20 Episode results for "Birkenau"

"The Hyena of Auschwitz" Pt. 2 - Irma Grese

Female Criminals

43:31 min | 1 year ago

"The Hyena of Auschwitz" Pt. 2 - Irma Grese

"Due to the graphic nature of this woman's crimes listener discretion is advised this episode includes discussions of the brutalities of the holocaust including torture picture murder sexual assault and abortion that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children. Under the age of thirteen. Dr giza la perle looked on with pity at her patient peril had been imprisoned in the auschwitz concentration camp for less than a year but she was already used to treating this sort of injury her patience breasts were covered with infected lacerations. The aftermath of a vicious just whipping the exam was interrupted by the patients attacker. A camp guard named era gracia peril couldn't ask your mom to leave because the beast would interpret the request as a sign of disrespect and have peril beaten or worse while era watched dr apparel operated. She had no access to anesthesia. She couldn't even sterilize the knife. She used to cut into the woman. The surgery would be agonizing thing but it was necessary to save the patient's life harrell hated to see her patients suffer but when she glanced up at era what she saw aw revolted her as para later explained earmuffs grays was enjoying the sight of this human suffering her tense body swung back back and forth in a revealing rhythmical motion her cheeks were flushed and her wide open eyes had the rigid staring look of complete sexual paroxysm picture a murderer a gangster a thief. Did you picture a woman. We didn't think so- society -ociety associates men with dangerous crimes but what happens when the perpetrator is female every wednesday we examine the psychology motivations nations and atrocities of female criminals hi. I'm sammy nine and i'm vanessa richardson and you're listening to female criminals apar- cast original original. This is our second episode on earmuffs gracia a sexual sadist and nazi concentration camp guard at the age of nineteen era. Was this assigned to work in auschwitz birkenau at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing breach out on facebook facebook and instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever ever you're listening it really does help we also now have merchandise had to podcasts dot com slash merch for more information last week we covered earmuffs childhood in rural germany hitler rose to power while ermo was still a young girl and she soon found herself enamored with the chancellor in spite of her father's disapproval the culture of nazi authoritarianism unisom nurtured and heightened earmuffs vicious streak when ear mo was unable to complete training to become a nurse she instead took a job as an alpha z. Hernan or female guard at ravensbruck concentration camp in nineteen forty one their era embraced cruelty and quickly rose through the ranks <music> after one year and robbins broke the nineteen year old was offered a promotion she assumed the high ranking position as report fewer in or the report leader at auschwitz-birkenau this week we'll discuss earmuffs career at auschwitz-birkenau and bear belsen will also discuss the way the media shaped shaped era mas narrative after her death. The sexual nature of her crimes has intersected with earmuffs femininity to create a larger than life mythology after her death breath before we get into the story a quick note few records of eras actions as a concentration camp guard exist and most of what we know comes from survivor accounts often the specific dates and locations of certain events are known era arrived at auschwitz birkenau in march of nineteen forty three when she was nineteen. Auschwitz-birkenau was different from her previous posting hosting ravensbruck because it was larger with more prisoners it was also integrated with both male and female inmates whereas ravensbruck was women only most importantly eras new position as report leader meant that she held a higher rank in the camps hierarchy soon after earm- arrived at auschwitz birkenau. She adopted a pair of large dogs. She kept them near starving so that the animals were unusually vicious and aggressive when ear mafele that a prisoner failed to show her proper respect she unleashed her dogs to tear them apart around the same time here the fashion to whip out of wire and cellophane which she carried around with her everywhere. She often lashed her prisoners with it. Your mom made for a striking mm figure with her tall boots cellophane whip and perfectly combed hair her reputation for brutality in vanity soon earned airman numerous nicknames including the hyena of auschwitz ear misuse of a whip and violent dogs bear telling similarity to the behaviors of theodora rabbinate's the cruel chief war dress and training instructor at robbins brought concentration camp bins oversaw earmuffs training when she began her her career as an alpha z. Herron like earm- a- bins was infamous for her brutality. She reportedly loved to beat prisoners with little or no provocation -cation she to carry a whip and kept a violently vicious german shepherd with her at the camp vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode so please note vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show. Thank sammy dr charles stangl or identified identified. A phenomenon termed reference power in the book principles of social psychology. A person with reference power has not only authority but also also a strong ability to influence those under their charge who may identify with them. The obedient party often changes their behavior to mimic the person in power. You're without even realizing that they're doing so for example. If your boss is a powerful blonde woman you as a woman in the same field working under her might find yourself considering dying your own hair blonde without even knowing why that's referenced power given earmuffs strong psychological inclination toward award authoritarianism. It's likely that she modeled her own appearance and behavior on bins. Who earlier held power over her at auschwitz-birkenau. Oh air must soon made her own mark. She'd always received attention for her. Natural good looks and remained obsessed with vanity. She ordered custom tailored jackets. It gets from a famous dressmaker named madame. Greta earmuffs spend hours doing her hair every morning and wore strong perfume. Not only was earmuffs. Perfume perfume use a sign of her vanity but it was also a subtle form of torture. She knew that the prisoners at auschwitz birkenau were dirty tired and poor by wearing a memorable perfume. You're continually reminded her prisoners of those luxuries they could no longer have other forms of torture were more overt avert earmuffs didn't hesitate to beat or kick inmates. No one was beneath her notice and it was cleared her victims that era derived sexual will pleasure from her cruelty based on the details. We have about ear must actions. It seems likely that she was a sexual sadist sexual. Sadism is the tendency tendency for the status to derive sexual arousal when causing his or her partner physical pain sadism can be practiced in safe and consensual ways but a study published in aggressive behavior by carry a robertson and raymond a night showed that sexual sadism often correlates with an antisocial a personality disorder as both sadists and people with a._p._d. Share a desire for control and domination during her tenure as a guard earmuffs frequently frequently found ways to sexualize violence. She often targeted the most beautiful prisoners for torment. She may have been jealous of their appearance or may have grown more roused when she was attracted to her victims. Era was quick to whip large chested women on their breasts often those whip marks became infected affected earmuffs then watched as those women sought medical treatment growing visibly aroused and by some accounts masturbating during the treatment mint. It's difficult to say when it started or how often it happened but during earmuffs time at bir canal she also sexually assaulted numerous female prisoners prisoners this is particularly notable because ear must assault were in direct defiance of the nazi party stances against same sex relationships and sexual relations relations with jewish inmates dr ilan h meyer who specializes in sexual orientation law conducted a series of studies measuring how societal oh homophobia impacted lesbian gay and bisexual people psychologically i he observed phenomenon called minority stress in which lesbian gay and bisexual men and women tended to internalize the hate the experienced due to their sexual orientations in a follow up study meyer explored the long term impacts of minority stress which included unhealthy coping mechanisms and a higher likelihood of sexual promiscuity and sexually usually risky behaviors when era found a woman she wanted to have sex with. She ordered the prisoner to sleep with her. Many of these women complied knowing knowing that they risked violence or death. If they refused earmuffs demands during the length of they're abusive relationship earmuffs showed partiality to her victim's account suggested that one of era's sexual partners received extra food rations era even had her partners reassigned to made services in her home so that she she had access to her victim whenever she wanted but inevitably over time ehrmann grew bored with her partner then the victim was sent way to the gas chambers even wall she engaged in these coercive relationships with their prisoners grays continued taking lovers from the ranks of s. S. guards stationed at auschwitz-birkenau while the existence of such a relationship has never been proven rumors suggested that era was even involved with dr yosef joseph mangla a cruel nazi doctor famous for his torturous experiments on concentration camp prisoners mangla also known known as the doctor of death arrived at auschwitz birkenau on may thirtieth nineteen forty-three only weeks after nineteen year old eras transfer are he soon ran painful medical tests on the inmates there he was obsessed with proving that his victims were inferior to aryan germans and often tortured portrait as patients to death to try to prove his point even if their relationship was never romantic era and mangla had a close professional camaraderie she she often attended mongolia's medical experiments watching with excitement as he maimed patients who came under his care manggala also evaluated evaluated new prisoners upon their arrival at auschwitz he chose who went into the camp to work and who was sent directly to the gas chambers to be executed. This evaluation was supposed to be strictly under the purview of male guards but many prisoners reported that earmuffs frequently selected who should live and and who should die on mangoes behalf earmuffs jealousy and vanity often came through during these selection processes and she regularly sent the most beautiful full female prisoners straight to their deaths during her tenure at auschwitz birkenau ear momentous shah fewer friends hat singer owner as unto sharp fewer or sergeant had singer oversaw construction the camp the too soon fell for one another earmuffs and hat zinger your matt late at night for sexual liaisons while she had numerous partners among the s._s. guards. You seem to actually love hat singer soon. However here mass sexual encounters would catch up to her in nineteen forty four the twenty one year old guard discovered that she she was pregnant coming up next. We'll discuss era grazes pursuit of an illegal abortion. 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It's embraces optional preventive preventive care plan use it for everyday expenses like routine veterinary care grooming and training one in three policyholder submit claims claims in the first year so don't wait get your free quote at embrace pet insurance dot com slash criminals right now embraced pet insurance prince dot com slash criminals embrace pet insurance is underwritten by american modern insurance group terms and conditions apply see website for details tails now back to the story in nineteen forty four twenty one year old ear mcgrady's discovered she was pregnant after numerous sexual encounters with other nazi guards and inmates at auschwitz her out of wedlock pregnancy. If discovered would serve as evidence of earmark moral deficiency an incompatibility with nazi ideals she could lose the one thing. She cared about her job. As a nazi guard at auschwitz spear canal it's unclear who the father was given eras sexually active lifestyle. She may not have known either but she did know that she was in trouble. Trouble abortion was illegal in nazi germany but ehrman knew who to ask a jewish doctor named giza peril who was interned at auschwitz-birkenau birkenau. Dr peril worked as gynecologist before the holocaust began and now served as a doctor in the camp soon after dr peril arrived at auschwitz. It's birkenau. She learned that pregnant women were automatically enrolled in dr mangla cruel experiments those who survived the experiments were executed once manggala was done with them even while they were still pregnant during her imprisonment peril performed countless abortions in order to save the lives of her patients. She knew she'd be executed. If the guards knew of her activities so peril only ever terminated pregnancies in the middle of the night she she met pregnant women in their barracks and couldn't use any anesthetic or medical tools has she didn't wanna draw suspicion by using the camps equipment according into perils autobiography. I was a doctor at auschwitz ear. Mcgrady's called parallel to the maternity ward one day once the women were alone. Airman confessed that she was pregnant. It was against policy for prisoners to even touch their guards at auschwitz. Let alone examine them but peril complied applied and confirmed that era was pregnant era reveal that she knew about perils abortions and that she wanted one peril was shocked she didn't i didn't know how your melinda about the abortions or how long she'd known the penalty for performing an abortion was death but refusing eras order. Could it also get her killed. Ultimately peril decided that she was dead either way so she may as well do as ehrmann asked hera wasn't prepared to perform the surgery right then so she agreed to meet your mother next day in a small shack at the appointed time peril was surprised to see that earmuffs showed up for for her appointment not only with sterilized medical tools but also armed with a gun. The gun was just added incentive for peril to perform the operation russian. There was no backing out now. Peril asked era to lie down on a bench with her loaded gun clutched in her hand. You're my did as she was told old. While peril worked she weighed the likelihood that era would turn on her the moment the procedure was complete. The doctor made peace with what she assumed was was imminent death. Soon the operation was complete and it was a success ermo was unharmed and no longer pregnant ignorant. She rose to her feet and said you are a good doctor. What a pity that you have to die. Germany needs good doctors. Peril braced herself for the fatal gunshot but it never came instead eram reminded peril that she had to keep the abortion a secret secret then she promised to give peril a warm coat and reward for successfully completing that procedure without another word here mma walked away for weeks after the procedure peril waited for her inevitable arrest but it never came era had nothing to gain from reporting peril doing so would require her to confess to her own unplanned pregnancy and abortion an era had no desire to expose herself peril was never convicted for performing illegal abortions but she never received the coat that era had promised her either era also managed to avoid getting caught and soon soon she received yet another promotion in may of nineteen forty four at the age of twenty one. She rose to the rank of uber off zeran. The second highest rank a female concentration camp guard could achieve. She held the position for seven months and her tenure was a reign of terror for the thirty thousand prisoners under her authority in her autobiography fragments of e sabella auschwitz-birkenau survivor isa bella light road of the regular humiliations ehrmann enacted against her prisoners every day. Inmates were required to stand at attention for roll call which didn't didn't end until the guard declared the roll call complete often. Even after prisoners were accounted for your mclamb that the count was one short. She pretended to search for the missing prisoner for hours. Meanwhile the prisoners exhausted underfed often sick and feverish which remained standing until earmuffs grew bored with the game and released them on one occasion a sick and exhausted girl collapsed to the ground during roll-call earmuffs blamed the collapse not on the sick girl but on a pretty prisoner that era was attracted to a woman named she shah as punishment for the other girls collapse. She made she chenille on the ground and hold too heavy rocks above her head. All of the prisoners watched while frail l. She struggled to hold the rocks for hours. Another survivor judith strict driven recounted in her memoir that earmuffs supervise teams of inmates while they transported heavy stones outside the camp. When one team dropped their stones earmuffs unleashed her dogs on the women. Some women managed to escape the dog attack. Earmuffs ordered them beaten but era would soon face justice throughout early nineteen forty-five allied armies captured more and more nazi territory in january of that year the allies marched through poland drawing closer to auschwitz-birkenau on january eighteenth nineteen forty five twenty one year old earm- oh was transferred from auschwitz to the relative safety of ravensbruck the same concentration camp where she trained a scant two and a half years earlier march of nineteen forty-five spelled at the beginning of the end as the allies successfully retook france and crossed the rhine river into germany once again earmuffs fled to a new concentration -centration camp bergen belsen for her own safety their earmuffs reunited with her old lover france hat singer. He'd been sent directly to bergen belsen from auschwitz. They resumed their romantic relationship earmuffs and the other guards weren't the only people who traveled from camp to camp camp trying to stay one step ahead of the allied army. The guards also evacuated their prisoners sending them on death marches. Whoever survived the journey resumed their forced labor in a new camp era was at bergen belsen at the same time. A young girl named anne frank reached the camp after marching from auschwitz birkenau and died at bergen belsen in march nineteen forty-five within days of airman's arrival. Many of the same prisoners that era had terrorized auschwitz-birkenau were relocated to bergen belsen in her memoir return to auschwitz survivor. Kitty hart art recounted her feelings of despair. When she stepped off the train to find familiar tormentors waiting for her she said the old gang graciosa sir and the rest of them must have been sent there from auschwitz. We knew what to expect from such creatures earm- founded humiliating to have to continually annually flee and run like some kind of coward and she responded to her loss of power by acting even more cruelly clinical psychologist lisa firestone wrote in a piece titled the inner voices behind violent behavior that people with an inflated self image often lash out in violence when the aggrandize sense of self is threatened for example by slights or perceived disrespect ear mcgraw only served at bergen airgun belsen for two months but she still established herself as a fearful and violent authority during her short tenure she earned yet another other nickname the beast of belsen while snow fell and ice storms raged earm- ordered her prisoners to stand at attention or kneel kneel on the ground for five or six hours at a time. If anyone slouched she would beat the prisoner unconscious in one account earmuffs ordered order to pair of kitchen workers to peel potatoes and throw out the peels when the workers attempted to eat the peels assuming their guard wouldn't miss food meant for for the trash. Your mom brutally punished them. On april fifteenth nineteen forty-five bergen belsen was captured by british troops before for the siege twenty one year old ear mcgrady had the opportunity to once again relocate to a safer camp but she refused her lover. France france had singer was remaining in bergen. Belsen and earmuffs didn't want to leave him behind. Her decision was fatal that day british brigadier bob daniel was trying to enter a building when he felt something poke the small of his back slowly cautiously really he turned around next he saw what he described as an immaculate german woman very tidy and very well dressed and she had her gun level that him and her attack dog on a leash even in the face of an armed ear magara daniel didn't feel threatened. He couldn't imagine someone who looked so attractive and feminine could be dangerous. He urged her to escape and she did afterward. When describing being the incident daniel confess that he'd feared the real threat was the large dog era had with her jonathan jackson of the mannheim centre for criminology noted that people are more likely to fear crime if they feel vulnerable men are generally larger and stronger than women and so are less likely to fear ear violence from women. Even after british troops took bergen belsen they didn't arrest the female concentration camp guards while they arrested tried and unhanged the male s._s. Officers the british assumed the women weren't dangerous and put earmuffs and her compatriots on grave digging duty many female email concentration camp guards were able to escape from justice and return to their lives allied forces invaded nazi germany with traditional sexist values intact. These troops refused to believe that women could be complicit in the evil and brutality of the concentration camps even when presented with ample evidence of their behavior professor sonja star of university of michigan's law school found in her paper estimating gender disparities in federal criminal cases cases that men are twice as likely as women to serve prison time for the same offenses and men senses are sixty three percent longer and and harsher meanwhile the liberated camps survivors testified to the british about what they'd survived. The troops were astonished to hear numerous accounts of the beautiful blonde woman who had terrorized her prisoners for years on april seventeenth nineteen forty-five eras lifetime. If time of cruel and abusive behavior finally caught up with her and she was arrested by the british troops soon she was charged with murder and ill treatment treatment of prisoners the penalty if she was convicted was death coming up next we'll explore ear must trial and execution vanessa and i have some exciting news for you. Starting now you can listen to female criminals episodes that are older than six months completely ad the free exclusively on stitcher premium. We're always looking for ways to improve the listener experience. We found an amazing partner in stitcher to bring you episodes ad free three six months after they're released again. This will only affect episodes older than six months. Nothing else will change will still be releasing new female criminals episodes. Wherever wherever you listen to podcasts for a free month trial go to stitcher premium dot com slash podcast and use promo code podcast. That's stitcher pitcher premium dot com slash podcast and use promo code podcast. What if if your doctor didn't know what was wrong with you. Medicine isn't always an exact science. Sometimes it's a guessing game when the world's most renowned experts can't explain what's wrong were left with a medical mystery every week. The podcast original medical mysteries looks at the strangest real life medical medical cases in history and the experts who raced against the clock to solve them. If you're curious about some of the world's most baffling and bazaar diseases you'll definitely enjoy medical mysteries. You can sit alongside doctors as they try to piece together the clues of an unexplainable health condition and solve a high stakes mystery. How do you cure what you didn't know existed follow medical mysteries for free on spotify and anywhere you listen podcasts or visit par cast dot com slash medical mysteries to listen now now back to the story on april seventeenth nineteen forty five twenty one year old concentration camp guard earmuffs gracia was arrested for her brutal treatment of the prisoners under her guard at auschwitz birkenau during ear muslim prisonment in a facility three kilometers away from bergen belsen an an epidemic of typhus spread through their camp her lover france hat singer died of the disease at the age of thirty five on april twenty third nineteen eighteen forty five hat singer was likely the only man era ever truly loved. His death was devastating to her. She eventually stood trial for her crimes. On june sixteenth nineteen forty-five alongside forty four other guards twenty two defendants were we're women ermo was defendant number nine the press delighted in photographic the young and beautiful ear mcgrady. She was only twenty one years old and even as she stood trial for her life. Earmark continued to obsess over her appearance. It was reported that during recesses she rushed to the nearest. I muir to fix her hair for the first time since her father kicked her out of the family home. Earmuffs briefly reunited with her sister. Elena who was called called to testify on her behalf during the trial helena discussed their childhood. She described her sister as peaceful and said she could not believe that ear ma <hes> would participate in such violence most of what we know of earmuffs early life comes from these trial transcripts but that information is highly suspect due to earmuffs changing story about her life she might have misrepresented her own mindset and actions in order to avoid a conviction or perhaps she she was lying to herself as much as to the jury a study by the department of social work and psychology at the university of evola found that when people feel a sense sense of guilt they struggle to access memories associated with their guilty feelings the stronger the feeling of guilt the harder it is to recall the memory when when era was questioned about her role in selecting which prisoners to send to the gas chambers. She denied that she ever participated auschwitz survivors testified otherwise an article titled dissonant bishen aggression through diffusion of responsibility and dehumanisation of victims found that people were more likely to behave violently and aggressively toward those they viewed as less than human when era was questioned about her own opinions of her actions. She said she was convinced. All that had happened was right although she knew that her freedom and her life hung in the balance burma refused to show any kind of remorse for her actions like many nazi war criminals she denied culpability on the grounds that she was just following doing orders as a young beautiful woman who'd only known professional success since she turned eighteen year may not have believed she'd ever be held accountable for for her own actions. If so earmuffs confidence was misplaced on november seventeenth nineteen forty five along with eight male guards cards earmarked and two other alfie hernan were sentenced to death by hanging for a month after her sentence twenty two year old era komo was imprisoned in hamlin germany the prison consisted of one hallway with eleven small cells and an execution chamber at the end of the hall earmuffs and the other prisoners couldn't leave their cells without seeing the ever present reminder of their coming deaths ear miliband with fellow convicts vicks while she awaited the day of her execution. She formed an easy camaraderie with the other former camp guards. The knowledge of their impending death seemed to draw them closer together. A two thousand eighteen review of statements from death row inmates published in frontiers in psychology found that prisoners facing facing impending death often adopted positive attitudes. Their mindsets were primarily focused on love religion and community. If any the condemned noticed any irony in their fall from jailer to jailed. They didn't comment on it. On december twelfth nineteen forty five the the night before her scheduled execution earmuffs sat up late with the other women. They received extra rations for their dinner and sang traditional german songs things well past midnight. The next morning dawned an era was reportedly in a jovial mood. She chatted with her guards laughing and telling jokes. She didn't give any indication that she was afraid of her looming death. The executioners constructed a double gallows large enough to hang to inmates mates at once they did this because of the high number of scheduled executions after much debate american troops decided to execute the women one at a time time but hang the men in pairs to save time the women would also be killed i to spare them. The horror of listening to the men's deaths all morning at nine thirty four a._m. On december thirteenth nineteen forty five troops took away the first convicted woman. At least it's a bit fokin rod ear mcgrady awaited half an hour after fokin routes departure finally at ten. Oh four a m the guards arrived lived and escorted earmarked to the gallows for the first time eras calm exterior slipped she'd spent her entire adult life cultivating a disaffected appearance which she'd born through concentration camps torture sessions and her trial but now as her death swiftly approached coached earmuffs feared the pain of her execution as the troops pulled a white hood over her face earmuffs said schnell which which translates to quick earmuffs stepped onto the gallows. The executioner dropped the trap door. Era was declared dead immediately after the trap door opened. She'd received her request for a quick death. British policy dictated that hank the prisoners were to remain on the gallows for one hour after their death but the executioners had too many criminals to kill that day so they removed earmuffs body after only twenty minutes she was buried in the hamlin prison courtyard nine years later earmuffs was reburied in the veal cemetery at twenty two years old earm- aggressor remains the youngest woman ever executed by the u._k. Government in the modern age and dr gieszl apparel who performed eras abortion survived auschwitz birkenau after her liberation in nineteen forty five she struggled duggal with guilt and grief especially once she discovered she was the only member of her family to survive in nineteen forty. Seven dr peril moved to the united states where she lived for thirty two years in nineteen forty eight peril wrote her memoir. I was a doctor in auschwitz in it. She recounted her experiences with air mma. Including the secret abortion numerous other auschwitz survivors also wrote memoirs that detailed their experiences experiences with era gracia while earmuffs vicious nature was hardly unique especially among nazi concentration camp guards. She captured public lick attention due to the transgressive way. She expressed her sexuality through violence. As bianca vida explained in her paper 'gendering the holocaust cost women are traditionally expected to be nurturing and gentle any female violence such as that perpetrated by ear mageza is an affront to society society and a woman who enjoys violence is particularly shocking add to that the salacious and sexualize nature of earmuffs crimes times and it's no wonder that the modern world latched onto ear mcgrady's as the face of nazi perversion and evil in nineteen seventy seventy four don edmonds directed the movie the she wolf of the ass it told the story of fictional nazi doctor elza who served in a p._o._w. Camp she performed a series of sexual and medical experiments on prisoners until they staged a revolt and escaped. The camp ills the she. She wolf of the s._s. was just one entry. In the burgeoning nazi split tation genre a subset of the exploitation and sexploitation genres nazi azzi split films sought to titillate and excite by telling violent and highly sexualize stories set in nazi run concentration camps ills of the she wolf of the s._s. was a surprise grind house success launching a franchise with three sequels hollywood producers looked for more stories as of sexually predatory female nazi guards testimony about era gracia was mixed with horrific accounts about other guards and buried behind hind layers of fictionalization condensation and artistic flourishes soon it became difficult to tell fact from fiction especially in light of the the fact that so few official records exist of earmuffs life for example. Some stories claim that when ear mo was arrested allied officers found three lampshades made of human skin in her home. This report may have been true but it's more likely that this story is confusing era with another another notorious camp guard ills a cock who was known to keep souvenirs made of the skin of her victims in another account earmuffs tied a woman's legs together while she gave birth because the woman couldn't spread her legs her labor grew increasingly painful and dangerous however however no record or first person testimony exists to corroborate the story human skin lampshades torturing a woman in labor would certainly be consistent consistent with what we know of ear must personality but it's also exactly the sort of salacious story that would spring up about her character. After her death over over time whatever knowledge we have of earmuffs grays of the person has gotten wrapped up in cultural narratives about nazi-ism violence and feminine sexuality earmark has come to symbolize evil sexual sadism and transgression as she's become a larger than life boogeyman but your mom grazer didn't begin her life as a boogeyman or as a symbol she was an ordinary woman caught up in the thrall of authoritarian fascism awesome while today we feel horrified at the evil that era perpetrated we can also treat her story as a cautionary tale of how easily a person can be conditioned to perpetuate evil. Thanks again for tuning into female criminals. We'll be back wednesday with a new episode. You can find more episodes of female female criminals as well as all of our casts other shows on spotify or your favorite podcast directory. Several of you have asked how to help us if you enjoy the show. The best way to help is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see you next. It's time female. Criminals was created by max. Cutler is a production of cutler media and is part of the podcast network. It is produced by maxon ron cutler alert with sound design by russell nash production assistance by ron shapiro and paul molitor additional production assistance by maggie admire and freddie beckley this. This episode of female criminals was written by angela jorgensen and start sammy ni- and vanessa richardson. Have you had a chance to listen to medical mysteries yet each week. It follows different patient as doctors race against the clock doc to diagnose the most mysterious ailments they've ever seen from the bizarre to the terrifying. How do you cure what you didn't know. 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Liberation of Auschwitz - Jan. 27 1945

This Day in History Class

08:52 min | 2 years ago

Liberation of Auschwitz - Jan. 27 1945

"You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about eagle maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. Now, we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. Hi, I'm eve and welcome to this day in history class I show that uncovers a little bit more about history every day. The day was January twenty seventh nineteen forty five. Soviet forces finally arrived outfits, the complex of Nazi concentration camps in Poland after liberating Warsaw and Krakow earlier in January. We ran up to them and they gave us hugs cookies and chocolate survivor. Eva core said later, she was just ten years old when the camps were liberated. We were not only starved for food, but we were starved for human kindness and the Soviet army did provide some of that. Eva course it. Else was actually a network of concentration, death and labor camps. There was outfits one the main camp outfits to Birkenau, an outfit three mono- viz originally designed for prisoners of war Birkenau evolved into a death camp for Jewish Romney and gay people and anyone else deemed subhuman. The majority of people who died it out foods took their last breaths at birth canal. So when the Red Army arrived at outfits it was a victory. But the reality was the troops were still at a place where over one million people died at the hands of the Nazis in their nationalist racist policies. More than six hundred corpses. Laham pals around the camp and over seven thousand survivors were left behind but the Nazis head already left. You see the end of the second World War was nearing in allied troops were closing in on the Nazi camps. So before the Soviets got to Auschwitz, the Nazis at the camps focused their efforts on getting rid of all the evidence of their crimes. At S S leader Heinrich Himmler's orders, the Nazis destroy part of the gas chambers at Auschwitz Birkenau in late nineteen forty four. Well, they did it. They actually forced the Sunder commando or prisoners assigned to manage the guess chambers to take apart the crematoria piece by piece and in January of nineteen forty five the Nazis blew up instead on fire the rest of the buildings and even burnt documents in the streets as part of their last ditch attempt to cover up their tracks and carry out the mandate of creating a so-called area Mace the SS call for the abandonment of outfits as Soviet forces got closer amid January nineteen forty five. The essence sixty thousand prisoners west away from approaching truth and into the heart of the crumbling German Reich, what the SS euphemistically called evacuation was really what prisoners more appropriately called a death. Th- march. Remember, it was winter in Poland Fiqh in starving. Adults and children alike walked mouth through snow mud. I am blizzards wearing their thin prison. Uniforms, only to end up and another Cussing tation camp or die on the way. There. People who couldn't keep up were beaten and murdered and many died from exhaustion are freezing. It's not known exactly how many people died on the death marches from Auschwitz, but some estimates put the toll at as many as fifteen thousand people. But even after all, the Nazis destruction evidence of the brutality magnitude of death at Auschwitz remained. S commander aren't smells her head ordered everybody left behind to be killed. But guards had deserted the camp in about seven thousand people who hit during the evacuation or were deemed unable to make the brutal trip to Germany for it. Also with when the Soviets arrived covered in waste in a Macy. It. Among the ruins the army found over eight hundred thousand women's coats. Tens of thousands of pairs of shoes more than three hundred thousand men suits and nearly eight times of human hair. Hundreds of Soviet soldiers died liberating the camps. Housemates prisoners have made many attempts successful and unsuccessful to resist an escape Nazi tyranny. But on January twenty seven people at the camps were finally able to envision a future beyond slavery, cruel, medical experimentation and being poisoned to death. But liberation didn't mean immediate freedom. Some people quickly left the camps and most tildren who left went to children's homes and orphanages though, some did find their parents, but other former prisoners were incredibly exhausted in sick and many died despite being fed and given medical assistance. Many jewish. People didn't have homes to go to or face the threat of violent anti semitism back at home and even after physical liberation the mental and emotional affects of imprisonment at Auschwitz remained. In two thousand five the United Nations declared January twenty seven international holocaust remembrance day. I'm Jeff coat in. Hopefully, you know, a little more about history today than you did yesterday. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks to Taylor Mays for all his production help we'll see you tomorrow. Hi, I'm Ariel Casten Jonathan Strickland and together we're going to tell you the stories behind some of the biggest triumphs in failures in business. That's right. We're going to explore situations that tested the metal entre preneurs pivotal moments required making decisions we'll be talking about some big companies that everybody knows like Disney LEGO and Harley Davidson and together we try to answer the question. What do you do when you find yourself at the brink? Listen scribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Auschwitz apple Auschwitz Birkenau Birkenau Soviet army Red Army Heinrich Himmler Taylor Mays Eva core iheartradio Disney Macy Robert lamb Germany Joe McCormick Ariel Casten commander United Nations
Medical Murders Crossover: Josef Mengele Pt. 2

Dictators

55:17 min | 5 months ago

Medical Murders Crossover: Josef Mengele Pt. 2

"Listener discretion is advised this episode features discussions of murder human experimentation torture medical procedures infanticide and holocaust. That may be upsetting. We advise extreme caution for listeners under thirteen. There's an implicit trust. We tend to place in doctors. They're the ones we rely on to keep us well to save the day when lives hang in the balance and that's a heavy responsibility enough to give any normal person an ego boost but that kind of power could be intoxicating especially if it's handed to the wrong person and in a world where a little power is the difference between life and death. Supreme authority can make you if not a god at least an angel an angel of death. This is medical motives opoku original every year. Thousands of medical students take the hippocratic oath. It boils down to do no harm but to closer look reveals a phrase much more interesting. I must not play at god. However some doctors break that oath choosing to play golf with their patients deciding who lives and who dies each week on medical murders. We'll investigate those. Who decided to kill. We'll explore the specifics of how they operate nor just on their patients but within the own minds examining the psychology and urology behind heartless medical killers. I'm alistair murdoch an joined by. Dr david kipah. Md hi everyone. I'm very happy to be here to help. Alister with some medical insight and information into the killers ammo. I practice internal medicine and have done so for over thirty years and i'm particularly excited to be diving. A little deeper into our story of joseph mangla the angel of death. You can find episodes of medical murders and all other powers originals for free on spotify or wherever. You listen to podcasts to stream medical motors for free on spotify. Just open the app and type medical murders in the search bar. This is our final episode on. Dr yosef mangula also known as auschwitz birkenau 's angel of death. Last week we learned about bengalis quest. Become a famous doctor and anthropologist and his zealots like devotion to his mentor. Oedema freiherr von shula today. We're delving into mangla horrific tenure as a doctor at auschwitz birkenau. The gospel experiments. He carried out and the quest to bring him to justice. This and more coming up. Stay with us. Who is alex rider or retain extraordinary spine reluctant hero. I m e. Btv's original series. Alex rider is an action spy thriller following the british teenager who was recruited by m. I six to uncover the secrets behind his uncle's murder and much larger conspiracy stream alex rider now exclusively on our md btv streaming service offering pre movies and tv shows for free no subscription required available on amazon fire. Tv or anywhere. Prime video is available. Imdb tv is entertaining is free. This episode is brought to you by titan celebrate national family caregivers month with tight-knit a new podcast from the ralph c wilson junior foundation exploring the many ways people can build tighter relationships and communities the first season shines a light on family caregivers in everything they do stream it now and learn more about the series at tight-knit dot. Org this episode is brought to you by hennessy. for superstar artists. My luma never stopped. Never settle means celebrating. His true voice and dreams overcoming any obstacle along the journey. His new curate. A playlist in collaboration with hennessy is bulla songs. A lift him up and motivate him as well as celebrate some of the voices of hispanic culture. Celebrate your voice and checkup luma's playlists. It's lucidly on spotify in early february. Nineteen eighty five a group of auschwitz survivors reunited jerusalem. It had been forty years since the liberation of the nazi concentration camps and they came together to demand justice they assembled before a panel including lawyers historians and government advisers and for this audience. They told their stories thirty survivors in all including twins and little people shed the harrowing experiences behind the bomb. Wire of auschwitz-birkenau testimony was delivered in hebrew english and french with some survivors speaking publicly for the first time about their treatment at the hands of yosef mangla the angel of death at the opening proceedings a panel member. Lean forward to speak. He described mangla as a self appointed judge jury and executioner. Auschwitz was a place of horace where emaciated prisoners wandered aimlessly with nothing to do but work as enslaved captives and wait for death for most. It came in the camp's gas chambers. But there were those who didn't live long enough to be gassed fell where they stood and with thrown into growing piles of dead bodies. Some died of disease or exhaustion shot or murdered by the prison guards. This hellscape that thirty two year old. Joseph mangla stepped in may of nineteen forty-three. A trained physician anthropologist. He may have grown tired of his desk job in berlin and wanted to use his education to further the nazi cause so with likely help from his mental otmar von sure he accepted a posting it outfits once they're mangla slipped into his role as medical doctor on the surface it sounds like a position intended to care for the thousands of prisoners who passed through the camps gates but mangla job had very little to do with saving lives for years. The nazis used the concentration camps as their own personal test laboratories where doctors experimented on prisoners daily ostensibly. The experiments centered around collecting research on common diseases. Like becky lsus. But doctors also toyed with ways to pull off their relations. The nazi doctrine of arianne superiority had taken root and spread beyond the halls of government into the sciences across europe. Many german scientists and doctors of the nazi policy seemed happy to ignore the ethics of their profession in order to fuel pseudoscientific research unfortunately scientists and always immune to political ideology. And this was very evident in nazi germany. An example of this was her ideological promotion of social. Darwinism the nonsensical tie between scientific observation in nature and socio political conditions. The notion regrettably helped propel the eugenics resurgence of the early twentieth century. Eugenics is concept and practice of improving the genetic makeup of the human race by controlling the expressions of traits deemed desirable or undesirable. With in ancient greece eugenics was re popularized in the early nineteen hundreds and many countries even implemented eugenic policies to improve the perceived stock of their populations in the united states for example the virginia sterilization act of nineteen twenty. Four made it legal and acceptable to sterilize mental. Health patients across the nation. Eugenics is an extremely myopic way to view human evolution for one. Genetic selection criteria is subjective usually dictated by whoever stands to gain from it eugenics also leads to a lack of genetic diversity by selecting out certain genes through eugenics. We are limiting our ability to adapt to an ever changing environment. Much like national. Socialism itself eugenics was a concept doomed to fail. Unfortunately that didn't stop the nazis from trying before war broke out mangla had worked under otmar. Von sure at the institute for heredity. Biology and racial purity shula. Geneticist was obsessed with the idea. That twin studies were key to unlocking the secrets to creating a so-called mazda race and willing zealots that he was mangla took up his mentors beliefs many auschwitz doctors in god's claims they had to be convinced to work there but mangla never gave the impression he appeared pleased with his newly gained access to the thousands of people arriving there each day among the jewish and roma families as well as the other singled out minorities. There was sure to be a number of twins. More than a researcher could hope to come across. In their regular work. Ordinarily medical studies on twins were mostly relegated to observational work. But the twins viewed as specimens arriving at auschwitz would be so much more. Despite his alterior motive mangla wasn't auschwitz solely to experimental twins. Yes he invests shula secured funding for research during his tenure there but he was officially there as an officer of the s s and he took his duties very seriously survivors would later recall seeing mangla standing on the arriving train platform handsome and well turned out he was one of the first memories many had of auschwitz. He whistled as he directed prisoners with one hand. Some with since the left others to the right to the gas chambers for immediate death or to be put to work in the slave camps to squeeze the life from them later mangula would come to be known as the angel of death of auschwitz. So named for his cold blooded looks and demeanor sending people to die but as he calmly sentenced thousands of people to a swift painful end. Mangla watched carefully for any twins spilling out of the trains. Families with twins. Weren't sure what the god's intentions were but most sent them to mangla willingly though. Some were taken forcibly from their parents plucked from the straggling line of people waiting to walk into the gas chambers. Others who wants twins will also pulled aside to be sped little people the exceptionally toll and those with a noticeable physical condition all peaked mangles interest and were allowed to live for now as he strode among the arriving prisoners. Looking for those he deemed valuable. Mangla took the time to check in with some of them. He asked how the journey was and with. All the concern of a doctor listened as they shed the details of the trip. He also specifics eager to hear how cramped the train had been or how many people died along the way trusting the charming handsome man. Some people told him they felt unwell with a sympathetic smile. He sent them to die others. He singled out handing them a postcard and pencil. He asks these prisoners to write postcards home and took pleasure in dictating description of the loveliness of auschwitz and urging the reader to visit once. The post kant was written and addressed. He calmly directed the scribe into the line snaking towards the gas chambers with cold indifference mangla directed most pregnant women to their deaths though he decided to spend some on his orders those he saved was somewhat looked after four hours standards but this only lasted until the woman gave birth. At which point both mother and child were usually sent to the gas chambers. Like much of mangla decisions and work had auschwitz. His reasoning was unclear. However at least one. Mother ruth elias had a separate fate. She somehow escaped mangoes notice when she arrived three months pregnant at the camp but when he did find out he decided to make the most of the situation immediately following the birth of her baby girl. Mangla ordered routes breasts to tightly bandaged. He wanted to see how long a newborn can live without food for a week. Ruth tried desperately to keep her baby alive with moistened bread and soup but it was no good mangla cain to check on her and the baby every day one night mangla appeared. Ruth's bedside and told her to be ready. The next morning ruth knew he intended to send them both to the gas chambers and to sped. But that's evening a jewish prisoner and dr forced to work while at auschwitz came to ruth. She handed her a syringe filled with morphine and offered an alternative to mangle as plan. The doctor urged ruth to kill her own baby. The doctor explained that she herself had taken the hippocratic oath. That she mustn't take a life. But in this case there was no saving. Ruth's daughter if she didn't die of starvation. I the gas chamber awaited at dawn. Ruth however still had a chance if the baby was dead. She reasoned mango. Legis might lose interest in the mother with her little girl barely clinging to life ruth injected her with the morphine it was a macabre show of compassion from the new mother and her fellow prisoner with sorrow. The women nestled the tiny corpse among the pile of bodies outside the barracks. The gamble paid off when mangla arrived in the morning. He was frustrated by the baby's death he wanted the body presumably to perform topsy but couldn't find it. Among the many dead ruth was sent away to another camp and if it was one doctors compassion that led to ruth's eventual survival. It's also true that mangles twisted curiosity played a role in keeping her alive at least for a time. That same curiosity caused ruth immeasurable pain and suffering but she wasn't the only one who survived albeit severely scarred by joseph mangla scientific curiosity up next mengele's experiments on the twins of outfits. Hi liz. I'm thrilled to tell you about a new spotify original from podcast that i think you'll really enjoy. It's cooled off love story every tuesday. Our love story celebrates the up stones and pivotal moments. That turn complete strangers into perfect. Has each episode offers an intimate glimpse inside a real life romance with couples recounting the highlights and hardships that. Define their love. Whether it's a chance encounter a form of friendship or even a former enemy. Our love story proves that love can begin and blossom in the most unexpected ways. Ready to him all. Follow our love story free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. What's if you discover your life with something. It's not answer. Alex rider ordinary extraordinary spot. Reluctant hero. imdb. Tv's original series. Alex rider is an action spy thriller in a british teenager. Recruited by six based on the novels. By anthony horowitz. Alex's mission begins off the. He learned his uncle's death was a cover up and alexy's upbringing secret spot. Training alex will puts he spice skills to the test to find out why he's uncle was killed. And how it fits into a much larger global conspiracy stream alex rider now exclusively on imdb tv streaming service offering premium movies and tv shows for free no subscription required available on amazon fire tv for anywhere. Prime video is available. Imdb tv is entertaining as free now. Back to the story in nineteen forty-three thirty two year. Old dr yosef mangula took up his post as an ss officer and doctor at auschwitz birkenau. There he played a key role in selecting. Who would die in the gas chambers. And who would lived to work in the slave labor camps but while that was his official role at auschwitz. He was also that a satisfy his own pseudoscientific curiosity and further his research on genetics and eugenics to do that he needed twins hundreds of them and with thousands of people arriving at the camp each day he got them. It's important to note that any official records of angola's work at auschwitz have been lost. It's possible they were destroyed by. Ss god's as they abandoned the camp or they were seized by the liberating forces or both whatever the case with the records went any documentation of exactly what mandela did to his subjects. All the twisted reasoning behind his experiments mangles. Let's see what happens. Approach was likely a combination of morbid curiosity and is complete lack of empathy while his scientific grounding was always dubious astros was a place where he could feed his macabre curiosities without consequence under the guise of legitimate scientific research in psychology. This is known as supplementation or the transformation socially unacceptable desires and behaviors into legitimate actions. One example of this is the belief that some doctors especially surgeons practice in order to satiate their desires to tinker with human bodies. Medical doctors and surgeons have a different approach to their patients. Medical doctors look to establish long-term and carrying relationships over time whereas surgeons or called in to fix a specific problem and don't have that advantage of developing these relationships and for surgeons that may actually be an advantage not disadvantage. Most doctors like myself are not comfortable being in the surgical suite. I think that supplementation for surgeons is just one part of the equation. I think there are many reasons if people go into specific specialties. In mangle fits experiments. It seems he was doing little else in satisfying his personal fascinations. Given what we do know about mangles research it's avenue. He lacked the ethics morality and smarts to carry out any proper scientific studies. What he did do was approximate. The scientific method while unsuccessfully masquerading as a caring physician despite the lack of records. We still have an idea of what happened in his lamps because survivors of auschwitz were brave enough to share their stories and they painted a terrifying picture of the smiling angel of death like every new inmates arriving at auschwitz twins and those siblings. Who looked enough like that. They were mistaken for twins. Were showered and branded. But unlike the rest of the prisoners their heads were shaved. Nor were they all made to wear prison. Uniforms being one of mangoes chosen few had other perks. The gones usually lead to beat. The prisoners didn't touch mangla twins nor where the twins punished for small infractions. Like stealing food. Something that likely would have earned anyone else swift execution already. Mangla had marked his test subjects as more precious special but though he saved them and allowed his subjects to retain the tiniest measure of dignity they want sped the pain of knowing what happened to their families and that emotional pain was only the beginning. Physical and psychological torture awaited all of mongolia's subjects. But i they filled out a form. The sheets included dozens of questions about the twins background. Health history and physical characteristics including things like hair and i color. The former sent directly to the kaiser wilhelm institute in berlin where mengele's mentor otmar. Von shula eagerly waited these forms so full of detail with perhaps an effort by manjula to lend an air of scientific purpose to his experiments. He was desperate to achieve notoriety as a doctor and anthropologist and it's likely that his careful documentation of his subjects was intended to bring credibility to his work but though had a medical degree and studied anthropology at the highest levels. It's generally accepted fact. That mengele's mind was deeply average. He sold approval from his mentor and acclaimed from the wider community. But hadn't the smarts to accomplish either once. The initial survey was complete. Mango would personally interview each of the twins while the assistant measured them from head to toe. According to one survivor mangla was especially interested in hair and would examine the roots to observe the way it grew here. We may be able to see mangles. Thinking emerge in an effort to support nazi beliefs. He wanted to prove that everything about a person. There is an hair colors height head shape and even behavioral traits. Everything was all dictated by genetic factors the nazis idea the genetic factors dictate. Everything was largely influenced by the first published. Scientific study on twins by sir francis dalton in eighteen. Seventy five goten. Who was actually a half cousin to charles. Darwin believed that nature prevails almost entirely over nurture twins of actually been studied and medicines since the days of pockets dating back to the fifth century bc. From a scientific perspective. The study of twins is useful because it allows us to examine the relationship between environment and genetics. Which we've learned from our last episode in the field of epigenetics. The study of twins relative to epigenetics has the advantage of looking at someone's environment over their genetics. Assuming the twins specially identical twins have similar genetics. One example is discovery of the l. s. p. one gene a marker per mammographic density and breast cancer risk. Scientists found that identical twins had similar mammographic density while not identical twins. Expressed only half the similarity. These findings suggested some breast cancers are determined largely by genetics including those caused by the bracket jeans. Though mangle this method proved to have little scientific bases. His interests in twins clearly wasn't novel in the scientific world. These initial chonsun measurements perhaps served as a basis for mangoes ongoing research helping him to decide which twins who are best suited for different areas of attention but they were also a chance for him to get to know the prisoners. Some of the young children he would sit and chat with for stretches of time too many. He was cheerful smiling and laughing with them. He brought sweets and liked it when children in the camp not just. His twins called him uncle mangla for some survivors. This side of mangla is the one they remembered best. When the full extent of his scientific experiments were later revealed many of his subjects experienced a jarring cognitive dissonance. The man who sped them from the gas chambers who brought them candy and taken an interest in them could possibly be a monster but kind uncle mangla was just a tiny facet of the criminal. Doctors personality he kept his subjects happy or at least more comfortable than some of their fellow inmates because he could and because he enjoyed wielding that power but he also did so to trust calming them down during traumatic procedures was easier if they liked him. One subjects arrived at the camp. They were initiated into an almost daily barrage of tests and observations. six days. a mangula children were taken the one and a half miles to a facility at birkenau. They're in a dedicated building. The tests began mondays wednesdays and fridays. With a measurements. They were stripped naked and waited up to eight hours. While mangla assistance usually jewish prisoners who medical anthropological professionals measured every inch of them on tuesdays thursdays and saturdays. Things were even worse for hours. The twins would be forced to give blood samples often while they were injected with unknown chemicals into that other arm. Children who are too small to provide blood samples by their arms had it taken from the neck a much more painful procedure and unfortunately that was only the beginning. Due to a lack of records. Reports of mongolia's more probing experiments are anecdotal but horrifying on a near daily basis. The prisoners tasked with supervising. the twins. Were instructed to prepare several of them. For the days experiments the chosen prisoners were bathed and take into one of a number of facilities around its birkenau. Sometimes the experiments were little more than x rays or blood tests but not always like a good nutsy. Mangle was obsessed with producing the perfect aryan specimen as mentioned earlier. It's believed by some that. He hoped to find the secret to altering person's hair. And i color and share that valuable knowledge with shula and his colleagues to this end he performed experiments on the eyes of his twins. A pair of twins who survived recalled. One day we were given eyedrops afterward. We could not see for several days. We thought the nazis had made us blind eye drops with the least invasive procedures. Some had chemicals injected directly into the eyeballs simply so mangled could observe the results waiting for color change. That would never come other. Experiments occurred with little explainable reasoning. One survivor alex steckel. Who was twelve. When he arrived at vets recalled seeing mangla performance operation to remove pieces from the prisoner's stomach dekel stated that the procedure was performed without the use of anesthesia. He also witnessed mangla. Removing a person's heart again sans anaesthesia. And here's where things need to be taken with a grain of salt because in the decades following world war two yosef mangle passed into the realm of myth in his book manjula unmasking. The angel of death biographer. David g well asserts without discounting his guilt in the atrocities conducted auschwitz-birkenau the mangla reputation far outsized his impact at the camp sometimes leading to stories of horrific experiments in service of perverse racial curiosity. Still if accounts like these are true it paints an even more diabolical picture of mangla than we've yet seen without anesthesia. The operations mangla was reportedly performing would have been tantamount to torture an excruciating painful and traumatic event like this would cause a patient's cortisol levels the stress hormone to jump off the charts. This could lead to a number of dangerous physiological outcomes like heart attack stroke and death if true. These stories are horrific if embellished they speak only to the perceived evil brought about by angola's actions. You'll occasionally hear tales of mangla attempting to manufacture conjoined twins by sewing identical twins together or of surgeries to remove or replace. The sexual organs of boys and girls biographer. David g marwell suggests that some stories like this might be more in line with trope than truth but it would be a mistake to dispute every survivor's account of time under mangla so-called care. One man moshe ao for remembered. The results of experiments performed on his twin brother. T be saying. Dr mangla had always been more interested in tb. I am not sure. Why perhaps because he was the older twin. He performed several operations on tv one surgery on his spine left my brother paralysed. He could not walk anymore then. They took out his sexual organs often the fourth operation. I did not see t be any more. Whether or not all of his experiments were as gruesome as the story suggests is a subject many have debated for decades. What is clear. Is that mangla killed. Many of his twins for the express purpose of examining corpses dr miklos. Nearly a jewish prisoner performed autopsies for mangla in a specially constructed room in july of nineteen. Forty five dr lee offered his deposition about one particular disturbing evening at auschwitz fourteen. Roma twins waited outside that i section room crying one by one mangla had each child brought into the room and laid upon the dissection table there. He injected them with ever pan to i knock them out then chloroform directly into their heart to kill them. According to dr nestle each of the waiting twins met the same fate fat night. Like much of angola's actions at auschwitz. This incident largely remains a mystery. We can only guess his motives. The reason mangla combined pan with the chloroform is it ever pan was something that would augment or be synergistic with the chloroform to make its effect even stronger. When used by itself it does not have the same killing power as it does. when combined with chloroform. Maybe the combination of epa pan and chloroform in mongolia's mind was more humane methods can than the gas chambers. This certainly would have been less painful. Less frightening death summarily killing them in his own way may have also been something that made ankle a field powerful one last measure of personal control over his victims. He may have even simply felt. They were no longer of use to him. Whatever his reason for executing these twins they joined the number of bangolo subjects. Who didn't survive. Bosch fits and though many twins survived auschwitz because they were mangla subjects some died for the same reason author robert jay lifton theorized that part of the twins value to mangula was into curious trick of the genetic sameness they could be studied under identical conditions. Go through the same or similar experiments and then if needed be thoroughly examined once they were dead another auschwitz prison doctor radiologist abraham see recalled a pair of roma twins who were particular favorites of mangla and the prison doctors. The boys were around six or seven and both exhibited symptoms of suspected closys. They were studied. As the nazis were interested in curing. The disease but careful examination led most doctors the camp to declare them free of the disease but mangla was unconvinced stubborn and furious at being contradicted. He insisted that he alone knew the truth after arguing. With abraham mangla stormed from the room and returned an hour later. He calmly admitted that the boys were not to burke ula and that he shot each boy in the neck then dissect it still warm bodies to search for signs of the disease. Mangla likely told himself. The boys deaths were just a final step. In his scientific process that it was an unavoidable consequence of medical advancements but in reality he murdered them in a misguided effort to prove a point. Having confidence in your convictions can be a useful trait in a doctor but it can just as easily have disastrous consequences. It's not uncommon for doctors to disagree about a patient's diagnosis from a patient's perspective. It can be really upsetting and potentially life threatening to receive conflicting or worse misinformation. This is why multiple opinions are very important. When it comes to major health issues good medical practice would never discourage a doctor from getting a second opinion or allowing their patients to do the same. This can only bring in more information and give a patient choices that they may not have otherwise had with only one opinion when fortunately there are unreasonable practitioners who view themselves as infallible these types would wrongly take offense to any differing opinion doing it as a challenge to their expertise and egos. This seems to be exactly the kind of doctor. Mangla was at auschwitz. They were few who could challenge. Mangla essentially had free rein to do as he pleased sentencing thousands to death with a flick of his wrist then playing doctor with his twins. The science was dubious the medicine minimal and his actions criminal but it was the kind of research mangula believed he needed to do to achieve fame and respect but despite his grand ambitions he didn't have forever and infamous as his reign outfits was it was all coming to an end up next. Yosef mangla final days at auschwitz-birkenau. This episode is brought to you by britannia experienced britannia. A world filled with romance treachery political intrigue and magic follow the invasion of britain in forty three. Ad one rival kings queens tribes and gods are forced to put their differences aside to avoid their demise at the hands of the roman empire while the romans stop at nothing to conquer these mythical lands now. The only hope for britannia is a young girl. She's only followed the chosen one as she pursued her destiny to save her people and defeat the empire oncoming for you. Watch all new episodes of britannia sundays at nine. Eight central or on demand anytime only on epochs get the channel or the app. This episode is brought to you by bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Ice-skater needs a pair of blades. A new helmet and a good set of kneepads. And you used your bank of america's cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback on online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of posts skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more rewarding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. Now back to the story. Some accounts of yousef is time at auschwitz make particular mention of his kindness to small children. Most make much of the tara. He struck into the heart of adults who knew his power all agree that he was a monster and in the decades after world war two. His infamy grew as reports emerged of his horrific scientific experiments. His reputation came to resemble an evil scientist toiling in a dingy laboratory. But the historical record largely rests on the stories told by his victims. It's from such accounts that we know one of his most prominent. Ut's at the camp between nineteen forty three and nineteen forty five was selecting prisoners to be sent to the gas chambers those who escaped that fate upon their arrival still lived in fear of mangla as a physician at auschwitz. He strolled through the camp and various barracks choosing those who looked weak. Sick were imperfect by this point in time it wouldn't have been hard to find prisoners. Who look close to death. Nazi death camps replaces ravage with two days and prior to arrival prisoners. Lived in ghettos that were hotbeds for illness. The crowded and unsanitary conditions of these places lead to epidemics like this and dysentery which were exacerbated by the long and pack train rides to the camps in this regard. It was unlikely that one would arrive at fits in good health. Even if they did there was no guarantee their life would be spared by the summer of nineteen forty four mangla had been at auschwitz for about a year and the war was going poorly for the nazis with defeats seeming imminent. They redoubled the evil efforts to eradicate the jewish people from europe. Aside from the twins pulled from the masses most arriving prisoners were now pointed in one direction to the gas chambers despite the almost certain defeat his country now faced reports say that mangla continued to take perverse pleasure in his role he even found the time to entertain himself at the grotesque expense of his doomed captives in july of that year. A group of hungarian rabbis arrived at the camp wearing their traditional black coats. Woolen pants and hats. When mangla spotted the men he ordered them to step out of line to sing and dance for him. The rabbis began chanting the coal. Need ray a him of atonement as they. Don and display spiritual devotion mangula was unmoved. There wouldn't save them from his judgment when they were done. They rejoined the line. Moving into the cast chambers. It wouldn't be the last time. Mangla wielded his power with unnecessary cruelty by now. This was his domain and he had caught launch within bengalis fiefdom. His tests on twins went the only twisted medical research and separate from his own experimentation. 's mangla sense of cruelty knew no bounds. He sometimes like to keep his own subjects happy to make his own life easier. But those prisoners he didn't need were another story. Entirely one account tells of fifteen-year-old ab hillman who striking beauty shown even with a roughly shown head and clad in the shapeless outfits uniform by the time she arrived at the camp most selections for the gas chambers took place inside the gates of outfits extensively to help him make better informed decision mangla to strip naked for him when e b hillman removed. Her clothes on reported mandela's marked fascination with her. She transfixed him and that was unacceptable. He resolved that she should be punished. And ordered has sent to block ten. That infamous building was where mangoes colleagues conducted cruel gynecological experiments. Hardly any of the subjects survived weeks later e was seen wandering. The campgrounds has stomach bloated from told surgeries and her limbs swollen. She looked aged and with it no longer an enchanting beauty and no longer of one to mangla he had other things on his mind. As nineteen forty four drew to a close even fanatics like mangla could read the writing on the wall. Some ss officers and guards began making preparations for retreat. Just in case still when the roma camp within auschwitz was closed and all its prisoners slaughtered. Mangula was careful to have his twins bodies retrieved from the gas chambers to properly examine them. It's interesting to note that mandela's twins were likely some of the very few victims of the holocaust who received an autopsy. It's impossible to say what his intentions were performing these autopsies. Maybe he felt he missed some important detail after reviewing is work. It's also possible. That is interesting. Twins escalated to some bizarre obsession the sort of behavioral addiction driven by his brains dopamine imbalance whether this action was driven by a need for thoroughness or something more pathological mangle. The scientific records would ultimately be lost time but to the end he remained committed to completing his work. Whatever it was and he began to worry about what would happen to his data in the coming months to one of the prison doctors. He lamented isn't it's a pity that all this work will fall into the hands of the bolsheviks with the russians just weeks from reaching outfits many nazi doctors destroyed their records but no manjula in a desperate effort to preserve his research. He packed slides and notes into boxes then supposedly had them shipped to his home town of gunzburg. But where those boxes ended up is anyone's guess. It seems that no one has ever uncovered written records of mongolia's work at auschwitz. And the doctor himself didn't stick around to answer any questions. In january of nineteen forty-five he disappeared from the camp. Under cover of darkness in the following day's whatever was left of mongolia's records were destroyed. They were blown up by the remaining. Ss guards along with the massive crematoriums that for years had polluted the sky above auschwitz with black smoke. Though it's clear that joseph manganiello was never the great scientific mind. He imagined himself. It's hard to not be somewhat curious about his loss medical records in all likelihood however mangles research was probably not all that useful despite the importance he attributed to it. It's even possible that mangled. I tried to hide these records. Not for their research value but to avoid embarrassment over his incompetence brutality and lack of results many with firsthand knowledge of mongolia's experiments had osh fits denounced him as a scientific wannabe. Which makes it even harder to imagine. It is lost records would be a great contribution to medicine. And yet the doctors work at auschwitz was deemed too valuable or two incriminating to fall into the hands of the enemy so it was destroyed with all the rest. It was a desperate attempt by the nazis to cover their tracks to hide the millions of murders that took place at the concentration camps. Thankfully it didn't work. And the world was made aware of the holocaust unfortunately many of the worst offenders from the nazi leadership evaded those seeking to bring them to justice including the angel of death of auschwitz following his escape mangla largely remained a free man in the immediate aftermath of the war. Only the survivors of auschwitz. Really knew what he had done that. Unfortunately he was not a prominent name on many wanted lists. He slipped through the cracks and eventually made his way to south america. Even after the war he seemed unable to stay away from medicine risking still more lives in the process in argentina. He practiced medicine without a license until a teenage patients died during an abortion. Afraid that any attention would expose his identity. As a war criminal he moved on he was just in the nick of time to nazi hunters had tracked down his argentina address and his extradition that by the time everything was in place for his arrest. Mangula was already gone fled to paraguay. Unfortunately this wasn't his only escape from justice during his years as a fugitive for decades so many of mangla surviving twins state silent too traumatized to speak up to faithful to shed their horrifying ordeal until february of nineteen eighty five when a group of surviving twins reunited in jerusalem. To finally reveal the truth. It was a trial of sorts. Forty years had passed since he slipped away from shvets and manjula had never face justice. His victims were done waiting for their day in court. Three days of testimony made headlines around the world has the truth about yosef. Mangla twisted experiments came to light for the first time at the close of the trial. The assembled tribunal demanded that efforts resume to apprehend the seventy three year old doctor and bring him to justice. An international manhunt began with forces from the us israel and germany searching for any sign of the elusive mangla. They wouldn't have to look for long that same year. German police exhumed remains from a grave in brazil and confirmed they were in fact yosef mangla. The renewed effort to find manjula. Had come too late in nineteen seventy nine at the age of sixty seven. He suffered a stroke while swimming and drowned. He was buried under the name. Wolfgang gerhardt hiding his true identity. Even to the grave in his youth mangla was desperate for fame and admiration for his work but beyond his auch its infamy. He didn't contribute anything to the medical field. A lot is made of the temperament required to be a doctor but seldom do we talk about the personality of scientists. Joseph mangla was fit to be neither to the end yosef mandala remained an unrepentant nazi. Who fail to take responsibility for the monstrous role. He played in the holocaust shielded by his family's wealth and helped sympathizes. He deprived his victims of chance to confront him to ask him. Why if mangla had a great mind if he would truly concerned with a scientific imports of his research he might have felt compelled to defend or explain his crimes that auschwitz-birkenau then again it's easy to see that mandela's mind was neither great nor particularly scientific. He was mediocre to the last degree except perhaps in his capacity for evil thanks for listening to medical murders. And thanks again to dr kipah for joining me today. And thank you alison. Newberry bunch for more information on yosef mangla. Among the many solstice we used we found the book children of the flames dr yosef mangla and the untold story of the twins of outfits by sets mattielo nado and sheila cone dekel and the nazi doctors medical killing and the psychology of genocide by robert. Jay lifton extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of medical murders and all other past originals for free on spotify. Not only to spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy. All of your favorite podcast originals. Like medical murders for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream medical murders on spotify. Just open the app and type medical murders in the search bar. We'll see you next time. Medical murders was created by max cutler and his opoku studio original it is executive produced by max cutler sound designed by trish williamson with production assistance by kalyan. Kristen asa vado jonathan cohen jonathan ratliff and this episode of medical murders was written by joe callan with writing assistance by maggie. Maya and stars david kipa and alistair murden uh listeners. Don't forget to check out our love story. The newest spotify original from podcast every tuesday discovered the many pathways to love as told by the actual couples who found them. Listen to our love story. Three on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

mangla Mangla mangula alex rider joseph mangla auschwitz birkenau Alex rider ruth mangles manjula Ruth mengele yosef mangla hennessy opoku alistair murdoch Dr david kipah Dr yosef mangula auschwitz birkenau Joseph mangla
Approaches in Difficult Histories

Kalamazoo Valley Museum Interpretive Hour

52:59 min | 6 months ago

Approaches in Difficult Histories

"Content warning. This episode contains difficult histories and personal narratives that could be traumatic for some listeners. Content includes violence, death, genocide, and racism please be advised. History is bleak it can be very difficult to confront many things have happened that contradict the moral codes society is built over time. Some of these actions and Events Permeate in the tortured memories of many. Some have been swept under the rug to then be rediscovered and discussed but no matter the circumstances humans have been and are capable of terrible things. How do we address these issues in Contemporary Times? Interpretation serves as a means to confront and discuss these difficult histories which plagued the memories of many. Today we will explore that which we have to explore to ensure the continuation of their memorial association and public consciousness. These are the stories from our difficult past on the Kalamazoo Valley museums interpretive our. My Name is Jacob Wolf. And I'm Great Wilson. And today we're talking about just that the stories from our difficult pass. And whether they happened within the past. Fifty years or even hundreds of years ago these histories continue to be contentious. And continually explored and discussed. To. Start off today's episode, we are going to explore sites of genocide and to in particular. The first one we're going to address is the site of Switz- Birkenau. For those unfamiliar Aushwitz Birkenau was originally the site of Polish army barracks. Offshoots Birkenau at the time, but instead had a different name run by the Polish government. However in World War Two in the nineteen forties when Germany invaded Poland. The Nazi government took over this site and converted it into the largest concentration and death camp run by them. It was supposed to be the culmination of their final solution that being to wean out any non Aryan races out of the European continent and to make Lebensraum for the German people. Overall this was a integral. Part of the Holocaust which led to the deaths of millions of Jewish people. Political Prisoners Homosexuals Roma People Jehovah witnesses just to name a few of the various people marginalized and killed by the Nazi government. and. This site was no exception being absolutely large in its magnitude. There were three complexes on the site. Offshoots one AUSHWITZ to which was Birkenau. And Osh wits three. These held a variety of prisoners and serve different purposes, but nonetheless led to vast amounts of torture and death. Many individuals who were not killed in gas chambers or murdered by squadrons with guns died of disease or very commonly of starvation. This can be noted on their ideas, which often stated the reason and cause for their deaths. Also at these sites were other forms of human atrocities. Nazi officials raped many women at the camp assigning them roles as prostitutes for one. There was also general assault in general abuse and torturing of prisoners for sport. Overall, the site is an absolutely gruesome sight. And now it only sits as Aushwitz one for. All of our Schlitz two and Three were wooden structures and burnt down after world, war two either by the Nazis themselves or by invading Soviet forces. The site sat as an empty shell for a long time and the original brick Polish barracks. Osh wits one as mentioned earlier was the only thing that stood. But after World War Two, it was then converted into a museum which is its core function today. The site is visited by tourists every year, and it's a very common destination for both mourners and those who want to see where the atrocities happened. So, now that this is a site that many people visit, it is a museum. How does an interpreter approached this difficult difficult history full of torture murder death abuse just to name a few. Well according to Tomas Schabowski who works at the site as a tour guide and interpreter. He states that one has to think of the core purpose of the site. A place like this is a museum. But it also functions as a cemetery and the site of education a site of reflection. It's all of these things in one and it is one of the primary sites to preserve memories of the Jewish people. Gay People the remote folk. And all other types of individuals who were either kept and killed at these sites to remember what happened. Because according to him, the Nazis wanted to erase all memory of these people in these places to make it a perfect crime and interpreters insure that no one forgot the evil that these sites embodied. and. They don't continue to forget the evil that these sites embody. Ensures that the official historical narrative does not also fail because as the story spread over years. Survivors can no longer tell their stories personally. It is very likely that skewed narratives could come about. For example, very popular Hollywood film called the boy in striped pajamas is an example of falsely portraying history. Although individuals, see this as a film to discuss the absolute horridness of the concentration camps. In general, it misportrays the harsher realities the happened there. These people were completely isolated from anybody. They would have had no opportunity to act with the child especially in other child and also likely that other child would have been killed. Most children were sent to gas chambers and were not allowed to live there. And people expect to see the sights that were portrayed in these movies and in reality can be disappointed to learn the truth was much harsher. and. That's not appropriate to the memories of the individuals in victims at these sites. And that's the role of the interpreter is to allow those voices and those narratives to continue on so that people understand what happened to understand. Necessarily what this means them, how to prevented? and. Another. Question that trubisky brings up. is particularly how can we adequately balanced proper commemoration of the victims of mass extermination with the needs of contemporary mass tourism? In today's ephemeral age individuals are often consumed by media. Their phones information comes by very quickly and it is extremely hard for some individuals to be contemplative to meditate on things, which is ultimately the purpose of these sites since they don't serve a function primarily as just a museum, but also as a cemetery and also as a place of reflection and. His answer to this is to emphasize historical awareness, respect and responsibility. And I would argue that responsibility is the most important facet in interpreting the site and provoking. because. Remembering will provide respect to the victims and remembering is that responsibility that these people hold? Because as time continues on as mentioned and various narratives, get skewed and survivors can no longer tell their stories. If these individuals remember their responsibility to these individuals memories and to continue on in public consciousness so that they guide these in their decisions in the future and bring them to their children so that they all understand what had happened there. than the visitors. Ultimately Leave with a more plentiful experience and the purpose and bowl of the site as a cemetery place a reflection place of education. Really achieves its Coleman. So, ultimately, it's emphasizing the individuals stories and emphasizing the responsibility of the visitor to not only be historically aware and to respect the site. But to be responsible in the memorial ization of such a difficult history. Thank you Jacob and doing my own research into topics as such I found that many of them were lacking information or as you alluded to presented in an unsuitable wet. Of these sites that I was researching. The Armenian genocide was particularly notable top. Between nineteen fourteen and nineteen twenty-three, the mass murder and expulsion of one point five million ethnic Armenians was carried out in Turkey in adjoining regions by the Ottoman government. Clearly, this one of history's most profound and utterly horrifying events. Despite this in today's world outside of a proposition from twenty years ago, that is yet to be finalized. Little information exists regarding one of history's most gruesome systematic exterminations. There does however exist an online museum which recounts that the World Soon forgot the Armenian atrocities the Turkish. Republic denied that they ever occurred, but his new genocides occurred the memorials created by the Armenian community provides stark warning to the dangers of ignoring these crimes against humanity in the dangers of whitewashing the historical record. The warning signs that came before the Armenian. Genocide have repeated themselves in Nazi, Germany Rwanda Sudan and many other places since nineteen fifteen. We can ask why each time new genocide occurs a we should not have to we need to remember the past for better future and we need to help those who inherited this past come to term. Clearly as the online museum is illustrating, there is so much more room for interpretation in this field. The last sentences of the quote stated are particularly important. In order to remember the past, we need to commemorate properly. As we'll go onto discussing this episode, the need not just for remembrance, but a proper execution of it is crucial which presents cultural institutions that discuss these difficult histories with a very challenging role. Absolutely, and now we're going to shift away from talking about the horrors of genocide to something closer to our country specifically. and. This particular issue is interpreting American slavery in the Enslavement of African descended people in the continental United States. A particular set of sites that are contentious in exploring American slavery are those homes of the founding fathers of this country. At the homes of these founding fathers, some narratives of slavery have been fully incorporated. But this process has developed in the past few years really just within the past ten years and the practice still has a lot of room for growth. Now. There are different typical types of interpretation for confronting American. Slavery. For example, there's symbolic annihilation which means that the site does not recognize the existence of slaves or state that it was not important enough to discuss. There's also trivialization or deflection. This could mean that the site displays slavery as benevolent or refers to contemporary whites as slaves. There's also the issue of separating sites or exhibit areas on slavery segregating this knowledge from the main narrative of the site itself. And generally, the goal for interpreting these sites where slavery occurred is relatively corporation. Which means that there are attempts to discuss slavery and these attempts are incorporated throughout a site? And hopefully in the end, this leads to Full Inc. which means it is an integral part of the interpretive plan. And seen as integral to the site itself as it was in the historic context of the past. For example at Mount Vernon a few years ago and interpreter portrayed William, Lee Washington's ballet. He stated that life at the estate was better there than for other slaves in first person because marriages were recognized in six slaves cared for. However. This creates that benevolent. Shies away from the fact that in the end he was owned, it creates that grateful slave narrative and as an example of trivial. And affliction. Slavery in this case is used the valorize Washington and the approach trivializes the institution completely. Also only using first person when addressing the person's experiences. Is Not particularly appropriate because we're not sure how William Lee felt about slavery. We're not sure about his opinion about how his experience compared to other slaves in the region. He's expressing an opinion that is not an opinion of the actual historical person that he's supposed to be interpreting and overall. It creates something that is completely false and not rooted in fact now, one could perhaps in this case. Deviate from first person and go to third person to discuss different aspects of the slave experience or if there's any true written material from William Lee himself perhaps then it would be appropriate to incorporate that sort of narrative. But in the end, what this does is it trivializes the institution and provides a false perspective of an individual and puts that perspective as if it was the truth as if it was historically contextualised. Also, in the video on their Youtube Channel from a few years ago called how to make linen from flax white living historians performed the work of enslaved people who are mentioned once in the video as skilled enslaved weavers. This has no mentioned for the fact that they solely did. This type of work can misguide the viewer thinking it was a benevolent willing practice when in reality it was carried out by black enslaved folk. However within just the past few years. After these videos have been released an after this interpreter portrayed William Louis. There has been some development. For example Brenda Parker is a black interpreter and she works at the site. In portraying Caroline Brannon. She discussed in first person what the meals of slaves were like and the various places they would get ingredients and what the Washington's eight in contrast. This experience this video, this interpretive content does not shy away from any negative aspects. In this she addresses the slave quarters which are deceptively nice made of brick, but in reality, slaves were required to stay where they worked. So only a very few amount of slaves lived there and those that did still experienced the hardships and persecutions for being enslaved and black. She gives a metaphor of a quilt or the Front Looks Beautiful. But on the back there stitches and knots which make that beauty come together. According to her enslaved people for the stitches and knots, and she ties away the deal with a particular moving and provoking quote this being a cage is still a cage. No matter what it's made out of. This alternate refers to the trivializing narratives portray and Mount Vernon ten years earlier by different interpreters and. Instead demonstrates A. Maturing of the theme and A actual recognition of the historical context and experiences of black enslaved people at Mount Vernon and what exactly it was like. Now. Still in general, this is a segregation of this interpretation from the main sites and exhibit areas. There is ability for individuals to explore these different sites to visit the places where Dean slaved lived and the places where they worked. But in reality, the whole place all of Vernon was where enslaved people worked therefore by having separate sites and exhibit areas on slavery. It segregates that knowledge from the actual site itself it separates it from Washington. And any INC is relative it doesn't fully incorporate what rule slavery played at Mount Vernon, which is an integral role that absolutely. Defines the site's historical context and in attempting to address this difficult history these hard histories of Enslaved people and how they how they lived at a site of someone sobre feared in the country, which is extremely contentious. Since I met with backlash, it's important to stay true to that historical context and what happened at the site. It's important to recognize the conditions and the fact that they were harsh in that people were still enslaved and that to quote a friend of Parker. To recognize that a cage is still cage no matter what it's made out of. I couldn't agree more Jacob transparencies clearly of enormous importance when interpreting these difficult histories at such institutions. As is described by author, Jeffrey J Crow in an article regarding the interpretation of slavery at historical sites quote inclusiveness truthfulness research in tailored interpretation, our principles that can serve any historic site in the context of African. American. History they can provide a framework for reaching audiences uninformed unexposed. What many historians believe is the central theme in this nation's past rates. Pro explains that colonial Williamsburg basis the conundrum of having to present an accurate picture of the past while at the same time catering to the demands and the prejudices of its pain audience. Notes that perhaps no historic attraction has incorporated African American history. So successfully into its overall program s colonial Williamsburg. In seventeen seventy five almost half a Williamsburg's nearly two thousand inhabitants were African or African American. Before the nineteen seventies, most visitors would not have seen any evidence of a black presence. The progressive development of material at colonial. Williamsburg. Is largely due to the creation of the Department of African, American interpretation in presentations which was established in the nineteen eighty. In nineteen seventy, nine, the colonial. Williamsburg Foundation made a strong effort to integrate African American history and culture into its research programs insight Inter tation. Historians archaeologists, architectural. Curator's in others work in conjunction in order to design responsible. African American, public history programs. Ramps and endowment to the colonial Williamsburg Foundation have funded major African American history initiatives including the reconstruction of a rural slave quarter Carter's grove plantation and a wide variety of interpretive programming throughout the historic area that brings to life the everyday experiences of African American men, women, and children. According to the foundation, the pre nineteen, seventy, nine manual of interpretation barely mentioned slavery. There was only one explicit reference to servants lades. Slavery was interpreted in just one place the plantation office. The interpreters only discussed slave owners in their trials managing the enslaved population but made no mention of the hundreds of people who fed clothed in served their owners. The nineteen eighty manual produced nine years after colonial. Williamsburg's initial commitment to African. American. Interpretation made some very important developments African American programming flourished between seventy nine and eighty eight carving a new narrative. The touched on all parts of the society in order to provide a broader and more truthful understanding. Carter's grove became the site of historically accurate constructed quarters, new approaches to interpretation in team devoted to telling the stories of the quote unquote forgotten. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight manual grappled with big issues like black white relations, the development of African American cultures in daily life within the slave system. All of these themes were crucial in the development of colonial Williamsburg into a more socially conscious institution in a major turning point for the future of African American interpretation. Today Living History presentations exhibit in special tours have emerged to tell the story of slaves free blacks ended edged servants within the context of a thriving colonial society and economy all of which was excluded before. The information demonstrates thorough preparation accuracy and unflinching honesty all of which contributes to the esteemed interpretation that is provided. In the same way as colonial Williamsburg Thomas Jefferson's Monticello estate has made a point of becoming more socially conscious and inclusive. Cultural? Institution. With the help of numerous staff members and scholars. A collection of new projects and initiatives have commenced staff historians, Lucia Stan in Dianne, Swann right launch the getting word African American Oral History Project an undertaking that has gone on to preserve a multitude of recorded interviews with nearly two hundred descendants of Monticello enslaved community. These oral histories serve as an intrinsic element of the slavery at Monticello which are offered on a daily basis. Stanton a prolific scholar published free someday. African. American families of Mina Cello as well as those who labor for my happiness slavery at Thomas Jefferson's final cello which in addition to the oral history project shed light upon the previously unknown lives of the Hemmings hearn Grainger Gillette in Hubbard slave families, all of whom played into girl and diverse roles in the Monticello community publications such combined previously published essays on its lay families with new findings based on the getting word oral histories that described the lives and experiences after slavery. In addition to these projects publications, a website was launched regarding to getting word project to make the information available to virtual visitors. As. Well is this Dr Eugene Foster along with a team of geneticists established eight genetic link between the descendants of Jefferson in hemmings families. These findings were published in the scientific journal Nature, and these findings have sent served a very important facet of the history presented Monticello is a demonstrate that the enslaved community was intertwined history in ways that many people did not realize for example. Monticello post eighteen o nine kitchen has been restored in in this kitchen enslaved chefs trained in the art, of French cuisine such as James. hemmings prepared sophisticated dishes for the Jefferson household. Now, it is used in live demonstrations by historians like Michael, twitty who offer insight regarding cooking methods of the community as well as the true origins of many dishes that we know in enjoy today. Monticello also CO sponsors major exhibition. Known as slavery at Jefferson's Monticello Paradox of liberty with the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American history and culture. It traveled from Washington to museum venues in Atlanta St. Louis, and Philadelphia and this exhibition like others again demonstrates the theme slaved community was intertwined history in ways that many people were unaware of. Publications and exhibitions that are well underway. MONTICELLO has demonstrated their commitment to continually reworking material in tailoring to be appropriate as findings are made. New Innovations in slavery research clearly have a large on academic scholarship in public interpretation museums and with its strong commitment to these teams Monticello is helping to set the precedent for the future of public interpretations of Histories. And I think a very successful way in which they achieve. That is through recognizing the names of the enslaved people and recognizing their contributions the site if possible, for example, at Monpellier, the home of James Madison Paul. Jennings. Was a long time individual who is enslaved from birth by the Madison family who played a pivotal role in the family and White House and wrote a memoir about his life as enslaved person someone like this is a perfect person to explain to. Struggles in experiences of an enslaved black person in colonial America and in Nineteenth Century America to light those experiences and. Confronting these individuals stories much like confronting the individual stories at Switz-. Birkenau is an extremely extremely provoking way to communicate this difficult history and to personalize it and to get people to make their own assumptions about the topic at hand and a final takeaway note that is important to emphasize and kind of final thought for interpreting the history of enslaved people in American slavery is that this is a group of people were displaced from their homeland without choice. So much of the culture they created whilst living in America was. Adapted under harsh conditions and they saved a lot of their African roots and. Adapted and created new a new culture within a country under four circumstances and extremely difficult circumstances, which ultimately demonstrates resilience and willpower under diversity, and this is also very, very important tuber trae because these individuals had plenty of agency over their life and they took it when they could and it's extraordinary and it's important to confront. Well said Jacob and to change gears a little bit and analyze something on a bit of a smaller scale. But certainly no less than not -bility are the Detroit riots of nineteen sixty seven over the course of five days in July nineteen, sixty, seven, the Detroit police and fire departments Michigan State Police They Michigan National Guard in the US Army were involved in subduing what became the largest civil disturbance of twenty th century. America as a result of confrontations between black residents in the Detroit Police Department. A rate of an after hours drinking club took place, which was the site of a welcome party for to Vietnam War veterans in all eighty two patrons at the club were promptly arrested in from their violent soon escalated. The crisis eventually amounted to forty three deaths, hundreds of injuries and almost seventeen hundred fires as well as over seven thousand arrests. Issues of racial discrimination, police brutality and economic dislocation began to tear dozens of cities apart during the nineteen sixties. and. This narrative followed Detroit for many years to come. In the past information, regarding such events has been clouded in left Hiba wondering what took place in just as importantly why it took place. Today institution such as the Detroit historical, society work to shed light such in provide a full detailed explanation from the view. Detroit sixty seven perspectives exhibition at the Detroit Historical Museum allows visitors to better understand what exactly took place, what happened leading up to it as well as the impacts that has on today's society. It analyzes the fifty years prior to nineteen, sixty seven as well as the fifty years afterwards up to the present day detailing the progress and setbacks that have occurred along the way. As is described by the society. The exhibition narrative conclude by offering a perspective on what lies ahead in will challenge community to use what we learned in the past hundred years to help create a future for Detroit built with unparalleled promised an opportunity. Detroit sixty seven looking back to move has been described by the historical society is a multiyear community project bring together diverse voices in communities. As well, as this the Detroit history museums, oral history project is a massive collection of stories and experiences shared by Metro detroiters that represent a wide array of perspectives. This project portrays the thoughts and feelings of those who are in positions of authority during the event those who lived in the city and remained as well as those who left the city afterwards. This project does a fantastic job of encapsulating the events in their entirety seeing that the testimonials are given by an assortment of individuals. It is of enormous importance to acknowledge the different scope that everyone views. The same tragedies through in every perception is obviously vastly different in for that reason the Detroit Historical Society in particular does a phenomenal job of encapsulating all of the information that they can to give us the broadest understanding. Possible. Yeah absolutely I. I look to that and Ultimately interpretation is about letting people make their own assumptions about things and when all those perspectives are provided. That really allows someone to make their own conclusions and ultimately understand the culmination of what happened in Detroit in that year. And now we're GONNA shift to the West side of the United States back to World War Two again, and we're GONNA Explore Mansa. Nar and the issue of Japanese internment camps. Now for those unfamiliar with Manzana are on. This is basically what happened in one, thousand, nine, forty to the United States government ordered more than a hundred and ten thousand men, women and children to leave their homes and they detained them in remote military style camps. The man's our war relocation center was one of the ten camps were Japanese. American citizens and residents. Japanese aliens were incarcerated during World War Two. And these sites were particularly difficult because many of these individuals were third generation citizens or second generation having been born in the United States having never even been to Japan. But because of the bombing of Pearl Harbor FDR signed this order which caused all Japanese American and Japanese immigrant individuals in the United States to be sent to these concentration camps and they were here for several years, some individuals had to grow up there. To better explore the experiences at Manson are endless difficult history to provide a more provoking narrative. There are several oral histories available. Recorded by the National Park Service from the eighties into the two thousand. And one of these particular individuals who experienced the site was Mama Nagano. Mamo, Nagano was born in Los Angeles her father immigrated the United States as the teenager. When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, her father was arrested because he was involved in judo, which is a popular Japanese martial arts sport, which uses swords and various types of weapons to combat each other and he was transported across the country to various prisons and camps, and eventually moment the gun on herself and her family were sent to Mandar. Fortunately, she was able to protest the arrest of her father a hearing with the man's Narc Group and the group was impressed by our patriotism which allowed her father to joy in her family there in Manson are in the summer of nineteen. Forty three. But this doesn't use the various types of hardships that GonNa went through. She recalls Seriou nces at Manson are with the food how everyone would have diarrhea and however one would have terrible bowel movements due to the quality of the food there how there wasn't really much to do and how individuals were. Moved around by the guards and. Treated as if they were prisoners which they really were. Even though the US government told them that it was a relocation camp. They were kept there indefinitely and they were not allowed to leave and they were not allowed to go anywhere. And they were completely trapped and she spent all of her time in her high school years there and to college where she learned and worked in lived her life. She recalls a particular moment where there was a survey in which the individuals at the camp were asked to answer whether or not. They'd fight for the USA if they were asked to. Her mother pressured her to answer. No but her gut told her to say yes. They mentioned the US government at the time that this was not going to have any consequences. It was merely just the statistics aspect. But those that answered no percent to a terrible camp up north and those who answered yes. Were allowed to stay and possibly had the opportunity to leave sooner. which she automatically did she was allowed to go to college and pursue her degree and. Particularly, how a quaker girl helped her in her experience. Eventually she became a visual artist and lived her life doing that. And As, demonstrated through oral history. She takes this experience with her to her late end of life. She mentions how she has a friend particularly who would never accept the reparations given by the US government to those imprisoned at Mansa Nar in the nineteen eighties. His wife man who refused to accept the reparations his wife bakes him to accept it but he's headed. He felt that he was wrong. To quote another prisoner at the camp, who is a third generation Japanese American who grew up on a farm in California Victor Moore Oko he felt that the Japanese American population got screwed to quote him. He felt they should have deserved more money for what they've done having earned a couple of tens of thousands of dollars. He said that if this happened to a white person, they would have gotten six figures. He particularly remembers also the food that they ate at the cafeteria. He had stomach pains constantly do the constipation because the food aid which you described as lousy was causing him to have this his experience and his perspective alongside Momo Nagano's experience. Demonstrates that. Even with an apology. Even with reparations. These experiences cannot be healed. The wounds were made and these people were betrayed by their own country. and. It appears that in interpreting these cases and the site specifically, it's important to listen to people like Moma Gano or like Victor Mural Oko. It's important because. They know these experiences more than anybody else and their perspectives combined with others. Details with life was like at Mansa Nar and emphasizes the socio racial issues that caused men's in art to be created. Victor Mural. Remembers particularly riding through part of California that was known for having racists in being a center for white nationalist groups and how they yelled at the Boston how they harassed them. He remembers that individuals were very aware that Japanese families were being rounded up and how when they were getting rid of their stuff at their house. Cared for by their Canadian neighbors who eventually actually sold all their things they put it in a large pile and there were scrappers driving around looking for. Stuff to salvage from the Japanese families who were taken from their homes, and he remembers particularly his uncle looking these people in the eye and setting the pile of their stuff on fire so that these scrappers could not get what they had. And Mona Gano recalls a house, her father built in Los Angeles and how when they had to leave his father left it for friend to rent. And eventually this friend rented it to this one man and when he came back, the man claimed he owned the House and because of laws at the time, which did not allow his father to take this man to court. He had to pay back the House that he already built in paid for. And ultimately. The resilience in this narrative is striking. And the stories that these people tell. Are One of a kind and really are the best in most provoking way to understand these experiences. And interpreters at the site itself, which is now part of the National Park. Service. Do exactly that. The site now provides self guided and guided interpreter lead tours throughout the site with a variety of educational standards and materials for schools. The guided tours are site specific and have various levels of education based on the groups including discussion forum for those well-versed on the history. Educational Standards are based on identity connections to the past war end for tenth and Eleventh Grades Internment Experience and Perspective in consciousness. There's another program for younger students called become a park ranger where students get a badge for familiarizing themselves with the Manson our stories. This includes completing a booklet which prompts children to watch a video on Mandar Research. The story of one of its prisoners answer questions on maps research. A historic kids would play with Atman Star reflect on what they learned, and ultimately this interpretive programming takes into mind the individual experiences of individuals like victim, Rural Olga, and Mona Gano and ultimately when exploring these difficult histories, it's extremely extremely important to recognize the voices of those who are affected by these difficult experiences if possible. I absolutely agree the ability to take charge of the commemorative narrative process is of utmost importance and applied very. To the last site that I would like to talk about today, which is sand creek a site in southeastern Colorado territory. The events that took place here are well described in a book by author Ari Common Known as a misplaced massacre struggling over the memory of Sand Creek the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site Commemorate the November twenty ninth eighteen sixty four attack on a village of about seven hundred southern Cheyenne and Arapaho people along Sand Creek. which is about one hundred and seventy miles southeast of Denver. At dawn approximately six, hundred, seventy, five soldiers of the first and third regiments. Colorado Volunteer Cavalry Killed More than two hundred, thirty of the Cheyenne. Arpaio over the course of just seven hours. For more than one, hundred, fifty years. The Same Creek massacre has maintained its significance as one of the most emotionally charged in controversial events in the United States history. Congress, designated Sand Creek massacre is a national historic site in two thousand and the site with dedicated before opened to the public us. A very weird inflection. Congress designated San Creek massacre is a national historic site in two thousand in the site was dedicated and formally opened at the public. Twenty seventh two, thousand, seven. For most of American History White said medically written native people out of the national narrative more often forgetting than remembering them. Most historic sites that recount westward settlement take on the perspective of white settlers. Memorial said, do discuss native Americans typically used as benchmarks for national progress as objects rather than as subjects. Native, people are regularly cast is uncivilized suggesting that they have no history of their own and are exclusively at people at the past. Looking to shift this narrative, many native people who helped in the creation of the same creek historic site rejected what they saw as quote unquote a hollow offer of painless healing quick reconsiliation. These native people understood that controlling the interpretive apparatus in the context of national. Public. Space offered them a very rare opportunity to steer the commemorative process. Insisted upon that the site be referred to as the Sand Creek massacre national historic site as well as at the massacre story be told from the perspective of the natives. Many keough county residents were described as hesitant in regards to the historic sight seeing that they did not want to be looked down upon by advertisement of occurred in their backyard. As explained by an analysis of this text, a misplaced massacre considers the Malcolm Ation of the history in the memory of Saint Creek as a result of unrelenting tension over the shape location in meaning of the site of troubled history. But one example of the president being affected by antipathy over the actuality of the history. Through the eyes of three different men all with vastly different perspectives. One being perpetrator one being a witness in one being a victim author of this book Recounts Various Moments From Commemorative Events regarding the Creek Memorial site and doing so emphasizes that many were part of this commemoration process had notre concept of the English fell by others. The author quotes, for example, the Colorado Governor at the opening ceremony in two thousand eight who emphasized that the new memory site constituted a foundation for healing in for living in peace without conflict. The county commissioner saw it as nothing more than a facet of economic growth in made no mention of the massacre during the opening ceremony at the site. The book cover serves as an example of how heroin the process of commemoration can be for those who have been victims of callous historical events. Too often those involved in the process of commemoration Ale to understand this and consequently seem apathetic in distasteful. Symbolically, the massacre was misplaced as a result of different interpretations of what took place namely rejection, but also the memorials that mitigate the severity of what took place referring to it as a battle. The author goes into great detail regarding the efforts made by some countries to incorporate their troubled pasts into reconstruction for a better future in particular Germany in South Africa. However, Kellman condemned the United States for their failure to do so by continually distorting history in order to construct a more tasteful narrative. Explains that the civil wars still viewed in a very positive light as something that transposed a history of violence into one of virtue. Despite this, the westward expansion that took place in the United, states must be seen in violent context while the civil war may have contributed to the abolition of Slavery Westward Expansion, decimated the plains tribes in the same creek massacre is one notably devere event. While people throughout history have clinched the idea that the massacre at sand creek was a heroic effort with the purpose of civilizing the West. It is more apparent now than ever that we must reform such views. If the new memorial manages to quote challenge visitors to grapple with competing narratives of us, history come and concludes. In perhaps, the massacre will no longer be misplaced in the landscape of national memory and. Thank you so much for that last than yet. and. I guess. Now that we're wrapping up the episode, it's time to think of some bigger themes that relate to that. And, I'd like to contextualized within the idea of a commemorative museum pedagogy. This C. M. P. is a technique which analyzes the ways in which people confront defense knowledge. What people do is they receive. Repeat reflect and reconsider. and. When one in my opinion provides these individual narratives, these individual perspectives, for example, at Sand Creek providing the perspectives of from. Native American groups or perhaps at Aushwitz Birkenau. Providing perspectives and experiences of the individuals. or at a place like Monticello and addressing James Hemming specifically in the individual and his experience in confronting these difficult histories, severi provoking way and kind of A. Theme in Interpretive Models Better Successful is confronting this history through exploring the personal narratives of those affected by it if possible because. Overall these histories are not only difficult to confront because there are so harsh but also in some cases difficult to confront because they're contentious perhaps because of political atmosphere such as the case with American slavery or as the case with Sand Creek and. What I have to say this is to reference a quote by David W young. And in this quote, he states that in history the things we can agree on are the least meaningful to explore. And that's why these contentious histories these difficult histories are so important to explore not only for commemorative purposes and not only for the play purpose of remembering histories of these individual experiences and why they were difficult to confront. But also they're important to confront because they are difficult in nature and that people disagree on them and overall. This will create a more meaningful and more fulfilling outcome from confronting these narratives. Thank you for listening to the Kalamazoo Valley museums interpretive our podcast. You wish to learn more about the episode topic please visit Kalamazoo Museum dot org slash podcast, probably Agassi notes transcripts, and other behind the scenes content. Due to Covid nineteen stay at home order. A museum is currently closed until further notice. Until then stay safe and healthy and visit us in two weeks where we'll talk about planetarium's.

United States Jacob Wolf Detroit Williamsburg Monticello Washington Birkenau sand creek Manson Mount Vernon Kalamazoo Valley murder Colorado Brenda Parker Moma Gano Nazi government Germany Aushwitz Birkenau
Liberation of Auschwitz / Arne Nss born - January 27

This Day in History Class

13:59 min | 2 months ago

Liberation of Auschwitz / Arne Nss born - January 27

"Today's episode is brought to you by ford. The ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years and counting the all new twenty twenty one. F one fifty. It's completely redesigned to be the toughest most productive f one fifty ever then tear has gotten a huge upgrade with more luxury and comfort than there's ever been an available tailgate work. Surface helps simplify and support. Your work includes guides for measuring even built in slot for a smartphone or computer. Tough this mark can only be called. F one fifty check out the all new two thousand twenty one ford f one fifty at ford dot com built fort. Proud built ford tough. What do explorers a former newspaper editor and minnesota insurance salesman have in common. They all wanted to be the first to reach the north pole. I'm cat long signs editor at mental floss and the host of the quest for the north pole. A new podcast launching january fifteenth about our insatiable desire to explore the mysteries of the arctic. And stand at the top of the world. Iheartradio is number one for podcasts. But don't take our word for it. Listen to the quest for the north pole. Every friday on the iheartradio app. or wherever. You get your podcasts. Hey y'all here. We're doubling up today with two events in history on with the show. Hi i'm eve and welcome to this day in history class. A show that uncovers a little bit more about history every day. The day was january. Twenty seventh nineteen forty-five soviet forces finally arrived outfits. The complex of nazi concentration camps in poland after liberating warsaw and krakow earlier in january. We ran up to them and they gave us hugs cookies and chocolate survivor. Eva course said later. She was just ten years old when the camps were liberated. We were not only starved for food but we were starved for human kindness and the soviet army did provide some of that. Of course it also was actually a network of concentration death and labor camps there was fifth one the main camp outfits to birkenau an outfit. Three mon of it's originally designed for prisoners of war birkenau evolved into a death camp for jewish romney and gay people and anyone else deemed up human. The majority of people who died at auschwitz took their last breath at birth canal so when the red army arrived outfits it was a victory but the reality was the troops. Were still at a place where over one million people died at the hands of the nazis in their nationalist racist policies. More than six hundred corpses lamb powell's around the camp and over seven thousand survivors were left behind. But the nazis had already left. You see the end of the second world. War was nearing an allied troops. Were closing in on the nazi camps. So before the soviets got to auschwitz the nazis at camps focused their efforts on getting rid of the evidence of their crimes at s leader heinrich himmler's the nazis destroy part of the gas chambers at auschwitz birkenau in late nineteen forty four. Well they did it. They actually forced the thunder commando or prisoners assigned to manage the gas chambers to part the crematoria piece by piece and in january of nineteen forty five. The nazis blew up and set on fire the rest of the buildings and even burnt documents in the streets. As part of their last ditch attempt to cover up their tracks and carry out the mandate of creating a so-called aryan race the ss call for the abandonment of outfits as soviet forces got closer emit january nineteen forty five the s sixty thousand prisoners west away from approaching truth and into the heart of the crumbling german reich with the ss euphemistically called evacuation was really what prisoners. More appropriately called a march remember. It was winter in poland. Sick and starving adults and children alike walked mouse through snow mud. I am blizzards wearing their thin prison. Uniforms only to end up and another concentration camp or die on the way they are people who couldn't keep up were beaten and murdered and many died from exhaustion are freezing is not known exactly how many people died on the death marches from auschwitz but some estimates put the toll at as many as fifteen thousand people. But even after all the nazis destruction evidence of the brutality magnitude of death at auschwitz remained s. Commander aren't smeltzer had ordered. Everybody left behind to be killed but guards had deserted the camp and about seven thousand people who hit during the evacuation or were deemed unable to make the brutal trip to germany for at outwith when the soviets arrived covered in waste in a macy's it among the ruins the army found over eight hundred thousand women's coats tens of thousands of pairs of shoes more than three hundred thousand men suits and nearly eight tines of human hair. Hundreds of soviet soldiers died liberating. The camp's housemates prisoners have made many attempts successful and unsuccessful to resist an escape nazi tyranny but on january twenty seventh people at the camps. Were finally able to envision a future beyond slavery cruel medical experimentation and being poisoned to death but liberation didn't mean immediate freedom some people quickly left the camps and most children who left went to children's homes and orphanages though some did find their parents but other former prisoners were incredibly exhausted and sick and many died despite being fed and given medical assistant. many jewish people didn't have homes to go to or face the threat of violent anti semitism back at home. And even after physical liberation the mental emotional effects of imprisonment at auschwitz remained in two thousand and five. The united nations declared january twenty seven international holocaust remembrance day. I'm eve's jeffco and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can subscribe to this. Dan history class on apple podcasts. The iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks to tailor made for all his production help. We'll see you tomorrow. Today's episode is brought to you by ford. The ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years in counting and the all new twenty twenty one f. One fifty is completely redesigned to be the toughest most productive f one fifty ever. The interior has gotten a huge upgrade with more luxury. More comfort to help make work more productive. The available pro power onboard gives you the ability to use your truck like a mobile generator. You can power an electric grill or power tools and available tailgate work. Surface helps simplify and support. Your work includes guides for measuring and even a built in slot for smartphone or tablet. Computer that can really come in handy. And when work takes you into the wee hours of the night the distinctive lighting system of the all new f one fifty includes available zone lighting for better productivity embed leading for working indem light toughest mark can only be called check out the all new twenty twenty one ford f one fifty at four dot com built. Ford proud built ford tough. I like bed. That's really firm something after that. Rest easy to sleep number three sixty smart bet you can both the just you cover with your sleep number setting. Yeah really fall asleep faster. Yes by gently warming your feet. Okay but can help keep us asleep. It senses you're automatically adjust to keep you africa's become to sleepnumber proven quality. Sleep is life changing sleep and now save a thousand dollars on the sleep number three sixty special edition smart bed queen now. Seventeen thousand nine only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com. Hey i'm eve and you're listening to this day in history class. Podcast where we bring you a slice of history. Every day day was january. Twenty seven thousand nine hundred. Twelve norwegian philosopher arna deca. I'd ness was born. Ness was known for being an influential figure in the environmental movement and coining the term deep. Ecology ness was born in slimmed doll near oslo norway to a wealthy family. His father ragnar died before he turned one year. Old are not found in early interest in nature and philosophy. By the time he was a teenager he had already become adept mountaineer. He also began attending university. Lectures nest did undergraduate work at the sorbonne in paris and graduate work at the university of vienna and the university of california berkeley in vienna with the vienna circle the school of philosophers who developed the movement of logical positive. Ism ness got his doctorate in philosophy from the university of oslo in nineteen. Thirty eight ness finished building. A hut in the hauling scott mountains. He called the hut tae barucha stein aunt. For much of his life he lived in spent time here developing his philosophical ideas. Soon after graduating he became the youngest. Ever professor of philosophy at the university of he was also the only professor of philosophy in norway. At the time once appointed he made the history of ideas a prerequisite for all academic fields in his book. Truth as conceived by those who are not professional. Philosophers ness was one of the first people to use statistical methods and questionnaires to survey philosophical beliefs. But nazi germany invaded in nineteen. Forty influenced by gandhi's active nonviolent resistance ness advocated for the same. He stayed on the faculty at the university of oslo but he was not passive. He worked for the norwegian intelligence agency. You during the occupation and he collaborated with members of the resistance after the war he even mediated conversations between torturers and the families of torture. Victims ness was also influenced by the work of dutch philosopher. Spinoza a prominent rationalist in the seventeenth century after the war ness continue to work on language and communication and published more works. Unesco invited him to lead a project to explore controversies between the east and west over the terms democracy and freedom. He also founded the journal inquiry about philosophy. Science and society ness the first expedition up. Tea-rich mur the highest mountain in the hindu kush in nineteen fifty. Four ness was influenced by rachel. Carson's nineteen sixty two book. Silent spring about the environmental effects of pesticides. norway's culture is also deeply rooted in nature ness became heavily involved in environmental activism in the nineteen sixties. He remained an avid mountaineer. He retired from his professorship in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and he coined the terms deep ecology movement and akasa fee in the nineteen seventy-three. Article the shallow and the deep long range. Ecology movement a summary in his view the shallow ecology movement provided short-term technological solutions to environmental issues deep ecology stressed the importance of changing norms values and practices in environmental decision. Making in a coffee is a personal philosophy or wisdom grounded in attention to the earth that guides a person's actions toward and beliefs about nature and human beings ness called his a coffee. Tea the t standing for vegas dine and he traveled around the world encouraging others to develop their own apostrophes ness went on to run for office with the norwegian green party and became the first chairman of greenpeace norway. He died in oslo in two thousand nine. I'm jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can find us on twitter. Facebook and instagram at t. h z. Podcast we also accept electronic letters at this day at iheartmedia dot com. Thanks again for listening in. Have a fantastic twenty four hours until we see you again as much as life has changed over the last year. You're still pretty busy. So consider convenient covid nineteen testing from quest. Get the same test hospitals use. Without a doctor's visit simply order online select from drive thru or at home options and get results sent securely to your phone or computer. it's a great fit for your busy life with over twenty five million covid nineteen tests processed. You can count on quest so order your test. Today at quest cove. Nineteen dot com.

ford ness Eva course lamb powell auschwitz birkenau auschwitz smeltzer poland soviet army heinrich himmler krakow red army america warsaw arctic arna deca romney minnesota norway university of oslo
Rashida Tlaib and the controversy with Israel: We must never forget the past, lest it become the future

The Daily Article

06:41 min | 1 year ago

Rashida Tlaib and the controversy with Israel: We must never forget the past, lest it become the future

"<music> this is the daily article podcast published by the denison forum or culture changing christians to receive the daily article directly to your tale inbox. Each weekday morning visit the daily article dot com now. Here's today's news discerned differently. Here's the article. I wish i were writing today. The daughter of palestinian emigrants is elected to the united states congress shining a light on the significance of palestinian and people everywhere she returns to the west bank to visit her elderly grandmother and to inspire the palestinians with her example of hard work and success but here's the narrative. I am required by the facts to write instead. Rashida toledo observes in the u._s. House of representatives from michigan's thirteenth district before <hes> her election to congress she was the first muslim woman to serve in the michigan state. Legislature representative to leib has been extremely critical of israel. She is called called for an end to u._s. Aid to israel and expressed support for the boycott divestment and sanctions program. This is a palestinian lead campaign promoting adding boycotts against israel the divesting of investments in the state of israel and sanctions against the israeli government after dozens of lawmakers participated aided congressional delegation to israel representative to leave and her colleague and fellow muslim representative illinois omar decided to make their own trip it was planned by minnesota a group the washington post and the new york times described as headed by a longtime peace negotiator and working to promote global awareness and and knowledge of palestinian realities however as david french notes in the national review miffed is actually an anti-semitic organization that frequently produces reduces vitriolic hateful rhetoric for instance it published a neo nazi treat is condemning the ju- controlled entertainment media and claiming that to permit the jews jews with their three thousand year history of nation wrecking to hold such power over us is tantamount to race suicide miffed to honored to female suicide bombers and celebrated a woman who helped murder thirteen israeli children during a nineteen seventy-eight military operation and it questioned whether israel is a proper proper homeland for the jewish people representative to leave announced her desire to visit her elderly grandmother in the west bank inc but the israeli government mindful of a repeated criticisms of their country and policies denied her entry the next day israeli authorities stated that the congresswoman grice woman could enter if she refrained from criticizing their country xi agreed then changed her position claiming that she could not make the trip under these oppressive conditions wins she said of her grandmother silencing me and treating me like a criminal is not what she wants for me. Representative to leib and representative omar who who is also barred for the same reasons from entering israel have also posted to cartoons by an artist who participated in iran's annual holocaust cartoon contest asked in two thousand six. The artist has often compared israel to the nazi regime. This controversy comes at a dangerous time for the jewish people. The sunday times recently profiled a number of jews who moved from the u._k. To israel because of rising anti-semitism at home a new report says antisemitic incidents in britain have spiked to their highest level since records began in nineteen eighty four a jewish cemetery in bordeaux france. France was vandalized last may a recent survey found that eighty nine percent of jews living in europe. Feel antisemitism has increased in their country over the last decade aide. Another report found that anti-semitic acts in france increased in twenty eighteen by more than seventy percent compared to the previous year closer to home aman who allegedly threatened to carry out a shooting at a jewish community center in ohio has been arrested. A recent survey found that one in five americans and thirty forty percent of young adults do not believe that the nazi regime exterminated six million jews during the holocaust the hudson institute warns that america america is facing a shocking spike anti-semitism and in addition to traditional sources on the extreme right this time it includes left-wing progressives and islamists slama. Sts whatever we think of israel's relationship with the palestinians or any other political issue we must be careful earful to stand diligently in passionately against hatred of the jewish people anti-semitism is one part racial discrimination a sin in which people feel inferior earlier to others can pretend to be superior on the basis of their ethnicity or skin color and it is one part jealousy and resentment as people of the book the jews jews have always been highly literate and have proven themselves successful in nearly every vocation on earth jews constitute two point one percent of the american population and but they have received thirty seven percent of all u._s. Nobel prizes anti-semitism grieves the heart of the one who said to the jewish people in isaiah forty three three four you are precious in my eyes and honored and i love you and who says to the rest of us whether jews or gentiles palestinians or americans he loved us and sent his son as a sacrifice to take away our sins. That's from first john four ten. Whatever people have done they can still do what happened to six million. Jews in the holocaust can happen to jews today. That's why as psalm one twenty two six seven says we must pray for the peace of jerusalem asking that peace be within your walls and security within your towers and it's why we must never forget the past lest it become the future. The director of the auschwitz birkenau state museum recently responded to the global rise of anti-semitism. He said people need to see auschwitz. People need to come not only to cry over all the victims but maybe to feel their own responsibility today. Do you feel your responsibility today. If you like what you heard please leave devote rating and review for the podcast. Thank you for listening to the daily article podcast today.

israel representative france denison israeli government michigan congress united states Rashida toledo auschwitz auschwitz birkenau state museu omar leib hudson institute jerusalem Legislature palestinians europe west bank inc
"The Hyena of Auschwitz" - Irma Grese

Female Criminals

58:52 min | 1 year ago

"The Hyena of Auschwitz" - Irma Grese

"Due to the graphic nature of this woman's crimes listener discretion is advised this episode includes discussions of the brutalities of the holocaust including suicide torture and murder that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children under the age of thirteen in the spring of nineteen forty to a group of female prisoners was allowed outside. The gates of poland's robbins brooke concentration camp to perform work. They were all sick tired underfed and frightened the prisoners were ordered to collect stinging nettles but weren't giving gloves is to protect their hands from the plants bristles soon. Their hands began to bleed but they didn't complain. They were too afraid of their guard. An attractive active blonde haired woman but her outer beauty disguised ugliness underneath one prisoner managed to fill her entire basket with nettles when she presented it. The guard lashed out complaining that the basket still wasn't full. She struck the prisoner on the right side of her head and then again on the left again and again and again. This prisoner didn't get the chance to finish her work. She was too badly beaten to do anything and in ravensbruck concentration camp being too injured to work was essentially a death sentence. These beatings were one of the realities prisoners faced when working under earmuffs gracia the sadistic woman known as the beautiful beast picture murderer a gangster a thief. Did you picture a woman. It didn't think so- society associates men with dangerous crimes but what happens when the perpetrator is female every every wednesday we examined the psychology motivations and atrocities of female criminals. Hi i'm sammy ni- and i'm vanessa richardson and you're listening to female criminals apar- cast original. This is our first of two parts on air mcgrady of vicious concentration camp guard who terrorized mr prisoners at numerous concentration camps during the holocaust she was known as the beautiful beast because of her striking good looks and her particular take your penchant for violence at par cast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and instagram program at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help us to leave a five star review wherever you're listening it really does help we also have merchandise had depar- cast dot com slash merch for more information <music> before we get into the story. Let's talk about the nature of criminality generally to be a criminal. A person has to break the law aw but what happens when the law allows for or even encourages harmful and dangerous behavior ear mcgrady's and many other citizens sins of nazi germany learned that compliance with the national law required them to commit crimes against humanity in discussing earmuffs crimes will look look at the nature of obedience and authority when a person commits an atrocity because they're ordered to do so. They're not breaking the law but they're violent. Behavior is still a crime against humanity decency and morality earmarked grays served as a guard at both robbins brooke concentration camp an auschwitz birkenau while cruelty was the hallmark of many nazi officers gracia distinguished herself from her peers with unusually vicious behavior here she tortured prisoners not because she had to but because she enjoyed it in addition to her cruelty grazer was known for her beauty and her vanity she often lashed out at beautiful prisoners who triggered her jealousy and sexually assaulted those who she found attractive this week will cover earmuffs early life and how the rise of fascist nazi germany led her to feel especially committed to a cause built on torture and murder eventually eventually. She served her country as a guard in robin's brook concentration camp next week. We'll dive into eras tenure. At the infamous auschwitz birkenau concentration asian camp in poland and at bergen belsen germany will also discuss her arrest trial and her impact on the world's perception of women nazis sees and the intersection of sex and violence ear. Mug grazer was born on october seventh nth nineteen twenty-three in the small village of russian germany she had four siblings and her parents were farmers far from wealthy but at at least the work was stable enough that era rarely went hungry even in the midst of the great depression though the great depression began in nineteen twenty nine in the united states within the year. It was a global phenomenon. Germany was particularly hard hit because so much of their wealth was tied up in international trade and unamerican loans with the collapse of the u._s. Economy germany's own currency was severely devalued around the time era was seven her family's struggle struggle to make ends meet and they weren't the only ones her parents were devout. Christians earmuffs father alfred grazer was very strict and often often beat his children when they misbehaved then as is going to take over the psychology from here. Please note vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show. Thank sammy according to a study by duke university's jennifer e lansford children who experienced domestic violence before the age of five are more likely to commit violent crimes as adults and to have other problems with social adjustment. This is more pronounced in women women than in men as an adult earmuffs would become famous for her sadism but as a child era hated violence and confrontation in addition to the domestic violence era experienced at home. She was also frequently bullied by the other girls at her school her younger sister helena said that you're a never had the courage to fight but on the contrary she ran away from the other students the reported date varies but in the early to mid nineteen thirties thirties earmuffs mother bear <noise> av- into gracia discovered that her husband was having an affair with a local pub owners daughter unable to deal with this information mation berretta committed suicide by drinking poisonous hydrochloric acid the loss of her mother at such a young age had a negative impact on your the development and shaped the sadistic person she became as an adult doctor harold koplowitz writing for the child mind institute noted that when a parent commits suicide their child typically lacks healthy coping mechanisms which may lead to greater mental distress as the child reaches adulthood. This is especially pronounced. When the suicidal parent is the mother with her mother gone era moas raised by her abusive father alfred. She chafed under under alfred strict rule. He closely monitored her every coming and going as earmuffs matured dating was off the table so long as her father maintained such a firm grip on her a particular point of contention between father and daughter was adolf hitler alfred was officially a member member of the nazi party but as the party gained more power alfred's reservations about their brutal rhetoric and practices grew meanwhile the impressionable annable earmark was immediately devoted to hitler in nineteen thirty before hitler was elected as the chancellor of germany. The nazi party established the boot deutscher medal or the league of german girls. The bpm was the fina counterpart to the hitler youth and it offered girls between the ages of ten to fourteen gene chances to travel and camp without their parents a rare opportunity for young girls in the early twentieth century. The bpm also provided classes on music zik sewing and other feminine arts beneath the surface. The bpm wasn't just a girls club. It also served as a propaganda vehicle goal the classes they offered were designed to instill young girls with the values of the nazi party including the importance of marriage motherhood and civic service when airmen her younger sister helena learned of the bpm they wanted to enroll immediately by this point ear mo was desperate for any opportunity fraternity to get out from under her father's thumb the promise of a camping trip with the b. M. seemed like a breath of fresh. Air compared to earmuffs stifling homelife alfred forbade them from joining the b. m. but the girls joined anyway earmuffs was already devoted to hitler and the courses she took at b._d._o. A._m. Only cemented cemented her connection to nazi ideology. In nineteen thirty to adolf hitler was elected chancellor of germany after after working as a propagandist for the nazi party. Hitler was an expert at using the power of rhetoric to inspire and influence the public. He ruled that elementary entry schools rewrite their curriculum to one that advanced nazi ideologies in addition enrollment in the b. m. for all german girls ages ten to fourteen eighteen became mandatory in sociologist sergei to houghton paper the rape of the masses he determined that nazi propaganda <hes> incited a powerful unthinking conditioned response in the people of germany inciting a fever a sense of loyalty in many at reached here mo was nine years old when hitler became chancellor and she held a certain distinction within the bpm because she voluntarily enrolled earmuffs felt she'd already proven her her devotion to the fewer in addition. Nazi ideology was also very flattering to her personally. Era was the ideal aryan prototype blonde haired and fair skinned nazism also criticized the decadence of city living and celebrated the working farmers of germany under this new political political system era. Mill was no mere poor farm girl. She was a paragon of nazi virtue. A study by the hong kong university of science and technology gee found that even when people are aware that they're being flattered those people will still be more inclined to think positively of the flatterers as nazi ideology elegy assured earm- of her value. She became even more committed. The more earmark came to identify what the nazi party the more alienated. She was from her father. Even worse around nineteen thirty nine a few years after the death of eras mother alfred remarried to the woman. He'd had his affair affair with this must've felt especially like a betrayal to earmark. She likely blamed her new stepmother for her biological. Mother's suicide while alfred's parenting style contributed to eras growing authoritarianism. He was also her only tether to the world outside of nazism as era was drawn the deeper and deeper into the world of the b. m. She surrounded herself with like minded people. It's impossible to say how eras life would have been different if she hadn't hadn't fallen under the spell of germany's new charismatic leader but one thing is certain earmuffs devotion to hitler coupled with her nationalistic loyalty not would transform her into one of the most infamous nazi war criminals coming up next we'll discuss earmuffs further indoctrination into the nazi party and look at how she came to serve her country as a guard in a concentration camp. What if your doctor didn't know what was wrong with you. Medicine isn't always an exact science. Sometimes it's a guessing game when the world's most renowned experts can't explain what's wrong were left with a medical mystery podcasts newest original medical mysteries brings high stakes storytelling ling and intrepid investigation to the hospital in the first medical procedural for the podcast space medical mysteries follows desperate patients battling modeling mysterious symptoms as determined doctors race against the clock for a diagnosis. How do you cure what you didn't know existed follow medical edical mysteries for free on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts or visit park cast dot com slash medical mysteries to listen now and be sure sure to stick around after the show to hear a clip of the first episode of medical mysteries. You won't want to miss it now. Back to the story in nineteen thirty nine sixteen year old ear mcgraw was swept up in the nationalistic fervor surrounding adolf hitler's rise to power she also became increasingly alienated from her family as she embraced nazi party ideals and surrounded herself with like minded friends as chancellor color of germany adolf hitler advanced authoritarian rhetoric he criticized the old regime the weimar republic for being immoral and decadent and hitler advocated for every german citizen to engage in a practical role in society. These roles were often assigned along gender and racial lines for example hitler believed that family was the beating heart of nazi germany his family values meant that men were encouraged to work outside the home and provide for their families women were encouraged to devote themselves to the three case kenda kushida and cure shot which translates to two children kitchen and church in hitler's ideal hierarchy nazi women were subservient to their husbands. The authorities of the household and the entire family served their governmental authorities at the very top was adolf hitler himself the ultimate authority in germany human beings beings are particularly susceptible to the power of authority. One of the most well known studies of this behavior was the milgram experiment study participants were instructed to ask ask another test subject trivia questions each time. The subject answered a question wrong. The participants were ordered to press a button which they believed administered it a painful shock the more questions the subject answered incorrectly the more powerful and painful. The shocks became in actuality. The test subject act was an actor who only pretended to be shocked but two thirds of the study participants continued to press the button when instructed to do so by an authority figure even when they heard the actor scream and even when they believed the amount of energy they were delivering was lethal the citizens lessons of nazi. Germany proved similarly compliant to their authoritarian regime. When anti jewish pogroms began after hitler was elected the majority of citizens sends obeyed as nazi ideals took hold in germany women were encouraged to get married have babies and focus on raising their children but when germany's economy began to suffer from a lack of workforce hitler changed his messaging women should serve their country by leaving the home and working but they were still limited to low-skilled or traditionally feminine industries like nursing factory work or farming in nineteen thirty eight fourteen year-old world earmuffs dropped out of school. Perhaps she wanted to escape from her father's oppressive household though others including her sister helena have supposed that era emma was still badly bullied at school and wanted to escape from her social torment and it could have been a little bit of both whatever her motivation ear mo- moved doubt of her childhood home and stopped attending school for a little under a year. She worked in a dairy farm then. She found a job working in a shop in the town. One of lucian earmuffs continued to mature into a striking beauty. She told her friends about her dream to be a movie star. While earm- fantasized about making movies she worked toward a more practical goal becoming a nurse in march of nineteen thirty nine at the age of fifteen ear. Mma left her job auto shop girl in lucian to work as an assistant nurse in hoan lucien sanatorium. She trained there for two years. We should note that when hohenlohe sanatorium was founded at the turn of the century day primarily treated to burke ulises patients but by the start of world war two hohenlohe doctors were red teaching medical students how to care for their patients or save their lives instead hoan lucien hosted numerous horrifying medical nicole experiments nazi doctors who utterly believed they belonged to a master race used people who had been deemed degenerate as unwilling participants depends and their tests and procedures during earmuffs training at ho- hen lucien her mentor was dr karl gebhardt a stone fuhrer or unit leader the hospital he rejected the advent of antibiotics and sought to study the spread of infection to support his theories for years he had prisoners from the nearby by robbins brooke concentration camp delivered to hohenlohe sanatorium there gephardt would inflict battlefield style injuries shooting stabbing stabbing and breaking the bones of his unwilling study participants gave hart left the patient untreated for days after inflicting the injury he claimed claimed this was to model the time soldier spent waiting on transportation from the front line to hospitals once the wounds festered gave hardwood then track like the progression of the infections that would often kill the patients on occasion heated minister sulfides to test their efficiency but it wasn't uncommon for him to allow his patients to die untreated today. It's hard to say whether gave heart genuinely believed that he was advancing humanity's understanding of disease or if he just used these experiments as an excuse to torture his patients the records don't specify whether or not you're my personally participated aided in these experiments but given her closeness to gave heart. It's likely that she may have overseen some of his tests. In a paper titled effective torture on the torturer clinical social worker melinda de observed that people who commit torture much like their victims are likely to afterwards suffer from trauma rama and p._t._s._d. In addition may timber shogo of the istanbul center for behaviour research and therapy noted that people who suffer from torture related did p._t._s._d. Are often likely to perpetuate the cycle of violence by committing vicious acts against others down the line for reasons that aren't entirely known era never completed her training as a nurse. One possibility is that earmuffs social status held her back. Even under the new regime mm-hmm hohenlohe sanatorium professors typically gave preferential treatment to wealthier and socially connected students as a mere farmer's daughter airman. Your mom might have lacked the clout to complete her nursing certification. She was forced out of hohenlohe in nineteen forty. One at the age of seventeen she was frustrated straight at the unfairness of it all and the apparent corruption at the whole en- lucien sanatorium a study titled the wisdom of demagogues institutions corruption and support support for authoritarian populists observed that people who suffer due to corruption or perceived corruption especially corruption that stems from the government are more or likely to develop authoritarian attitudes ear mo was already devoted to hitler's vision for germany her growing identification with authoritarian beliefs and the experience at hohenlohe only strengthened her devotion and soon dr gebhardt presented another way for her to serve the country she loved one of his friends worked as a guard at robin's brook concentration camp through the friend gebhardt arranged a job for airmont as a guard by nineteen forty. One the nazi party had already overseen the gassing of over seventy thousand mentally ill and physically disabled people in the spring of nineteen forty. One the holocaust began in earnest as the nazi german government forcibly removed jewish citizens from their homes the government it needed somewhere to put all these displaced people and guards to watch them employment in nazi concentration camps was generally considered to be men's work but some camps were segregated by gender female guards ran the women's sections throughout germany roughly ten percent of all concentration camp guards were women men about two thousand five hundred in total and in march of nineteen forty one seventeen year old era considered the possibility of working as a concentration concentration camp guard in ravensbruck however the camp required guards to be at least eighteen so era would have to wait before she could begin her service <music>. She spent six months working as a machinist on a dairy farm located right outside of ravensbruck during that time ear more likely saw trains loaded did with prisoners arriving at the camp. She may have imagined what her life would be like. As a guard within the cap era learned that concentration camp guards earned about one hundred eighty-five rice marks per month. This was the equivalent of about one thousand three hundred dollars in today's u._s. Currency and at the time was more than double double. The standard wage for low skilled factory work best of all concentration guard work didn't require a formal education or family connections which made did a popular career among low class germans along with the good wages concentration camp guards also held authority the poor farm girl who lacked the right connections to complete her nurse training must have been attracted to a job that would grant her instant social status in the summer of nineteen forty thirty two eighteen year old era enlisted with the s s l z herenton the female division of hitler's personal military force. She underwent a medical examination the nation in order to prove she was healthy enough for concentration camp work and pass a criminal background. Check earmuffs easily passed. Both aspiring prison guards also so had to take a written test. This test didn't just gauge applicants knowledge but also their loyalty to party ideals according to the warfare history network the test included questions like where did adolf hitler right his book mein comp eras lifelong devotion to hitler paid off here as she passed passed all the tests with flying colors with these hurdles cleared earmarked as a finally achieved her new dream. She was a concentration camp camp guard at ravensbruck next. We'll see how earmuffs brutal training and authoritarian beliefs amplified her natural sadistic streak making her unusually violent even for someone working at a camp designed for murder now back to the story in nineteen forty two eighteen year old earmuffs grazer began her tenure as a ravensbruck guard already hardened by her extremist ideology. Geology earmuffs was a violent and natural choice to work in a concentration camp. Ravensbruck was a female only camp located in northern germany about about fifty six miles from berlin. The inmates at ravensbruck were jewish women and a socials nazi. Germany's term for sex workers lesbians homeless unless women and any other women who failed to meet germany's cultural standard criminals and political prisoners were also sent to ravensbruck any woman unfortunate fortunate enough to fit into more than one category say a woman who was both jewish and a social was executed soon after her arrival if she made it to the camp at all only about a quarter of all the prisoners ever sent to robbins burke were jewish robbins brooke was both a work camp and a death camp up prisoners were forced to manufacture german weaponry and uniforms or to perform hard labour like building roads while subsisting on meager rations and prisoners were regularly selected often at random and sent to the gas chambers ravensbruck was also a host to numerous medical experiments reports differ as to how many participants there were but the several dozen women selected for this fate were known in the camp as rabbits about fifty two thousand of the camps one hundred twenty thousand total occupants died during their stay in addition new recruits for the female only off z. Hernan or female guards were sent to ravensbruck to train here in a rare camp run almost exclusively by women off z. hernan learned firsthand and how to engage in cruelty and torture before they were assigned to their permanent positions. Most of the records kept at robin's brook were destroyed after the camp was liberated at the end of world war two as a result what we know of life in ravensbruck comes largely from survivors accounts therefore the timeline can get a bit hazy and it can be hard to separate fact from rumor ear arrived at the concentration camp for the first time in the summer of nineteen forty two when she finally turned eighteen by the time she arrived robbins broke was severely overcrowded over thousand prisoners were housed in barracks designed signed for two hundred fifty with most of the women sleeping on the ground sometimes without blankets era like all of the guards trained at ravensbruck arrive. I have to display of loaded corpse carts and sick and starving prisoners. The skeletal inmates stared at their new guards with dull empty is is it was a striking way to establish what life in robin's brook would really be like after her arrival. Earmuffs immediately entered a training program designed to harden guards and push them to overcome their aversion to harming other human beings. Most humans instinctively resist harming or killing other people people historian s._l._a. Marshall observed that during world war two fewer than one in five soldiers ever fired their guns at another person and follow up studies backed up that observation since that study behavioral psychologists have found that operational conditioning can overcome this instinct linked in simple terms a person can practice killing or harming another person over and over even emulating this experience with realistic human women shaped targets with repetition that person can train themselves to be more violent. These sorts of repetitive training sessions have been integrated into to modern military training exercises and now about ninety percent of soldiers shoot to kill in war more than a fourfold increase <music> to be clear while there were powerful psychological factors that drove earmuffs the brutal acts. She committed as a concentration camp guard. Were not trying to imply hi. That era had no choice in the matter even compared to the other guards earmuffs soon stood out from the crowd for her unusual viciousness in addition while how many concentration camp guards were drafted into their service ear mma signed up voluntarily. She wanted to do this kind of work. In the first i days of training established guards pulled prisoners from the camp and ordered the trainees to beat them. The guards would then note how viciously the new guards would hit hit kick and otherwise harm their victims not only did concentration camp guards brutalized their prisoners but they also maintained order within their own ranks the stronger more successful women would arrange to beat or bully the guards who weren't strong enough or who didn't act cruelly enough ehrmann learned quickly during one of her first days at the camp she stepped in the way of a prisoner and apologized she was brutally punished for showing that small amount onto respect to amir prisoner within days ear minute never show humanities the ravensbruck prisoners not only did she become hardened but she exceeded the brutality of her conditioning. It's likely that you're a trained under theodora bents another female concentration camp guard who became infamous missed for her penchant for violence and sadism bins liked to lash out at her prisoners and beat the women without provocation to make the beatings more severe bins kept vicious attack dogs at the camp and also carried a whip with her at all times no record exists of the relationship shared between been burma but because of their similarly sadistic nature and the fact that both women serve together at the same time in ravensbruck. It's not difficult to imagine at the women may have formed a mentor mentor relationship. The ravensbruck training program typically lasted one to three months depending on how long it took an incoming coming guard to adapt to the concentration camp conditions era graduated from the program after only three weeks as a full guard ermo was able to enjoy luxuries including lush quarters stocked with fine clothing seized from the prisoner's air must soon wore only the highest. This quality tailored jackets along with her signature shined jackboots. She spent hours at the mirror every day ensuring that she looked perfect. Even the inmates at ravensbruck noticed earmuffs striking appearance she was as well known for her cruelty. As for her looks earning the nickname the beautiful awful beast meanwhile the prisoners that earm- oh oversaw worked to the point of collapse and forced to subsist on thin cabbage soup they were subjected to whippings and beatings for any offense and on occasion for no reason at all well beatings were required component of training. They weren't an ordinary part of guards life after they completed their training program. If prisoners broke the rules they were punished but otherwise most guards didn't seeped torment. Their prisoners era was different. She enjoyed beating prisoners for no reason other than existing ear. Most violent tendencies which would have been horrifying outside of the prison allowed to thrive in the harsh concentration camp world around this time she took several lovers sexual liaisons between female off see her renan and mail s._s. Officers were officially forbidden because casual all extra marital sex was incompatible with the nazi ideals of marriage family and child rearing but they were also quite common the orgiastic gassed parties that concentration camp guards through became an open secret among guards and prisoners it may seem especially hypocritical to the prisoners that that the guards would so brutally enforce the rules on their inmates while flagrantly breaking them in their personal lives but the tension didn't seem to bother earmuffs author psychotherapist dr eric arm as how detailed authoritarian traits in his list he included the belief that rules are meant to be followed by other people bowl but broken by the individual authoritarians love rules because they provide an opportunity to punish transgressors but those same authoritarians carrian's often find excuses for why the rules should not be applied to them in defiance of nazi. Germany's emphasis on purity earmuffs slept with numerous male guards and rarely went long without a lover during her year long tenure at robin's brook. It may have been around this time. That era discovered her penchant for sexual sadism according to the d._s._m. Five sexual sadism is the act of finding sexual pleasure in harming a sexual partner. Not all sexual sadists are dangerous in fact many status are able to enact their desires in a consensual and safe setting but when a person enacts these desires fires without their partners consent or without proper safety precautions the sexual sadism is classified as disordered era was notorious glorious for the sexual pleasure she derived from the suffering of others and while she engaged in consensual relationships with fellow s._s. guards it was only a matter of time before earmark pulled her unconsented prisoners into her sexual fetishes those above her certainly noticed her cruelty and and so in march of nineteen forty-three after a year in ravensbruck she received a promotion and transfer to another concentration camp in beer canal poland. This recognition was in eras mind validation for all her hard work and loyalty before taking up her new post earmuffs returned home in nineteen forty three to visit her father alfred and the rest of the family. She wore her full s._s. Uniform and polished boots to shine ehrman knew that her father had only become more critical of nazism during hitler's rule. She had to know that her uniform would agitate him. Perhaps that was the point. She wanted to provoke an argument. She was still a teenager. After all or maybe deep down earmuffs still longed for her father's others approval and thought that showing off her crisp nazi uniform would finally earn his begrudging respect during her visit earmuffs brag to her father father about her new job alfred was horrified and he lashed out alfred told his daughter that if she was going to move forward with this position she could never for return home again. According to some reports alfred also beat earmuffs before she was able to escape shortly after their fight and still nursing in her anger against her father era left her home for the last time it was also the last time she'd see her sister helena as a free woman. She was devastated by the fallout of her fight with her father. Although their relationship it always been tense here must still longed for her father's approval now now that she knew she'd never receive it. Earmuffs put her own family loyalties behind her and tried to focus only on the bright future sure that lay before her ear mcgready was going to auschwitz. Thanks again for tuning into female criminals. We'll we'll be back wednesday. With our second episode on era gaza we'll discuss her atrocities at auschwitz birkenau and how she was finally arrested tried and executed for her crimes. You can find more episodes of female criminals as well as all of our casts other shows on spotify or your favorite podcast directory tori several of you have asked how to help us if you enjoy the show. The best way to help is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see you next time. Female criminals was created by max. Cutler is a production of cutler media <hes> and is part of the podcast network it is produced by max and ron cutler with sound design by russell nash production assistance by ron shapiro and paul moller additional production assistance by maggie admire and freddie beckley. This episode of female criminals was written by angela jorgensen and stars sammy ni- and vanessa asser richardson now that this episode is over. Here's the clip the first episode of the podcast original medical mysteries. It's about joseph merrick a man with severe deformities who was first exhibited at a freak show. Oh as the elephant man follow medical mysteries for free on spotify anywhere you listen to podcasts or visit podcast dot com slash rush medical mysteries to listen now on a cold monday morning in november eighteen eighty four a canvas banner was unfurled over a shop window on white chapel road in london. The crude painting ding showed a humanoid creature with an elephant's trunk rampaging through the jungle. It was monstrous unfathomable it. It was the elephant man half man and half an elephant atop headed showman barked at the doctors and students trailing in to the london hospital right across the street for just two pence they could see the specimen for themselves but ladies indelicate delicate health were advised not to step inside the elephant man's condition could be quite a shock as the man led the curious obvious spectators in he warned them ladies and gentlemen brace yourselves to witness one who is probably the most remarkable human being ever to draw the breath of life and then he pulled back the curtain standing on the small. All stage was a horribly disfigured man covered in folds of drooping lumpy skin. His right arm was twice as big the left ending in a massive finn like hand his feet were oversized flat and wrinkled like an elephants his head was bizarrely distorted and covered in hard tumors a bony mass protruded from his upper lip and buried behind the swollen misshapen brow or a pair of brown eyes gentle bright and unmistakably secondly human imagine sitting across the desk from your doctor. The splashy x rays and our is our clipped up on the wall. The test results are in a manila folder tilted. Just out of your line of sight. Mm-hmm questions are already forming in your mind. Is it serious. What's my chance of recovery. Will my insurance pay for this. Imagine your dr looking you in the eye and saying we don't know when our bodies fail we trust doctors to diagnose the problem but medicine. It wasn't always an exact science. Sometimes it's a guessing game with life or death stakes. This is medical medical mysteries a podcast original. I mali and i'm richard. Every tuesday will look at the strangest real life medical cases in history and the experts who raced against the clock to solve them as we follow these high intensity stories will explore medical research that might solve the puzzle hustle next week in part two will analyze all the evidence and try to find an answer you can find episodes of medical mysteries and all other parkhurst originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts this is our first episode on joseph carey merrick who became well all known as the elephant man in the eighteen eighties this week will explore the development of merrick's baffling condition and his doctors attempts attempts to diagnose it next week we'll look at his improbable rise to fame in london high society and the research that might have finally explained in his illness today according to the c._d._c. about three percent of all newborns born with congenital disorders commonly known as birth defects this can include anything from cleft palates to heart malformations to extra fingers toes congenital disorders were just as common in the late nineteenth century as they are today but the elephant man symptoms were more extreme than anything his doctors had ever seen from the age of five joseph merrick began to exhibit strange bony growths on his face and skull his feet and right arm grew out of proportion to the rest of his body and his spine was curved by severe scoliosis the skin all over his body took on a rough lumpy texture and folds of loose overgrown skin hung down from his head back and chest just the condition progressed over the course of his life and by the time he reached adulthood his symptoms were so shocking that he couldn't leave the house without without causing a panic on the streets during joseph's lifetime very little was known about human genetics but his unique set of symptoms helped researchers connect the dots between a few disorders that weren't thought to have an underlying cause for the next two episodes will look at the evolving all the theories about what caused his condition was it caused by trauma. His mother suffered while he was in the womb. Was it a combination of skin disorders known as dermatologists and pecci dermott acela and if so how do his bone deformities fit into the picture finally will look at genetic genetic research from later decades that might explain the root of his symptoms but first. Let's start with the theory. That joseph himself accepted as the truth maternal impression for this. We have to go back to the very beginning in may of eighteen sixty sixty two womb wells travelling menagerie pass through leicester. England menagerie was a collection of exotic animals drafts leopards zebras lions and elephants mary jane merrick at twenty five year old. Sunday schoolteacher was in the crowd watching the animals prey down the street read. She was six months pregnant with her first child and so far the pregnancy had gone smoothly. She kept a hand on her belly dreaming of all the things they would do and see together once her child was born. Suddenly the crowd swelled forward and mary was pushed into the road. She fell right in the path of the elephants. She looked up to see a pair of thick wrinkled feet stomping torture. She scrambled out of the way just in time. As the elephants brushed past she caught her breath and checked herself her injuries. She and her unborn child had made it out just just fine three months later on august fifth eighteen sixty two. Mary gave birth to a perfectly cle- healthy baby boy. They named him joseph after his father baby. Joseph was in fine health for the first few years of his life. His first i medical scared didn't come until age five when he tripped and fell badly injuring his left hip the wound became infected before it could he'll inflaming inflaming the hip bone and causing permanent damage to the joint this made it difficult and painful for the young boy to move for the rest of his life. Joseph merrick would never be able to walk properly. He could only shuffle across the playground with his cane while the other children ran and played to make matters worse while his hip injury was still barely healing. Mary noticed something strange happening to her son's face. A swollen lump was growing out of his upper lip. At first it was only slightly raised as if he'd fallen down and landed on his face nothing to be too concerned concerned about but as the months progressed it grew into a tumor that ran across his right cheek pressing his upper lip outwards gradually salihi other symptoms started to develop his skin especially on his back and chest became loose and rough his right arm grew out of proportion as did his feet which were turning into thick shapeless stumps and soon the hard lump of flesh on his lip was several inches long resembling rather unfortunately in elephants trunk. Mary's mind went back to the parade. She'd witnessed while pregnant. The elephant encounter must have scared her so badly. It affected the baby in her womb. Joseph was marked from before birth by the memory of his mother's fear as bizarre as it sounds. This was actually a common medical theory at the time same maternal impression or the idea that a mother's thoughts and emotions could affect a developing fetus gained popularity in the middle ages. It was believed that if a woman was particularly sad during pregnancy the child might be born with a predisposition towards depression or other mental illnesses or if a mother was traumatized by a certain animal the baby would be born with resemblance to that animal. This idea was based in folklore more than biology by the late nineteenth century. The theory was already falling out of favor as doctors gained a better understanding of genetics but while there's no evidence that specific thoughts our fears like a run in with a circus elephant can cause birth defects research. It does suggest that a mother's lifestyle diet and stress levels can impact a fetus's development. The body stress response is regulated by the corticotropin-releasing atropine releasing hormone or c. r. h. This hormone is secreted by the hypothalamus. The part of the brain that regulates most bodily functions during pregnancy cr h is also produced by the placenta which can lead to highly elevated levels of stress hormones in the bloodstream and nineteen ninety-six study by developmental psychologist janet a._d._p. Etro founded in mothers who reported high levels of stress ask or depression their fetuses exhibited higher heart rates and were less responsive to external stimuli. Both of these factors are associated with an increased risk of anxiety and emotional regulation problems in childhood. This suggests that a mother can in a sense pass on anxiety the order oppression to their child exposure to stress hormones can also impact oregon development according to a two thousand eight study in developmental cycle michael biology quote during the last trimester of pregnancy exposure to the stress hormone cortisol is critical for the maturation of the cardiovascular killer system the pulmonary system renal systems and overall fetal growth however there isn't sufficient evidence linking maternal stress grass to more severe congenital disorders like the symptoms five year old. Joseph merrick was exhibiting. It's also unlikely that one brief stressful is full of event like a sudden fall during a parade would affect hormone levels enough to harm a developing fetus but in the eighteen sixties maternal attornal impression due to the elephant encounter was the best explanation anyone could offer and five year old. Joseph seemed to accept it. He he grew into a lonely shy child who spent most of his time reading marion encouraged his love of learning as a sunday schoolteacher herself. She made sure or her son's health. Issues didn't keep him out of class. The family's second child william was born without any medical issues to speak of it appeared appeared that whatever was wrong with joseph at least it didn't run in the family but in eighteen sixty seven the same year. Joseph started showing showing his symptoms. Mary gave birth to their third child. A daughter named marion records indicate that she was disabled from birth but the exact nature of her disability isn't clear congenital disorders are often caused by hereditary genetic problems even if both parents appear perfectly really healthy they still might be carrying genetic mutations that can be passed down to their children. If joseph and marianne both had similar symptoms it's possible that they both inherited the same mutation but it's also possible that the two children's health problems were unrelated. There are many factors that can cause congenital disorders and we don't know enough about marion's disability to suggest that it had anything in common with joseph's in spite of his ever worsening health problems joseph's early childhood was mostly happy then in eighteen seventy three another health related tragedy struck. The merrick family joseph's mother. Mary suddenly fell ill and died from bronchial pneumonia and it was devastating for ten year old joseph. It apparently wasn't as devastating for joseph senior because within two years of his wife's death he had remarried to the families landlady emma would until emma was a widow with two daughters of of her own and the new stepsisters may joseph's young life miserable by this point. Joseph's afflictions had progressed from mildly unusual to downright disturbing the other children never let him forget it. The like tumor on his mouth and cheek had grown considerably making it increasingly difficult for him to speak to make matters worse. Another growth was forming on his forehead and sacks of spongy skin. Now hung down from the back of his skull a foul odor emanated from the skin growths no matter how often he bathed twelve year old joseph was always the odd one out whether it was at home or at school to add injury to insult his hip problems has made it impossible for him to run away from the bullies just a year after his father's remarriage. Joseph left school at the customary age of thirteen at the insistence of his stepmother. He got a job at a cigar factory to do his part in supporting the family. This job was fine <unk>. At first it didn't require much walking and he didn't have to interface with the public but by the time he was fifteen his right handed grown so large and heavy that it was impossible for him to roll cigars. He had no choice but to leave his job. However unemployment wasn't an option. The family's finances were tight and joseph stepmother. Emma didn't have any sympathy for his disability more than once. Eh set his plate down for dinner with a sharp remark that it was more food than he had earned in a misguided attempt to keep the peace joseph's father put him to work the family shop in a role he thought would be well suited to the boy's condition door to door sales. Y joseph senior thought his disabled shockingly deformed son would find success as a traveling salesman is a mystery for another day but undaunted by the challenge ahead fifteen year old joseph hobbled through the city lugging his father's wears in one hand and his walking cane in the other he knocked on the door of each residents knowing that any unsuspecting housewife who answered with simply scream and slam the door in his is face. If a male homeowner answered the door there was a better chance they might stand and gawk instead of immediately fleeing in fear when this happened joseph launched into his best sales pitch but because affleck growth on his lip it was nearly impossible for anyone to understand what he was saying as he limped through the streets a crowd of spectators would gather around staring whispering. He tried to persevere after all he was used to being teased for his appearance but it was impossible to sell his goods when he was constantly mobbed on the streets joseph was beaten severely by his father when he came home without meeting his daily sales quota by age sixteen gene he stopped coming home at all spending whatever money he made on food and cheap lodging houses his only comfort was a small painted needed portrait of his mother which he carried with him everywhere she had always encouraged him to be his best even in spite of his condition if she was watching over him there was nothing he couldn't overcome but positive thinking couldn't change reality living on his own was is unsustainable on the monday after christmas in eighteen seventy nine seventeen year old joseph packed his bags and dragged himself through the iron in gates of the leicester union workhouse in an effort to combat poverty. The british government set up work houses where unemployed or infirm citizens could perform menial labor for room and board to encourage the poor to find their own jobs cbs instead of relying on the government. The conditions in the work houses were so horrifying that only the most desperate would resort to applying joseph. Joseph was given a uniform and lead through the drabs stone corridors to his dormitory where he'd share a room with as many men as they could physically fit inside side every morning at six a._m. He was woken up for a breakfast of bread and gruel. He'd worked from seven in the morning to six at night. Chopping wood or unraveling old pieces of rope after dinner he went back to the dorms and sat down to sleep because of the heavy masses of flesh growing from the back of his skull lying down strained his neck and made it difficult to breathe. He had to sleep sleep sitting up with his knees pulled up to his chest. His arms wrapped around his legs and his head resting forward on his knees. Uh the next morning joseph wake up from a very uncomfortable night of sleep and get ready for another day of menial work. This was his daily routine for a soul crushing four years. The only bright spot came in eighteen eighty two about halfway through his stay. The elephant in trunk tumor on his lip had grown to be eight or nine inches long and he could no longer move his mouth enough to chew so he was taken to the infirmary. The surgeons had no useful advice on what was causing joseph's condition or how to cure it but they were able to remove nearly four ounces of flesh from his upper lip just enough that he was able to open and close his mouth again and then it was back to the workhouse for an intelligent agent educated young man like joseph being locked away for a lifetime of labor was a depressing prospect. He wanted to see the world he wanted to live life but was there to do if he couldn't walk or talk or roam the streets without causing panic the answer came came from a newspaper advertisement sam tors gaiety palace varieties the most buzz worthy musical in leicester. Joseph knew the place well it. It was just around the corner from his childhood home for his next big spectacle sam tour was looking for curiosity's novelties as some would say freaks of nature. Joseph merrick had found the perfect career coming up. The elephant man's steps into the limelight.

Germany joseph carey merrick adolf hitler alfred grazer robin Germany nazi party ravensbruck spotify mary helena sammy ni birkenau facebook murder poland hitler chancellor emma
Ep 311 | When Even Randomization Fails You | Guest: Josh Hammer

The News & Why It Matters

39:31 min | 2 years ago

Ep 311 | When Even Randomization Fails You | Guest: Josh Hammer

"Welcome to the news and why it matters. I am Sara Gonzalez, we were so happy to be joined by special guest. He's back the daily wire zone Josh hammer. Yeah. Well, I mean, I was hostess I was going to ask you to step it up a little bit more so happy, you're here, sue, what's the top story tonight. I promise to be not quite as good as before. That's my promise to think that's the wrong way to do it. Maybe we'll see we have twenty candidates who actually made the debates. They're split into two nights. The Democrats even screwed up that process and we'll go over that. Okay. And Pat gray from Packer unleashed pony making society, a better place to live good. I'm pretty excited. I can't wait to hear about that. All right. Josh AO. See has new video out, she's going. She's comparing the elite Lillian detention camps the border to rolled war to Nazi-era concentration camps, not a good luck. So we'll we'll break that down. I don't know how you don't see them. Obviously, we've got a lot to get into. I want to thank our sponsor relief factor. So relieffactor has made it to say, say tolerable ish the around Glen, west tolerable, s that's in the realm of tolerable. He's actually in at the ranch this week. And so he is doing physical work, which I think is really me, his minions that do most of the work forum, but occasionally has to walk outside and yell at them, or whatever he does just that is enough to cause Glenn. Lots of pain, and I know he used to do this all the time, east real problems with, and he's been taking relief factor, feeling a lot better able to go out and scream at minions almost all day long. I mean who doesn't want that? So if you are one of many who you know, you haven't been able to scream at your minions. You definitely want to try out really factor. It's a hundred percent drug-free created by doctors. It's four key ingredients that fight the inflammation in your body, which, you know, is usually that's what's causing your pain. So oftentimes you don't need big. Pharma to solve your problem for you seventy percent of the people who buy their three week quick start pack go onto keep ordering more. It's working for the majority of people can work for you. If you're in pain, you can go to relief factor dot com get that three week quickstart pack for nineteen ninety five the odds are in your favor. And if not, you know, it's nineteen ninety-five I think that it's worth it to see if you can get out of pain, relief factor dot com or you can call eight hundred five hundred eight three eight four. All right. Stew, breaking down the twenty twenty democratic debates, I get a little despondent about the key sort of the current state of the Republican party. And then you look at the Democratic Party feeling I actually a little bit better. They. This is a maze ING. So last time, of course you remember they were famously hacked, and in that hacking process, we found out that there's a bunch of people in the DNC that we're not so big fans of Bernie Sanders, maybe trying to the scales, a little bit towards Hillary imagine she would have lost anyway. But still that was kind of the one of the takeaways, especially for activists. They were pissed off about that. So this time they wanted to make sure this is a completely free process. Like we are our hands are off it just absolutely ran. You get sixty five thousand individual donors urine. You get one percent in the polls year. And we, we swear. So of course, they made these these, these standard solo that twenty people the maximum, they were going to allow made it into the debates. They had to split it over two nights. Now, of course, you remember this from the Republican 2016 campaign where they had sort of the big boy table, the adult table in the kitchen table was kind of the set of, of that, where you had people who were really competitive for the nomination and then that secondary table of people who were there, trying to like, get from the minor to the major leagues. Well, look wasn't exactly. Great. Plus, you're kinda saying then you have to make a choice if you're the DNC, and once again, what they wanted to make sure everyone knew this was completely random this time so they decided to actually kind of randomly pull the, the candidates out of a hat, basically, and try to divide them over the two nights. Of course that did not work out. Well because you now have they're hoping to get a split of the major candidates. You get a few on one night, a few on the other didn't really happen. Here's your breakdown, and this is a June twenty six and twenty seven the to Bates, the first one is going to have a Lisbeth Warren, who the only candidate in the top five of polls that made this debate. So all the other four of five went the other way. So you got Elizabeth Warren. Beddoe Aurore Cory Booker, Julio Castro Chelsea Gabbard, Jay Inslee Amy klobuchar Bill de Blasios, John Delaney and Tim Ryan. I know a lot of names that people are connecting deeply to in that field. It's not a good one. So that, you know, it's an interesting kind of breakdown. There is people going to bother watching that first one. Here's the second one. This is. Where all the big names come into play. Got Joe Biden. Bernie sanders. Of course, the top two then Buddha judge and comma Harris than Jila brand. Michael Bennett Marianne Williamson, Eric swale. Well, Andrea and John Hickenlooper hell of a crew together here. So this divide kind of brings up a lot of interesting situations because this matters, right? Like the news and white matters it matters because it matters, who the opponent is this race is going to be really important. And you know who's going to win this race? This is like if your team is going to Super Bowl. You're watching the other conference championship game like you wanna know. So here's who does this actually help. I think it helps someone like a Beddoe Aurore who's floundered so far in the polls, he will not have to deal with sort of the circus of a Bernie Sanders versus Joe Biden matchup. He's only going to have Elizabeth Warren. So these sort of secondary people who've been bubbling up in that let's say, six to eight in the polls sort of range have a chance to actually make name for themselves where if they were below Biden Sanders might not be the case. Amy klobuchar are sort of same story. I think she kind of sits there as someone who has a lot of potential. She's supposed to be a good debater. She comes from. She has a prosecutor background. So we kind of think that she might do well here, she's a very good electoral history. Probably the best out of any candidate field as far as like how well she's performed an elections. So she'll have a chance to do something, and Cory Booker, I think it helps Cory Booker in a couple of ways the same way as Amy closure will know she's kind of off that main stage secondarily, like Booker is particularly awful when he feels like he has to really go for it. You know. And like if he's trying to overwhelm outshine Biden Sanders fighting. I mean, there could easily be Spartacus moment on in that one. So I think that was pretty rough. Who does it hurt? I think it hurt someone like people to judge who now remember America doesn't know who this guy is you're listening. You're watching the blaze you're on the daily wire people who to judges, but America as a whole don't know. They don't know what this guy is. He's a complete unknown to them. Third of democratic voters. Have never heard his name. That's how. We're this guy is. So how is he going to shine through as the mayor of south bend, Indiana? In this field, comma, Harris sort of the same thing she sort of you put her in that top tier. She certainly in the top five of polling, but now behind a Sanders fight with, with a with a Biden, you know, as he going to be she going to be able to kind of make a noise, she's again, though another one that's supposed to be very good at debating from a prosecutor background Jila brand who cannot get a break. I mean look, I think she's terrible. But like this is she there has been no bigger disaster in this democratic campaign Cureton gillibrand, who continually pulls zero percents behind people like injury and Marianne Williamson, it's incredible. She's been, you know, she's just been a total disaster. The other one I would bring up here is build the Blasios. And I think this one is a little bit different in that diplomacy. Oh, actually would be would benefit, I think from being in the middle of the fight being able to get in between take on a Biden or you know, a Sanders. I think like you have come on commie. Yeah. Yeah. It's fun. It is fun to watch. But, you know, he's a loud mouth. He's a New Yorker. He's the guy that wants to fight, and like he wants to shine. Maybe he'll be able to do that. But again, is he gonna yell at Elizabeth Warren? That's a different look than being able to Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden and last, I think the Elizabeth Warren, what is the most interesting part of this? I love to get your thoughts on whether this helps or hurts because you could say it helps she doesn't have to fight with Biden. She doesn't have to Bernie. She's the only front runner here. She's kind of loan. However, she also, you know, are people going to care about this? I debate I mean is like it does feel like the kitty table debate to. She just looked like the, the front runner of the kitty table, which is a bad look for her as she's kinda coming on. She's been pulling very strongly. It kind of comes at the, the, the end you look at this, and you say, we really have no freaking idea, how this is going to come out of the fact that brought likely bite, and Bernie will play against each other, and there will be a mess most likely will be very, little debating a little five minute speeches, you know it's not going. This is a terrible way of deciding presidential nomination and to the democratic I think credit, they made the standards much more difficult for the next set after this, first couple of debates. So this field, should get smaller relatively quickly. It probably should help lose it with Warren. But she's so awful. She's just so bad. It's really bad as a campaign, or as a human pain. I, I mean, I'm not a judge. You know, I'm just going to burn the fires of hell. You're not. But I'm not I don't wanna judge don't mistake. So I think she'll probably blow it. But, you know, here she is with all the Lilliputians she should dominate that debate. And I bet she doesn't Joshua. Liz Warren is less likable than general warts. Honestly being honest. She yourself this big populous figure I read some article yesterday. She's got this big student debt loan forgiveness plan. I'm gonna to the exact numbers, but it was roughly two-thirds of the benefits of plan go to the top forty percent of the income bracket. So she's not exactly this kind of hard charging, like class warfare. She, she's, she's a Boston alita. She was a Harvard Law School, professor. So I think he's also a fraud. And what you're getting, I've had I look at that feel the candidates, one of my first takeaways is this for a living. I forgot the Tim Ryan was. Running for president. I remember Tim Ryan challenged Nancy Pelosi speakership at the years ago like allegedly moderate kind of Ohio, rust rustbelt kind of like forgotten Reagan Catholic democrat, if you will. But I got who's running for president? So they've got now this field down quickly. I think Warren, we'll probably benefit from being the only notable person that first day I could see someone on that second day with all the heavy hitters kind of, like one of the lesser names, like, like actually, like being able to like take a cheap cheap shot at jab here by Bernie. I could see someone like maybe swale well doing it. I'm not really. Sure. What? I'm not really. Sure, what that looks like. But it's, it's possible is how pissed are we the wean missiles, not in the link. Either night. It's just not there, Horowitz. I know I wanted to get we were hoping to get. I wonder how many donors he got to never never got that number. It's funny. Wait mess him. He he's the mayor of Miramar Florida and you might say that doesn't sound like a big presidential candidate. It's bigger than south than that is important to note, somehow Pete, as is on the stage. I think it's racism by the Democrats. They don't want black guy on stage. Well, Right. They're just uncovered a before we get to my little pony, which I'm so excited about let's take a quick break. We'll be back. I feel like it's not the my little pony that I grew up with. I up with that might be. Pass. What do you have to tell us about my little pony there helping better than? Yes. And they are teaching our children about lesbians. And I think that's uppermost in Oliver minds, isn't it? I set my priority at all right? Kids, sit down. Watch your cartoon and learn about homosexuality because that's where I want you to learn it. The writer of the episode the last crusade has put in aunt holiday, an anti loft and they're apparently to characters who are with each other. They're, they're lesbian ponies. And do we know how it's portrayed in the show that have not ear? They're gonna find out all of that this week as the week progresses in. There was little debate about it on Twitter like, oh, stop it. That's another right wing conspiracy thing. So the writer cleared it up he replied to these messages. They are lesbians. Okay. Okay. Well, thank you. Good. Good. Because I. Ending. It is, as a zoologist, Pat. Are there lesbian ponies in the real sexual game in game male a male male ponies? But there are there are no lesbian. There are gay animals or Guinness. Gaidar. But are there are there lesbian m? No, there aren't there aren't. No. Okay. Trying to say that as well take that rake to the zoo. Yeah. He's he says diversity and representation or important for kids, for so many reasons and it's my first priority on everything. I work on my first priority for my kids, is please leave all sexuality out of cartoons. Is that too much to ask? I don't do have we ever seen episode where the ponies or heterosexual are having sex of any kind of my little pony. Think so, so why do we have to introduce Lisbon ISM into a show? That's not about sexuality, just let them be kids get you just let them be kids. And then when it comes time to explain lesbians or hetero 's all do that. You for everyone or just for your kids thinking about doing. Everyone comes to anybody better know you'll Miller. It'll be interesting journey. I shake it over. I'll just be the birds and the bees are. That's all we just recently saw this to with the cartoon Arthur that they're against the teacher. The teacher had a gay wedding. And so he walked down with his rat boyfriend should be spouse. And then married, the, the, the rats, did they wink at the camera and tell you like that was like, hey, this is what's happening case parents. You were wondering. Yes. Seeing is happening within Alabama got criticized for not airing it exactly public television network didn't air it. Aired the episode where Tom and Jerry hooked up either. Which was that was. I mean, the fact that they went. The cut it that one. It is an important an important clarification that you made. And that the Alabama public television network made as well. That this isn't a homophobic stance. We're not saying homophobic against it. It's just that's inappropriate and something to leave for families to have the conversation when they feel like it's the appropriate. You litter for your old kids before you're old kids. Right. This is the problem, right? Because if you leave it to the parents, they get results, they don't like parents might say, that's not good. Or you know, it's the same thing that's happened with the environment. I mean, that's the to me like one of the worst ones you see because it's so feel good. There's less controversy about it. I mean, got how many frigging episodes of cartoons for little kids, that you see about recycling? It's like and like, you know, we go through the whole recycling thing. I did a whole episode on that at one point. But like the bottom line is, like, that's, that's an easy one. Right. Like that's think of it is harmless. And lot of times it is. But it's like it's constant they're constantly berating you with these left-wing opinions, and when. In you. It's all conspiracy theory of the right until you ask them and say, like we got into this business to change the world. Of course it's about saving. The environment is a good example of that. They have now admitted. Oh, yeah. We're, we're left wing. Sure. We've been preaching that stuff to your kids, the whole time. This is nine hundred seventy and it seems to be they did say Bernie. Yeah. They are that it said that. JK Rollings said that Dumbledore was gave again. Right. It's more. Here's what I see this. The traditional conservative concern is the government is going to encroach on the nuclear family and the church and you're putting your private space and try to reach your children. That is still absolutely concern. But I think we're increasingly seeing that it's also prided institutions that are also culturally hegemonic as a term, I would use in such a way if the media is the academy, it's Hollywood they are all kind of banning together because a fortune five hundred the ivory tower and the in the purpose oriented, Hollywood are all kind of coming around to spew this same leftist agenda, homosexuality, is near the top of that agenda. And this is, as you Said, Zare is not about homophobia. This is about who is responsible for raising your children in here. The government is in my mind indistinguishable from what I just called, these private culturally, hegemonic actors because pushing the same thing. And the Hollywood eventually admit it, right. Like it comes down at the end like any ask them about influence like one of the things they'll say is the change in smoking, right? Like they stopped smoking in movies and stuff. Trying to make it cool. And when you ask about something like that, that's not controversial. They'll absolutely come out at an omit. Yes. This is what we're trying to trying to influence. We don't want people to think this school, it's the same thing everywhere else, and they will admit it when you ask them and press them on it, Josh AFC. Yeah. Well, she does it again. She has it a lot. It seems days. So she's got new video out, Sarah, where she is talking about how the legal Elian detention facilities are border are equivalent to concentration camps in Nazi Germany. There's really no other way to take away. What you said other than that, where to begin. Let's go ahead and play that for the viewers before we get into the conversation states is running concentration camps on our southern border and is. Exactly what they are. They're concentration camps and. It doesn't bother you like I don't like. Like like I like what we can have. Okay, whatever I'm gonna tell people that are concerned enough with humanity to say that we should not that never again something and that. The fact that concentration camps are now in institutionalized practice in the home of the free is extraordinarily disturbing. Yes, you know what I generally try not to make it personal, but I'm gonna make this personal. Okay. Hi, I'm Jewish. I had a relative is you'll spend read who passed away at the age of ninety six two months ago, he was sent with entire family to Birkenau when he was a teenager his siblings and his father were immediately murdered upon arriving there. He was separated from his mother. He got outta Birkenau went to Italy randomly found. His mother by pure happens after the war went Israel, and eventually settled in Brooklyn where he lived for decades. Religious observant Jews entire life, just passed away two months ago. Nazi Germany was uniquely evil. It is the world's most brutally systemically executed, genocide against a minority already citizen population, by the way, that is one thing that is incredibly different here. Let's, let's, let's hold aside for a second fact that we're talking mass murder versus just detention to wait for your silent hearing. Okay. Jews were citizens. Their polish citizens on Gary and citizens, German citizens, etc. Does that as a huge distinction right off the bat living in their own country? On their own homes. Okay. It is just beyond defensive and like I'm not trying to play the victim here, but as a Jew supports border security and supports know immigration, but illegal immigration. These are not the same thing, and it is just ridiculous. How those on the left repeatedly invoke hall cost imagery, to describe ice describe CB p described immigration Foresman, Cory Booker, just if you go have the exact same thing. He was talking about how Hondurans Salvadorans who are fleeing up to our border are quivalent to how infamous infamously FDR turned around a ship of Jews fleeing the holocaust. I think it was in Miami. Florida miami. He's turned him around. They all went back to their death. Okay. Asylum law, under the United States is literally meant to protect exactly the kind of people that have DR turned around religiously at persecuted minority, same thing with the Coptic Christians in Egypt, who are being slaughtered by radicals on their same thing with the ZD's in Iraq, who were slaughtered by. That is to asylum law is meant to protect it is not the same thing as people fleeing economic hardship. Okay. Which was which the overlay majority of this current legal immigration way this, but for do this is just despicable. It's despicable. It's, it's shameful. It's gross. I'm not trying to get my blood pressure up, but it's happening naturally. I mean like this is not okay. And like it's not okay to talk about contemporary public policy debates that have nothing to do with the bloodiest, holocaust, and genocide ever with that. So you have every right to be pissed off. I'm pissed and I'm not Jewish. But how do you feel about remake creating the land? That's what shirts. The backward message. Yeah. She used a good opportunity on the platform to attention to that important that goodness is how often have we talked about? I know I've seen the bumper sticker on your car. Donau yet. And you have it backwards just in case, someone's looking at which is surprised me that she did the same thing. Yeah. I wanna I do wanna get get into this little bit more me treating lint. Yes. Also AOC's comments and I have a couple additional questions for you, Josh. But I wanna get to it in overtime 'cause I wanna make sure that we have enough time to do that. Let's take a quick break. We'll be back on. Told her. Part before we go. Wanna remind everyone about the mercury one museum that is coming one are the dates to it's the end of this month. Yes, it's the end of this month till July seventh is here in the studio. It's gonna as a lot of really amazing stuff from history from current stuff going on around the world right now as well. You can go get tickets at mercuryone dot org. I know Jeffy and I are doing a tour together in which we will discuss his heart attack his surviving tornado. We will throw things at him. There's a lot of great parts of that tour interested in that, but Glenn has tours. David Barton has tours. I know there's a lot of really cool stuff going on with. So make sure to go to mercury one dot org and overtime coming up. We're not done with the conversation. You wanna make sure to go to blaze TV to catch that you also at blaze, TV dot com. You also get other awesome shows like Pat gray unleashed. The. So sixty eight central seven to nine mornings I filled in for you. I don't know how you do it. It's early early. I'm just mad the rest of the day. Do. Next. Up next. Enjoy bonus overtime content from the news in wide matters. Available exclusively for podcast listeners, and blaze TV subscribers not a subscriber. Start your free trial, at least TV dot com. Getting back to a OC Conon. I struggle with this because while I do think she is actually very stupid. I wonder if the comments are not intentional to create, you know, this confusion between two things that she knows is not the same. But she would like everyone else to think it's the same. Do you which one do you think it is? You think she's truly just clueless. Or do you think it's some sort of intentional with probably any other person other than a? Oh, see, I would say you're probably smart enough to know. The difference here with her with her. I genuinely don't know. I mean like I'm not in, like the Donald Trump tweeting like low, I q individual game but she's just legitimately not a smart person. I actually have no idea like, what her history courses consisted of. I have no idea. Most people, I think Cory Booker, when he compared like, what was going Cory Booker went to, like, yell loss was, I gonna for Rhodes scholar. Okay. Cory Booker knows better, generally, don't know. She get a mask. Economics BU. Yeah. It was an economics and what foreign relations shouldn't be as dump. She is. I feel like you know, she graduate I feel like the people at Boston University, just like all the buildings downs we give up leave empty pit here of steaming buildings. I feel like with her. I think she thinks. I'm reading into her mind a little bit. But I think she thinks she's being intentionally brave. I think she thinks she's doing that. She knows it's going to piss people off, I think, but she thinks it's just like the brave thing to do, like it's like telling this uncomfortable truth that no one else wants to admit, and like, you know, because she's constantly surrounded by people who just reinforce her and you look at the comments on there, there's very little pushback on anything that she's saying, I think she's in a look. And look I can actually understand it from her perspective. She's obviously, a dunce that was working as a bartender, two years ago, and that was running the Democratic Party. So I would be pretty confident with what I was doing too. I can understand how this happened but I think that's the cause of it. I, I don't think she is like you know what I'm going to calculate and piss off all these Republicans today. I think she's just like I'm the only one who will tell the truth. I may oh, see I wrote I ruled the world, right? And he hears thing. I'm not gonna call ASEAN anti Semite, but she does pal around keenly apologizes for what she had to. Leibman Ilan Omar, if I'm a stake in either expressly supports media against Israel releases like ambivalent at the at the best towards it. So she approaches anti semitic public policy stances. I'm not gonna call an anti Semite right now. But suffice to say this historically, equivalent situation for a non Jewish population. Let's say I don't know like me like a Muslim population. I don't think she would be doing. Yeah. Pat, it's interesting to me that, you know, obviously, we are all xenophobic or racist. Our own. President is literally Hitler, he's taking these people into concentration camps yet. They're still coming. But interesting. Yeah. You would think that they'd be running the other direction, yet, they're still trying to get here. Artsy was a great point. I mean they obviously must be at some level, preferring. What they're getting here to what they had right? Like there's a fundamental choice they're making. And it's like the stuff isn't been publicized. Well, people know that you're, you're walking right into the concentration camp would call it. And they're just like. Yeah. Like, let's, let's go do that, if I remember my history. Right. That's not the case in these past conflicts. This is they very much did not wanna go there and shows. How ridiculous claim is we've talked about in the past how we thought when Trump got into office that the illegal immigrant entrances would would lesson. But eventually you're going to have to actually build the wall or can't be just talked for a while. Tough talk will work and it did. But it's not working anymore. But now he's starting the really tough talk again, by saying he's going to deport millions of people starting next week. So we'll see what happens then if that kind of reduces the flow because if I'm coming here from seventeen hundred miles away, and I think you're just going to turn around and deport me back to where I came from may not make the effort. So maybe this will have an impact. We'll see all right? While Josh while you're here, we need to we need to utilize your big brain while you're here and talk about the double jeopardy rolling. That's Goethe's just recently, put out so fascinating case out yesterday. Gamble, the United States, the question presented here with spec to the double jeopardy clause and the fifth amendment's and the actual language of the clause, basically says you can't be tried twice for the same offense from from legal standpoint. It's the word of fence that is at issue here. So. About is, is a fence the actual criminal conduct or as offense how one sovereign entity in its criminal code defines. What is proscribed or, and band? So for instance, for one hundred seventy years in US case law, there's been what's known as the dual sovereignty exception to the double jeopardy clause, and what that means in plain English is that the federal government and the state and state government can each prosecute you for what looks like a similar offense. But because in our system, federalism, the states and the federal government, both retain their own spheres of sovereignty that does not violate the double jeopardy clause. So, yes, they really interesting breakdown to seven to split. They basically say that we were not wrong hundred seventy years that this exception is an exception because fence is not just the conduct. It's how the actual sovereign entity defines, the offence under criminal code Justice, Alito very, very, very law and order, kind of conservative writes, the opinion for the court, Clarence Thomas, writes, a fascinating concurrence, strains. Bloodstreams concur in footnote, five questions. Usually Premacy like everything. I've read about for the past five years, like I was just like giddy every in that thing to centers just as Ginsburg and Justice, Gorsuch. Really, really interesting split, Ginsburg, basically rights typical kind of pro criminal defendant, descent. Gorsuch, though, has a very intellectually compelling. I would say dissents he it's not frivolous. I mean, conservatives, you need to take it seriously, citing a lot of Blackstone and kind of, like seventeen hundreds English case law. I think probably has the better the argument, but I'm not solely convinced. My rule of thumb is that Clarence Thomas gets a ninety five percent rebuttal presumption of correctness on constitutional issue. He messes up. But it's, it's really rare. But fascinating case great split courses continues to himself as more libertarian leaning conservative Alito odor. Classic law and order kind of tough on criminal kind of conservative Thomas somewhere in the middle from legal nerd standpoint. Sarah great stuff, too. I think. It's really fascinating. Because I mean I. When you think of just generally the concept of double jeopardy if you do something wrong, the idea that you can get tried into places for it seems, you know, seems wrong. Right. It's it seems like it violates it, but I can see how I mean especially if you were to have like, you know, with the codes being slightly different, right? Like they're kind of two different offenses. But if you did one thing, you know, it feels wrong that you'd have that secondary sort of push to, to get convicted of it. And it also allows the government allot of leeway and being able to write of something that they think is wrong, which is at times like the OJ thing, right? Like you have fiction, then you have the civil thing. And at least at least we got something out of that, even though they got the first one wrong like it opens that up a little bit. It feels as if it's something that they could utilize in that way was like a second chance pursuit of. Yeah. It was the first time. And that know makes it makes me a little nervous but I do understand that. I also feel like there's a there's an interesting part, when it comes to pardons on this, and that, like, in theory, like you know, if Trump were to of course, we're talking about Trump because he's in there now but, like, if Trump were to pardon someone, and then the, the sake then go, and try them for the same thing, and sort of like or could he pardoned for both while apparently not now? I it's a fascinating sort of back and forth. I you know, I tend to always when I get into these situations where I'm not sure ten to one aside as to lessen the power of the government to do. Whatever is trying to do. So maybe I haven't read the whole ruin. I feel like reading Gorsuch might be really interesting on this just just to get to kind of get a sense of him as a as a as a supreme court jurist Welsh to people to really understand where he's coming from. I feel happy with him right now. Like, and I feel much more nervous about Cavanaugh. So I don't know. That would be. While other interesting aspect about this was that Gorsuch and Ginsburg and same side of this, which doesn't seem logical, but it's kind of a different reasons. Right. Yeah. But it's interesting to see two people. So ideologically different on the same side of an issue showing you. That's not just a partisan thing. They're actually trying to noodle that one out. And also, I think interesting to see like a soda or not with Ginsberg. Yeah. I mean, I you know, that's, that's a fascinating one as well, you know, because a lot of a lot of talk. I know like judge has some plan about the supreme court. And like I you know, in the everyone talks about it as right left thing, we need to have come wait for presidents to name three, and they all leave, you know, it's like you need a backup and say, like a lot of times, people are just really trying to do what they think is right in the constitution, and there's been a lot of these splits lately that have not come across those five four lines. That's healthy the Ginsburg. So my are split is arguably more fascinating to me than any other because those two never disagree. I mean they approach is me being very cynical. I hear they applied the two most outcome oriented jurists. On the court, I hate to say that bluntly, but that's just reality. They are. I think Kagan is markedly better than their short. So to my or Ginsburg for purposes, as someone who sees the constitution that way, for sure. She actually Qizheng only will come out with something that's mildly sensible being the right side of things. She's a good writer to all right? Before we go. Did you guys see the lavar ball controversy on ESPN is I think I didn't? Oh now he's going to New Orleans, right? And he got traded. Well, yes. But that's not the controversy. He was on a on a on one of their talk shows. He said something really extremely offensive on air to a female host watch. Go ahead go. Lavar can I switch gears with you because I have a question. Let's stay focused here. So that was in this. So that was it. That was it that was with me anytime. Yes. That was so offensive ESPN had to come out and like issue, a statement about his comments. How you can ears. I don't get it like a sexual reference. Hair lane. Switch gears. Okay. Apparently, doesn't make a hand. Just use your imagination. Right. You gotta you gotta really, really. Wow. Are to try to make that God. Indiana Jones, search to be offended. Oh, to be a frequent arc Yala gist of really discover the hidden truth, how you're supposed to be offended on any given day. I don't even understand. It's incredible. And I wonder too, if, if that female host had not kind of stuttered and made it kind of thing anyone would be talking about it now. But now she's getting attention. So it's good for her. So you know as females. We're being taught now. If we just draw attention to stupid, innocent joke. We'll get. We'll get all this attention on ourselves. Cleveland CNN. This is to two years ago and the remember who it was. He was on the air sports hosts. And he was like, oh, well, you know, he said something about boobs. He said like, boobs and clay Travis tramps, right? He's like boobs on the air like she the host acted as if it was like the critic, she couldn't even believe a person would say such a word. It was like the literally out of the Puritans age. And she came out like a pilgrim was so stunned. And they go to commercial like two seconds later, the doing this, like Christiane Amanpour, five day, special about sex around the world. First of all, that's horrific like the idea that you're thinking about Cristiano important sex in the same universe is really terrible. But like the like they act so offended. And then they will say when a conservative is like I really would rather not have my little pony hooking up with the other girl pony on in the middle of the cartoon, like we're, we're the Puritans. They're the ones that amazing like these the, they're not even it's not even real right? Like in that I think you're right reaction to it is what sells it. If you can come up with that nice reaction of, oh, my God. I'm shocked and create that moment that can go viral and that is now your job. It's not about listening, what he's saying it's not about saying, like, okay, it's a playful comment from like he's just joking or any tie, like you can't just take it in the spirit. The feminist leftist stands, nineteen nineties, that Bill Clinton can continue to have szeswith, whoever the heck Yvonne to as long board abortion move on dot org. We talked about yesterday like my favorite organization in the world right now because it was created to say move on from sexual assault move on from sexual. Harassment guys, you conservatives, you're so focused on the sexual stuff. Cub on now. All they talk about is me too stuff. I mean, it was basically a move on from me to, and it's still one of the most prominent democratic organizations around. All right. Yesterday's poll. How should President Trump handle the crisis at the border while the Democrats block has progress on the wall. Interesting result. Sixty three percent of you said shut down the border entirely. Okay. Wow. That is a hard stance twenty seven percent, said make a deal with Mexico. Ten percent of us. Just don't just stop trying to make a deal and put tariffs on them for crying out loud did not intimate the hardline stance of sixty percent of you. Down the border. Making a deal does not sound fun on the internet. You just say the hardest thing I feel like you guys are not remembering that we lose avocados do that. I mean. I mean. The fence, I suppose you could be over there to catch them with the over there to catch them. They're delicious, you know, matter what you say. All right. Today's poll, should President Trump avoid war with Iran at all costs. Let us know what you think Josh, you're interested in this particular topic at all costs is the keyword there. No at all costs, but we obviously do not want war, but this is a uniquely hostile regimes and we can take extremism. Yeah. Pat, I'm thinking, we don't need another war of the Middle East at almost all costs. So it'd be obviously they could do something missiles at our shit attacker. Yes. Exactly. But I mean almost no cost. You let us know what you think at the blazes Twitter that is at the blaze. Josh, thank you so much for joining a pleasure and we'll see you guys tomorrow. You have to get your avocado toast for dinner. Keyed up. Thanks for listening to the news white matters. We hope you enjoyed the podcast if you'd like to watch the program become a blaze TV subscriber and start your free trial, now at blaze, TV dot com.

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Alverna Cher, City Funeral Director and Will Planner: Turn Your Failures Into Fuel And Keep Your Dreams Burning

For Women Who Love The F-Word

12:08 min | 11 months ago

Alverna Cher, City Funeral Director and Will Planner: Turn Your Failures Into Fuel And Keep Your Dreams Burning

"Strong and independent woman is something to behold she pays the bills buys own things and she doesn't let affect factor stability our self confidence. She is a sold rich woman. Are you ready to be rich doing what you love beyond purpose and control of your life again. At for women love the Atwood podcast. We will open the talking about it Lachlan's online, getting recognition as leader and female entrepreneur, and also the athletic, being fabulous, having freedom and financial independence. It's time to own. End Loved The F. Word. Welcome to the show. Another one I saw Sika up. With hers. Own You, know you see. Her Mama, so yeah. Pete's one hundred. Blow Shipping. Hung Cush, so he did y'all Tina's talking to you both. The. Only the hundred. Hundred. Qualifier Send Choi Leisure now. What do you mean ten? Young. Doesn't need see the. One does young. Tight GSA. How you made that! Border Palm Me Oh. It's all that we want. To put on, condal eight CR. And Oregon, always young all week a new. England. Coach. Waste should. Be Mean. Three hundred and lies akan uncommon. Saddam Hussein. Since. Nineteen dot person. In Singapore how? Do Writing Wheels. Orange Al Qaeda and We'll be why Israel writing in your. Opinion Writing Wheel is important for everyone is not only for the rich broker. Why because you went to need down a clear instructions to our one except okay? Options on how to handle our assets. Any on. Okay, how to me if I'm wrong by genuinely I think both writing very expensive is very tedious, fifth troublesome that right. General four just. Leave. You choose to right, but we always a lawyer would then don't. we don't need a lawyer threatened. She is. He's not to become the only do not say by. ABC need. My friends the. NONNI say. Erected Is a ball. Might Name Elva my. Job Done. This! Oh, so will there be people with very. What I! My Bank account. On yeah, but as she right think we all right, we will meet to spill his. Okay. Okay, but we need to. All okay. That's why that's why I think this is. All things would be clear in the lobby but Mike, so it can be very simple, but you get everything print. Young the one two parts of. That? Real people! This. Gate the whole. Of. Yeah I think. He's he's. An argument brought not become brothers if they're not become. Sin hosted that's. Equal. He started in Asian especially, no more be blocked pebble. Go on to talk about it. Actually they can him. A Ball I saw the first one. You know upbeat hand. We insurance. Okay. People the. Three Penn.. Is Money. I have a call. Last fees. That might be people who actually cannot afford it. So. That's why pre-planning is very. Yeah, so, what will be the things I say? On the other as MRS, the Day also can choose what puffy. or Zeno, what kind of? Okay. Yes, event with us. An accident I think you plead. Clothing to way is any very Let's see requests over. He's. Some egregious. Okay to go celebration. Yeah, I I think you brought up a point whereby just? Lobbied on my knees. But I think as time goes by. Improve the whole society I think people should view it the in very different light. Way You. See what any of the day! You can see the end of agenda, but is a celebration of the whole journey. Dad, give warped tool, so do we in the way that you want as one more than. I read some articles actually. Is Very hundred sold some charity? Edgy engulfing Komo live is. Wing for doll, knocking on every Sunday to find. The apples the. went out alone. Bratty. Birkenau Poking Fun. Deputy. Okay. When you talk about light leaving. Each dot the company. As. A. One time was. Got You KINDA. Kinda wanting. Hudson. Baby woman you don't. Like now you're on there to show the and share. That's all. So that is being lifted in. His so he? Tried to identify how to let people that really how? People might have question not knowing eight. How is it likely was saying just? Like writing about real, and even planning on I, think the easiest way is the reach of the professional. Professionals And not advice you. What other steps based on individual pieces? I think it's not Easy Light Mapa entrepreneur job now. All about time manage. Sign. Of things have jogger seems. So I used to old change. House we. Read about the. Dead now I found the. Money. Pieces one nine. My Operation Wise. By eventual on. We've online. Business is edgy. How? Everybody who wants to a modest. Just educated the kids properly ring them up, but. Why is. Let's see what you. Come on started this Rhonda. Housewife I tell housewives Niger net overnight. And when you? have to sugar everything so at the time he had this business. You. Need something? A fallback. Should Be Papa because you've got kids your? Ten days to me a five thousand dollar bills. No. I manage to really make it. Was An act now if you, if you will then fought so hard you now you're owning broke loses. Something to be proud, obvious, though something to show off your by something to be proud on. Well balance and John Link. It came through a Breckenridge. We all very problems with. of So for your now. Heavy all this. Heavy thing you start to go rhino so sharing. Sharing. Bull how the right wheels plan. Your mind expand my edge used to go into it's. To educate these. Young Generation. When they know what to do. Educational methods. Of India grow up into. We'll have these. Around my de need. Japan. And not only for themselves on the might be able to educate book row. Who Bring his? So busy my mortal now he's to. Spy Your. CUT DOWN THE ON. Sold. into. Generation. Each. Edgy. So have you don't have? All these things you should actually see. That's. You so much for joining me today I'm so ornette daily connected and hope that I can continue to serve you as you build your dreams, and if you love this episode and I hope that you did rated five stars, give us glowing review because we were helped more women around the world finding these rich podcast alone strong together. We are unstoppable. Now shared this with every woman who needs it because this is how we are changing the world, one woman at a time. As always get out of your comfort zone and go to what's the dreams? If always wanted to achieve for women who love the F. Word being fabulous, heavy freedom and financial independence. My dear soul rich women, sending you, my love and I'll speak to you soon. Bye for now.

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#36: Can Latinos Save the Planet?

Important, Not Important

1:16:16 hr | 3 years ago

#36: Can Latinos Save the Planet?

"Welcome to important. Not important. My name is Quinn and I'm Brian Calvert Kennedy. This is episode thirty four. Thank right, four. Wow, I now today's question Brian can Latino, save the planet. Nobody'll be super fucking helpful. Our guest is Mark Magana. He is the founding president and CEO of green Latinos. They are a national coalition of Latino environmental national resources and conservation leaders and fun fact. Mark was actually the first Tino to serve a senior staff about the White House and in congressional leadership pretty bad ass. Yeah. What do you have gone for your fear self? What would you say you were the first blind to do of something I, I was the first person in my fourth grade class do go anywhere. We'll be able to on the first try fill in. In all the states on a on a map of the US her. Did you learn those? I don't think I can do that still. Can you still do it? I tried semi recently maybe like maybe like five years ago and I forgot New Hampshire. See, I would fuck up some in the middle. Okay, which is pretty much what people in the middle think that people on the coast. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. I mean, if you just gave me right now yet it'd be some some missing one you can. You can really just put you can do every every state I used to be new capitals to know. We did have a great place mat when I was very hip, adding it was all the states with their capitals. That was a cool thing to like, look at while you get one of those three writing that down right now place. We had a couple of good ones. We had that one and we had and the, you know, the solar system, although like it's different now. Probably I have that. I put down the ceiling of our playroom. You got these stickers? Oh yes. He at c, I love that t love ESI and I raised them in order on the ceiling of the playroom. That's so cool. Yep. With approximate distances. Yeah, you know. So relative fact is they're not that close together. It's not all equal. Apparently there's a new map of the US coming out. That's more accurate. Sorry, not at the US Napa the world. Oh, yeah. Yeah, that's more more accurate in is as it relates to the size of all the continents and stuff. So we've been fucking that up for a little. I know was like bad nineteen hundreds when there were, you know, they were like, we don't know what this is. Let's put a dragon. There. I don't know. Yeah, so that's my answer. Did you have you ever I I, what faint if you before anybody else you know is just we had a back to school night last night at the kids teachers, and we're talking about how report cards Birkenau and things like this. Crazy like that as they weird now. It's not as much weird as it took me back to an an. I describe this to my child which surprised no one, which is, you know, at least once to get later, especially in the public school system, you know there, there's just like these pre-selected remarks. They can pick from our like not just your grade, but like how you're how you're doing. You know, things like that attendance or social or behavior, whatever. And I feel like it was like however many semesters. It is from first grade to twelfth grade in a row. I got my pre-selected one because I was always in. The same school system was socialized at the inappropriate time. Nice verbatim perfected yet. So I don't know if those a first, but I feel like at some point it was a common als probably got their shit together. Yeah, and at least maybe had a bump in the middle where they did all right with our. Nope. And again, all these teachers knew each other all they, the only constant this guy just so could lies is at the inappropriate time. Yup. Couldn't couldn't keep it together. I'm really, yeah. Yeah. Was that you? Oh yeah. I could see you as sort of the class clown where you sitting in the back guy. To sit in the back so that I could fuck around as much as posture. Yeah. What was your method of fucking round? Was passing notes or airplanes or not airplanes are notes? No, it was mostly just, you know, like cracking jokes quietly, but obviously not quietly enough because then I would, you know you'd get caught. Sure. It was a lot of like and what it turned into, not doing it quietly, but just being like right up front about it. Like if my teacher said something that, like if my teacher misspoke, for example, just misspoke. It'd be like, excuse me, did you mean to say that and like repeat it like just to be an asshole. Oh, so you're just a dick? I turned into just a dick but never say, never like I was never an actual asshole. I was just a raging smart. Ask you like I never made any never made any teachers like feel shitty or any though I are you. Sure. I am very aware that I had a great relationship with all of my teachers. I was just too much of a smart. Some your teachers might be listening and they. Might be like, actually now really there, everything was really good. I was just a smart s. How did that get broken out of you? Just life? Well, I got out of school then, whereas then it doesn't work anymore. Yeah, nobody gives a she ASU. Welcome to the real world. It's like my my kids, he's like, oh, can I. Make today a half day on the? No, you're like a ward of the state. They don't. Sorry. He's like, what's if what if it's like important, I gotta go to grandma's Mike. That's not. That's not your important in actual important are not yet. No, the very different. They're very different things. Sorry, champ so hot as hell here while wildfires just torch in California. Did you hear that the? Here's the thing, though, is that the conditions of climate change have made them worse and more violent and more right? Spreadable there's oftentimes still started. Absolutely. One of them was literally a tire dragging on the road, and they said the other one was a guy. This is as far as I could get was started with a man with a hammer, now's will. That could be what I could be anything. And it started the Mendocino complex fire, which is the biggest fire still going, but how critical I gotta get a little further on that. Anyone has any more information started with a gentleman with a hammer. The spark I'm not unclear point is everything is dryest. Fuck. The wind is blowing right in the fire season never ends. So it's good times. It's good time and yet you still keep picking hot coffee, can't stop. Can't stop, won't stop. Are you not a cold brew gentleman? Not really. I like that weirdos. Chocolate shake mushroom thing. You get me that is delicious. You'd better fucking like it. I love it. Yeah, but I can't. You know, I don't know. I want to slowly drink. I think that's it. I wanna slowly having realize you've made an enormous mistake. Oh, every time. Yeah, so so hot, not the coffee about my body dowager plus them, or I feel like I run hot. Sure. But you don't wanna like, what? What do you what do you like calmly in like grew slowly sip on? That's cold. Nothing cold shit. You fucking chug chug about this few. It's more about the ritual. I'm just saying much ritual. There should be a there needs to be a breaking point. I mean, you drink in your coffee for the caffeine or for the ritual. Do you need the caffeine if I don't have coffee, like my brothers and my wife, nonfunctional humid start to have a little headache. Oh, that's not bad. Feel like half the people listen to this are like your fucking lucky that that's all you got. Oh, what happens to other people? Just. Non-functional can't get out of bed while no asked that that's not me. Okay. Yeah. Just like the taste and the ritual more than anything in that hot hot heat. Megan mistakes left, and. Right, welcome. Welcome back folks. All right. Let's go talk to Mark. Let's go talk to Mark Montgomery k. Our guest. Today's Markman ganja and together we're gonna ask how Latinos save the planet. Mark, welcome. Well, thank you. Thank you for hosting me for sure. We have very happy to have you Mark. Let's get it going very easily here. Just tell us who you are and and what you do. Excellent name is Mark Mcgann? Yeah, I am the founding presidency of green Latinos. We are a national network of Latino environmental and conservation advocates. We bring together Latinos from across the country from the different sectors in the environmental movement from the Tino's who work at big green groups, Latinos work in local environmental Justice, Tino's in the government sector Latinos in the renewable energy corporate sector to come together to work to work with each other on behalf of our communities and also behalf of each other. Professionally, we consider ourselves. Kind of a mix between a professional organization and a policy organization. We try to get more Latinos in the field, keep them in the field, give them a sense of belonging since family and then elevate them in the field while also addressing issues that are of key importance to the Latino community when it comes to environment and conservation. Amazing co dig it. How long has Greenland has been around. So we started ten years ago as the national Latino coalition on climate change. We changed our focus about five years ago and became green Latinos, and so aside, shortening the name by about twelve words harder. You change the focus. When we first started ten years ago, we were focused on specifically a cap and trade Bill in congress and how we could get more support for that cap and trade Bill. The last major effort to pass a climate change Bill. And what we saw was that. Latinos in the environmental movement were silent and they weren't working together. And so we've done found at the the real need was to bring power that we all had individually and differ resources different access to bring it together as a shared resource and how we can work together and also how he could cross a break down barriers between historical barriers between the sectors of the environmental movement that prevented sectors like the big green groups and the Egypt crews from working together and how we could do that through the power of our relationships to get to break down those barriers ticket, incredible down. Did you start it by yourself? You got partner in this? I did. I started a with shoe other people who were my original board members and who still are in the environmental movement to other Latinos. And so he took it from there. It's been great. That's awesome. Excited to learn more about him for sure. All right, so let's get our conversation set up for the day. The our focus here is to end this thing with steps that that we and our listeners can take to actually make change. And so that's what we're going to do today. It is now more than ever time for action quite clearly. So let's let's let's get into that. We want to know why why? Why? What is happening is happening how we can fix it and we want, you know, actionable, actionable steps out of this thing. So, so we can make some make some changes. No Fultz in around Mark around. I got to know. I got to know her come in. All right CEO later. Alrighty. So listen, Mark. We start with one super duper important question. Some really set the tone of our conversation today. So instead of saying, tell us your life story. We like to ask Mark. Why are you vital to the survival of the species. I thought this was going to be boxer briefs. We all we can get into that. Got into that for sure. I think that we as green Latinos and other activists are vital to the speed, the species survival of the species because now is the time when we need activists to be activists. We have like moment when we have to. We're a lot of people in DC are used to being indoor cats. We worked with having these comfortable meetings and going into a writing letters and and sending op-eds and doing comments to a regulation. All these things are not affected right now. And so we need to, at this point, learn and get our claws back and become outdoor cats, so that we as a group of activists can make serious change on the front lines in order to search. In order to save the future of society. We need serious sacrifice sacrifice of our time sacrifice of our comfort, our luxuries, our, our security, our safety in order to make the changes to choose pieces of who we are capitalism. The way we spend the way we consume in order to have a chance of surviving. We need to have large scale, social and economic change in this country. And if we don't have that large scale change, which doesn't come from letters and it doesn't come from comrades the Federal Register. So you're saying it doesn't come from tweets or does come from tweet, shall we be tweeting. I think it was MLK who said, I just be all right. I feel like tweets is an aspect of organizing that I may not appreciate myself, but it is affected and you see that with the dreamers. You see that with any town the gun, you see that with the metoo movement these? No, it absolutely is, but we had a follow it up with with feats in the street. Who whatever the rest of I would like you to continue with the outdoor cat metaphor for the rest of the conversation. Yeah, because. Yeah, man. Well, I I love so listen. We're going to sit up little context for today's question. Put together some notes here to get everyone. Our listeners at home, they're probably not home. They're fucking millennials are on the subway or whatever they can do or on their. What are those scooters that you ride Brian arts, birds scooters. Anyways, friends got some questions. Mark is going to tell us how wrong or just hang up. I don't know. We'll find out. So let's talk about again. We like to dial it back to the lowest common denominator here for folks. So we got about three hundred thirty million people in the US right as a two thousand fifteen. A fourteen percent of our population is foreign born about is it two thousand sixteen? And again, Mark just keep correcting me as wrong here. The internet is not a reliable source of information, but fell fifty eight million Latinos in the US in two thousand sixteen counting for over half of our national population growth since two thousand. How does that break down? Because the Dino's are not one group. Thirty six million Mexicans, five million Puerto Rico. And that was I believe, from two thousand sixteen. So before the hurricanes it to millions of adorns to Mohan Cubans million Dominicans downlist Guatemala, Colombia, Honduras, Spanish, Ecuadorians Peruvians bought cetera. Yup. And the growth in Hispanic populations is predicted to triple in the next forty years, which is crazy. Wow. So if you wanna know what all these lovely baby-boomer white people are scared of the breakdowns expected to be a by twenty fifty five. I think forty eight percent white twenty four percent Hispanic, fourteen percent Asian and thirteen percent black Serena look really different and that has less than fifty white. Yeah, it's about time, but let's talk about Latino voters. So it looks like a median age of the known America's twenty eight whites median ages forty-three, which is old, thirty-six blacks, thirty four forty percent of the Tino's have college experience. The dropout rate is at a new low. Cal. Sonja host the most imigrants protects us as a fastest growth rate. Georgia's has doubled since two thousand fastest in the nation's. Oh, wouldn't have guessed that. Now, this is a crazy side. Stat was just again painting such a different picture of America, almost twenty percent of US cohabitees of a partner of a different racer ethnicity. Wow. Like that's something I feel like you go back and watch mad men like that's, that's. I don't think anybody saw that coming in, but in the beautiful it said still. So let's get specific though, for our topic sixty six thousand Latinos turn eighteen every single month in America which is important because what can you do at eighteen? Brian? You can vote. That's a big bet you want me to vote. I do want to say yes, there is other stuff in new voter every so lots and lots of new voters as always important disclaimer at your heritage does not make for a homogeneous voting block. It's not true for Latinos are spandex, or Asians, or blacks, or even white folks for for example, I and I think Brian believe major policy decisions regarding the future for planet should depend on empirical science and someone like I dunno, Paul Ryan who's also white and lifts. Weights is this piece of shit. I would sell it to a sorcerer at the drop of hat. But anyways, Latinos will swing key races in two thousand eighteen. There's no doubt. Out. You know, we look at Arizona Clinton lost thereby ninety. One thousand votes. Six hundred thousand eligible. Latinos didn't even cast a ballot. And now we've got David Garcia running for governor. He's a vet and a teacher. Nevada kids in public schools is a fourth generation American, but just because he didn't come over yesterday doesn't mean he hasn't forgotten his roots. So hopefully that and better outreach efforts can get those folks out. Texas Trump won. TEK spite hundred thousand votes. Three million Latinos didn't vote. Yup, so fucked Ed cruise. Oh, but we have to get these folks out to vote whatever the that the catalyst is. I mean, hopefully conservation clean energy is on that less because the other thing is is not just coming out to vote. There's some evil working against them, a lot of folks for trying to take their vote away the GOP. The Republican party would whatever means in two thousand eighteen is a is devolved into a feverish band of racists and science skeptics and a lot of liars and they've a lot to be scared of Trump has very good odds of winning again, which is terrifying. Go past couple days has been fascinating, but his approval ratings are high, which is insane. Anyways, they're doing all those things because the folks we just talked about countries changing. I firmly believe it's changing for the better diverse perspectives. You points candidates leaders every everybody wins. But some green today says, seventy percent of Latinos said the no conservation organization has. A reached out to them. This affect that forty percent of the Tino's left with live within thirty miles of power plant, which is crazy to me. So what I want to get into today's, I want to hear all about Latino interesting, clean energy and science, and climate and conservation, and on the positive side becoming robots and and not living on two point. Oh, and so I'm sure Mark has plenty ad and we'll tell me all the ways those things were just wrong by. They don't matter, and that is awesome. So Mark, let's get to a man. How exactly will Latino save the planet. So so we talked a little bit about what prompted the organisation of of green the Tino's. Is there a particular moment, you know what came first? Was it that there was enough support or is it the Latino background of of of minding the planet? Was there some sort of crucible moment to what got you? Got you guys on this path and his continue the momentum. So when I first started, I started as a consultant. I got hired. Do the work and the more I got to know about it. The more I read about it, the more I reached the holy shit moment of that the degradation of our planet, the effects on animals species, our homes, our health aide is e migration, EKO genocide these things are massive and they're tumbling towards us faster and faster at blinding speed. And it really shook me to my core, but what really turned me was that a five and a half years ago I had my first child and the same month. My mom passed from leukemia most closely associated from industrial pollutants, and and and and for me seeing what my baby daughter, what was going to be the biggest thing that's going to affect and completely have a have a negative effect on her life. Life is the massive effects of climate change and in honoring my mother and you know what she went through with their leukemia and and the continuation of of pesticide poisoning and industrial poisoning in our communities. All of that said to me, I, this isn't a consulting gig anymore. This isn't a jogger. This is what I'm going to do full-time, and this is what I'm going to dedicate my life to. And that was my a HAMAs and it was something that had been inside of me because now Latinos are what I like to call cultural conservationists a. And can you talk a little bit about that again, in the sense of dialing it back, you know, just assume you're talking about white people. Here we, we are pretty diverse were like eighty five countries and and I'm sure we have plenty Latina listeners, but you know, I want everybody be on the same page here. Yeah, absolutely. So the concept I have is that when. In your growing up as Latino and many cultures will say I, yeah, that fits me as well. You have a respect for the conservation repurposing reusing that comes from your Diaz and your Wella and and you know, it comes from you learn environmentalism, essentially from the back of a chunk law which is a slipper you learn to turn off the lights because you're gonna get smacked across the head of you don't. Right. You learn not to use intimating too many times. You learn not to waste food. You learn to, you know, put a sweater on instead of put the heat on. You learn to wash out a ziplock bag to that that a butter container in the fridge, never has butter in it that you know you eat every part of the animal you repurpose and reuse what you have, and it's not because you are. Are a signed on the dotted line environmentalists for a big environmental org, or you know that you're a funder that you are it because of your culture, what you've been taught, it's an assumed position and whether or not I can afford a whole nother bag of ziplock bags. I'm still going to wash out my ziplock bag and put it upside down to dry it. I'm gonna reuse a piece of tin foil and flatten it out for the next time. And these things come from our culture and an ill. What we did a survey that asked people Latino voters, are you someone who considers themselves steward of the environment, seven seventy plus percent? Yes. The very next question was, would you call yourself in environmentalist low teens, no shell, they don't. It's not a label that they have. It's. In the smooth position that has nothing to do with the policy. It's just, of course I'm not gonna shit where I eat. All right. I'm going to have respect for the land. And of course I'm not going to be wasteful. That would be disres- rightful turn more my family and and and you know, I, I'd get some memories of getting smacked around for doing it. And so sure. Now these things lead our community to be environmentalists in action, but not necessarily a name and may not necessarily in policy action but kinda in his so they need to day need to translate. Yeah, they need to be. I open that. Oh, I do all those things. I am an environment. I am that shirt turns out and therefore and be there are a lot of people who aren't, and that's unbelievable. And see their degrading my community that's under attack. And so you know, therefore, I need to be an active cultural conservationists and private cultural concert, right. It's funny. I think it's side note. You know, I was a religious studies major and I'm a total pagan atheist at this point. But how it's so interesting the, you know, the way like western of religion loves to throw labels on everything versus so much of the rest of the world. It's just a part of your everyday life. It's not like, I'm, I'm part of this institutionalized thing, and that means I go to church on Sunday for so much the rest of the world. It's it's just how you live your day to day life, and it seems like that is that's that's very similar. There's just ingrained and that's part of your family, and it's part of your culture in your community. But guy adopted the label from cultural Catholics. Yeah, and it makes sense. And now I guess it takes a group like yours, hopefully, and others to then, like you said, you know, it's like some superhero origin story where it's like, you know you, you gotta start using these powers that you have in these things that you care about an in translating them, which you know is the same thing. People been saying to white people for the past couple years as I'm glad you've enjoyed this time of privilege, but you need to start opening up your fucking pocket books and and and helping out these other causes that you may not see day to day for whatever reason. Yeah, walk the walk man. Yeah, right. And if you don't, it's going to take us all down. Right, right. So all right. So with those values in your new life calling, what were you? What was what were your and the group sort of initial goals and how how of those translated were have been your successes and failures up to today? Our initial goals were a, let's find out. Who's out there who are Latinos that are in the field because we were silo, you'd find four here in one here and to there, but they didn't know each other. I would introduce a Latino from a big green organization to another Latino from the very same organization, and they found out they worked on the same floor, but they just kept their heads down and one did soil erosion. And the other did ocean acidification and they did their work and they went home. And why do they keep their heads down? Was it because they hadn't been called upon or because there is a cultural obstacle vid catch. They kept their heads down because they didn't necessarily feel like they were part of the larger organization. They didn't feel like they were, you know, going to be invited to the happy hour after after work or that they were, you know, the, they were part of the the, the water cooler talk. They didn't feel part. Of the community of that organization because they were such small minority and they didn't a lot of times they wouldn't feel welcomed. And part of our origin story was several people coming to me within months of each other and saying, I'm just, I don't feel like I'm being listened to. I don't feel like I'm being appreciated. I don't feel like there's any movement for me or my ideas are being considered, and so I'm gonna go do teach for America or I'm gonna move out to California and I'm gonna do something else. And so we'd lose advocates in our movement. And so that was one of the key points of our origin story was how do we keep Latinos in the field where if they don't feel the love or the familia in their organ own organization, we can provide that as an organization and be that part to encourage and support their work, even if they don't feel it in their in their own organization. So how do you do that specific credit? And so it. It is a matter of having some of our more senior members and members that well, number one is it's knowing each other. And then I, you know, at first the organization started with a list serve a Facebook page and in and the basic forms of communication. But what we discovered was that these things are great and affective for a certain amount of things. But if someone said to me, hey, Quinn is applying for a job would use it. Would you support his nomination? I'd be like, fuck Quinn. I've only met him once they're on the phone again, a lot in general. Fuck. On a on a podcast. I don't know if he's any good at this job, but so what we did was we put together a summit where we all came together in person and we met each other and will eat drink together. And we danced together and we talked together and we made plans together and we built relationships. And so now after I've had a good dinner with with Quinn and I know him someone asked me and I'll stay our or Queenie's meals me as they can you get on this letter, I'm going to respond and I'm gonna do it. We build, they're still relationships. And so that's the success has been from a very personal level of trust being built, not from list, serves not from tweets, not from emails, but from personal coming together in very intimate settings and and and building these trusts where we might not trust where they come from or their organization that they work for. But I know. No, they're heart is in the right place personally. So I'm gonna take a chance and I'm going to build this together and we're going to support each other in that way. And so it's been a huge success in that manner. And the excitement is palpable. Mine all our summits grew from fifty the first year to one hundred the second year, one hundred fifty two hundred this year. And so you know, we get more and more and more and they continued to be increasingly environmental Justice and local leaders like one pot potus at tech to Haas in Houston, or Robert Garcia at the city project in Los Angeles or Elizabeth peer up rose in New York, whom come together and are able to were able to hope help with resources and support and energy. Like you mentioned earlier, the equity in the resources in the environmental Justice movement wasn't there and it's still. Isn't, but we, we are. We're slowly making inroads on those types of things, and it's exciting. What are we a the general public? I mean, what are we wrong wrong about or or need to be filled in on? Because there seems to be seems to be two sides of the coin. There's the white people are really terrified of the incoming revolution in the people that are excited about it. I feel like we've both besides sort of raw statistics, I'm sure a hundred percent. Sure. We're all making plenty of sumptious that are that are incorrect or misleading. So where can we pointed be pointed in the right direction? I guess when it comes to whether it's culture or support or or things like that, where are sumptious opinions. Yeah. I mean, in general, it's that the Latino community are issues are the mainstream issues we want. We want to work good jobs that, hey, we wanna work hard and we want a better lives for our children, and we will sacrifice anything for our children and that shows on immigration. I mean, they, they stop and separate families on the border accusing these parents of abusing their children when they're willing to sacrifice everything to see that their children have a better life and that is unbelievable. And where were all we all feel that way we will do anything for our children. And so. This is a community that is very traditional. That's very family oriented. That's very patriotic that loves the opportunity that they have that loves freedoms and and and really does work themselves to the bone and his loyal an and wants the best for their communities and will defend their communities and wants the best for their children. And these things make for a make for beautiful citizens, make for beautiful community members, and we're in this together. And so we need to see it that way instead of being people that separate each other and try to divide each other, it's it's evil. It is fucking evil. So I have a question for you. So getting into the things that that are most important to Latinos and and and coming from this sort of, again, more softer, quilted background of of conservation without calling conservation. Getting to like sort of the harder statistics. And we've talked a lot about sort of environmental Justice. Recently, here is diluting does know that forty percent of them live within thirty miles of the power plant. Are they becoming aware of that? And the fact that the system was designed that way or that that's where the cheapest housing is and that's where they are. Is that something that's becoming something they're raising arms about? Yeah, they know why they can afford the rent in their neighborhood. They know why they live south of Martin Luther King avenue and west of the freeway day. No, that that it's important for them to stand up and defend their communities, Latino. It's very interesting to note to put this in context when the immigration rallies happened the the the, the March is the huge immigration marches that happened across the country. State didn't happen because Latinos wanted beneficial. Immigration legislation are wanted open borders, or they happened because congress put forth a completely negative immigration Bill that would make it a felony to be associated with an undocumented immigrant, even if it was a family member that would make things like trying to get a better life for their family of felony that they were fighting back on an agreed jus- piece of legislation, what motivates Latinos for the most part is number one, I want to work hard. I want to be left alone so that I can have a better life for my child education, a hope for the future. But if if you mess with, if you fuck with the mothers by putting their children's health and risk by purposefully pudding, a coal fire power plant in their neighborhood. Good, and they find out that that's what causing their child's asthma. Then you're in trouble that that mother is not going to ask for a tax break or a mortgage interest deduction or anything any sort of advantage, but they are not going to accept being fucked with purposefully and that's when it's when they have their back to the wall when they see that this is purposeful and they're being targeted in their communities being targeted that they will stand up and they will was down that coal fire power plant, and they will find a way to get that chemical plant closed and so and they'll there are relentless because are we actually seeing success as there are in Chicago, their organization, a shutdown to cope fire power plants after FINA mothers raised up because of the children have too many children. Their communities had asthma, and they look up at what they. Called the cloud maker, which were the smokestack fire member that grown up as a kid. I love that I taught. I loved it looked so cool. Oh, sure. Fucking to storm in Rockwell pictures of the fucking kids running after the mosquito van in the streets. Fun. Yeah, yeah, is doing pesticide spraying, right? Yeah, and it it. It is unfortunate because growing up in LA for me, the worst things weren't in California. You had wildfires floods mudslides earthquakes. He's still do. Yeah. But the back the worst days for a child in the eighties seventies were the days when the air quality was too low and you weren't allowed to go outside and play. Imagine telling a child, you can't while side and play because your air is too fucked up. While and that just became the new normal for us, there was nothing weird about it. And then the days when would could go out and play three, two or three of the kids would have to carry their inhaler with them, and we'd have to take time outs from playing so that these children could breathe again by taking emergency inhalers that was normal for them to have these inhalers in their pride. At what point does that become like just the fucking accepted status quo. When do we stop being the frogs in the ever increasing heated water Ryan jump out instead of just adapting lie. It needs to stop. And now I'm a parent and I have water purifiers on all the sinks and air purifiers in every room. And we, we buy organic food. You know what our Ganic food used to be called. They used to be called food. Right? We all right. Getting charged to be able to live healthy by the same corporations that are polluting us, and so they get paid coming and going and we allow it and that has to change. Absolutely. So Yalta, what are the? What are the science based issues most important to to Latinos? Obviously, you guys mostly cover the environment, but my imagine there's a wide spectrum, you know, from DNA sequencing or disease to to crisper and cancer developments yet, it's funny thinking about that. I, you know, there's was a tough time recently or Newsweek had a whole thing about their their. Their cover story was basically centrally like, why doesn't anyone ever DNA sequence by people like no one gives a shit about that. You know, minute shows like all the issues with it, and I imagine like this shit is just going to keep coming up. It's it's like an another way. They're screwed on cure. About the people that have stood up, you know, what are the other sort of science based issues again, so so people can really understand this culture Mer, these were your people are coming from, you know what? What else are they fighting for? What else they really give shit about here. The everything else is happening. Yeah, just this week, federal court ruled overruled the EPA when they chose not to ban Chlor Pira foes it, which is a pesticide, a toxic nerve agent pesticide developed by the Nazis. It good related. Family as Seyran gas and puck and EPA decided that the science wasn't closed on this, their classic words that they use for everything and that despite the fact that children that were exposed to this corpora FO's at any level, not just farmers, but residue on our fruits and vegetables. We're having mental issues were having trade issues hold on back up again. So we're. You hear this kind of, shouldn't you like what the fuck like? Where is this being? Where is this being used currently, like in what products and practices? So they banned the use of corpora foes as an insect repellent or indoor use something like twenty years ago because it was Hello abhorrent, right? But they thought in their wisdom, it's abhorrent for indoor use, but let's still spray it on farm workers. And so on the on the on the people, you know, workers insect-repellent they're, they're working in the fields and this spray, although it may be sprayed on the next farm over the wind takes it over, raise it on them and it's wind works. It's a nerve agent, and these people will start foaming and vomiting. It's happened in. It's happened recently. It is horrifying. What has happened and who do you think makes up most of the farmwork. Yeah, so so wait is what what happened with the judge now? And so he said, fuck you. EPA federal judge overruled EPA and said, you're not following basic science. This is a threat to children to farm workers and you have to ban it. You've got sixty days to do it. Man. So it was that recently as was a week ago we go, and so they haven't decided whether they're going to, you know, other, they're going to try to take it up to the Supremes or fight. It just suck an incredible to me because like at some point and we always say what they're gonna do with this somewhere there, there's a sequence of people who are going to either decide or be told the decide like you have to fight this thing and like, how the fuck do you go home to your children or even just, I don't know as a general human being, you know what? I think yourself and then me, I still want this to happen. I think we should still nerve guests that people who are making me my yellow peaches, like. What the where is the fucking schism. I just don't get it. I do truly miss the days of like. Intelligent conservatives like I'm happy to do Chris disagree on planning stuff and have an intelligent conversation about things. It's it's great. It's important for the process. It can't always be super left or super right as much as I've gone full hippy at this point, but, but it's insane like there's been a schism in morality now that I just I genuinely like, don't fucking get. Station when people are foaming at the mouth, one thing. Right, right. What's the, what's the threshold foaming at the malice. Got it. Is he foaming at the mouth? We should probably not do that. Peaches. Peaches are great, but give it give it a fucking rest. We can use something else. There has to be something else. I Don. I mean, it's just it's insane to me. It's it's besides the the course the ridiculousness affected these people are at the EPA. It's not some, right, right. Some of the group that is just like, who is this person? I just you just want to sit them down and be like, tell me where this is coming from, like who hit you. Yeah, and that's a that's a case where science came to our rescue. They've studied this nerve agent for years, and there was nothing that could that the scientists really could it a otherwise say that could defend the USA corpora FO's. And so Henry? Yeah, even again, like it's like you don't even need, you know, study for twelve years foam into the mouth, check that one's out, right, right. Yep. Nope. Sorry. Fuck had not. Gonna use that one anymore. Figure another one out. I mean. But it's when it's when it's when the lobbyists for DOW Chemical becomes more important than your child that were. Fell. Yeah. I mean, we could go on about the the fucking money stuff of your ever. Yes, it's it is a nightmare. All right. So listen, it is lazy and it is pretty fucking racist to think just because Hispanics are running for office or that they care about the environment that Latinos will turn out to vote and vote in the direction that one of us would prefer them to what else can we do to encourage positive turnout and participation. More importantly, I guess leading up to actual turnout participation in the process along the way. We know, you know, Latinos are very community oriented. They're very. So when they hear from peers that it's cool to vote, that is important devote that I'm gonna vote that I did vote that I registered. You should register that this information that's coming from their trusted peers that's coming from the powerful, go moderates in the community, the priest, the soccer coach that the community leaders themselves are the ones sending the message then and also in this day and age that the celebrities the athletes right that they follow. Our says work with a lot of those more the faces and names. Is there an outreach there to try to give those people a podium? There is an outreach to do that. I couldn't. I can say we've been very successful in being able to do that, but it is something that is important in in. I wanna make sure that we do that more and more as we increase our social media usage. I am. I am of a certain age where I did not grow up with social media and of a certain age where Twitter is not your natural instinct. And so I do believe that it is vital to be able to reach people with the influencers that influenced them. And that is community influencers, and that is it could be celebrity influence or social media influencers, but they need to hear that a, it's the cool thing to do be it's important to do and that every vote is important and that see that it will have an effect on their community and if they don't do it there FOX and here's, why are there a good amount of younger people like s in in your in the green Latinos party organization? Yeah. How does how do your demographic skew, you know the it is? I am hard pressed to find a young, Latino millennial or younger that doesn't say they're an environmentalist so it's amazing right above that generation. You get a lot. A blank stares and a lot of what you know, but but it is. It is almost universal and and and I'm talking lifestyle wise, riding bikes vegetarianism veganism, you know, up and down water conservation carrying water bottles. And it's not just the Latino community, but I'm most more focused on that where these young kids are living, what they're, you know, not completely still have consumerism and in, but they're really breaking down the boundaries of what we had. This sumptious we had growing up, capitalism is right. You know, the consumption is right and and testing these things and saying, hey, let's think about this. Let's think about society. Let's think about how we live and and maybe do it a better way, and that's beautiful. I learned so much from them. I love Nick. You to. So our Latino is going to turn out to vote on November. Sixth, how if things changed in the past twenty two months, I expected in the in the first election for Latinos to come out heavily. Unfortunately, the Clinton campaign did not excite them and give them something to vote for voting against an unknown commodity. That was fun to watch. Like WWF wrestler was not enough of incentive, but now there is a track record. There is words there is deeds. There is family members suffering that I have got to believe that Latinos will stand up when their back is to the wall and take the time to register, take time to vote. And like you said, sixty six thousand Latinos are turning eight. Eighteen every month. Men. Those kids are gonna be in it, and they're going to tell their friends to be in it and that Tuesday, November it's going to be, you know, hey, did you vote? I voted, hey, I got my sticker and here's a photo of it and I and I wanna live in that world. Yeah, that happens and I wanna be there when it happens and that excites me. And so I feel like with Pete Wilson back and he, he motivated California's to vote, and and Judd and sheriff are Pyo motivated zones devote Trump is gonna motivate Latinos, devote and others not just let through knows. This is going to be tidal wave, say it with me, Ryan Quinn. It's going to be a tidal wave fucking hope. Will you know? I, it's, there is all you know in two thousand sixteen there all the. I remember there were pictures of Latinos in line, and then everybody you know is making their jokes online. Oh, thank God. The Latinos is gonna. Save. Us turned out didn't go so well. Pictures of people in lines, don't do it, and then you see these numbers of people that didn't turn out. And those reasons do make a lot of sense. You know, the Clinton campaign did a fucking terrible job of that of reaching out to those people and giving them specific release reasons in an appealing to their to their basic moralities and family values in conservation values, and you just hope you hate to say it, but it's like you hope it's gotten bad enough specific enough to these people in their communities that they are getting its midterm, like a lot of people don't turn out in midterms, always, you hope this is the biggest one ever it's still going to be lower. I mean, US is voting turnout period is is atrocious, but you hope you hate to be the party of, no, but you hope there's something here for for people to build on that. They that they want to be part of to to turn back this, this just wave of Buchan evil. So all right, how, how can we help with that? What are the side, your group, which groups are having the biggest impacts over the next few months? Wh, which which group. Are doing the best work, where can we most specifically help, whether it's helping to try to reach out to some of these influencers and things like that, Brian knows all those people. Yeah, I'm kidding. Like, how do we? How can we get? Let's get specific here about mobilizing our people here. Yeah, so I'll talk to talk about other groups that aren't green Latinos, and then hopefully you give me an opportunity to talk about our stuff, but when it comes to getting out the vote for environmental and conservation advocates, the league of conservation voters doing fantastic work. They're raising more money than they've ever raised for a midterm. It's record breaking the amount of money that they're raising and they're in where they're applying, that they are applying it four pro environment, pro conservation candidates in these battleground races, and they're applying it against the dirty dozen environmental miscreants in the house and the Senate to take them out. It is time when you can't have a form of denial and. That to become cheap, where what's the cost? There is no cost to denial. I'll just I'll make up for it with oil and gas industry. There's gotta be a cost denial, and and now groups like l. c. b. and then you have activist groups like three fifty and green peak and near a club that are putting the boots on the ground. We've got the people's climate March coming up on September eighth in San Francisco and and across the country, go to people's climate dot org and sign up to go to a Mark on September eighth. You've got actions that are being taken at at green Latinos were at green Latinos, dot org. And right now we're fighting in defense of the clean power plan, which just had a the repeal announcement this week, and we're fighting against the clean cars rollback, which had. Peel a couple of weeks ago. Yes, so so let's get into that. So how are you? How are you guys spending your time and your funding? So we can send people they're both now and over the next three months? Like what are what are your beachheads. Yeah. And so for us, we're really pushing in one community that we work with in Los Angeles that's over by the port. There's organization called the moving forward network and they're organizing communities that live in high traffic areas with drugs. So all of Ellen diesel and three ways and ports and goods movement areas to fight for electric vehicles. And there's a group called Chiesa that where they are fighting for the VW money that you know when VW cheated on their emissions of, oh, yeah. Dates got all this money in that in that, and they're fighting to have that money go to providing electric buses for school. Children's school. School buses children's shouldn't be writing in buses to school that are idling that are hurting are always the grossest. Yes, that are burning a scuttle and you're stuck in that bus school buses should be electric and they're fighting for that. And at the same time, as they're doing this, the administration wants to roll back clean car standards when no one's asking for it, the industry isn't even industry is against it. They asked for, they did ask for like his first month in office. Another like una, no, we fuck up. We, this is not at all what we were talking about that just give their studios. Fucking knocking out trucks left and right. All Americans buyer is SUV's, but anyways, and so we are. I mean, I earlier I had chastised the old form of organizing, but I have to say that that form when you do when you compliment it without feats on the ground and the letters and the response to and comments to regulations, and you put all these things together, we can turn around decisions of this administration, and we have, you know, the these things, they had a dirty truck standard that they put out and they had to turn that around or an effort to sell public lands that they had to turn around. And so these things are happening. And so we're, we're trying to organize the Latino community to push back on these announcements through social media. We have, we have guides of social media guides. We have comment. Signs, we have buttons where they can call. And when the operator answers, they give them their zip code and maybe their address if needed, and they'll hook them up with their member of congress with a script saying, you know, you have to fight for the clean power plan or against the clean cars, rollback, or against pesticides, the issue that they find addresses them and their community that motivates them and they and they speak to their friends, they speak to their family. They speak to their community and they belong to local organizations. This education that's happening to them and it's happening in their own backyards. That is what is making the change and it and it's happening and and it's gradual, but it's happening are some of these new fangled tools of like townhall project or five calls dot org? Are those getting into Latino community? It's not that they aren't. It's that some of the. The organizations that can afford to use those or have access to those are reaching successfully into the Latino community. And and it may be sold for some of it is just lack of culturally relevant messaging. They may trait and that goes beyond just taking English language messaging and translating it goes into what would let's, you know, if you're going to research, what motivates your members than in you? Wanna reach Latinos than research. What motorists for tie, or you know, do do an analysis, talk to some Latinos and say, does this messaging work on you and and if you don't address them in a cultural relevant way, it doesn't matter what tools you have. They're not gonna hit that button, right? But if you do like I wanna I wanna hook you up at the five calls dot ORG people they, they've done such a great job of, you know, start off as this website to announce. It's a, it's an app on your phone and and it's just exploded. It's great. It couldn't have made it easier. It couldn't be easier to use, but you know, basically it has list of timely ship that's going on. You pick the issue. You click on, it shows you by your location who your representatives you. There's a script and you click, they picked up and I talked to them or it was busy or I left a message and then it tabulates the whole thing. And you just read the thing he plugs in the names. I mean, it's it's so easy, but I would love to see an and maybe there they do have a a translated version of that, but I doubt it because it's a lot of work and their bootstrap. I would love to see some sort of integration there, something specifically focused towards those communities that maybe takes out some of the extraneous stuff. Not that anything extraneous these days. But that's the problem is everyone feels like they're fighting on five hundred bucks an hour. Yes, but I would love to see something a little more specific and if someone can go can handle that translation to see that power because because you can make an impact in the time that we have left, whatever sixty, ever, whatever fucking days too. To get into those communities and get those people fired up and calling. Absolutely an interested in what's going on. So that's that's interesting. And maybe even some of those odds of America people to as well. They just launched a whole new thing called vote. Save America. Oh yeah, which which is all about. It's making sure you're registered and then checking it four fucking times because people keep sticking your vote away, but then it the next thing it does is point you towards specific things in your area where you can make a difference now because the the five calls Doug wordings e. dot org is great, but that's talking to your existing representatives. Something like boats America is a little more focused on phone banking, things like that for for the people who are running for office now. And that's obviously a thing that's gonna make such a big difference commencement. So and may and make some of those five calls calls where you're talking to your peers, you know? Yes, not just yakking elected talk to your peers and make that election app. One wear on election day. You have automatic five priests. Texts that go to your five friends that you already had set that said, hey, Joe vote yet. And that goes out automatically to ten of a little reminder. Literally just says one in always as take take your best friend or take your most popular friend with to too. Yeah, that wouldn't be there us Brian, but the point remains. Not everybody can be popular, so. All right. So do you guys take? Do you guys take donations money? Yeah. Do you like money like where is the dollar going when when we when we give to green the Tino's it, it, you go to green Latinos, dot org, and there's a giant give button. It should be the entire front page. If it's not gonna. Right, and you hit that and then you take your retirement account and you just wrote in a couple numbers. Check on bingo where we're, we're going and cook and every awesome. Awesome. Awesome. I will. We will all that's going to go in the show notes and and the this is the part where people actually able to do things with a we love philosophy and talking about the why of things. But you know, getting into the what, if in the house is always, that's the point these days. All right. Well, we are close here to to time. Thank you very, very much Mark with us today. Appreciate enough. Yeah, he's been fantastic. It's been a great conversation. There's a lot of important things that we need to address and podcasts like other social media tools are are more important than I ever thought. And I know it's shocking chocolates pretty much every day. Do Mark, who who else should we? Should we talk to not necessarily climate or Latino could be anything. You know, again, I think you get the gist. We, we like to ask one big question a week or talk about one big topic from space to cancer antibiotics to devoting to, you know, the existential ish exa centralist stuff that is affecting people now are in the next twenty years. And there we found a, you know, a great consortium of folks that are kicking ass on the ground that people don't really know about. So if you have any recommendations now or later we would, we would love to take those from. Right. Well, let me think about it and I got your emails and I'll send you some good ideas. You guys are covering some very interesting topics and you do it smartly and with a sense of humor which is which is vital if you want people to listen, you gotta be funny and you got to reach their summer training them emotionally. And so that's that's. Important. So thank you for doing that right. Brian used to be able to cry on demand, but all the surgery may that go way. Can't move. I can't move Machiko anymore, but to look. All matters. We're keeping them young Margot. All right, Mark. We like to wrap up our episodes with a lightning round of questions. Yep. Lighting around Mark. When was the first time in your life? When you realized you had the power of change the power to do something meaningful, Chevy lightning bolt sound right. I think I think growing up for me, I was moved in musical theater. I was theater to theater high school. How can I had the ability to move an audience by words or song? And I thought end by my voice and I thought this is this is something that I am going to use and it wasn't through musical theater was through politics to be able to move people with my voice and my words, and that was an early form of power from me. So you're saying you're a singer, marred, still saying? I was the only musical theater person in history that really was not recommended to sing. They just they were. They were just like, no, why don't you? Let's. Three. I guess Mike's not working today against, sorry, mired story. So weird a yodeler on the podcast and we did have a yodeler. Yeah. Yeah, you can sing a few. What do you call it? I don't know how to talk about music a few lines. If this is going great for your Brian, I'm going to stop. Yup, don't saying yeah, we did have a yodeler. Number two. All right. Mark, who specifically is someone in your life that has positively impacted your work in the past six months? I say for me, I, I'd have to go to Cesar Chavez. I mean, he's not alive, but nine. I am in a mode of thinking about leadership, and I said this earlier. So pardon my repetition, but we are in a period of time where leaders were added desk, have been added desk, writing letters, going to meetings at Owen, be listening to funders and or catch in, or in his fucking hand, leaders of movements are the ones that are out front taken. The first baton going on the hunger strike the longest going to jail. They're the ones on the ground. Round putting themselves at risk and Cesar Chavez lived what he preached. He he was out there out front. He didn't ask anyone to do anything that he wouldn't do, and we lack an. I'm not putting myself in anywhere near that category. When I say we lack that kind of leadership. At this moment, I'm including myself, but reading about him and learning about him. And I was alive when he was alive, makes me motivated to say we can't have and be those leaders again. And that are the first across the bridge that take the first baton. That make the giants social change that is uncomfortable because if we don't choose to put ourselves in a bit of discomfort now we will have no choice but to be in discomfort later. And so we need to be the ones to say, I, I am. I am going to be the leader that puts ourselves out there and people like Cesar Chavez and others like Emo. Okay. That I mentioned earlier, were the leaders at did that? And so that motivates me. Do you ever think about running for office if we changed campaign finance reform? I didn't have to be glorified. Telemarketer raising five thousand dollars every day. I'm in elective office. I would consider doing it. But in this current stage, I am not going to do that. I think that's a pretty fair answer. Yeah. It's it's pretty ugly out there. She's, hey, Mark, I appreciate all the positivity and enthusiasm and successes. But what do you do when you really get overwhelmed by all this bullshit specifically? What do you do. Everybody's talking about self care, everybody, some, some of our guests go walk in the woods, some a nap, some of play with their kids, some of them, you know, Netflix, how do you take care of yourself? I take a nap in the woods with my kids. That's insane. Coincident. I love watching soccer. Squad enter at Barcelona's. My number one, God DC United is my local squad, and I love traveling spending time with my kids going out riding bikes. Going out in the woods, listening to music going to see live music. These things really make life worthwhile in in. You need to escape because there is a lot that brings you down, but there's more that we can do together that makes us optimistic like it is DC good music town. It used to be a great punk scene in in the late eighties, and then it kinda died for a long time and. They had a kind of a hip hop junk yard band seen here, and then now it's coming back. There's about, you know where there used to be like three music venues. Now there's like thirty. And so this really is making an effort. But I, I wouldn't say that DC had been a good cultural or art scene on its own, but it's coming back slowly where we create our own stuff and. For me too, when I need to like get Senator just go escape music, especially live music. Oh yeah. Yeah. The vest Bryan. Have you ever been to DC? This just occurred to me. I I have a few times, but just short trips have to do a little trip. Yeah, it is. I saw the team trip. What do they call those flowers? The cherry blossom. Sherry. Awesome. CS saw the cherry blossoms. I went to the the mall. Oh, good. I bet it's been. I had some really good food. Okay. All right. We'll talk more about the talk more about DC later Mark. How do you consume the news what he, what do you do? You read your news? Mostly I sign up for political an environmental rags that come in my Email every morning, and so I, I do. What do you like? I get a mixture of politico and axios and ABC has the node than others. And so I will digest those as quickly as I can. And then there's several that do strict. Early environmental, you know that that have good environmental news, enter energy and environmental news, and and I absorbed those as well. But I like to be I less and less do I watch TV it's too depressing. The news on TV stark out. It's dark and I haven't. I'm not good enough on Twitter to be able to really figure out how to be selective enough to not waste a million hours trying to get one nugget of news a wish I was because people who are good at it. No, I, yeah, it's getting harder. Yeah, it's getting harder. All right. Brian, ask your favorite question. Is a good one Mark. If you could Amazon prime one book to Donald Trump, what would it be. It would be probably Naomi Klein, no is not enough. She's incredible that it's how we can go beyond just using our words. Like I've said, you can't just be anti-something. You have to physically be someone who is on the ground being against something and using their time in their efforts. And so you know, is not enough on in this scenario, we need to push back more physically and more aggressively love that love it. But I wish bed. The different questions that one. Yes, somebody will read it to. All right, Brian. Take us on. Where can where can we all follow you online? Mark, green Latinos is our handle. Hopefully you're not the one handling that you just described your Twitter. I'm absolutely Nour's. Okay. Is we have a team of twenty millennials locked in closet that are working on daily? Perfect. And let's see. Facebook. We've got a couple of green Latinos, public s sites, and I believe we may have. I know we have an Instagram and maybe have a Snapchat, and they're all just bow hop notch. We're getting better. We're getting better. Your confidence is coming. Awesome. We'll put all that stuff in the show notes. I've tried to get Brian to do us a Snapchat. I don't know. I will what that entails me neither. Yeah, we need not millennia. One, we need a young person. Do you know we're technically millennials, right? I mean, just like. Very tired is tired. Yeah. Anyways, I think I think for me, Snapchat is very difficult because I like I'm, I'm like, Nixon, f- I'm gonna tape it. I'm going to save it and Snapchat. They just race these things, and it just for me, it's like I just spent my time writing this beautiful to go that eloquent and it's gone in five. Yes. Yes. Right. I don't get it. I don't get it for him setting. Yeah. All right. Well, listen, Mark, we can't thank you enough man. This has been awesome. And for all that you're doing out there, I wish you guys the best and we're going to mobilize these humans as much as we can back you guys and help as much as we can over the next few months. And then after that, I mean, if things don't go well, November six, there's no after that, but you know, from going forward, we thank you for all that you that you do out there for making this your mission. Yeah. Well, thank you. Thanks guys. Keep doing what you're doing and let's hit the streets. Yeah, absolutely. All right. And we will your heart out if you wanted to Mark if it. No, don't let people tell you can't sing. All right. We'll talk to you soon. All right, by us. Thanks you. Bye. Take it easy shares. Thanks to our incredible guest today, and thanks to all of you for tuning in. We hope this episode has made your commute or awesome workout or dishwashing or fucking dog walking late at night that much more pleasant as a reminder. Please subscribe to our free Email newsletter at important, not important dot com. It is all the news most vital to our survival as a species and you can follow us all over the internet. You can find us on Twitter at important, not IMP. So weird also on Facebook and Instagram at important, not important, Pinterest, and tumbler the same thing. So check us out. Follow us share us like us, you know the deal and please subscribe to our show wherever you listen to things like this. And if you're really fucking awesome rate us on apple podcasts, keep lights on. Thanks please. And you can find the show notes from today, right in your little podcast player and at our website important, not important dot com. Thanks to the very awesome Tim blamed for our gym and music to all of you for listening. And finally, most importantly, to our moms for making us have a great day. Thank guys.

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Shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival

Formally Informal

24:43 min | 1 year ago

Shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival

"Hey Tommy here <hes>. This podcast is going to be a little bit different than our normal. <hes> unfortunately a tragedy has occurred. Someone has shot and killed multiple innocent people go on a mass shooting at the Gilroy garlic festival today. <hes> what you're here is first hand witnessed this event <hes> just hours after it happened our hearts go out to the families affected by this attack. Oh my Gosh I o made fucking garlic festival in find out some got shot. Oh yeah there was five dead or something like that I was there. Were all fucking text next to make sure he's okay. Fuck Dude. He was serving beer out. There will then fucking com wire. Why are you not tech Holy Shit all them? I'm GonNa text them on. What's is gone on fucking you? Don't take some Shit like like Oreo K- know you fucking call and make sure man what was going on. Oh there is like five people go the garlic festival today. Oh my God from Gilroy. Do That's like fucking twenty minutes from here. Multiple reportedly were injured and Sunday in Shooting Guru Festival today at least seven people have been transferred area hospitals toward the ended the final day of the festival fuck. I mean this is just a few hours ago. Yeah no the <hes>. My Lady was playing it on T._v.. I guess about five people were killed six injured and so on so forth she's Chris James. That's the time to crack a beer beer root beer man. Let's not the fucking point. Hey I just saw some shit on the news about the fucking garment festival you'll pay. Hey Man Yeah I was there. I was there. I'm good. I'm good Oh shit man. It was like I was probably about fifties. I would say about fifty Louis from that from the shock yeah yeah I was there man I was getting ready to go home and I was <hes> in the bridge area and all of a sudden like took in five shots like right away and other mark records. Are you know I'll be honest I thought but because I was looking at the cop to like see what his reaction was a complicated because in the richer there's a cop now looking at his reaction to see q then he didn't do another of what the Hell mixing do you like people running towards get out of the air. You know get out of the League. That's what I knew. Something was wrong. I just I just ran dude. I'm not I wasn't. I'M GONNA take no video. No nothing yeah. I don't blame you yeah. Yeah you scary scared holy Shit Bro Yeah so yeah. I heard some people were killed. <hes> were injured but I didn't see the guy I would. I I was close and this guy I was running. My friend lives on the other side of jewelry. I ran to her house. Well I mean didn't run but I ran some of the way and then walked away to your house and <hes> from what this guy was walking Nixon. Me said he thought a guy like camouflage. He says he was camouflage Dal. Get all that Shit Damn so he had like military fatigues and Shit on yeah yeah yeah one of my friends. I'll tell you just drink and try to mellow out because because he was crazy and I never thought that I was in something like this crazy because I'm on like when I'm so forward the biggest she's all yeah. Stay away from crowds without drew by Mandalay Bay casino with that for you. Do you remember what happened to family. Be Mixing frigging when I'm back to something she let this happen uh-huh my God that's fucking I I actually I'm actually recording the podcast with friends of mine right now and <hes> we were looking to the news in fucking popped up on my screen and I was like Oh my God dude. I gotTA fucking call him. Make sure he's okay. No make sure to let them know that we wanted to make sure he's okay so so we want to. We wanted to call. Make sure you're okay <hes> I. I don't have two way communications on the call. Fuck Dude. That's a fucking trip <music>. Some people have come from the original issue torches. I got like a couple of people but at least eleven people fuck I couldn't connected with the with the news until Jeffrey humming things man who's the I'd never thought something like this would happen yeah that that's always here right. I mean eh trump's even talking about it. He says law enforcement is at the more. She's going to fucking talk about it. I got to mention a cellphone then. I'd never heard what I was walking away from the the park. I never heard that many sirens my life and it was like it was like a war zone yeah now right now. I'm outside and I can hear the helicopters. Just just from what I heard is like I said the second there's a second suspect and they're still looking at large. I suspect is down by better custody. I don't know I'm glad you're OK shit so we're all glad you're okay. I mean like I said I never I mean I've heard you know I used to shoot myself and after you know I thought you know if if I were to say it was an assault Rafer pistol to me John Pistol but now reports coming out that I am with an A._R.. But do it was when I shoot any archenemy your ears ring distant not this does not mean you make something about bowed out at all like I said I thought it was crackers. Like Spider Cocker twenty two it sounded like a twenty from and another report that I- ties that the the interviewed a band the earlier on the news the bad it said that they were shooting from the stage towards the alley towards the towards the area where people eat me alley which is in the center of the of the fact of well. That's where I was literally will off to the side after the tide of it a little bit <hes> but that's a hundred that's like one hundred yards away and they're saying that those shots were coming from bad hide and into the into the alley into into into the area where where people were and <hes> but it sounds creates a lot closer back and like <hes> <hes>. I didn't think anybody get hit. Yeah I just saw the people just running away from from that area. It was just chaos at that point. Yeah Yeah and you know we. We were lucky we we opened the canyon out that people are scrambling wielding a pair. Actually I didn't see anybody gets grappled. You know travel ban ribbon to open it up to the good and then we ran towards exide. That's where <hes> the shuttle buses are. The bus drivers will telling the <hes> the people that were running away to get off plus. Get off the bus and get down. Get down and almost got on the bus get myself. What if this guy is running? You know you know like I didn't find him and gets on this bus with me I I. I don't know I'm not going to get on the run up. Run up the backside of the of the Birkenau. I'll you know find my only but yet that's what scares me most Gigan- what is the shooter you know gets on this Bush with what happened. Yeah Yeah that was that was scary to <hes> but yeah it was <hes> situation to say the least wow dude well. We'll please tell them we're all glad that he's Ok and the the next I drink. We're going to have to be honest is. We're glad that he's doing well so yeah so the guys are telling me that they're all glad you're okay and that the next drink is on us. Thank God I can't I twenty because when you call me I work with <hes> he just call me earlier. You don't follow through an it was crazy because it's after that volunteer work best of all and something like this happens you know I would've never thought something like with the honestly you know I'll bring this up to that. Initial reports say that this guy snuck through the creek site and not through the fences and you know I'm familiar with the Cecil I've been going to off and on for the last twenty years. There's a <hes> but I always thought there's a perimeter fence along along the creeks I and the initial thing that he came through the creek side through the fences and smoking but I always thought that those those parameters that that terminators tight but I don't know what else thinking is he's. I volunteered today. I guess you didn't cut me down or even one you know with the with Tintri they didn't do that at all. Wow Yeah I'm dating. They need you check mighty just went in there Joan my name and they said they give me freestanding. Put me in security. That's that's that's a security breach that that's a weakness. You know everybody everybody that pays normally to go into the festival. biggie wandered down get shirt checked and everything on a standard standard frankly and I hope that comes up because look you know but one thing is that perimeter always. I always thought that you know digital 'cause I can do that through that creek and through that ball by ten years ago I always thought that was fixed. You know that they would fix that that you know it was something anything they could just crawl under make a whole you know it's one of those readings ventures that you just go through and because dude like doing shit like this could happen what they find out. I'm glad. widhraw right where I was like I see shooting I see shooting in the mail in the in the lines and like all great another one right and I'm like thinking whatever right and and I click on his his fucking Gilroy Mike what Gilroy and this is garlic festival. It was like Oh fuck over there. I'll faulk <hes> while I mean we're. We're all glad you're okay. I mean <hes> <HES> I. I'm just fucking speechless right now but <hes> we wish best for the families and all that other shit too we really do like. I can't imagine something like this happened. Is You know but the and and it it goes back to talking to my <hes> my friend you know we have the toughest gun laws in the country and she'd like it happened. I don't know if it's third or second time or whatever right in the last three or four years yeah. This shit is happening here. We'll I mean just last month. We had that guy kill kill his manager at the Ford dealership right eight way by our work like five minutes yeah issue. I believe in gun control to an extent own guns I <music>. I should have a hobby. We've gone on Sean substance before together a are. I mean you know what they're saying that this guy this guy head you know what I mean and it's not it's not gonNA help into bout who uses it and they're saying that this is the initial reports. They're saying that this was a young White Guy M._O.. That you're going to look like online like you know. L The other things you know mashing this is this. This is not a gun issue. This is logical issue control this part yeah. It's a psychological. This is eight psychological this. Is You know this is something else then you guys are going to have to find a way to get these guns out of these guys hand one of my friends. That's ultra conservative trump supporter <hes> I used to use my old corker and he lives in Utah now all yeah it conducts a mini series. You know thing I asked me. If I'm okay. I'm good and he hasn't yeah you know there's there's a lot of places in the world and all I'm glad I have my lie concealed carry. What would you do in that situation though that you're going to run towards the fucking Bomb Mr Marine Kyrie I would be running into that group? I would do running toward you know I would be running more wherever people the running away because once you obtain that license you are remember. You and I talked about this when the mentally be when that happen the M._F._a.. From that COP throws you have an obligation AH protect people because those seconds that that people are getting killed. You can't stop you can save lives with you know by acting on the acting within those seconds and I the same thing even today if I had if I had a concealed carry in in California I would Iran I would've I would've gone. I would've gone toward toward. I don't give a fuck. What kind of gun can I would've just gone on the but it's like I said it's like a you have to have a you have to have a mentality that that you have to have them mentality that you react? Into that you do that without looking at <hes> other things by looking at a family that I have to look out for you know what I mean like you know what I mean you exactly. You have a quick decision that you have to make to sacrifice. Everything and I hit a cigarette because you know when we hire cops really doing that. Do are you blooming to sacrifice your some cops copter Mary. Everybody has a family. You know. You've got these job for the really judy. How you do that mentality you just go? You just got to go because the second concede life in these types of situations fuck. I wish I had my cable the patch you in in our conversation here I'm sure Zach. These guys are dying. Asking questions ends but it's okay. It's okay I mean you know you. You kind of caught me when you had a few trying to calm down the adrenaline Jonathan I was. I was running disguised at like. I told you that he was right next to him. He thought it he's all yeah. You know it's it's losing your mind that should you run or she rockaway because maybe this guy is sucking aiming at people ooh ready. You know what I mean like. Some of these people like they want to do more machine people who are running away just cause damage and he told me that straight up my wow you're right because I did the same thing I was like kind of. He's going through my mind like you know. Should I rent or should Iraq because every guy yeah exactly comprising well. I'm GonNa let you go. I'll see a work tomorrow. I'll be there okay yeah man yeah no problem. I get some rest and I'll see you tomorrow. Man Holy Fuck in California what he was saying is like it. It sounded like it was firecrackers because the A._R.. Fifteen that used to be able to get in California were only <hes> able to carry the twenty two rifle rounds so that makes sense like it sounded like a pistol and officers like pop pop pop pop up as a bill to carry five six which are rifle rounds is kind of what he talk about like if you hit that shit it's GonNa fucking Blair out your ears. You'RE GONNA you're GonNa hear the crack like you here. With a thirty. You know Yep so mcq sense. There was some dude who just dented sir. I grew up with guns a group around him like my grandma had like a shotgun and a rifle on her wall. Let's put it that way like my family is that level of central California where like their Hick Redneck Shit like but we need to have psychological aspects like even even England and other European countries deal with it. It isn't about gun violence violence. It's about just psychological care and actually dealing with the issues but there isn't any financing going towards that either. My personal opinion is if the N._R._A.'s going to say it's not gun violence. It's it's a psychological issue than they have to fuck and put the money for to fix the psychological ship like fuck. You catch like no no no. That's the problem and then sit silent. You know what if you're going to say. That's the fucking problem that. Help the fucking problem help the people that need the need the help don't fucking cut off the funding. I don't know man. I don't know man your buddies good though I'm glad to hear safe that's yeah it is good that nuts nuts nuts nuts man. I was Kinda hoping for more funny fucking recording today <hes> something a little bit more lighthearted. I've been trying to push in that direction but it doesn't look it's GonNa work all right well. I can give you one more to do it before before I wrap up and leave. I'll leave you with this. <HES> GRANDPA who one romp with two hookers in get your grandpa laid radio contests choke to the death as he hurried his dinner on way to have three. Oh no I will now share with you the Huffington Post story. Oh God of okay okay. I got listen to this. I Johnny Morris Eighty six died on Thursday hours before he was supposed to redeem his prize for winning Howard Stern's. Get My grandpa laid competition all wow or is choked on a piece of steak just prior prior to when he was scheduled to have sex with two women from the Moonlite Bunny ranch in Carson City Nevada. Were Prostitution's legal what he's been there before. I think this is the saddest day in Bunny ranch history owner Dennis Hof told T._M._Z. has he sat next to crying. Theresa kisses who had selected orders as the winner or is his grandson. Ed said his GRANDPA was looking forward to the big night he was ecstatic. Is GRANDPA said or grandson said according to the New York Daily News he'd been that way ever since our trip to the to the stern show and then here's A. C. Gallery for porn store gallery. Is that actually her <hes> no no. I don't think so no now I say wonder he choked on his fuck at stake Jesus Christ. Oh you WanNa see the girls these girls. I believe these are the girls Oh my God poor guy reminds me of blue in that one movie where he dies before he's about to get into that fucking school yeah where he dies while he's about to fucking do the K Y wrestling match with those chicks and SPA. I don't think we're asking the real question. Did they follow through with the competition. I want to go ahead and say no. I'm going to say no that that did not happen yeah. They're pretty much ended once. They found out like his dead so you're not gonNA have sex after all. What I really WanNa know though is because I mean I'm? I'm you know yeah this. Is You know there was a competition thing that Howard stern is doing. Did the girls still get paid. Oh yeah no they. They got paid prior to the competition and it was kind of those things like. Would you be willing to fuck an eighty year old man and they're like oh can fucking pay it right like yeah and then he seemed like a nice guy and they're like Oh yeah. I'd love the fuck this guy myself. I wish we we had the budget to do something like this. I imagine what we would do with that kind of budget. Oh we would honestly great it would be honestly I'd be reading the competition so that I one oh come on. I I would be fair. I'm a fair yeah but you know what I'm actually debating to open up a page on page and maybe make it a goal to have crazy things like this <hes> to have a budget to actually do contests so <hes> you had we may actually be seeing a formerly informal podcast Patriot page coming up here soon for those who want to support the podcast and make <hes> make our troops come true yeah I am also going to be opening a discord channel <hes> for communication. If you WANNA contact us through dischord I will be including Lincoln the description for that as well for our server.

California COP Shooting Guru Festival Gilroy Tommy Chris James League Birkenau Howard Stern Louis Mandalay Bay Nixon Jeffrey Ford Bush biggie Cecil faulk
120 - This Podcast Will Solve All Your Problems

The Valleycast

1:01:43 hr | 1 year ago

120 - This Podcast Will Solve All Your Problems

"Hi everybody and welcome to the Elliott. Morgan Valley cast our good to see you. Hi How are you gosh? I'm nervous? Are you nervous? This is such a weird thing. I'm doing a podcast by myself. I've never I've never done this before and I can already see. There's a little thing white here in the video on the iphone and I wish I had. I wish I had fixed that. So we're already second guessing ourselves. That's good yes so. This is the second of two podcasts. That we've done from the valley folk that are just Solo. If you haven't seen Joe's yet go check it out. He did a feeling good podcast. I'm going to be doing a feeling bad. Podcast for a second not really. I'm GonNa tell you what I'm talking about. I'm telling you what I'm going to talk about in one of the things I'm going to have a feeling bad segment just to balance the universe. You know there's too much positivity going around right now and here to visit you know Martin. This is it you know. Thank you for hitting play on. This is a very surreal thing to be alone and in quarantine for over two months now and go from speaking very intimately with people to now being by myself and speaking to a larger group of people some of whom I know some. I don't and so before I dive into what we're GonNa talk about today and where this is going to go and how it's going to change your life. I just want to say that I hope you're doing okay It's like a maybe it's a pity thing to say now but I really do. It's so crazy everything's crazy and I you know okay and please bear in mind that like I've been alone I've been alone in my head for a while so I don't entirely know what's GonNa like fall out of my mouth but I do know that I'm going to be trying to speak from where I'm at. Which may be in some ways a good place and in some ways bad place and it will differ from where you're at so from the bottom of my my my silly squishy heart. I hope you're doing okay and I hope that this is enjoyable for you to listen to. I'm GonNa try to talk about a bunch of stuff. And then here's what's going to happen. I'm going to link all of them together with a singular theme. Okay and then at the end of it all your problems are going to be solved so congrats your life is when you're done when you Ends you're going to be like okay. Get everything now and you know. I promise I promise. That's what's going to happen if you stick around to the end but between now and the end. Here's what we're going to be talking about. I I'm going be bragging about myself. I think it's important to remember that in times of a global crisis when we as a nation are spiraling towards the worst economy. We've had since the Great Depression for the second time the past twelve years. It's important to have people rise up and say hey look I am. Also we just do we do a lot of like self deprecating humor and so we're switching it up here on this podcast. We're into a little bit of self-aggrandizing humor if there is any such thing and I'll try my best to like stick to my guns and not flex the self-deprecation muscle too much. But I will because I suck at a lot of things see anyway. Let's dive in here. We're GONNA BE TALKING ABOUT TODAY. First of all. Have you guys Discovered Leslie Jordan instagram account. Yet if you haven't and you're looking for joy in your life and you are just look if you like I don't have timelessness. Oh podcast I need. My Life Changed Right now. go check out leslie. Jordan's INSTAGRAM. It is nothing but light and love and laughter. And he's just this adorable tiny gay man and it's just he's the best and if you haven't followed his. He cracks me up. I saw his account from a tweet. That Tyler Oakley re tweeted. It's a leslie. Jordan is the only vlogger that I need or something like that and it was just this montage of him doing stuff instantly. I was like whoever this person I've seen him around. He's been in things for centuries but yeah first things first. Let's do the important stuff and talk about Leslie Dorm Anyway. Here's what I'm actually. After the bragging renew the feeling bad segment okay. Then I'm going to talk about underwear for some reason you'll never guess and then we're talking about what I'm into right now and what. I'm reading room listening to stuff like that. In case you're like I need more media to consume because clearly if you're watching this or listen to this you probably switch it up a little bit. Maybe it'll be of help. Maybe it'll be entertainment to you. I don't know I don't know I don't know but I do know that by the end of it you're going to be like I can't. He did it. He did it. I doubt I thought it was a joke. But he was being one hundred percent. Sincere and yeah. That's that's what we're doing here. This is going to be a life changing. Podcast you you're going to have your problems fixed. We we all know that everyone has problems right now but there's not anybody who's going all right enough is enough. Let's just solve it all at once because people think that's impossible like not realistic. We'll say what am I going to Brag about? Okay what do you I mean I guess if I were should I start gosh all right? Let's start with the valley folk. I'm GonNa Brag about the valley folk for a second. Is that okay? Do you mind if I if I do that. I mean you're here you're part of it. You got me into this mess. You know what I mean. It's your fault if you're listening to this and you're like don't know about is this is on you okay. So the first step is taking responsibility for your own actions. This whole year has been and I don't mean you're in the sense of twenty twenty. I just mean like a year as in from a year ago. I'm real proud. Y'All I'm really proud and I'm proud of a lot of things that I think people are would be like all proud about that but I am. I'm proud of all of it and I'm really excited for this to be over. Because we were building this wonderful momentum toward you know what is a new direction a better version of who we are and then this whole thing happened just sort of felt like really frustrating pause button but in that pause there's been a lot of time for reflection and a lot of time for you know. Healing is probably a dramatic but accurate word. It's it's nice to be distanced a little bit from the onslaught of like hate that we got during the the lease stuff and it's nice to be like moving on. I think but part of the moving on process I think is also being able to look back and look back in a way. That's like loving. I guess kind also like taking ownership and taking pride in the good stuff rather than like harping on the bad and I think if you if you dissect everything if you look back I can only speak for myself here. This is just me talking talking behalf of the valley which is a person who's a lot some things for sure and some things that would have been maybe think about that next time but for the most part. I'm really proud and I say that because you know you know what happened. Okay so I was hanging out with my girlfriend like a week ago and we were talking about like headphones and how sometimes you can forget. You're wearing them and forget that you have and I told her this story about. I think it was twenty thirteen source fed and we were in the writer's room and we were like doing our thing probably seven. Am IN THE MORNING. Six thirty or something insane. And I remember I was listening to like. I'm sure some super cheesy music that was like like Weezer or some late nineties pop punk band which we'll get to also in this later in this episode terrible music taste that I have but I I listen to music the same way. I listened to music when I was a fifteen year old kid. It's always life-changing no matter how basic and simple the lyrics are. It's one of my favorite things about weezer. Just their total cheese balls and so I remember. I don't remember exactly what it was. I assume it was like weezer or even something worse. Like third eye blind's something a little cringe. Just cringing enough. That you wouldn't really want people to know that you were like this is what I explained and I remember getting really into it and doing my thing and riding. It'd be in our time talk about news and it's going to be and then I remember Lee turning to me and going. Oh do you think people can't hear you right now? And I took my headphones off. And I was blasting the music to the whole like room and it was very funny and it was very embarrassing and I told that story and I was like oh. I wonder I wouldn't feel comfortable sharing that because there's like a painful thing now associated with the positive aspects of having worked with someone that you no longer work with and I was like now now. Can't I'm not GONNA do that? I'm not GonNa not tell stories and be proud of certain elements of things. So this is doing that. Basically just tearing off the mandate being like just so. You know you know paying aside. I'm really proud of the valley folk. I'm proud of what we did as a community. I'm proud of having worked with Lee in both professional on a personal realm for so long and because of that there's a history there and there's a history that we can learn from and we can reminisce about and we can laugh at and that's where I'm trying to come from so at the risk of people being life or opening old wounds there's opening on moods and there's also speaking from scars and being like. Hey you know this is a very beautiful thing and I feel like the celebration of it may be got cut a little short because of stuff. That went down But you know there's no reason we can't look back on things and be like one a show. We want a national like TV show and the real reason for that is because of the community that we have and that is what we were banking on when we made a very painful decision and to look back now and kind of see like we re y'all's comment some you know. Check THE SUB. Read it and all that stuff and yeah like you guys get it you guys get the the struggles and probably can infer internal things that are that we're working through but that's not that doesn't mean that all that other stuff isn't good and all other stuff shouldn't be celebrated so That's where I'm at. I'm just happy I'm just proud. It's been a cool. It's been a beautiful two years even including The the pain and the hardship. So I hope as you guys are listening to this that you're feeling that I hope you're able to to speak about this or to think on it and a joyful way because you know this has been a nice time for putting things in perspective a little bit and yeah we got a good thing. We had a good thing going. And I'm excited for the future and I'm excited to just Kinda Rev the engines back up a little bit when when the time comes and when I look back on on everything it makes me proud of all of it and makes me proud of every person involved and it makes me proud of the Patriot. Makes them proud of the Patriots? It makes me feel good about having a patriotic because there is something to the the knowledge that our hearts are in the right place despite the fact that we're narotics That I think is is cool and I think it's is worthy of talking about a little bit and being proud of and celebrating because I don't know I don't know of many people like the Valley Folk. I don't know of many entities like the valley folk. So yes that's that's all I'm GonNa say on that I think it's beautiful so combat me. Hey haters or whatever. I don't know everybody calls him trolls out. I don't think somebody being upset over something you know. Getting a wrong impression is necessarily a troll but You know some of them are and they should all just walk into the ocean forever. like people who don't like water you know people who don't like water the taste it. What how if you don't like if you don't like the taste of water you should anyone who doesn't like the taste. Water should find the group of people who also don't like wire and should hold hands and you should walk into the ocean. I'm not saying drown or die. But they say that. If you don't like something you should associate with it more. You Know Saturate yourself with it so just keep walking into the ocean until you decide that you like water and then come back. How can you not like water? Because it doesn't have a taste. That's my favorite. That's my favorite thing about it. Sorry as I eat or drink orange juice. What do we got here? I got this gas station or something about buying orange juice at a gas station. That feels like like I'll be healthy but so I hope you guys are doing. I hope you guys are seeing modems of of growth. I think you'll see more and you'll see stuff. I think you'll see a lot of Sparks poppin soon when this is finally over and we're all back together and I also you know we just miss each other and we're also three individuals who have been going through separate things individually and there's like A. There's almost like a. It's like when we first started. It was like we Gotta. Kinda get to know each other again when this is all done and I'm excited. I'm just excited to do that. So that's that's number one bragging about it because You know I'm proud. I'm proud of how we handled it and I'm proud of how the community is being very like we have such a Very logic like mostly logical group of folks who I think are just articulate in the way they sort of deduce things is you. We can't really hide too much because of smart because smart and that's also something to be very proud of the other thing too is just Being proud of source that is really cool and having in this is going back further and because the bragging and I've just been trying to think on things like get me out of the whole of going what am i. What's the point of any of this? Because I don't know about you guys or if you're experiencing this at all during this team but there's a bit of a There's a bit of a sense of of the Neolithic pointlessness and being like am I. Am I doing this because I'm terrified to do anything analysis it's still about? Joyce still have it I think my girlfriend and I talk a lot about how there's this you know. I don't know if it's true or not. But they say that you can get psychologically stuck in the time of your most success Which I look forward to but 'cause I also live on her delusion that I'm not as successful as I will be. Which is nice but who knows if that's actually going to happen. That's sort of the the hope you know. It's the hypothesis. I will invest in the future with work and then one day. It'll it'll all work out. I've had a little bit of just being like like what else should I look into tonight? Look into going back to school should I do? What's my my do? I have anything to offer That isn't being done a billion times by billion other people and so part of that has just been going. Okay what have I done what can I? What can I look to as something that is worthy of being proud of source fed is included in that? And Not so much. The time spent there because I love pretty quickly but the people as a result of it in the community that's built around it is really cool. I did a video called every source valley folk hosts leaked Tinder Bio Which will go up at some point but it you know it's making fun of most people but hopefully in a kind way because it's it's not something. I always feel like an on the outside of a little bit because so many people even though I'm an og member of it there's so many people. I just didn't know or didn't work with or got to know in a different capacity later and I don't know it's like being in a party that I was like my be invited to to this thing and so I'm proud. I'm proud of having people like that in my life that are very colorful and unique and different and and the also that had just has let me have a you know career or continue to work in this This weird weird weird world for as long as I have and that again goes back to. So that's a proud of that What else am I proud of? I have a list right here. Isn't that sad? Shouldn't it be able to be memorized? Maybe just put. Maybe he just memorize it before. We started fast Relationships so I'm really proud of how this quarantine has affected my relationship with my girlfriend and a lot of relationships with my family extended family and friends who I haven't seen or heard from In a long time but mostly I'm just proud to be an equal partnership based in respects and has really nice and it's was a gamble and it was a very apprehensive thing where at the beginning I was like. Oh don't Oh you know maybe I mean I had a crush and I was like. Maybe no can't be that good. It can't be that good but then let's just see you know and you kinda creep on the instagram misled into some De. Dm's and then he ended up going to Vegas and then he ended up being a bit of a maniac. And then this relationship happens and It's tough at times and it's a but it's growing and it's like getting stronger all the time and there couldn't be anything better and I also like it. It's nice. It's nice because I know what happened. And what I know the life I had and I knew that I went from being Reussir to pretty happy but there is a strange. I did this. Podcast Another thing. I'm very proud of his the fundamentalist podcast that I do with with Pete. Because it's always fun it. That stuff's always fun for me. We'RE GONNA get into it a little bit here About Psychoanalysis and kind of some philosophy toward the end of this podcast. But we were doing an episode that I think is maybe going up to date on it. But it's on celebrity. And it's on sort of the the way that you're branded. And the way that you were at you know whatever you do becomes your brand basically and I did like the sarcastic thing in the self deprecating thing for for so long that it became sort of muscle memory and I got a little tired of it but also there's something strange Lee more vulnerable about being like. Hey I I'm happy because that is like I dunno it's like you can't there's no instinct to protect your feeling of feeling bad. There's no like I can put that out there and be like people are GonNa be whom if you bet like? That's the worst thing that can happen. But if you're happy and you make that known people can be pretty terrible. House like was two weeks ago or something. I woke up grace night. Boasted the the pilot on podcasts. Which is something we decided to do for fun. And it's weird to do things like that because there. I read all these comments from one person that was just like an really mean person and I really hate-filled person and it got in my head a little bit and it burned me out and then I was thinking about how sad person has to be to see two people just like talking about television. Show that they like watching and incite something in then that is so evil and so like satanic that they need to just spew hatred At you that so specific and grows and terrible and There's something about showcasing. Happiness that on one hand people will go. Oh well they're they're actually. They're not that that's all a ruse and there is. There is an element to that. No relationship is perfect by any stretch of the imagination. But there's an different thing where it's like. It's also like don't come off to happy because people are going to rain on your parade a little bit in that part of it so it's nice to feel there's an ice center of gravity that has happened. That's just very peaceful and calming and I know what it was like. When it wasn't that I know it was it was chaos and so I only say that. It's not to brag or anything but also to encourage folks who are in relationships. Maybe that suck right. Now that are in Quarantine. Can you imagine? Can you match imagine by Gal Gadoe Magin? And there's a brand there that's like difficult for me to stay steer away from sometimes. It's I like you know. I'm I like dark humor and so it I don't know where the crossroads are between being all right and then also being a blue ruled by Which maybe we'll talk about that as well when we incorporate what What I'm into right now. What I'm reading and all that fun stuff so yeah hold tight. If you're not doing well and also I would encourage you switch things up. It's okay. It'll hurt my therapist Said it's funny thing which Halvard at twenty four minutes. That's pretty good for just now. Mentioning Therapist He said something to me really. I think it was years ago. I started seeing him but he was like you know Ninety five percent of the time when you make the right decision things get worse. And you hear that. And you're like okay and then it kind of makes sense. No wonder people stay in crappy relationships or they don't make decisions that would ultimately make their life better because in the interim period it'll get worse like if you get into If you decide to to start working out then you know you're I did it and I started throwing up immediately and I hated it and store and I hated myself for being so out of shape So life got worse And that's like the smallest easiest example. It's I I don't know of many things that if you do that are quote unquote right Where immediately you're like well wonderful. That's it's why we enjoy Self behavior speaking of self destructive behaviors and working out. I M started doing that. Are we're GONNA at the beginning of this thing and it had been doing it for two months. Which is the longest in my entire life that I've gone with consistently working out. And that's so sad but it's been so nice and I know a bunch of y'all kind of started doing that as well. I'd GonNa tell you what I use it still embarrassing. I'm not GonNa tell you the program But it is cringing Verte. It works and it's fun I like it and it's like I also was in the mindset of like you know. I don't know if I'm ever going to be successful in the how I imagine it to be but I also know that I want to look back and feel like I've done everything I can do or attempted everything I can do to at least fail like in a way that is like okay like the failure is it. I did everything I could do. And if that's a different kind of failure than looking back and going I could have done better. Had I done this thing and one of those things is was exercising. Because I was like how can I expect to whatever and I'm saying that something I'm proud of which again feels weird and it feels like bragging because I am but at the same time. Please take it as encouragement in the sense of going. You know it sucks everything sucks. That improves your life. So you know maybe even this podcast so something to think about and it's and I talk about it fairmount when people are like. How do you deal with stress? And how do you deal with with anxiety? And all that fun stuff and it's like for me. I know that I started working out because made my mental health better that day and I only kept working out when I gave up the idea that I would look a lot different as a result of it because when I started obsessing over that I got frustrated and I got a hopeless and I stopped so only when I was like. I'm not. This isn't GonNa work actually end up doing it so that's nice. I'm excited about that and then I also have just been taking a break from drinking. I haven't drank long. It's been but I read a book which we'll get to in a little bit and it wasn't a dramatic You know decision. It was sort of like. I basically watched a Nikki. Glaser clip from the Joe Rogan podcast and she recommended a book Called easy way to control drinking and I love all the words in that title as I. Love Easy I love control and I love Dragan. So let's see what this is about and a lot of it was sort of her being like my career. Better my life better when this when I cut this out and I don't know if I'm gonNA keep doing it. I'm also hesitant to talk about this. Because it's it sounds dramatic. You can't not talk about not utilized drinking and people here not drinking. It's Oh no always go. Gosh Oh no oh I also like switching things up and it's not like I don't I'm not by any stretch of the imagination saying that I'm you know like saint during this is like I saw Birkenau or started working out and I stopped drinking and also pick up other bad habits all the time and then drop them. Hopefully but the it's been really nice the workout drink. The not drinking has been great. I don't know if I will again. I probably I mean I don't know how when this is all it said and done. I don't know what my brain's going to do. I talk a lot about going to vegas. We'll see we'll see. I'm definitely going to Vegas without a question but if I'm going to go and I'm gonNA enjoy it and we'll see but it's For now it's a very nice thing and it's not a stressful thing it's a it was a joyful fund. Easy thing which was crazy. It's the book made this incredible outlandish claim that when I was done with it it'd be like not wanting to actually drink and layer gary will and it so that was cool. Fine this is really nice and what else on the stuff that I'm real real proud of right now. There is the comedy Special Holy Shit on Amazon that is available for free for all prime members. I'm proud of that. I wouldn't watch it again but I'm proud of it and I remember. I was at with that whole thing because I want to do something that it took me forever to write that thing and I cut out a bunch of stuff. It started as a one man show with like different. Acts and lighting cues very leg. Grandiose I think the plan was to wear like a black turtleneck during it just to make it as pretentious as possible but the whole goal was to essentially be self deprecating as possible. And as like you know Rau- as possible and then combine that with having a single shot the entire time is so. It's just cracks me up I. I didn't like it because comfortable watch and then I was like no. I do like it because it's uncomfortable to watch but if you haven't it out as nice and also thank you to folks who've who've watched it who have left kind reviews who see it's not meant to be the funniest comedy special in the world go figure yours but it is. I'm proud of of what it is. And I'm proud of the rawness of it and so thank you for those who watch and also who've reached out about it because that was the other thing too like. Is this going to resume? Is this just like whatever it has from from what I can tell and. That's really nice. The next thing I want to talk about is underwear guys. And this is an ad segment Summertime dreaming seamless transition. These are the days when visions of sunshine and Surf Dance through our heads. Is it probably now more than ever as we collectively mold into our couches? But we got. Oh I see. They fixed it at the that an insert for sure but yeah no for sure yes. We're on our couch of Melton Anthony Surf but we got to keep the dream alive. Me UNDIES is committed to the cause by keeping you in a constant stream of uninterrupted dream. Inducing undead comfort. You guys know we love me and talk about it all the time. It's one of my favorite sponsors that we have on this. If not my favorite sponsor they're absolutely wonderful and you'll have notice about me. I've mostly been able to replace all my old underwear with me on these and occurred to me today. We've had these sponsor for like like the year and a half or something and the. I can't tell the difference between unaware that they sent me a year and a half ago the underwear. They sent me like last month. That's pretty great so the quality is really high. And that's something that I wouldn't be able to say without firsthand. Came without them sending us up. Let me not just the both you. And it's like every it's incredible and some of socks in there and telling you folks sign up. It's the it's a treat. It's just a treat so yeah. Let me give you some talking points about me and these in case you don't remember me. Andy's are made from micro modal a an irresistible soft sustainable fabric that encases your nether regions in of comforts magically made from trees another reason to give them a hug me on these are offered a range of sizes from x at x S. two four X L. Biondi says a great offer for our listeners. The FOR ANY FIRST TIME. Purchasers fifteen percent off and free shipping. You gotta give the super softness a try you guys. Because what else do you have to do? One hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed of course. They do whenever something has one hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed feels a little brampton but that kind of people bragging kind of turns me off so whatever but anyway to get fifteen percent off of your first order as well as free shipping and one hundred percents satisfaction guarantee good these dot com slash valley dot com slash valley to fifteen percent off your first order and free shipping and one hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed go to these dot com slash valley It'll help your junk and it will help our junk as well and so it's wonderful. They're wonderful drought. Become an all sorts. But I don't do patterns because I'm do I don't do. I do not do the fungi colors but I also like to clarify that. I do not feel like an adult. Right BRAG PORTIONS ARE. Let's do the feeling bad. Hi everybody. I'm Joe Berry to welcome to feeling bad. Y'All to conspiracy theory okay. Pirate on my family's getting sucked into the the stuff and it's easy for me to just get so frustrated. And so how do you not how? Why why why and I it on facebook and they. There's a lot of like send. This is censorship. And they're trying to hard something that's controlled by the whatever and Blah Blah Blah Blah. Here's the embarrassing thing. I felt for like a hard myself I all have fallen short of the blur an for a hot minute. I was like you know you I. I watched the plan. Dammit thing with the guy who looks like a like a caricature of a conspiracy theorist and that woman who's a scientist Makovich or whatever and Dr Malkovich and she brought up stuff in it that you know it. It doesn't take a lot. If you're mildly articulate and you can give any version of proof or any version of reasoning it. I'm I'm pretty susceptible. Apparently and it didn't last long lasted like a day and I kind of googled some stuff afterward and did a little research and everyone was like no. This is person who kind of crazy and been doing this before Blah Blah and that kind of jerked me out of it. Basically is a youtube video from a doctor who was like. I'm not GonNa Gore Fi this. You're going to believe this and I was like no. We know I'm very logical in the back of my mind. And that kind of a kind of believed Bruce second easy. It's easy to get sucked up in this stuff man in. I don't even know I don't even the thing that is interesting is like let's just say all the conspiracy theories true a trend with that. I've seen with people who are on conspiracy sub it or sub forms warms the are slash and also like facebook and stuff where. I see a lot of this They always on the the side. They always assume that they're Cusp of uncovering right. Like there's going to be this. Everything's going to come to light and there is going to be this new wave of X Y and Z. And you're going to see a uprising and Blah Blah Blah and. There's always a thing with it's about it's about a blow up. This is about to just blow in their front because of that because of that they're censoring it and I don't know I don't know if Some parts of this have been may be lied to lied about. It wouldn't surprise me. You know like why would that that part isn't that big of a surprise. I think that the lying is assumed on some level I would hope it is because you know there should be some skepticism with our leaders across the board but I mean if I was a scientist and I was in the lab I messed up and a virus got out of a lab and it killed a ton of people. Yeah I wouldn't I wouldn't want people to know because of the fact that they would kill me but when you go from that when you leap from that to this is a grand conspiracy meant to usher in the New World. Order and Bill Gates is trying to reduce the size of the human population using vaccines and in an effort. To to further a make things worse he is an oligarchy billionaire who have given power to who is not an elected official Blah Blah Blah. And it's like you just spirals and so but it always spirals in a way. That's going this in. This is going to blow things up. So That's interesting. It's always like just about to happen and you know it's always secret knowledge. May I got a secret and you don't and if you have a secret you are then on the your eyes are going to be opened in. It's like this version of enlightenment. That's like not a real so it's just crazy it's sad to see and it's Azi my my family be sucked into it and I also kind of get it because you know people are scared. And then they're going to be searching for answers and they're going to concoct things in their brain now. I don't have any experience with people assuming things because of a lack of information. But let's just pretend I did. I can understand how people could create a narrative that was inaccurate to make themselves feel better while thinking that they were somehow a pioneer for having. It just sucks to see man. It selects to see your family who you know you share values with but then you see them falling into something like that. And it's a different world than people who don't have family get sucked in that don't have aren't close with people who get into these things or into the megaworld because you're not experiencing these people on a firsthand basis so it's easy to distance yourself. How stupid and dumb and Blah Blah Blah? But then when you actually talk to him like no this is this is a person who there there is a heart of hearts and they have their own lives and It's tough it's tough to to see but there's also one argument about aren't I watch the video get sucked into it myself and then act high and mighty about them of can't believe. I can't believe the got mick. You've really got me. Maybe there's even as I say that I'm like am. I just being sucked back into the narrative of the media is pushing and then you know what you can do in times like that. Here's a fun little tidbit of advice. Stop doing that. Who Cares? Just stop go read a book. Go read a book and watch some TV and stop trying to use your brain to figure out you know. It's so the amount of noise I've been doing a little bit of meditation throughout this time. Meditation is I hate saying that word. It's sort of like a it. Seems like I'm saying it's it's been hijacked by by people. I find mildly annoying but I try to do it when I can. And it's you know it's nice in times like these because if ever there was a time when it would be helpful to have an ability to not be consumed by your thoughts probably right now like I feel like I'm turning into a little bit of a schizophrenic. I mean granted. I'm doing an entire podcast right now by myself where. I'm just talking to myself so it's GonNa be a schizophrenic element to it but I feel like I feel and I don't mean to say that in a way that is offensive or anything but there seems to be a splitting of myself at times where there is a logical side. There's an emotional side. There's an angry side and they're all yelling at each other and there is a something of value of step back and being like look at my dumb I just the other day in my girlfriend has like. How's your has your brain do and I was like you know it's amazing. It just won't it won't shut up Ed zero like let's go to bed. Just this stupid thing can stock one hundred believe that more repression. But it's like I'll say I'll start talking about it and I'll get bored with my own words because they've already ran through my head so much more normal needs would use to hear this so Get conspiracy theory stuff is is feeling Batman makes me feel bad and The whole thing is is inconceivable So stay stay away I think. Even there's a I always buy that bumper sticker that says If you're not mad you're not paying attention Moseley. Yeah yeah that's exactly right. Yeah but the thing is I'm not. I'm not mad. So that's Kinda cool you know Sometimes it's good to be mad but when it becomes the pass time which it has for me at times during this is just being show just like angry. Everyb- every person Times like nice to just go. Hey you know what I can actually turn the TV off. I can actually get off my phone I made a point last night to just turn off our phones and just watch a movie granted. It wasn't because we were really in the news. We're just too much gravel And Oh my goodness She will be like scrabble and her scrabble. Go APP like shows the stats. And I'm like I have the data you are better. You are better at this The one thing I better at those using tiles at once while seven times it's called Bingo have had like ten more than Jeff. But it's also well it folks. I destroyed find I N G and it's put something in front of it trying to find a four letter little tidbit or find a you in an an and put on in front of it. I work sometimes about some fun stuff. And then we're talking about some books and then we're gonNA talk about gram tight altogether and you're GONNA be different. I didn't forget you guys listen. Weezer released news talk and it is perfect. It's perfect. It's it's perfect I. It's so cheesy tall hero and Gal of that band I really do. It doesn't go away it doesn't it. The love for them is constant and never changing and part of it is because I love the Meta story like the backstory behind Weezer. I think they're just a a fascinating goofy ass bunch of dudes Rivers Cuomo I adore. Because he so accenture can so strange and you know. I can relate in a micro COSMO level of To him with a the way that he's done he's treated the band and the way he's treated his career because for the longest time there's always old school fans that are like they need to go back to blue album. They need to go back to. Pinkerton weezer sucks. Now they love. You know that's like the they're not as good as they used to be Sure but it seems to me that the quality that they are going for is not like quality. Isn't the number one goal? There seems to be a love of fun and desire to do different things to still be successful and I like that. I like the fact that the kind of own the fact that they were like. Yeah we sold three million copies of our first record and since then we've been trying to make hit after hit after hit on some tiny level and it's cool to see him do it. It's really cool when they fail. And every now and then there's a great summary Atlanta Drug Dory's wonderful Been listening to that. The white album is incredible as my favorite weezer album and they got to have van. Weezer come out and I like it. I'm excited for this shredding silly album that I hope is is is great and apparently they won't call okay human coming out later that they're seventy five percent done with based on okay computer or title after rally and there's like an orchestra behind him and they're doing all these like Incredible Symphony Music Infancy rock or whatever that they have a album coming out who right after that black album coming out and they got another one that's already lined up. What are you to get that level of productivity and that's how that's part of being stuck in my twenties. I wish I still had that level of drive and just like aren't content as possible. Throw as much stuff at the wall. If you're in your twenties you should do that as much as possible. In my opinion because do it for the world gets in and breaks your heart a little bit and make become a little bit more like precious with your your stuff like I can complain about like just go for. I'm trying to get back to that on my own personal stuff with doing things. That are Just making me happy but yet it's cool to see someone like Weezer. Just be like we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA and people got down united do it. And then they're like yeah. Look at Ella. They're beautiful wonderful human beings. Yeah even songs that people really hate. I like listening to you. I listen to Zombie bastards a lot at the beginning of the end of last year. For some reason it was a good one. Green Day also has a new album out supposed to do a tour which is super pumped to go to. But obviously that didn't happen. Called the Hella Mega Tour and they released father of all mother efforts and it's a really hard rocking album. I really like it. Superfund I listen to it while I Exercise not to Brag Bragging you got the humor in that whole can come off to tone deaf but who knows what other music listening to. It's not the same anymore by REX. Orange County. That's a good one good. Song Rufus. Wainwright has some new stuff coming out that. I'm really enjoying certain about books for a second. I am Oh yeah I download. I downloaded this book that it's my favorite of all time. I'm just GONNA give some recommendations right now to kind of wrap some of this stuff up the road less traveled If you're looking for something to read if you're looking for content to to consume it's my favorite book of all time by M Scott Peck and the first chapter alone. I think is is really amazing. I think the first sentence is like life is difficult not that and then it goes on to SORTA talk about the difficulty of life. And it's my favorite self-help book if you'd call it that just a remind. Yeah just in case you're wanting to maybe toy with thinking differently about problems thinking differently about stress And I like it. It's been very helpful to me. I mention the easy way to control drinking. That's a really fun too. It's very strange. Very Weird. How how he does it. I don't think works for everybody in every situation. I don't think that I I'm not trying to disciple for any of these things but it just throwing out case you're looking for stuff And then there's this book so I I've read most of this book before But I'm rereading it now because of the time that we're living in and I think it's very interesting but it's called. Capitalism desire inspired him. Todd McGowan who actually. I did a podcast with him on the fundamentalists he's a professor slash psychoanalyst guy and he wrote this book called capitalism and desire the psychic cost of free markets. You know at the risk of sounding like a college liberal arts major whose let problem and this is actually really interesting. I didn't take on it. It's really media and it's hard to read someone read like a little paragraph on it. Because I wanNA talk about common theme and we're the WE'RE GONNA that's GONNA be we're gonNA talk about how all that stuff's connected to everything else we've talked about and then you're gonNA leave this going. I can't believe I can't believe that that everything is solved now so this book. I guess it's hard for me to kind of explain without diving too much into stuff. But it's attempting to think reconcile Karl Marx with Freud. So now we're just getting into pure if you're still here just you're impure like happy me. Happy town Listening to a podcast yesterday by channel called plastic pills and it was talking about like the Jordan Peterson Slob Jack Debate and is came out and she was like. Are you just like so? She was like. Are you so horny right now? Listen just so horny listening to this and I was like a like a psycho. Phd students talking about the. I don't know it's come full circle in being like I guess this is what I'm into. This is the hobby I duNNo. I tried pottery and we got these little pottery things and gracious gift yet. Paint your little bowl. I mean a little and I was really hoping pottery would be like the thing but now apparently it's the stuff that it's really hard to talk about without sounding slightly obnoxious But whatever man I like it. It's interesting it's all the brain stuff I like. I think a how people think and I happen to think for it and stuff is really interesting and also what I really like about it and the reason I think I mostly entered as it. You see it in so many aspects of life that it's like hard to avoid and it's sort of reminds me of when I was learning about evolution. How it wasn't so much people going. Here's all the evidence for evolution. Because I'd grown up in a A. You know the young Earth. Creationism being the way to go and so I expected evolution to be a case built around things pointing directly to like here. It is. Here's evolution but instead what I like about evolution is. It's not so much that it's that everything else makes sense when seen through the Lens of evolution and I've used psychoanalysis in a similar way. I view it like if you if you you can't find a spot in your brain. That's the unconscious. But when you start looking at people's behavior and you start looking at how they repeat things and how they're self destructive a lot of what for a talks about does start to make a lot of sense Specifically later for it but anyway I if you're into that if you are interested in in that kind of stuff I would recommend this book because I've talked about it before but I wanna read this paragraph because I think it's interesting. The fundamental gesture of capitalism like. I'm not gonna read it like an asshole. I'm just GonNa read it and there's no world which this isn't cringing feeling for me so I hope it's equally uncomfortable for you. This is like tiny version of comedy. Special it's uncomfortable and I guess that's why worth it anyway. The fundamental gesture of capitalism is the promise and the promise functions as the basis for capitalist ideology one invest money with the promise of future returns. One starts a job. With the promise of a higher salary one takes a cruise with the promise of untold pleasure in the tropics. One buys the newest piece of electronics. The promise of easier access to what one wants in every case the future embodies type of satisfaction foreclosed to the present and dependent on one investment in the capitalist system. The promise ensures a sense of dissatisfaction with present in relation to the future. I think that's very interesting and I never really occurred to me that like you know. So much of our lives is based in investment in the future and in Later it'll be better and I can get frustrated when I see or feel stagnation and you know Not taking action or taking more action but when you think about it we're kind of told from the beginning of life that if you if you just wait you'll you'll be happy. The happiness is always in the future. You know you go to college then you can get the job. Then you'll be happy when you get the job. Then you go to work. Every day you get the paycheck then you have the money and that'll make you happy and then you take that money. Sacrifice that money you give away the thing that you paid for with the only thing you can't get back which time and then you get a thing and when you get that thing it never really fills the whole that you're wanting to and then that leads you to buy another thing and go back to work just as always it's always outsourcing your your happiness to to the future and That would be the theme of this ties everything together. It's the promise and the idea that you know we're living in a time of chaos right now and there's a lot of people I think who are hoping and praying for a bit of a utopia this bit of a perfect world We're all the problems go. I think that's a fantasy that's really unhealthy. It actually according to this book at least sort of plays within that system still. It's still says. Hey just keep way. Just keep waiting. It'll get better get better better. I don't think that's the case and I think the only way for it to get better as to actually truly internalize that and accept it And I think about that. In relation to the valley folk there is a a world in which we would not have done a lot of the things we had done. Had we believed that in the future things would just get better Or that things would solve themselves and when we realized that they weren't solving themselves we took action and it wasn't because we thought we were going to somehow then be so successful. That would be a promise in the future. It would be going. Hey we do this then whatever it was going this isn't working and so we're going to change this now and that I think is Is Good I think that's a good thing to do. In pretty much all aspects of life and it ties into my relationship. When I started dating my girlfriend I had in my mind like oh we would maybe be good together and I had that fantasy and I had that that hope. This could be really cool. You know maybe likes you give me and it is a wonderful relationship now but what I remember when I was like reaching out into the and being like really nervous about it and then when she was like responding going on actually responded maybe I remember being like the motivation. That really got me to do. It wasn't going if I don't I'll never have the perfect relationship. The motivation was going. I need to find out as quickly as I can. If this isn't gonNA work because I need to then move on and find someone or something else and that's not to say that everything's perfect or that it's Utopian of of a relationship right now it largely is to be honest with you But it was the act of doing it so that the giving up a little bit of this idea of a perfect thing going if that good in my mind I need to kill that version of any kill that that utopia that I have in my brain and I need to just do this now and see what this result see. What happens as a result of this action that led to it actually happening things like working out same thing? At the moment I gave up the idea of going. I'm going to do this so that in the future. I look a certain way. I obviously hope that I continue to hope that I hope it works better than it has so far but when I actually started being able to be consistent it was when I stopped going. I need to do this because in the future I'll be happy. I started doing it because that day I would be happy and I could learn to love it in those moments if I kept doing it and so that was part of it. So that is so. There's this disengaging I think of a promise. This disengaging that you're going to solve everything with everything is going to be a hundred percent better. That can make things actually get better and I think on some level. This is a depressing idea. It's almost neolithic point. If I'm never going to be happy I think the act of happiness happens when you give up the idea that you're going to be super happy in the future that you're going to have a perfect life in the future because then the promise of the future. You're no longer outsourcing. You're you're no longer outsourcing your happiness to distance between now and then you're going. This work may not work and I'm doing it because I'm listening myself in right now. It makes sense. I don't mean this in the sense of don't plan for the future. I think that when you plan for the future you should do so in a way. It's like imagine you WanNa make a movie right so you you WanNa make a movie. That's worth that. You're getting thirty million dollars for. That's your goal. It's your dream and if you could only do that you would be so happy. You'd be so sat realistically. You probably won't get that. You probably won't have a thirty million dollar movie that you get to make so the if you know that if you really internalize that two things can happen you can go and probably not. GonNa get it so I just not even. I'm not even going to try. I'm not not gonNA try because what's the point you know that's even if I do get it. It's not going to make me happy. The reason it's not GonNa make you happy is exactly why you should work on it. Get to that as quickly as possible. Because then you start to actually get better in produce start writing the screenplay start you know make you start doing the thing learning thing playing guitar. Whatever it is in in give up the co- The comparison of your present to the imaginary future and start getting you know present a little bit. Give me a little bit more Free I think with. It's a freedom that's what. I think it is so I think that's the theme. That's how your problems are going to be solved as I started this This podcast and I I promise you that your life was going to be changed. It probably didn't you've probably invested in the future and that's okay But you know if you had not invested in the future if you would not gone oh I have to do this. The after listening to this. And it's going to change everything if you said when I'm just GonNa see what he's GonNa talk about. Maybe it helps a little bit and maybe the whole point is that there is nothing that any of us can do to solve all the problems and all we can do is try to support right now and try to be happy right now and make it as best as we can make it right now while taking into consideration the fact that sometimes making things better means things get more painful. I Dunno something there. It's fun to think about. It's also you see this promise idea in the conspiracy theorists world. You see the people go. Oh you know the the The the revolution is coming. You see this in politics. If once trump is at only trump was out of office. Everything would excuse me be better. It's not true You know that's a lot that's a fantasy that you're telling yourself in in if you constantly have that fantasy. That sounds a little like a prison. I don't believe that you shouldn't work for. I don't believe people shouldn't protests. I'm not saying any of that. I think everyone should actually protest more vote. More get more angry get more messy because the fear associated with not living up to some utopia I think is paralyzing for for a lot of people at least for me. This is stuff that's helped me in the past and maybe it's it's useful to you or maybe it's just common sense and this is all just been a bunch of nothing but if you listen to this and you listen to that promise and you really expected it to solve all your problems. Well you're crazy And if you if you didn't listen to it and expect it to Solve your problem because what you're wrong. It did solve all your problems. But here's the thing you can only be wrong or crazy you can't you can't be both and you can't be anything else. You're wrong or praise so I opt for crazy or at least attempt to by the way. This is a blueprint for Peepshow this is the apartment that jazz in Mark Levin behind me and Buddy Pete. Rollins introduced me of that show. Where do a podcast with called the fundamentalist which check out the videos are on this channel? Youtube DOT COM slash. The valley gas feel free to subscribe and hit that button. But Oh my goodness. Isn't it wonderful? It's got all these little jokes. If you guys haven't seen peepshow that the final thing I'm going to recommend it's absolutely wonderful so yeah. Capitalism desire that the free cost or the cost of free markets markets. I think is an interesting book and he gets cool how it explores how the problems of capitalism. That aren't just bore. People who are disenfranchised that also talks about how it actually doesn't work for the successful people in fact cats and how it actually relies on people being dissatisfied and a constant constant state of dissatisfaction. Which in turn is what I've parents according to this. We want and that's a whole other ball game to get into but it's really interesting and makes you feel you know makes you feel smart which is cool. I like feeling smarter. Probably won't after I upload this but anyway that's the podcast everybody and Yeah I I think that's it. Go enjoy music weezer. All that I'm trying to think the road less traveled also. Kinda ties into that. The promise of You know life would be perfect if there was If it was less difficult And you know a whole book about life being difficult in the the joy of that I think is is really nice and helpful and in line with that and be wary of of people who are promising you stuff. One of my favorite things about the valley focus that it was an experiment. That was an experiment. We say that but then when you don't know what's GonNa Happen as a result. I don't know what's going to happen but I'm excited to find out and I'm excited for you guys to be a long ride. So thank you very much and I hope this was somewhat okay. Let me know what your thoughts were in any medium you want. You can leave comments down below or tweet at me but yeah look forward to next week's podcast. We'RE GONNA be getting back together if not next week. Then probably the next week or the week after. But they won't be too many podcasts. I don't think without us being back together. Which will be nice if you stuck with me. This whole time sincerely thank you. I've no idea how it went but I appreciate you guys very much. I love you and the by

Valley Folk Weezer Leslie Jordan Lee Vegas first things first Morgan Valley Joe Elliott Martin facebook Tyler Oakley Patriots weezer Birkenau youtube Bill Gates writer
Film & TV Catering with Nichola Smith

The Screenster Podcast

53:03 min | 1 year ago

Film & TV Catering with Nichola Smith

"That's the job of keeping that smart on. Everyone's face making someone love you know <hes> it's wonderful to say into wonderful to see the reaction to our food service and how people love it so much and ah we've done a good job. I'm very very proud. Hello and welcome to the screens podcast. This is a podcast that talks about film and t._v. Through the lens of the people working in it i'm joji. I'm an actress and general television television and film enthusiasts. I want to know more about the nuts and bolts of this industry so each episode i'll be talking to different guests about their roles in the business what's great great and also not so glamorous about jobs and what they're what jamie this week. I'm recording on a farm in and sorry with nicholas smith founder film and television catering company healthy yummies ever wondered how many people it takes to make a t._v. Show or film well. It's a lot and they wouldn't get through that days without some delicious food. Nikola talk to me about the logistics around feeding such high numbers why a good meal onset is so important and and how their role is caterers is just the tip of the iceberg. I took ourself to cook. My grandmother was a cook and my mom was a king cook. Seventy issues have lots of kind of abigail patty auty dinner parties and remember her doing baked alaska in just thinking wow this is incredible crises scenario the theatrics i guess and that was what i really enjoyed about it but <hes> we always grew our own vegetables and so from farm-to-table april kind of thing so it was always interested in cooking always loved music. Music is at heart everything we do so once. I left the music business i thought oh how can i combine the two so we thought right. I'll do festivals nathan my grandmother. Elvira may bless her. She was on the death paid and she let me the money to get this little bedford c._f. Van which are still have now been converted into craft coffee offi fan and so i started doing street food in my day show everything to me about you know whole foods eating with whole foods <music> and foraging as much as possible so my dish was scallops dive. They're raising. This dish is incredible was he. Sites like being wrapped up in a in a blanket and having a pinch on the bombay johnny depp tabu expect dish because it really was something else. Sensational it was it was dive. Scholar served in the shell with on a bed of celerion alario puree what they can and seashore vegetables and so the ultimate bacon was from this beautiful farm that we still use now actually an i and i've been to the farm and seeing the roaming around the scholarships with dived by this guy who's offend mine actually and he's the only guy who's oh a license to dive scallops in west bay dorset which is a whole area that they've banned drinking and so he's the only guys go the ticket license to go in to collect the scallops so it's funny i would he was he was always too busy to deliver salons and i was living in london at time so literally order my scallops. He died the next day and alberto meet him on the motorway. We would do this exchange orange and so there would go off into festivals and things. I'm doing my scallops and we funny enough enough hours. I was doing something. I was getting ready for a festival while i was in shortage of everything together and compatible cell phones all ready to go. I thought right. I feel van with petrol. I don't have to do in the morning so it was a friday night. Everyone was out partying and she'll ditch. Um i put the wrong. I put diesel into the call and instead of national there. I am waiting the comes. We start putting the van up to the truck and this drunk team. Productions came over and they said what do you do. I talk about it and said i did location catering is i think it must have been so governor for the rich was gonna tell you anyway. I said we've got oh a paloma faith video coming up next week absolutely love you look the look of the van and everything we come and do it as just being tired by saddam you'll be fine. It'll be so it by next week so you hold the phone up and book to some from that book king then go forward your jobs those four then turned into a and before i knew i had i was built in seven often chuck on my own and then we just did commercials. We're mainly doing commercials. Get the old film and then we started getting bigger movies and literally printing printing off talks all escalated in that way so i never i never intended on gordon so they just fell into one of those beautiful state. That's that is literally the definition of fate meeting those people that's amazing. It's incredible when my life seems to be. I'm i'm definitely an opportunity and i i'm. I'm a bit nomadic. I love the outdoors. I love early mornings mm-hmm crazy about food so and i laugh you know you have to be self sufficient on certain so i learned very quickly to be a mechanic an electrician a plumber. You can't wait around for your bills to do it so all of these things i really enjoy and so i think yeah definitely landed in the right job. That's awesome. People say that caterers are the beating heart of film and television set. Why do do you think this is what gives healthy yummies its identity yup. I think your absolutely -vivor. I always say that we ah we like the local power. All it's like all kind of community based place where people can go. Oh take a break from set for minute being a completely different world <hes> and so for me of course the food is such a huge power of a which will take very seriously you got to fuel people and yeah killing people with carbs and start storage is just not it's not conducive to a good working day much more than the food. It's it's atmosphere and environment virement so go out of our way to create a really nice space with the look. The feel are tables that we put out from a quite interesting colorful lots of flowers lots and lots of hours. I'm which of course can be difficult sometimes when you're on the move kind of with maintaining this level of service but i think it's so important to you know to be able to step off set and step into an environment that feels completely different all the girls head scarf also wearing readily the music's going of course it sounds systems built <music> into every truck and there's a lot of laughter and i think it's really important because you know the days alone radi long. Everyone's everyone's in the same boat and so you know if you have one person that's a bit of a moaner. It just brings the olteanu down so our focus focus has always been very quickly actually the not to go fill the typical kind of catering staff but to to hire people. I got a good sense of humor and yeah and then teach them the job so we are very lucky. Got an amazing crew and all you hear is giggles also also long enough. It really does make a big difference that a certain nice. That's the massively like without food. You don't even have a crew. Do you know exactly and you mentioned off the back of that as caterers onset. You're also shoulder to cry on. Can you expand on the other strands at your job and how you not yet nirex louis. That's just it. Some you know you find sort of people come kinds of people might be run or an axa sir producer direct to they're just having a bad day and i think people gravitate to us. We're always there with open arms. We're always laughing. You know in some time someone's just having a bad day and just need a candle so take around the back of the fan big hug cry out laughing how enough they'd go but as i say i think for me. It does feel more. The local pub yeah knows like community service. That's that's really nice and can you explain the difference to listeners between catering for meals and then craft because a lot of people wouldn't know what kraft is. Yes so yeah catering. Generally you'll be based at the unit base where all the winnebago's full production actors are we would serve breakfast base the catering team would serve breakfast base and then we would serve the lunch which is called running lunch with run the lunch out wherever there they're shooting and so people come in and get their breakfast around seven or eight that will be going for an hour and off. They go to set so craft. Services is an american thing. It's come over to england's thankfully because it's it's one it's one you know. I absolutely love this part of what we do. We have a bit more like like streets really yes. You've got the theatrics in the komo artery so basically the services a unit that goes that follows the camera team around and so once breakfast is finished. We've got this unit. It goes on to set followed. A camera team around is always amazing. Hoffy hot holistic drinks juice spa and then which is turning out food all day. No we always wished that we had that little bit more time for machine touches and things but you just it's just so it's so much pressure to get food out the door. Whereas the craft services we can react to people on the day you know we're always put our boards out funny anecdotes and which is always a reaction to the people and say you know if it's cold day we can make lots of nice this whole war me winter wall maze and just yeah just react to what's going on. You know people once something we you can just you know we can change and reacts right away and it's it's much more colorful. You can really finish the dishes of just small bites. Lots of small bites to keep going gabbing is lovely because people onset rumors. Go round all the signs. This is coming out in ten minutes and you know it's it's hilarious we we might go and do set runs if they're too busy to come up to us but we get a lot more creative license there we can really go for it and we really enjoy that poor did things on television and film set in lots of different sets oversee very highly pressured. How do you ensure all things. Your side are running as smoothly as possible uh not that they always do. Yes i think i've always say you gotta have a degree of anxiety to kit this different degrees. Mine is an all time high most of the time but also guinot to a little bit psychic because you know the twists and turns you got to be prepared to do a three sixty degree turn at any time and and she just learned an takes years so anybody that's deciding to go into this line of work. It will take you ten years to do the job improperly really it's it's this time is the is the best teacher <unk> you learn over time to react very very well and very quickly to all of the situations that come up and to have backup plans sounds like times ten literally so when we're training up new management you know it's difficult because you know you can't put an old head on on young shoulders and you've got to let them do it and be in the loop it to learn their own lessons. You cannot teach everything but it's definitely something you learn in time time but you've just ahead of the game and as a side was being psychic really intuitive in a lot of the time now we he's sort of you know we'll we'll take it upon ourselves to speak toward the departments to get heads are what's going on the next day. You know yeah yeah you. We have to otherwise things could go wrong quite rapidly. So when does the like say you. You've got the cool you're working on a particular particular film. When does the preparation start for that film. You'll we're always working a day ahead right. Okay you know if we can get even further ahead. We will you have to because you never know what's going to happen. You know the following day that they might not have the light that they need something. That might be something wrong with locations nations are everything changes and so you've got to be completely prepared for it so as i will always working today ahead you you just the pays in my dad's always sage in a perfect preparation prevents people performance over the ps. I've asked awesome tons of my guys. You just you just work as far ahead as you can. You know the issues so for example get oil deliveries the day before impractical food the day before signing for the next day depends on where you you are every location is different. Sometimes we're able to get a good few days but it depends on how many people you're feeding you. Might you know if you're out on the roads and you'll feeding being over a thousand people for tom paul. Yeah you're gonna have to storage space food of this stuff yeah so it's all very modular and you learn as you as you grow incised that you just have to have lots and lots of modular backup. Okay <hes> and you have to scale up. There's just no two ways about it. I desperately expertly didn't want to scale up you know i wanted to keep this beautiful sweet gorgeous creative business that we've got lovely and for all of the fine detail and to be beautiful forever when i hear the horror stories of scaling up which i completely understand i have the biggest gets respect for the competitors out there that have done it because it's not tiffany and difficult to retain you know that that <hes> attention to detail but there are ways in it's we've taken we've taken our time ten years now and we're only just scaling up thou and it's all about just having the proper management structures and processes all the boring staff by higgins beat down every single process that everyone member of staff will do from the second that they arrive on set all of that sophist to be written up it should training and of course it's just there's just so much. I mean this files some five hundred miles of this stuff but i think to do it successfully. <hes> you know obviously my focus is the the business owner over. Say on i'm precious about our look configure on the creative side of what we do but the biggest thing for me is making sure that we do safely because it's probably the most difficult recall trickiest catering model <hes> in terms of you know keeping that safety element mayor mayon shore that the health and safety is is in good shape and and the foods you know the food and hygiene with a one of the twists and turns and i'm <hes> logistically. It's very very difficult. I'm an something that you learn for the years to keep everything in line with with food and hygiene regulations when everything is changing so quickly out training ming modules are pretty fierce smile and but it's the only way to do it. It really is and how do you cope with more and more people having possibly vegan diets or particular. I'm gluten free. Even i know love your ingredients cater for that anyway. But how do you get given a list before from the the production team this person this person. This actor has very specific requires. I'm yes of course we get all of that but we you know again because everything is so time-sensitive yeah the pressures so awful. Making lots of separate meals is nigh on impossible. Yes you've you've also got the money constraints thanks to swell so you have to keep your teams need untidy yet so we get all of we get all of the the dietary requirements for the call sandy crew in advance but opposite very difficult time constraints and the pressures and everything to to make lots of separate meal appear what you learn very very quickly is to make sure all the practically everything you have as gluten free is free free and all of these allen's allergies or a huge part of as okay and so and the vegetarian vegan side of things. I guess the film businesses just lucky that they've got us doing it because that's a huge passion of mine ever since i've been cooking when i was cooking in restaurants now now the head chef would go. We've got a vegan and then come straight to me because of. I guess it's when you're cooking especially for the aww aplomb by sofi and meal for ways felt very passionately that people should i. It should be providing a meal that people in joint doesn't matter what you are what your intolerance is something. That's really of lame really taste. Him really finished finished off. You know not less lyle afterthought yes yeah and so when we started well ten years ago when we saw today i own oldest vegan options. Were you know really lovely ready finished all the different dimensions flavors that you need and cameras and for me you know cooking with meat fish. I can do very easily because already you have the flavor there but vegan cooking. It's going to take everything that you've learned about cooking and just you know fro- out williams out star again yes breath. It's a whole different ballgame and for me. That's that's challenging and i really really enjoy a number eighty. Enjoy seeing the people on sir enjoy their food so much and the feedback that we get is lovely. I mean that's another lovely thing about being on sale. Is you get immediate feedback whereas when you're working in a kitchen kitchen your out front. You're in the kitchen so you never you never see people's reactions yeah yeah 'cause and of course when you're making food all want is for someone to enjoy and the thing about what you do as you say your shoulder to cry on your like one of the hubs onset if you get a nice meal meal and all these people are stressed at that moment of release of people onset it's because it's so as we said as well highly pressured that if you just get to sit down on and enjoy a nice play something it is literally the highlight of someone's day it's amazing absolutely absolutely and the thing is. There's no reason why h. shouldn't be useful. Yeah all the same as what you were getting restaurant. There is no reason. I like food to look pretty. I like the different colors. I'm obsessed with the different colors and you've got to have the ying and the yang you've got to have the soul and the sweet sour our dimensions the crunch in the smooth. You know you've got to have all of this in that one dish yeah well. I like about what i find interesting about your company healthy yummies is your your what you strive towards his nutritious meals this good for everyone and will make you feel good as opposed to just you know as you said had lumping carbs on people and this because i need to people need to sustain themselves but it needs to be good for you as well because also feel stuck in the middle of nowhere. You not just pop to wait trades if you don't like in especially if you're staying in hotels com make your own meal just having the time yeah but it's search the nutrition is always interested may since working in nightclubs. No i was burning the catholic off both ends going to the opening of bloody crispy onions and lived in my twenties and i would lychee work seven days a week and then you're working the day's but also running the night tom savini evening time as well so obviously it's hard and that's when i started looking taking into whole foods and healing with whole foods found very very interesting them actually if you eat the right diet. You don't need anything else. You don't need any supplements yeah and so cooking with whole foods became a bit of an obsession with me and i started reading reading lots of fabulous books. One in particular was healing with whole foods by poor poor pitchford and a huge birkenau. Can i read it from cover to cover and then people will come to me and say i've got this almond almond. Can you suggest a menu so i would do the menu and then do the recipe the pieces well. It's kind of power all started and then when i started the company healthier according to healthy because i wanted to provide food that was healthy and yami. There's no reason why it coming to the focus has always been about nutrition but making those nutritious meals really taste in and it's a it's it's a it's spring fascination and it's been absolutely amazing to see see the difference onset you know from and seeing that kind of we call them the meat and no fetch man you know he ah he will come in. He'll see out food. Perhaps on day one day to turn the knows them. We were the environment airman is lovely where howling with laughter before you know it the meeting no veg man lured into our net and eating wonderful food and trying new new things which is wonderful because you're also you're providing a healthy meal that someone's really enjoying but you're also that person now now their food horizons of opens up a little bit and they will try more things which is amazing. It's difficult especially when you're out on the road. It is difficult to when you're when you're filming in the studio an your static locations. It's much easier to give lots of trees. Jason and introduce new things yeah when you're out in the roads. It's much much more difficult having to move location every day but it's so important to to keep it going changing because i really do think the food it really does per people out of iraq's yvonne they it really does and so we just can't be boring mundane. It's changed constantly and most of the big movies would be tasked will have private chef really which we do however however saying that you know way their menus off productions are quite happy you know letting the the cost of the main meantime i ate with us because we kind of cover everything that they like but quite often will be asked to sort of work with the cast on their diet plans fish. They're doing not serve their own stunts and things like that so you know we've had quite a few you actors of being vegan and knitting stunt work and so therefore i work with their trainer we worked together roane on a mini for them making sure plenty of proteins and then we'll make it as well so i kind of for me. That's that's really interesting because sets. Let's decide that i'm i'm really interested in really laugh so we do. We do do it but the main catering. Nothing takes lower by his yeah. I can imagine a you used to kind of working irregular hours and how do you manage working regular hours yes yes. I am definitely regular hours now. As you get older it gets more difficult than i have to have my hours of rubbish but for maton diet and nutrition irradiates it's it's having its discipline and food for for me these days i if i don't meditate or to my yoga well then just go downhill and supplement from well and that's it really. That's the bottom line who go tumbling down. If i don't you are what you that's it ends of the story. You really are what you we and so obviously i have my down days but not too often because sir you just wanna go nonstop absolutely and with your schedule and is it a lot when when you've been on location is a lot oreilly mornings. Are you getting the van in three a._m. And things like that what i'm very lucky i did my first my last job on set on a fill masjed-e-jameh taylor finished in september so i have not actually been working the <hes> but when you were doing it as well roughly roughly you probably get up around to god horrible two zero three in the morning and you're in so i need my time in the morning to wake up so i'll always get up an hour earlier a name. Maybe an hour traveling to the job the opening we always need two hours to get ready for breakfast and so they learned after lunch pack down you believing around four four four p._m. That's if you're in a static location. If you're on the road she'll be doing more hours moving moving location in but yeah it's quite full on and obviously you know my joke wouldn't finish. They're still got run the company so i would get get high five or six and on the computer answer emails to quotes and things like that but you know the tate. We've scaled up now. We have an amazing management structure so life is is much nicer these days than i can sort of just watch your from from a distance and and you know which is great because he committee this not so much emotion there when you work in the job since i found it very difficult oh so do the job to cook job and and to take a step back and you know see how we're running our our our organization. It was <unk>. You're very emotionally involved yeah so it's yeah it's much much nicer nail and also you know we're. We're we love. We've got a big backoffice that provides support for the guys out in the team on the road. Which is it has to happen. You just so it's it's very it's tiring tiring and at least now we're kind of in that position where we can you know if they've got a travel. We'll we'll organize something. We'll go up and take over from them for or you know organized little surprise his all the bonuses and just little bits keep picker upper really and so like on average for the day in the life of location caterer. Would you find yourself working seven days a week sometimes or is it very much say you're on a project for how how how long is the longest project. You've been working on for the current job that we're all mobile the longest project because it's a series in that doesn't six months iraq and so whether it's in blocks had to five weeks and then a week of in five weeks which is quite nice. That's very nice so even within those five weeks will not not be working so seven days a week. No they'll do okay. Ask the world to five in the manager might to six okay but most of the time it's five days which is great and we're actually working in another bonus at mesa of stepping off say is and having worked set for for so long you know i know i know it's a so you know at the moment working on china to have a scheme where especially if if they were on the road we they shift so the four days on for four days of catch which is quite tricky to to do. We're working on that at the moment because otherwise people just burn out in just really need looking after and yeah and i think also they need to know the someone's looking after them because it is the these rewarding massive. It really does because it's it's. It's very hard. It's very hard. I think because it's fast. It's <hes> you know it's. It's mentally draining. I'm but it's really he physically difficult yeah especially. When you're working big numbers and you lychee don't stop you. Don't stop for lunch. Nothing you just go go. Go go and so you know it's. It's just so important that you know when you knock off if not yet when that we can comes your oh. You're off for the weekend so we're just constantly on his work on different models. Everyone's got bad time. That's good but we were talking about before what we and especially a you now as the as the business owner having to still manage the company and it's still hard to go on holiday and totally switch off now it completely as saying that just to sicily for all the date ended up coming home early just because you you know it's just the anxiety around the movie <hes> and just you can never really relax because as of the changes and because of the moves and because you know i could be that person that kind of just sits back and put up. It's just not it's not me and you know when some some movies are trickier than others. Specially those are out now on the roads. Deafening around is difficult. You're going from hotel to hotel. You've gotta get supplies. Brought in from god knows where we move into long time you move from one hotel and the supply hasn't got there in time so they've delivered to the hotel from before and you know and and then of course it will go the movie will move from days tonight so we're all nights at the moment on the movie that were right now as i'm on nights and on the russian it's tricky so that that level of support is so important and go on holiday with these great ideas. I can have two weeks off and put up. You know if there's a problem. It just never feels right to be a way to get time. Just deal with it. Yeah definitely i can totally relate as an actor because you put things in your diary and then you've always got to like be aware that you might get called for an audition whether you're in australia straight arrow not and if it's an important audition you still have to come here. Just go go yeah which is awful. How'd you actually get jobs f._i._n._r._a. because obviously you've been in ten years. Is it now case if like you just know people hilby like nikola. Can you work on this. It's really unbelievable. We've been i yeah i i mean not just feel completely blessed to be honest. We've been side. Lucky does is a small world. It's a big world and it's a small world and and so i haven't advertised at so i'm in ten years. It's just word of mouth a think purely because i i wish we care about every single little detail and it's how we look how the staff looks the menus he's always changing which is which is difficult to continually change and have structure and you know and and and to and to be out there with a with a smile and i think that is the most important thing is just keeping that petra up and constantly keeping the pecker. Thank you know we like street food. You are on the frontline like an actor. I guess you all they're on the frontlines. Whatever's going on with you personally. You know you just gotta get get that face or get that smile owning get out there. I think gen- generally i think it's just having such amazing. People were frost frost. Everyone's the same we all get on like a house on fire. We've lived with each other for the last ten years. We go out together. We have holidays together. We really do have a who nothing that laugh that s- infectious an odyssey of the food services goods. We've been lucky enough to sort of get to ten years now. Where we're finally kind of scaling up yes we're now on the preferred supplier list for two of the biggest film companies in the top two actually which is to seeing seeing little healthy yummies come. They have on the contracts next to these huge amazing easing film companies. It's so bizarre. I keep pinching our just can't account believe it. We've come so far and the camaraderie. The iga film is second to none radiates. You that's the job yeah gaping that smile on everyone's face making someone love you know it's wonderful to say into wonderful to see the reaction to to our foods and l. service and and how people love it so much and we've done a good job. I'm very very proud. Speaking of which didn't bill murray's have something to say about your wonderful catering company. The infamous bill murray loves healthy. Yummy armie loves my laissez so funny because we're we're serving in america in the morning. I always say oh built my bill. Murray bill murray's aches. Must my staff you can see in the now is lifted up toward the sky. I'll not stole regain but it's so funny. We did a wonderful wonderful attitude. Actually our first film visit hyde park on hudson. That's on yet. I'm bill murray was on that and it was it was such an amazing amazing experience. We're the most beautiful estate for three months in the u._k. In the and i was catering out of my little street food it was so funny we turned up to everyone just laughed because we didn't turn off premise seven and a half ton truck now we were feeding one hundred twenty croon cost and we took the van so it's the street food van and then we would build our kitchen in under tents in space in the old days. We were just we ll everything off of but it was absolutely wonderful. We just had the best time ever. Bill murray used to come into my kitchen and stick his fingers in some like exits. I became bill bill. Marie hicks lupton but we had. It's a who with him. Yeah he was amazing. I mean that's another thing he just on films that you just you go to the most beautiful locations and sodomites opie the places that you would never ever go to and it sorry romantic and poetic. Sometimes you know when the things that i love the the things that are really get mazed just setting up somewhere in the dark and then suddenly it starts getting you know the sun comes out and you see this amazing using outlook. You know i think my god. I'm the luckiest person in the world is that why is early miles lovett that say nine. This is a really boring just who question but when you're on a set for that long as allocation case. Where do you get tough in date. So do you come home to like. We get excited. Excuse me i was gonna say no. We absolutely have to because you know. Obviously we're very aware of the you know. It's gonna manage our team mm-hmm. Yeah i don't know about other people onset but on need to make sure that into pay it on time and you know even if anything over a half hour drive off to say it's just not good people driving sometimes when you're on the road you have no choice you gotta to make a move your work day and then you've got to make that move just fall but he do it because you have. You have to course oversee. We're very where is just making sure everyone gets dressed. What's being your best and your most challenging moment in your career. As a location to i'm beyond gerald's <unk> question. Oh united will free free every navy we do is roll to from and they're all wonderful and without doubt. It's the comradery that you get within the crew. Yeah you stunned. One is lovely. When you see old same faces now 'cause you. You meet the same people on on the jobs all the time and you know you'll day for challenge during the bad times good times and it becomes like a little family so let's say the the the best. The thing in the world is is that kind of sense of community and the friends that you might along the way the worst times. I've got funny story actually go on. Tell him so we were. I think one of our first jobs we were catering coldplay whole play and i think it was yeah it was the first time it was just a lorry built and so so we went out on the sheet with new new lori and audio didn't really know what i was doing when i designed that laurie and i was cooking and i sort of realized that the waste water was all blocked so i came out my flights and went underneath the chuck trying to the release this blockage which are managed to successfully but the whole blockage on my face all spearing spewing out of the truck and i'm trying to get up and i can't get up fast enough because i'm underneath say some pulled me out in the end and there was like the chris from coldplay standing lychee fact globules foul and the ends of each comforting. I'll go there are many many moments like that than many moments of being caught short but the upside of that is i. I will be writing a foods and recipe book at some point very soon exciting which i think i'm called beautiful mistake. Its its own about being on the roads being on film. Something's missing from an ingredient is missing supplier hasn't turned up and so you have to at last minute. Throw something together and go wow that's amazing but goes on the menu little beautiful mistake so yes. There are too many good times to talk about. It's as an amazing business radio amazing business very very blessed very lucky to be part hard because it's definitely not everybody but you know i always say there has to be a degree of madness for anyone that does business business and it suits me quite well but it said i do find all the logistics you know when it's challenging you know having to to move and think fast and constantly sort of find solutions for problems of their pop. Mrs in frustration always one fake guy well. You gotta be positive. That's that's the thing i've learned you know you really have and there are so many situations situations where you could tumble through not having the right you know outlook <hes> and it's always come back to just just to frown upside down in a positive state yeah what's up to at the moment. You said you've taken a step back so you're more managing the sort of the company as a whole. What's what does the future look like for. You be question yeah so i'm the features look really good. The film businesses anthro having here in the u._k. We have we're pretty much book for the next ten years which is wonderful because you find that you work with a handful of producers so you p._m. Since that will just use you continuously on their job so most bake movies around three months yep. We'd get books about five months in advance. So you know you know where you are. Which is lovely. Yes so the focus thrust. The moment is a skating up. We probably turned down twenty. He'll thirty jobs a week. Raise insane on my and it's been like sustar but we're never going to do something half-heartedly. That's the thing and so for me. The focus really is about is is all about getting the scaling up successfully so we've got this amazing new ops director who we call the major gary he's <hes> him. He's got an interesting past he he he works he was in the army. He actually worked up to major level started off as as a chef. It was in the army thirty five years. Which is you know the way we have to run. Things is very much like an army situation so that worked quite well and then he i think for the last three years he rolled out thirty five restaurants thirty two ivy restaurants in three years resigned yeah. It's really helpful. Wise joins us. I keep saying you must be mad but i think just to. The is not worked in eazy. E's is very interested tonight and he's he settled in really nicely in these really helping us scale up so the fo the focus is working with him getting to a point where we can be doing three or four movies at one time instead of two mayans so we're literally printing off trucks at the sweden which is great because i've really enjoyed that sony thing designing the trucks and each one that we do oversee. We've learned a little bit more about service so you know no. It's it's designing the chucks that work on a practical level but they look pretty as well and when you say designing you mean inside yes those earning the kitchens send an also obviously had how they look on the outside and how does that work you biathlon and then repair or do they come custom-made with kelly we built from scratch and so yeah we'll we'll buy a seven and a half ton truck so it's just a shell and then take it to coach works six and we design interiors exteriors. That's fascinating. I always great. It's great far. I love it. I really enjoy that that part of it and already enjoyed joyce sort of you know we introduce saying more ways to you know help not out basically remodeling reach tommy way we built <unk>. It's a remodel and looking at different ways to speed up the service fun things that we can introduce with. It's a create a bit more flair and color. That's also so yes we we. We've we've done a deal with the coach works and it's crazy see the number of trucks that we having built over the next five years. How many do you currently have. I think we've got nine kitchens and then i i don't know how many civil supported support vehicles is loads and so when you have nine kitchens at a mobile kitchen three of them are containers okay which is what we use for our static locations and if i had if i could use them for everything perceive if the jobs on the road you got to be on wheels but i don't like the the staircase because your your cook it yeah. You're in such big numbers in the health and safety wise. You know i'm always having it's actually running up and down. The stairs kuhn so it's much is you. You know when you've got something. That's a ground ground level. It's such a treat for amazing but yeah is growing so the the focus because radio is just about training new staff also focusing on on staff getting them off two courses sources that i wanted to ice cream making or not so fun. Stuff chefs can take a week off to cause. Get back to say you know. I think the whole thing really is just always been a wanting to be in a position where we can give something back so yes. The the work is really really hard by the wages are fantastic in which is lovely to be in a position to do that. It's necessary yeah and to be l. to sort of you. Know put people in training courses and just keep you know. Keep going brings me. How what would you take someone who wanted to get into the same side of work. You're crazy <hes>. I'd say that it's not for everybody but yeah. I mean it's it's not something that you learn. Overnight ain't definitely something that takes a long time to do properly way to do it properly you can do. I think you know you can cook for people making sure that the crow everyone safeguarded with the food hygiene health and safety too big project and making sure that star for a trained properly just even how to production and you know how to get to learn the film lingo is quite a big deal just learning how the how the how the movies work the gist of it all. What's your favorite television show and film. I'll why should i be favorite. Ah okay all right so film. I think there are so many abor watch this the other night and it tickles me blue with malinois amazing movie and what was the other the smile at t._v. Show t._v. Show christ what about documentaries and documentaries oh god. I love documentary. I mean i mean you know the blue planet things like that. I laughed like nature programs. Just relaxing really relaxing <hes> <hes> yeah. I'm definitely into those kind of things i'm not. I don't i used to watch tv and i loved kora. Kora was hard international hilarious but i don't watch anymore. It's just it's just too much of a waste of time and i've got a mountain of folks call to get through so that's why to my spare time nice. That's lovely. Thank you so much again. It's been a real. We'll pleasure and i hope to see very soon. Yes lovely thank you. It's been great. Thanks so much for listening coming to this week's episode of the screens podcast with my guest nikola smith. If you enjoyed the show please do hit the subscribe button and give me a little review. I'll be super grateful as it's also help others to find it for more tv and film related news. You can also find me over at w._w._w. Dot screens dot u._k. See you next week.

bill murray iraq business owner london nicholas smith johnny depp Nikola Van jamie Elvira alberto abigail patty Kora bombay england tom savini founder birkenau alaska
The Science of Learning: 77 Studies That Every Teacher Needs to Know

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

2:08:40 hr | 1 year ago

The Science of Learning: 77 Studies That Every Teacher Needs to Know

"<music> welcome to another episode of the mist of arts and must podcast with me craig barton a show where people interest uninspiring me from the wom- the world of education this some around. I spoke to bradley bush on edward watson. The authors of the science of learning seventy seven studies that every teacher needs nice to know but before we dive into that a quick word from our sponsors q. the fancy music and podcast broadcasting kindly sponsored by tests now most listeners will probably have heard of tests but here too cracking fox fully tests have have been supporting educators for over one hundred years and now have a worldwide community of white for it thirteen million nights test believe in the power of great teaching and connect teachers in schools all over the world helping them to improve the lives of children through education alas. The summer is over but fear not because i'm tears you'll find everything you need to give your best performance for back to school from phase and subject-specific tech specific resources to templates how you get organized to resources for meeting your new class back to school. Icebreakers reward systems and assembly ideas. You'll find everything you need to get. This school year off to a great start at tests dot com forward slash back hyphen to hyphen school hyphen twenty nine hundred and as a special treat. You'll even fight a massive specific back to school blog written by me. Aren't you lucky and that wasn't enough. You'll get a free back to school resource bundle when you download by any resource from now until the eighth of september the test bundles bulls are bursting with bright ideas to give you and your students the best possible start to the new school year and if you're looking for resources beyond the back to school period than visit does dot com full with slash teaching hyphen resources all year round. I'm browse their library of thousands of resources for every subject checked. Oh why not share your own resource by loading them to task to help teachers and students all around the world ever since i started teaching tasr been that to help shed the wonderful work the talented and generous teaching community it remains my first stop when planning my lessons on there is no doubt it has improved improve the learning experience at the thousands of students. I've been looking to teach so check out the back to school collection on the tests resources in general by following following the link on the podcast notes page breath alands. If you're interested in spreading the word about your product service or event. It's the very best listeners in the whole wide world then drop me an email at missed the bottom maths at gmail.com to find out about the sponsor packages ages available bolt back today's episode with broadly bush and edward watson now. One of the perks of my job is i get sent loads of lovely free books mainly maths but also on cognitive science and teaching issues as a whole now. I'm not the quickest reader in the world and with a seven month old so who does not yet quite seem to have learned the concept of daddy's quiet time. I have to be really choosy about which ones i sit down to read but i'll tell you walk. I am sure glad i chose broadly. Edwards book the science of learning a super accessible guide to pieces of research that can improve what goes on on both inside and outside the classroom on the authors bradley edward have a wide range of experience to draw upon not just from education but also from the fields of sports and business so in a wide ranging conversation we discuss the following things i'm plenty more besides how does working with children <unk> difficult working with teachers and also different to working with adults in other professions. What is a take away from a study that someone listening could put into a practice straightaway. How much work should we as teachers sat and how should students do it and then one of my favorite topics yet eighties. It is sleep why sleep important for students. How should we motivate board students. How should shoots revise for exams a what stood studi bradley and edward find the most surprising now. It was my mid korean crisis that first exposed me to the world of education research. I gobbled up a load of it all at once but one barrier i found myself continually coming up against was the big question. What does this look like in the classroom. I hope this conversation with bradley. Edward helps answer that question and as at that i'll be reflecting on my own takeaways at the end of the interview the usual plugs before we get cracking rocking my boat. How i wish i taught my is still available from old good or evil. Bookshops ivan new book out that have edited eighties called education myths. It's part of a research at series. It's available from amazon and john cap and i've got all the big names contribution for air to robin elizabeth bjork dog limonov andrew rolled it is a showcase of some of the best writing talents around thoughts education myths check it out and if you want to sponsor the podcast and drop me an email at you can also support the podcast via patriot and sign up tobia mellberg's a month there are details in the show notes or via patriot dot com forward slash mr boston maps and i'm so pleased about five of the now signed up to do this and it's just it makes me so happy because it's yeah it's kind of showing that these podcast cassava use an outside of my kind of narrow selfish reasons for doing them just to learn myself on that older people are finding voluble and my other podcast series inside exams. We'll be back for season two in the new year and can catcher with episodes from season one by following the links and the show notes and finally talking of the new school year make sure you head over to the parent company of diagnostic questions and sign up for one of our free month's schemes of work. You can not be your own scheme to the ones created rated by the likes of attic sal o._c._r. White rose maths musk's mastery and the easy see scheme that has been created by. I mean and i want you sign up one of these. It's all completely free. It means you. Students will get sat high quality quizzes throughout the year your new benefit from the likes of automated marking doc in actionable insights and this is my favorite the ability to plum faira. It's all completely free just had to eat dot co dot u._k. To get yourself started anyway without further ado let me introduce you to a broadly inadequate. I really hope you enjoy this on. I know you will and house ever. I will see you on this and okay so if we start as we always do on the show with your mass speed dating questions so questionable johnson either of you. What is your favorite number and why. I was going to go for forty two because that would be obvious but i actually went. I'm for seven just because it's a number that crops up a lot. It's like seven deadly sins seven colors of the rainbow days of the week. One of the world james wong's number and there's a whole bunch of really cool stuff with. I suspect you don't want to get into but i see what you're on the wrong show if you. I don't think we want you to go into laos. Give us just one little interesting mats with seventy like okay. One of the things i really like about the number seven is it's the lowest net one number that is not the sum of three inches square is wow flipping back to work that one out but it's true very nice okay. I'll say a very strong start. What about not speaking for the benefit of that was ad with so let's go to you know it would set the bar pretty what you going for your favorite number. Yeah i feel it. I should've gone first because it's not quite like an anti-climax after that. I'll think think about it and identify a bit. I didn't have a favorite numbers sort of always just much preferred even numbers two odd numbers. I don't know why there's something about i've tonight symmetry or just quiet how guarantee everything but yeah always been a fan of even numbers odd numbers yet. No i think i'm with i'm with you on that one. I'm with the <hes> of missile on the primes apart from to this yeah this nice yeah there's some nice up even though and in fact just danger pay when we had the robert and elizabeth bjork on on the show talking about memory is all into or even though mrs well she can divide them nicely with families and all that kind of you're in good company that yeah yeah all right. Let's go what what favorite topic in master's student. We'll go back to edward for this one. I wrote to mathematics and automatics but i still think that of all the things that i learned the service. The my favorite topic was mechanics mainly because i like bmc mathematics android and that whole veteran of mechanics is really excited me. Well let me tell you something. You're doing well. Well till that point down nations that we have a big mechanics. Versus statistics split on the show and i'm very much the start side of things there so so <hes> yeah and i hate that so we definitely get jeez right could be a long long entity that song rights okay. We brought the those wide open few now. It's nice avoidance of pretty for me probably angles over triangle because it's probably will be the first time when it was explained to me that i kind of realized that once the step-by-step strategy mass it wasn't this big scary unconquerable thing. It's like our once you know the process and you know the formula becomes quite easy so i always think len glover teranga was built a turning point for me with <hes> aw my relationships with mass at school nice nice little though with angles and turning point man that was that was that won't be lost on the listeners out so that's that's very good and then finally let's go back to you at last one and what what would you i mean we've got to get into what jobs actually are at the moment but if it was nothing to to do with kind of them education sites lynn in this on what would you what would you like to live had some great jobs in my life. I'd actually like to return to one of my previous. Joseph was being the army is it was fantastic. We got to see a whole bunch of stuff that perhaps most people get to see and to work with some extraordinary people. Oh wow fantastic. How about yourself breath yeah. I am ciller kind of in terms of when i'm not working education gatien lucky enough to do stuff in in sport which is quite nice over applying psychological research to athletes and teams teams. Tell them improve performance. I kind of have been lucky. Knock off one. Neither neither come back fantastic super bowl. We've kind of teased those obam out. Some some form of life. Life is so so let's go for it. I'm just take if you don't mind just briefly them the steps of where it all started the you both and way you today so again if we go back to edward to start to fossil right okay so i actually took a chemistry degree after leaving university i took a slight strange step of joining the army did that full seven years across the <hes> the world and then left that to go into management consulting assaulting which i did for a number of years working with one hundred companies and then after i left do what i'd always wanted to which was started up my own company which i did in online line. Computer gaming did that for ten years until eventually sold company retied loss ago. Perhaps the most gulf my wife suggested that it was a good idea. I am i gonna get a proper job. Met somebody on the golf course and we started up is company in a drive about thirteen or fourteen years ago and dr sir mental skills catching company and we work can spoil education and and in businesses as well wow flipping at from toxic. I'm sure we'll dig into your experiences with with all those different groups of people and you pass craze as we go through the conversation that's absolutely fascinating awesome eight in and how about yourself brad yes so i spoil psychologists initially by trade and so back in the day when i was doing my masters austin my my research thesis was on the fail failure in teenage athletes and how we could help male youth footballers <hes> step up to senior football and just sounded quite interesting then when i was doing that research how lots of the studies were based based on education education as across asia so he kind of was helping athletes on the one on one basis improve their footballing abilities. I started doing stuff in schools as well just changing the context may say plants exams and so in sport which i still did a bit of walking reckon with individual footloose in the primarily from a range of different clubs and being lucky enough to be part of the support staff for athletes from team g._b. Before lost to an pal games having them improved performance handle nerves become better learners is on aspects really improve performance from a psychological perspective and then we're kind of doing that side by side with work in education education so within an hour dry mainly due the aspects running staff inset days using similar research but helping them apply to a a to the school students wow flipping at the absolutely fascinating stuff this and then when i was one of those reading up just briefly anew backgrounds grounds it got me thinking that you work with a wide variety of people for from lots of different areas and whereas myself when i find myself working with kids versus working working with teachers after kind of tweak from this to change the way i do my presentations teaching and so on and so forth but that's nothing compared to take the wide variety of people at the counters so i just wondered how do you change the way you approach a session. Let's say with students versus with teachers or with parents erin soul with athletes or with business people what are some of the kind of main differences with how you interact with those groups of people if that makes sense yeah <music>. I'm we do really why with like quite a big range so one day can be the next day agree had teachers. I think we try which do is. We try to ourselves and authentic with by six. I think people quite quick to spoil when you're being insincere or when you're trying to talk their language so i think tried to be south antic version throughout is quite important. I think one thing that helps us. Translate our message to different groups. Is we know what we're in so we might be experts in in psychological research and potential guidelines full that why not try to act like i know more than the french teacher about how to teach french or tiny mypillows vile tactics they should be employing. You know we've kind of getting them to reflect themselves so that they can apply and i think that's quite keys knowing what we know knowing what we deny then helpfully applying attorney situation is fascinating. You say that that's something reflected on the fed that myself recently like. I'm a maths teacher speech and i don't pretend to know anything outside. My little secondary must bubble but anytime i'm looking to speak to colleagues from jackson primary colleagues i always say that at the start aw i don't other flipping clue about anything in terms of subject specific pedagogy or anything like that and all i can do is say my main message that i passionately believe in and then and essentially throw it over to the audience to think what would i need to do to make this work for my situation for my context for my background is is it that kind of thing. That's that's one hundred percent what we do really i think the main emphasis frost engage people and the interest people and infuse people people and inspire people and then as you say it's up to them to take the teaching or the message and and apply the way that most makes sense celeb- absolutely yeah and that certainly seems to be a much more effective way of getting the message across and saying do this this'll definitely work through this this'll definitely work and so so on and so forth but fast fascinated and one of my favorite questions i always ask them on the show and it tends to be kind of teachers or people with with derek classroom experience it who wind city but i think this could work. Equally well with youtube is about favourite failure so i wonder if there's a time and it can be anything it could be when you delivering a corsican. It could be something else from your professional career time. Was something went wrong and crucially what what did you learn from the experience again. I'm gonna take in one here. This is from the way distant past where unfortunately i decided that perhaps i knew better than everybody. He was ramsey. You and i managed to get my tune completely and utterly lost for three or four hours took look in the morning and i i inland some pretty painful lessons and it took me years really to stop having nightmares about it and dan i think the the lesson that i was really there are lots of people at that who knows stuff that you can learn from <hes> and you should be taking advice advice from and for the end of the day all wrong that's fair enough but you should at least consider the advice and the teaching and the and the experience and i think that's kind of a young thing and as you as you get slightly more mature you realize just all of the great things people know out there that you should build on rather than react against wow. That's a great favourite failure. I love that one. I know what about what about it was abbot. Was it yeah we went for an old one. I thought really recent walton. I just last month me being a c._d. Training inset on mexico mission up pinot in scotland and pof- the one of the studies that we were talking about was what kind of incentive essential ingredients or claus's environment and how shy like trust essentially. How do you build by within your students one of the one of the guys from the back of the room min hut broad scottish accent he was saying that for him. The key thing he said is all about fair and he's fair and i was on stage i was going oh god. I wasn't expecting <unk> a reluctancy how i was going to reply until i questioned him about an economy turned out. He was saying that you have to be fair. Dominic confinement at tangent of talk mehta and stuff like that. I learned from it. It was pretty funny at the time calling. Maybe not lt seriously when i'm presenting yeah get it chugs later here in scotland. Wow that's really all right. Let's turn our attention and to the book now. I got lost. They come the podcast because i always big up the books and that i am half of how people i'm talking about but the reason is that get sent loads of books and i only pick the ones to to invite on the show who i think it's a really worthy worthy book so what i say here that at this spot the size of learning is absolutely accents. I generally mean this so before we get into the specifics of just just tell us briefly. But why did you decide to write this book. Well thank you for calling woods <hes> about the book if it makes you feel better. It's kind of a mutual fan club because when we did the birkenau publish was asking us how we wanted to commit a i'm a big fan of your podcast and i was dying for us to get by on some of the episodes so it's really nice to know that you enjoyed the book an thank you my pleasure. Thank you see. How do we write the book. I guess polly was sir can wipe spectrum. I just got bored in a sense of having to guess while i was meant to be doing always thought like the must be onces onces alba and it turns out every question. I think it's each contain cold. I'm wants to know the altitude husband researched and we might not have definitive answers but there's definitely good guidelines of best bats and nothing once you know the knowledge and what not this research econ imagine having not known there but then the question then became wasn't everyone accessing or these great answers scrape the search. I think partly over such is behind. Pay walls filled filled with really psyched jargons. It's not written for its intended audience and we just wanted to produce something that was that reflected rick research and good practice was really accessible and understandable and just as a vehicle to kind of get other people's good research out there yeah and i think you're right. I mean i know when i was researching for my book the bloody hot to read some of these research. I did not have a clue what was going on with offer offer complimentary. I think you know some of these journals. We've had to read five and six times systematically have a basic understanding. I think if i like like many people have the luxury of time and you have gone through that research experience themselves and yet. I'm still struggling to comprehend it so then. How can i expect someone to be an expert of their subject. But how can we expect a french. Teach will jog for teacher to be an absolute expert in in subject and essentially an expert in psychology as well and hopefully this kind of helps bridge that gap a bit. I absolutely and i'll say one thing that strikes me immediately about this and i i think this is such a such a smart move and it reminds me a bit of tom sherrington most recent book on rosenshine principles. It's the layout of the book is so. It's it's so easily accessible so felicitous. You don't have the book in front of them and i'm going to strongly recommend them. Everybody's snaps over one of these and each each studies. The seventy seven studios using stories across a double page and you've got the study you've got the main findings you've got related research and got classroom implications for big bang combined bang bang and aries free study and how did you settle upon that format and and why go for that particular nor with a gal all chip in here on this one i mean one of the things we're very keen on the idea of al ping people understand psychology and implication uh-huh and very much everything that we do is quite a bit of is translating over that techy stuff and making it accessible and brad ashley thinking on at me for about ten years to write a book of some sort and i always resisted the crazy thing to do you deliberating. I'm very good at reading a book. Read them and so. I said we'll do as long as it's a comic book and <hes> probably wasn't really into that 'cause he's a bit of a site techy. He wanted to write leser words. In the end. We came up with a compromise and the compromise was this the half of it would be pitches. An half which would i could read an half of it would be learning tax by my colleague brad and so that's kind of why we came up with what we came out with as we refined it then came into this two page layout where one pages is for people like myself who have have very long attention spans and just wanna flip through and find cool stuff and then perhaps go into detail on it and then for those who really really want to go into detail is <hes> some could learn tax and then some references at the back which way you can go back to the original studies but most of us don't have time to techy stuff. Most of us like yourself. We know we we want to find out information quickly and i think that's kind of where we went to yeah. I love it because as you say this is the option to go as deep as you want. You've got your links to the related research if you if you want to kind of challenge your interpretation of its and go to the original source you county hound these i love that aspect but also the classroom implications because that that's often the most difficult things we it's taken a study and thinking well what what does this actually mean for my for my day to day teaching that fascinates me and i just found out what what was she taking their for right. Did you bring your teachers into play. How how did you how did you come up with these classroom. Implications uh-huh i mean that's the hardest part because summarizing. The study is basically just like the headline results in the classroom. Indications is most difficult because is it looks like you take a concept like any of them. Let retrieval practice switch. A lot of people are talking about how looks i think in the primary school might be different. It looks in a secondary school. It looks different english as it does to art or mass and so he parliament we had we were lucky because we have lots of contact with love good teachers so those are good bill cuna that went back and forth and we just tried to do it in a way that provided a general guideline that different teachers could take different implications from air while still giving something concrete that gives them enough to to start with yet makes perfect sense. I think that that let you say that's all you can do. It goes back to what we what we were saying about the start of affected the it's down to the teachers to think okay. What can i due to tweet this to to make it work for my secret for my circumstances and i think you strike the right balance of giving the right kind of suggestion and details are as i i think he superb so many questions before we dive into the real details of this. What what what's the dream. How'd you hope teaches in schools will use it and in fact. Have you had any any feedback for from how teach in schools are actually using the book yet. We've actually been blown away by some of the feedback because like you work on something yourself and he gets say stay close to him by dandy actually know if it's any good on by the time you're close to being blown away by something about we've got we know a lot of schools are giving them either to their heads of your heads of departments as a way of just prompting discussion and putting debate because i think knowing the research is one thing and so we can help with that level of it but then combining that with knowledgeable of your cayo hi whole and your subject and actually those discussions are web real value is and so we've been really encouraged by school who added they'll teach us ep de librarian debray or using air as just compensation starters in the stall from so that more people are talking about research and then seeing what avenues avenue goes down fantastic now. Let's dive into some of these in particular well the seventy seven studies yeah. I just wanted to ask did you. Where did twenty seven confirmed. Did you write the studies. Just count them up or did you have a few symptoms in a nice number. It's a nice interesting number. Do you always aiming for seventy seven. That was that was that just kind of did i not mention very early on. I it really is a very important number. Just imagine inputting to seven snakes lies very very good. I like it. Is it really all right well. Let's let's let's dive into. Some of these studies have themselves so i want to talk first about ones aimed at teaches and then once aimed at students and then just kind of ones in general that that may be favorites toll particularly surprising moms so let's start with teachers now one thing that listens to the show law there are practical takeaways something that they can listen to now props dry. Maybe even even driving into work. I am as as we speak something that they can put into practice either today or tomorrow next week with relatively little efforts and what would suggests that i'm going to go for the study on retrieval practice is quite current at the moment in an a lot of people know know about it but the there is also reasonably extraordinary <hes> ah so one of the things i'm very interested in is what is actual knowledge allege is for some people. It's it's actually just awareness so reading and rereading notes is quite got a common revision technique. I used ice actually take it to extremes use to read in bed before i went to sleep and then put the books underneath my pillow the dump through the pillow in my eds and in a way that's kind of reading and rereading knows tends to end up passes that you have seen so. We'll say i know the text. I know it's horrible. I know my nose by off by heart but actually when it comes to the the the moment when they have to put it out on a piece of paper logically ordered and with some reasoning behind it becomes very difficult and the only way to be ready for that is to is to practice is to actually test yourself will be tested on on on the on the information that is in those notes and that's something we called retrieval practice and the students say that rereading our notes is actually the most important thing to do when revision and actually it turns out when you look at the results from a research that <hes> the testing is important because anchors stuff in the brain much better than actually read. Yes absolutely sorry so certain to bratton egypt just online at this is one of the things that that's fascinating about this for me and again. This goes spots. We've mentioned robert bjork. This goes back to work on undesirable difficulties that the problem with kind of reread and feel so nice. It feels familiar. It feels like everything's things go in and especially you get the highlight is out and it looks pretty. If it looks like you do some real good work and i've got kids continent saying i two hours revision last night and i said what did you do in our read through my notes watching a video i did some highlights and so on so it feels comfortable whereas retrieving feels flipping painful. It's it's really hard to-do and for me. One of the biggest challenges with with a lot of these findings from cognitive sciences is getting the kids on board with them because often counter intuitive and they feel l. A. law more difficult than the comforting less effective things that the students like to do and is that something that you found jet drive any any kind with guidance online well. I think the saying that i come across recently which i think is really good memories residue of hard work and and you actually have to you have to engage with the with the knowledge and work and do something with it otherwise it doesn't stay there yeah yeah yeah and i think things are getting students to kind of acknowledge that kind of how to help the has to be some conversations at some stage of what what people prefer is. What's best for them. So i always kind of joke with students my goddaughter. She prefers to chocolate ice cream for breakfast. That's but i know what's best for her and the same as i think for reading verses retrieval practice and i think by what we thought there's a lot of teachers have asked us from the when the guy when we talk about this study for example this guy kenny send us some of these graphs that we could show them like this proof that you you know the evidence. Is that what you're doing might not be actually. I'm what you think you're doing. Wow isn't actually what's best for you so i didn't kind of objective data and more more knowledge is is a good barrier and going back to your question for how to teach then uses in a practical way i always think about the start and the end of the the lessons are key moments that you can easily. We've in finding some cognitive psychology. I used to always start with you. Know five minutes right down the learning outcomes or lesson objectives on east always finished with five minutes of let's summarize the key points that we covered and i just think now that's just ten minutes wasted and competitive. I did a bit of quizzing at the star and a bit of quizzing at the end just looking for opportunities to sneak in a bit more on this retrieval practice. I think is a good start yep. I completely agree and meets is the key and a moving away from so so this is my fifth year teaching. I twelve years lessons. We just tore nice tidy little blocks. It was this lessons on adding fractions this lessons on join a box plot whenever it is and and build an explicit moments where students have to retrieve not just information related to the current topic or something that had last week last month last year. It's it's so simple and it sounds so obvious now but it's it's the key because if if students house you say if they're not retrieving them not not strengthened in the storage retrieval strength of these memories and so on and so forth i completely agree with that and oh sorry go no i was just gonna say the whole concept of not just quizzing quizzing using stuff that you said like he did last week or last month is spot on <hes> what about favorite studies the burke was actually reputational bright like quite clinic study of adding houses forgetting curve which is kind of stood the test of time and not linked to the concept of you have to revisit information. Looks are one of the schools now the back of this research. They came up with the time they call thinking thursdays which is every thursday this day. The start of every lesson the students are going to get a quiz something they did three or four months ago so it's like they're not expecting to be fresh in their mind so so that way that combining by this concept of retrieval practice at indeed spacing just to kind of really make them think about the material find nice application of weaving resurgent actually daily practice i completely agree and the other thing i like about this is something i've certainly found. The last few years is routine so important and students expectations are so important that if they know for example and in that one that every thursday this is going to be happening. They're prepared for less lesson. Time is spent explaining what's happening what they need to do and so on and so forth and when when kids are used to what's going to happen visit. There's real power win that i think in terms of getting the most out of every of every minute within lessons but again we can we can dive into certainly motivations of light later on with kids and was the was the one that you wanted to say about a study that teaches could put in straight. Where would you go for retrieval as well just slightly different version of similar line so kind of the teeth so i let the studies memory quite obviously retrievable seems to be like the big win my special one of the other there is i think are worth so we did a study on pre questions so pre question is when you ask someone the question before you teach them the material so instead of saying in this lesson we can learn about how many fish in atlantic appre question would be. You'd also question. How many fish do you think they're on their land. Take before you actually he's not material they also the pre questions a kind of increased students curiosity and attention for the lesson and so as a result they found that when they've been later tested the students on how much they remembered their equal rights while up by about fifty percent so using questions before you teach material tail is quite nice and that also complements another study which shows on the technical term is on is called elaborated interrogation and in layman's terms. That's just asking people. Why do you think that's the case and so they found by getting students. You teach them information by getting them to reflect on. Why is this the case retrieve expert why you're getting them doing more than thinking and they found students who've been exposed this kind of elaborate interrogation them memory levels the mount baker called from the lesson almost doubled so i think using pre questions before you teach material and using laboratory interrogation this whole concept of weiser suffocates off. Do you teach the material that both kind of retrieval practice techniques but kind of standalone. I think that's something i can practically do tamara. I was going to improve learning strat way. It's absolutely i'm so pleased. If you've said this because youtube is to be the perfect people to help me out with this because i've struggled with with this on particularly in my reading of the literature i come across it noticed the pre-test the fact this asking asking these questions that kids have never been told as a way to either increase curiosity or prime the students to start thinking about this particular area so the more receptive when they get taught it that the problem i i don't know whether this is it could just be about teacher or it could just be my subjects of mathematics and or it could just be the kids that i've i've been trying this with but anytime i try this what the barrier attend together is that if i showed the kids a problem that i know they can't do because they haven't been taught it yet for quite a few the kids that last quite frustrates in an potent and it can actually lead them to almost gave up before i've actually got around to teaching them the new way of doing it whereas some groups it works really well as this moment of intrigued to hawk them and get them get them really keen to learn the techniques to solve this problem. Carry out this method and is there any is there anything whether it's from your reading or just your general experience that the fines that some of these these techniques from from cognitive six signs actually there's a psychological side to it the the means that they're either less effective or more effective with with certain groups of students than others if any not make any sense at all or almost certainly i think the big drive to be more research engage. The big challenge faces is perceived. Achieved is just do this thing or the time because it works everywhere for situations does what we kind of good guidelines of best bats because your knowledge of mass now will of your students probably will give you an indicator of when is best to use this technique best not to for example on pre questions. There was one one study we didn't include in the book but i think we including the related research power was <hes> monoprix question say and then give them a tex to reach find information mation or they watch a video that tends to have quite negative impact on learning because they then basically skim read everything. That's not related to that pretty question. Go go everything and just try and find. The answer was pre questions. Better is the teachers at the front because you call him fossil word my teaching. I control the pace of the lesson so that's not to say. Pre questions are always good or indeed always bad. It's awesome. How do i use them and i think the have to have that trial and error aw and knowledge of your students to be able to work out how best to apply these techniques. It's not just a blunt instrument that years or the time one congressional pre questioning one of its roles as you mentioned is to is to <hes> prime misuse. I discover all expose the knowledge that they already have they can hook the new knowledge into to make stay in the brain and clearly if you if you ask questions have no connectors that there are no sites to to to expose and then it is going to be frustrating so there is a bit of a technique in a bit of an art to due asking the right questions that actually exposes original sites that you can hope and knowledge into absolutely but it's absolutely fascinating yeah well what about a study or result the teacher listening could think of this this this is going to be my focus to building over the course of the next term or or even the course of a year and perhaps even with a group of colleagues or department. Is there anything that you think is a long term. Good bats okay. I'm going to <hes> on very controversial here because it is something that we need to. We need to do something about and i have no pretty nonsense to it but there are they going to mobile phones mobile enza an extraordinary invention and they are essential and clearly we need to know and teach our students to use them properly because they are very very powerful. Have there is quite a big downside to it and one of the studies in our book <hes> <hes> exposes the idea that <hes> but just for having the funding there on the desk in front of you decreases your <hes> you'll performance and so another one of the things that we have in they did a some research based on looking at schools had banned mobile finds finds a nicer happened and there was a a intensities yes see results six percent difference and some of the less able students it was as high as fourteen percent difference sloughed flipping. That's something we need to be aware of and certainly in again very scientific in my my the experience of seeing these funds come into the into the classroom. There is a big big difference in terms of concentration and focus in all of those things and that has to be related to how well people learn and we can't just ignore it and go. Oh these things are so wonderful that we have to let people use them and they have to learn by some sort of magical way. How do you use them properly because we all need to be taught how to use. This stuff said that it doesn't decrease performance so i ask controversial and i know a lot of your your listeners will beginning. We'd be throwing things at the radio now for not good if they're driving. It is something that we do need to be aware of and think about is absolutely the probably throwing the mobile phone casually and is fascinatingly the essay that because there's this tradeoff isn't averse. Is that like that the technology the power. That's available to kids now. I mean even even myself myself that. There wasn't available to me when i was at school versus this this yeah this destructing element of them and again as a math teacher. It's it's real pertinent into me because there's amazing graph drawing software whether it's desma so josiah's available on kids on kids phones there's wolf from our further can calculate some amazing using things but you've you've got. You've got a way that all against as you say again. I can't quite remember where i read this this week but yeah it's it's exactly what you're what you're saying there with the just the presence of mobile phones even if you're not interacting with them directly destruction get she's thinking about almost i interacting and thinking about what you miss out and with them and it's a massive trade off and i think as controversial as it is. I think i'm leaning towards towards your view on on this one. The the the bonham is is the way forward and and just getting out this specialist technology whether it's whether it's via ipod chromebook one whenever an atom lens needed but i guess the downside to that is not required schools to invest in having this technology available whereas most most kids these days. What have how in that pockets ready to go so it's it's so difficult isn't it. There's a definite trade off of the technology versus the destruction well. I guess the question question from me and the way he kind of got to be on a complete tipping point with this now in terms of it's good to ban them. Is how much benefit do you. You need to get a your happy to fourteen percent for your struggling students and then jesus as is like forty percents. Jesus is a huge number and so if i'm going into this knowing that it might her mush my struggling students the most i'm gonna want to as that trade off off and on some benefits but for me. The benefits clearly don't outweigh fourteen percent for struggling students yeah. That's that's a smart way of looking at it. Flip connect us sometime to this. We'll we'll stay up a great deal with listeners somehow. How about you. Did you want here yet. So the one that i found don't quite interesting in terms of if a group of teachers we're going to work together relates to one of the studies on resilience because i used to think resilience was all about how you might be seven of ten zillion personality bobby nine out of ten and if we can each help the individual troop that resilience levels that's kind of a good bet okay today but one of the studies looked at the environment that one can create like say your classroom are what is an environment. Oh i'm in that leads to them. Developing residents looked like so therefore you're capturing all of your students and the fact is they came up with that. You need both oil to help people develop. Their resilience is the first is what we call the level of challenge. I high demand high expectation high belief that they can improve zayn get better than they did yesterday. These high expectations are more about behaviors robin outcomes so one set the bar high essentially and then the other factor that combines with his level of support as this includes feeling connected to the group knowing he'd taguchi for motion advice or technical cla vice and need to you need to have high levels of demand but also the learner feels supported and for me. I think why that's important across our whole. School is consistency so if they're getting it in one class but in another class they're not that high level of support or not a high level of demand when there's inconsistency as beauty which leads to learning decreases basically and so i think as a group of teachers educators sitting down and going for a school as a college what does high demand and high support look like if i went to your lesson what would i see and knowing that the class next to using the same sort of thing thing in terms of those two i create an environment where resilience can develop as opposed to being this big motivational speech that you have to give to in order to increase priest that resilient levels about that's really interesting. You say that as well with them because i get off of reading just these last couple of weeks. It's all been kicking off about growth mindset again against every few months is there's a big thing about it and but he's really really kicking off over this last week at the time of recording because people are coming out to sign as absolute nonsense donovan carol dwags coming out and saying she didn't quite realize just how complex it was it was going to be in terms of applying these principles to two schools and it's a similar thing with resilience zillions. I mean there's no chance growth mindset works. If you just have a one hour assembly at the start the year bangalore a few posters and expect everyone to to develop this growth mindset. It's this. There's two things that really struck me about what you said that i is the consistency they can't just be getting this message in in one lesson and again in the other but also this the support element living to this is all well and good having a challenge. It's all well and good giving kids these complex problems and so on and so forth but without that challenge just becomes bloody frustrates in an really really demotivating for these kids and in fact the resilience levels can can decrease in that mindset which could have been pretty open can become fixed pretty quickly if that support pulls isn't there if if that makes sense completely and so when we were researching the bugs being pleaded not studies that referred to the growth mindset and i was looking at case okay so what does the research say about grades for example and found about twenty studies around the world and around the different age groups that found yeah streams with a growth mindset has posted of impact on grades and then i found about ten that side it had no impact on grades at all and that's really hard because people when they look at research they just want the headline finding it's like does it help not help and always there's nuance on like it can help or it could have under these situations which is interesting even lost growth mindset study that came out the headlines as reported well. We didn't have an impact when you read what the actual research is set on the study the is they find it really hard to compare because the control group had only been exposed to growth mindset or maybe it would help for this age group on this setting differently. Hey for example with research says it tends to have more striking students then she already quite high-achieving so there's all this kind of nuance to kind of weigh three which is difficult because people title one often very binary answers and so. I think a good starting point is you read the research then you kinda go. How what is there such saying. Can this transfer what situations might at work might not work but you have to know the studies to start to start that conversation. I think absolutely yeah absolutely flipping at this brilliant. This and i want to own. It sought now about ed. That's very important to me and many teachers listen to now. That's homework homework because again. It's the amount of hours i've spent marking box on sunday afternoon on a wednesday evening and stuff and again i i've for many years. I've been wondering am i literally wasting my time doing this. Well what what what's your view on homework based on what you've read in your experiences this included on homework. It's actually one of my favorite because it's just one of these things i everyone does it and you think you've always based on it and this upsets bob and it's worth working out. How do we best do it. <hes> kind of three main findings came out on mrs quite well over thousand students across different schools. They found frequency matters more than quantity so some regular homework is more important factor than just the time spent on homework so little and often is always make things better than lots. It's all at once and more is not always better. So what we found is our students. He got the best grades and the best exam results they were typically doing about one hundred minutes or high mcknight as a total so that might be the most effective but actually she found not to be the most efficient and found about an hour of homework. A night was the most efficient because even though there were small improvements between an hour and one hundred minutes the mouth of improvement wasn't didn't wasn't justified in the amount of time it took a regular is more important than just the amount <hes> <hes> sixty minutes seems to be efficient number. One hundred minutes tops most effective number on my favorite finding which i wasn't expecting from this study but when you think about bounded probably makes sense was they let students who did the homeworks the heat of the home without their parents help did about ten percent better because because they'd had time to struggle and wrestle with it and i guess longtime that makes sense because as they become older in school and they became get more knowledge they subjects than their parents did. They have to be able to do this stuff independently so i'm quite interesting finding facts syndication voice in the school and for me as a parent handy for me tonight isn't it's an interesting on that last bit in that as a parent is like that seems to be an excuse for me just to let them get on with it but actually i think that's kind of what it saying is that you still have a been a parental responsibility to provide a structure for it to happen and that's the difficult bit is that will fight as much as they can not do any control if given the chance whereas if given the right structure then then it becomes efficient as it's really interesting again y- you mentioned home these role faults. What's that been swimming around in my mind over the last six months or so. I was an interesting one. We must department a few years ago. We rewrote all are homeless. They took the ages to do ever was hours and hours and hours and hours we did we rewrote it. When i started reading about retrieval so instead of having topic specific homos we add mixed topic homeless to tap into spacing facts and all this kind of stuff. It's been hours doing these homeworks but it goes back to something. I think you said earlier arm and we gave these the kids and for a decent proportion kits. They just one point nine f._m. Whatsoever there was maybe spending thirty seconds on the homework or copy of their mate on the way on the bus and it it doesn't matter how well these resources or how much it's findings and based in cognitive science and supported by research and so on and so forth if the kids don't put any author in it's not gonna work at all and that's one thing that really strikes me about everything everything i read it. All comes down to kids effort doesn't and if the kids aren't putting the effort in no learnings going to take place that seems particularly true with with homework and does that make sense. Yes senate also. It's just it's the big white elephant in the room is the ola f- enter teaching kids the school and then they go home and there's a different environment in a different mindset about education and homework and all of these things and that for me is a big disconnect and and again this it is another thing perhaps the teaches ourselves to be thinking about is how to engage parents in the whole thing because they have the kids most of the time and if they are not getting the right stretches for homework then as you say perhaps you always see your time and yeah just just on that and dylan william spews out kind of good educational quotes what one of my favorites and i'll mess this up for me says something along the lines of that's an teaches could learn a lot brought from music teachers. I think called pet peripatetic can ever say that were the teachers who just teach guitar for one hour a week or record or whatever they they only see their kids props actually even twenty minutes a week sometimes and he said that the the what they're very good at he's realizing that actually what happens in those twenty minutes isn't going to be the key to to students learning because no one can learn guitar twenty minutes a week or online the piano twenty minutes twenty minutes a week what what they they do that. Twenty minutes is to prepare kids to practice effectively outside of lot twenty minute period because that's where the learnings going to take place whereas a lot of classroom teachers and i apostle foaming this camp. I'm under the illusion that all the learning is taking place in the three or four hours per week that i see my kids in math lessons whereas as you say they spend the vast majority of time outside of lessons and it's those structures that kind of culture that happens there. That's going to have more of an impact on what what learning takes place than anything. I do in lessons really again. I don't agree with us at all. Now i'm right behind. I think as a really good way of explaining explaining it as well and less less of flesh out another white elephant in the room is actually a big proportion of learning happens in the two months before the exams when revising like crazy because they want not well in their exams and perhaps if that was spread out over the year would be more effective absolutely absolutely okay well then just one more thing on on the kind of teacher side of things although there this definitely she's on students as well and that's nothing's -iety so we have we have listeners of teachers of all subjects listen to this podcast these days bo i always like to keep you keep it loyal to the original maths maths gang that followed me from the beginning so that's something that i've read about an in in preparation for my book and i've i've spoke to a couple of people about it but i'm interested in in your take on what you perceive it to be in crucially as teaches. What what can we do to help our students with so it's an interesting one because because someone once told me that students will have the strongest opinions about t- subjects at school then i love hated and there's no middle ground one is max us and the other is i mean people have strong opinions about stall with a slight caveat of idea sometimes worry that we i raises we tend to make clinical terms ovo everyday emotions so we know some students find it stressful frustrating as obviously that everyone has has matter because they don't like mass they struggle with it but we know that as a particular subject that people have very strong opinions about two studies found quenching tons of helping people with matt sanctity the first relates directly to teacher practice so one of what this <unk> study did was it took teaches through a hypothetical situation so they said the situation is this one of heathens did really badly in their first maths. Let's exam of the air and so your first question answers. The teacher is what do you think this code's future. Mass ability will be like and they said about birth earlier they measure teacher mindset and they said teaches with a great mindset. We're more likely to think that you have enough data you to make this judgment call. I've only got a sample size of one result whereas the fix mindset we're more likely to view the fast results as proof that the kids like mass ability that further they said how would you respond to these sheets and teachers. He said it's too early to tell at this growth mindset. They were much more into what researches coined strategy focused so let me break down the problem for you. Here's the step by step guide. Let me set you extra questions because you need to practice access even stuff like no that. I'm going to call you next week in class because this is an area. We know you need to improve on whereas teaches fixed mice have much more likely with good intentions. I should say to do what they call it. A comfort approach going stuff like not everyone can be good at mass. We will have other skills and like don't whoa i'm gonna ask you too many questions because i don't want to dominate on embarrassing take different approaches and then they went back to a different bunch of students and they said here's is the situation. You did bat in your first exam. Your teacher either said they said why. How does this make you feel and the students had got the strategy. Workers were much more likely to be motivated and high self expectations of their future mass ability where students should have the comfort proj- actually had the exact opposite of the intended defect and actually made them feel worse about mass an ability to do mask they'll seen as free that that teacher knew that we didn't have the required ability so love it does stem from the culture and the environment that we create around students from a teacher perspective and just to really drive that wedge home there was an isolated i looked at parents behaviors and how about links to maths anxiety and they found quite interesting different gender approaches say found onto parents of boys were much more likely to write mass as important and say that they're some that expect them to do well in the future in mass whereas parents of daughters were much more likely to rate massive being less important for their daughter and say that expected to work much harder in order to achieve similar results oats and see you take one of these things combined of you know i go in with some preconceived notions myself as a student and then i interpret misinterpret white teachers saying hang on a color view why parents saying and increases ho co two where becomes acceptable to say a maths person was whereas i don't really know of any other subject where people feel comfortable saying to reading person. I'll teach you how to read then and so there is something quite specialist talk about maths mainly because there's a right or wrong. It's quite offensive. <hes> the people have a higher failed but this is good news because it means as adult as teachers or parents we can help influence their attitude towards the subject based on our practice really interested in that brats. I'm i the the months teachers listening here. It will be the all too familiar thing that happens at parents evening. Were parents will say why was never good at maths and as soon as they say something like that you just cringe because you think iggy kits got no chance because if that's if that's that's the ceiling just been lowered by about ten meters there but by by saying something by saying something like that you can understand it because massive very divisive thing and like you say that i think it is a lot to do with this right and wrong elements of it which he props don't get in in in other in other subjects but what really strikes me about this and it goes back to what we've seen about homework is that obviously the teachers got a massive role to play but the parents come in come into plot on this as well and one school. I've been doing some work in over the last twelve months what they do is they bring in parents and interschool for this very reason to outline outlined just how important it is the message that they give to their kids at home that shorts important to to to get them stood in homework and routines and tobacco early and we'll talk about sleep sleep in a few minutes but also to just mentioned parents that the messages they give whether they're for the right intelligence because again parents saying to a kid who struggled on a math test don't worry about and i've on can be good at issue could other subjects the site not for the right reasons that trying to be competent in solemn but making lake clear to parents that that actually these messages perhaps the most useful and in fact a better way of framing that would be to do this this and this i think that can be so so affective and it just really brings home to me the importance of appreciating as azerbaijan about already that we see kids for are really limited a really small propulsion of time compared to the rest of their lives and it's making sure where possible these these these positive messages get outside of the classroom as as well well as being within our classroom if if that makes sense absolutely and engaging with the other way as well so i found this is quite interesting because i've just recently had to let one until i find the so messages and kind of how we as parents and grandparents communicate within like sometimes i goes the other way and there's just so much lavish praise the loss you're so you're the smartest thing and it's like it's not the smartest thing like just faulted like everything just gets praised slights degree in d. c. With some people one of researchers found quite interesting is people with the small reputation find certain events really stressful because if reputations on the line with each performance you're constantly being judged as small till notes than some subjects that have a definitive answer can be really stressful because you're worried that your whole reputation is kind of up for grabs which is quite a a daunting thought for teenagers especially absolutely fascinating right. I i can't resist asking you this any longer so again again. If you've listened to a couple of episodes of the show one thing i find it hard not to talk about is sleep. I'm absolutely up obsessed with sleep and we've just had to look a lot as well so he's at the time of records right sam <hes> coming up to six months sleep sleep sleep. Ironically is is a distant dream infamy these days but i've always been obsessed with sleep. Matthew walker's book. I'm on we sleep is is one of my all time favorites an ally again. I think this is something that is a real potential big win gene for schools and the teachers and parents and for people's but it's something that the some reason doesn't seem to have found its way into the classroom in the same way that perhaps retrieval has and and stuff so tell us about your you're finding your interpretation of the research into into the importance of sleep the students and perhaps we can tease. He's out some practical things that we as teachers can do to help students and parents feel and appreciate the benefits of sleep okay well. I can take this one <unk>. I'm hoping almost come out the other end my children eighteen and twenty one and i was going to do anything ah differently the one thing as a parent want. The one thing i'd sort out will be the whole sleep thing. I think the greatest gift you can give you a child. World is to teach your child to have regular sleep and the right amount of sleep i don i i think if that's one of the major things that you can do as a parent is to help them to sleep particularly nowadays <hes> and <hes> so so there's quite a bit of research on the benefits of sleep and it's really easy to do take divide groups into half-and-half you given regular mattis layton half you deprive them of sleep and there's some big studies has asked some of the more impressive one's memory tests were performance of sleep deprived students being forty percent less than those who have a decent traumatic sleep and ask a lot of a lot of performance difference. I think again one of the things that i see more and more in in in classrooms kassem's is just barely stay away. They yawning there some of them. You know that sometimes i i'm slightly off my game but if somebody's falling asleep in your class cheaper and if and if as a lot of research is saying is that sleep means means that you are less able to make those those connections in the brain to remember stuff and that's happening day in day out <hes> then then there is an issue and and it's not surprising as an issue because again he has listeners hammersley. Did you have last night and how much sleep usa posted we've had last night and every night we justify the fact that we had six hours sleep last night because we had a really important thing to do the next day but yes that's possibly true every now and then but not every single night and case in my experience are really going for it and i i. I actually take could reach me how close stance in my household and still and still there you go in sometimes at one o'clock in the morning in this offense who's brings me back to the mobile. Phone again is so here's the question. The often asked parents in particular is so i how many of you let your children golden have the phones in the bedroom to which the answer is them and why and the answer is the main answer that comes out is because my children students say that if they don't have a phone in the bedroom then they don't have the alarm clock function and they work and the answer that is going amazon and buying oncle five critical see and then don't have to have your phone in the room and then the then the next fall back position is what i don't want to be cruel when i don't want to them to be different and i don't and it's their phone and how can i take the phone off and the answer is no who's painful then not paying for it still students and so it is your phone is again another issue that we have in the malaysian. It's kind of snuck up on us. His parents is how do we teach children to use their phones in in a wet i that means that it doesn't keep me awake for two or three hours in the night when they should be sleeping so yes sorry to be again controversial talk again this. This is an area that fascinates me on ano- lots of people and i guess for me one thing that's worth quite well with with my kids and i'm by my kids into the kids. I teach maps to and this. This is a wide lesson. I think that i found particularly important with with all the cognitive science principles tried to try to share with my students and get them to build into their own habits is to tell them why why would do in it and sleep in particular is a real easy one because all you need to share some of the studies that you've mentioned there afterwards and say to the kids look you could. It's like a secret that nobody knows give you can be getting a good sleep. You can be yet you light your superhuman. You super charger can be remembering things can be taken in new information. You can be making more links. Why on earth would you want to disadvantage yourself by reducing that kind of processing power by thirty percent forty percent and for some kids. It's it's not message that the that makes the difference as opposed to you know the more hardline you must get to sleep and so on and so forth so again. I'm intrigued from your back rush particularly yet. Go find you on that. One is is awareness is really really important and we we give talks tobacco this both to students and parents into teachers and every one of those groups the the origins and their mouths literally on the floor because they haven't. I haven't heard it before we always a surprise for us and it is it's like why would you give away a grade as a student because you want to be on the phone own at night. Why would you as a parent allow something addictive as a phone in into the bedroom. When you have actually got the option to do perhaps persuade or even even have imposed some discipline on your your children so that that doesn't happen an end. It is about a win but he's also the bat telling people that you're not alone said quite often. Particularly parents will say it. Is anybody else having his problem in. Everyone's noting ahead absolutely i. I'll tell you although i'm so obsessed with sleep. Now each gordon you the way for me. I think this is a danger so i've i've got on my my arm trucking me sleep left right and center and i'll as with a baby suit recipe for disaster this so i'll be leading bad panicking thinking god on my i've gotta get sleep. I've got to get to sleep i can. I'm counting down. I'm seeing the minutes disappear. I'm thinking i'm not going to get my eight hours now. Maybe i can get seven and a half and so on and so forth and then waking up in the morning. I'm checking my my sleep and if it's below seven hours of good quality sleep or whatever i feel like crap stray. Oh i think that's the dust. The day ran off because because i know the kind of debilitates fatness can be so. I wonder if if this is a danger that you perceive that that we could become a little bit. It's almost kind of a self fulfilling prophecy in a way that the once you become a bit sleep up sast e can kind of take over your life and you can you can start your performance can go down because you expect your performance to go down if that makes sense yeah and i thought that does make sense and i guess the big challenge in august frustration for educators is with this is being such a big important when and they have less controlling this like in their classroom where they can directly impact this stuff and that's why i think your price to student education. It's so important and more schools knowstone take over the community. We are experts in education and waigel teach the students but paul is. We're going to help educate parents as well one nugget. If your sleep obsessed i was told by sleepers the job so she said this wasn't based on a particular study so it's a rough rule of thumb lies equate anecdotal but she says her gut feeling is and this is what parents seats now. I think for each electrical item that's in their child's room that isn't alight severe a phone or tv and xbox for each electrical into isn't a light. You can improbably minus one hour sleep so he's got a t._v. She would bet that gets two hours less than a child who doesn't have a faculty they in their bedroom. Ow now flip thinking about everything. I liked that flip and i could you just just on sleep again. If we have parents listening or we have from our teachers listening. He wants a veteran form their kids so we can say to them okay. If you don't get to sleep there this is the kind of a fantasy is going to have other any messages from research or your own personal experience about helping kids. Get a better sleep so we can remove devices. Is there anything else that you'd recommend yes. The device is the big ones so while this we look found that being on your fighting all device for two hours before bed regina's meditated in which is the sleep palm. The device is one other complete mistakes that we see that she didn't tell us they make caffeinated drinks before late in the evening running as we know caffeinated drinks takes about twenty minutes to half an hour to hear your system so you're having many strings just before you should usually go to bed dust opole recipe regular bedtime so again what you're talking about in the classroom with routine the same as much trefor bedtime sleep researchers say they can fairly fairly accurately predict both your quantity and quality of your sleep based on what you do in the build up to your sleep. There's something known as the pillow test which is if you fall asleep within five minutes of your head hitting the pillow. That's an indication should be going to bed earlier. You shouldn't be completely crashed out ready for sleep straight away by the time you call to badische should be dislike gradu- process. That's entrusted a lot alike. That's interesting. I'm going to be at the end of this conversation. I'm i'm recording segment for pakistan. I'm going to put out before this warm where it's what have i learned this year and one of the things i've learned this year and this is through through having a little baby. Isaac is just next door is he. He's actually getting better sleep known. He has white noise at playing him sleep. Oh i have a doctor. I've adopted this now so i'm i'm bob slightly white noise central at first. It was really weeks. It's really loud uh-huh but now i don't think i can sleep without this this white noise and it's it's again this is this is kind of a general principle that i find from from from cognitive science and that is is it goes back to something that we were saying at the start. It's it's taken the research and then he's almost conducting your own little micro experiments whether it's with yourself with your kids to think what can i do to to try this implication the research house and let's let's talk a little microphone for a week or two weeks. Let's see what happens and yet particularly the white noise. That's been a game changer for me now. So i'm yeah i'm white noise. Central analysis listeners try that one out. He can have that one for free. I wanna i find interesting about that. Not what you just said. There is so the asia your child is you'll putting in a lot of effort into <hes> experimentation and trying to get this young child into a position where they can sleep through the night so you putting a ton of evidence and yet when we have teenagers teenagers all of a sudden it's like we don't want to upset them and i think one of the greatest things that was ever said to me as a as a father was this spy <unk> with like edward. You are not your child's friend. You are his father and that for me is a very very important distinction for parents is is like it's not about doing things which make necessarily a things that you'll kid wants to happen. It's bad doing the right right things for them and helping them coaching them and teaching them what are the right things that they need so that by the time they're eighteen or nineteen and they go off and okay somewhere else hopefully not mine for they've got all of these things in that locker and that's that's that's where parenting is about adjustment okay so the next thing of light to ask you about is an again another challenge that lots of teachers face and that's motivating board student so i i've sat through many a maths lesson years hand friday afternoon and i'm trying to teach the woman's infractions simultaneous equations so something brilliant line on the kids. Some kids are struggling that tell me that board and it's it's an uphill struggle the entire lesson so am what does the research say about the best ways to to get these kids on bought it to start them putting the effort in that we all know is is crucial for them to learn anything yes i. It's a really broad area because there's just been so much research done on may titian coming different aspects of motivation so a couple of the studies that kind of stood out for me one of them which was quite key study was they told a whole bunch of students a new topic in oh really boring way electrode. The teacher was really monitoring powerpoint or really dry type delivery and they did that because they want to replicate mccade complain that you were just describing machines have of on board in the lesson and they've been four different conditions to the first condition. One told why they're being talk the subject the second group were told they needed to call because it's going to be a test and the test is really important though we're told because that's what we've always he's done here. That's what you should do this school and then the fourth grade were towed how doing well in the subject would help them achieve their own personal ass new goals and then they kind of measured by self report our effort the students end is also quite counterintuitive to war initially expected because there's going to be a test had hardly any impact whatsoever on cheated motivation levels and i guess that's kind kind of because he sees students revise work very differently in september october november december january february march compared to how hard they work in april-may may when they've got their big exams into the because there's more media-savvy towards that what they found was better for motivation was playing the topic pick to how what topic would help achieve their own internal goals and that suggests kind of going back to learning outcomes lesson objectives again that it's the what you're teaching that matters but it's why you're teaching it that really taps into their motivation and presumably fuel passionate about your subjects in in your topic that you're teaching it makes sense for third just thirty seconds at the medicine to shadow because it kind of gives them a reason to carry as well and so the research this is referred to as a sense of purpose and this. It's quite emerging area of moore's senate. She's coming out so that's one area. I find tap into their internal. You can i just on not brad because it really fascinates me this as well. I think there's a real danger and i fall into into this this trump myself that the you take something like that and i i think purpose okay what does purpose me. Purpose means real life so purpose means. He's trying to find a justification for why every single topic. I'm teaching my subject. Mathematics will have a definite key role to play in the rest of their lives and that has led at some of the worst lessons. I've i've ever done in my life. I'm trying to shoehorn in reasons for teaching quadriplegic equations or trigonometry or shiny ratio because i i say all well i guarantee you're going to use this when you're old and the kids are like why aware i'm realizing to scrape the barrel pathetic pathetic reasons but i think what you've said. This is the key to it. It's it's the teacher being enthusiastic about it and if there is a genuine linked to the real world relevance to the students lives then of course also tap into it but what i've certainly found just anecdotally is that the kids prefer just to be honest and if the me being honest is lot we're going to do this. I find this genuinely form and i'm going to try and find a way to get you to enjoy as well. I'm not gonna lie to you and say that singer finish school. You can be using this every single day of your life. I i think being honest with the kids and at the same time tapping into not natural enthusiasm that you have subject i find that to be the key to providing fighting. This purpose as opposed to the artificial retire may have gone down in the past. I don't make sense of your instincts with fishery. The research is fairly like distinction thinking on this in terms of you. Wanna talk into them to vacation. You'll may yes because that's when it becomes internalized a and as you say the worries that you go through trying to find fads or trying to be really cringed when you charm latest what fifteen year olds care about kind of bay found by getting into like what do they want to achieve. And how do they think doing mass will help them achieve that that's then it becomes more internalize. The other study studied. I thought i would just like why hannity said was around. There's a misconception on motivation so historically most people think if you draw like think a diagram of motivation and the new draw straight line and that leads to achievement said moore made faded. I am the more likely to achieve whereas what one of the studies that we included compound is it's it's bidirectional so motivation leads to achievement but achievement also leads to people be more motivated. We like doing stuff that we're getting better interact so rather than going down like you candy partly the motivational route and i'm going to try and spy but you can also go down the route of if i hope you get better at think and show you that you've had success and that you progressing. You'll be more motivated than keep doing that thing again. In the feature isa works both ways with achievement motivation. Yeah i found that when i was doing my research for the book when i came across these i found that very very surprising so i'd galway's planned for motivations are less motivate the kids and then they'll be successful and it was a real real game changer to me to think actually if i can help the kids be successful than fingers crossed now they'll be motivated and and what i like about that is i think it's easier to do the latter it's easier to plan to get the kids feeling successful fassel using things like retrieval and the things that would know from from from science as opposed to trying to tap into the thirty different personalities not in the class and find a way to motivate each of them if that makes that does but the big bay that we've had between ourselves deny is so you have this way of of motivation and achievement and the two linked to each other is how do you get students on the wheel and the first one to a completely disengaged and it's really hard to show than progress and achievement because they're disengage how how did how did you get them in that funnel or that whereas is a really interesting challenge. What's your views on that well. I think one of the things you talked about earlier. Is you have to be about your subject and even the boring disabuse subjects. There's a concept of emotional contagion which is primarily in the research we have in the book is about having kids working with kids who are working harder than than which has an effect sort of drives the person who's who's mobile oh boy by the subject to full harder but but i actually think the key is is your emotional contagion may like i <hes> have i teach kids for my sentence chemistry and one of the things that <hes> have a lot of difficulty with his is motor acquaintance and the there is a way of teaching equations is exciting does generate some emotional contagion and get onto that flywheel readies is part of teaching is leading people into that onto that wheel so that they get onto the fascinating yeah. It's like you say it's a big old area. Isn't it motivation but what intrigues me about this. Whole thing is the it was never like we've talked about a lot of things here. We've taught about sleep. We've talked about students revise and effectively. We're talking about motivation that that wasn't something i ever really started considering explicitly as as a teacher open salon allows say two or three years ago when i've been i've been teaching for twelve years and yet these massive things above and beyond our own subject knowledgeable and beyond pedagogy these these are these are massive things for teachers to consider and that's why as you said at the outset having not definitive answers for having some rough guidelines and bass spats are so important teachers because if any of these things like if the motivations gone if the sleeps gone over everything else we do almost pales into insignificance insignificance if that makes sense completely incoming for me as a psychology background easter baffle me when i talk to teachers and ask them what they knew what i consider about my topic of psychology and they'd go the most they got was a bit about piaget obey about the gold ski and like no one did any of the stuff that like i was reading about. I didn't didn't understand because i could see the implications so much learning but i've got to say. I think you look over the last few years. It's actually been pretty amazing seizing. If you take a step back think how fall professionals come in short space of time this dr really even more research engaged informed and i think stuff stuff like the education down foundation. Welcome trust research adan. Look how many people go the education and you mentioned earlier. Tom sherrington harrington's recent boat. Which we think's brilliant light beatings very much now becoming mainstream paul of good is considered normal and good practice <hes> <hes> and so but yet when we started working education during c._o._p._d. We were getting very different. Requests viable ten years ago to what we're getting now. What we think is really really foraging. What what what's the difference. If you don't mind me asking so police in terms of the language so whereas before we might have had stuff around around. Can you do stuff around. May vacation or performance on the pressure might be in a phrase now. It's much more we're going around. Meta cognition self regulation an even on a superficial level sometimes when we talk to the schools wherever you run sessions we kind of got the amount of knowledge. That's already in this area now. Now from a teaching learning is being really impressive because everyone's basically getting excited getting these about reading research and applying research the danger becomes it becomes just a tick box exercise. Go yeah we really research informed or we did. The meta cognition cds all great as mindset assemblies alike. We can kind of take that box but we're seeing more and more schools raping. How do we think about how do we integrate it for us for our cohorts and i think that's probably because of those previous places of engine now amazing stuff more valuable absolutely about us great here. That's fantastic and final kind of specific question of us duty for me. We've kind of touched upon this earlier on about some about the importance of retrieval but again just putting it into the hands of the kids. What are the best ways for students to revise effectively for exams. Would you say so. It's common question we got asked and we think we can divide it into like do's and doug edwards deitz and then do the ds okay. I've got just a few. I mean the one of the most interesting to me is research on use of music so particularly when i was revising i felt that i had to listen to music while i was was revising specifically pink floyd and we don't need any told which i thought l. meant that because always revising whatever it was integration or something like that if i played a specific type of music with my revision that all i needed to do was to recall it when i was doing my exam and magically audio to do integration and that's not the case actually got the research had that body research suggest that trying to get your brain to multitask particularly when you're listening to music and things he's like that when you're trying to revise it as she counterproductive and you get worse results as a result so that for me was quite an interesting study in the book <hes> again my phone's <hes> we'll give them to you. Give them to someone else. While revising time skip breakfast and and people are sort of pay lip service to this a bit ma- most important meal of the day you can skip lunch if you like if you wanna skip anything but thanks get launch because it gets he set up well for the learning concentration of that sort of stuff so those are the ones that i'd go for the doug side and they're just interesting frost because when we all all students how many of you got nine half hour sleep last night and ate breakfast i would think less than five percent of students debate delays things and then he go well. That's it's just an easy when like you didn't have to be smalto deal more vision just those things for star and your head of the curve the big he's i mean obviously we've touched. Retrieval practice say the phrase we often use our sheets now is he don't dame de revision in order to get in your tests you do lots of tests noticed noticed good revision with retrieval spacing revisiting stuff one of the biggest misconceptions i think from psychology around the work of interleaving because people often get a bit computer i into leaving is mixing up the topics that you study within in a subject so that allows you then to make connections between them and choose the appropriate strategies so it's not say you have to do something mixing up. Your subjects is more mixing up the topics within the subject. I'm on my quirky ones. I quite light from the burke. Is they have since revise mm-hmm. I think it was called. Text had to revise and the two conditions where you have to revise it because it's going to be a test or you have to revise it because you're enough to teach it to someone else afterwards and they found the off having to teach it to someone else massively improve people's learning learning and memory this was known as the protege of fact is by being the one who has to teach it to someone helps me organize and clarify my missile healthy predict what questions you might ask me so that i have to revise that sort of stuff and that's why having a good study partner or even as a parent erin if you're not sure about the topic you think how can how much have them teach. You can be a really really effective. Revision trusted fantastic. That's really a lot less obsolete brilliant and now there's a danger of course and i would very heavily this. We could go through literally every one of the seven in the prep. Nobody will buy the books well. What are we going to do before we start wrapping things up. Some reflections actually throw it over to see both and feel free props to tweak pick one study see that that that you want to you to one of these questions with but either a study that surprised you the most or a study. That's made you purposely. Change something that you do in your day to day. Practice practiced all just won the as you've got a bit of a soft spot for this general favor and perhaps even just pick pick one out each that just tell me why you've chosen. It's an again it. I felt so right okay. I'm going to go for the study on feedback and why it surprised me was i. I thought that's a satellite atwood mention that there's a big difference between giving feedback and not getting back in terms of how students learn and memorizing rising subject. I thought that the main drive of a study or the main findings of study would be giving feedback is really good the ashley what surprised me about it is it turns out thirty eight percent in studies of the feedback that was given ashdod more harm than good off and that's a shocker yeah. There is a good way to giving feedback in the pool giving feedback. I suppose the big takeaway from a is to concentrate more on in terms of feedback concentrates more on processes and strategies required to do better rather than on the results aw feeding good about whatever it is that you're trying to and that for me was it was kind of where i suppose. Moseley should go but the shocker was just how damaging some feedback is yeah. I felt the your rights alive with the absolutely blew my mind when it when i first came across because the other flipside of that is and giving giving feedback. It's certainly not time neutral thing for a teacher to do that. That could be something that takes up six or seven hours a week of of that time and the thought that not only might not be having no effect but actually could be having a negative effect is just about some of these addressing absolutely brilliant choice. What what what would you go for so the study did not surprise me the most so. How many are you familiar with the marshmallow experiment. Oh yes this thin about <hes> <hes> yeah being able to resist temptation awesome outline it for our listeners also one of the most iconic studies psychologists don't even forty years ago the basically found students who the marshmallow the students are able to wait on the promise of getting a second they shouldn't see waited. They say delayed gratification and they've hindu way better a whole range of outcomes in school in their careers and the lowest obstruction even the quality of relationships as this was always held as the a big study of which we can just get into delay gratification. They'll do really really well and the studies one of the most nine but the study that crash that surprised me the most. I was actually a fairly recent update on this study and because everyone knows the original study but hardly anyone knows the update had version and we'll they did on the updated version is half. The students be sold. The teacher lied to another student at the start of the experiment made the teachers seem unreliable untrustworthy back and so they wanted to find if i don't trust the person giving me the advice i'm only then less likely to fully advice to delay gratification and found that students who sold the teachers trustworthy they waited. I think it was about thirteen or fourteen minutes whereas if she didn't she didn't trust the teacher they wait about two or three minutes before full they gave in and out pretty much changed. How psychologists the concept of delayed gratification so it's not something that you know you might have a six hour tenability and someone else about having <music> out tenability and that's just the lottery of birth that eight out of ten is do better than the six hundred ten is actually suggests that the environment that we create for our students is so key for them to develop that resilience and that delayed gratification and this bill when trust and reliability and i couldn't find one study that found that i have to like the person who are learning from that really makes a difference how much learn from them by do you have to trust them and they have to be reliable even if i don't like what they're going to say if i can kind of predict if they consistent than not psyching for that motivation that resilience. I'm not going to change their bit for me. 'cause then it kinda. Though that's something that i can impact on as an educator ask quite interesting quite important. Finding wow less appreciable that is yet obviously from testing and again. He can't to quote dylan. William agani says that teaches relationships business and if the relationship isn't there and again well we're going to be in trouble and often the focus in the past has been to try and make the kids like me and that's i mean that could be a really dangerous game to play whereas trust is something that's much more in control because kids can see you being consistent over a period of time and that can have that that's the thing that has the positive effects yet is thus brilliant sometimes as well as i say i i literally am speak to you all day about these studies bought. I think hopefully we've we've wet. The listens appetite enough in this this book which is absolutely fantastic so what i want to do and before we wrap up. He's just a couple of reflections from you. Both if that's all right. Is there an example of something important that you'd both changed your mind about so i guess for me when we started we may much face on stephen interactio workshops as if i can just help them develop if that mindset and learn how to always like that's the win now kind of thing if a staff just make such a big impact because it's the moist is about actually one's environment and the coach makes a difference and in the last year to really come around to idea of actually. It's not just awful. It's not just student has to be parents is wow if you mentioned as a triangle you have to have all three sides for that message to stick whereas before i think i'd just look at an individual's performance and think it's about my actions with them and then individual choices as opposed to creating a system that gives them the best chance or flower shane in my kind of change up by now tossing. How about you as well. I'm getting really boring and just guy guy with that as well. I just having just done my mass level for the sir. Talk with my son eighties his <hes> you know it is so important what guys on the asti tools learning the structures that you provide your child old <hes> and so i think quite a bit about work at the moment is in this nutty problem is how do you encourage all in <unk> parents to teach their children in a way which is consistent with what you're teaching them with the mindset that you're you're trying to encourage the school than it is a tricky tricky problem because you could run workshops as we do with parents or do <hes> after school talks parents but not the people turn to the people who are already doing a pretty good job and it's the ones who are oppressed had terrible. Hello <hes> school experiences themselves or very very busy or does the ones that you need to try to coach not and that's the puzzle is how do you engage these people in the limited amount of time. Have you guys teaches lives lives as well <hes>. How do you engage parents in the in the tremendous and import more that you will with children and too often the in in a in some schools they some schools it site will what's education for but in other schools is it sort of the top end is even worse so i think which is like well. We give them to you to teach up when they come home. I expect them to have been told yes and that's just as corrosive even as as as difficult to deal with as as bad for the students as education is education for your right and i again. I'm sure this i'm sure there's lots of different different studies in statistics bombing around on this but somebody told me just this last week nationally something ridiculous like only twenty two percents the parents turn up to parents evening or something scarily low like that and as you say it's the it's the wrong parents if anything not turn up at these things so. Is there anything again if teachers listening here this will be resonating with them so much that they got. They got kids in their class who they know they need to engage with their parents because they're essentially fighting a losing battle with with with certain wanted. The students is there. Is there any advice that if you can get the parents silence on the phone or you can get a meeting with them. What what's the kind of angle what what are the things to say to to bring these parents onboard is. Is there any guidelines there well. I think that one of the most important things is things like this causes. Actually we've all got to get together. As educators ages and find out is tricky tricky problem that we need to find out who's succeeding here and how are they succeeding and let's all do that because it seems to be an unsolvable conundrum but there's gonna be a solution to and if there isn't a solution to it we've got some serious difficulties ahead ahead and i think that it's a us like the teachers versus the parents when we've seen it work while is famous being a joint a joint effort and one of the research staff me was the biggest impact that parents have on their child's academic performance is attitude towards education and high expectations for their child mm-hmm so it has to be a joint effort and having them become aware of just how much impact they have and how the school can support them and how they can support the school oh and so all in it together ultimately when the same thing. It's not this combative me versus you. It's how do we get the best for your child absolutely fantastic final question for me before one hundred big three am. Is there anything that either of you wish you'd know when you first started out either in your careers. He is or in kind of education in general that you know now yeah <hes> okay so for me. I think i was in way to t- software too lenient. I'd always kind of inclusive class knows my whole thing. I wanted them to know that they were paul team and we're all in it together and often lead to me loan my expectations i think of genes capable of and not accepting that i instead of the best answer i wouldn't leave any time after the question before i found awkward just accept any answer whereas is kind of red on the research and the more we've done now. A workshops is nothing really be tight expectations. Someone told me the way that no one rises rises to low expectation. It's like for some of your students. If you don't have high expectations for them they might not get that anywhere else in their life and so it's high expectations -tations of themselves hog stations on the teachers and as you were just saying high expectations from parents because we set the bar high <hes> and help and support them to get there as opposed to lowering the bottom feel good just about porch even fantastic and how oh by yourself i put for me. I think the most interesting thing that i would like to have known when i started i'm was about medical questioning really and the power of questions and there are different types of questions that are applicable and appropriate at different times of the learning process who says so for instance when was the battle of hastings is is a great question but it's it as one answer and it it is appropriate at a certain amount of time a certain time during the process when you are trying to get a knowledge base but then there are other questions you could ask about the balance hastings was pat perhaps and with better learning outcomes i they they learn more because they they ask stretching and engaging engaging brain and all of those hooks within the brain allow you to take information in and memorize it so for instance you could ask why did why did we invade england s._s._i. Next to the level up when another question that you could ask him with lots of different finance is what would have been different in england would him hadn't invaded england and then finally maybe at much higher level. You might want to ask a question person like what's the difference between williams of age invasion and caesar's invasion <hes> and each of those is is gets a different different response within the different levels of learning and is appropriate at different times an me that it's a fascinating idea. I didn't know about when i first started. Questioning was top of my mind. Brilliant flipped plenty of food for thought bussey purple and we'll to drop things off. It's it's time the big three because two of you can have a big six. If you want we can come together for big on the way all the three website so blog post that you'd recommend and our listeners check out what i'll do is. I'll pulling to these in the show notes okay so are we are of decide on this one to go for a joint answer. I get i get to do the preamble and set it up so that brad can hit it into talk. Show with the big. Three are obviously obviously our website so we do a regular blog disseminating. The latest studies that we find interesting so that's on in a drive dot dot com u._k. An attached i won't giggles in adroit resources as a whole ton of free stuff that is aimed by students and teachers <hes> ourselves. I guess stowaways obviously obviously the second one of those who have already been. We think the education endowment foundation is a really good side of weighing up existing research looking at the impact the cost and i think we are toolkit is the single most important factors driving this research engaged over the last two years so we're quite big fans of site sites and the third one thought he's talking a little bit different. One of the blogs <hes> really enjoy reading <hes>. There's a chop as a a psychologist who was heavily education. I love reading his blogs a bug. I could mark smith. He's done a couple books. I think on psychology psychology in the classroom and emotion norlander but every time i read his blogs. I learned something new and i think he's writing styles. Berlin does some stuff fantastic so we're big fans that air in the drive as well which what's how will we find that that mark smith on sorry. I'm pretty sure it's called the emotional. Learn is the smog if not i can always send you the link. No that's perfect is fantastic. We'll be links to those in the show so that's brilliant and we'll we'll just just time for me to to report really and just just a couple of things so i thank you fifth given up your time today. Both of you to speak to me. It's again. It's i'm so looking to could be doing this podcast. I just learned so much is just fascinating to talk to you both but also thank you for for writes in the book. I mean you know it's a good book. When you've got people alight dylan william banging on about good it is professor dame alison peacock call hendrick all the big names coming out saying that this this is a fantastic book. I've not seen in anything quite like this. Before that takes these big essential stories distills it down in an easily accessible and then again office me guidance but also also challenges me to think as we spoke about the whole the whole show. What do i need to do to make this work for my kids my situation my context and so on and so forth and for the time poor teacher this is perfect cushy. Can you can dip into one of these every night. You can use it as a stimulus for a departmental meetings and discussion shen or at break time between two colleagues. It's it's tailor made for the realities of of life is busy teacher brought together engaged with the research and discussing about how we can make it worth for kids and frost situation so thank you for writing. The book it really really is at wonderful book and i again. I've no hesitation recommended that the people check this out so and edward abroad. Thank you so much vietnam today obsolete ball. Thank you very much. Thank you appreciate it and and they haven't there was my interview with broadly atwood's. I really hope you enjoyed that one and god's much out of it as i did all this. I don't get a bit of stick for for this on twitter off a few people who will go nameless ball an enthusiastic during these conversations because i choose people who who i am genuinely inspired by 'em and also i don't talk about books unless i genuinely loved reading the book and that was very much the case with this balkan and with this conversation. I'm always a bit nervous going into interviews with people. I don't know i haven't spoke to before and that was the case here but again just probably inhabited just just great guys who it was an absolute pleasure to talk to and to learn from some that brings us to the takeaway now there's a few here and see what kind of adopt the theme of abruptly inequities book go kind of bite sized qualms and cova quite a few and then hopefully if the rainy of these people think oh. I want to look at it more in depth about that then you can either am looking probably neck woods book deuba to google in and yourself the first off. He's he's mobile phones now. This is something that's m katherine the dan had teacher from michaela and sat on my recent slice of advice. What did you learn from from this year. Podcast episode that mobile phone to the bane of of many any teachers lives and again as i said in the conversation there's lots of benefits to the technology. Having this technology in your pocket is something that even when i was a student i couldn't even dream seem off being able to plot graphs and solve these incredible equations and do all these geometrical transformations and so on and so forth but i was probably an ugly pointed out does does this benefit the benefit of kind of access to technology do they outweigh a fourteen percent dip in g._c._c. at results for the lowest attaining leanest fourteen percent wow so that's definitely something that the head teachers school leaders or classroom teachers listening who i've control over that need need to need to think about how d- how do we harness the benefits of this technology but in a way that doesn't help the these less desirable outcomes and then we get to resilience millions now at this may be really bad of me but i looked resilience onto the same kind of bonner's as growth mindset's. I'm going to be speaking hopefully if i can get. The interview salted salted. I'm in the next few moments with with people who know far more about resilience than me and can probably pick up on that misconception that i've got but it seems that from from the conversation ovation bradley edward for resilience to work for growth mindset training to work it needs to things that needs firstly consistency and secondly support and consistency is is crucial if this is just a one-off assembly or po few posters up against the wall. If this is something that a school or a teacher goes mental on for a week leak but then doesn't follow up just disappears like like anything and needs consistency. It needs constant reinforcement constant reminders constant referring back eh but it also needs support. It needs edits. Expertise telling kids to be resilient will tell them tom. A growth mindset is no good and for me. I liken this nice to <hes> to to teaching anything to modeling method or procedure and if i don't show my kids exactly what that looks like why hi it looks like that i go through it step by step and then also if they go on a slightly different path if i don't have a way to steer them back onto the right path in a way that makes sense to them. They're not going to learn that method procedure well. It's the same for this like we can't you tell kids to be resilient growth mindset. It's got the expertise support that the guides them down the right path in and that's difficult that's difficult so as i say this is something i think i've been guilty of dismissing in the past this resilience resilience and growth mindset and so on and so forth. This got to be something to it but i for me. I need to be convinced of that. It definitely is powerful but crucially. What does it take to make it work homework now. Homework isn't something we've discussed all that much really am on the podcast. I often master teacher. Tickly mass teaches one there on what what does the homework policy look like and so on and so forth it's fascinating to delve into the research behind this so the first one that struck me that frequency beats quantity and this goes back to route seems seems i'm obsessed with routines routine in the classroom routines for lining goal routines for asking questions mathematical behavior that i described as reflect expect check talk about my views on variation. I'm obsessed with routine and i liked frequency beats. Quantity sixty minutes seems to be the magic number and that seems to be the thing that allows students to put the efforts in but it doesn't have the diminishing marginal returns that comfort from longer work and also it's good from a teacher feature whitlow perspective again. It's quality work that kids appointed as opposed to just spending hours and hours and hours doing doing the same old thing but of course sixty minutes required school coordination across subjects and that's something that's not always they doesn't always happen and often kids'll say walk up five or six homeless that jin tomorrow and so on and so forth but then they'll have a a couple of days where they've got knock knock on wood so timetabling across homeworks to try and get this magic number of sixty that that's going to be an important and again he comes back to something that's gonna come up time and time again and it has on previous episodes the meyer about all this research it doesn't matter about cognitive science working memory and all that kind of thing if the kids don't put the it's all a waste of time sixty minutes stop there with one eye on the homework and another ion naira on wall sapper whatever it is isn't going to be as good as dedicated focused hard solid sixty minutes so it's not just the time. It's how student spend that time him and for that. We need to get kids on board with it. We need to show them the benefits of and so we also need to bring parents in and again this is something that's going to keep coming up in this take away the role of parents parents parents not not being able to necessarily sit down and help students with the mathematics the english on the history homework but to check kids doing it to check the do not in the right conditions and also to help support the teachers in the message that this is an important thing that gets to be doing the role of parents the more i read read the more i speak to people the more i'm convinced it's absolutely massive and that comes to matzec zayed's he probably criminally we haven't discussed the enough on this podcast. We did it with a lucy right cross smith when she came to talk about and the cambridge mathematics expresses but i definitely want to talk to more experts on this but again speaking broadly net with <hes> the role of parents and comes into play again this negative messaging ceiling on ambitions. I always struggle. Matthau is never good at maths. Just kinda low was the aspirations but also the point that often i forget the over praises boswell kind of falls prey saying oh well don't you do really when the kids own that that can be just as as damaging is not giving students the price not giving them the confidence they need to props over commissons -iety as i say society is something that i've only scratched the surface off and it's a massive thing that yet i i need to. I need to look into more sleep while up how many times have mentioned these intake ways now sleep and i'm not gonna do a big thing on this now so i've got a special sleep episode coming up soon but the big thing for me is is increased awareness. It amazes me that it isn't at the forefront of all schools policies sleep because it doesn't my whatever else you do you if kids don't sleep in the not taken information not retaining information than processing information sleep needs to be the big the big thing and as i got an episode all about that coming up less couple motivation motivations sonate in one my views on motivation completely changed whenever i started reading eating research into it i was often of the well i was always of the view that you motivate kids to help them be successful but then the more i read typically reading the work of greg ashman ashman in the studio. He put me onto suggested. The line of causation was the other way round that actually you get kids being successful in that in that motivates them and you get onto this virtuous circle but but i find it interesting that the question that broadly net would pose there is how'd you get them into until out virtuous circle cheese fries. How'd you get them onto the flywheel because this is this kind of self fulfilling get kids feeling successful than motivated and the more successful than the more motivated. It's brilliant kick. Start the process. Do you need that extrinsic motivation to kick start the process. Do you need this this praise even these rewards to get kids to put that extra epidemic that leads go to be successful that that makes them motivated and so on and so forth or is it enough just to get them fairly successful from the outset and again it will depend from teaches the teacher from kid to indicate if you've got a disaffected year tanu absolutely hates masses had a terrible experience of maths. What's the best way to get on board. Is it to give them some actions like motivation. Is it to essentially give him a pizza earthy. Stay behind for a revision class all to give them kind of praise really big them up or is it to teach them in a way hey that for the first time they get something they've never got before or both important and it's going to be it's going to depend on your knowledge of the student esther which is going to be the the thing you. I need to lead the thing you need to go with. I am and i like that the the idea of this emotional contagion from students and teach. I think that's a really nice one. Just kids seeing that teaches. I genuinely passionate about this subject. It can't help but spread around and that can only be a good thing and final one before a ball final literally schwann before i do the big one and that's revision. I'm found that interesting. The combination of sleeping breakfast being impulsive is interested in it. There's loaded cliches bobbing around that. I've said the kids before in the past and i've never known whether the true and i'm convinced now by the sleep on the breakfast one seems important as well and then the big thing is what am revising revising by testing by self quizzing by juicing retrieval not by highlighting my watching videos and so on and so forth but but this self quizzing we know from the deluxe keyword that this is the most effective way for students to revise them retain and maintain information into leaving the the more. I speak to teachers the more becoming aware whether the kind of shift as happened no one's talking into leaving a few years ago now. Everyone's talking it but i think a lot of people it's i've got the wrong end of the stake with with interleaving and it was interesting to you bradley edward speak about this that into leaving within subjects he's a really good idea to do certainly in the classroom and also in students revising advising so you do in a bit of fractions and let's switch to solving some solving so man linear equations then let's switch to join pie charts this rebooting this reloading loading and and also notes in connections within subject is is really important but not between subjects so it doesn't seem to be beneficial doing ten minutes a maths which into to ten minutes of french than ten minutes of english and so on this is this task switching costs that you often hear about in in research outside of the the world of education nations so until leaving within subjects good thing as opposed to doing three hours at the same area of mathematics nonstop but interleaving between subjects jack's possibly not and also the the the big wellington's revision. Teach it to someone else trying to teach what you're revising to somebody else whether it's a parent whether it's a fellow students students or even i found the kids who don't have anyone around to do getting them to write. It down described the method that you're doing just on a piece of paper that process recess. I've tried to put your thoughts into word into a logical sequence. Stop it can be really really powerful. I found with the students and then the big wolf and this is the big thing i got when i was reading reading the book and whenever whenever i read a lot different research i think to myself okay the vast majority of these studies had done in laboratories batteries and they have to be right because he's a controlled environment and often that based on kind of artificial scenarios retrieval of vocabulary copy larry paths or memories of pitches and so on and so forth those big dangers there have making inferences in the classroom environment because the classroom environment is so many different factors come into play this his relationships between student student student teacher this time of the day the day of the week what's happened at home. All that kind of thing comes into plane and interference. It's as massey's plays around with with the data and so for me. Micro experiments is the key to this. It's taken these these findings from the research. The seventy seventy seven students from broadening edwards bull from any book or anything you read is taking these the the these takeaways taken these these implications recommendations but then doing little micro experiments with with shoots whether it's groups within your class whether it's try something with nine thousand years hanzel whether it's let's try something with year. He writes for this half term and the next time i'm going to switch to something else. And of course you're going to get the same validity. You've got all kinds of issues there book. It's the meat comes down to. The big question is what do i need to do to make this work for me. I've got the kind of general picture of what is a good idea. What's back to buy the evidence for what do i. I need to do to take that big idea. Make it work for me and for me. It's it's these micro experiments. These these moments of reflection you've taught a lesson or kids have done an assessments or something like that that enable me to get a sense of where i need to tweak things to to make it work so loads that that was a bit of a lot but hopefully some of some of it made sense i got i got slated for this but i do strongly recommend ee snapple. This book is great waist laid out. He just dip into it dip out of it. I mean no disrespect to the officer but he's kind of an ideal toilet book. Are they in your toilet. You're in now. Let's not go into too much detail here but you probably. Let's say you've got a few minutes to play with you. Crack open this book. You can read a study in and you can do it. In one go you can and then you can think all right. Maybe okay. I'm gonna try that tomorrow next week and so on and so forth the ideal toilet book. I'm surprised i didn't get meets. It's it's right for the front cover anyway and so all that remains for me to do now is to the funk a few people firstly thank you took to broadly inadequate given that's come on the show is absolutely fascinated. Speak to them and thank you to podcast themes comfortably jazzy the music that you've heard throughout the show on a big funky to you my loyal listener i mean if you listen to this and just as it's been released its annual in the u._k. It's the start of yet another the school year. Can you believe it where the flipping acas ousama gum but hopefully i'm gonna try and help us get through the year and being evidence informed with assuming the wonderful guests that i've got lined up so whether you listen to these podcasts on your commute to work when you're walking the dog whether you're going for doing the washing up. I hope you find that interesting an on this insightful as i find them you don't support this podcast. The easiest ways to leave a review aware via podcasts from the next level from that is the recommend this an episode what is one of your friends and props colleague from another subject and then if you feels that so inclined and you want to offer some support to this podcast then patriot dot com forward slash missed at the bottom of is where you can donate tamiami mellberg among anyway yet nothing that's me. I don't think i've anymore say we pleased to know so. I really hope you enjoyed that. Tom and i'll be back with another fascinating guests at very soon. You take care of yourselves by for them uh-huh.

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NPR News: 01-28-2019 3AM ET

NPR News Now

04:52 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 01-28-2019 3AM ET

"NPR podcasts are now. Available on every platform checkout all our shows at NPR dot org slash podcasts. That's NPR dot org slash podcasts. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jim hawk federal government employees are returning to work this week after the White House and congress agreed on a temporary deal to reopen the government. But as NPR's Matthew Schwartz tells us the shaky truce may not last lawn three weeks. That's how long the government will be open unless the two sides can agree on funding for border security between the US and Mexico in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, President Trump put the odds of coming to an agreement that he would accept at less than fifty fifty. And if they can't agree Trump said he would use his emergency powers to build the wall anyway on CBS yesterday acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, said the US is facing a national emergency. We have data that there are actually hundreds of known criminals in the next caravan that is coming up through Mexico today. These are not made up numbers. Trump has been tweeting build a wall and crime will fall Matthew Schwartz. NPR news. Venezuela has changed course announced says it won't expel you. As diplomats nNcholas Maduro angry that the Trump administration is recognizing his opponent one Guido as interim president earlier gave the diplomat seventy two hours to leave about the US refused. And now Madero is revising his timeline to thirty days allowing for more negotiation as NPR's Philip breeze reports Guido continues to dial up the heat on the incumbent. He's piling on the pressure at taking his campaign to the streets promising a week of mass demonstrations next week he's doing so at the risk of arrest. And he's appeared in person at a couple of rallies since that huge gathering in Caracas Wednesday way swat himself in as interim president yesterday. He showed up quite a small gathering a couple of thousand people he repeated his offer of amnesty to security forces in the civil servants who one of abandoned the doodo NPR's Phillipi is reporting. Thousands of people took to the streets of Paris Sunday to demonstrate against the yellow vest movement. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports they call themselves the red scarves, arguing that president. Emmanuel Macron must be given the chance to govern. Thousands of people wearing red scarves are hots March through Paris in the rain denouncing disorder and calling for democracy. The interior minister says about ten thousand people turned out a day after the yellow vest movement held its eleventh, Saturday demonstration restaurant owner neem Hanafi said she's lost a lot of business because of the weekly yellow vest protests and violence, the more than two months putting the CD upside down. So the is also about respecting others people point of view, people here say they are sick of a few thousand yellow vest protesters holding the country hostage. Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris. This is NPR. Sunday was Holo cost remembrance day, although millions lost their lives in the holocaust for some that painful history seems distant now one Brazilian artist is trying to connect with the victims by bringing them to life through colorized photos. NPR's? Amanda Morris spoke with the artist about her project faces eventuates northern two years ago. Marina Amaral colorized a photo of a fourteen year old girl killed an adequate the photo went viral and Almirante got messages from people saying they had no idea what the holocaust really represented until they saw the victims in color. I think when we look at the black and white photos day are almost representing something all something to happen. So many years ago, and it is difficult to to connect to the victims in a more deep in to make way. Now Morell is working with the Auschwitz Birkenau memorial and museum to color. Thousands more phases. She wants. Finish two hundred by the end of the year. Amanda Morris NPR news, the blockbuster movie. Black Panther took the top award at Sunday's twenty-fifth Screen Actors Guild awards. The wind puts Black Panther squarely in contention for best picture at next month's Academy Awards in the leading acting categories Glenn Close and Rami Mallika solidified themselves as front runners with wins that follow their triumphs. At the Golden Globes the Amazon series the marvelous MRs miso about one the first three awards handed out Sunday including best ensemble in a comedy series. This is us when best for drama. I'm Jim hawk NPR news in Washington.

NPR NPR Trump Paris interim president Jim hawk US Eleanor Beardsley Matthew Schwartz Amanda Morris Washington president Mexico Academy Awards Auschwitz Birkenau memorial an Wall Street Journal White House Venezuela Mick Mulvaney Caracas
How One Writer Uncovered the Lost Histories of 999 Women and Girls Who Were Sent to Auschwitz

TIME's Top Stories

09:49 min | 2 months ago

How One Writer Uncovered the Lost Histories of 999 Women and Girls Who Were Sent to Auschwitz

"Brought to you by the so-fi daily podcast. Eighty percent of new year's resolutions fail by the second week of february if reaching financial independence is something. You're striving for in two thousand twenty one. Don't let your goals fall by the wayside. Listen to the s-o-f-i daily podcast every weekday to keep informed and keep your financial resolutions search for some guy wherever you get your podcasts. How one writer uncovered the lost histories of nine hundred ninety nine women and girls who were sent to auschwitz by suzanne hanes at the end of february nineteen forty two. A rumor began circulating around the town. Who men may in eastern slovakia. The town crier would later speak the rumor into truth announcing that all unmarried jewish girls had to go to the towns registration office for reasons which would become clear. Quote in due course teenage sisters. Edith and leah. Friedman were worried but complied with the order registering for what they thought was a work opportunity and believing that they were doing their duty for their country. Other young women thought they were going on adventure with their friends much about the order remained shrouded in mystery including where the girls were going. What kind of work they'd be doing and how long they'd be gone for. The reality was more sinister than any of the townsfolk could have imagined. Edith leah and more than two hundred. Other teenagers from their town were taken to the train station. Where the whole inca guard slovakia's paramilitary forces separated them from their parents without a proper goodbye and force them to board a train bound for poprad in northern slovakia. Young married jewish women joined the girls from a from other small towns and villages across slovakia. Forced to stay in the inhumane and traumatizing poprad barracks where they were fed. Starvation rations and order to clean the barracks on their hands and knees at eight twenty pm on march twenty fifth. Nineteen forty two. The girls that had been rounded up and poprad numbering nine hundred ninety nine in total boarded a train that would take them to auschwitz. Their journey was the first official jewish transport to the notorious nazi concentration cab and until recently their stories have been largely overlooked by history due to their status as powerless ordinary individuals and above all as women according to writer heather dunn mcadam. Teenage girls were not important they were not intellectual says mcadam author of the nine hundred. Its title in the. Us is nine hundred ninety nine. The extraordinary young women of the first official jewish transport to auschwitz who spoke to time in the lead up to the international holocaust remembrance day on january twenty seventh researched over the course of the last decade and building on a narrative thread she'd been following since the nineteen nineties. The nine hundred draws on interviews and testimonies from survivors of that first transport and their families. Intellectual men have owned holocaust literature. I truly believe it is misogyny. And i also think it's classes when that train pulled into auschwitz in early nineteen forty two slovakia had become over the course of three years a nazi-satellite state anti semitic measures had become part of daily life. Jewish people were forced to wear a yellow star and routinely faced discrimination in business education and property ownership according to yod by sham the world holocaust remembrance center fifty eight thousand slovakian jews were sent to the extermination camps during nineteen forty two and approximately one hundred thousand slovakian. Jews died during the holocaust between twenty five and thirty. Five thousand survived including edith friedman. She survived typhus and tuberculosis and had several close calls with ss guards though. She escaped selection for the notorious gas chambers during her time in the camp her sister leah. who'd become seriously ill with typhus. After arriving at the camp killed in a mass gassing in december nineteen forty two after three years of enduring the horrors of auschwitz birkenau. Friedman was liberated when germany surrendered in nineteen forty five and. She returned home to humanity where she was reunited with her parents. To tell you the truth. I did not believe that i would survive. Rights friedman who became edith grossman. After she married in the final part of the nine hundred. But i said to myself. I will do what i can tracking down survivors. Decades later mcadam first became familiar with the story of the transport while researching her first book. Rina's promise published in nineteen ninety five. The book drew on interviews with rena. Corn reich was on that first transport from slovakia detailing the experiences she and her sister donka had at auschwitz mcadam researched further and found that the date of the transport and the fact that the individuals were all girls appeared to be a mere footnote in the annals of holocaust literature in twenty twelve around the time of the seventieth anniversary of the transport. The author was living in europe and visited the train station at poprad where she found a plaque dedicated to. The memory of the girls with candles lit around it there. She left a list of the names of women that she knew had been on the transport. One of those names was that of adel. Gross who was eighteen when she boarded the train at a prod and was later killed in a gas chamber at auschwitz. Gross is family and slovakia. Never knew what happened to her until they found mcadams list at the train station in poprad and contact at her other relatives of gross living in california where reading rina's promise and also reached out to mcadam. I get chills just thinking about it. It was such a huge moment to be able to give this beautiful young woman back to her family. Says mcadam as more survivors of the transport including edith grossman started contacting. Her mcadam decided to write a book to weave their narratives together with supporting family testimonies. The usc shoah foundations visual arts. And the slovak national archives as well as yod sham and even since the nine hundred was published a year ago. She's been contacted by more survivors over the last year. Mcadam has been working on adapting the book into a documentary. Recently interviewing two out of the five living survivor. She's aware of who are both in their nineties. One via zoom in australia and one in new york in person both mcadam and her cinematographer had negative cove in nineteen tests before conducting the interview and wore masks and stayed six feet apart from their subject. I did have to speak loudly so she could hear me says mcadam who hopes the documentary will be released this year. The hardest part of the interview was not hugging her newfound interest in the stories of women in wartime. I've been telling this story publicly since nineteen ninety four and it's never taken off until now it felt like i was shouting into an empty barrel and getting little response. Mcadam says adding that she feels the me. Too movement has sparked greater interest in the stories of women for her the story of the nine hundred ninety nine girls from slovakia is a reminder that women and girls are the key targets in war and genocide and she felt a deep responsibility to tell their stories faithfully the challenge as a holocaust biographer is to stick to the facts and i do always try to end with something positive so that we have a sense of hope. But you can't sugarcoat this stuff. One of the most important things in my book is that in the end. They don't all go home and live happily ever after grossman married and had children after her return home but her life was not free from hardship as she recovered from tuberculosis that had a debilitating impact on her health in nineteen sixty eight. She and her family were forced to flee to israel when the soviet union invaded slovakia. Eventually making their way to canada. On last year's international holocaust remembrance day mcadam was with grossman at her home in toronto watching the commemoration ceremony. Take place in poland on. The television grossman was ninety. Five and it was the last such year. She would mark the day before her death. In july twenty twenty mcadam recalls grossman turning to her in the middle of the ceremony. Saying you know the day. We were liberated. I got my period back. I was jumping up and down with the joy of being a woman again of being free.

slovakia mcadam suzanne hanes Edith leah edith grossman poprad heather dunn mcadam leah Friedman typhus world holocaust remembrance ce edith friedman auschwitz birkenau Corn reich donka auschwitz mcadam Edith tuberculosis Mcadam
Medical Murders Crossover: Josef Mengele Pt. 1

Dictators

44:51 min | 5 months ago

Medical Murders Crossover: Josef Mengele Pt. 1

"I hi everyone since. Dictators is taking a break this week. Here's something. I think you're really going to enjoy two episodes from the fantastic series medical murders. It's a spotify original from podcast and a favourite of mind. And it's free to listen to on spotify over. Ever you get your podcasts enjoy. Listener discretion is advised this episode features discussions of war anti semitism and eugenics. That may be upsetting. We advise extreme portion for listeners under thirteen. It's not uncommon to desire fame and glory to at your name into the history books and for lots of people then go reflection of our vanity of our need to leave a mark that declares i was here. It's usually a harmless dream that will come to affect few people but ourselves. But when you combined the ego of someone seeking notoriety for its own sake with the mind of a scientist things start to get dicey when that person is a doctor. Things can get downright evil. This is medical murders podcast. original every year. Thousands of medical students take the hippocratic oath. It boils down to do no harm but a closer look reveals a phrase much more interesting. I must not play it god. However some doctors break that oath choosing to play god with their patients deciding who lives and who dies each week on medical murders. We'll investigate those. Who decided to kill. We'll explore the specifics of how they operate. Not just on their patients but within their own minds examining the psychology and urology behind heartless medical killers. I'm alliston murden. And i'm joined by dr david kipah. Nd hi everyone. It's a pleasure to be here to assist alastair by providing some medical information and insight into the killer's modus operandi. I'm particularly interested in seeing how dr mangala performed all of his atrocities since this was a contemporary issue. While i was growing up you can find episodes of medical motors and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream medical murders for free on spotify. Just open the app and type medical murders in the search bar. This is a first episode. On dr yosef mandela also known as auschwitz birkenau angel of death after he arrived auschwitz in one thousand nine hundred forty three mangla selected untold numbers of people to be sent to the death chambers but he is perhaps most infamous for his twisted experiments on twins serving his warped view of genetic research. Though records of these experiments. Guess chilling accounts. Tell of the deaths were caused and even of cold blooded murders today. We'll look at mangla early. Life and how a mediocre students became fanatical research willing to near and participate in mass slaughter. Next time we'll take a deep dive into mangle. His time at the nazi death comes his shocking experiments and the quest to bring him to justice or this and more coming up. Stay with us. Who is alex rider ordinary tain extraordinary spine. Reluctant hero. imdb. Tv's original series. Alex rider is an action spy thriller following the british teenager who was recruited by my six to uncover the secrets behind his uncle's murder. And a much. Larger conspiracy stream alex rider now exclusively annoy md btv streaming service offering premium movies and tv shows for free no subscription required available on amazon fire tv or anywhere. Prime video is available. Imdb tv always entertaining always free. This episode is brought to you by mail chimp. Multiply your marketing smarts with an ai powered great of assistant customer journey builder and smart recommendations from mail. Chimp try it now. At mailchimp dot com slash smart marketing. This episode is brought to you by audi. The holidays are here. And it's time to get started on those wishlist but this year may be swapped the fuzzy slippers and cashmere sweaters for something more exhilarating like the cutting edge available virtual cockpit amid my systems and the conference of quattro all wheel drive which can only be experienced behind the wheel of a new audi and some throats yo wishlist at the season of audi sales even happening now growing up in the village of gunzburg germany. Yosef mandala lead a pretty charmed life. He was born in nineteen eleven and as the eldest son mangula was entrusted by his parents to supervise the transportation of supplies between their successful farm equipment factory and the train station village locals remembered him as charming articulate and handsome he also had the as of a natural leader. While overseeing shipments at the station he was thorough and careful unafraid to give orders even as a teenager and by all accounts he relished the power. If only he were a good student he might have been perfect. Alas young anglo was noticeably unconcerned with education. He was well behaved says only but he lacked the diligence drive that would propel him to greatness in other words his profound mediocrity didn't concern him as a teenager. He took a shine to the finer things in life. He and his friends indulge their more impulsive sites spending time driving cars and wiling away hours. Cafes and salons mangla himself like to wear expensive suits showing off the most fashionable cuts he preened about seemingly concerned with fast 'cause and his appearance more than anything else later in life mangla would paint a different picture of his youth suggesting he took off his father who spent long hours stoically working to provide for his family but in reality mangla proved to be more like his beloved mother. Follow burger according to authors. Lucette luck nado and sheila cone deco. Val burger could be warm and maternal or she could behave like a raging bull. Her reactions were impossible to predict while has been called. Was the one in charge of their farming equipment factory. It was vol burger who inspired the most fear. Among their employees she would make impromptu visits to the factory and unleashed her fury upon workers. Who drew her. Ira if things were out of place improperly cleaned or simply not to her liking she would fly into a rage while we don't know much about mangoes childhood personality. This description of his mother is illuminating. It's likely that today she would be diagnosed as bipolar. Her behaviors are classic symptoms. It's very common in people that have a bipolar disorder to have problems with anger. An impulse reactions so we often see people that are going into a rage for almost no reason because of bipolar disorder is inherited. This explains a lot about mangles behaviors. When we're genetically predisposed mental illness stressful events contributor their worst expressions people are correct. In saying stresses killer but as far as we know mangla wouldn't demonstrate his own frightening temper until much later in life. that's duality would come to be replicated. By manjula as he marched the grim grounds at auschwitz-birkenau for now he remained charming and polite mostly contents coast through life on his good looks and his family's money however things began to shift towards the end of the nineteen twenty s. Germany was still reeling from its world. War one defeat and vindictive wave of antisemitism swept through the country stoked by adolf hitler's growing influence with the emerging nazi rhetoric came a growing nationalistic fervor one that even laid back mangla found irresistible during his late teens. He became active in the gross story. Show you can bond. Or the german youth movement the group advocates for return to the germany of old and they're mangla demonstrated the first glimmers of ambition. He became a local leader within the organization and delivered eloquent speeches at the age of nineteen mangla fully switched gears despite his lacklustre showing at school he decided he wanted to make a name for himself. He finally took an interest in his education enrolled at the university of munich. In nineteen thirty. He'd study medicine and philosophy hoping to become a famous anthropologist and geneticist he definitely achieved infamy alastair by the end of the first world war the fields of anthropology and cinetic took on a very interesting shape at this time. Nationalism was on the rise especially in germany and a growing interest in anthropology seemed to spring in part from this movement similarly the twenties and thirties were a very exciting time for genetics notably marked by the development of the mandel. Ian model gregor mendel was one of the first scientists to actually studied genetics and he did so in plants and his findings remained the backbone for all modern genetic studies. What we've learned so far. Is that joseph manglo wanted desperately to be included in the scientific community so he must have been very impressed with gregor mendel. Work on genetics. And i'm sure there was some degree of envy in the work that he did. But mangla ambitions one just about advancing scientific discourse and discovery. He wanted to be famous renowned before leaving for university. He told a friend in his hometown. One day my name will be in the encyclopedia coming up. Yosef mangla sets out on his dark path to infamy. Hi liz. I'm thrilled to tell you about a new spotify original from podcast that i think you'll really enjoy. It's called olive story every tuesday. Our love story celebrates the ups downs and pivotal moments. That turned complete strangers into perfect says each episode offers an intimate glimpse inside a real life romance with couples recounting the highlights hardships that. Define their love. Whether it's a chance encounter a form of friendship or even a former enemy. Our love story proves that love can begin and blossom in the most unexpected ways. Ready to him all. Follow our love story. Free on spotify wherever you listen to podcasts. What if you discovered your life with something. It's not answer. Alex rider ordinary extraordinary spot. Reluctant hero. imdb. Tv's original series. Alex rider is an action spy thriller although in a british teenager recruited by six based on the novels. Boy anthony horowitz. Alex's mission begins off the. He learned his uncle's death was a cover up and alexy's out. Brian secrest training. Alex will put his spice skills to the test to find out why he's uncle was killed. And how it fits into a much larger global conspiracy stream alex rider now exclusively on imdb tv streaming service offering free movies and tv shows for free no subscription required available on amazon fire tv anywhere. Prime video is available. Imdb tv wise entertaining always free now back to the story. In nineteen thirty-one yosef mangla was a year into his studies at the university of munich as he pursued his goal of becoming a renowned anthropologist genetic scientist a fellow german with random missions was growing in popularity. The global recession created an uncertain atmosphere allowing adolf hitler to expand his influence. He was now the leader of the second largest political party. In germany the nazis hitler and his followers further spread his ideas of german superiority and scapegoats at the jewish people for any and all problems as these ideas took hold anti semitism rose in every corner of germany famously. The eventual government response was one of discrimination and murder but the nazi party influence was even greater than that in academics where we typically rely on cooler brighter heads to prevail subjects began to skew to a decidedly bigoted view genetics history anthropology biology all were increasingly affected by anti semitism as was mangula. It's tragic that hate penetrated the scientific landscape in the nineteen thirties. While it's less overt today we still have racism and discrimination and the medical community. It stems from a more veiled and systemic problem that bleeds into the world of healthcare and it's manifested to things like unequal access to education healthy food and affordable medical treatment. We're all some order to mercy of the systems and environments were placed into so it makes sense unfortunately that mangala focused his studies on anti-semitism. As hitler's popularity was now growing as his education continued mangula his carefree personality and buckled down to focus on his studies and his increasingly hateful views. He wanted to know what science could do. About the light of jewishness in germany. It was around this time that he became aware of the work of social darwinist. Social darwinism is the theory that races or groups of humans are subject to the same natural selection laws as the plants and animals darwin observed and wrote about in nature dna problem with social darwinism and said it uses purely scientific theory to promote an unscientific idea darwin's observational theory about life's biological diversity. Campy responsibly applied to socio political or economic matters. The approaches just flawed and nonsensical despite this the nazis anti-semitism dovetail nicely with the pseudoscience of social darwinism leaving room for prejudice in which should have been a neutral scientific setting. Perhaps because he'd found something that's so interested him mangla graduated with highest honors in nineteen thirty five. After five years at university he was a certified physician and had a phd in anthropology helping him on his way to his goal of scientific fame. Soon after graduating twenty-five-year-old angles acuity position at the university of frankfurt's working as an assistant to professor oedema freia on ventura a renowned racial scientists ver- shoe had built with nazi funding the institute for heredity biology and racial purity. Among his interests ver shula was interested in tracing the role heredity played in disease examining genetic abnormalities and their transfer between generations and looking at environmental factors on genetic defects. Although over sure was horribly misguided studying genetics in relation to our environments can provide valuable insight and curing many diseases diseases in fact strongly rooted in genetics or the inherited dna sequencing of our genes. We now have technology known as crisper that allows us to go inside a gene and manipulates dna. So we can fix the broken areas that caused specific diseases like sickle cell. Anemia we have now actually had one case of curing sickle cell anemia based on this technique. Dr mangula interestingly had something in common with the current technology from crisper both were trying to understand how genetics played into disease and to human behavior. But of course as we've seen valuable science can be abused. The sure certainly wasn't using his position to help humanity. The institute for heredity biology and racial purity helped further the burgeoning eugenics movement and also provided material support to the nazis by helping implement the nuremberg laws. The nuremberg laws restricted the rights and citizenship of jewish people so mangla and his colleagues were responsible for determining whether someone was or wasn't jewish wall the concentration camps weren't yet running mangla choices had an enormous impact on the lives of those he selected those he declared jewish with stripped of their livelihoods along with their citizenship. And many would end up being tortured and killed by the nazis in this role. It didn't take long for mangla to become a valued member of a shoe has team in fact he was soon. His most trusted assistant collaborating with his mentor. On various projects to further the cause of nazi pseudoscience of the next few years manjula published several academic papers meant to bolster his own skewed scientific opinion. One studied segments of the jaw in humans. From four geographic regions. The differences between the jaws indicated clear racial distinctions particularly between two european. racial groups. Other studies clearly influenced by his mentor looked closer at the issue of heredity and physical defects like cleft palate and abnormalities in air college. According to author. Robert j clifton mangla studies while fairly respectable for the time claim more than they prove working alongside for shoe was illuminating for mangla. He respected and admired the professors work which so neatly lined with his own developing bigoted beliefs in return for shoe mentor. His protege showing him the ropes if the research weld and sharing his wealth of experience in particular he stressed to mangla. That experimentation on human subjects was perfectly acceptable. Indeed preferable when it furthered. The scientific cause unfortunately human experimentation has long been troubling stain on the reputation of many scientific advancements actually racism in medicine contributed largely to human experimentation. And unfortunately this vulnerable population provided the human resource that we needed to go further with our studies. It made it go quicker because we had human subjects. Human subjects are a lot easier than animal subjects in fact around the same time. The nazis were conducting human experiments. The japanese were conducting biological and chemical warfare tests on prisoners at the infamous unit seven thirty one facility upon the unit's closure at the end of the war. The us government actually kept the data. They obtained from this factory of death. The reasoning was allegedly to prevent the communists from getting their hands on the research but the very premise suggests that some grim yet useful information was gained from these awful experimentation this represents a disturbing reminder that important and useful science can often be very messy and compromised in modern times. Human volunteers are only used in testing. Wants a treatment has gone to its final. Fda approval stage like testing vaccines. The benefits of human testing wasn't the only belief shula passed along to manjula. Virtue was also convinced. That twins held the key to unlocking mysteries of genetics. He theorized that to truly understand what is passed along via genetics. Twins were essential so for years. He had focused his research. Almost exclusively on twins experimentation on twins. He told his protege would be the holy grail for his work to have to genetically identical test subjects one to remain as a helpful control was ideal but despite his passion for human test subjects and twins shula was never known to conduct any experiments on living twins for now the research was conducted via observations and comparisons between patients. It wasn't ideal but it was all they could do. Mangla spent long hours in the laboratory while his mental carved a high profile for himself. The shula made frequent contributions to the literature of the day and wasn't shy about his anti semitic views in his writing. He frequently praised. Hitler and cold for drastic measures to eliminate the jewish people from in society in weimar republic era germany and beyond anti semitic beliefs. Like shoes and mangles were on the rise and the more the senior research of vocalized support for the nazis. And they've violent antisemitism the higher his profile rose in the end. His in support would lend scientific authority to the horrific final solution later at the nuremberg trials. A witness testified that for sure sacrificed his pure scientific knowledge in order to secure for himself the applause and favor of the nazi tyrants like many germans ve issue may have been guilty of falling in line with the nazi rhetoric to curry favor and the emerging regime. Then again. it's also possible. He really was as fanatical is history. Paints him whatever the truth. He had a fervent admira in yosef mangla. By nineteen thirty eight twenty-seven-year-old mangula was working side by side with the most prominent genetics and race scientists in germany and he was more than just a colleague he was a trusted aide and close friend. It's likely mangla so as a father figure his own. Father often kept away from home by his work wasn't a strong presence in his life. Besides mandela's father worked in a factory which was hardly the kind of career. Mangla spy into this shula. The renowned celebrated researcher was his guiding light and he would do anything to impress him in mangla. Shula had an impressionable ambitious young mind at his disposal. It was only too easy to mold mangla into a willing even eager disciple in the future. His assistant could perform research of his own further spreading the gospel of racial purity across europe. But after three years working undeveloped shula mandela's world was about to change in nineteen thirty eight mandela joined the schutzstaffel the ss and receive three months. Basic training from the gags yeager an alpine infantry troop and then in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. Germany declared war on poland. Suddenly mango was no longer just a scientist. He was leaving the laboratory behind and trading his white coat for a stiff striking uniform. He was going to war coming up yosef manggala decides who lives and who dies. This episode is brought to you. By titan november is national family caregivers month across the country millions of sons daughters spouses and close relatives care for a family member experiencing joint complexity. The way get to know a few in tighten it a new podcast from the rousey wilson junior foundation. It shines a light on family caregivers in everything they do offering a glimpse into the day to day of caregivers who have altered their lives for their loved. Ones stream it now and learn more about this series at times dot org. This episode is brought to you by qaluwa coffee liqueur. There's a time and a place for holiday traditions. But you know you'll have more fun celebrating when you go off script when you introduce colusa at your next virtual get together. You'll see fun times. Follow made with one hundred percent real arabica. Coffee beans kalou brings a fun loving twisted. Your glass ditch the steph and get creative with easy to mix kalou cocktails lake espresso martinez or cold brew. Sodas that helps you celebrate all the unofficial unserious moments of holiday fun. Pick up a bottle of colusa this season at liquor or grocery store near you or order online via drizzly. Now back to the story in one thousand nine hundred thirty nine war broke out europe soon. After twenty-eight-year-old yosef mongolia was sent to work in an administrative position at the s s race and resettlement office. His role was remarkably similar to his early. Work at the institute for heredity. Biology and racial purity where he determines the ratio cleanliness of his fellow germans now. He reviewed citizenship applications for germans living abroad once again his education was put to use judging aryan credentials to determine who was a true german. It's not clear exactly what work did to make these decisions but given what we know about the nuremberg laws and the subsequent decrees about german citizenship. It was likely less science and more paperwork to the nazis. Jewish people weren't just a religious or ethnic group. They were an entirely different race adherence to judaism was of little concern to the nazis. If someone was jewish lineage they were separate inferior. According to stifling arbitrary rules anyone with three jewish grandparents or two jewish parents was considered jewish. As was anyone who belonged to a jewish religious community or married into a jewish family. So mangla likely predominantly looked at family. Trees and census information mangla remained at the race and resettlement office until june of nineteen forty one when he was shuffled to the often schutzstaffel the military branch of the ss and sent to ukraine. Despite his years long entrenchment in academia thirty year old bangolo proved and adept during his time in the often assess. He was awarded the iron cross second class for heroin service on the battlefield but he wasn't to remain there for long the following year. He joined the s viking division to become a field physician during world war. Two here at last manjula achieved his goal. He was a doctor treating patients and it was no doubt a high stress posting on the battlefield. Mangla held lives in his hands unfortunately for his patients field hospitals were rarely well stocked with equipment medication. Wh- personal violence wasn't the only factor making the rookie sweat. Epidemics was so common as to be expected during the humid summers while the freezing winters brought with them the delightful threats of hypothermia and frostbite. Instead of extensive onsite treatment field medics would only stabilize wounded soldiers and prepare them for evacuation to a field hospital. While these harsh conditions lead to concerns about infection and sterility the primary focus on the battlefield was keeping people alive in world war. Two being a field medic came with many responsibilities. The most common being brief examinations and applying turncoats morphine injections cleaning wounds and sprinkling. Sulfur powder to disinfect bandaging and dragging wounded soldiers off the field while being a field medic is to this day incredibly respectable in the military. It's hardly the kind of glory mangla imagined for himself when he was in medical school. The ramshackle working conditions. When the thing mangla was ill prepared for. He quickly discovered a grim reality of medicine. Doctors can't save everyone. Oftentimes he was forced to make split-second decisions about who to treat he couldn't save all of his comrades and needed to quickly assess who had the best chance of survival though he would later tell friends that he hates it. These force choices. It's not difficult to imagine. Mangle making decisions informed by his research and prejudices which of his comrades would best serve germany in the future whose genes deserve to be carried into the next generation. It's possible these thoughts ran through mandela's head while he weighed his options. Who would live. Who would die. The choice was his alone. Doctors are usually associated with saving lives. But many forget that sometimes for that to happen. Someone else is going to die. This reminds me of a time. I was moonlighting in an emergency room residency and a traffic accident delivered to me three critical patients as alone physician with only one nurse. I had to decide who to treat after a quick assessment. I chose the youngest person and to this day. I'm still haunted by that experience. Making a life and death. Decision is never purely objective decision some of the variables that doctors have to consider when making life and death. Decision go beyond age. These variables might be the degree of trauma or acuteness of the illness. They may also unfortunately refer back to people's own prejudices weighing all. These variables is part of our doctor training. However it's never an easy decision and there's always some remorse for whatever. That decision is having to make that difficult calls a grim reality for doctors. Dr joseph mangle wasn't excused from this obligation. The does appear however that he was somehow protected from these natural feelings. He didn't know it but mangla was honing a skill that would serve him well in the near future but for now he remained deeply committed to his role he even earned an iron cross first class after rescuing to wounded soldiers from a burning tank. That was taking enemy fire. It's unclear how but sometimes will at the end of nineteen forty two mangula was injured and declared unfit to remain in the field. And so he was spirited away from the battlefield emerton his post at the race and resettlement office in berlin. This time working. As part of the team seeing the concentration camps after his time in the field mangla found the realities of a desk job dull around this time he got back in touch with his former mentor. Osipov over sure. Who had assumes the prestigious role of director of berlin kaiser wilhelm institute back in the same city wants more. They picked up where they left off. Rekindling bengalis passion for shoes research but mangla wants to make a most significant contribution than paperwork to be the most helpful. He felt he should be using his education and scientific training to advance germany and both he for sure believed that the most groundbreaking medical research in germany was going on at the concentration camps though the nazi concentration camps are perhaps best known for their legacy of gas chambers and mass graves. There were other grim practices carried out behind the barbed wire since as early as nineteen thirty. Nine the camp sipping science for human experimentation undertaken by german scientists in the name of scientific advancements prisoners at doco were exposed to cholera diphtheria influenza tuburculosis and yellow fever. Once the inmates were infected e good doctors injected them with various substances experimenting with ways to slow or treat the spread in particular. Typhoid fever was zeroed in on at buchenwald one of the first built and largest concentration camps the deadly illness was a perpetual problem for the german army and the deaths of prisoners in service of finding a cure was a pittance. In comparison in the eyes of the nazi doctors that is they cared. Little trifling matters like medical ethics. Only six months after hitler became chancellor the first german sterilization laws went into effect across the country. By the time mangla was assigned to work in the concentration camps. Doctors have moved forward with research efforts to find the best methods of mass sterilization. The nineteen thirty-three sterilization law permitted the force sterilization of many living with disabilities and illness from the deaf and blind communities to those committed to asylums for schizophrenia epilepsy. Alcoholism and more but the knows he's wanted to find ways to speed up that eugenics project eliminating quote unquote undesirables ability to procreate seemed like the logical next step in particular. This grim research was speeding. Along at outfits men women and children representing a voss diverse swath that the population will arriving there every day for mandela. It must have seemed like an endless supply of test subjects one. That was only too tempting for an aspiring genetic researcher. Mangla and brochure knew about the work that was happening at the camps and they wanted to be involved for a pair of eugenics happy scientists. It was the opportunity of a lifetime at auschwitz. The possibilities reach beyond even their twisted imaginations iga for his protege to be in the thick of the scientific action the shula used his considerable clout with the nazi party to have mangla two outfits as an s s doctor and that wasn't all he also pulled strings to secure grants to fund mongolia's research once. He arrived soon. Everything was in place for their scientific dreams to come true in april of nineteen forty. Three yosef mangla packed his bags and set off for outfits. The train station at auschwitz was busy at all hours. Sometimes thousands of people arrived at the camp in one day ferried across europe and cattle cars. The journey to the camp was unbearable packed into the carriages cheek by jowl with no food or water for days. Those who survived the war would report some mothers driven to killing their own children during this transport unable to bed that pain cries of hunger and fearful at what waited for them at the end of the journey when the prisoners finally tumbled out of the trains onto the station at auschwitz. They were met with a grim site. S s. soldiers patrolled with dogs ordering new arrivals where to go not far from the station. Flames and smoke billowed out of massive chimneys turning the sky read the crematorium for each arrival a high ranking s officer waited on the platform to sort the thousands into two groups the few who would work as slaves at the camp and those who would immediately die from april nineteen forty three on a new face appeared on the platform. Thirty two year-old yosef manganiello always looked immaculate. As in his youth he preferred his uniform to be perfectly tailored his boots. Even amongst the filth of the death camp always gleaned. His white gloves seemed to shine bright. Even in the dark as he stood on the platform directing god's way to take prisoners left right left right. These ones live these ones die. The split-second decisions echoed those he made on the battlefield except now his decisions were based on. Who looked strong enough to survive forced labor with a flick of angola's wrist. Those who looked week was sent to the gas chambers. He had no use for them. These snap decisions. He made determining a person's life or death must have given him quite the god complex as he made his judgements. There were people in the transports. Mangula kept a careful watch for soon after he arrived at the camp. A new order began ringing out over the din. If the arriving prisoners twins twins over here. God's waded through the throng searching for twins of any age and directing them towards mangalore. Some were pulled from the lines. Inching closer to the gas chambers while others spotted seconds after they stepped off the train. Some families resisted the separation after the traumatic journey few willing to allow their children out of their sight. Some parents argued or had the audacity to ask for their children to be given food and water as they were dragged away. Mandela had these parents beaten. They were slowing everything down and that was unacceptable for their part. The twins singled out by mangla. Weren't sure what to think of this officer tall and handsome with a broad grin. He'd saved them of that. They were sure but wine. Next time on medical murders mangla settles into his role at auschwitz and gets to work carrying out the live human experimentation. He dreamed of for years. His pseudoscientific research would result in untold debts. Innumerable cold-blooded murders thanks again listening to medical murders. And thanks again to dr kipah joining me today and alison. Thank you very much for more information on. Yousef mangla the mini sources. We used. We found the book. Children of the flames dr joseph mangla and the untold story of the twins of auschwitz. By lucette massillon look nardo and sheila cone. Dekel extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of medical murders and all other parkas originals for free on specify not only just spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like murders for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream. Medical murders on spotify. Just open the app and type medical murders in the search bar. We'll see you next time. Medical motors created by max cutler. And desert park studios original it is executive produced by max cutler sound designed by trent williamson with production assistance by carly maddin. Kristen jonathan cohen jonathan. Ratliff and erin lawson. This episode medical murders was written by joe callen with writing assistance by maggie admire and stars david kipa and alistair murdoch listeners. Don't forget to check out our love story. The newest spotify original from podcast every tuesday discovered the many pathways to love as told by the actual couples who found them. Listen to our love story. Three on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

mangla mangula germany manjula alex rider shula Alex rider university of munich nuremberg gregor mendel Mangla alliston murden dr david kipah dr mangala dr yosef mandela auschwitz birkenau alastair gunzburg Yosef mandala sheila cone deco
The Parkland Students, One Year Later

The Daily

26:53 min | 2 years ago

The Parkland Students, One Year Later

"The from the New York Times, I'm Michael Barr. This is the day. Today. It's been one year since the shooting at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland. Duly producer. Claire tennis getter went to Florida this to check in on some of the students we met last year. It's Thursday February fourteenth. Last year. A few exactly the Marjory stoneman Douglas high school shooting, my colleague, Jack Healey went down to parkland and interviewed a group of freshmen girls who are in the first classroom that the shooter went into classroom twelve sixteen when I thought about this about being a school shooting, and the one thing that I've always said that I would do is text my mom, and I'm like, thank you for everything. And I was so like mad at everything I wasn't going to be able to get you do that died and not let my mom know that I loved her. And in that classroom is girl saw eight of their classmates get shot, and then I just hear like a few shots happened over here. And then I seal, so she's just extending like this and then falls back and three of them were killed. So Jack interviewed the girls, but I was the producer working on the daily episode and over the past year. I just haven't stopped thinking about them. I've thought about them each time. There's been another mass shooting a thought about them on election night. And I thought about them just pretty much every time I've seen a group of teenagers. So as we approached the one year anniversary of the shooting I wanted to check back in with them. Please moment to locate zone on your boarding so out of Florida. Got the group back together one of their houses. The grabbed a few snacks. And they all settled in. Jade nj Holly fifteen I'm not in Thaddee. Birkenau fifteen Brooke he didn't fifteen and it. Six. And they immediately started talking about the last time they're all here together in the same room Philly. It's like after like you see somebody to move in. It's like during something. And then like, you know, when they have the ten years later, they cut their hair. All I feel like I choose my. Different person than than who. I was like when I was asked city. What do you think you felt like what do you feel like now I felt like I feel like now I don't wanna weigh on Philly for a little like. I feel like I've been through shell like how has been done. I and a net dot Philly goes show in. What were those first weeks back like so it was about halfway through the school year? And what was a typical day like what did it feel normal school at all being together? With like the only good part about like that almost weird. We're doing this setting was different. She's like not like such that fewing that that there yet. Like the kid who sat there like died. Was there ever a day when it felt normal ever like in your whole at school year? It kind of never Shiels lake we have like a new normal. I feel my normal is like seeing the toll hundred building every day you're in like having flashbacks in the moving like, oh, you're things actually after like three months. I would say when. It wasn't. It wasn't all we all the time. It was like I was like feeling good suburbs. Good time. Yeah. Yeah. I'm not gonna watch summer was like. Finally away from the building every that. I wasn't sure if some of feel good or bad via like don't have that built support group. But were you did you stay with other Douglas students enough during friends? Completely understand at least for me. Look, I talk about them all the time. And for sure feeling I interesting them where they can like therapist because they understand me. They know me. So it's a lot more personal. So your your friends who were also in school? I don't talk about it with like, no one. I it's not even friends. They not even my closest friends. It's really hard for talk about it. 'cause my closest friends like most family were in the building. We're unlike it's just like. The what is it going to help me to talk about it? They're going to feel bad for me. And then what? How's it feel right now? Different. When like there someone in the business because they're all offense that were they feel like they can't even talk to me about their day. Because like I'm doing. I am doing me feel about that. They're. That's because I want my friends to be able to talk to me about it. I have no problem with people who were in the building talking. Just don't act like where I was reviewer is the same thing. That's my only the only we try to compare of. She's like, it's it's different. It's different. It's very very different. Shifting to the new school year. How did it feel coming back are awful? Yeah. Asia's like, oh again. So one of the things from my understanding about going back to school last year is everyone who was at the school was was there on the day of the shoot end. But then when you came back to school this year for this new school year. There's now a new class there are freshmen who weren't there. What is that like not good? Why the thing is like some of them are action. Very nice, very understanding and accept the fact that day don't know anything about it and the knocking to ask suspectful. And then the other half are just wish that they're just a really Ribeiro at trying so hard to get attention. Amanda anyway. All of the Bill. And. Open house. I don't know. But like they think it's funny, and they're like dropping textbooks poverty thing like that guy's serious PTSD could be like right next week. So they they're walking through the halls in like making loud noise. All the time. I was thinking about. Viciously show after the pep rally. I was master class two portables and we were right in front of the freshman building run on pop the water right in back. Renton for the fresco. It's more than just like one one. You don't ask it? It's like kids sit like they don't have like, they're not considered it. They don't they don't give like empathy too. All think about it in the may be because they don't really understand if you don't understand the distance student thing don't like try to be funny because it's not funny. It's so it's so here in US off Moore's talk about the freshman like there's there's this dynamic high school experience like feeling like now, I'm older. And I hate those freshmen, but of course, it's completely different for you separation. Like this divide legs. I have no issue on any other yet. Yeah. Yeah. What do you think the ideal? What if you were a freshman this year? What would you think would be the best way? Just. No. Don't just over don't talk about it. Like, you know, what we went through doing anything because I know that you were scared of you were you didn't know what was going on. But because a lot of them were next door middle school in evacuated, but they weren't it was for them. But here different. Yeah. I write my years in the hallways. So we don't have to same. Does all of this doesn't make you feel older? I feel only untied woman we religion. Fury. I feel by celebrating member base times. I feel by getting my license. I feel they can't milestones. Every mile really hard. I just feel like so really don't like getting up everyday. Sometimes they're supposed to be here that whole thing wasn't supposed to happen. Very we all talk about bernallio liquor child who got ruined. Feel like it's like not there. Anyway, high school whenever says high schools like the best time your life along with college. But like, it's no you don't get that. It's consuming our lives. Yeah. It's never gonna be that any more to never gonna be. Division. Plano cares. Leo like. Your parents are like, oh when I was in high school. It's like when I was high school, I can think about. Would be the she he'd have are hard to differentiate what's from the shooting in which unlike regular teenage exacting Xining 'cause everybody has dying of everybody. So for me take get those times really feel like they're limiting. I can't hear an auto know it's from the shooting. And I don't know what it's from. It's like a combination of the not like just like sadly session the basis for young. Sometimes the stress of the shooting has a big impact on like regular teenage. So it can make your. The normal teenage stresses more even more. Not because you guys are all fifteen about to turn sixteen. So what's going on your life outside of us? You're about to get driver's licenses school dating. I mean right now in life. We're worried about next year next year is going to be a junior most colored. Yeah. Definitely call shorting thing about colleges, which is scary. But show scared so very be scared to apply to colleges because like I don't wanna be accepted. Just because Douglas. They don't want that to be got. Above someone else. Definition of IM. Exactly. I don't wanna look good to your college. Because I was in the shooting. I just really time going by show clap areas, I think simply wants a year trees. That's why I feel like yesterday that to me is relate. I rely. Everyday. I think because I think because like we've just been living at this whole year like it just haven't gone away like around. When I look back on the person was exactly urge today. She wouldn't like have not like this issue like different completely completely different person. You think your fundamental changed? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think everyone is don't think anyone can mentally be this aim after Roman through part of you exactly early. Sometimes think about what I'm twenty of Mike. Oh happened like that seven years ago. Like, that's scaring. I think about what has been that long. We have kids. Our Regan years to meet a one have kids yet in a place like this tower, Regan one of his life. If one day. To go through through. He just feel so bad. It makes me not want to have kids kids, obviously, the very very very far. The way. Remember? Always say that everybody who goes through mass shootings Joan go to the set of the mass shooting every single day and see the building where every we. We. Wants to go in. Still all I think we all. Closer. We we wanna favorite. See like, I just wanna see how they left it. England. This is so curious about like like it's like we went there every single day. I was building every single day heavily four classes. It's it's I had to. What do you think you do if you could go in? Just like. Together. Dreams about about. I don't guess. I like have it like kind of engraved like thought like just like valentines stuff like or wall? I guess we're gonna stop it. We're gonna try you'll be able to go in. No, we're not going to be able to go see photo. I still work. See it for myself. I know we haven't per tying the week. Like literal, you go probably. Like, no time travel dream because I like it's like recurring like Negra have like adequately have anything about going forward. But like I always of the stream where I'm able to go back to that day in China warn people, and I try to warn of Lena 'cause she was like my class in to be no more other. I remember a dream it. I showed a list my touch to talk to the to the room number on it. You have. I remember I remember I was it might I was showing her. I was showing her in my dream, and she was like hearts not believing look like telling you there was a shooting. Don't go to class, and she went anyways I wanted to capture the finally you're coming with me tattoo. Can you tell me what they both have yet? So mine is the top is the date in Roman numerals to fourteen eighteen the second layers like the three hearts for Alex Wilson Melena and the third layer is twelve sixteen classroom number. What's yours and mine is like a flower, which is kind of it's like if you see like leaves on it, and that's represented the growth ios from what happened, and then there's the room number twelve sixteen and then there's three little loan like flower pedals things for only now. This makes me feel close to them. I like it up only. I wish I didn't have to get this to. Yeah. Paid how take part of its permanent show is. It's always going to think of it in like I want fair. Yeah. I think the significance of getting something permanent on you is like that just like the tattoo. The shootings are going to be with you like the rest of your the rest of your life. Three months after the shooting. Always be searching videos of the shooting watching them over transit. I try like 'cause I needed like I needed that closure. I needed to actually see like, I think the point I want to go in the room. You have more closure. You side anything. I'll be have is our memory mentally. That's not as reliable definitely. For the faith. Do you think you'll ever have closure? No, probably maybe how could you have? Hopefully, the Bill. To have closure. But I don't know if it's I think after the actual videos of it, Hoppy like, I love to see that. I started a trend that exist in some. I think it will they hot Howdy. I'm visine picture. However. Well, I watch everything that comes out everything that comes out and watch every article that comes out about it. I watched because I like to know I anything that happened. Because I even though I know I just don't I like to. I don't have the proof yet. Because then I don't look like an idiot telling my story go. Yeah. It's validate. Yeah. For planning on this Thursday, secretaries, more some terrorist. Joel's immoral to some terrorists on. Yeah. The the that are so close to says in like I saw max there like two seen literally rape is is is his headstone up yet. Berlin. Visit Ivan has we were to leave. I don't wear lane is this. I'm going to Martin's run to Luke's which are of the same. You don't have school Thursday Fridays. Optional optional. I mean, both of them is they're both gonna be there. The you're able to go into service projects that is that right? Are any of you gonna go into school? They're saying, no, I can't. Yeah. Like, I couldn't even stay for the rest of today. Yeah. I left her lately. No, I can't physically like shorting. Could I don't like I don't wanna be like at whole thinking about on homeboy of? Oh, yeah. Beholding already feel I. In school, which we reside Blake gone early for so many days because of like everything just being too much, and they feel like I can't miss anymore school because the amount of things I have to make up is insane. Tomorrow is not going to be an academic is very any. Things plan. I hope we get into testing. We can same. What do you think that people get wrong about you? What do you think people should understand about you were in the classroom? Something that I've always wished that the media news that. How what we went through? Politics, not everything's about March for lives in. Whereas March for lies is great Emmys fact that they can make a changes amazing. But we. Have stories that are worth being told. And I think that the nearing. Yeah. And I think that the media is just so quick to politicize everything. 'cause that's what makes everything Nori. Yes story. But it's not not everything's political. We're actually gone through something that's like real real. And really any. Yeah. And it had to ever. It happened really fourteen fifteen I know like. Would show aging about what the March for legs did make over time. It's obviously getting less like lex of a national discussion like less less in are less important in her conversations right now. Which is upset here. I feel like another thing too is especially with like a bunch of news stations. That is I feel like a lot of people forget, and like I wish people knew that just because the cameras away in like people aren't like writing about this much. Does not mean that like the issue in a way like people are still depressed. People are still having panicked taxing Zion tax. And there are still people that they can't go throughout the day without breaking down because of this in the didn't just like poof when like the camera's stocked like reporting them her interview in there. Nothing stopped. What were you comes out of someone knowing that a fully understanding your story? It'd being in the room for me. It's more about like memorialize them. And like remembering that because that's what matters to me. That's what matters is to is to keep to make sure their names keep them alive because they didn't deserve to die. A may. They're not here show their stories. But was do. That's like the only reason that like Enron political exactly is that we just want their name to be there forever. They didn't go when they're gonna be there with us in memory as long as we live. And we as the people who survived it can like bring their memory to life to other people into show them. How amazing they work may meet them. We hope that like by showing you. How smart Lena was by telling you, how kind Alex was telling you how funny Elissa ways that you can understand. As if done or wonderful job honor, the banking. Thank you for talking with. Community. Two. I take one today. Yeah. You know, what's not smart the way hiring used to be job boards that overwhelm you with tons of the wrong resumes. Now, there's a smarter way at ZipRecruiter dot com slash daily. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology finds the right people for you and actively invites them to ply. It's no wonder that's recruiter is rated number one by employers in the US and right now listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash daily. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash daily. Here's what else you need. I don't wanna see shutdown shutdown would be a terrible thing. Border security compromise designed to avoid another government shutdown appeared to be heading toward passage on Wednesday. After President Trump signaled an openness to signing the legislation by tomorrow night. Despite the fact that it does not come close to funding his border wall. We're gonna look at the legislation when it comes and I'll make a determination the president has not formally committed to backing the legislation which includes almost one point four billion dollars for border fencing rather than the more than five billion dollars. Trump has requested for solid wall. But congressional leaders from both party say they will pass it starting today as a win for the American people of it's a compromise. And that's but the professors to as with all compromises, I say to people support the Bill for what is in don't judge it. For what is not imminent. We have other days to pass other legislative. We need to reacquire to signal have positive confirmation of a safe landing as the spacecraft bouncing surface Mars rolling around the antennas pointed at many different orientational. We're seeing on the. Messa said that opportunity a spacecraft designed to roam the surface of Mars for three months, but that stayed there for fourteen years has died opportunity, the longest lasting robot ever sent to another planet took thousands of photographs that offered humans a close up view of Mars and provided scientists the clearest evidence to date that billions of years ago. Moore's once contained water a prerequisite for life. 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162 The Deal of Last Week

Makom Israel Teachers Lounge

35:46 min | 1 year ago

162 The Deal of Last Week

"Welcome to the mccomb is really podcast where we connect students and listeners with Israel by discussing and exploring current events relevant issues. I'm your host Michael Unterberg here as usually always how and Goldman. How's it going on? It's gone good Mike. Welcome back from Poland will probably later in the episode here. Some of your thoughts about that. But we wanted to hear your thoughts about the deal of the a century and And and what that means for us a week in now that we've had a little more time to reflect and a little bit of news development adopt the cooling down of some of the you know sort of when the news was given last week that part of the trump deal was. Israel has the right to an annex territories. Even though there's a four year freeze and things like that a lot of the things that people were jumping up and down about seemed to have cooled down over the last week both from the is really sad but also more from the more I would say from the American side that the Palestinians have the right to negotiate changes in the deal that the Israelis can Amex so quickly so as sort of. I think we predicted things. We're going to start to cool down that That the hot takes were a little too hot and you had to sort of let things simmer down so what. What are your takeaways? Both from the past week. But also we'll also from listening to my discussion with Benji. Thought first of all Kudos to bend yet that you did a really really good job in you know Talking about editing giving some structure and some in some good insight I think inside in the the end was really clearly where we are now and I think where it's going to end up as one more align of deals that were proposed used by various diplomats American and or otherwise that will go to the dustbin of history and and willing to Won't go out but the question is so but what does it do for people living here and How does it affect our lives if it does And what educational points can we make. What what can we learn from it? Even if it doesn't actually change history. What insights does it give us? Yeah so so first of all whether it was one framing. I thought that it wasn't so oh word is more accurate. yuck accurate framing. Let's say when Benji was talking about how we're we're kinda still in forty eight reference framework that the Palestinians are still fighting the knock by and we're still trying to fight for those things in in. I think the truth is at that. And this is part of one one of the problems that that Israel's really more in a sixty seven framework opposed sixty-seven framework and the Palestinians may be in that forty-eight is very whereas Israelis are arguing about the aftermath of sixty seven Palestinians are fighting the aftermath of forty eight. Yeah and that's part of how we we are constantly not even talking. The same language is in you. You mentioned when you talk about refugees how we see the solving the refugee issued Palestinian refugee issue or others. We're not even talking along the same language we're not even. We don't even have the same frame of references of what is a way to To come to some agreement and I think that that is one of the big ones because pal scenes at least those when there was serious talk of a peace process. Important potential plan. Faustini's always spoke about the Green Line. The forty forty forty eight boundaries for batteries and Israel never spoke always talked about adjusted boundaries. Even the most you know the largest Offers you could say by it all marked or or Barack they never went back to the to the forty eight boundaries because Israel sees that as has as a very problematic and also Israel always talked about even if it went to give those boundaries that that that Jordan River car car door would always be under at least some kind of Israel so whatever the sovereignty right exactly so I think we. Israel's always really talking talking post sixty seven and how you solve this issue and the Palestinians are always talking forty. I can quibble Palestinian negotiators. I would say you know tie in two thousand one on who. It certainly was acknowledged by many Palestinian negotiators at that exchange of territory made sense that. Yeah but I'm saying the frame of reference is still seven forty eight boundaries as for Israel or not or are not different. We're not going back to boundaries right so that I think that's one more step in understanding the the the lack of communication not being on the same page with the Palestinians. I if you want to constantly right -cation dysfunction that we just we talk in different different languages an Arabic Hebron Lee Bow. Yeah literally are fringed cause us to frame things so differently that will talk we. You think we're talking about the same thing but we're not right and the other thing. I think that needs to be brought up in this whole discussion is the Gaza withdrawal in two thousand and five That is You know in a sense of unilateralism right. The fact that Israel made a unilateral move and pulling out of Gaza and I think we could argue. The failure of unilateralism created a vacuum that led to chaos right which is obviously bad for Israel having rockets bill so bad for for Palestinians because we see the difference between the West Bank and Gaza and technically absolutely employment. Everything stability of life for Arabs in the West Bank is high high much higher than and as you. Guys noticeably Sibley pointed out that this this deal of the century. I don't even know why we were in falling into that. You Know Promo I just using the term nine. Obviously that's what they call it but I can't put that's a lot of mustard you put on that statistic spin of that was cool. I heard you I heard your face grimaces service but this plan is clearly smacks of Israel unilateralism And and and so we have. I would argue threatens. Yeah you know after four years if you guys don't come to the table Palestinians then it'll just going to annex this unilaterally including the Jordan Valley and and highways through your country. Your country is going to be a Swiss cheese of Israeli roads running through you and that's just what is going to be. Yeah and and that's and that and that that really doesn't work to unilateralism doesn't work really add it leads. Send us down a worse avenue and I think the Palestinians are banking on that. Do they know that even Israel sees that in many ways so the again. I do think they're gambling. That all of these strategies won't work if we dig in on our heels and don't play ball right at the end that means time is on our side and we will win so whatever solutions they suggest whether they're more to our benefit luster benefit. We will not play ball right so so we have to see that you L. again as it goes to the dust bin on the other hand. How how's it affecting those of us on the ground here because this is actually does potentially affect their lives whether you know whether just Even John Kerry plan and even the Bush plan we were like yeah. It's not going to go anywhere. We could see that even then I think most people well it's question because it's not pragmatic but what makes the the the the colonial Hubris of even a superpower thinking. Hey everybody do a we say day and it will make everything better for you out without deep consultation in other words and clear lack of knowledge of the of the region. Even you say Sharon said he read twenty books. Yeah I mean they went through all these things but there's no way that you ever like that. You can't come up with a plan like this and say like you understand the Palestinians. I'm sorry it just does not reflect a deepened. It's ludicrous even the language. Yeah As ludicrous so Yeah it's it's who Brits it's I mean I think they have to I. I don't know I I'm not. I'm not a politician like that. So it's hard to understand what goes through a person's mind the by the way even historically you know Jimmy Carter was able to be helpful to Sadat and Bagan making a peace deal because Sadat initiated the conversation big and jumped on it and together they formed something and then the Carter jumped in and help them negotiate it but the initiative will force them in the room together. Kilo the deal whenever the deal was falling apart right the only thing that saved it was the face to face the two leaders and then the different teams. It wasn't someone image. Come from the outside saying this is how you're going to solve it. Correct you when the when the leaders wanted to happen internally. There's a chance doesn't necessarily work correct. But it's got a shot when somebody the from the outside says here's what we say is the solution by the way that was Oslo. Also the Americans only came in after incorrect after the Palestinians and Israelis had a Negotiate face to face. They're only getting a stamp of approval by a superpower. Not well and I and I do think that there was in Israel genuine optimism that as low could work by many many Israelis. Yeah I think in real time. I didn't have that optimism. I did and you did I I did. I simply didn't trust Yasser Arafat's motivation Shen. I didn't think was actually to have two nations living side-by-side into states. I just didn't believe him. Yes so I didn't think it would work and you know You know from a Western perspective. It makes so much sense that it's hard. It's hard for many people to understand Dan Palestinian intransigence from a Western perspective. And so they just can't believe the Palestinians are really doing what they're doing and so they do things. Well you know. Kushner in multiple interviews has said Well they're going to miss an opportunity here right but that's not how they think of it so they don't see it as an opportunity they see it as a failure. They've I've seen stepping into a bear trap. That'll keep them frozen and not be able to move. Why would I put my foot in a bear trap right? How can I convince them that? It's not a bear trap trap. So that's that's an interesting diplomatic challenge right that the deals entry doesn't begin to address. How can I convince them that? No no this isn't a bear trap. Strap this is your freedom. We can get you out in the open and have a full. You know healthy society. That's you have a country that's been bigger than Singapore with more economic opportunity. And you all you have to do is acknowledge that the Jews are an indigenous people with a place in the Middle East and the right to statehood as your neighbors. I don't know I I duNNo. Nobody's addressing that problem right housing and the street. Look that was that was the basis of Oslo that the mutual recognition so it was funny. It's funny because the mutual. Yeah you know. The mutual recognition of our said that Israel has a right to exist. Yeah and it didn't clarify as a Jewish state for the Jewish nation and because of that when Arafat said I acknowledged Israel exists and even has a right to exist but part of what he meant by demanding the right of return as in other words if millions of Arabs should be the citizens of that there should be it should be a state that has leaders voted democratically. And that states should have more Arabs than Jews. And that's why I was talking about before we just don't speak beat. We don't have the same frame languages. And we said Israel we met as a Jewish state and they said Israel as a as a primarily Arab state with Jews living in so today. I think that this is it does find expression in in today in the reaction of people on the street so first of all I don't I feel again predictions as you know the late. Mr Fina right if I should be so humble to make a prediction but I I don't think of humble prediction I don't think this is GonNa and it caused any mass protests or violence or anything like that. I I think you're already seeing the cooling off. That's interesting but I'll tell you but I think it's a deeper thing going on and that's fine. It was and it wasn't going even if even if the size weren't well not actually way and it's not because for for if you see both intifadas happen. There's kind of any tooth paradoxical things one is sort of a sense of hopelessness but that that hope is our actions can actually change something And I think the Palestinians are at the point where they don't think that their actions for the most part in Mass uh-huh can really change anything and that's why you had. This kind of stabbing into Vodkas was individuals who just were hopeless and almost suicidal as opposed to a framework mark that was really having a mass protests either grassroots or even a more organized. And you don't have that now and I think that a lot of Palestinians they saw this in the paper over over over the weekend. The CHABAD paper which is one of the reactions is direction. We felt on the ground in Palestinian speakers that we've brought into the class and people that we've interacted with. Is that Gimme citizenship. I want citizenship. And that's how we'll get equality here and then eventually we will either be the majority or not but but but I rather it'd be a citizen of one state then having two states because the two state solution has gone. I think the day to them to say for you know looking in the news. Well this is killing. The two state solution in many Palestinians are have thought that the solution is over and there's a growing minority in favor of a one state solution. Yeah and so give me citizenship in Israel. I'll use my a a my democratic rights and I'll make my life better and L. in Shala God willing. You know we'll have a majority and that's back to this. Yes Israel's right to exist but as as a binational state not as state I think I think that I don't know that the Jewish my job. I don't know that the Jewish majority of Israelis who think that's a good idea is growing having any evidence of that there is polling evidence. That is catching. Yeah certainly among younger Palestinian among younger palisades polling around thirty percent. Yeah that's a sizable sizable minority. And we've also seen articles in the last couple of years. A huge amount jump Africa. What the percentage is a huge jump in percentage Palestinians living in Jerusalem who have gotten Israeli citizenship So that that that that is a trend that is definitely You feel bill In in some voices and Palestinians yeah and and There is a sense. Among among many Israelis that Israeli Israeli leaders aren't taking steps that that the that the enfranchisement of the Arabs of the West Bank is a threat to Zionism. AWESOME BECAUSE IF ZION is if Israel is a Jewish democracy then adding two and a half million Arabs to the row would would threaten threaten Jewish majority. And what are we doing to to prevent. That Israelis don't agree and leaders don't seem to be taking steps to and I mean I still the question you asked this other question in this I think falls into it. So why. Why now So the I think that in the last the last election couple months ago the Palestinian issue people aren't voting on the Palestinian issue. So the question is is not oh trying tip that forefront in the elections and and and get away from the religion estate shoes and his own personal issues to to all the talk is about the deals the century. And nobody's talking about if we have an election in a month right which is crazy a month before the election and we're barely talking about it as a society correct so uh I think that that is a big that was certainly part of this spin to renounce it now before the election was to help them to make talk about the Palestinians as was getting from Russia correct as is as the co photo op of him appearing in Uganda of Yoni Netanyahu brother being greeted by an honor guard by the descendants of Idi. Amin you know Title Tabby Yeah. He's playing he's he's good at this. Although he blew the indictment yeah game and now he's actually indicted again you don't know if he blew the game he just you know he was you know. He was defeated in that round throughout this. He's had a lot of losses over the years can always win. Yeah yeah so but So that that those are my kind of thoughts after listening to the podcast from last week and also the to dabble a little bit the reading. Yeah I think you and I sort of disagree on whether you could make an argument that the Palestinians should take it like I I totally I mean I ah I just don't see why they would first of all. They were offered many better things than they turned it down. They go into negotiations second fall like from from their perspective. Let's wait a year. Trump will be out maybe trump will be out. Maybe not like you know. Maybe the dog will die like right. Why why why would they even make an approach? Like what did I say they get out of this. I would argued. I think if I were a Palestinian politician that you engage into an and built that that. To just disengage from the process gives your people a sense of despair but to say that let's work on it and see what we can build out of it. Let's see how we can direct it. I think that's as leadership I think. That's educationally important to teach the the people you're supposed to be building okay. You're talking like a Westerner correct west. I think an an and you have Palestinians who think like that and argue that and I. I think those should be leaders like I I really do. I don't think the fact that you could make a better future. That isn't betting all your chips on the all or nothing win But I would say that this. This deal is so ridiculous. Why would you engage in this? In other words I would agree with you. With Omar Plan agree with you with barrack. But this is I invite Netanyahu to our office in Ramallah and we'll talk about how to get this closer to the Almer plan and then we'll talk Y Y. BB is not necessarily shown himself as interested. In anything he'd be invited Abbass to the Knesset and invited himself to a mouse. Take they come up on it. I guess part of what I'm saying is I think it'd be realistic value in the Western perspective and I think that the Palestinians playing against that in the in the big world today is folly in other words. I get what they're thinking. I get why they thinking it as much as I can as a non Palestinian and I realize I don't really get it. I just my efforts to get. It have yielded. I think a certain amount of success and I think ultimately that that they are what they're doing is self destructive. I don't think in the long run. Yeah we don't disagree with that. I'm just talking about this plan particular. I would see no reason right everything. The trump has been trump administration has made so little effort towards the Palestinians. So why would they. I mean there is a time when you have to draw your line because they left because it takes to tango in other words. The trump's early on on when they've made these efforts at inroads and they were rebuffed so they're like okay. Why do we need to play Games with you idiots so they need to be they need to be playing a similar game to be be which is does not embrace this full-throated but it has to be the devil's in the details? Let's make this work. I think. The constant petulant. No no no a thousand sometimes no is losing them patients in the Arab world. It's losing the patients everywhere I think in other words. Even according to their theory I think strategically being dumb and certainly in a broader percents of how the world actually works. I think they're being done. But that's where we're disagreeing. I mean that's not over correct. We're disagreeing in the world of hypothetical and I think every time you're talking about the two state solution you're only talking in the hypothetical because practically it's irrelevant so whatever plan and nuance of plan and better plan. The Palestinians is clearly are not interested and so we have to plan now since it's practically impossible all the energy being spent on how to make the best. two-state solution is imaginary academic fantasy. Okay so at a certain point but that's and that's interesting and worth playing for various reasons but at a certain point you have to say okay since it will not happen. Now what do we do. How do we protect a Jewish democratic? MM credit majority in Israel in the full meaning of Jewish and the foaming democratic and the full meaning of the land of Israel. How do we how do we maximize our possibilities? And I and I think ondon secure and secure because you know. That's that's what I would argue four. HQ's Liotta article. She'd better be a free people in our land to the full extent of however. How do you answer those questions that has to be the conversation beyond The two state solution. Yeah Yeah now In the few minutes we have left. I wanted to know if you're you're at a a pretty overwhelming experience experience in Poland this year. Can you describe basically what you did. What your job was So yeah I was in It's very very overwhelming. Yeah I've been going to pull a now for twenty years leading educational heritage in Jewish. You know very different experiences. France's that include obviously thousand years of Jewish Jewish life and civilization in in Poland and obviously it's tragic demise in years the Holocaust Oh cost but this was an exceptional experience To have an all these years where on January twenty seventh In nineteen forty forty five the Russians came into Offense in the town of of Vinson Polish name and conquered conquered The area and and more or less took over offense. I'm using these words particularly if we get into the narratives and much in the calls. It liberated that's right. You're speaking with an educator's accuracy with the. Yeah if we get into and I I'll talk more a little popcorn. Russians liberate a Polish right. They write was all kinds. The things that goes into part of the overwhelming part of all this is these three pronged narrative fight. That's going on between Israel Poland and Russia But but So every five years the the museum of Auschwitz Birkenau. That's there to to teach and remember about the About about What happened in the hall particular every five years they do a very big Ceremony state ceremony were heads of state. Go like more than fifty state delegations. Sion's come over three thousand people you can never get accurate numbers. Three thousand four thousand. I don't know And they build this huge tent so that people aren't freezing Israel was very focused on the major Israel with all these heads of state and diplomatic miserable. You were at the Auschwitz site of Auschwitz Birkenau. This was in sight of Birkenau and In Birkenau in in Berkeley outside the gates of Birkenau and the mazing amazing thing was that ambassador Ronald Louder Who is the president of World Jewish Congress and he's also the chair of the Office Perkins Memorial Foundation Realizing realizing that this is going to be the last chance to bring a significant amount of offered survivors at the ceremony. Because another five years you know we're talking you know Mo- most survivors in the late eighties. Early Nineties They won't really be able to come so put as a goal to bring one hundred twenty survivors from around the world and we got over a hundred survivor ever so vouches Birkenau Memorial Foundation. Turn to J. Roots another organization. I work with involved in that. Runs Meaningful travel educational patient programs around the world and particularly in Poland to run the survivor delegation. So there's five of delegation then made up of one hundred twenty or so survivors. Is there a companion each when a companion to help them all paid for by the ostrich Berkeley Memorial Foundation Amazingly And then family members who wanted to join a delegation of over three hundred people and my job was running the delegation the logistics on the logistics education running overseeing all the delegation and It was ran from basically it was sort of started on Friday before with a smaller group and then and then on the Wednesday after so on the thirtieth for the whole delegation and which is overwhelming to be look. I've doing this all these years. I've met a lot of survivors talked a lot of survivors. It was even traveled through Poland with. I would say good amount of survivors. But there's nothing like being with over one hundred survivors and their family members and many many many of them have never been back. Usually people have been back because they they've done it more than once you know. These are survivors of no. We're talking only of survivors survivors. Wash fits Birkenau And it was really a many of them. They all just want to tell their stories. You know that's why they are a lot of them a lot. Lot of in spoke about coming there for the last time or only time after the war for closure and they were spilling spilling their stories out and their families were hearing things that he didn't Nestle. Let's see here before they've heard before but in a very different very different tone. The oldest delegate is one hundred years old And he came with his wife who's ninety five live from there from Memphis And they came with also two daughters And the youngest delegate. What seventy five so that? Yeah you just had that boy was born in Auschwitz a month before liberation liberation. Wow Yeah in December and amazingly her mother was able to to nurse her and keep her life and there was another boy born and we're mother was able to also. Oh my gosh. Yeah and the mother incredible. Yeah well she can see before they got there. Oh she was an issue is a recent. Yeah I mean I. I don't remember exactly went. How when exactly Kaha? Because her father was murdered in and again offshoots of thing and I make to labor camp would yeah lady they know the mother was pregnant and then she hit her and she had to keep her life for a month. So the youngest was seventy five and the oldest one hundred And then of course all the years spanning between because he'd Other kids were there and pretty incredible Pretty incredible stories and experiences. Come from all over the world people literally all over the world. Thank you know As as was weird to be more in a background rather than a a leader. Who's speaking all the time? It's more of a listener when you're so first of all I mean for me personally. I wasn't in the role sort of educated. They're already so I'm going tonight as back in my regular roles educator some very safer because it's like getting expect to be but Part of our part of our challenge was to. It's not a regular journey Mesa. Right so part of China's how do you. How do you enable these families to have these meaning experienced people to speak survivor survivor? Who goes with you on a trip right? So you'll walk down. You'll ask him or her to speak. Their stories replaces well. How do you do that? Walking through Birkenau with five or seven survivors. And everyone's hold those story okay. So we tried to break a framework that they share with their their their children there and their families and Boca Sham. They got a lot of positive feedback that it was successful. That lots of people was there any What was done to record tons of recording so you can go on? I mean go go on the preserve off. It's Website that they built built for this. which the stories of lots of the survivors? And there's lots of videos There was lots of media. There's tons of media if you if you Google or on Youtube Bosh at seventy five you'll find tons of media was like I was a media zoo. I mean I've never had that either the deal in my life but there's lots all the major Outlets were there. Send me one clip that you would want me to link to the episode and let me ask you this. Because it's an Israel podcast. Yeah what does what does this role as a educator of Jewish heritage I in the diaspora play in your role as honest educator question. Though that's I should've thought about that before you should soon right well look it's Our whole experience in diaspora has shaped who we. We are a people today right. We can't in the early years of CER- certain Zionist movements are group's wanted to almost wipe Out The day aspirin. There was an impulse. Yeah it was called like negation of the Diaspora Sleep Gola right to. And that's why you find. Zionism awesome such a huge emphasis on the Bible and and by the way archaeology ads. I S you said we should. We should be re become the Canaanites like pride and right right Break off of the Jabotinsky. We're wanted to call call themselves canaanite yet so that was a sculpture in the Israel Museum. Again yeah exactly so so I think that that is. That's not my approach to identity building our who we are. You have to take the whole picture and the whole picture is is that we are very very much connected to our experience who went through and I. I often tell my students in there that you know I feel so American you know Oh sports. I'm more focused on American music. Actually more like American music address like an American. I've been in Israel thirty years but I still have. Such cultural and references is in framework and part of my identity as American My family was in Poland for hundreds of years. I don't know exactly how many Baio for hundreds of years. So how has that affected my identity. Right it is really shaped who we are and much of we are and that is very important. It's important embrace that part of our identities I think Knowing that our home home is in Israel nine Homa. So that's why I am a big believer people like How you know we have this this big this big Thing about Kidney L. overpay saw should Ashkenazim not eat legos. Should they eat legos. I'm a big believer in e in not eating. I'm not into like I do believe Anura Vegetarian. I'm a veteran that yes we are one nation. We should come home but we should also bring being embracing our cultural differences. You know I really am a believer this multicultural and Ms. There's there's a multicultural Jews I would. I would hate. I hate to see Yemen's losing their culture identity and I don't WanNa lose my Ashkenazi at any but that doesn't mean I that that that is exclusive. It's it's it's part of what makes me but it's also part of bringing it together to Jewish people and how does the destruction part of it so the destruction part is yeah That we have to that we have to also confront those parts of our history which are which are which are very Difficult and we we have to also confront the idea of what it means to be another. And how and being in other in a place that you don't have the place that is that is yours that gives you some of you are Identity and a physical safety. Those things come together And I think that that that is also very important that we see around the world today you know many other places other people are being seen as other what that affects in that. That's that is a very dangerous thing whether it be for Jews or for for any other people's Who who don't have their Their own identities as a as a nation. It's different if if you have your own identity then you can enter. You can relate but other within very different and and the society seeing you as other and we see that a lot and in many different places even in Western World Make it happen that that that can lead to a lot of danger So it's all it's all. Aw It's all one big story picture and it's just a question of where you were using them out somehow the web you can start at any place in the web and it all interconnects next to this. Yeah boy mixing metaphors but to this tapestry of you know look at me and it does me as I say like in Poland Jews one st important for thousand in years. If it wasn't if it weren't good times people always say oh well palm was awful and why they go no we we like. You can't paint it with one black thing because then we went interstate. We let her pay plays that. Were all bad we left. And that's what happens. Unfortunately it does turn all bad And Jews in Spain they usually think of it as the expulsion or the inquisition realizing that the Golden Age is one of the most creative prosper. Exactly So those that's sort of on a personal level there is on. I don't think we have time for a butt on this. This level of the narratives that are being you fought by. The government's is also an extremely interesting topic that maybe we'll about how Poland and Russia And Yeah all these countries are battling over how their story should be told him although I I don't I don't I don't know the Germanies does Germany dog in. NFL pretty much not no. They're like leave us out where we gotta because Germany. After the War Germany was forced to at least West. Germany was was forced to come to terms with it In their society and they really did. I mean again. You have different things. Boil down to the street. Level is different than how the government handled. Ah But but the big picture they dealt with their role in the World War Two ignores government had to address. Yeah anyway way but Just going back to the survivors. Really some really All everyone who is amazing amazing stories of I mean five on rebuilding again like rebuilding after the videos. You sent me a and when I encountered these things I always think what gives me the right to be in a in the same nation Chan as those people who are like. Yeah like you just feel like small but also so appreciative that you get to be part of a people with that kind of is definitely inner beauty strengthen it's just Yeah we're lucky people as whatever we go through but we are us yes and we have we have our. We should never forget to celebrate the re the embarrassment of riches it is to be part of this nation. Yeah so thank you. Thank you good to have you back. I know I never begrudge you those Only back for a little while. We'll take a week again. Thank you So much. Thank You ben for engineering us to the end of the episode which this is thanks for listening to the mccomb mccomb Israel Teachers Lounge podcast. Don't forget to share subscribe rate and review. Join US next time.

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Diane von Furstenberg

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

1:01:01 hr | 22 hrs ago

Diane von Furstenberg

"Hi everyone it's sophia. Welcome to work in progress today. I am absolutely honored to be talking to tighten in the world of fashion history. Women's history and while history diane von furstenberg or as she is known commonly around the world devi f born in belgium at the end of the second world war. Two holocaust survivor parents d f went on to change the fashion world married a prince and amassed a net worth of over a billion dollars per clothes have been worn by millions of women around the world including catherine the duchess of cambridge with paltrow jennifer lopez madonna and my very favorite michelle obama. She's written several books including diane a signature life and the woman i wanted to be and the upcoming own it the secret to life. Now it's seventy four. She oversees the diller von furstenberg family foundation with second husband. Tv pioneer barry diller which puts their wealth to good use providing support to nonprofit organizations including community building education human rights arts health and the environment devi f is an overwhelming inspiration to me personally and to women everywhere. She's overcome incredible odds and change the world. I was honored to get a chance to learn from her her story and her passion for her work and causes. She discussed becoming a young mother at twenty two leaving her first marriage moving to america and starting her own career in fashion which resulted in the creation of the world. Famous wrap dress and we also talked about how she and her husband berry along with. Their children and grandchildren have created a family unit that formed a foundation to help those in need devi. F is one of the most accomplished people. I've had the pleasure of talking to. She is a wealth of knowledge and experience and joy. I learned so much from her. And i know you will too. If you like me are a huge fan of t. You have to try. Sips by spy is a t. club that makes discovering new tees fund and personalized and keeps it affordable. You take a quick t quiz and the match you with new ts to try every month your selections come straight to your door and you always get free shipping. I've actually become a master at making the perfect mint green tea during the pandemic and no they don't come in the same box. I actually combine them to get them. Just right as a work in progress exclusive. you can use code. Wip to get fifty percent off your first sip spy box. Go take the quiz at www dot sips by dot com slash wip and get fifty percent off your first personalized tee box with code. Wip happy sipping this episode of work in progress supported by remote works another podcast that i love that tells extraordinary stories of teams that made the shift to flexible. Working in each episode of remote works their host melanie. Green tells inciteful story about how people and companies are adopting. I actually just listened to their episode on preventing burn out the other day and they talked about the ways that people interviewed had been coping in the ways that companies have been working around people to support them through this and it gave me some pretty phenomenal ideas about how i want to continue moving forward in this new year so yeah i highly recommend it search for remote works anywhere you listen to. Podcasts will include a link in the show notes. And thank you so much to remote works for your support diane. It's such an honor to have you on the podcast. Today you are a woman who has been an icon to me for so long and it's sort of a pinch me moment every time i get to spend time with you because we've become friends and i are this incredible advocate and we've worked on wonderful wonderful work for the public together and i don't know if i've ever told you this but back when i was in college with my very first paycheck i ever earned from an acting job. I went to bloomingdale's and i bought two things. I bought an orange unbelievable. Marc jacobs jacket. And i bought it. Diane von furstenberg wrap dress was a black and white dress and it was so fabulous. You still haven't. I do i still have it. I don't know it's me anymore. Because you know i was eighteen at the time but it was such a moment for museum woman. I felt i felt like an adult. I know you know is very funny because ride. Now it's it's a very very interesting moment even in the br- for the brand because with everything that happened it was a moment to reset the business plan and reset everything. And make sure that you stay to the core of who you are and all of that and i also realized i have so many archives in such a huge library of friends and my volt is is huge on the brand the next year will be fifty years so now i have a very young team. And it's so nice because they get so excited by the seventies you know so it's very nice and then so what i was saying is that i didn't know what i wanted to do but i knew the kind of woman i wanted to be. I wanted to be a woman in charge ride. I wanted to have a man's life a woman's body and at twenty eight. I was already separated. I already had two children. I already was enormously successful twenty eight. I became the woman i wanted to be. That woman i was on the cover of newsweek and interview and wallace adjourn twenty eight and then later people say who do you design for and i always say the woman in charge and so in charge was is always been very much the umbrella over my brand and then i started to think about being charged with his of mean blocks and two years ago i started the movement and i wrote a mission statement about what it is to be. Charged and to be in charged is first and foremost a commitment to ourselves. It's not an aggressive thing against man. It's not an aggressive thing. Period is just only who we are we own. Our imperfection may become acids. We own a mobility. We can turn it into strength. And i realized you know the branch still designed for that twenty eight year old woman. She's not a girl she's a woman because even though you know i mean i'm an older woman now but that twenty eight year old woman is still inside me. I was mem- you know that feeling of being in charge is still there so that is who i cage you. I'm curious because you you talk about this notion of being a woman in charge being the thematic umbrella in your life you know you've built underneath it. And it's a thing that you've continued to pursue and i wonder i always liked to know who my guests were before we all knew them as the people they are now. I wonder at what age did you begin to feel that kind of pulse for your own goals and creativity and power. You grew up in brussels. Was this something that began there as a little girl. All right so since you talk about brussels. I was born in belgium after the war. My mother during the war was a prisoner of war in slave labor. She was in the concentration camp. The worst she went to auschwitz birkenau than they. You know they were losing the war. They moved to. You know another cab another anyway. Thirteen months she spent in the camps by the time she she came back. She weighed four nine pounds. I mean she was a skeleton. She wasn't supposed to be alive and in it's funny because the hanukkah's museum did all this research. And they found all this information and when my mother was liberated she filled the question there with a name or surname age. Where she was from blah blah blah and then it said state of house and she wrote excellent health. She could barely move but she wrote excellent hand and high love that because that really shows her willpower. She never wanted to be a victim so to me. I was raised as you know. I mean the doctor when she got married the doctor said you cannot have china for at least three years because you will not survive and child will not be normal and sure enough. I was born nine months later. So i mean the fact that she was not supposed to survive. I was not supposed to be born. All of this makes who i am right. I was raised by a mother who told me. Fear was not an option. She would never allow me to be afraid. If i was afraid of the dark she would lock me in the closet today. She would get arrested. But truly i'm thankful she did that because after five minutes. You realize that it doesn't stay dark and even if it does stay dr. What's to be afraid of the dark. You know so. She made me like that. She made me very responsible. She never told me to be careful. She always go ahead do it. You know but she made me responsible. You know if you do it. You pay the consequence. What what was she like to grow up with as you were becoming you know a young girl a teenager you speak of her so highly in all of your writing and these stories about her so incredible i mean i just think about the determination. The determination the gumption to say excellent. Listen when you have a very strong mother you also resent that strength you know. I mean she would give advice to everybody on. My friends and i used to hate that now. I'm ten times worse than her. But she made me and my children because she shown he died twenty years ago so both. My children were thirty. And she met two of my granddaughter's so she had a major effect on all of us. And we pass it on. I mean we are definitely a dynasty of very strong women and we continue to pass the word at this point of my life. I'm born on new year's eve so unease eve. I always take a big white sheet of paper. And i make i do columns in first columnists family and the second canada's is my brand and then the third is meat and So my family's fine. I'm so proud of who they are. All of them and blah blah blah. My brand is now being rebirth. You know. I'm creating a rebirth again. And me at this point what i want to do with the rest of my live the most is i want to use my voice my knowledge my my experience my connections my resources in order to have other women to be the women they want to be and i do that to the awards. I do that to my books. I do that too. I do that to the philanthropy. Everything that i do. And it's very it's very fulfilling. You know i am. I am blessed that i have had a very very full life. I mean it hasn't always been great. I have been sake. I have gone through. Failures have gone to all kinds of things. But i mean now looking back i mean i have so many so much experience so many images memories souvenirs connection relationship people who come in and go out of your life and it's it's a wonderful chain of love that you bill you know and writing. This book has been amazing. I book was gonna be called in charge. Everything about incharge brings you back to own edge. Then i decided okay. I'm going to call it own. and i. it was going to be in prose. And then when i was riding it i thought it was condescending and then i decided to make as a dictionary and i line dab two hundred sixty eight words that speak to me and some words that don't speak to me and i started writing it and then cove it happen and then all of a sudden with kovin it was. Oh my god. Everything became more serious. Every word had so much more meaning and and that was very good but what it was great. Is that at the end of it. I realized that. Actually i have never lied. Mostly not to myself and that is what has allowed me to have a great life. And this is what i would like to say in this book in a very fun way in a non condescending way just make people realize that we have the keys of our lives that we we own who we upped that offer character is the most important thing i mean. We could lose our house. We could into his own wealth. We could lose beauty with lose our family. We could lose our freedom but we never lose our character even under torture you see. My mother never lost her character even though she was. You mediated to the worst way. So it's really. This book is all these lil experiences. All these little anecdotes on these little words and becca that i have learned and all my knowledge is in this tiny little book which originally was supposed to be just a gift on the verge of being frivolous and years. It's fun but it's also serious but z. Areas doesn't mean boy certainly and i think you referenced covid casting this shadow over all of us and and i had a similar feeling to what you described everything fell. It had more weight. Things felt more solid more important Connections felt clearer family. Felt even more important. And i think there's something really profound about sitting with our lessons and our thoughts in a time like this and i can feel it in the book you know and i i started to read it and i thought oh this is this is really connected to kind of the depths of who we are and and how. We came to be really no. Listen i mean we. Some people didn't amion. I kept on knowing my husband all the time. If you learn something what you know. And he doesn't want to deal with that they didn't want to deal with. What do you mean. What do you mean i said. I don't know but if the world stops if the entire world is stuff if everyone is wearing a mask. I mean there must be some meaning that we all should learn from this. No i believe so. I do and i think even what it can mean as you say to see everyone wearing a mask you know if you have to go to the grocery store or wherever it is you need to be the amount of love that i found myself feeling when i would see a group of people lining up six feet apart waiting to get into the grocery store everyone in a mask. I thought every single person i see. Who's wearing a mask. Just like i am cares about. Humanity cares about their neighbors cares about their family. What a what a symbol of. Not just patriotism not just let's do it for for our communities but really let's do it for each other one to one human interaction it it it sent me into such a space of analyzing the way we cohabitate differently in it. It was profound at times now word from our sponsors who make the show possible this past year. We've seen so many businesses adapt and get innovative to survive. One way you can adapt and grow your business by finding the right people which can still be difficult and we're doing so many things remotely fortunately linked in jobs can make the process of posting a job and finding your ideal candidate easy. I have so many friends who found incredibly qualified members of their new work from home work from zoom teams. Unlike din get started by posting your job for free to reach lincoln's network. 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I am a huge fan of resale whether i'm doing a sale to benefit charity or i'm hunting and thrift ing vintage or cool previously weren't items online i think that a circular fashion economy is incredibly important to the future threat. Up has over thirty five thousand brands for women's or kids clothing handbags shows and more for up to ninety percent off the estimated retail value. I've scored items from some of my favorite brands for as little as six dollars. No joke it's easy to find what you're looking for to. You can customize your search by style size and budget and they're constantly getting new arrivals so there's always something new to discover. These items are in high quality condition and some even still have the tags on plus they come delivered right to your door if for some reason. It's not what you were expecting. They have a really easy return policy. So it's worry free. Get the sales. You love at a fraction of the price. You'll look good and feel good with threat up and for work in progress listeners. Here's an exclusive offer just for you get an extra thirty percent off your first order at threat. Up dot com slash. Wip that's threat up. T. h. r. e. d. u. up dot com slash. Wip for thirty percent off your first order threat. Up dot com slash. Wip for an extra thirty percent off today terms apply. Where did it all begin. Where did the love of closed begin. Was that as a young woman did. Did something happen when you were studying economics. Because to go from the university of geneva studying economics to to wind up in paris working in fashion the turns are just amazing. Well i did not know what i wanted to do. I really did not know. And i didn't have a career path at all. I never graduated. And i went to paris and i got a job of for photographers agent. And you're doing that. I mean i was just receptionist an assistant but what i discovered. that was the The world of fashion the world of magazine photographers models makeup artist advertising agency. I mean the image of fashion. And then i met an italian man and he said to me you know. You should come at come to see what i do. I have a factory in in coma. And i print silk. I'm a printer and you should see the other side of fashion where they make things and i went there. I mean and believe me. When i say to young people you know when you start your life you have all the doors in front of you and you don't know which is your door. I promise you that was the least glamorous door and that's certainly is not the door that i thought would be my door but it ended up being my door. It was fascinating because komo is the end of the silk road. And that's where all the sale factor is the italian factories on and this man was the printer so he would print print print. And so i learned how to buy industry how to put it together to do a connor pilot. And all of those things. I learn there but i never thought i was gonna use it. And then he bought the factory next door and in the factory next door they were making hose and then the hose were no longer in fashion because the pantyhose was born and so when he bought that they would all these machines with uber knitting machines and this man says it unwanted. Throw these machines. What could we do with his machine. And he called a young company and he experimented with sika yawn and that's how he discovered the jersey fabric so the jersey fabric and then the print and then he went then. He had to find a factory where the need is small enough to deal with us kind of fabric. Then i went to. My mother gave me for my birthday. She gave me a ticket to go and visit my boyfriend in new york so i went to new york. My boyfriend was a young glamorous australoid talion twins so everybody new york was crazy about him so he was invited everywhere. So because i came in visit i was invited everywhere and i met an older young designers of the time to host on the stephen burrows georgia santangelo all. Those people gave me clothes. I went to their showroom. And i had not seen close like that so after two months i had to go back to europe. I went back to the factory determined that i had to find a way to go back to a maximum and that moment when i went inside the factory i said oh now i know. I'm going to make some samples that i will try to sell in america. That's how it's incredible. And when does that fall on the time line because many of us who have studied your career have seen the photos from that incredible as you mentioned the seventies fashion era studio fifty four culture and the stunning images of the dancing in the nightlife and the fashion. I mean it feels electric. Was that in the earlier part of your career. What are your memories from that time. Yes yes that was the that was the seventies you know i was. My mother used to say i was lazy. I think i was. Today's the until i was twenty two and that age twenty two. I got pregnant. I got married in that order. I started to work and i moved to america. And from that moment on hems and what was it like posing for andy warhol and being in that that space alright. So new york in the seventies was first and foremost dirty and dangerous but as a result because it was also very cheap you had a lot of artists and there was also a feeling of freedom. Somehow there was sexual freedom because that was the space the ten years between the discovery of the pill and the discovery of aids there was also the era of women's liberation. They make love not war. it was. Let's say it was a very fun time to be on. My mom has great stories. She she grew up on the east coast as well and was living in manhattan in the seventies and talks about you know the protests she would say we'd we'd go to a protest you know. Be chanting about how vietnam had to end. And then we'd go to fifty four and you. You dense away now stress the fear and i know i know i know i. It was that time. even in paris wasn't paris is sixty eight. It was the same thing in you win. You know demonstrating in the street and then you go dancing. I i remember many years ago. Leading one of my first Marches on washington for human rights. And we had this incredible man who was a longtime human rights lawyer who came to speak to us and he actually said that if you have the privilege to march in defense of others you need to make sure that when you're marching is done you dance to celebrate your freedom. Oh nice right next me cry. I just think it's such a beautiful reminder about doing the work and holding your joy in joanne you. I think are such a pro at that. You've done such incredible work. You do it with joy. Well i yeah. I mean listen. Sometimes i'm a little you know. I'm bound on myself with sometimes. But i am on a mission. And that's what owning is the boat owner. Whatever it is omen. Whatever happens to you own. You know whether it's you being diagnosed with cancer or you have a flood in your bathroom or your boyfriend left you a whatever you know just own and and the minute your own at your in control. So i'm curious about how you get there because the idea of owning of using that happens to you good or bad as as fuel for your power that feels like an Ha moment to me when you talk about it. A a sort of revelation of how to live and for me. Something i've spoken about with so many of my female friends is that there's such a culture of shame that is thrust upon women. If someone left you what did you do why. Why couldn't you hold a man if you left a relationship. What's wrong with you if you have a failure at work if you there's so much about no matter what a woman does. She's kind of doing it wrong. So how did you change that. Okay first of all the words to throw in the baskets blame and shame and complain. I yeah i don't complain. I don't blame even even when you could blame someone. Just forget it. Don't waste your time blaming anyone. Just deal with it. You know deal with it whatever. It is but shame. Shame is i mean the only thing you could be shamed for is to have shame you should not have shame of being who you are you are who you are and you gotta own it and of course be a good person. I mean you know and the truthful and honest and all of that but schering shameful. what. Oh i hate. I think it's a really important thing for people to hear to your point. The umbrella society may wanna put over us includes those words you wanna throw in the bin but the umbrella you are encouraging people to live under is owning it being a woman in charge exactly lamb gonna see what i vote for. Shame shame shame must be avoided at all costs although it can be hard when we accept ourselves and our actions. We have no reason to have shaved. We mentioned blamed to. I want you to read blame. Blame is a word to ban from vocabulary. When we blame we give up. Power blaming is the opposite of owning. And you know we waste. We waste time blaming you know even the weather it. What's what's the point so owning it. Yeah one that. I really loved. And that felt like such a moment for the book And i think because so much of what you and i have been able to do together over. The years has revolved around activism and advocacy. Your your amusing on advocacy in the book. You said fight for the good and the bad will disappear standing up against violence abuse inequality we must look for the light and build around it finding empathy inside us we'll help shift humanity advocacy is using our voice. It is our duty and privilege to do so. And i just i love that. Find the light and build around it and it. It feels like a a book of secrets for me. And i imagined for so many women are you. I'm cancer. what are you. Happy cone Do you do you identify with the coach. Yes explanations of your sign. I am definitely ago. I love to climb. i'm a big hiker. So i i totally identify with a goat. Yes yeah mine is mine family. They call me the good. I love that. Mine is all about water and i'm a cancer with a. I think it's an aquarius rising. So it's just water everywhere so lots of feelings everything. That's beautiful makes me cry. Like the quote in your book. And i i really find that i feel the earth and i'm very sensitive to what's happening to people and you can hear it in your voice house though. I don't know you have a very very very compassionate boys and you know compassion is. It is an interesting word. It's a word that i had never thought about until longtime ago. I was diagnosed with cancer. And all of senator understood what compassion one and. That's the secret also of words. That's why like having done. This book is a dictionary because why words have power words of energy on their own and it's nice to meditate on a word and the and the meaning of a word can change according to where you are in life and it's interesting and is also my mother didn't want me to use words not right like if i would say it's divine jr. So what do you mean divide. What does that mean you know. She made sure always that. I use the proper words when you when you say that words can change. i. I know what you mean. It's a very intimate. Trust that depending on what you're going through or what you've learned a word when you are being clear about its definition can mean different things to your affect you differently. I'm at i'm so curious. It has power worse. Yes i mean very much. You know you use words you have to be very careful like people say oh I died for it. I no known. Say dan i mean. Do you mean you dive long. I mean words have power. Words have energies like intention. The most important thing to focus on his intention. I used to do taichi and mai taichi master taught me at some. Were doing exercise. And he said intention focus on the intention and as it were we explain this more and he explained to me that if you focus on energy you stagnate if you focus on power you get hurt but if you focus on you get the energy and the pow. that's beautiful. So how did those lessons affect you in when you say that you really zeroed in on what compassion moment when you went through your bout with cancer. How how did that all relate. I mean it as very often with feelings described. The you read when i rode compassion. Oh it's a long one anyway. I only learn about the meaning of the word compassion. After i was diagnosed with cancer at age forty seven until then live had been a marathon. I remember the waiting rooms. The fearful is the. I understood the suffering of others while refusing mine reaching for my own strings owning it. My sweetman was of daily radiation. Although the treatment itself only took a few minutes there was always a long wait. The wade became an opportunity for routine to find a book to read. Only there something that helped me together. I picked the story of a grandmother. Mother and daughter three generations of swinging chinese women who suffered and survived extraordinary difficult condition from bounded fee to cultural revolution. I finished reading the book. Exactly as i completed my treatment by that time i understood compassion. Compassion is an emotion but also a muscle that gets trained and developed. It is a practice that adds a fuller dimension to identify with others and they're suffering as well as our own. So what was your intention when you're going through treatment. Oh to kill the bad sends. I had invented the little song and i would walk to the hospital and i would sing this song to kill the bad says so that the never come back again that that was that was minded and i think about it in terms of what your taichi master said to and the idea that if you focus on the intention you get the energy you get the power incredible. It's in the book by the way under the letter intention so you can go back to it. i'm gonna read you. One more provocative. Because i really liken provocative is one of my favorite words. I love the sound of it. It tickles. It's a combination of question and affirmation. Nothing is more provocative than speaking the truth and revealing imperfections. The provocative part gets the attention. But the truth gets respect. When i first started my company in my early twenties. I did a lot of personal appearances. All around the country and lay philadelphia. Detroit miami san francisco. It was also new and exotic to me a young european park avenue princess coming to town to show her easy affordable. Little dresses is high was introduced by the local press everywhere. I did not love the definition. That's when i decided to be a bit more provocative in my narrative to show that i was not perfect. The words became mine and story. No longer affair beautiful and there is really something to remember that you have the power and permission to define yourself to not settle for anyone else's definition of you that that is provocative and it is powerful. Exactly power is important to remember. Forget about the permission. You don't need any more information. I said i said last year having a conversation with a another person. Who's become a good friend on the podcasts. I said look. You have to write your permission slips. That's what that's what. But i mean. The word permission is like it's it's funny as a word. I never the us yeah. I'm not surprised by that. I love it you. You remind us all to move away from needing permission even from ourselves and i like that. Yeah just own it on your own but you do you do severe. You do thank you diane. You own it and but you know again. Here's an example. Doesn't mean that you know because you own what you do and you are the woman you want to be doesn't mean that you don't have compassion for others. I asked you how you wear and you're well but the first thing you talked about was all the people why not well you own who you are but you. That doesn't take away that you have the compassion and you want the designed to have the ones that don't i agree i i feel very similarly to you. I think it's a duty and a responsibility and it's a privilege. It is a privilege to be able to serve others. And i mean it's total primin. Doja attention that's another one that i love love. Love love it once. We pay attention to details and two others. Our lives become richer. It is like adding colors. Were drawing turning into a painting a walking into a forest. Some people will see trees others. Our universe and paying attention to people is a you. Secret is a use secret. And it's a key to open so many thing when you when you talk about owning it and and you mention the lists you like to make any. You made a list of words for this book and you make less on your birthday on new year's eve you speak about the list you make for the brand and and at the beginning of our conversation. You mentioned that you are rian visiting it. Which fuels wild to me as as it so iconic and successful. Yes but you know you have. I was very successful. And then i sold the company and then twenty years ago i started again. The brand was in the worst place. I started a game and it went six. I mean you know you have twenty. Years is generation and i had management who over expanded wanted to be too big and he wasn't ride so i had to rescaling and go back to the core because i had offers people want to buy it and i realized what the assets they wanted to buy them one by the name they wanted by the library of prince they wanted to buy the the iconic silhouettes my archives in all of that and i thought ooh that's true that is very valuable so i'm putting it all together and i have very young team and to see how they it and how dane chartered. It is very very exciting and then also we live in a different world. it's the world of a virtual. You know i mean we also virtual and i love the virtual. I love my phone. I love my ipad. It gives me access to everything and everyone is a different world. So it's very exciting because it's like an old brand but it's gonna be a new starter and when you look through your archives which by the way when we're all allowed to see each other again i i'm desperate to get in there and see all of your friends and patterns when you look through those things how does it feel. Does it evoke memories de remember. When the wrap dress. I came out and started. All of this yes yes. Of course i remember all the prints. I remember of course of and also i ride my diary and i've always kept a visual diary with photographs. And what is amazing. Is how consistent the girl who runs the archive. She sent me an article of when i was twenty five and i'm talking essay exactly the same thing that i said. Now i mean it's insane so it's fun. What year was it that the rap i came out seventy four. Wow and as you are reimagining do you feel like you will continue to use that silhouette. Yes i mean. That's a silhouette that so classic for sure. Bush him but you have different interpretation. You know last year and now a word from our sponsors that i really enjoy and i think you too. It can be so hard to find skin care products that are made with clean and safe ingredients after all what goes on. Your skin is just as important to your overall. Health has what you eat. That's why i'm thrilled to tell you about my friends at osea. It's not only good for your wellness. It's good for the planet's wellness to down to the sustainable packaging that they use. I started using sia products about a decade ago. Because i was lucky enough to meet their co founder melissa at a dinner here in la. And i love the story of their brand. Melissa and her mom make osea right here locally with the environment in mind my very very very favorite thing that they make is there in doria algae body oil. I have super sensitive skin and la is actually incredibly dry like all the time. Y'all it's the desert and this body oil has saved me. it keeps my skin moisturised and feeling healthy. I just love the way it feels. Smells and abc's under algae body oil instantly moisturizes and replenishes dry skin. Trust me i know. It leaves every single inch silky smooth. I love it and you can feel good about using it as well. Because his skin and body care products used responsibly. Sourced plant derived ingredients and they are vegan and cruelty free. You can try it. Risk free for thirty days and get free shipping on any orders over fifty dollars. They even send free samples with every order. Get ten percent off your first order with promo code. Wip at oca. Malibu dot com pets ten percent off with code. Wip at the malibu o. s. e. a. Malibu m. a. l. dot com today. I'm curious to when when you think about the industry you know between seventy four and now are there things you've noticed about the way that it has changed the way that social media has changed it. What do you really see as those big markers in the industry. What has changed of course internet and buying online and all of that and social media. Yeah it has changed everything but the essence of what you say and the essence of a woman you know. Dv f is about the woman. I ride woman before fashion. So i talk about body language eye contact and body language. When i first started with my little dresses other designers would look and say what special. Wh what are those stupid little dresses. Well they may have looked like that on the hanger but when the woman wooded on all of a sudden her body language came up. And that's what i know how to do is very simple. Close very simple but somehow shave the way all these old fashioned dress making tricks. Make your body look good. Look this is a newspaper that somebody's send me. And this is. I don't in the seventies and this is what i wrote. Self discovery is a frightening journey the process of growth of becoming independent learning. Who you are and what you want from life is the real secret of life happiness and beauty so you know i was saying the same thing and it strikes me that data is the essence that you put into your clothes yet for women. Yes because you as you say you make clothes for us to where not closed that wear us. That's right and is the woman is how you move. I always say how you that on or how you do that. That's what the difference between men design Once said to me men design to make us you. Women design a make clothes. I say what you mean. He said well look at for example jersey. Right jersey fab. Rink noman designer. You can get excited with jersey. You know you get excited with satin but women designer. Whether it's coco chanel. Donna karen norm. I can malley madame. All of the women designers they love jersey. Why because they know how it feels so when you think about feeling and you think about the body language you wanna give someone permission to exude. How do you come up with your designs. Do you design for yourself. And then imagine other women in the clothes. I designed for the woman in charm. That woman who is busy who she's on the go. I want her to be six sexy free on the go and i wanna give her clothes. That are the best friend in a closet. Things that she can wear up or down she could dress it up with piece of jewelry with i-it's and we're dumb it's on about making your lives easier and making you several butte and that energy the energy of giving ease and confidence strikes me as also supporting our work and when we talk about women in the workplace female leaders entrepreneurs about all the work you've done with vital voices. Can you tell our listeners about the organization and how it works yes of course of course so virgin. Voices is the most efficient most wonderful global network of women's leader in twenty five years ago. They was the first global meeting of women's leader in beijing and he clinton was first lady and she went to it and that's when she said women's ride our human rights and and when she came out of there she looked at her chief of staff minerva and she said we cannot let this fall down like it because it was so exciting like a souffle and so they started the organization at first. It was governmental and now it's independent and it is amazing. I mean the women that i have met and when we talk about women's leaders they're not you know leader of countries as as women were leaders in the market or things like that but they did things and they made things they create this incredible network and we train them and we help them when we and it's a fantastic organization and i've been on the board for a long long time now and because of high you know that is also what inspired me to create the deviants awards. Which are i gave awards to five women of a year and i give them money and explosions and they are incredible women. They're women who had the strength to find the courage to survive and the leadership to inspire. And you're the director of the diller von furstenberg family foundation and you support so many wheel yet we we are all together. Yes we're equal. Yeah and i. I love that not only. Are you giving these grants to women. But you're you're providing support to nonprofit organizations in areas of community building education human rights our health environment. I mean you're doing so much incredible work. We do the best weekend we should do more but to leave an impact. I mean if you're lucky that you have a voice that you have an ability to give people exposure you have the resources. It's an obligation a duty. But it's also an amazing privilege. Well one of the things. I always think about in terms of your impact when i'm in new york And walking along the hi line is the fact that you helped to bring that into existence through the foundation. I do. I did yes. I have to say that. We're definitely responsible for the high line. And now we're launching. We're opening the little island. Which is the park. Fifty five yes. It is true that that definitely exists. I mean the last thing that Digital yanni did as the man is that. He signed the destruction of the highland and we had to revert for for anyone. Who's listening at home. Who hasn't been to new yorker may not know what the highlight is can you. Can you tell the listeners about it. Yes so the high line is this elevated railroad. That went from johns vote. All the way to javid santa and it was for the meatpacking. That's how they transported the meat and it was a railroad and it was abandoned and all the real estate people wanted it to be destroyed so that they could use the real estate for their buildings. And when i started the company again twenty years ago i moved to the neighborhood. And when you move to a neighborhood you meet people. And i met these two young guys and they had this dream of taking the high nine and turning into a park and i because i had a big studio use my studio to give their first fundraiser and then from there on i was very committed. We ended up being the largest contributor for the high nine and it is not a park and it is number one if you can believe it's a number one tour. Is this danish. It's incredible i mean the the landscaping the plants. The art the view of the buildings. It's really one of my favorite places to walk in new york. So thank you. Thank you. And i'm curious because you you and your husband in the foundation that you run together as you mentioned you're such a partnership and i think it takes quite a phenomenal man to be a partner to and be in all of a woman who's in charge. How the two of you created such healthy partnership and been able to influence each other in love and in work. I deny t. I always say that he gets all of the credit. But maybe i should get some to. And it's not just my husband and i but it's also our children and grandchildren. I was always afraid. I never wanted to be too strong of a mother and a mother that powered her children so i always made sure that my children had plenty of space to talk and clearly. They didn't and they do so every decisions we make we make it as a family and it's it's fun. It's really fun. Even number one of my granddaughters it was an art camps that she went all her life and she loves that chem. And i don't know why i used to say one day. You will own that camp and the camp was in difficulty and she has for the foundation to buy the cam so now. The foundation owns the camp. And so that underprivileged genuine can also go to that art can and so even though she's only twenty she's actually running it obviously your family's very inspiring to you. I'm i'm curious. Who else in your life inspires you whether it's authors or other women in your field or or people you've come to know through your foundation. I don't know. I'm here in looking at my table and the books that i have. I just read a biography of warm disney and am not reading one on mother. Teresa you know those people that inspire me. I mean this so many people who inspire me so many people who are interesting and by the way sometimes. It's not even you know. They're not that well known. Sometimes i read an article and and then that contact this person. I love my new friends. I love my friends that i made on the internet. I've made yeah. I you can have intimate relationship with his people. I have to thank you for one of the people who inspires me most. Who's become one of my closest friends a few years ago during your women's week event at the store in new york i interviewed a woman named yana elizabeth johnson. She's incredible marine biologists and climate scientists. For those of you listening at home. She joined me on the podcast in our first season and i am just in awe of her ability to translate complex science and motivation for protecting the planet to everyone she speaks to and we had this. Phenomenal conversation during the panel. That day. we've stayed. We've stayed the closest friends. We've just had a ball for. That's what i call the chain of love. Yeah yeah it really. It feels like that you've created by many many changes. I love it when you think about the kinds of events that you're used to throwing gatherings like that incredible panels on everything from fashion to climate politics. And now you're releasing this fabulous book but we are still dealing with a pandemic. Do you plan on having a book tour. Will you do something. Virtually or will i am now. I mean this is my second week of my book tour. And i don't stop and i'm not going anywhere so i mean you know that's why i say the look the great size of technology. Of course we will go back to me and talk and and all of that but dependent make has accelerated us into the virtual world in the most unbelievable way in a year. Yeah it's very incredible. I think about people dealing with the last pandemic in nineteen eighteen. And i think how much harder it would be. Because you couldn't do this. You couldn't see the faces of your friends and family. And i mean i guess you'd have the letters because you know you're writing snail mail so you'd have the souvenirs to reread. But i'm very grateful that we have the ability for action during all of this I'm curious as you talk about this moment in life and we are working from home and everything's changing. What would you say is your favorite piece of clothing in your closet. Now for this moment you know for me knows. They have to be reassuring. I'm very faithful to the close to my style to all of that. So he's always the same. Always the white cotton indian shirts. I sleep in you. Know or my favorite sweater or my pajama pants. That i wear all the time. I mean these also you know beautiful and that's why i think that's strangely enough the close my clothes relevant again because there's just great pieces that you could wear with a sweater up down with boots. Oh with flippers. So yeah things that create a kind of uniform and make because it's not so much uniform as much as it's your personality again. I go back to forgive you for me is the woman i what i want people to remember. Is you that you have and so. If you feel confident you look so my job is to make you closed that you will feel comfortable in and love that my favorite question to ask everyone who comes on the show is what would you say in your life. Feels like a work in progress right now. Life life life is working says absolutely the secret to live is owning it and that is the best advice i can give anyone and also that you know the most important relationship is the one you have with yourself. All of this is all the same thing. It's about owning only in love the well thank you for your friendship and thing that you show up in the world for so many of us. It's a real pleasure to listen to you to talk to you and and continue to do the wonderful wonderful wonderful work that you do. God bless you thank you earn.

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