarkers like LDL cholesterol, Elche cholesterol. It's the same, the nice story. How could it not work? It raises h. l. cholesterol turns out nice and doesn't work. If you wanna take a legitimate trials to show it works. And is there a price for using nice and even if you don't believe the legitimate trials. So that's another story which will probably get definitely get Get into. into this is one area where your peers will argue with you. Some Ma many will not other than heart's. I've tried everything else. Nothing else's work. Let me look. I'm a guy, took an nice in myself a bunch of years. So before I knew what I knew now and didn't unfortunately work for me anyway. So this CAT ATP it's going to raise HBO cholesterol, but how much it raises. It really depends on the potency of the inhibitor and are different degrees of c. Topalian Bishen we have weaken hypnotism..

Dan Reiter Topalian Bishen
"bishen" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"A good shock collar question. He can't get that wrong. A new survey asked that question to thousands of Americans, and they found the most popular answers so named the top three decades that they said in the correct order, and as a lifeline, you can ask me about any decade all tell you. If it's in the top three in all even tell you what place it's in some really trying to help you idiots out. I really really am. All right. Well, my first thought is people always romanticize the fifties. And the sixties. Yep. Even though I feel like those times actually terrible scare hind closed doors. They were horrible. Sixty s the sixties in front of closed doors were awful. Yeah. Like the social up people in this nation was, but when people when people talk about it, they just talk about the cops in the gentleman. Yeah. It's always sounded the most fun to me like drugs and partying and colorful stuff, the seventy. Yeah. Fashion was free love free. Love. Everyone was wear. Whatever you want that. Yeah. Like women's lib was starting to have. Big mustaches. Eighties. People talking about the eighties all the time to I do feel like a lot of people. Love the roaring twenties. Bishen and Speakeasy scores.

Bishen Speakeasy three decades
"bishen" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"I've never barred money. The I've never barred money because I think most people raise money or with high interest rates because they want shit faster. I want stuff slower. The bigger the am Bishen. The more patients you have to deploy. So that worked out a lot of this shit. I didn't realize at the time talk about a lot of stuff now is like it's hindsight, I can look back and be like, oh, so much came to be natural, you know. But I didn't have to deal with interest rates because I never looked to borrow money. I was I was willing to eat when I started being a media my company now it's gonna be a billion dollar company. It started in in a conference room and somebody else's company because they didn't want to pay rent. But I didn't because I wasn't worried about people coming to see a fancy office people just fronting all the time. Sir. So. Believing that. I've never doubted when I made the investment. I'm not writing some kid a twenty five fifty thousand dollar check because I doubt it. You know. Unfortunately, in that game, six months later, forget about doubt. You regret it. The biggest thing I learned was there was a lot of fake entrepreneurs. The biggest mistake I made was I was coaching and investing in thinking as if that person was me and I learned like I'd like the idea. I could see how they could do it, but they weren't me because I'd look on their Instagram and they're like at the beach on Friday afternoon and the first time I see that photo like I'm dead because they weren't even making money. They borrowed money, and the audacity is enormous. People go out of business. They write me an Email, dear, Gary. Sorry to inform. You looks like we'll be closing up shop our app as failed. We have seven thousand dollars left that's entitled to you. You You know. know, we're really sorry, but good news, good news. I learned a lot and in the future, maybe we can do something and I would reply like good news. You lost my hundred thousand dollars mother fucker, and there's just so much of that entitlement, you know. And so that's in the last four years I've gotten out. I've been building my business because there's so much fake entrepreneurship in the game. Guy..

Bishen Gary twenty five fifty thousand dol hundred thousand dollars seven thousand dollars billion dollar four years six months
"bishen" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

"There's between three and five rounds to Bishen around that this this is the veterans kinda take over, you know, and I can finally say the goal is to five part rounds. Beaches Johnson's I got I, I understand it. There's a threshold. There's a happy medium to this. Listen, man, we can't say enough. We're happy for you yet. We both picked you. He keeps of course. All right. Well, Henry, congratulations. I look forward to your next fight again. I'm guessing if it's going to be, I know they DJ has got some type of work he needs done, so we'll see how long he may be out for, but you had nothing major and you're ready to get back into camp soon. Yeah. I'm not that type of guy that that takes the back on the train and I'm not that guy. I'm. I'm. Unless you take time, I put in all work, the gym. Have I taken my time and and relax. Enjoy gets bad. They will back to the Jim. Awesome. Enjoy getting fat before the gym relate. I appreciate it. Got he. That's what we have to show. He's a lot to what was great talking to you and congratulations on on a victory that stunned a lot of people, but not us cause rats. No, I, I appreciate it guys. You guys have. All right. Here we take. All right. Champ. I gotta payroll. People love and underdog kepi they do. I couldn't even not. Well, let's take a break in the is to call. Couldn't people show. Brian Ortega loves the fight. He loves the strategy and you know, LSU loves. I know what he loves. Matt triangles. Bryant t city what he does. Oh, you also look to your tires. That's right because a triangle and not help your that makes your car, clunky. If you put triangles where the wheels belong, it wouldn't be a smooth ride. No b. but like Brian Ortega ties or tough as they come there, the official tires of the UFC look, there's a lots love about Toyo tires. They have aggressive design, proven on and offroad capabilities tires for any weather and the toughness tobacco, all up a confidence that comes with tires. So no matter what you're driving, no matter where you're driving, you can count on Toyo tires. My tires are not tough. I have no confidence, see a girl and I go, you don't wanna get in the car. You can. My tires aren't tough Bronco Tegas tough. Of course. He's always confident. That's why tough people love tough tires. If you're tough, these are the tires for you toy. Tie yours. I tried something different worked. Thank you. The next time you need tires. Yes, for Toyo the official tire of the UFC learn more at Toyota t. o. y. o. Toyo tires dot com. Backslash UFC Toyo tires dot com. Backslash UFC. How was your bathroom break?.

Toyo Brian Ortega UFC Bishen official Johnson Henry LSU Jim Toyota
"bishen" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Only annuals i feel lighter i don't carry grudges i'm bishen vanity it's great let go i should have started sooner and i also feel softer because i'm not scared of being vulnerable i don't see us weakness anymore and i've gained spirituality i'm aware that before death was in the neighborhood now it's next door or in my house what do you wish that the younger union knew about a beckoning i wish that the younger me would have known that it is an inexorable unavoidable process the nothing can stop it that i have to enjoy the body i have got moment i've always wanted to be different i wanted to be a told blonde with long legs now how do you i chief latino women it's impossible on i know that in ten years i will look at pictures of me now i will say wow she looked pretty good for her age i'm never going to look better than now this very moment never it just seems like state of mind is so important i think it's very important i tried to appear in front of everybody has a very healthy and strong person and that helps me believe that i am that for example my mother is a wigner she's all the time to sold it i'm in pain so we always had the dea that my mother was very frail ill person that would not live long she's strong as a bull but the shoe projects on what she thinks herself is frailty.

ten years
"bishen" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

Early to Rise Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

"Flip the script in your clients minds that your jim oh my goodness chris is going to be in the gym on saturday morning at ten o'clock this is awesome world to hang out with them we get to ask them about what's going on and that is how you want to set things up so it's just eventually communicating hey everybody i won't be training these sessions anymore because as you know my mission in life is to go and help this many people do this make these changes and i just want to go up there and do it and so i'm stepping away we brought in these new coaches they're going to be training with me for a couple of weeks you're gonna get to meet them you're gonna love them they're going to be better than me and i'm just stepping away to have greater impact and then when you get people to understand that everybody's going to buy in and everyone will get over it because we all get over everything in life and because everything you can get over and everything's a learnable skill and just go out there and with that mindset become the oprah madonna or rockstar of your business and have everybody realized that but have obviously have great charisma and be very humble but realize you have to step away in order to help more people lost thing what's the one thing that you want the viewer at least not everybody run out you need to this what do you want them to do i want you to go out and redefine or first of all define your definition of success what is it that you really truly want to do with your skills your talents and bishen 's your values your vision for your future and figure out here's the best version of me then i want you to go and get a coach or a mentor or even your big brother big sister your your mother your father your your spouse partner and have them say where can i elevate my game and then from that what i want you to do is play to that level.

chris bishen partner
"bishen" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Eight five five five no one 1035 are you somebody who likes to date people way way older or way way younger large aides differential i'd like to here why why i mean i think we know why but i would like to hear why works or if it works because it's like you guys were saying at some point what are you talking about what do you have in common in a what are you do besides that sex and i feel like if you know yard the one that's in your 20s like twenty one or whatever near dating the older older at some point you i mean you're gonna change alive from twenty to thirty from thirty to forty like what how are you guys aligned with your goals are right here and bishen thuan like lake jaggard sure you know he's he's iconic successful he's artistic but he still seventy four years old and dino she's still 20something says of fame thing like they just okay and with yeah what's gotta be yeah it's not a because there's really literally nothing else besides thad other than that he be old mc mc the old guy walking until exactly these that if he doesn't have the money and the notoriety them then there's no way this happens ripe i can't imagine let's talk to janet hajat geno wasn't afraid naji good morning good morning so what are you you don't see a problem with the mick jagger thing you don't see a problem with me hooking up with a twenty one year old the wedding which i did not do by the way i don't you know probably you're twenty one euro i don't in better they feel like you can go are you a great conversation now you go about accommodation like you were very very example me okay i twenty four years old i am a houseowner i own a car i have a successful career you know like i don't think it really mattered with anything like that relationship why a credit manner but what if you're dating let's say you said you're 24 uhhuh and you're dating like a sixty year old don't you feel like you guys are going to have different goals different things that you wanna do a knife.

lake jaggard naji bishen thuan janet hajat geno mick jagger seventy four years twenty four years twenty one year sixty year
"bishen" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"bishen" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"We were asked about the collision and the investigation into the collision you're still underway the first collision grant uh hurt most people were aware of the one that could play can you when a destroyer uss gerald uh hit a are workrate broader collided with very um uh a merchant ship in the approaches to tokyo harbor uh you know if not a complete investigation on not least publicly but what the navy relief so far is their judgment bridge crew heard what they call insufficient cooked regional awareness which means pick weren't entirely aware of what was going on outside in front of noses well go the question is why and the investigation will help reveal uh i suspect that training in crawl and um we'll know more about trap but at the same thing happened mr kraft's set if i may the saint they hate him with with the us as mccain and a correct me if i'm wrong sir aren't these aren't these these these are the navy ships that have the antiballistic system that could possibly possibly shoot down any missile lobbed by kim jong own now you're absolutely right komo the problem here fleet it is being challenged right now uh exactly four a among other regions by uh north korea and uh and bishen aggressiveness and could be reacting to ships with ballistic missile defense capability is not good margaret growth not good for our allies and it's going to send the navy scrambling to find replacement and the navy is already where you overstretch that subject of the book wile and tell us about china's actions in the international waters of the south and east china sea sir well china iran crying too kern international waters of the south china in the east china sea into chinese territorial water and this is important because worn they're not international waters according to the definition given by the lob who treaty towards china is a signatory that it also crew it's also a problem for the united states because shouldn't who jeff from administration the united states has a mild prime nation that depends upon trade with other countries over the fees has worked very hard to make sure of a.

mr kraft mccain north korea navy south china united states tokyo kim jong china iran jeff