22 Burst results for "Birt"

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

04:08 min | 8 months ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope those promises bring to our everyday lives. whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with a different one and almost always people smile when they fake a burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live is. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing who. You're not tense. The name the burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god's promises. Well hey there hello again. Everyone welcome back so glad. You're joining me today. Here on the bird. Not ernie show. I am coming to you from kansas where it is so windy today. In fact i would not be surprised if you kinda catch little little wishes of the wind because it is really just blowing and howling out there so happy windy fall day from kansas. This is episode seventy nine. And today. I'm going to read from the new testament the book of matthew. I'm going to read a passage more than just one. Verse passage the new living translation. Just one version today not gonna read from the amplified and not going to compare and contrast different versions just the new living translation today. Matthew twenty five fourteen through thirty of the new living translation. Okay here we go. It's a lot so it's gonna take me a minute to read through it or a couple of minutes. But i want to encourage you to listen because this is god's word and it's going to speak to you. It always has something to say to us. God's word does so. And i'm going to read it straight through chapter twenty five matthew versus fourteen hundred thirty..

ernie john birt Burt kansas jan matthew Matthew matthew versus
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

05:28 min | 9 months ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope. Those promises bring our everyday lives. Whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with different one and almost always people smile when they think of burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing. You're not tense. The name burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god's promises. Well hey welcome back to new show. Podcast getting the promises of.

ernie john birt Burt jan
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

04:31 min | 9 months ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is jan birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope. Those promises bring our everyday lives. Whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with a different one and almost always people smile when they fake a burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live is. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing who. You're not tense. The name the burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god's promises. Well hey there hello again everybody. Welcome back to the bert ernie. Show podcast this episode.

ernie jan birt Burt jan bert ernie
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

04:29 min | 10 months ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope. Those promises bring our everyday lives. Whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with a different one and almost always people smile when they fake a burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live is. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing who. You're not tense. The name the burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god's promises. Well hey there. How low hello again. Everyone welcome back to the bert ernie. Show podcast.

ernie john birt Burt jan bert ernie
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope those promises bring to our everyday lives. whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with a different one and almost always people smile when they fake a burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live is. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing who. You're not tense. The name the burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god's promises podcast this episode number seventy four and i'm your host. Jan albert of.

ernie john birt Burt jan Jan albert
"birt" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

Inappropriate Earl

05:43 min | 11 months ago

"birt" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

"Lose birt's defined playing bidders like largos smaller venue side legendary venue in even like the clubs in l. a. r. john. I mean comedy stores are big room the main specifically. Do you deliver the jokes differently. If you're doing largo or like september tenth chevallier theater. You make adjustments to the size of the room. I mean you do have to. I don't wanna say him big in yourself. But there's there's more of a like this the next special that i shoot i wanna do it in a very small venue. I was looking at my specials and a lot of them. I'm like in this stance like kinda sending it up into the rafters and so my best sets happen. These tiny mindset last night at the urban improv show loose and intimate and like we elect actually looking at people and talking with them. It felt like so immediate end. I want to try to find a way to capture that. Some people have but really really captured on film. You know in a special But yet you absolutely you have an seeing The gas and they were at the. Greek theater may adjust. We're opening for the white trash need. Just broken through. They hadn't made the adjustment from small club. Ban destroys a small club to now..

chevallier theater birt john
"birt" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"birt" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Hanako goes out the window a little bit when we see these free mountainous one day races. Which is no. There isn't a classic on the calendar. Okay you could say is pretty mountainous. Birt's we saw the innsbruck world championships. A couple of years ago and also on on saturday the you get interesting scenarios when you have a big mountain passes or very steep long climbs like the mikuni which is the final decisive climb. You get sort of configuration of a race that we not really used to seeing. And they're obviously riders just exceptionally exceptional form like wildfire on. And then you get the pure climate and it makes for a really interesting sort of battle Between between the different categories of riders without he say not the same resources that they would usually have in trade teams in road races with six or seven domestiques and how they they decided they tried to use as resources was really interesting..

Hanako Birt
"birt" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"birt" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Is you know. Build up these embedding. The classic term for it as anything can really be an embedding from from one space from one vector space to another vector space essentially taking raw data raw taxed Let's say product reviews right. You know customer reviews and then converting those into burt vectors. And what you wanna do is just do that once and so when you ask about the most perfect data pipeline right you want things like traceability you want. There's reasons now that you might need to actually take data out. So there's gdp are all those familiar things where we might actually have to remove data even from our trained model so at some point. It's not good enough to just delete the rows of a user from your database right like you also have to delete or modify any and all models that have been trained with that users data. This is a very difficult problem. It's not very easily solved. But the ability to trace and say this set of you know fifteen or five hundred models used that single person's data we have to now pull it out and then retrain and start from that particular point in time right and then retrain and so feature stories gives you that ability right. Where if you break it down. Future store is a you know. it's database tables. But has this notion of time right that these features were actually ingested and you can share these features just like you can share rights any database so before sage maker features store people built these on their own and they were sort of bespoke. But the folks over at tech thanh and then the sage maker feature sorta really alike tackle this. It's a really good topic. You should pull someone from from tectonic or somewhere to discuss this. That's really interesting to hear that. Basically the entry point into what you would consider a sensible data engineering data science stack. Is this feature store. Why is that of all the things in the pancake stack. Why is the feature store best pancake. The best layer. Well you can reuse right so these oftentimes are very complex. Transformations going from raw text to this Vocabulary that bert has has learned right. You know birt has been trained on millions and millions of documents and bert has a notion of right like human language and trying to get language. Text into these. You know burt. Vectors could take many days you know. Yeah depending on like how much compute you have. How much do you have all that stuff. So you really only want to do that. Once or very few times. And just sorta incrementally and so from that point right like you could also then share not only with your teammates but yes you could use those same features that have been transformed those those the same birkbeck when you're actually making predictions yes. Otherwise you're making this transformation twice so you would have to do at once during training which could take a few days huge batch job to then create those vectors and then when you go to actually make predictions rightly you would then have to re transform that same text into that. Same victor space and so really. There's a lot of sort of operational cost savings going on there. That's tectonics main value. Prop is they have lots and lots of cool features but they also save you quite a lot of time and i have a really good value. Prop okay well. Unfortunately we've got to get going. But i'd love to keep talking to you. We should do another show. I'd love to. We should do one in person. Maybe in a few months. I think we should just like do a like a long. Like the history of data engineering like six. What does the six year history of data engineering. And why is it the way that it is today. But i also love to do a show that actually covers Aws in a little more detail if onto wants to come on but sorry to cut it. Short man i. I'd love to talk longer. Yeah no problem. Yes always good to see jeff you to in person soon for sure..

bert birt burt jeff
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope. Those promises bring our everyday lives. Whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with the different one and almost always people smile when they think of burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing. You're not tense. The name burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god commented. Well hey there. Idaho and hello again..

ernie john birt Burt jan Idaho
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope. Those promises bring our everyday lives. Whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with the different one and almost always people smile when they think of burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing. You're not tense. The name burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god commented. Well hey hello there. John elbert here back again for another episode of.

John elbert john birt jan. Burt ernie God burt
Igniting Your Feminine Fire with Aurora Farber

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Igniting Your Feminine Fire with Aurora Farber

"And welcome to live love engage. I am grace rand and today. We're gonna be talking about abundance. we're going to be talking about femininity. And more specifically feminine fire intuition all sorts of wonderful things with my guest today on the program who is aurora farber. So first off. Welcome you to live. Love engage aurora. Thank you so much. I'm delighted to be here. Connect with you to connect with your audience and to live love and engage absolutely will. We are delighted to have you. And this woman is she is accomplished. She's got a lot going for. So let me just share a little bit with you or with yes. You are listening watching to see a little bit more about her. She is a transformational coach. Intuitive guide writer speaker sacred space ceremonial list way finder magical muse and modern day priestess and her mission is to help women get unstuck by reclaiming and igniting their feminine fire that heart light within that integrates life giving power compassionate love and intuitive wisdom and these three feminine flames are the key to creating a life of passion pleasure purpose on the journey feminine leadership which is so important all women we are leaders in our own right but sometimes i think we don't always express that enough or maybe own net Which is why aurora. Please that women are works of art and every woman is a sacred vessel capable of miraculous creation into activate that creators shockey fire. We need to come back home to ourselves to our inner fire to are feminine. Fire so Actually you know what i we were. We were talking before we started the recording That i was going to go one way. But i'm thinking let's let's deal with the feminine fire right now and what Maybe a little bit. Explain a little bit up more out about that. And why women why it is so important really for women to reclaim and ignited. Yes i'd love you. I really loved your introduction and remembering those words that came through me that women are works of art. And if you think about a work of art vessel right piece of pottery. There needs to be that fire that place of animation where we come alive and so women are not only works of art but we have the ability to create we can create life. That is our shock d fire. that is It's our superpower for thousands of years women who rose into that knowing who shared their gifts their medicine gifts their inner wisdom their in tuition their ways of working the earth and with The body those things have been cut off for many women in its pass down through the lineage and so this and fire is nothing new but it is something that we are here to reignite and for me i love you know there's as i work with thirteen divine feminine archetypes in there. Two that come to me when i feel into. What does this mean to me. Well there's that creative shocked the fire of like the wild woman of the primal goddess dancing around the fire that howling to the moon that kind of fire right that that birt's life and creativity and as passionate and full of energy and then there's another fire and it's the fire of the goddess of compassion. That's the triple flame. That lives in the heart. it's the purple fire zip for me that is composed of these three flames power love and was dumb. And that's the fire. That is my mission to bring back to this world to reignite power love and wisdom well this wisdom we've had inside of us but many of a separate gotten or it's been stripped away in told that it's not valid of that. We were crazy or that we were all lunatics right so having inner knowing This love we are capable of sharing but for many women that that aspect of self love that flaine first needs to be ignited and then power. Well certainly we live in a different age and that is one of the beautiful things about the time now. We do have more power but the models of power that we have all the masculine models and so we've kind of come into our own. Feminism with like okay. Well i've got to put on my pant suit and you know just trying to follow the model of power that we've seen and yet these typical structures of the patriarchy especially this year this year during covid see structures are crumbling and we are beginning to see how they don't serve at least they don't serve all of us they may serve some of us but not all of us and so when you add that aspect of combining power with love like how can i add to the flame of love where i can use my power to serve all of us answer the guidance

Grace Rand Aurora Farber Aurora Shockey Birt
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there. My name is john birt and this is my podcast the burt not ernie show where we talk about. God's promises and the hope. Those promises bring our everyday lives. Whenever i meet somebody new. I introduced myself as jan. Burt and say like burden ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with different one and almost always people smile when they think of burden ernie that got me thinking. I'm the bird. And i'm not in ernie. But how often do we live. If we're someone. God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing. You're not tense. The name burt. Not ernie show. I'm so glad you're here. Let's dig into god's promises. Well hey there hello again everybody here. It is brand new year. First.

ernie john birt Burt jan
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well. Hello there my name is John Birt and this is my podcast the burt not Ernie show where we talk about God's promises and the hope those promises bring our everyday lives whenever I meet somebody new I introduced myself as Jan Burt and say like burden Ernie. Since it's easy to confuse my last name with different one and almost always people smile when they think of burden Ernie that got me thinking I'm the bird and I'm not in Ernie. But how often do we live if we're someone God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing you're not tense the name Burt Not Ernie show. I'm so glad you're here let's dig into God promises. Well Hey. Hello there. Welcome.

Ernie Jan Burt John Birt
"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on The Burt (Not Ernie) Show

"Well hello there my name is John. Birt and this is my podcast the burt not Ernie show where we talk about God's promises and the hope those promises bring to our everyday lives whenever I meet somebody new I introduced myself as Jan Burt and say like burden Ernie since it's easy to confuse my last name with different one and almost always people smile when they think of burden Ernie that got me thinking I'm the bird and I'm not in Ernie but how often do we live if we're someone God never meant for us to be part of knowing who you are is knowing you're not tense the name Burt. Not Ernie show I'm so glad you're here let's dig into God's Promises They lose their welcome back to the first. Show everybody. Down on.

Ernie Jan Burt Birt
What's on Your Shelf?

Art Beauty

09:39 min | 2 years ago

What's on Your Shelf?

"Our guest today Who the suspect with him? By the way but kind of schooled us a little bit a lot of a lot of it on you know on our shelf fees because he said do you know why do you feel that you need to have so many products. And he's right or he's not wrong but I will say like our shelf. Fees are are just things that we buy and use and that are not branded not sponsored that we just share with the world I am addicted but products products. Al Security Blanket for me as I'm aging as I am morphing into all the roles that I have now. I do grasp and remember that that like ten minutes in the mirror that gave me the confidence throughout my life. I reach for beauty products to do that for me. It's definitely like it's a clutch approach so I I'm going to try and turn a new leaf after our guest today. 'cause I truly like the light bulb turned on a little bit more. It is a lesser sir. More it is being responsible as a consumer. It is choosing certain brands. I I I can't say enough about this interview. Other than the fact that I possibly hostages changed my life a little bit. It totally did and I'm looking right now to grab my my my intro for him at Mike in Durski. I'm just GonNa win this one but it. Mike and Durski is really truly a titan of the beauty industry. He's held executive positions at Laurie. AL at Unilever he held it's executive positions at birt's bees and most recently lists and I did try to get him to re install one of my favorite it products the shellfish that got discontinued but he is coming out with his own line. Here me raw. It's going to launch in January and a big part of the ethos of his company was was it. We need to be more sustainable. Not just in the physical packaging but in in how we view beauty and that we don't maybe necessarily need eighteen different products to slap on our face. But you know what we're GonNa let him tell you a little bit more about the company when I left bliss but first of all thank you so so much for introductions Berry Swedish new When I left Bliss I was being interviewed by magazine? And they said okay. You've been in the business for like thirty years. What's changed well? The obvious things is influencers in the Internet. Those to the big changes but aside from that after thirty years were still selling women. Products will should go on their skin packaging. Which isn't sustainable bank claims? We can't keep for prices are too high on skews. We don't need and we're all guilty of manufacturers facture the marketers retailers and we have to stop in we're not honoring the people trying to serve his whole businesses. Trying to be about making women feel better about themselves and we're not doing that by having bad ingredients by had not have simple packaging choice. I want to do something about it. I wanted to challenge industry. I want to get back on track of what's right and You know whether it's the confusion of behind what's clean beauty and is clean natural as clean sustainable and really let people know what clearly really means. Because it doesn't mean you do those things and to really fight to have the industry change and get into sustainable packaging and I mean in this day and age no company now forget the beauty industry should be making anything with a not thinking about where the materials are coming from and how they're being disposed off and on I think we we need to make a make a change in this ridiculous having forty skews hundreds of skews. It's nonsense and I wanted to do something different. So this whole idea was challenge convention challenge every convention that kind of operates by and come along. That really talks to the way women are today so you have said in one of the things is that I found so powerful in the pitch. Was that clean. Beauty is actually a dirty word. What by that I mean? That's intentionally provocative but I think a lot of the retailers are doing the right things by saying we need to have standard products and They they decide what ingredients putting Greens from bad. The problem is that the average consumer thinks that clean means natural and they might think that it means organic. They might think that it needs sustainable. And it doesn't mean any of those things all clean means don't have really bad things in there and the truth. Truth is no skincare by the FDA has really bad things in there so while trying to help consumers is misleading. Because women are inferring that the stuff is natural. And it's it's it's a sustainable or organic in it's not and if it's important to use natural products if you believe that that no synthetic ingredients should every put inter on your skin who is bad for your health. You need to know that and buying something says it's clean and it's not clean as is is going to be damaging it's it's not truth. Is there any regulation right now on on the terminology of of Clean Beauty. You know every retailer in every brand who call themselves clean has their own definition right back about ten years ago when I was at birth. It's been I created the standard for natural personal care products and I worked with about ten other competitors and I worked at the natural process association to come up with one on standard. This is what natural is and Stores like target and macy's and Wal Mart were all Setting their shelves according to our standard is one standard and that was ten years ago and that standard kind of went away now. They made people making their own standards. So I just tell people lose with people's either clean. Just go and find out what clean means to them. Ask them you know right right email to the company. Does this be your natural. They're not naturally inspired. You know but really natural. It's a big difference and and let me just ask really briefly anything natural anything. Organic the shelf life is. Would you say half if not less often. And there's there's a new little push in the worlds where like keeping everything in your little mini beauty fridge. How do you feel about that? I agree with that. I I think that I think there's nothing wrong with a product having having a lower shelf life I mean i. There's a little symbol on on packaging. It's a little jar with a LID coming up and it says like how many months after opening is it good and we believe that six months after opening is a lot better than thirty six months after opening meaning I would be okay with the product but being no good after six months because it's not fresh anymore and I think I think That makes more sense than I mean. Think about food which we'd a piece of Sam mm-hmm that's good thirty six months after opening. What what what the hell they shooting that Salmon's and make live dialogue? So I I I I have no problem with Something that says once you open it using within six months and the other thing I thought about was you know I'm a consumer. I shop beauty all year round I don't always opt for the overnight shipping. I don't always get it off of Amazon. Where primes the next day? And sometimes I will do ground shipping but during the months of July and August. Guess where things are so hot and you don't know how long it sat in a truck. You should should should the consumer be worried about that of a truck. That's a hundred degrees will i. It's interesting you talk about the the shipping the overnight shipping. One thing. I always I do like when I buy things from Amazon is I wait I have so many items to ship. I keep it in my cart if you don't need it wait because you're saving so much in Environmentally in terms of carbon footprints. I'd rather have one shipments of ten things. In ten shipments of one thing. I also on that that is I mean you know I realized this and again. It's just something I'm a culprit myself but I was ordering during one thing at a time. They used to say oh. I Love Amazon and I live right across from a twenty four hour drugstore and instead of going across the by the toothpaste I'd order it from Amazon on and when I really somebody made me realize you know that's a terrible carbon footprint what are you doing and I'm guilty of it and I think that I'm glad you're addressing it now because it's something that we all need to be much more aware of an Amazon prime is fantastic and I I love using the service. I have it but I mean I don't need a dozen batteries tomorrow and and you get this little tiny pattern raises coming to big box. You know how much shipping is going into it flying on a plane. It's ridiculous I tell people mess. Emergency just keep everything in your cart and then when you had an emergency thing then have it all come at one time. Okay but back to my question. Agent market really hot hot months. And we're being trying to be very PC and use all. The carbon makes our carbon urban furnace mall. If I don't do overnight shipping or two day express in it sits somewhere for ninety to one hundred degrees on a truck for day or two cannot affect that organic natural products. No usually a wealth.

Amazon Clean Beauty Executive Bliss Mike Unilever Durski FDA Macy Laurie Birt Sam Mm-Hmm Wal Mart Salmon Six Months Thirty Six Months Thirty Years Ten Years
SpanBERT

Data Skeptic

10:16 min | 2 years ago

SpanBERT

"So on the show we've been talking about burt night every episode come out but I'll take for granted that listeners at least should by now know what burt is so I'll skip that question and just ask you if you could put into context may be some Wayne which you've been applying birt has had an incredible affect on the P. Community. I think that's pretty obvious by now in one sense and this has also affected me personally burt kind of killed a lot of projects that were trying to create or design a model that is specific to a certain task came along you know this this kind of massive pre trained mass language model all that within three training e pox on on the target task it's getting stead of the results and putting those handcrafted models leaving the way behind a lot of people's first impression of bird is to be impressed with it what was your journey towards questioning where it's boundaries lie in span. Burt were not the per se trying to understand what the limits of Bert are but that is still a really really interesting question I have had other work that tries to kind of analyze what Bert Learns we actually just got a paper award and the Blackhawks NLP workshop for that paper that's work with with Kevin Clark does she khandelwal Chris Manning and other people have written similar papers in basically found out the bird is kind of learning the whole traditional NLP pipeline implicit manner and it's getting a lot of gains from that but I don't think that we have seen kind of what the limits of burt or Bert like models are at this point can you tell me a bit about how span Bert which is the shortest way to describe your contributions what's the long way what do you guys innovating on in your research since pampered what we tried to do is improve the pre-training tasks that bird is using bird is not a model but a- pre-training methods in that pre training method birt has two objectives one is the mass language model the other is accents prediction we focused on mainly proving the mass language model so the mass language model itself the way it works is that you get a sentence say I had a nice chat with Kyle at then you randomly pick some of these words mask them that say we must chats and the model needs to predict the missing word in I had something with Kyle is chats to make that after kind of to force the model to capture more interesting things about language and I'm keeping this vague intentionally will road to that in the second what we did was I instead of masking random tokens we masked random spans of tokens so we're not saying we're not giving the model as input I had a nice something with Kyle were saying I something something something something with Kyle and that is that a bit more flexibility in terms in the things that it could potentially predict by making the task more challenging basically forcing the model to learn more about length. approach the other thing we added was that we're not only forcing it to predict these missing words dismissing span from each of the individual mask Toke John's but we're forcing it to predict the information from the boundaries off the mask span so from the word I and with with Kyle were trying to predict everything that was in between tell me more about that limit does that mean I'm not going to consider things like the length of the span we didn't change the length of the sequence so the model knows what what legs it's trying to predict but it needs to kind of saying in a bit of a hand wavy way in needs to learn longer range dependency so it needs to learn not only what kind of immediately neighboring words I wanna be but what the next three words are gonNA be or forward depending on the length of the span the idea is novel and appeals to me and thank you put it pretty succinctly when you said we want to force the model or the learning process to learn more effectively but as I also think about it I wonder Well Okay you've made the problem harder if you train your model with your method on the exact same training data set we hope that that effort doesn't fact force the model to be murder do you have any way to quantify the degree to which that's true so that's a great question and we actually put a lot of effort and especially Taiwan resources into making sure that we're giving Berta real fighting chance the original of fighting chance to beat us in addition to taking Google's version of burt and just download you know whatever they may publicly available we also re implemented burt ourselves and we did a bit of hyper parameter tuning and every kind of training trick bit data or hyper parameters or training for more rations that we also applied to the baseline so we had baselines that were actually much much stronger than the original birds and we were still able to outperformed them when we added the span birds objectives on pre-trading tasks very neat and is there any way you can measure do that or is it more qualitative as you introspective results if you'll allow me to go on a bit of a of a tangent here please this is a question asking since two thousand sixteen when along with Felix Hill we ran the Rep Avowal Workshop this was twenty sixteen since then Sam Bowman joined us and actually kind of took the lead on this we came together to make this shared task that everybody's been running on glue I think most of our listeners have heard of a now we have also superglue which is kind of the next generation much harder tasks as well glue as a really really good way or was a good way until I got maxed out by by all these models but it's a really good way of evaluating how will these pretrial tasks are actually working because it evaluates a diverse set of tasks with different types of training set sizes different levels of complexity of difficulty if you manage to improve the results glue by say two points that's really really meaningful I'll mention another work that we did kind of concurrently it started actually from kind of the same parent project but split off into two things one of them was span the other being Roberta so Roberta the the idea was basically let's try to replicate birds but do a lot of hyper parameter you name and scaling up that original bird just didn't do because I know they thought it was big enough and good enough to really was at the time but apparently what we found in Roberto was that you can do a little bit of tweaking to the hyper parameters for example just training and get for a bit longer maybe try training with bigger batch works really really really well in fact it works so well that on glue for example we were able to outperform xl nets by a little bit so kind of that's really saying something yeah I would say within variance but basically without adding all commodification exit added to the model so we just you know we basically had the simple model even simplified it even more we removed the next symptoms addicts in the NFC objective didn't spend Burton as well and used just a single sequence to train each example and just scamming it up training for longer using slightly better vocabularies just really really improved performance on a bunch of tests and not only glue we also just east results and Superglue as well where there's really really big leap it's not at human level yet because superfluids significantly harder it has a bunch of tests that are significantly harder than the ones that we have in glue but still it's a huge advance in Yeah absolutely I seem to recall the paper on a lot of tasks like putting your your approach to the challenge with the famous squad and squad two point Oh data sets that you were eking out those arguable percentage points improvements on span burt when compared to Vanilla Google burt and a few others I know all deep learning a little bit inherently blackbox but do you have a sense of you've the mechanism or or what it is is allowing your model to outperform I really the most impressive results were in what we call span selection tasks so squad squad to a lot of the machine reading question answering our task data sets that we ran on we see this really significant improvement there this is probably because Spaniard is focused on representing and predicting the content of Mrs Expense and I think that's why we're getting gains on these are also mentioned one other task that we ran on which which most people don't run on because it's a bit more complicated which is correct resolution reference resolution is a really hard task for a models currently the state of the art on this it's it's about seventy nine F. One whereas before us the best model was from Lee and others which was about

Burt Birt P. Community Bert Wayne
Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

60-Second Science

02:21 min | 3 years ago

Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata seems like anytime you see a squirrel. It's busy doing something pink headed somewhere scrounging for food and being out in about all the time also means era tasty morsels for a lot of different predators. Keith target a behavioral ecologist at at Overland College. He says squirrels scan their surroundings for hawks and owls cats and foxes but they also have another surveillance system. They eavesdrop on nearby. Birds BIRT's eavesdropping on alarm calls or eavesdropping on chatter is a cheap and easy way to supplement the information that they have access to because it's free it's produced by other individuals in the environment. It's publicly available to any organism that has the cognitive ability to recognize interpret that information tarvisio colleague Marie Lillie tested that ability by riding around town on her bicycle stopping when she found a squirrel then she'd set up her equipment play the fearsome fearsome scream of a red tailed hawk and then either play the casual unworried chatter of songbirds chiefs or ambient noise as a control all the while she observed the squirrels behavior and she noticed that when squirrels heard the reassuring chatter of songbirds following the Hawks doc scream they relaxed more readily. Imagine this if you're walking in a crowd and everyone seems pretty happy and content and they're chit chatting with beach other. You might even subconsciously take that as information that all of those eyes and ears apparently seem to perceive the environment as being safe and we think the squirrels might be listening in on bird chatter in the same way the details are in the journal plus one and squirrels give back to the community to with their own alarm calls which might help other eavesdropping animals but in busy urban environments Tara and says that rich fabric brick of animal communication risks being drowned out by the loudest animals around us. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher.

Hawks Christopher Dodd Yata Marie Lillie Overland College Keith Tara Sixty Seconds
Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

How I Built This

24:51 min | 3 years ago

Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

"Welcome back revenue which is which is great rate. You know you could start to see maybe a path towards towards real profitability. <hes> and i guess the the next year you really i mean you. You're still running his business by the way out of your apartment in boston that you guys share right <hes> the starts to turn a corner though because as we see that reaction in the street and boom we start thinking about distribution and hiring a sales rep and that that summer of ninety five the momentum starts rolling and debt was when you made your first higher as well i guess right that's right yeah. The <hes> cary sherman moved in upstairs cheers from us and became a friend and we just used to beg her when she got home from work to help us <hes> pack orders and help us try to organize the orders ars and <hes> she was a big help so we begged her to quit her job eventually and she did it. She could do things five times faster than us for one thing and then it became clear we needed the help pretty badly and she needed to take a leap yeah. We we had a friend over for dinner one night because he was pretty sharp and we asked him to tell us how much business we would have to do to be able to afford to pay carry <hes> seventeen thousand dollars which is what she said was the minimum the question to her was what is the lowest amount that you could possibly get paid to work with us and seventeen thousand dollars so he did the math for us and he said that we would have to do a quarter of a million dollars in business which sounded like a billion dollars yeah and we we did two hundred sixty two. I think it was two hundred sixty two thousand a a year yeah and that two hundred sixty two thousand was like that's to pay for all your supplies and everything and everything was not profit that is that is oh no in those in those roche revenue days we we would get prepared for died t shirts p._f. Dis they caught and we'd store them. We didn't have enough room for them in our apartment which store them in a bulkhead in the building and we had to put them in trash bags <hes> that were tightly wound up because it was moist down there and so a in any given day we would get a certain amount of orders we would be designing during the daytime in the afternoon and we would take those shirts down to new bedford. Get them died in the shirt collars. We wanted the next afternoon. We'd take those shirts out to a marlboro mass and to screen printers midland graphics screen printed t shirts and then <hes> by four o'clock drop them off at u._p._s. Whatever the orders were which was you know two or three retailers a couple of order and then we then we set up a trailer like the back of a eighteen wheeler container owner containers like permanently stationed next to our screen printer with their permission they had a dirt parking lot and for zero rent they because we were afraid to to get the overhead of a warehouse and so they let us was thirty dollars a month to rent the <hes> lease the container and end for zero dollars. They let us <hes> park it on their lot he because you didn't take the risk on on like a long term lease so you'll just let us a shipping containers are warehouse makes sense your we want. We wanted to make sure the revenue ran way out ahead of this needed a couple extension cords lighting and not a lot of ventilation in those containers but <hes> we cranked some of ninety five ninety six and it was kind of non stop twenty four seven how did you how did you get the trademark on it. I mean it seems like a very very common phrase. Life is good but you got a new trademark. How did that happen well. We failed five times. We were going to the boston public library at all you couldn't important attorney and we sent five applications and failed and then i went one night to play basketball and some guy asked me. Did i see you and your brother selling t shirts in front of the boston garden the other night and i said yeah and he said how's that going not so good but we have this great idea the eh i went on and on about what the concept was and that we're trying to trade market and then i realized that i'd been rude and not ask the guy what he did. I said what do you do for a living and he said <hes> trademark attorney and guy's name was bob pierce and i went and saw him two days later and convince them to do the work pro pro bono and he knew just what to do so we had to make a lot of changes we had to create hang tags and labels we the label in our shirt said jacobs gallery gallery so we switched the label to life is good and then we had to get affidavits from five different retailers who said that it represented a brand and by definition legally trademark denotes the source of the goods so there's when you just put a mark on a t shirt that's called ornamental but if people look at it and say that represents the source of the goods in some way then it's a brand so he did all those things correctly and i gotta tell you it's twenty five years later and and bob pierce still gets all our intellectual property business. That's amazing so you got the trademark on this phrase. Life is good as a brand and that's your you sort of you own this phrase phrase and you can use it as your business even the fact that you said it a few times during this podcast you owe us money got yeah. It was a it was a big day when we got it. We we still didn't really know how to run a business or what to do but it was. We knew it was a a valuable thing yeah. How did you guys divide up labor between the two of you like who did what who did finances who who did the art who to the delivery. How how did you guys who was in charge. Who was the boss older brother. The boss anything that involved brainpower pretty much fell on my side no seriously bur burden off he had more of a background coming out of school <hes> on the business side and he's a great communicator great motivator so he worked worked the phones a lot. I spend more time on the drawing table or like at the screen print shop or maybe packing up stuff but there's plenty of crossover birt's. It's very creative as well so it mixed pretty seamlessly over the years. I guess there was a turning point pretty significant turning point in nineteen ninety-six. You guys get a call from a pretty big sporting goods chain based out of indianapolis named named kelly ins or gaylon galleons something something like that yet galleons yeah. What was that yeah they were. They were actually in our opinion. The best sporting goods in the country <hes> their stores were incredible and yeah they they were open to a sales call and interested in the brand so they invited us to go visit them in indianapolis and we actually actually couldn't afford to fly out so instead we've just transparent with them and asked if we could piggy back when they came here would they come and visit us i would they didn't realize was that there was no life as good in that when they came to visit austin becoming to our apartment so they <hes> anyway a we made them prince spaghetti and rago sauce and we hung out and they they were on board and <hes> they placed the biggest orders is by far that we'd ever seen and they kind of put us on the map outside of new england. I think dick's sporting goods eventually bought galleons right. That's right and i i i don't know if it was apparent to them that the entire company in burt myself in kerry or sitting with them in our kitchen at dinner but but we did have a lot of laughs and then we got an in order and that was a huge step for us to suddenly be shipping two hundred and eighty eight pieces instead of twenty four pieces to a retailer so so once you get into galleons aliens was at just like a game changer i mean. Did you see your business just like skyrocket. It was a game changer because once he would happen was <hes> most of our business stan and now is a specialty mom and pop business so the mama pops will take a look at the big guys. Try to find brands. Sometimes that different <hes> retailers carrying galleons was kind of a model citizen that a lot of small retailers looked up to and so once we were in galleons we're in all these geographic <unk> graphic locations and there was great visibility for us so all of a sudden our phones were ringing like crazy from other retailers from other territories and so- galleys was probably responsible responsible for hundreds of new accounts over the next year or two and business really started booming. You know went from that. Two hundred fifty thousand six hundred twenty then we broke a million at one moment to the was just mind blowing t- thinking how do we go from having like seventy eight dollars between us three years ago. Two million dollars in sales was pretty mind blowing and we didn't have a concept of you know like what it meant to do a million dollars. I think we thought maybe we should retire knows wow we hit a million dollars. I mean i think we definitely stopped and sort of you know how to how to beer and kind kind of said wow man what what has happened but on the other hand was still in our apartment and you don't really look around and see any differences just a mad scramble we'll still but but i think yeah i think galleons an crossing not million dollar mark connor gave us the confidence to invest in a lease get the warehouse and and we hired a few people we i mean we we didn't even have a computer would do untold kerry who still works with us to this day by the way she actually owns five percent the business. He's a partner yeah but she you know she said to us. You really need to get a computer and both on our like oh. We're artists we. We don't want a computer and they so she needed to run the business. Why do we need a computer but she was right well. There's a lot of absurd of exchanges. We had this guy who had run champion the brand chair and wilson sporting goods and he was helping us out through his a sales up. You know we connected personally. Jay phillips god bless him. He was flying up phillies like an angel. We didn't yeah to get angel slash devil the best kind and he <hes> he would give us advice and direction and then he would ask us very basic questions like you know what he got on the books for next year. We're like what what what do you mean like. How do you plan how much product to make me. We like <hes> we just. We've been doubling for like the last few years. We figure you're on a double again. He's like that's a very scary way to run a business and he asked us what our assets sets where he's trying to get us off our personal off our loans because our our personal names were on the loan notes and <hes> he said we gotta. We've got change this. You know what do you got for assets. Burton are like we can get a mountain bike and we're dead serious. We didn't even know how to answer questions like think. I got that picture mom. We got a v._c._r. And he was just like dumbfounded. Looking at us like these guys are so so clueless spine shirts like i because i mean when i think of life is good. I think like <hes> going to ocracoke island. You know someplace. I like cape. Cod like you know you would life is good and it's the summer and it's easy to feel that way. Is that where the shirts were being solden like beach towns and places like that in the summertime. <hes> one of the strengths right away was that it wasn't one distribution channel. Oh so you're talking about destination resort which became important to us right away but sporting was really big. Two gift shops for people like you know around themes like home. Themes like you know love family gardening grilling all that kind of stuff so it really was <hes> oh the distribution was really spread out which which you know we didn't really i can't take credit for strategically planning that but a helped us a lot through the two years the economy has gone up and down and when you're in a single distribution channel it's hard to weather economic downturns but for us you know some would get hurt worse than others and we were always able to weather it because we were <hes> not too many eggs in one basket yeah there. It was so many different places for us to go in when the economy went down it would not all the channels will get impacted the same way i mean did you. I mean when you think think about <hes> a very simple phrase some very basic and not i mean your guess agreed artists no no no oh judgment but like very simple our work and it became this thing t shirts and and dinner plates and posters and things like what what are the things that i'm probably forgetting about recipes backs towels. I mean really doesn't you know it really just became you know what he's a good canvas to connect emotionally with people and in more recent years more things like video content and publishing books excetera which is extremely exciting to us but we're still most known for the t shirts. Did you guys. I mean you've been doing this now. Since really i guests since the late eighties rape on t shirts. Have you ever <hes> any part of of of of you guys want to sell it. You know sell it to a bigger her company and just kind of cash in 'cause you 'cause you've both of you become pretty well off from this tiny little t shirt business and <hes> <hes> you can. I don't know can do whatever you want. I think the reason that we're not interested in selling going. Public is what we learned. Learn from these customers that started sending us letters emails sharing their personal stories and they really taught us that optimism is most powerful aw in the hardest times and these are people dealing with chemotherapy losing loved ones and they'd say we all wore life as good t-shirts to the memorial service for my brother because that's the spirit with which he lived and we've got thousands of those letters and emails and people kind of <unk> opening up their whole personal lives to us because the emotional connection to the brand. They're the ones who taught us this and if we'd hadn't received those letters that may they have been appealing to us like yeah. We've been at this for a few decades but we want to spread that message as wide as we can because we believe in it more than anything anything else in the world am burt but what what are your thoughts on. I mean did did you ever consider find to sell the business well in a lot of ways. We really feel like we're just getting warmed up. It honestly feels like a startup today. We're we're like a twenty five year old startup where there's all these young people oh walking around that remind us of ourselves but are much faster and stronger and smarter and i'm not <hes> operating the business. I was as president and c._e._o. For a long time and we replaced me with a woman that actually came from our nonprofit side and she's killing it and you can tell pretty quickly oakley that she's about ten times the operator that i was and it's allowing me to dive back into the creative and i haven't been there in a while l. so we're really kinda back to where we started in the beginning. Hey let's design some t shirts but now we have a really strong balance sheet. We own one hundred percent of the business us and you know we have no intention of going public or selling the business we just wanna see you know how far we can take this in at some point figure out what to to do with the structure something creative maybe denisov to our staff. Maybe we can sell it to our customers. Something that enables the <hes> that will enable the best work of life is good to be done after john de gone so i mean. Do you guys feel like you grew up up with very working class home. I mean in the room upstairs with frost on windows and like you presumably today a a up. Both of you are doing pretty well. I mean you can you can live pretty comfortably. No no question about it yeah just to have our own home seriously not not to be too corny but that that's pretty cool and to be able to travel. It's incredible and <hes>. I don't think we would ever take that for granted to your what what is your i mean. What did your parents make. If your business your mom passed away <hes> a couple years go and then i can see your later. Your dad dad passed <hes>. What do they make of this. I mean this t shirt business at turned into something huge yeah they they loved it. I think they were proud of it and <hes> they really did do their part while we had our dysfunction growing growing up and there were times. Were you know right right up until the time that our mom passed away if she saw somebody in life is good t-shirt she'd run up to them and say my son's made it was embarrassing when your weather but <hes> our our dad got a kick out of the nuts and bolts of the business he always wanted to know the details els and he was so encouraging when bert ni- for that year and a half when we did live at home and we're still doing the van trips he always was. Just you know we'd roll in at three a._m. Some night how'd you do did you do. It was never what the hell are. You guys doing like your you know your college graduates like you get get your act together. There's no pressure on career. It was always how'd you do and that helped a lot and maybe maybe the interesting thing going full circle. Oh with our dad is that in the autumn of his life he he came out of that funk he really came out of the depression and he really became the a guy that we never knew that we see in those pictures you know before we were around and it's hard to say what that what caused that but as our business grew grew that house that we grew up in really fell to pieces and our and our parents while we were living just like you mentioned guy better and better along the way and we'd go oh visit our parents living in that same house falling apart so we decided to knock the house down and build them a nice new home and <hes> you know i think it was the first time in my father's life since he you know since he had all those kids that when people came to visit they had a place to sit down and at the he could be proud of his home and i think also where he felt like he was a failure he looked at his six kids now and you know we we landed on our feet all of us and he didn't screw everything up so i think he was a little easier on himself and in some ways this success of the business <hes> might help my dad you don't get over that hump and realized that if we're not failures he wasn't a failure and it was really cool to see him relaxed and and enjoying his grandkids and it was like it was like he in our mom were dating again. I mean they just like hang out and spend time and you know the who won away on some weekends and things they hadn't done that and you know thirty years i mean it just they were married for fifty six years and then the the last one believe it or not while it was tough with moms illness in everything they they had some great years now. Our mom said that too just before you know once she knew the cancer was was taking her life and there was nowhere to go. She said nobody should feel sorry for me. On the happiest i've ever been in my life you know part of that was i'm sure because because my dad had come out of the funk and also that she knew that that she did a good job with with our kids and they were all okay wow you know when you think about this crazy story going from t shirts up and down the eastern seaboard to sell them out of the back of van and knock on the dorm rooms to seventy dollars between you two you know a shipping container as your office and and the company today what it does reportedly almost one hundred million dollars in revenue years at about right that's right. You got about what almost two hundred employees today right pretty good. I mean do you for for seabird to you. When you think about the success of this company the attributed to your hard work and you brothers hard work or in your intelligence or do you think that a lot of it came from just luck law to walk. I think we we stumbled into something. That's much bigger than we are <hes>. I think we've been resilient. You know maybe more resilient than smart but it's a good good fifty percent ain't luck we right place right time <hes> two percent skill and then we've we've worked our asses off so that that's that's played a big factor factor too so you know maybe there's all those parts are equal and john how much of it because of like how much because of your hard work and your skill intelligence. I would say skill intelligence. Maybe twenty percent <hes> hard work another twenty eh and then brute strength. Maybe from me twenty so neither only in really the you got your answer there in that neither of us know hotter add up to one hundred percent and yeah just you know so until definitely not skill a lotta luck clearly no question that's john birt jacobs. Co founders of the life is good company for the way we know for a fact that at least one other t-shirts has traveled traveled all the way to space and twenty thirteen astronaut karen nyberg posted a video on the international space station and she was showing how she washed her hair in zero gravity and the shirt that she's wearing in that video. It's from life is good. It's a grinning girl who looks like the original jake sitting back to back with her dog and underneath. It says lean on me.

T Boston Kerry Indianapolis Cary Sherman Attorney Bob Pierce Marlboro Boston Garden Bedford Phillies Ocracoke Island Karen Nyberg Basketball John Birt Jacobs Dick Stan Jay Phillips Partner
"birt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You extract the Honey out of the honeycomb, it's capped over with beeswax kind of cap it, so it doesn't drain out. So you have two uncapped it, and you're cutting off the beeswax capping 's. So that's your beeswax so you so you start making candles, and then, and then doing the same thing, bring them to craft shows and selling them. Yeah. And how how sales go good instantly instant success. Well, we certainly not every show, we have some real bad shows but good enough to keep going. So I've read that you guys got a pretty big break in nineteen eighty nine there's a boutique in New York. Called Zona, and they came across your candles at a trade show in then ordered hundreds of them. Yeah. Yeah. How do they find out about you guys? The owner must have come across us at a show somewhere, and he ordered our little teddy bear candle. It was a little molded candle in the shape of teddy bear with a plaid bow tie under his chin. And he sold hundreds of them had Jew fulfill those orders, it was you and burden like, how did you would you do just worked all the time? You know, I remember working long hours and what you guys call the business. Well, he had kind of a stencil that he had painted onto every behind that said, Birt's fees. So eventually, it became Birt's vs. Given your characterization of Birt has this kind of really independent back to the land kind of guy. What did he think about this growing enterprise? I mean, all of a sudden, it's a business I mean, in and not just Burton Roxanne selling jars of Honey, and wax, candles. But, like New York, boutiques ordering this stuff. I think that he probably wasn't as happy about it as I was he had no use for any changes to his lifestyle. He didn't have children for one thing writing, and I'm far more ambitious, and he was. Yeah. But he went along with it because he could see how important it was to me was Burt fairly easy to work with or was he like a, you know, stubborn and difficult. He was a prickly kinda guy people, including myself gave him kind of a wide berth, we divided up the work. He would collect all the overdue bills, you know, overdue accounts receivables, and he was a fixer when things broke down or needed maintenance. He was always willing to do that. And I was a very hands on with the product development and getting the product made and shipped. We had different roles. Yeah..

Birt Burt New York Burton Roxanne Zona product development
"birt" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"This will happen to all who beleaguered dump in our contest. Honey, I think we know who wrote that one. So to close this my shoe, I want to sing a song that I wrote to a tune that I stole and it's actually going to sing. And if you don't know who that is this this next if you don't know who that is this next minute is truly going to be fever dream and like what? Thought anyway. Hi guests hailed I guess to I guess to bike hike pike talking to buy Birt's lay on my shades east. I guess I guess I guess you. Tony's in my contact had. She's just making me crazy heart. Cafe The cafe. cafe. Say hi to my rabbi, they love me like go body else. Why? My gold fish, Elizabeth. And she doesn't love me. So I tell myself. Yeah. Top to myself ready player. One to pick up the phone on the phone to pick up the phone and to leave your shoes outside. It's a really really wet leader shoes outside and three condition. If your birthday the back condition or for there's November so damage. Abebe fake. It's me the principal kingdom. I just had to come back and tell you once again, the peanut butter's timeless classic like the godfather. It's spoiled us from lunchbox to real life. We all enjoyed on our own unique way. Usually enjoy it.

Tony Birt fever principal
"birt" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on 600 WREC

"You've had analysis done on the on the the letters that by axe Birt's to offer opinions. There has been not by me, but by others, and some verify it some some don't know, but the majority of them believe that handwriting similar will after our break in a couple of minutes. I wanna get into Sundance, and perhaps Etta maybe Lisa can help us with that. But for the next couple of minutes. Can we talk about Butch is life after South America, you indicate in the book that he traveled all over the place, or at least he told his family that he traveled all over the place. He ends up as you just mentioned in goldfield, Nevada. Why would make sense for him to be there? And I asked because. After I I saw your stuff in the. Early eighties. I I went to goldfield and got old telephone records, and and ask people around it and trying to verify it. And now I see in your book you have a name for him the name that he used there. But it would make sense that he would be in goldfield in that general time period, tell us why. Carey why don't you take that one? If you can why he would be in goldfield. I mean, it was aptly inaptly-named town. Well, he had many connections in goes down. He had in fact, become a member of the mine owners association and goals from nineteen twelve and this was many several years after supposed to, Dan. TNL's lay. Where is mine guards for Mervin j Monette one of the largest gold producers out of goldfield? And in fact, we have in the book we have a photo. Most McCain Elza. As gardens as a huge shipment of the gold from the mines. Which went into partnership with with MJ Monette in several things thereafter. Including an expedition to Alaska during the gold mining years. I should tell people to goldfield was I mean, it was a BoomTown there were gigantic nuggets picking up off the ground that was for a period. Anyway, the biggest town in Nevada and attracted the herbs and a lot of really interesting characters it did. And in fact, wider push one of the partners wis Butch and Jane Monette in the Alaskan venture with Tex Rickard. Triggered operated hotels, and saloons and goldfield, and he's also the builder of the. The famous stadium in New York City Madison Square Garden, and they went into partnership in in about nineteen twelve and went to Alaska together. So all of these people they they traveled in these circles. And when you tell people this, they say, well, you know, it seems impossible for Butch and wider to associated wider, man. In reality wider push. But it is day you'd be interested in fact time he met, but you'd be interested for house burglary in San Francisco with the well, Jay, Scott. Well, one of the biggest builders in goldenseal. So he had heavy connections. There. Yeah. Well, I I love those stuff. I always believe that every great story has a as a path to Nevada and Las Vegas at some point. And it sounds like this one does as well carry Rosborough and Lisa LeBron talking about their book Butch Cassidy, the untold story on the other side of this break, we're gonna ask about what became of Sundance and the mysterious at a place, and if we have time, we'll take.

goldfield Butch Cassidy Nevada Jane Monette Mervin j Monette Carey Lisa LeBron Tex Rickard axe Birt Alaska Etta Madison Square Garden South America Las Vegas McCain New York burglary BoomTown Dan
"birt" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:00 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Closed doors never ever wants. I'll say and they're put into an affidavit never once heard him say anything close to being racially insensitive. Never wants. Joe Scarborough would would would would would state under oath that. He never saw the president who in knew for dozen years ever say anything racially insensitive, and then five days later, he is an avowed racist and so's that anybody who voted for him. Is that the reality in America? Ladies and gentlemen, is it just narrative is the lies the one eighty degree swivels in just a matter of days, you tell me call us one eight eight three three Gorka that's eight three three three three four six seven five two and the insanity really knows. No bounds. The the standard of the UK wrote a piece responding to an analyzing the insanity of this professor from. Giving his full name professor Daniel Pollack Pels p l z e. Who wrote an op Ed piece for the New York Times in which he stated that Mary Poppins is clearly racist why because she participated in black face as well like governor Northam now, do you? Remember, the original Mary Poppins movie? I just saw the the sequel, which is a lot of fun. The original one. The governess the magical governess becomes friendly with Bert. Of course is Dick Van Dyke. Do you remember what Birt's job was? A chimney sweep. And when you sweep chimneys, you get dirty and when she's dancing with Bert on the rooftops. She wipes her face and the soot makes her face black. Therefore, she must be a racist. Because she sang that song. The Dick Van Dyke called step in time. That's not a joke. It's not April. First that is a professor a liberal professor writing the New York Times being analyzed by the standard of the UK. The lunatics truly have taken over the asylum. Eight three three three Gorka that's eight three three three three four six seven five two. Let's go to line one. Dave in Atlanta, Georgia. Sebastian gray tabby on the radio. Thank you. I just wanted to bring up the governor of Virginia. I know when we did yearbooks. When I was I'm ten years younger than him. You actually pick out your own pictures and quotes and the things that express you're the best for your personal page. You mean, you don't you don't pick out photographs somebody else gives you of themselves instead on your page. You don't have photographs with somebody else. That would be a great idea. But I don't think that's how it works. Thing. Editor of the yearbook that wants to come forward and say, yeah, we kinda slip that in as a job. Yeah. I think I think it's pretty clear, of course. I mean, it is against all common sense. Everything we know about yearbooks. Just the just the statement that he said, oh, I still haven't received my yearbook from nineteen Eighty-four still hasn't received his book. I think that you know, the the US mail must be a little toddy in its delivery. Thank you. Dave. Let's go to line for Judy in Pennsylvania. Judy. Welcome aboard. Our thank you got to go get things in can get my on my common tearing order the last thing you just did about the lying on racist. I really got me thinking a couple of different tangents but thinking region that I called was I think all of Asian BS about the the racist. I think it's all a bunch of ES the real the real word that man stood up and is willing to kill babies after they'd been born. And I you think that's a handful years ago. They were guys named bird from West Virginia. Chapman, the teen years. It was a member of the KKK. In fact, I think he was like grand wizard or whenever they good friend of Hillary's. Her mentor or something like that? Yeah. Yeah. Look you've hit the nail on the head. The how what a strange world we live in Judy that we are arguing about a yearbook from forty years ago. When. My generation we we got rid of all that racist. We were brother and sister boyfriend, and that's what I was gonna say Judy hang on hang hang on Judy. Hang on the point. I'm trying to make is the one you started with that. We're arguing about a photograph in a college yearbook when this is the man who few days ago as a doctor said, it's okay to kill children who have been born. If the parents and the attending doctors say, yes, that's what we should be having press conferences about that's what the governor should be addressing vats or the DNC should be pressuring him to resign of. But of course, it's not it's the black face KKK photograph, which in itself is reason enough for him to resign. But nobody nobody in the DNC is calling for him to resign because of his stand and infanticide vats the issue. Thank you so much Judy. I'm Sebastian Gorka, more of your calls next on eight three three three three Gorka. That's eight three three three three four. Six seven five two. And then I'll special guest Horace Cooper, don't touch that. Dial..

Judy Dick Van Dyke Joe Scarborough Birt professor New York Times Sebastian Gorka Mary Poppins professor Daniel Pollack Pels UK Bert Dave DNC America governor Northam Sebastian gray Virginia West Virginia Atlanta US