22 Burst results for "Birt"

Igniting Your Feminine Fire with Aurora Farber

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Igniting Your Feminine Fire with Aurora Farber

"And welcome to live love engage. I am grace rand and today. We're gonna be talking about abundance. we're going to be talking about femininity. And more specifically feminine fire intuition all sorts of wonderful things with my guest today on the program who is aurora farber. So first off. Welcome you to live. Love engage aurora. Thank you so much. I'm delighted to be here. Connect with you to connect with your audience and to live love and engage absolutely will. We are delighted to have you. And this woman is she is accomplished. She's got a lot going for. So let me just share a little bit with you or with yes. You are listening watching to see a little bit more about her. She is a transformational coach. Intuitive guide writer speaker sacred space ceremonial list way finder magical muse and modern day priestess and her mission is to help women get unstuck by reclaiming and igniting their feminine fire that heart light within that integrates life giving power compassionate love and intuitive wisdom and these three feminine flames are the key to creating a life of passion pleasure purpose on the journey feminine leadership which is so important all women we are leaders in our own right but sometimes i think we don't always express that enough or maybe own net Which is why aurora. Please that women are works of art and every woman is a sacred vessel capable of miraculous creation into activate that creators shockey fire. We need to come back home to ourselves to our inner fire to are feminine. Fire so Actually you know what i we were. We were talking before we started the recording That i was going to go one way. But i'm thinking let's let's deal with the feminine fire right now and what Maybe a little bit. Explain a little bit up more out about that. And why women why it is so important really for women to reclaim and ignited. Yes i'd love you. I really loved your introduction and remembering those words that came through me that women are works of art. And if you think about a work of art vessel right piece of pottery. There needs to be that fire that place of animation where we come alive and so women are not only works of art but we have the ability to create we can create life. That is our shock d fire. that is It's our superpower for thousands of years women who rose into that knowing who shared their gifts their medicine gifts their inner wisdom their in tuition their ways of working the earth and with The body those things have been cut off for many women in its pass down through the lineage and so this and fire is nothing new but it is something that we are here to reignite and for me i love you know there's as i work with thirteen divine feminine archetypes in there. Two that come to me when i feel into. What does this mean to me. Well there's that creative shocked the fire of like the wild woman of the primal goddess dancing around the fire that howling to the moon that kind of fire right that that birt's life and creativity and as passionate and full of energy and then there's another fire and it's the fire of the goddess of compassion. That's the triple flame. That lives in the heart. it's the purple fire zip for me that is composed of these three flames power love and was dumb. And that's the fire. That is my mission to bring back to this world to reignite power love and wisdom well this wisdom we've had inside of us but many of a separate gotten or it's been stripped away in told that it's not valid of that. We were crazy or that we were all lunatics right so having inner knowing This love we are capable of sharing but for many women that that aspect of self love that flaine first needs to be ignited and then power. Well certainly we live in a different age and that is one of the beautiful things about the time now. We do have more power but the models of power that we have all the masculine models and so we've kind of come into our own. Feminism with like okay. Well i've got to put on my pant suit and you know just trying to follow the model of power that we've seen and yet these typical structures of the patriarchy especially this year this year during covid see structures are crumbling and we are beginning to see how they don't serve at least they don't serve all of us they may serve some of us but not all of us and so when you add that aspect of combining power with love like how can i add to the flame of love where i can use my power to serve all of us answer the guidance

Grace Rand Aurora Farber Aurora Shockey Birt
What's on Your Shelf?

Art Beauty

09:39 min | 1 year ago

What's on Your Shelf?

"Our guest today Who the suspect with him? By the way but kind of schooled us a little bit a lot of a lot of it on you know on our shelf fees because he said do you know why do you feel that you need to have so many products. And he's right or he's not wrong but I will say like our shelf. Fees are are just things that we buy and use and that are not branded not sponsored that we just share with the world I am addicted but products products. Al Security Blanket for me as I'm aging as I am morphing into all the roles that I have now. I do grasp and remember that that like ten minutes in the mirror that gave me the confidence throughout my life. I reach for beauty products to do that for me. It's definitely like it's a clutch approach so I I'm going to try and turn a new leaf after our guest today. 'cause I truly like the light bulb turned on a little bit more. It is a lesser sir. More it is being responsible as a consumer. It is choosing certain brands. I I I can't say enough about this interview. Other than the fact that I possibly hostages changed my life a little bit. It totally did and I'm looking right now to grab my my my intro for him at Mike in Durski. I'm just GonNa win this one but it. Mike and Durski is really truly a titan of the beauty industry. He's held executive positions at Laurie. AL at Unilever he held it's executive positions at birt's bees and most recently lists and I did try to get him to re install one of my favorite it products the shellfish that got discontinued but he is coming out with his own line. Here me raw. It's going to launch in January and a big part of the ethos of his company was was it. We need to be more sustainable. Not just in the physical packaging but in in how we view beauty and that we don't maybe necessarily need eighteen different products to slap on our face. But you know what we're GonNa let him tell you a little bit more about the company when I left bliss but first of all thank you so so much for introductions Berry Swedish new When I left Bliss I was being interviewed by magazine? And they said okay. You've been in the business for like thirty years. What's changed well? The obvious things is influencers in the Internet. Those to the big changes but aside from that after thirty years were still selling women. Products will should go on their skin packaging. Which isn't sustainable bank claims? We can't keep for prices are too high on skews. We don't need and we're all guilty of manufacturers facture the marketers retailers and we have to stop in we're not honoring the people trying to serve his whole businesses. Trying to be about making women feel better about themselves and we're not doing that by having bad ingredients by had not have simple packaging choice. I want to do something about it. I wanted to challenge industry. I want to get back on track of what's right and You know whether it's the confusion of behind what's clean beauty and is clean natural as clean sustainable and really let people know what clearly really means. Because it doesn't mean you do those things and to really fight to have the industry change and get into sustainable packaging and I mean in this day and age no company now forget the beauty industry should be making anything with a not thinking about where the materials are coming from and how they're being disposed off and on I think we we need to make a make a change in this ridiculous having forty skews hundreds of skews. It's nonsense and I wanted to do something different. So this whole idea was challenge convention challenge every convention that kind of operates by and come along. That really talks to the way women are today so you have said in one of the things is that I found so powerful in the pitch. Was that clean. Beauty is actually a dirty word. What by that I mean? That's intentionally provocative but I think a lot of the retailers are doing the right things by saying we need to have standard products and They they decide what ingredients putting Greens from bad. The problem is that the average consumer thinks that clean means natural and they might think that it means organic. They might think that it needs sustainable. And it doesn't mean any of those things all clean means don't have really bad things in there and the truth. Truth is no skincare by the FDA has really bad things in there so while trying to help consumers is misleading. Because women are inferring that the stuff is natural. And it's it's it's a sustainable or organic in it's not and if it's important to use natural products if you believe that that no synthetic ingredients should every put inter on your skin who is bad for your health. You need to know that and buying something says it's clean and it's not clean as is is going to be damaging it's it's not truth. Is there any regulation right now on on the terminology of of Clean Beauty. You know every retailer in every brand who call themselves clean has their own definition right back about ten years ago when I was at birth. It's been I created the standard for natural personal care products and I worked with about ten other competitors and I worked at the natural process association to come up with one on standard. This is what natural is and Stores like target and macy's and Wal Mart were all Setting their shelves according to our standard is one standard and that was ten years ago and that standard kind of went away now. They made people making their own standards. So I just tell people lose with people's either clean. Just go and find out what clean means to them. Ask them you know right right email to the company. Does this be your natural. They're not naturally inspired. You know but really natural. It's a big difference and and let me just ask really briefly anything natural anything. Organic the shelf life is. Would you say half if not less often. And there's there's a new little push in the worlds where like keeping everything in your little mini beauty fridge. How do you feel about that? I agree with that. I I think that I think there's nothing wrong with a product having having a lower shelf life I mean i. There's a little symbol on on packaging. It's a little jar with a LID coming up and it says like how many months after opening is it good and we believe that six months after opening is a lot better than thirty six months after opening meaning I would be okay with the product but being no good after six months because it's not fresh anymore and I think I think That makes more sense than I mean. Think about food which we'd a piece of Sam mm-hmm that's good thirty six months after opening. What what what the hell they shooting that Salmon's and make live dialogue? So I I I I have no problem with Something that says once you open it using within six months and the other thing I thought about was you know I'm a consumer. I shop beauty all year round I don't always opt for the overnight shipping. I don't always get it off of Amazon. Where primes the next day? And sometimes I will do ground shipping but during the months of July and August. Guess where things are so hot and you don't know how long it sat in a truck. You should should should the consumer be worried about that of a truck. That's a hundred degrees will i. It's interesting you talk about the the shipping the overnight shipping. One thing. I always I do like when I buy things from Amazon is I wait I have so many items to ship. I keep it in my cart if you don't need it wait because you're saving so much in Environmentally in terms of carbon footprints. I'd rather have one shipments of ten things. In ten shipments of one thing. I also on that that is I mean you know I realized this and again. It's just something I'm a culprit myself but I was ordering during one thing at a time. They used to say oh. I Love Amazon and I live right across from a twenty four hour drugstore and instead of going across the by the toothpaste I'd order it from Amazon on and when I really somebody made me realize you know that's a terrible carbon footprint what are you doing and I'm guilty of it and I think that I'm glad you're addressing it now because it's something that we all need to be much more aware of an Amazon prime is fantastic and I I love using the service. I have it but I mean I don't need a dozen batteries tomorrow and and you get this little tiny pattern raises coming to big box. You know how much shipping is going into it flying on a plane. It's ridiculous I tell people mess. Emergency just keep everything in your cart and then when you had an emergency thing then have it all come at one time. Okay but back to my question. Agent market really hot hot months. And we're being trying to be very PC and use all. The carbon makes our carbon urban furnace mall. If I don't do overnight shipping or two day express in it sits somewhere for ninety to one hundred degrees on a truck for day or two cannot affect that organic natural products. No usually a wealth.

Amazon Clean Beauty Executive Bliss Mike Unilever Durski FDA Macy Laurie Birt Sam Mm-Hmm Wal Mart Salmon Six Months Thirty Six Months Thirty Years Ten Years
SpanBERT

Data Skeptic

10:16 min | 1 year ago

SpanBERT

"So on the show we've been talking about burt night every episode come out but I'll take for granted that listeners at least should by now know what burt is so I'll skip that question and just ask you if you could put into context may be some Wayne which you've been applying birt has had an incredible affect on the P. Community. I think that's pretty obvious by now in one sense and this has also affected me personally burt kind of killed a lot of projects that were trying to create or design a model that is specific to a certain task came along you know this this kind of massive pre trained mass language model all that within three training e pox on on the target task it's getting stead of the results and putting those handcrafted models leaving the way behind a lot of people's first impression of bird is to be impressed with it what was your journey towards questioning where it's boundaries lie in span. Burt were not the per se trying to understand what the limits of Bert are but that is still a really really interesting question I have had other work that tries to kind of analyze what Bert Learns we actually just got a paper award and the Blackhawks NLP workshop for that paper that's work with with Kevin Clark does she khandelwal Chris Manning and other people have written similar papers in basically found out the bird is kind of learning the whole traditional NLP pipeline implicit manner and it's getting a lot of gains from that but I don't think that we have seen kind of what the limits of burt or Bert like models are at this point can you tell me a bit about how span Bert which is the shortest way to describe your contributions what's the long way what do you guys innovating on in your research since pampered what we tried to do is improve the pre-training tasks that bird is using bird is not a model but a- pre-training methods in that pre training method birt has two objectives one is the mass language model the other is accents prediction we focused on mainly proving the mass language model so the mass language model itself the way it works is that you get a sentence say I had a nice chat with Kyle at then you randomly pick some of these words mask them that say we must chats and the model needs to predict the missing word in I had something with Kyle is chats to make that after kind of to force the model to capture more interesting things about language and I'm keeping this vague intentionally will road to that in the second what we did was I instead of masking random tokens we masked random spans of tokens so we're not saying we're not giving the model as input I had a nice something with Kyle were saying I something something something something with Kyle and that is that a bit more flexibility in terms in the things that it could potentially predict by making the task more challenging basically forcing the model to learn more about length. approach the other thing we added was that we're not only forcing it to predict these missing words dismissing span from each of the individual mask Toke John's but we're forcing it to predict the information from the boundaries off the mask span so from the word I and with with Kyle were trying to predict everything that was in between tell me more about that limit does that mean I'm not going to consider things like the length of the span we didn't change the length of the sequence so the model knows what what legs it's trying to predict but it needs to kind of saying in a bit of a hand wavy way in needs to learn longer range dependency so it needs to learn not only what kind of immediately neighboring words I wanna be but what the next three words are gonNA be or forward depending on the length of the span the idea is novel and appeals to me and thank you put it pretty succinctly when you said we want to force the model or the learning process to learn more effectively but as I also think about it I wonder Well Okay you've made the problem harder if you train your model with your method on the exact same training data set we hope that that effort doesn't fact force the model to be murder do you have any way to quantify the degree to which that's true so that's a great question and we actually put a lot of effort and especially Taiwan resources into making sure that we're giving Berta real fighting chance the original of fighting chance to beat us in addition to taking Google's version of burt and just download you know whatever they may publicly available we also re implemented burt ourselves and we did a bit of hyper parameter tuning and every kind of training trick bit data or hyper parameters or training for more rations that we also applied to the baseline so we had baselines that were actually much much stronger than the original birds and we were still able to outperformed them when we added the span birds objectives on pre-trading tasks very neat and is there any way you can measure do that or is it more qualitative as you introspective results if you'll allow me to go on a bit of a of a tangent here please this is a question asking since two thousand sixteen when along with Felix Hill we ran the Rep Avowal Workshop this was twenty sixteen since then Sam Bowman joined us and actually kind of took the lead on this we came together to make this shared task that everybody's been running on glue I think most of our listeners have heard of a now we have also superglue which is kind of the next generation much harder tasks as well glue as a really really good way or was a good way until I got maxed out by by all these models but it's a really good way of evaluating how will these pretrial tasks are actually working because it evaluates a diverse set of tasks with different types of training set sizes different levels of complexity of difficulty if you manage to improve the results glue by say two points that's really really meaningful I'll mention another work that we did kind of concurrently it started actually from kind of the same parent project but split off into two things one of them was span the other being Roberta so Roberta the the idea was basically let's try to replicate birds but do a lot of hyper parameter you name and scaling up that original bird just didn't do because I know they thought it was big enough and good enough to really was at the time but apparently what we found in Roberto was that you can do a little bit of tweaking to the hyper parameters for example just training and get for a bit longer maybe try training with bigger batch works really really really well in fact it works so well that on glue for example we were able to outperform xl nets by a little bit so kind of that's really saying something yeah I would say within variance but basically without adding all commodification exit added to the model so we just you know we basically had the simple model even simplified it even more we removed the next symptoms addicts in the NFC objective didn't spend Burton as well and used just a single sequence to train each example and just scamming it up training for longer using slightly better vocabularies just really really improved performance on a bunch of tests and not only glue we also just east results and Superglue as well where there's really really big leap it's not at human level yet because superfluids significantly harder it has a bunch of tests that are significantly harder than the ones that we have in glue but still it's a huge advance in Yeah absolutely I seem to recall the paper on a lot of tasks like putting your your approach to the challenge with the famous squad and squad two point Oh data sets that you were eking out those arguable percentage points improvements on span burt when compared to Vanilla Google burt and a few others I know all deep learning a little bit inherently blackbox but do you have a sense of you've the mechanism or or what it is is allowing your model to outperform I really the most impressive results were in what we call span selection tasks so squad squad to a lot of the machine reading question answering our task data sets that we ran on we see this really significant improvement there this is probably because Spaniard is focused on representing and predicting the content of Mrs Expense and I think that's why we're getting gains on these are also mentioned one other task that we ran on which which most people don't run on because it's a bit more complicated which is correct resolution reference resolution is a really hard task for a models currently the state of the art on this it's it's about seventy nine F. One whereas before us the best model was from Lee and others which was about

Burt Birt P. Community Bert Wayne
Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

60-Second Science

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata seems like anytime you see a squirrel. It's busy doing something pink headed somewhere scrounging for food and being out in about all the time also means era tasty morsels for a lot of different predators. Keith target a behavioral ecologist at at Overland College. He says squirrels scan their surroundings for hawks and owls cats and foxes but they also have another surveillance system. They eavesdrop on nearby. Birds BIRT's eavesdropping on alarm calls or eavesdropping on chatter is a cheap and easy way to supplement the information that they have access to because it's free it's produced by other individuals in the environment. It's publicly available to any organism that has the cognitive ability to recognize interpret that information tarvisio colleague Marie Lillie tested that ability by riding around town on her bicycle stopping when she found a squirrel then she'd set up her equipment play the fearsome fearsome scream of a red tailed hawk and then either play the casual unworried chatter of songbirds chiefs or ambient noise as a control all the while she observed the squirrels behavior and she noticed that when squirrels heard the reassuring chatter of songbirds following the Hawks doc scream they relaxed more readily. Imagine this if you're walking in a crowd and everyone seems pretty happy and content and they're chit chatting with beach other. You might even subconsciously take that as information that all of those eyes and ears apparently seem to perceive the environment as being safe and we think the squirrels might be listening in on bird chatter in the same way the details are in the journal plus one and squirrels give back to the community to with their own alarm calls which might help other eavesdropping animals but in busy urban environments Tara and says that rich fabric brick of animal communication risks being drowned out by the loudest animals around us. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher.

Hawks Christopher Dodd Yata Marie Lillie Overland College Keith Tara Sixty Seconds
Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

How I Built This

24:51 min | 1 year ago

Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

"Welcome back revenue which is which is great rate. You know you could start to see maybe a path towards towards real profitability. <hes> and i guess the the next year you really i mean you. You're still running his business by the way out of your apartment in boston that you guys share right <hes> the starts to turn a corner though because as we see that reaction in the street and boom we start thinking about distribution and hiring a sales rep and that that summer of ninety five the momentum starts rolling and debt was when you made your first higher as well i guess right that's right yeah. The <hes> cary sherman moved in upstairs cheers from us and became a friend and we just used to beg her when she got home from work to help us <hes> pack orders and help us try to organize the orders ars and <hes> she was a big help so we begged her to quit her job eventually and she did it. She could do things five times faster than us for one thing and then it became clear we needed the help pretty badly and she needed to take a leap yeah. We we had a friend over for dinner one night because he was pretty sharp and we asked him to tell us how much business we would have to do to be able to afford to pay carry <hes> seventeen thousand dollars which is what she said was the minimum the question to her was what is the lowest amount that you could possibly get paid to work with us and seventeen thousand dollars so he did the math for us and he said that we would have to do a quarter of a million dollars in business which sounded like a billion dollars yeah and we we did two hundred sixty two. I think it was two hundred sixty two thousand a a year yeah and that two hundred sixty two thousand was like that's to pay for all your supplies and everything and everything was not profit that is that is oh no in those in those roche revenue days we we would get prepared for died t shirts p._f. Dis they caught and we'd store them. We didn't have enough room for them in our apartment which store them in a bulkhead in the building and we had to put them in trash bags <hes> that were tightly wound up because it was moist down there and so a in any given day we would get a certain amount of orders we would be designing during the daytime in the afternoon and we would take those shirts down to new bedford. Get them died in the shirt collars. We wanted the next afternoon. We'd take those shirts out to a marlboro mass and to screen printers midland graphics screen printed t shirts and then <hes> by four o'clock drop them off at u._p._s. Whatever the orders were which was you know two or three retailers a couple of order and then we then we set up a trailer like the back of a eighteen wheeler container owner containers like permanently stationed next to our screen printer with their permission they had a dirt parking lot and for zero rent they because we were afraid to to get the overhead of a warehouse and so they let us was thirty dollars a month to rent the <hes> lease the container and end for zero dollars. They let us <hes> park it on their lot he because you didn't take the risk on on like a long term lease so you'll just let us a shipping containers are warehouse makes sense your we want. We wanted to make sure the revenue ran way out ahead of this needed a couple extension cords lighting and not a lot of ventilation in those containers but <hes> we cranked some of ninety five ninety six and it was kind of non stop twenty four seven how did you how did you get the trademark on it. I mean it seems like a very very common phrase. Life is good but you got a new trademark. How did that happen well. We failed five times. We were going to the boston public library at all you couldn't important attorney and we sent five applications and failed and then i went one night to play basketball and some guy asked me. Did i see you and your brother selling t shirts in front of the boston garden the other night and i said yeah and he said how's that going not so good but we have this great idea the eh i went on and on about what the concept was and that we're trying to trade market and then i realized that i'd been rude and not ask the guy what he did. I said what do you do for a living and he said <hes> trademark attorney and guy's name was bob pierce and i went and saw him two days later and convince them to do the work pro pro bono and he knew just what to do so we had to make a lot of changes we had to create hang tags and labels we the label in our shirt said jacobs gallery gallery so we switched the label to life is good and then we had to get affidavits from five different retailers who said that it represented a brand and by definition legally trademark denotes the source of the goods so there's when you just put a mark on a t shirt that's called ornamental but if people look at it and say that represents the source of the goods in some way then it's a brand so he did all those things correctly and i gotta tell you it's twenty five years later and and bob pierce still gets all our intellectual property business. That's amazing so you got the trademark on this phrase. Life is good as a brand and that's your you sort of you own this phrase phrase and you can use it as your business even the fact that you said it a few times during this podcast you owe us money got yeah. It was a it was a big day when we got it. We we still didn't really know how to run a business or what to do but it was. We knew it was a a valuable thing yeah. How did you guys divide up labor between the two of you like who did what who did finances who who did the art who to the delivery. How how did you guys who was in charge. Who was the boss older brother. The boss anything that involved brainpower pretty much fell on my side no seriously bur burden off he had more of a background coming out of school <hes> on the business side and he's a great communicator great motivator so he worked worked the phones a lot. I spend more time on the drawing table or like at the screen print shop or maybe packing up stuff but there's plenty of crossover birt's. It's very creative as well so it mixed pretty seamlessly over the years. I guess there was a turning point pretty significant turning point in nineteen ninety-six. You guys get a call from a pretty big sporting goods chain based out of indianapolis named named kelly ins or gaylon galleons something something like that yet galleons yeah. What was that yeah they were. They were actually in our opinion. The best sporting goods in the country <hes> their stores were incredible and yeah they they were open to a sales call and interested in the brand so they invited us to go visit them in indianapolis and we actually actually couldn't afford to fly out so instead we've just transparent with them and asked if we could piggy back when they came here would they come and visit us i would they didn't realize was that there was no life as good in that when they came to visit austin becoming to our apartment so they <hes> anyway a we made them prince spaghetti and rago sauce and we hung out and they they were on board and <hes> they placed the biggest orders is by far that we'd ever seen and they kind of put us on the map outside of new england. I think dick's sporting goods eventually bought galleons right. That's right and i i i don't know if it was apparent to them that the entire company in burt myself in kerry or sitting with them in our kitchen at dinner but but we did have a lot of laughs and then we got an in order and that was a huge step for us to suddenly be shipping two hundred and eighty eight pieces instead of twenty four pieces to a retailer so so once you get into galleons aliens was at just like a game changer i mean. Did you see your business just like skyrocket. It was a game changer because once he would happen was <hes> most of our business stan and now is a specialty mom and pop business so the mama pops will take a look at the big guys. Try to find brands. Sometimes that different <hes> retailers carrying galleons was kind of a model citizen that a lot of small retailers looked up to and so once we were in galleons we're in all these geographic <unk> graphic locations and there was great visibility for us so all of a sudden our phones were ringing like crazy from other retailers from other territories and so- galleys was probably responsible responsible for hundreds of new accounts over the next year or two and business really started booming. You know went from that. Two hundred fifty thousand six hundred twenty then we broke a million at one moment to the was just mind blowing t- thinking how do we go from having like seventy eight dollars between us three years ago. Two million dollars in sales was pretty mind blowing and we didn't have a concept of you know like what it meant to do a million dollars. I think we thought maybe we should retire knows wow we hit a million dollars. I mean i think we definitely stopped and sort of you know how to how to beer and kind kind of said wow man what what has happened but on the other hand was still in our apartment and you don't really look around and see any differences just a mad scramble we'll still but but i think yeah i think galleons an crossing not million dollar mark connor gave us the confidence to invest in a lease get the warehouse and and we hired a few people we i mean we we didn't even have a computer would do untold kerry who still works with us to this day by the way she actually owns five percent the business. He's a partner yeah but she you know she said to us. You really need to get a computer and both on our like oh. We're artists we. We don't want a computer and they so she needed to run the business. Why do we need a computer but she was right well. There's a lot of absurd of exchanges. We had this guy who had run champion the brand chair and wilson sporting goods and he was helping us out through his a sales up. You know we connected personally. Jay phillips god bless him. He was flying up phillies like an angel. We didn't yeah to get angel slash devil the best kind and he <hes> he would give us advice and direction and then he would ask us very basic questions like you know what he got on the books for next year. We're like what what what do you mean like. How do you plan how much product to make me. We like <hes> we just. We've been doubling for like the last few years. We figure you're on a double again. He's like that's a very scary way to run a business and he asked us what our assets sets where he's trying to get us off our personal off our loans because our our personal names were on the loan notes and <hes> he said we gotta. We've got change this. You know what do you got for assets. Burton are like we can get a mountain bike and we're dead serious. We didn't even know how to answer questions like think. I got that picture mom. We got a v._c._r. And he was just like dumbfounded. Looking at us like these guys are so so clueless spine shirts like i because i mean when i think of life is good. I think like <hes> going to ocracoke island. You know someplace. I like cape. Cod like you know you would life is good and it's the summer and it's easy to feel that way. Is that where the shirts were being solden like beach towns and places like that in the summertime. <hes> one of the strengths right away was that it wasn't one distribution channel. Oh so you're talking about destination resort which became important to us right away but sporting was really big. Two gift shops for people like you know around themes like home. Themes like you know love family gardening grilling all that kind of stuff so it really was <hes> oh the distribution was really spread out which which you know we didn't really i can't take credit for strategically planning that but a helped us a lot through the two years the economy has gone up and down and when you're in a single distribution channel it's hard to weather economic downturns but for us you know some would get hurt worse than others and we were always able to weather it because we were <hes> not too many eggs in one basket yeah there. It was so many different places for us to go in when the economy went down it would not all the channels will get impacted the same way i mean did you. I mean when you think think about <hes> a very simple phrase some very basic and not i mean your guess agreed artists no no no oh judgment but like very simple our work and it became this thing t shirts and and dinner plates and posters and things like what what are the things that i'm probably forgetting about recipes backs towels. I mean really doesn't you know it really just became you know what he's a good canvas to connect emotionally with people and in more recent years more things like video content and publishing books excetera which is extremely exciting to us but we're still most known for the t shirts. Did you guys. I mean you've been doing this now. Since really i guests since the late eighties rape on t shirts. Have you ever <hes> any part of of of of you guys want to sell it. You know sell it to a bigger her company and just kind of cash in 'cause you 'cause you've both of you become pretty well off from this tiny little t shirt business and <hes> <hes> you can. I don't know can do whatever you want. I think the reason that we're not interested in selling going. Public is what we learned. Learn from these customers that started sending us letters emails sharing their personal stories and they really taught us that optimism is most powerful aw in the hardest times and these are people dealing with chemotherapy losing loved ones and they'd say we all wore life as good t-shirts to the memorial service for my brother because that's the spirit with which he lived and we've got thousands of those letters and emails and people kind of <unk> opening up their whole personal lives to us because the emotional connection to the brand. They're the ones who taught us this and if we'd hadn't received those letters that may they have been appealing to us like yeah. We've been at this for a few decades but we want to spread that message as wide as we can because we believe in it more than anything anything else in the world am burt but what what are your thoughts on. I mean did did you ever consider find to sell the business well in a lot of ways. We really feel like we're just getting warmed up. It honestly feels like a startup today. We're we're like a twenty five year old startup where there's all these young people oh walking around that remind us of ourselves but are much faster and stronger and smarter and i'm not <hes> operating the business. I was as president and c._e._o. For a long time and we replaced me with a woman that actually came from our nonprofit side and she's killing it and you can tell pretty quickly oakley that she's about ten times the operator that i was and it's allowing me to dive back into the creative and i haven't been there in a while l. so we're really kinda back to where we started in the beginning. Hey let's design some t shirts but now we have a really strong balance sheet. We own one hundred percent of the business us and you know we have no intention of going public or selling the business we just wanna see you know how far we can take this in at some point figure out what to to do with the structure something creative maybe denisov to our staff. Maybe we can sell it to our customers. Something that enables the <hes> that will enable the best work of life is good to be done after john de gone so i mean. Do you guys feel like you grew up up with very working class home. I mean in the room upstairs with frost on windows and like you presumably today a a up. Both of you are doing pretty well. I mean you can you can live pretty comfortably. No no question about it yeah just to have our own home seriously not not to be too corny but that that's pretty cool and to be able to travel. It's incredible and <hes>. I don't think we would ever take that for granted to your what what is your i mean. What did your parents make. If your business your mom passed away <hes> a couple years go and then i can see your later. Your dad dad passed <hes>. What do they make of this. I mean this t shirt business at turned into something huge yeah they they loved it. I think they were proud of it and <hes> they really did do their part while we had our dysfunction growing growing up and there were times. Were you know right right up until the time that our mom passed away if she saw somebody in life is good t-shirt she'd run up to them and say my son's made it was embarrassing when your weather but <hes> our our dad got a kick out of the nuts and bolts of the business he always wanted to know the details els and he was so encouraging when bert ni- for that year and a half when we did live at home and we're still doing the van trips he always was. Just you know we'd roll in at three a._m. Some night how'd you do did you do. It was never what the hell are. You guys doing like your you know your college graduates like you get get your act together. There's no pressure on career. It was always how'd you do and that helped a lot and maybe maybe the interesting thing going full circle. Oh with our dad is that in the autumn of his life he he came out of that funk he really came out of the depression and he really became the a guy that we never knew that we see in those pictures you know before we were around and it's hard to say what that what caused that but as our business grew grew that house that we grew up in really fell to pieces and our and our parents while we were living just like you mentioned guy better and better along the way and we'd go oh visit our parents living in that same house falling apart so we decided to knock the house down and build them a nice new home and <hes> you know i think it was the first time in my father's life since he you know since he had all those kids that when people came to visit they had a place to sit down and at the he could be proud of his home and i think also where he felt like he was a failure he looked at his six kids now and you know we we landed on our feet all of us and he didn't screw everything up so i think he was a little easier on himself and in some ways this success of the business <hes> might help my dad you don't get over that hump and realized that if we're not failures he wasn't a failure and it was really cool to see him relaxed and and enjoying his grandkids and it was like it was like he in our mom were dating again. I mean they just like hang out and spend time and you know the who won away on some weekends and things they hadn't done that and you know thirty years i mean it just they were married for fifty six years and then the the last one believe it or not while it was tough with moms illness in everything they they had some great years now. Our mom said that too just before you know once she knew the cancer was was taking her life and there was nowhere to go. She said nobody should feel sorry for me. On the happiest i've ever been in my life you know part of that was i'm sure because because my dad had come out of the funk and also that she knew that that she did a good job with with our kids and they were all okay wow you know when you think about this crazy story going from t shirts up and down the eastern seaboard to sell them out of the back of van and knock on the dorm rooms to seventy dollars between you two you know a shipping container as your office and and the company today what it does reportedly almost one hundred million dollars in revenue years at about right that's right. You got about what almost two hundred employees today right pretty good. I mean do you for for seabird to you. When you think about the success of this company the attributed to your hard work and you brothers hard work or in your intelligence or do you think that a lot of it came from just luck law to walk. I think we we stumbled into something. That's much bigger than we are <hes>. I think we've been resilient. You know maybe more resilient than smart but it's a good good fifty percent ain't luck we right place right time <hes> two percent skill and then we've we've worked our asses off so that that's that's played a big factor factor too so you know maybe there's all those parts are equal and john how much of it because of like how much because of your hard work and your skill intelligence. I would say skill intelligence. Maybe twenty percent <hes> hard work another twenty eh and then brute strength. Maybe from me twenty so neither only in really the you got your answer there in that neither of us know hotter add up to one hundred percent and yeah just you know so until definitely not skill a lotta luck clearly no question that's john birt jacobs. Co founders of the life is good company for the way we know for a fact that at least one other t-shirts has traveled traveled all the way to space and twenty thirteen astronaut karen nyberg posted a video on the international space station and she was showing how she washed her hair in zero gravity and the shirt that she's wearing in that video. It's from life is good. It's a grinning girl who looks like the original jake sitting back to back with her dog and underneath. It says lean on me.

T Boston Kerry Indianapolis Cary Sherman Attorney Bob Pierce Marlboro Boston Garden Bedford Phillies Ocracoke Island Karen Nyberg Basketball John Birt Jacobs Dick Stan Jay Phillips Partner
"birt" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"School saying he was looking for his bag while not even wearing a shirt visual in the office of the school Witter electronic locks that you have to be admitted to admit some to the school that says Sabrina was inside for several hours before running off. That's when Smith says police were finally notified they arrested him eventually near the school. I want to go to say, well, we didn't know we had a weapon. Well, how many school shootings you're done these days when we don't know what's going on. But wants to get you inside of the building. And that gun is fired people were hurt. And at this point. It could have been children's Smith wasn't shy about where he's placing the blame in this case. I personally hope that principal accountable for what happened in Darby borough. Andrew, Kramer, KYW NewsRadio. In a statement. The William Penn school district says it was question as to why the principal did not. That panic button, which will Birt's all local police agencies that they have an armed intruder in the building. Apparently, it wasn't utilizes the principal had no credible evidence that there was an armed intruder inside the building. Boy after her dog was found with two broken legs of Delaware County woman is now being charged with animal cruelty, the story from KYW's, Paul Kurtz, a Siberian husky named Tina is now on the men that the SPCA north Philadelphia shelter. He's been there since December four th after the agency's humane law enforcement team acted on a tip and rescued her from the Darby home of Tina Ray H L E director, Nicole Wilson says she suffered for a week while Ray tried to get her treatment had no funds to provide any care for the dog and indicated to the vet that she couldn't even afford X rays for the dog. Wilson says Ray refused to give up the dog at that point. That's when we move forward with a search warrant to seize the dog Tina has undergone multiple surgeries and is getting around the clock care at the shelter. But her future won't be determined until the legal cases settled and that could take months the SPCA has set up a Facebook fundraiser to offset a veterinary Bill. Has approaching fifteen thousand dollars and rising by the day on Paul Kurtz, KYW NewsRadio. The Chester county district attorney's office is appointing a special prosecutor why to investigate whether any laws were broken during the construction of the mariner east pipeline KYW suburban bureau chief, Jim Melwert, Chester tiny DA. Tom HOGAN says Seth Weber spent twenty six years as a federal prosecutor somebody who's got a deep knowledge of environmental issues, and is extremely powerful. Prosecutor. So he is a valuable addition to our team here HOGAN announced the investigation last month after meeting with property owners affected by pipeline construction. He points to sinkholes and contaminated. Well, water in the county and an explosion along the pipeline and beaver county, we expect it other people which step in the governor PUC, it'd be attorney general's office. And we haven't seen it. So at this point we felt a need to protect Chester county, and our citizens energy transfer the company behind the pipeline says they're confident. No laws were broken, and they will defend themselves against what they call baseless accusations. At the suburban bureau, Jim Melwert, KYW NewsRadio. A new poll shows that immigration is a top concern in two thousand nineteen nearly half of Americans say immigration is one of the most important issues that the government needs to work on this year. According to a new Associated Press NO RC poll Republicans site the issue as higher on their lists than Democrats with sixty five percent of Republicans saying it's a top five problem facing the nation. That's way up from forty two percent last year. Thirty seven percent of Democrats. See it as a top issue. But that's up from twenty percent a year ago. There is pessimism that the government will actually fix the issue as two-thirds express little confidence. Legislators will come up with a solution. I'm John Stolnis. We have another recall linked to faulty airbags..

Tina Ray H L Paul Kurtz principal Smith Chester county Tom HOGAN prosecutor Jim Melwert William Penn school district Witter Nicole Wilson Delaware County Darby borough Sabrina Seth Weber KYW Birt SPCA beaver county
"birt" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To remain vigilant. Please pay attention to the media pay attention to request for evacuation. If you are in an area that is currently under mandatory evacuation, please don't let your guard down, please evacuate. We need you to be participants partners with us evacuate. Well in advance of the fire. Now, two bodies have been found in a burned area of Malibu. But officials have said today they are not sure yet whether they are directly linked to the massive Wolsey. Fire. The fire seems to be acting up somewhat in the west hills area. This afternoon homes have already burned there. Of course, are Claudia pisgah is making her way up to the active area. And we'll have more when she arrives. And can tell us what she sees. In fact, I'm told she's with us now plotting, what do you have? Yeah. I'm actually on the end of where it turns into a sunset bridge. So it's a rpm canyon park and the fire really picked up here. There's this health side. This like little strip mall on feno, and and firefighters just came leading into this area. A hillside goes up, you appear to be some homes. It's a little hard to tell with the out here. But I can see the Jack up there. So I presume that their homes on the on the other end of that it looks like they're they've got a good handle on this is it's a lot of white oak. At this point. I'm not seeing any claim. But you know, the thing is we thought things had calmed down. The wind had down by all it takes is one of the hot side to get things going again. Here right now behind me looks like they're gonna make us. Yeah. They're making a water shop on me. So they should have this active part of the fire. Well, enhanced fairly shortly. Oh, I do see some up here on on the other end of the hillside by yeah, you've got firefighters reposes and again the chopper making drop from up above. But you know, it's it looked pretty scary there for a second. And it doesn't take much to get things going on here. It is. So extremely dry, but the good news. That while the wind picked up some there. They're still relatively mild compared to the kind of stuff that they were seen earlier reporting live card you can access. Seventy NewsRadio smoke is just sitting over the fire area. Are I in the skies, Scott Birt's up in the air and sky five over the fire? Scott, what does it look like from where you are? I'll tell you what.

Claudia pisgah Scott Birt feno
"birt" Discussed on Dude Soup

Dude Soup

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on Dude Soup

"Other people have commented on this before in the past other Sesame Street writers and then people and they've, I think Frank odds at one point is like they don't have genitalia rank is said, there's nothing blow away stone. They do not have sexuality. Sure. But I mean, that doesn't mean they're projected relationship. Yeah. I mean, they are to to their in committed relationship, a male apparently male creatures who are partners in life and live their life together. I was the top. Definitely bur no early think Birt's a secret bottom. Yeah, it's Ernie thirty. Definitely Ernie struck me as a power bottom. No. Also bird a bird submissive in that situation atop power bottom to me, or I know this is wrong with their interchangeable. I, I feel like they're interchangeable top power bottom. Oh. I can't do this. That's not right. I'm doing it. I can't be heard. Lippert Ernie Ernie. A rubber soup to nuts. Right, right. That's all right. Yeah, that's. Oh, that's okay. I'll earning Ernie is the orange is the the strong new is more. Yeah, Mr. hope are loves pigeons. Oh yeah. He loves virgins. I get Sesame Street being like, okay, so I think this dude, if he if he was writing it and he has his.

Ernie Ernie Birt Frank
"birt" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Thanks again for your incredible support of the show over the years. You know, I do the show for you all because I truly love sharing my enthusiasm on the wealth of the mind brain in creativity. Okay. Now back to the show, see you talk about some examples that Stephen Jay Gould talked about similar examples in mismatch of man. So like the Calcutta family story, yours talk about throw Birt's fraud. Ability. Great. If you could just briefly summarize that. But my real question is that you know the truth, the matters, even though some of their work was really shoddy. I mean, modern science does confirm some of their hypotheses nevertheless, in the sense that there is a genetic contribution not deterministic but probabilistic to intelligence IQ, right? It's kind of a baby in bathwater situation. I focus a lot in the book on, as you mentioned this book called the Calicut family. This was actually, I organize that chapter actually around a woman who was the subject of this book was sort of involuntarily turned in kind of a poster child for eugenics. Her name was Emma Wolverton and she was institutionalized in a home for the quote, unquote. Feeble minded a now because he was feeble minded. But because she basically got in the way her mother wanted to get rid of her. So she could get remarried. And this happened all the time. And as she would end. Up spending entire life in institutions, even though she could very well have survived is fine on her own in the outside world. When she was a teenager she met a man named can regard who was a psychologist who was hired at her school, the violent training school, and he had discovered intelligence testing in Europe, which was just a way of trying to decide whether children were of kind of had an average mental age for their age or a little lower little little head. And he started testing the students and then got so excited by the results. He was getting that. He started to think that he could come up with a whole science of intelligence. And around this time he discovers genetics, which is very new at the time and decides to go off and find the families of his students and what he does. He draws pedigrees for all students and he, he will Mark, you know, people who live fifty. One hundred hundred fifty years earlier as feeble minded just from the stories that has field workers would here, and then he would then use this as evidence that people mindedness was a simple genetic trait may be carried by one gene. So he publishes this book called the Catholic family about his discovery, and he and others use this as evidence for a really aggressive eugenics program because they feel like, well, there are so many people minded people and we have to stop them from having children in order to save our country and you can't institutionalize all of them. So Goddard lobbies very aggressively for state laws for sterilization. Tens of thousands of Americans were sterilized as all these laws and in Nazi Germany. The Catholic family book was used as prime evidence for their own attempts to reshape the human race and. Not only did they do Cerro's Asian, but they went further to extermination all based on this, this faulty line of evidence. So I think that no matter what sort of scientific discoveries that are happening now, hundred years later, we have to look back and see just how easy it was for very intelligent people for very for the for very prominent scientists to leap do incredibly harmful, destructive ideas based on on their idea that they had figured everything out when it comes to heredity. So here we are now and if people are saying like, oh, well, you know, I, it's easy. We will just change these genes and everything will be fine. I think we have to really question ourselves and ask, are we falling prey to the same kind of arrogance and simplicity that previous generations have fallen prey to? And that's a really point a good point that you making your book about how much damage scientists. It's not disci-. All of us can do when the science is poorly interpreted unethically applied. So I think that is an excellent point, but it's coming out fast. This genetic research using genome wide association studies, some scientists tend to get extremely excited over it. Do you fear at all?.

Emma Wolverton Stephen Jay Gould Calicut family Calcutta Birt Mark fraud Europe Germany Cerro Goddard One hundred hundred fifty year hundred years
"birt" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"And so he he drove it to set and he signed it by the stick shift and he signs to Greg, you're the real bandit, Burt Reynolds, right? So I, I've had that for fifteen years sitting in my garage. It's all careful. Took it to work about a month ago. Guy said, hey, man, I'm gonna get this detail for you. Take care of the whole thing. I said, look, look, look, look, look, look, that's a signature from Burt Reynolds, tell the guy, don't touch that. He goes, Nah, I got it. I got, I got, I got it back at the end of the day, it's barely there guy just scrubbed and looked like he scrubbed and scrub scrub and try to get it off. And so I'm I'm pissed right? And I never get mad and I'm just like pissed because I've taken care of this thing for fifteen years. I go to the guy, go man, what the hell with what's going on. He goes, I talked to the guy. He said he just put a towel over any never touched it. And now even more mad because I'm like, all right, look, look, come on. I can't. So I said that guy has to show up tomorrow morning. I gotta talk to him. So he comes in and I said, hey, man, come on was what's the deal. We put a towel on it and he goes, he hung his head and he goes, look, man, a messed up. I was on the outside at another guy on the inside. Look, Dan. He was doing it forgot to tell them, I screw. It up. And then I was like, all right, then I was like, fine. Like I wasn't mad anymore because I was like, that's all that's fine people. I fucked up people. Fuck up. What are you gonna do. I mean, there's nothing I can do about it. I'm not going to, you know, but now at least I can sleep at night. I couldn't sleep towel. Someone put a towel on it. I was gonna, say, domain look mold on my back. Can I can? I cannot bar your magic president. That's that I'll go. All right. Well, I found out he's going to be. I'm gonna. I'm gonna track him down because he's going to be in town doing Tarantino movie, Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio and stuff Birt's going to be in that. So I might have to track them down, give them to sign it again. I, he was willing guy that I expected some completely different and I got something completely different. Yeah, I, he was dynamite. Yeah, I expected just to not talk to him or whatever. At the table read, he came right over started talk, and I was like, okay. And then in the mornings, I, you know, I'm I'm going. an old I liked to get up early. He said, oh, man, yeah. So he'd see walk over to me and we talk time-to-time, I'd be smoking joining goes, what are you doing? Nothing. He would smell it and he goes, I haven't smoked that shit us just put it up. He would. Then he would walk away. Yeah. If you was just he was great onset. He just sit there and tell story after story story dog. Yeah, that's that's the one man show I have is one bench. Oh, by the way I'm gonna give you. Okay. I have one man show I ever given the show tiny body. He gave it to me as a present. All right, and it didn't do it down in Florida. He Vegas. Okay. Fucking clam about him and meeting Jack Dempsey and just hours, but him going to audition, what's the guy that he went to dishes? We're trying to figure that one that what's his name was on here an active okay that he went to on dishing for because I had all right. The guy that was in the hook in that movie showed up with a gun pulled the gun on Kazan like he just has hours. Yeah, that when he got a call from Clint Eastwood one day or Steve McQueen said. Picking up going to Vegas Vegas for? Because when we started the director that fires, he died now he's told Muslim. Great. Let's go piss fighting Dan, that the thing that nobody ever any brought down deluise. Yeah, the longest shot and that was like for Gallic me, bro. That's like watching Lucy. And does you know they were old and they started tone story..

Guy Burt Reynolds Dan Vegas Vegas Birt Greg Steve McQueen Kazan Clint Eastwood Lucy president Jack Dempsey director Florida Tarantino Leonardo DiCaprio Brad Pitt fifteen years one day
"birt" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"birt" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"To be the case people have talked about the concept of term premium which is basically the excess yield that investors require to commit to holding longterm bond versus a short term bond the idea that it's been close to zero and but there's no evidence if you look at it historically and i've looked through many different cycles that the reason rates are low whether it's blow risk premium or whether it's low expectations for inflation really makes any difference causation doesn't matter lot same thing is with the narrative that you know when people are saying that fed asset purchases quantitative easing have artificially depressed rates that have distorted the yield curve and implications for economic activity but again if you look at it historically as a general rule the forces driving inversion are relevant what matters is the difference between artificially peg short term rates and market dominated longterm rates not the absolute levels and not how or why curve kurban birt's it's about the ultimate results so again i just wanted to educate a little bit on why the yield curve is significant but also ask you to really ignore people trying to assess causation as to why the yield curve might invert doesn't really matter it's still a risk i will say it's not our base case i don't think it's going to happen and i don't think that's a major reason to be negative on the markets but again back to my narrative idea it bears watching something we're going to be paying attention to over the next couple of months up next stick with me just want to make a couple all their points of the again quote unquote narrative the current narrative driving investor perception in investor.

kurban birt
"birt" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Yes we're getting there i mean it's i mean it was anything that really grabbed you grab your attention from this i mean our say was very tricky because they sell kino's hopefully not law gets said birt's there's some interesting stuff there was a lot of interesting stuff going on i think the one of the most interesting things in the in the sort of culture of security technology in general is that the the the threats and the problems and the exploits and all that stuff is so they're so common they're so large there so frequent that there at any given time now there's like fifteen major things for people to stress out and worry about and you know you really almost have to go to this a conference like this to have the slightest inkling of exactly what the threats are what the threads aren't and we're and it's just keep getting worse and so you know i think it's getting the point where platforms like the chromebook is getting point where people are just gonna have to do pretty serious if they want to have any security at all pretty serious serious extreme measures just have basic security because you know it's an arms race and i feel like people who want security are losing that arms race i think very much is the question i mean defenses it was much hotter than than offense but i mean in some stuff that we've got coming through the line dwight greg thing that really grabbed your attention now i know the our site conferences generally a waste of time i have a completely different opposite allen.

kino birt allen dwight greg
"birt" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"A reasonable amount of skepticism to it was that these videos surfaced where both gary landtroop and burtt davy attended functions and campaign events with bannon and the candidate roy moore we also were surprised when we went to interview gary land trip and burtt david that both of them spoke about burtt davy's close relationship with steve bannon and although they wouldn't explain the origin of that relationship or its nature they were both very comfortable talking about birt's relationship with steve bannon incredible stuff washington post investigative reporter sean beaubourg who i feel like i just want to follow you around because you keep stumbling on really interesting unexpected stories wherever your reporting thank you for helping us understand the sean congratulations on the scoop thank you all right much more to come tonight what a weird day stay with us over three weeks ago now on march first nicole wallace here at msnbc was first to report that h r mcmaster was soon to be out as national security advisor could be out by the end of the month that reporting got a big response and it sparked a lot of speculation about who might get mcmasters job if nicol wallace was right and he was getting fired you might remember from this show there was one response online that we singled out here because it frankly hit like a thunderbolt quote if bolton replaces mcmaster and i've heard kelley likes bolton we're all going to die that was from colin call is the former national security adviser to vice president joe biden well now that that's actually happened now that mcmaster is not just out but john bolton is into replace him mr call isn't saying okay we're all dead now but he is still being pretty freaking stark this is what he's just written for foreign policy which has the headline as you see john.

kelley john bolton vice president colin nicole wallace sean beaubourg investigative reporter mcmaster joe biden gary landtroop nicol wallace advisor msnbc washington post birt steve bannon burtt davy david roy moore
"birt" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"Rhapsody birt's relate to somber it's hugely controversial because bryan singer got bumped out of the director chair for dexter fletcher but at least they did it at least they the promo photo looks amazingly scituate yeah one photo like it's one photo where they i swear they see enhanced his jaw to make him look more in like end bryan singer was already like the fifth director attached to that project malik is like the nine hundred actors onto that project project is just so like embattled i'm gonna go hard no so that later next year you guys gonna laugh at me i just feel like if i had somebody had brought up the tonya harding movie with margot robbie last year i would have been like no like what are you crazy so it that one was not as in battled production like me make very good point there i don't know the ins and outs of it but if i had to guess it may have to do also with like the freddie mercury state and the band like there's a lot of reasons why music things can become a complete nightmare fisher there's stakeholders with a lot of money in representation rights and all that stuff yeah so maybe it might still be okay but yeah i believe the members of queen for years we're like no i don't like your vision no i don't like your vision you can't have our music good luck doing freddie mercury bio pic without our music and it's not even a biopic it's like of this specific era of queen or something like that so i haven't other question which is about jona hills lady bird which is called midnineties shona hills ladybird man that is a good market that movie.

Rhapsody birt bryan singer dexter fletcher director malik margot robbie freddie jona hills
"birt" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

Legion of Skanks Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

"So i mean isn't even a debate i'm up being a dick i mean son love was awesome i'm a stickler and lyrics to and all i got to hear the drive me crazy kind of crazy though yeah you guys six yeah all these bans flitting ridicule their work we're playing ten seconds the first round is like a fucking to get through right now i know what they do that ten seconds don't the whole thing i know i could break it all down for them all the ribs birt's lewis stop man's spreading on me i'm a fucking adult man spreading on radically your life no it was ironically i think it was ever used the term spreading and then claim they're an adult yeah but i'm going to give me a wally i think merican overdose runs away with this one though for sure i definitely wanted to hear more that they were like a fucking cool band they were they were tight i like he'd be hanging them on ship rock yeah it does feel like that ship rock band for sure they were great i like the american overdose dave i just say i didn't think sudden love sucked i wanted to hear more of both of them but in american over there i thought they sucked i thought mike harrington won that fight and i'm going when american overdose always nailing it i know it's oversaturated with like the the heavy and metal stuff like that but i think that they won that round.

mike harrington ten seconds
"birt" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"The school teachers more to carry a weapon from our perspective uh we we would rather see uh an increase in law enforcement in in the schools uh the large school district where i work well we're we're uh we have a our own police department in the school that allows us to to get out there and educate educate the faculty and staff and the students run grills and like you said earlier bill you you you talked about see something say something it it comes back down to community policing and are having those layers of security uh in the large school district where we're at they've they've implemented the sex offender database so all visitors are screen through the front door and run through a sex offender database and and all these are tracked as it company the school increase the security and surveillance video so uh any intruders know that there's layers them layers of security that are in place and i think that's where it would that's where the answer is well you know gentleman the the the thing that struck me about this case is the somebody did see see something unusual and reports this young man to the fbi but it never came down the chain the food chain at the fbi to be investigated well uh mr birt of i can jump in here but in in in my experience tune in working in as i work over thirty years in public safety is the fire department and and now with the school system it's been my experience that the fbi intervenes when when the local public safety ask.

fbi mr birt thirty years
"birt" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"A mexican cowboy wants to me read your bible and play aren't prey on your own at the best cheeseburger is it some old farts name birt's house we also go eat drink we need you know what i was so mbs a bob clarke when he got to meet and have a beer with his audience i would love to meet this vibe pitt and have a beer michael you're on news radio kkob with eric strauss thanks for old michael good morning bill heilium buddy voican was chelsea's stuff people uh promoting catholics the catholic religion uh i was i'm my ex catholic strauss gotcha uh judgment here brother no judgment no i just uh i was taught the bible of the catholic church for all those years i was in there and um i just have just reading it it a minister julie the new the new covenant dude cut it would i mean uh it's uh it's it's pretty awesome honeymoon i mean how do you read it the new covenant in the knee and not be impressed by it uh or or be repelled by it i don't know it's just so michael you you've found a different since is spirituality in i i that works for you uh and in the you know i i told you i i don't i don't know seat the thing for me is and i i've rested with this i there's something i've tried other things these megachurches in these two and i always come i don't know why i always come back to the catholic church it just i i find a deeper sense of peace there and for you it's your bible and maybe like burt said reach bible and pray and i think that's a lot better than ninety percent of america right now thank you for the call michael i totally get where he's coming from snap me maybe i shouldn't be telling you all this little bit too too much peek behind the curtains this morning people got monroe's i'm going to throw central girl in just 'cause i love george but that berger was legit i'm not doing this just because it's george it's got cheese in the inciting cheese on the outside.

birt bob clarke pitt chelsea catholic church julie burt america monroe george berger eric strauss michael ninety percent
"birt" Discussed on WREK

WREK

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on WREK

"The pope the book boop put boop boop the john boop boop boop boop boop boop on her two john two two pope john birt vote do you want them boom the the group two bhutto from now too abruptly changed the subject this the internet i was there there's several sub genius newsgroups and of course zillion websites and so forth but and chat rooms all that kind of crap and one at one person was griping on on now all dot binary stocks slack which actually has great stuff on it uh he was complaining gives all my bob is this news groups screwed up all the posts are coming in daylight even a good he said i put their don't show up and he goes yeah everything's daylight for me too i think the conspiracy is screwing with used net so that we'll all go web based and friends i think that's exactly what's going on and i don't know know some you're probably a little newer to the internet and some viewer probably dealt with it for long time but i suspect that in about a year two will all have to have a licence to have a website just like the radio you know they there was a time when anybody could have a radio station that suddenly oh well there's not enough band win so and of course you know some of these subversives might use it for you noticed read something bad like information friends this supranational corporations don't lie competition and they know that our religion is the only entered out for the one world advertiser down with the super nationals it up with the supernatural ma fed up down with that quote list bob and up with bob as bob said in night team fifty non when they regulate websites only news group digs will have free pornography see muttered about in his sleep now phones i really do think that of course needless to say the conspiracy is not going to let us get away with murder on the internet forever like we have been i certainly feel like i have been but you know us this is.

bhutto bob murder john birt
"birt" Discussed on 1070 The Fan

1070 The Fan

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on 1070 The Fan

"Wide receiver hitch to john birt todd bowles and howard one of those linebackers entertaining max going on in aibak i asked him about learning there more he there's so much more attention to detail you just have to treat it like it's another class omit to setting the play because they're gonna have a different test every week about marie yard shot the first down on the run for daniel young law the defense is mostly fences in college football just say you know what will give you would we do that we line up here with reported us secondary patterson way of the ball he is going to get his guys too weak to adjust as i said earlier to jump routes look at a conversation here i'm back her safety used corners everybody's communicating based on fox based on tendencies and to that offense format rush michelle and to the hands saad huppert bothered by trade that howard and now a fourth fourthdown decision for tom harmon fourth and three of the plus forty two and it looks like he may lead his offense on the field from this baby your heart town this may be any number of options jerry anderson i just love to wash it and too slow to watch it on the field how interactive he is he's constantly like those lines actors sake is communicating built texas jerry patterson all over it all game like luckett five still look it up with assad is shell by clappedout award to call time and he runs down the sideline to do just that more than three seats it's going to send you an ucf smu chairman of the yards here should waterrelated boop boop james he was a thousand yard back decision a goal and part of a threeheaded boxster at running back longwood savior joan c and david freedman picked up a great blocked from the centre evan brown ethics and what that will not support what was twenty two pence but the catch that is what makes him so dangerous you can outside coverage white that is still lose the venture that might be the best for your catch a disease of the decree.

john birt todd bowles joan c smu clappedout jerry anderson saad huppert daniel marie howard football david freedman chairman assad luckett jerry patterson tom harmon michelle fox thousand yard
"birt" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In another life had were big john birt costumes a state fairgrounds because as put your job was now if you if you don't do little things right you're rounded all day and all those lights on you can get heat exhaustion and pass on real fast real quick with what he say he dressed up as of baru as of january now through pictures my office back in my illinois terni general days we had this big antiviolence initiative them i will i was a about other big giant character named imagined i was a peace stuff and saw walk run in a giant hut ask bird costume i thought you were gonna save back in your college days are back in your own you worked the milky back in your attorney general jose and fell under fl other other duties as a sign k but you know what got me recommendation a law school so i'm not complaining abdul is isn't it in your coating you a new survey half of us feel burned out and our jobs right now right does very minute and that's true across every age bracket i've got the top five reasons we feel burnedout number one uncleared goals which the kenneth sounds like with a personal problem more than it does you know something related your job argue that a your boss just doesn't give you direction that might are yet to forty two percent of people say it's the top cause of stress that their job unclear goals number two the commute of union verdict can be do not out almost none that's awesome i've i've been commuting before a half hour to work the most of my life here in the city and i've learned to like it i mean i know people i could imagine living in fissures in having like a day job and having to commute back and forth up sixty nine every day of your life you see but actually sometimes see i i'll just the commute part because sometimes the commute is actually it's your wind up time then if you're wind down time now brought up in chicago go try to give downtown a.

john birt jose law school abdul chicago illinois attorney forty two percent
"birt" Discussed on Your Mom's House

Your Mom's House

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on Your Mom's House

"Birt's real excited that his a sitting heart rate is resting heart rate is forty seven but anyways but he also takes like blood pressure medications lower your heart rate so he doesn't even jesus so he's taking staff to to alter isn't a and he's like we're really low well delusional near manipulating it didn't think about that what's your resting heart rate denounce it's actually lower your put you've always had like no pulse my resting heart rate is so low that the my physician sent me to a cardiologists the cardiologist sent me this cedars imaging institute and they're like abets even used to talk about it in my act and there were like so did you used to run marathons or something sure mice resting arteries usually between thirty six in and 44 so that's like you either have like something wrong or you have like a really strong art right like that's like elite at their hearts will have to work as much now i've heard your heart i put my head under jess that it goes like this it goes too two two two it's eight year practically dead and we'll wait for tenure i had every test run i mean like thirty thousand dollars worth of tests done this is a few years ago and at the end with like with o after all the multiple days of going injecting me would things have me run on treadmills all that stuff there like go strong heart that's the conclusion yeah.

Birt heart rate blood pressure cedars imaging institute thirty thousand dollars eight year
"birt" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"birt" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"N that's my question today is swollen birt's opinion trump is playing chess you know and i i've got to ask is he plane is trump plane checkers are easy cesca sometimes even during the election man it was hard it was hard to say look he knows what he's doing i eight honestly didn't think he did at some points and sure enough he ran away with that election you call the popular vote all you want if you shove a bunch of liberals in one place and they all both for the same drone that doesn't mean he won the popular vote that means the board has assembled and the board is not running this country right now the thing evans now imagine just a on america imagine hillary speaking out on kneeling for the flags you know the for the no tie i think i think she'd be down in the centerfield kneeling with the rest of the kooks you know in my opinion i just want to ask again what do you accomplished by kneeling what is the end game here what are you exposing in america let's go to dj dj you're on newsradio kkob with eric strauss good morning how you doing yeah trump everything with trump is timing because he brings this out at the beginning of the he could have brought it out the end of last year than it would have got nowhere now it's going to sit here and fast here the healthy than and let's keep the american people boycott the super bowl and if the sponsors pull out of the super bowl yeah that's going to hurt the nfl benitez trump trump doesn't like people who sit on the sideline and walk the fan and that's what the nfl done they have the owners of done well in i don't know if you know goodell he's he's a bleedingheart dude when member him speaking out on capper nick and he was in full supporter kabir nick he knew he was in critical of capper nick at all you know bleeding hearts though when their money started bleeding out of their pocket and they're not making any money the change well i look it's going to take because i can tell you and.

birt super bowl nfl kabir nick evans america hillary eric strauss goodell