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Will the Best Atypical Stand Up?

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:00 min | 3 d ago

Will the Best Atypical Stand Up?

"We have four Atypical Working Bipolar Depression Corinne Rey lar- larizza Don the Tuta Olonga. WALKS TEEN COMBINATION SYMBIOTIC CER- will call it. Oh, FCC, an top Ian Circle. Among them only Oh, FCC is supposed to be used with an antidepressant. That's the only way they gotta landscaping to work in the clinical trials, the other three work on their own for bipolar depression. And, what about the rest of the class? If you're thinking that the other atypical is probably work because these four do your betting on hope two of them era peppers, all and the president were tested in bipolar depression and failed. The others are untested. If we have to rest our hope on one, maybe it's a seraphine staffers. Osama. Pain has never been studied for acute bipolar depression, but it does have good evidence to prevent depressive episodes in bipolar disorder while the other eight typicals outside of the. FDA approved for that I. Just mentioned, do not. So that foot works, but how well do they work Leslie? Trauma and colleagues looked into that question with the likelihood to be helped or harm ratio, which tells us which Med has the best ratio of COSC- and tolerability. It's based on the more familiar number needed to treat the number needed to harm. Here's what they found Larussa. Don La. Tuta rose to the top in nearly every category. The, categories were based on different side effects. When we're talking about ethics, we were talking about one thing treating depression, but side effects are many, so they measured the likelihood to be helped or harm in several categories of side effects, weight gain, extra parameters, symptoms, fatigue, academia, and nausea as well as dropout dude at any adverse effect, which might be the most important of the bunch. I should note here that the study was sponsored by Sylvian, the maker of Larizza Don, but I have reviewed the data in other less biased sources and agree with the general consensus. They're Larizza Don is one of the better tolerated and psychotics, and with the number needed to treat of five. It stands comfortably alongside OFC and Qu Taya Pain. Those two are high on C., but they're lower on tolerability. Zipping Fox teen combination was actually a close second to Loretta Don in most categories except weight gain. Quantify opinion on the other hand sank to the bottom and most of the categories, although Kotite, typing ranks for both short and long term efficacy in bipolar depression and mania. It's also the typical that patients are most likely to quit in the short term and it side effects like fatigue and hypertension or often the reason. What about the newest on the block curric- present very lar- it's basically the less effective cousin Laura Zone, the to have never gone head to head, but careens number needed to treat indicate. It's about half as effective as Laura Zone. It does have two advantages. However, it works in Mania, which Larizza Don is not been tested in, and it's among the most tolerable of the atypical anti psychotics. Laura Zone as I said does not have any studies in mania, but it did work for mixed states and a new poster presentation, also sponsored by the industry brought some reassurance to those of us who worry that it may make mania worse like so many other anti-depressant therapies do. They re analyze Larizza domes main clinical trials again. None of these were done in mania, but they looked at manic symptoms and found that they did tend to improve with Larizza don and did not get worse.

Larizza Don Bipolar Depression Larussa Depression FCC Don La Laura Zone Tuta Olonga Corinne Rey Tuta Pain Ian Circle Taya Pain Osama President Trump FDA Leslie Nausea Sylvian MED
Ellen and Yvette In Lockdown

Mentally Yours

05:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Ellen and Yvette In Lockdown

"Hey if it's been like a long time since you've just had like just one on one chat. Offset. Bits of the country and. Fire laptops and things. It's really strange, isn't it? We thought would dip in different episodes this week because we didn't have an expert on talking about you know the bigger picture. How people being affected across the country? If they have mental health issues during the pandemic we thought well. Why don't we talk about how we've been affected? Just so that people consider I. Guess get like a first person kind of. Account, because as I feel like a ban on this by about constantly, but you know I've got bipolar disorder and you've got the. Seating his. Fun But. It's nice to like maybe this hour. Bet as well and say you know when not experts here's how we're doing. How you guys doing is all. Like come chat. Please do as well because obviously. This is just a punk cost between two people right now, but like talk to us on twitter facebook again definitely. Correct! Yeah, so affects great, which is mentally ill, also mentally Juarez's the twitter. Absolutely I feel that. Give out advice about. We'll stick to routine and do some exercise, but like. Is Hard radio sniff. I mean white sticking tour routine. Because I. Know I would have done though is off to speaking to all these experts said constantly. How good routine is fuel mental health I have Rishon out my routine and on Sundays. Yeah, it isn't. It isn't 'cause, but the thing is like most days I managed to stick to it, and then I feel like a loser because I haven't done it, so the thing is the moment like my sleep is very bad, so even had a sleep expert on gave his tips it still like. It hasn't managed to stop me from I. Wake Radio early now, so my routine. It's like get up at seven o'clock but. My. But I'm actually waking up like three am. Four am five am. And really full of adrenaline Sir I. Don't feel I can go back to sleep at that point. So you get open. Do stuff or do you just stay in bed? He has an. Varies an I it something I really am trying to keep an eye on and keep track of because. Some days I wake up without of energy I'll be really creative rows of style for like writer. The song like. I'll just at one point Nephew's birthday and I made minimum. A. Birthday, cake and a list and very helpful, but at the same time Hossam is just dislike I. Really need to be careful because the fight. What I'm describing is like. the the initial phases of potentially a hyper manic episode. So so all this creativity is great, but possibly is always thinking I. Really need to translate down. So what I do is already do one thing at a time, so even if I woken up at the a goal is ideas I'll be like well or so I'm Gonna I'm going to. Write, this thing I'm I'm going to do this of cleaning. I'M GONNA. Do but what can happen, is I want to do lots of stuff in between like I'll start doing the washing up. Then I'll start doing something, but what? I'll try to slow down as like. I'll do the washing up and finish it, and then all right some hurt tree, and finish them or like is is a bit. Crazy. You? You were going into hyper mania. What would? What would you do like? Are you able to kind of okay? This is what I need to do or is it I need kind of emergency urgent. Help at this point well, I mean the things like hyper menu mania. That's the thing like I'm not I'm not actually even that. Maybe. I'm maybe not even that worried about high mania because menu was manulife manual. When I've had it before is actually losing touch with the vanisi psychosis oldest gagged and stuff where you could potentially sections. Mania is things like to me is like spending lots of money impulsively being creative. Big Very talkative like so Yeah, it's not ideal, and in terms of I mean to want to question in terms of like how how do I deal with that I mean? The things I've escaped like trying to slow down. Do One thing at a time I mean I have friends in my my mom said of checking checking off mate, not like in a way that they really ever talk about disorder, but they are regularly checking. Who May which is useful? Because if I stopped telling them that I think I can fly or something. They'll. Hopefully they'll nice young hopefully. Things I mean like my mom's sort of been through this with me before like so she. She knows like in my voice. On Hammond Speaking Mike where I am pretty much emotionally and I've identified you. I've been supreme much through all through the pandemic anyway like I've had at the moment I'm going to high, but in the post of being a bit of depression.

Twitter Manulife Hossam Bipolar Disorder Manic Episode Juarez Writer Facebook Hammond Mike
The dangerous use of off label prescribing in times of a pandemic

Second Opinion

03:45 min | Last month

The dangerous use of off label prescribing in times of a pandemic

"FDA requires prescription drugs to go through rigorous testing for both safety and efficacy as a result only a small number of drugs that are developed are ever approved for use and then only for narrow indications so take for example. A drug called Gabba Penton. It was approved in the early nineteen nineties as an anti seizure medicine but it didn't work very well. So experts began to promote it for use to treat all sorts of other conditions including pain bipolar disorder attention deficit disorder restless leg syndrome and Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome. It has not been approved for any of these reasons but doctors prescribe the drug heavily and Gabba. Penton is not the only example even if there is no proof and the FDA has not approved drug for a specific condition doctors can still prescribe it because here in the United States doctors are allowed to prescribe drugs off label in other words for reasons completely different than what they were intended for or for what. They were tested to treat. It stands to reason that Dr should only prescribe pills to treat conditions for which there is good evidence of effectiveness but that is not the case in the United States. These off label prescriptions account for one out of every five prescriptions. That means that twenty percent of all drug prescriptions are for conditions for which the drug was not approved so when the president tells us that despite warnings from the FDA. He's taking the Anti Malaria. Drug Hydroxy cleric win as prevention for COVID nineteen. It raises all kinds of red flags. Currently there is no. Fda approved drug to treat or prevent covid moreover several studies. Most recently in Jama have shown that hydroxy chloroquine has been shown to be in effective intriguing covid in effective. So how wide why? The president's doctor prescribed this drug went. Experts advise against taking the drug will because it was being prescribed off label for a non approved condition and the same is true for thousands of doctors who prescribed this drug for themselves for their families or for patients on the advice of a real estate developer. Who HAPPENS TO BE THE PRESIDENT? I suspect the public thought that the president knew something that the rest of us didn't inside information. Well IT TURNS OUT. He didn't the rest of US. Were reading the medical research and new. The drug was a very little use to those with. Covert the use of off label. Drugs drives up the cost of healthcare and exposes patients to unnecessary risks. Uncertain outcomes. Hydroxy chloroquine can cause abnormal heart rhythms and dangerous rapid heart rates. So doctors who've written these prescriptions without any scientific basis. Now have a moral duty to reach out and inform patients about the risk of medical treatment with hydroxy chloroquine and the lack of any benefit. And we need to rethink the policy of allowing doctors to write prescriptions for drugs that lack any proof of benefit at a very minimum. We should require doctors to inform their patients that they are being prescribed drug that has not been proven effective for their

FDA President Trump Gabba Penton United States Chloroquine Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome Covid Malaria Jama
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

10:14 min | Last month

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"I had my tubes tied when I was young. When I got sterilized. Every doctor said you know you might regret this someday but I was twenty two if I had walked into a doctor's office pregnant at twenty two and said Hey you're I am I'm pregnant. I'm GONNA have this baby. No one who said to me you know you might regret that some day and you know at least. That's almost as bad as a doctor telling me. Haitian have children. Because you're bipolar and I mean that can I can see that now. I can see how that would be you again when you decide. Yes I will have. Children people accept that. That's no problem. That is not a decision that needs explained. But if you say yes I am not going to have children. Well my personal favorite misogyny. You know you're not married right now. Someday might need a man and he might WanNa have children but again. If I showed up pregnant no one would have said to me. Well you know Sunday. We might need a man and he won't want to have children and he won't want to raise another man's baby so you should really consider that. Continue this pregnancy. No one would have said that are way off topic this. You're telling me that you think the standard in America is that people will try to get you to abort your child exactly. That's my point. No one will ever encourage you not to have Chil- okay. People will always encourage you to have children and if you make the conscious decision to not have children people second guess it like. There's no tomorrow so so hang on our at home. Of course we're talking about this in the context of the mental illness. So it's a little. Let me. Let me flip this a little bit just so we don't get too far off track here because I understand everything that you're saying what you're basically saying t to sum it up. Lisa is that strangers and society feel that they have a say in your reproductive traces. Whether or not you're chill out how children how you raise children and so we all know that that's thing let's just establish that as a hard fact my question is why are they considering your mental illness. My question here is as you said I agree with you. That society wants everybody to have children know until you know green with you. Why are you trying to? He's not exactly what I'm trying to say. That is what you think. And you're right. Society wants everybody to have children your right. Why dreading there is this Asterik. Which is the thing that we're discussing right now. Which is that as a young woman who was childless. There's a lot of pressure to have kids but here she is saying. Hey I want to have kids like Oh unlike every other woman you should not because you're bipolar dynamic at play when you get this idea of I. I was well to be fair. These doctors probably didn't know I was mentally. Ill pushed very hard to not decide to not have to have children. But you're getting opposite message so I think the majority of women very strongly get this message of you should have children so it's kind of interesting that no matter how overbearing society is about this. They are in fact willing to take that step back for women who are mentally ill I get it and you know what though I know of the teacher looking at families and their sometimes. We're just like you know. The people really shouldn't have had children job out after their. Yeah you're like. Oh my gosh and you're going to have to more to make a good point. Anything that is public facing people are going to judge. We just need to point out like I have opinions on everything when I'm driving around. I think of the opinion of that sign the opinion of the the shoes that guy wearing it. Mcdonald's People's orders we are all judgmental crunchers. It's when we take the next step and we feel empowered to share that with strangers when the guy in front of me orders a diet coke that he also wants coffee mixed in. I think to myself that is disgusting. What would it take for me to feel empowered to tap that guy on the shoulder and say what you ordered is disgusting? Everybody would think that I was wrong if I did that. But if that person was deciding to have children and I found out that he had bipolar disorder and then I tapped him on the shoulder. People would like root for me. It'd be like good job. Good job pointing out that. He shouldn't have well. They also have to consider the gave that the message is entirely different for women. Notice that you don't see a lot of people out there saying that men should decide not to have children if they're mentally ill or saying that men need to make these decisions. This is about women and lake the point every time you see something horrible that happens to a kid like stupid example but years ago remember when that poor child fell into the gorilla cage. Yeah first thing everyone said is where was his mother and the the mom and dad were right. There was where was his father. What was his father doing? Why did his father not save him? So this expectation that you can comment on and talk about people's decision or how they raise. Their children is very much about how they mother their children. It's not about what father's alright. So we're we're we're off the rails. We know that society sucks. We know that society is very judgmental. About how people raise their children. We Know Society is very judgmental about whether or not people have children we know that society is very society is very judgmental about how women do that. Yeah she's right. I agree with Lisa one hundred percents and Leitheiser right about the you know it opens back the woman. You're right say well. You shouldn't have children because you're a man and you can pass on that bipolar Jean. That mental mental race. That's absolutely true. No one says that it's just a genetically passed on right if I to or both the same odds right to give a really really hard. Push back on this. I am a man who lives with bipolar disorder and when my wife and I were dating and people found out that she was dating a man with mental illness they did push back on her. They're like you should not marry this man. You should not be with him. You should not have children with him. I'm not sure why we're playing the suffering Olympics. But I know that it's worse for women but I'm telling you as a man I got a lot of Shit and when I dated people broke up with me upon finding that I had bipolar disorder to it's worse for women probably everything's worse for women we all very open your own. Wasn't I had a website coast line? I know that it's worse for women. Lisa I know everything's worse for women but I just don't want to leave men out to pretend that men aren't being discriminated against for living with mental illness. That's that's was an unfair. No that's not what I'm saying every single time I say people you say only women. Do you know anything. No Man has ever been discriminated against. No of course with children. No I think it's important to point out when you say I get a lot of Shit. You have no idea no idea. How much shit is out there? Does that end? I just? I can't help but notice that it doesn't yeah. Nobody should ever be able to get help. Because somebody is always going to be sicker. That's not the point. Then how come when I said about my experience. You interrupted my experience to talk about female experiences. You're saying that my experience has no value because women have it worse. Is that really the message that we want to get out there and I think to where I say unless your mom you don't understand what it is like to have. The same thing can be said with you know. I'm a woman and I know how untreated because of my mental illness. I guess I don't think about how men are treated because I know I'm treated. I never could understand because I'm not in your shoes. But you know that's why we have podcasts and conversations because it helps open open. Everybody buys exactly listen. I don't want to get a bunch of angry letters for people thinking that I think that what I go through and what women go through are the same. Because they're not but I also don't think that what middleclass women go through and what lower class women go through is the same and I certainly don't think that white middle class women and homeless women go through are the same but if Lisa said I need help for my mental illness and and I said well you have no idea what it's like to be mentally. Ill being homeless. Lisa would say that. That doesn't change the fact that I need help right back with Mary work. You know. Well there's always somebody has the worse off than I do. Well it doesn't minimize my pain. That's what I was trying to say says. Center thank you amy. So now to pivot for the Thirty Fifth. Time in this podcast. I do have one last question for mean I think people are gonNA WANNA know how I guess. We can't really say. How did it turn out because your children are still works in progress but the first thing people are going to ask is? Do Your kids have mental illness? Is your son mentally ill but I realize he's a little young for that question. Not Necessarily I started my journey at fourteen. I mean that's the whole genetic thing you know my by for example with my brothers my brothers have children too and I know when some of them have had their children in therapy they don't bring up the fact that oh by the way their aunt is by cooler because they don't want their child to be labeled really yeah they're scared to death and it gives me chills because I've always been open about my mental on. It's not something that I'm ashamed of. And it's not that they're shamed of. It is just something. I think that we're all afraid of because it's not easy. Living a life thing mentally ill if a challenge is not impossible but it is a challenge and. I know that's one of the things that my husband and I go round with at fifteen. My son is so stinking moody and he's never been worse I think. Oh my God. Is he going to be bipolar? I mean that's scares me to death and I don't see knock on wood. I don't see any signs in him that I saw in myself but it is definitely something that was at the front of everything that I do but again you know. I'm reminded by good friends. Say Hey my fourteen. Fifteen year olds being moody in Boise. Show from what my girlfriend have grows and then my girlfriends that have boys you know it very different how they deal with stress..

Lisa America Chil Asterik Olympics Mcdonald Thirty Fifth Boise Jean Leitheiser Mary
What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:35 min | Last month

What Cocaine Tells Us About Depression

"Today on sixty seconds side. What cocaine tells us about? Depression come starts now in this study in Cardoso and colleagues followed five hundred eighty five patients who appeared to have Yuna polar depression on the mini structured interview when they followed them up later after an average of years twelve percent had converted to bipolar disorder. The risk of conversion bipolar was three and a half times higher in those with a lifetime. History of cocaine use although they were careful to ensure that these new bipolar patients had mainly as our hypo mania during times of sobriety they admit that cocaine can cause persistent changes in the brain. That may mimic mania even during abstinence. The results are in line with prior studies. Which have found that even after rigorous testing every year one in twenty five people with depression convert the bipolar. The same rate they came up with and that substance abuse increases the risk for example. There's a large epidemiologic study where Jules xts and his colleagues found that co Morbidity Between Depression and Substance Use disorders was entirely explained by mixed features whether those mixed features occurred as part of full bipolar or a bipolar spectrum disorder like the Dsm five depression with mixed features people with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. More likely to present in a mixed state and more likely to respond to anti convulsants or atypical. Antipsychotic Stendhal

Bipolar Disorder Depression Cocaine Jules Xts Stendhal Yuna Cardoso
Helping Others During Lockdown

Mentally Yours

09:09 min | 2 months ago

Helping Others During Lockdown

"Save welcome to mentally oils. Thank you thank you for having me event. Thanks for coming on. So you're wanted with the Samaritans held on if you've been working with them actually not long about two years. I started doing it when I start work and I'd worked in a very busy high pressure job. That really left no room for anything else and when I stopped doing it uh suddenly thought I really would like to investigate Samaritans And it was thought that just came out of a clear. Blue skied at know. Why but it did I discovered that was a branch quite near me and I went to the information evening. I was really impressed with what I saw. And Went straight into the training and at all it all the way through. I was thinking if I feel this is quite right. You know just stop. It's fine but I never once felt it wasn't quite right and I've never felt wasn't right since And I look forward to shifts at Shelly. I find them really interesting and ment- mentally you know mentally stimulating and So I have no regrets about about volunteering tool. I think it's incredible. What am on the podcast. We always refer people to some of the end just because some people might have been Things come up if speaking about difficult issues and it's it's really fantastic to know that the Samaritans that just to listen in to have chats what sort of things that you deal with On a daily basis in terms of chatting to people oh my goodness Coolest issues are like snowflakes. There are two that are the same Era kind of broad categories that they can fall into such as `isolation loneliness mental health issues. Physical Health Issues Worries about work will finance family could be violence or abuse or things Those are very broad categories and when you to king to Kula it's completely incredible unit. You Cou- you couldn't you couldn't make up what some people have to go through And everyone everyone is different before Marson. I went to newspapers. And I thought I'd seen and heard do. But I realized when I when I became a smash in that hadn't even scratched the surface of what goes on in people's lives on a day to day basis. It's been very illuminating. Have you seen things change during the epidemic? Because I'm sure this Martin's being inundated during the stressful time interesting. We'll always inundated to be perfectly honest Shift and you take a cool and he put the phone down and immediately rings again. This just never any less up the calls. Just keep coming through and it's the same now And we have had a category added to the categories that we deal with one being covered. How the in my own experience of doing shifts through the lockdown I haven't had any cools specifically about Kovin. And when I think about it. I think that possibly mental health when it comes to mental health. It's a little bit like physical health. So people who have mentioned Cova to me have also go other issues. So it's a bit like you have underlying issues and then code and the challenges of coded Sorta the exacerbate these issues as it has done with physical health unit so the people who were suffering most with covert was the people who had underlying issues. And that for me. in the cools. I've taken has been the case. That people have got issues going on in their lives. May they may be prone to depression. They may be feeling very lonely. Anau lockdown has sort of those issues into much sharper focus. I haven't had anyone cool specifically about vid frightened of that actual many peop- law I think a lot of people to listening to the Picasso's probably relate to that because just vanik totally sort of from friends and even family who have sort of long-term half the she's Winstons if you sort of have anxiety General anxiety disorder that sort of become west because of to defensive in my case bipolar disorder in. They've been issues in terms of getting medication. Because of Kovic so it is also give lots of things become west sort of people yes I admit rishton about the unnaturally People with mental health issues and depending on how acute those mental health issues all often have quite a good comprehensive support cap package in place with the NHS and because of social distancing and because of not being able to see people face to face the many people with mental health issues. That support system has evaporated actually during lockdown. And we do. We do see people calling us because they can't any longer speak to that key worker. Will that support worker And Yeah I think I think it's. It's very difficult for people in that situation. Because the the package they used to be able to rely on. Isn't there the same thing happens a bit Christmas and Times like that holidays? People are away and doing other things. And it's a bit like that with lockdown some Jim Peas and mental health. Wise are offering example. Counseling defy laptops obsessions over the phone. I think it's probably pros and cons. Who Different people? I think some people find that helpful. Princeton's if you're depressed you might find easy to just sort of pick up the phone chat someone not she go into a surgery but then as he signed for a lot of people. If you're used to seeing the same pass in face to face it can be quite difficult to get used as a new way of talking to them or if together. I think doing what they can where they can. I think I think doing an incredible job. But it's inevitably gained be a bit patchy and maybe you'll key worker has to a self isolated is an can't be there for you I also had another cooler. He couldn't go to church for her. Church was a vital part of her of her weekly routine really was a point where she saw to touch base every week with the community that went to Sch- and suddenly that was taken from her and that was very hard So yeah it's it's people are finding that that regular support system has been taken away and therefore it leaves you feeling very on anchored and bit A little bit out of balance and I think there's no question that lockdowns been huge adjustment for all of us in. Its massive. What what has happened? In the last few weeks countries come to a standstill lutts huge. And you can't pretend it's no huge. It will have an impact on all of us to one degree or another. You know someone must have more resilient than others But you know being less. Resilient is not a sign of failure it is just the person you are and you may need some support and certainly smartened serve to support anybody. Who is struggling through this time?

Samaritans General Anxiety Disorder Kovin Marson Cova Martin Jim Peas Kovic Princeton NHS
No work and no stimulus checks for undocumented family in U.S.

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:40 min | 2 months ago

No work and no stimulus checks for undocumented family in U.S.

"We are storming hill who's head of the Montgomery county crisis center about the calls they've been fielding what we are seeing are people who are in acute mental health situations and very serious domestic violence situations our calls and walk ins overall have been down but who we are seeing are in severe need of our assistance we're also for example getting lots of calls for people who are extremely anxious overwhelmed by the state of their life due to the pandemic for example we have people calling looking for help who were those day laborers you know had jobs in the restaurant industry who are not eligible for government services who are now unable to find food don't have money to pay their rents concerned about how they're going to get their medications any kind of specific stories or examples say so and so told me this or this person told me that about their situation we have a family who contacted us where the mother cannot work in his quarantine in the home in her room four cove in nineteen positive symptoms in the rest of the family are undocumented therefore are out of work they cannot apply for food stamps they cannot get a stimulus check and they were very much you know crying overwhelmed the banking for help because they need to not only feed themselves but get medications and things like that you know Tylenol for their mother who's very ill another example of a gentleman who lives with his elderly mother he is uninsured and suffers for bipolar disorder he has been off his medication and for from his self report was functioning well doing okay but this pandemic losing his job sitting in the house all day has really kind of leads to his decline in his mental health and functioning so when he called seeking assistance we you know we asked him to come in and we were able to see him and get him to our traditional psychiatry appointment to start the medications for him what's the advice you have for people going through what they're going through right now concerning tough times any kind of advice for them even for myself what I found is finding something to do that has nothing to do with your work your family or the news really like listening to music taking a walk reading word puzzles something that can just break

Bipolar Disorder Montgomery County
Demi Lovato Spills Tea on Friendship With Selena Gomez

Daily Pop

07:58 min | 2 months ago

Demi Lovato Spills Tea on Friendship With Selena Gomez

"Abbado is spilling the T. On her celebrity friends who okay Demi is on the cover of Harper's bizarre and she talks about is the main issue as she talks about. She's no longer friends with Selena Gomez she does say that she loves the supportive friendship that she shares with Ariana Guerande. Let's start with the start with this. Okay so she says to women who are in competitive industry. The whole world seems that they wanted women against each other. So it'd be so easy to do that so she loves that Arianna in her. Have this great friendship. And there's not any kind of competition there as she talks about how she really really valued finding good girlfriends industry because she has such a hard time doing that Do you think it's hard to find friends within the same industry your end? I think it depends on how young you are. When you get into the industry I think a lot of times when girls come up together in any industry at some point the level of immaturity in the things that you go through in life will tear you apart that I got into this industry later on in life so the friendships I have. I don't see as competition. I see more as a guiding light. Like for me Scott Evans. Who's also you know? A young black man on this type of show is Kinda Sorta my guiding light in this whole thing and had we started off younger had been going through the trenches together in our early twenties. Maybe that wouldn't be the same. Yeah you know. I haven't done this for quite a while and I do know what you're saying and I do think it's changed. I think when I was younger I do think there was a lot more competitive and it was never outspoken. Typical High School Bullshit. You know where it's like. Oh well Carissa is is doing that. I could be doing that. I'm better than her. You know things like that that would be unsteadily said behind my back and I'd hear about it was like high school gossip stuff you know and then you did you got to an age where you realize. There's room for everyone right and the better. What does honestly lift everybody up so but it takes a long time to get to that point and I don't know that any some people don't get to that point I think especially in. This is not demis industry or our industry but I think reality stars have a hard time with s because they all think that they have the most interesting lives and that they have the best stories and that's why they do make a reality stars because they have this competitive edge with each other that it's really hard for them to be supportive in cheer the others. Don't you think I think when you start a reality show early on and again at the younger age I'm going to go at it? Behooves you have drama with somebody to have that competition. I think what producers trying to do. Is they try to say this. Is Anyone show? Whoever comes up and shines the most will be the queen. Bee of the show are the king of the show. So I think that's how they set this whole I think the same thing happened with Demi Levato and would selena Gomez there were people in their ears backing fort being. You're the next big thing. You're the next big thing so you automatically became competition. But it's so odd to me that now that these girls are in a more mature age. They've gone through stuff in life. I can't believe they haven't turned around and said while we are obviously more related than we know. We're both going through different things. We've both are struggling with our mental health. Maybe let's go back to those to those moments when we were kids in talk about the things that we went through and talked about how our mental health that was undiagnosed at the time and untreated might have played A. Yeah absolutely. I think you're right but it's interesting. Because so here's the thing what she said about. Selena Gomez they're basically. She said she had mixed feelings. What's laying posted this message on instagram? After performed on the grammy's because she basically says when you grow up with somebody you're always going to have love for them but I'm not friends with her so it felt that Dadan. She stopped herself I think he was looking for the word disingenuous and I think after your friend goes through something like she went through a matter who you are if we haven't talked in five years and you came out five years later and said that you went through this. You almost died. You went to Rehab. You got you know you brought in for evaluation and I was your friend at any point in my life. I will stop. Pick up the phone and say hey. I just saw your performance. It was moving. I just WanNa let you know that I'm here for you on top of that. I would double down on that if I had been through. Some of the the same things as we heard Selena Gomez open up about her bipolar disorder and about things that she was struggling when there is no better opening. Line to recuperating a friendship like. I know what you've been through. I've been through the same thing before snow. Use the L. That Selena. Maybe didn't take that step detects her personally and the fact that she went out and did it publicly. It almost looked as though this genuine over grill. You got you know somebody who knows somebody who can get in touch `Gabon to get my number for united then connect this belief. I think that sometimes they don't take the proper steps and when I'm sorry if you would oppose that about me on instagram and tried to go that route. I would've been upset. Yeah I talked to. I can't help. But wonder if her becoming closer to scooter. Braun made her rethink what she thinks about Selena. Thank I can only imagine. Scooter has said some stories and know some things about her that we don't know about and she's probably heard them. Maybe I don't know I wonder win. Her mind about a wonder what point it became. Slain is not my friend. I mean I mean the fact that she's going on record in a magazine. Sancti is not my friend I mean to me I feel like most loved would have been like. We don't talk as much as we used to. But you know always love her and you know always support her. Whatever you'd give some sort of vague answer like that but she's like we're not friends at. I think this will happen before. Scooter Braun. Because they haven't been friends in a very very long time and I think if anything I think moving forward scooter. Braun knows that twelve step program in an INS and out the INS and outs of it I think. Scoot Ron has been a part of an has had a hand in getting a lot of his artists on the right track and he knows the steps and he knows that forgiveness is a big step and he knows that making a man's is a big step and sometimes making a men's isn't about saying hey. I'm sorry it's about saying hey I accept that we're not friends anymore but I don't have any blood because my sobriety is important. I DON'T THINK SCOOTER. Braun is going to fire up this engine. I do think though the Taylor swift of it all might have played a part in it because Selena is a huge supporter of Taylor swift and Demi Levato came after Taylor Swift after the scooter. Braun allegations have been made I. I don't think it's a scooter. Braun thing I think it's a quick thing okay. I don't know I just feel like if you already are starting to change your mind about somebody nearly certainly cut them out of life and then you cut them out of your life and then you become closer with people who also don't love this person it just as fueled the fire to be like. Yeah I don't need you in my

Selena Gomez Scooter Braun Selena Demi Levato Taylor Swift Abbado Younger Age Ariana Guerande Arianna Grammy Gabon Harper Scott Evans Carissa RON Dadan Sancti
I Fear My Spouse Will Abandon Me

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

10:20 min | 3 months ago

I Fear My Spouse Will Abandon Me

"Here with my co host Gabe. And of course I'm here with my co host. Jackie and we were talking this morning about something. That's been weighing pretty heavily on your mind and I thought let's make this into an episode because that's our lives so you've been talking a lot about anxiety around the idea of your wife leaving you it. It's true I don't know why she's giving me no reason to think this. I just I wish and another kind of a messed up thing to say but I wish that she gave me a reason to feel this way because then I wouldn't feel so crazy we've been married almost eight years. There's no problems were not in the middle of fight. I just have this gut got visceral strong feeling that the woman's GonNa leave me. Have you had this feeling in your marriage with Kendall or at any past relationships before well? I'm having this feeling in my marriage with Kendall right now no but like previously like. Has this ever happened before no no? It's never happened before with Kendall. It has happened. You know what no no? This is the first time I ever been jealous or had these feelings ever in my life. You know now that I think about it. No when all of my other relationships ended I was completely blindsided. I have always been the dumped. Never the dumpy. Because yeah yeah well. My first marriage it just turns out women don't like to be married to untreated by polars in my my second marriage. We're still friends which is weird but it was messed up Okay another thing yeah. It's like memory lane. Thanks thanks. You'RE WELCOME. That's what we're here for you miserable but your talking about this in therapy which like. Yahu for therapy we know I love it. What is your therapists? Say My therapist lakes through this thing called chain analysis where we know that I have this feeling so now. Let's back up to why I have the feeling so and then when you connect those things you can work on it. The problem is backwards. Doesn't lead anywhere. I have this feeling. Okay what's the one step back? Well I don't want my wife to leave me because I love her. Okay what's the one step back from that? Has She giving you any reason? No the best that I can come up with is my wife. She's beautiful she's intelligent and this is one of the burdens of marrying somebody way younger than you either. She was like twenty six when we got married. And now she's not she's she's just achieved so much in the last eight years and she's not the same person and this person is so incredible that it would be lunacy for her to stay with me. What do you bring to your marriage? I bring bipolar disorder to our marriage a panic disorder and anxiety disorder. I mean those are those are some some pretty nifty things to to bring into a marriage. Okay right but what else do you bring to your marriage smart ass? Obviously I do bring things to the marriage I I do all the cooking. I do all the cleaning. I handle like the household or tasks like you know. The the minutia of life is all handled by me. I do bring that to the marriage. Okay but I'm going to ask you again. What else do you bring to the miracle? Basely like I'm her personal assistant through all of those things. What else makes your marriage uniquely yours. Because you're in it. I just told you I was her personal assistant. I am her personal assistant. I I handle all of that stuff for her. Which is why it wouldn't be so big of a loss to lose me. The other day I said to Kendall if I left you would have all the same things that you have now except the dog. I'm taking the dog. And she said no right. Yeah yeah she said no you sweet loving hug me kissed me told me. I was wonderful but come on which is supposed to say. You can't tell the dude that you're married to that you're living with. Yeah that's a good point. I could hire all of the things that you do for me and not have to tolerate your dumb ass okay. You're looking at all literally the physical things that you bring to your marriage right you are there you do all of these things that are like. I am physically exist in the same room as my wife. What you're not remembering or not seeing or not acknowledging is that you bring more to your marriage and just like the acts you perform and the reason why this is really important to me personally is because I live with two chronic illnesses one of which could make me completely physically unable to take care of myself at any moment literally at any minute. Ms could be like you can't walk anymore. You can't feed yourself. This is Real Fun Party. So you bring more to your merits and just like the AX. You perform for her. You offer her companionship. You offer her comedic relief. You offer her emotional support in everything. I'm sure and while I'm sure you're gonNA tell me it doesn't matter because you're bipolar. Because you detract a as much as you give Blah Blah Blah. You're failing to see that. The root of your marriage is the relationship you have formed with Kendall and all those other things are like a bonus. I'm not a stupid person. I agree with you and if the tables were turned if you were calling me up and you were saying Gabe Adams GonNa leave me. I would say all of the things to you that you are now saying to me and I get it. I get the idea that Kendall is a grown woman and if she is chosen to be married to me she obviously wants to be married to me and she is getting something out of it. I I don't know maybe I make the best spaghetti. I listen. I honestly don't know what it is and I have asked her. I have like why would you be married to me? And she's like well. My life is never boring. Why is this a priority? What do you mean your life is never boring one have you looked around? We live in suburbia all the houses. Look the same. Our life is boring as fuck. I just I can't find that thing I just. I can't find that thing in lieu of turning this into full blown therapy because as we know I love therapy. I'm not good at giving it to other people. Are you saying that you're not a licensed therapist? I am not. I also don't know how to therapies other people so I'm just taking what I've learned here. I would encourage you to go to Kendall and ask her to work to elaborate and maybe she's good in writing. Maybe she's good at talking like speak to her strengths of helping her. Understand what you bring to your marriage because I assume that it's never boring. Is a umbrella statement for a lot of tiny things that are great about you and what you bring to your marriage but a therapy session over what is really happening. Here is a lot of unwarranted anxiety. And you're trying to navigate it right. I'm just scared that she's going to leave. And I feel that I need a backup plan for when it happens and the keyword there. Being when I've been through two divorces I had a significant relationship where we live together and my biological father took one look at me when I was born. I was like yeah. No I've suffered a lot of loss of people who are alive and I haven't even gotten into the loss I've suffered from people who have passed away and I've lost a lot of people relationships jobs social status from living with bipolar disorder. So loss is just ingrained. It's just ingrained into me. In fact I firmly believe that I have lost more people than I have gained. And what happens when Kendall is one of them? I don't want to be caught with my pants down. That's not a double entendre. Just I sincerely mean I just. I don't WanNa be alone. I don't WanNa call my mom and dad and tell them that I blew another marriage. I don't WanNA reach over in the middle of the night and have nobody be there and I want to know how to protect myself from that happening. Because if she goes away. That's going to happen to me. That's going to happen to me again and I don't know that I can get through it for a fifteenth time. Oh I have so many things I wanNA say and most of them are encouraging first and foremost like you know that you will get through it because evidence of your life has shown that you have gotten through it every time you survived right. It may not have been pretty but you did it. You're still here. All those other losses did not destroy to the point of no return. I know you're GonNa want like say well but you know I did get admitted. Bal right like all those other things but like you're saying I'm here. I'm very resilient at being dumped. You're a functioning human being. You'RE ON THE PLANET. You have survived everything so far greater Sure but come on. There's people that have had their limbs hacked off that survived. I don't subscribe to this notion that whatever doesn't kill you only makes you stronger. Oh I don't either. There's lots of things that don't kill you. That make you really fucking weak agree but at the root of it all you have gotten through all of it right. It wasn't fun you didn't want to but you did you got through all of it. I did. And you currently lead a life. That is good and happy and sustainable. And let's talk about that for a moment. You're right. This is the best I've ever been and sincerely that's part of the problem. This is the best my life has ever been. I am forty three years old. This is the most stable. This is the happiest this is the healthiest. This is the wealthiest. This is the most in love. This is the everything I mean even if we want to like turn it into you know. Money Equals Happiness. Well I've got the biggest house. I've got the nicest car and I've got the least amount of debt if you WANNA turn it into. Oh it's the people you know. I Know Kendall kindles amazing. I know you Jackie your amazing. I have like two best friends. I'm not saying I don't want more friends. I'm just we all want more but if I just take base look at what I have. It's the most I ever had and all I can think of and all that goes through my mind is this is the most I will lose so when you talk about will I get through it. I don't know I've never fallen from this

Kendall Bipolar Disorder Jackie Personal Assistant Anxiety Gabe Adams MS
Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs

The Psych Central Show

10:04 min | 4 months ago

Postpartum Psychosis Warning Signs

"We're going to discuss postpartum psychosis and you were drawn to the specialty after you yourself went through postpartum depression postpartum anxiety and postpartum. Ocd after the birth of your first child or act yeah. There's a lot of things again. Happen in the postpartum period. I'm here to talk about one of the more severe conditions in the interest of full disclosure. I'm a forty three year old male. I've never been pregnant and I do not have children. I'm really really entry level. When it comes to understanding what post-partum anything is so thank you so much for helping to educate people like myself. It really is an important topic. It's absolutely important and a lot of people have that same feeling. I don't know anything about it. It seems like this weird thing that happens to other people and chances. Are you know somebody who has suffered through some form of perinatal mental health condition? Even if they don't talk about it which is very common a lot of people. Don't talk about it because there's so much shame around kind of not feeling well or not feeling yourself even during pregnancy and postpartum. There's all these ideas out there that it's this wonderful magical time and hopefully it is but for a lot of people in and that's one of the things that came up while I was trying to do research for the show so that I could talk somewhat on this subject. I was shocked at how many times I googled. Postpartum psychosis or postpartum anything and the articles. That came up. Were M I a bad mother M I abide parent. Am I harming my child? That really Kinda spoke to me like in a visceral way. This idea that you also have the illness. And there's all this stigma and shame surrounding it. Is that what you found working as a therapist? Oh absolutely hear comments. All of the time I feel like a bad mom. I'm not good enough for my child. Feeling Shame and the blame and confusion around. Why do I even feel bad? We are just not educated on what can happen. I think it's a great disservice to everybody who goes through any kind of perinatal mental health condition. Because they're mostly blindsided by it right. You like here supposed to be having the best time of my life. This is what my body is supposed to quote unquote and here. I am feeling like a failure and just to be clear. None of this is true. You are an excellent parent. This is just sort of the illness. And societies misunderstanding of the illness. Taking hold in an unexpected way over. Sorry this is a very treatable and very temporary condition if you get the right help and if you get it as soon as you know even if you're getting a little bit later down the road you still can feel better. And there's not a huge impact throughout the life course of you or your child however again in the more severe cases are not treated. There are some long term effects and I know that might sound really scary to people so I wanted to sell the myth that if you have a condition you're going to be like messing up your kid in some way like I said this is very treatable and also when it was very very severe there can be really life threatening consequences. So let's talk about postpartum psychosis. What is the definition of postpartum psychosis typically oppose artem? Psychosis isn't very rare Wanted to out of every thousand delivery and it is not postpartum. Depression or postpartum. Means -iety the onset of these symptoms are usually in the first two weeks but certainly can show up a little bit later. There's a really rapid onset. Meaning symptoms start quickly and it is characterized by the mind is kind of going off on. Its own in part because of hormonal changes in part because of your mental health history and in part because of sleep deprivation so people who are if postpartum psychosis are having rapid mood swings they are potentially having delusion or strange beliefs about themselves or their child or people around them they may be having hallucinations feeling very very irritated. The difficulty to sleep inability to sleep sometimes paranoia And what's really hard about postpartum psychosis is that the symptoms waxed and waned. Meaning they come and go so sometimes people can sort of the feel like themselves and appear to be like our normal cells and then sometimes people around them might observe that they don't look like themselves are sound like themselves so it can come and go for quite a few people and then for some people that symptoms on the onset is. They're just continue. So I know all that probably sounds pretty scary and Syria and it actually is pretty scary. And the're Like I said before. It's very rare and people who have a history of bipolar disorder are at high risk or if there's bipolar disorder in the family. They're at higher risk. Oftentimes psychosis in the postpartum is an indictment bipolar disorder. So let's talk about that for a moment. I myself live with bipolar disorder. And I understand psychosis from a lived experience because I I have experienced. Psychosis is it. The same is postpartum psychosis and for lack of a better phrase Gabe Howard's psychosis. Is this a similar thing or is it completely different? There's certainly familiarity in terms of symptoms of psychosis are the same. What what's very different here. Is that there is a new baby involved. And sometimes they delusions or hallucinations are in relation. To the new child is new very vulnerable child and also the perinatal person also very vulnerable. They've just given birth of had massive changes in hormone both during pregnancy at delivery and then in the Postpartum. They're really really rapid and kind of swings in the in the hormone during that time and sleep deprivation. Is You know when it's sort of like just you quote unquote. You have capacity to possibly sleep. In these cases there's Abadie involved and babies cry and they wake people up And that's what they do and that's what they're supposed to do But for somebody who needs sleep and isn't getting it and can't get it a whole other layer of complexity into into the life and into the simpsons because you're in relation to a baby a while having psychosis for some time that means that. There's like a hyper vigilant around the baby. Like it's really hard to not be around them or to let anyone else support them or sometimes it's like a kind of a total disregard like people in some psychoses. They will kind of forget the baby there so it brings this whole other level of danger and complexity also then. There's additional layer. That people around them are thinking. Oh well she's kind of baby. She's not quite herself or giving some other explanation for odd behaviors or strange behaviors. And it Kinda put people in a more of a dangerous situation because symptoms are explained away because they're not understood and it's not expected that these kind of symptoms will show up. I'm kind of assuming that the way that postpartum psychosis has played out in the media as well as How motherhood is played out in the media those two things combined because like you said we want to defend new parents. We don't just want every new mom under the bus and say oh well. You have a serious mental illness. That's the problem but of course this can be dangerous because it lacks care. I suppose my specific question is how is Postpartum? Psychosis played out in popular culture. It actually in very dangerous ways so in ways that further stigmatize apparently period. So mostly what we're seeing in the media while you see on. The news is postpartum psychosis that has led to infanticide. And this is a really really hard topic for people to hear about and also. This is a very real possibility with postpartum psychosis. I know that one to two percent of people who have term psychosis four to five percent of those mothers will kill their children. They killed their baby. It's really a hard reality to hear. And what I want people to know. Is that when this happened? Women are not in their right mind at all. They are not themselves. Do not know what they're doing. They're often being told by their delusion to do something. Sometimes there are delusions that the baby is possessed. So they can't be here although this might not make any sense but most of the time it's really out of love a lot of love like the world is too harsh for the child so they have to go and misses a very severe departure from reality. The Mon- who are in the situation do not know what they have done if they come out of it and get the medication that they need. They can't even thousand. What has happened people thinking say? Oh what a horrible person. I can't believe she done this. I would never do this to my child. And the thing is is that if she were in her right mind she wouldn't either. So what we're seeing in the media is usually the mob who have done something like this and who are being handcuffed or going on trial so there's most severe. This is the most of your consequences of perinatal. Mental Health Condition Postpartum Psychosis in infanticide. Is How postpartum psychosis is viewed. Most people are postpartum psychosis are experiencing hallucinations or delusions or some kind of waxing and waning symptom. That does not reach that level. Typically they may need hospitalization and medication. But it's not always the people who go on to have their children in this way.

Postpartum Psychosis Psychosis Bipolar Disorder OCD Syria Depression Artem Abadie Gabe Howard
Panicked Over Finances? Why Money Influences our Mental Health

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

07:56 min | 4 months ago

Panicked Over Finances? Why Money Influences our Mental Health

"Everyone and welcome to this week's episode of the not crazy podcast. I would like to introduce my co host Jackie Zimmerman who with major depression and anxiety disorders. And you know this guy gave Howard who lives with bipolar disorder. Jackie we've been friends for a while. Now we've been doing this show for several months and I decided that I want to risk all of that by talking about the one subject that causes more fights than any other subject known to man. And what would that be money? I want to talk about money. Money money money so in a recent poll. The three things that married couples fight about more than anything else are family religion and money and I would argue that money is at the top. Because nobody's taking people like onto the People's court or Judge Judy to sue over political and religious differences. Money is everywhere. If you talk to anybody literally just go grab a stranger on the street and be like. Hey you ever lost a friend over ten dollars. Almost everybody will have a story of a friendship. That just imploded over what we would consider a small amount of money. Money just creates an intense amount of anxiety in our society and the thing that I think is unique about money and anxiety is that it's something that I would assume everybody experiences not just people who are prone to anxiety not just people who live with mental illness but everyone has had some kind of issue with money that is given them anxiety. When I was younger I used to watch golf with my grandfather. And do these expose on the on the multi-millionaire golfers and they were interviewing one of them and they said. Hey when you have a PUTT and if you make the PUTT you win. One hundred thousand dollars and if you don't make it you lose one hundred thousand dollars. Does that caused you anxiety? Does that make you nervous? And the Guy said you know the most nervous I've ever been playing golf is when I bet another golfer a hundred dollars that I could make this. Putt and I didn't have one hundred dollars in my pocket. That really spoke to me because it wasn't the amount of money anymore. It was the awkwardness of discussing the money. Finding the money figuring out the money like this is what gave this guy anxiety and again. He's famous I don't know maybe he was just a cute story. He was telling bit. But that makes sense to me. You ever been in line and a dollar short. Like how embarrassing is that when you thinking that everybody in the store is like over on register five. There's a tall fat red head that does not have one dollar to pay for his groceries. I can feel that because if you've ever had your credit card declined for any reason your debit card and you WANNA justify it. I know there's money on there. That's so weird. I just used it like I just got paid. I swear I'm not a poor person race. There's this like panic where you want to justify. Why didn't work and my assumption is all of. This comes from the scarce any model right. We're all afraid of not having enough what happens when we don't have enough. So how do we have to work to get enough? What if we're working really hard and we still don't have enough and the anxiety around all of that of how much do you have? What happens when it's gone? I think is something that is underlying in our society and in everybody but amplified for those who live with any kind of illness because for me specifically when I worked at a big fat corporate job and I made all kinds of money all I thought to myself was. I'm staying here forever. So that way I make so much money that never have to worry about what happens if I actually can't work again because I will just bank so much money. I'll have so much I'll always pay my health insurance. Always have all of this stuff and spoiler alert. I don't work there anymore. It didn't make any money when I did work there. But when you have an illness whatever kind it is you're worried about money nitrous because of normal reasons but you're worried about like what if I can't work forever. What if I can't pay my health insurance? What if I can't afford to be healthy? That works its way around the Internet. That always says that. We're all three bad months away from being homeless. I don't know if that's true for all of us but that really spoke to me because it took about three bad months to really put me in a bad way where I started to need help on an interesting side note. None of us are three months away from being millionaire. So I think that we need to take that into account when we're determining how to like maybe structure our health insurance and things like that but but wrong wrong show. We'll just put that aside for a moment but think about this. The whole world is discussing being three bad months away from homelessness whether or not that holds up is really irrelevant. I think that does speak to the majority of people now. Let's apply that to people living with mental illness. People managing a lifelong and chronic disorder. Because I know that if I couldn't afford my medication if I couldn't afford therapy if I couldn't have afforded hospitalizations and on and on and on Gabe Howard would not be sitting here. That's just a hard fact. Yes I worked hard. Yes I have a loving family but you know what really saved me resources and that resource all boiled down two hundred dollar bills and that's sad. The catalyst for this was episode was from about a week ago. I sent Gabe text and basically I had a full blown anxiety meltdown because my husband had called me and said Oh my God our health insurance doubled on my last paycheck and I said wait. What do you mean it doubled? They didn't tell us that like they obviously would communicate that because that's what normal people think happens in the world But they didn't they just took it out of his check and it was doubled and I panicked and I have not an actual panic attack. I can't tell you how long but I felt it was the heart racing soul crushing. Can't breathe like Oh my God. What are we going to do because we are people right now? Who ARE LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK. And that is even questionable. Because I don't know when my paychecks are coming in because I work for myself and I don't have regular paychecks and my husband took a pay cut a year ago to take the job. He's at now so all of this spiraling around my head and I'm like how are we going to do this? This is four hundred dollars. We didn't know we needed an. I could just work harder. But where am I going to find the client? Just you know. Anxiety spiral talk in your head and I reached out to Gabe because we were already talking to said. Hey I know you're telling me something important right now but I'm not really listening honestly because I'm worried about this health insurance thing and I realized in that moment how money is something that can cause high anxiety and within a split second like he sent me that text about our health insurance doubling and almost immediately. I was in a full-blown panic about it. There's so many directions that we can take this and that makes me excited. I love it when Jackie says. Oh my God ex and I'm like Oh my God. We can do Y. Z. Bat Symbol. So we might have to create multiple timelines. And let me ask you multiple questions about this because the first question that I'm going to ask you is if your health insurance would have doubled and you had a million dollars in the bank. Would it have bothered you at all me today? Thanks no but I also think that people who have a million dollars in the bank are really good about money and any sort of unexpected expense. That comes up. They're upset about it. Also I understand what you're saying because paying attention to our resources is a vital part of money management but a year ago. I was sitting on my couch at like two in the morning and it was storming and I felt a drop of water on my head and I looked up and the roof was leaking like leaking a lot and I saw all of this damage and I thought oh well. That's a bummer. And I went to bed. I just went to bed. That's it. There's nothing I can do about it. I couldn't stop the rain. I don't know how to fix a roof. I don't know how to fix a ceiling but the reason that I didn't freak out panic is because I had the money I flat out had the money. I knew that I could afford to fix it. There was nothing I could do and I slept well

Gabe Howard Jackie Zimmerman Anxiety Golf Judge Judy Bipolar Disorder Putt Chronic Disorder
Bassey Ikpi, Author of "I'm Telling the Truth, but I'm Lying: Essays"

The Electorette Podcast

08:23 min | 4 months ago

Bassey Ikpi, Author of "I'm Telling the Truth, but I'm Lying: Essays"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Bossy. Igby author of the New Book of Essays Titled. And telling the truth. But I'm lying. It's a memoir in essay form that guides the reader through what it's like to live with bipolar disorder and anxiety and this is one of the most arresting beautiful collections of essays. Ever ride in a really really long time. As soon as this collection of essays was published. It quickly became a New York Times bestseller and it went into. Its second printing the day that it was released so I was really honored to have the opportunity to have this conversation with Bossy. Igby we open our conversation with my describing my reaction to the book and my deep emotional connection to it. So here's my conversation with Bossy. Igby start by describing my relationship to your book and I don't remember exactly how I became aware of your both and if someone recommended it to me or I read something typically a have these books that I read for work or for the podcast and I have another category of books that I just kind of reach for pleasure and so your book fell into that latter category. I was just going to read it through the holidays and you know just kind of enjoying myself so when I started reading it I wasn't prepared. You know I I was taking back in. My first thought was who wrote this and at the time. I didn't know that it was a bestseller right. I was truly stunned. That the head and the and the vulnerability you have when you talk about your experiences with bipolar disorder anxiety and then I became this really annoying person and I just started carrying the book around in my purse. So whenever somebody would invite me out for you know for drinks or for Coffee. I pull the copy of the book out from my purse and I'd say. Have you read this book because it's really incredible because there were just so many people in my life that I thought would benefit from reading it would grow and we'd get some some meaning from it right? Oh that's so cool. It's okay I'm always interested in knowing how people find it because I'm never sure if it's just like the interviews or I don't know how any of this stuff works so hearing that is really amazing. Thank you know the thing that stands out to me. Most is the language right the poetic language right. Because you're a poet right more or less more or less more or less right and I read somewhere. It was probably an interview with you that this book was not the book that you started out writing. This was the book that you originally intended to write that you thought he'd write something like a self help book this kind of a kind of a typical piece of nonfiction. And I have to tell you. I'm so glad that you did not write that book and that you wrote this when you talk about what the evolution for. You was like getting from that first book to what you eventually published. What was that evolution for you like? I have friends who who say that. I've been trying or wanting or speaking about writing this particular book for as long as they've known me like going back ten fifteen plus years and It's true that is a conversation I've had but when I was given the opportunity presented with the opportunity to write a book in Two Thousand Sixteen I went through one of the worst depressive episodes of my life and what I realized now looking back is that I have been in this spectrum of of depression or a mixed episode describing the book for almost a decade if not more and I was only a little bit better meaning not as depressed and when I got to two thousand sixteen. The year I turned forty everything. Hit me like a train and I realized that I was in the space where I didn't want to try anymore. I was exhausted with it. In dumb I spiralled in this way that I was a hundred percent not one hundred percent. I'm still here but I at say a large percent like eighty percents certain that I didn't want to be in this world anymore and I started slowly preparing my friends and my family and my therapist for the possibility that I wouldn't be here by the time my birthday came around or even a little bit afterwards and one of the things that I wanted to do was to have always wanted to do as a writer is to write a book and I was also thinking very practically in that. This is revenue for my for my child and my my family. My siblings this is you know this is something that they can collect on In my mind I had this. I'm not really worth a lot right now. But if I'm dead and I have a book then all this stuff is going to be perfect. The new rational irrational Is what I refer to it as but I didn't want to write that book. I wanted to write something different. I wanted it to be a super soul Sunday type of motivational kind of this is what I've learned in going through all of this. Is that these little lessons. I've taken from it and I hope that it helps somebody else then. I struggled to write that book because it was false. But it's a book that we sold When I eventually got an agent so I felt like I had to write that book but I struggled so hard and I was very fortunate to have the editor at Harpercollins. Aaron wicks who saw that. I was struggling and had said to me when we had our initial interview before I decided to sign the contract that she wanted me to be sure. I was ready to go there. And when you when you WANNA book contract when you want anything like Asu Xiaobo that whatever you know what I mean like sign me. I'm going to do that but I didn't know what she meant until about a year into the process and I'm struggling writing all the stuff that I don't like that I don't connect to. I'm I'm having this real conflict with the things that were going on in my in my life in my mind and I remember I was in New York for a couple of weeks to just rights. I figured I needed a change of scenery. Something had to give and I met with her and I was really honest with her. No no what happened before that was that I wrote like a war I it was the first thing I wrote in this new thing I was I I wanted to To free myself. I wanted to see if if I got it out of my system if I wrote these different ways and wrote it the way that it was coming to me in in different points of views and in different perspectives and different tenses. And really playing. With the Genera of non-fiction. If I got that out of my system maybe the other book would show up and then on top of that I was also like I said in two thousand sixteen writing these notes and letters to my friends and family Explaining to them how difficult it has been my entire life to exist in this way And I was trying to show them that that I done the best that I could invade more importantly they had done the best they could because this is all the things that I was contending with that they didn't even know about. So how could they have possibly known but now I'm telling them right? Those are two separate projects so when I decided that I was having trouble writing the book because there was something else that needed to be written I went to my to my editor with with with like a war with the one that eventually became to Hootie and with The one that's That's the really long one in the middle that's broken up into. I don't know anything's called hangs titles so much but the one that's broken down into like time. Increments I wrote those three and I presented the to her and she was like do this. Whatever this is forget what we were doing before right. Whatever you feel I can. I will figure it out as far as you know punctuation The way that the words come out whether or not the diction needs to be fixed like just write it and figure it out and once she gave me the freedom that permission it just it was I just I just took it and ran and this book combined with those letters and notes. South riding to my friends and family. All of that came together. This is what this is. What happened is a very long answer.

Editor Jim Taylor Skinner Anxiety New York Times Bipolar Disorder New York Aaron Wicks Writer Harpercollins
Los Angeles: Body Found Near Malibu Home Of Missing Woman With Bipolar Disorder

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:20 sec | 4 months ago

Los Angeles: Body Found Near Malibu Home Of Missing Woman With Bipolar Disorder

"Three LA county sheriff's detectives at a home in Malibu after a body was found there now this is near where a fifty three year old Malibu woman who has been missing for more than a week left investigators are not saying if the body is Juliett Schneider she was last seen on ocean view drive on the night of February eighth she suffers from bipolar

Malibu Juliett Schneider La County
Minding Mental Illness with Esmé Weijun Wang

Unladylike

09:14 min | 4 months ago

Minding Mental Illness with Esmé Weijun Wang

"I really wanted to be able to be seen as high functioning and I wanted to be able to be seen as normal and if people found out about my diagnoses. I wanted them to see me as like. Eah The person who had this serious diagnosis but who also graduated from Stanford with a three point nine. Gpa So it scared me that. I had these symptoms that I couldn't control ninety minute. All and welcome to One lady like they show that finds out what happens when women break the rules. I'm Kristen I'm caroline. And that was today's guest as May wage and Wang author of the New York Times bestselling essay collection. The collected Schizophrenia Carolina. I've been wanting to talk to as may for a while now. I stumbled across her a couple of years back when I was going through a scary mental health period of my own. As I mentioned before on unladylike I have generalized anxiety disorder and at that time like on paper. Everything looked good. You know but I was spiraling on the inside and it was honestly so unsettling that I didn't know how to talk about it and I didn't WanNa talk about it or not. I think I was scared. That talking about it would make it feel even more real and it felt like a burden. I didn't WanNa put on anyone else like. I just desperately wanted to figure out how to get myself back together. And that's actually how I ended up on as May's website. It's called the unexpected shape as basically all about getting your creative work done while also living with mental or physical illness and I was just so struck by how openly she talks about having a serious mental illness. Yeah in her. Mid Twenties as May was diagnosed with schizophrenia disorder which she describes as the fucked up offspring of manic depression and schizophrenia is almost like a demon that takes over a person The schizophrenia causes a person to no longer be themselves whereas depression and anxiety think are often considered to be quite awful but they are more considered to be things that are layered on top of a person. You know there's something that somebody is dealing with. they're not something that takes over or empties out a person or places. The spirit of a person in the collected schizophrenia is as may details her journey to what she calls the inappropriately crazy end of the Mental Health Spectrum Aka. A the most unladylike end and she's far from alone there an estimated one hundred thousand five. Americans live with serious mental illness or SMS. The most common ones are schizophrenia. Spectrum disorders severe bipolar disorder and Severe Major Depression. But as may also occupies a very particular space on that unladylike end of the spectrum. She doesn't fit. What we think schizophrenia. Looks like you know. She's not visibly unhinged or unkempt. She's a Yale and Stanford educated award-winning writer. Who's married her? College sweetheart has plenty of friends and frankly dresses. She gives fog. She does and I was really drawn to this idea of someone who is killing it on the outside all the same time. Her mental illness is sort of escalating on the inside. So today we're talking with asthma about navigating serious mental illness. How it shapes her ambition and why wanting to be seen as high functioning is so important to her and quick note. Y'All we're getting into serious mental health issues in this episode including psychosis in suicidal idealization. So heads up. If you're sensitive to those topics only as I grew up in Michigan and was raised by her Taiwanese immigrant parents. She started reading at two and wanted to be a writer by the time. Most kids are learning to tie. Their shoes. Baby was not messing around when she was about six as me. Sent a letter to the publisher. Little Brown asking how she could get her works in print already and they actually wrote me. Back I remember. They wrote me back the types letter typewritten letter and they said I needed an agent. So yeah I I've I've wanted to be a writer for a very long time. That's funny to tell a child that you need an like yeah. I've imagining some kind of like intern or assistant just thinking like you know. How should I respond to this kid? But alongside her big writing dreams. Sba had to deal with extreme evolving and often completely mysterious mental health issues and they also started when she was really young. When I was four or five I remember having issues where I would just filled with anxiety in compulsion. I remember this one evening where I was going to get up and get a drink and then we go to the bathroom and then I would feel like I needed to go to bed and get a drink and then go to the bathroom and I did this over and over again. Compulsively fan ended up standing at the top of the stairs and I just burst into tears and my mom said why are you crying and I just said I can't stop with puberty. Came depression anxiety and insomnia. By the time she was a teenager as me was having suicidal thoughts inserted seeing the high school counselor and at some point. She told me you're going to have to see a psychiatrist. This is getting really serious and so one morning. I told my mom before school. I've been seeing a counselor and she thinks that I need to see a psychiatrist and Mommy yelled at me. She was so upset so angry. She said we've always given you everything you've needed. You have close to where you have food. Who have a roof over your head? How could he do this to us? And I. I remember crying in the car on the way to school and crying I skipped first period and I was just crying in the art room. Eventually as May and her mom went to see the psychiatrist together he was a white man and he asked my mom in front of me. Is there any history of mental illness in the Family? Which is a very ordinary question to ask in this kind of like diagnostic meeting. And my mom said no. There's no history and I learned years later that there was quite a strong history of mental illness. My family and I asked my mom. Why did you tell that first doctor that there was no history of mental illness and she said In Chinese essentially wall? It wasn't his business and I think that kind of cultural stigma was a lingering factor throughout all of my diagnoses. Her diagnoses plural started with clinical depression and anxiety then the summer after as graduated from high school. She was exhibiting enough signs of mania that our psychiatrist diagnosed her with bipolar disorder. And my mom was just like okay. She didn't know what it meant. Really she told me years later that if she had really understood what it meant she wouldn't have let me go to school especially not across the country and not by myself as May was eighteen and a couple of months later she left home in California to start her freshman year at Yale. Now as many psychiatrists recommended that she wait to start taking her new bipolar medication until she got settled. Yale and could start working with someone there. This meant that there was a stretch of months whereas may was dealing with the stress of starting college and experiencing bipolar symptoms. That delay was the first domino to fall. That ultimately resulted in as May being hospitalized at the Yale Psychiatric Institute twice her first year there after the second time Yale sent packing then in her early twenties after she'd restarted her college career at Stanford as me began experiencing intermittent symptoms of psychosis. Psychosis is either hallucinations. So false sensory experiences hearing bang seeing things feeling things physically in the actually hearing things like you hear them as though they're actually there and then delusions are false

Stanford Writer Psychosis Collected Schizophrenia Caroli Yale Anxiety Depression Bipolar Disorder New York Times Kristen I Wang Yale Psychiatric Institute School Counselor Intern Little Brown SBA Michigan Publisher
Mother with mental health symptoms died in jail from 'torturous' neglect, lawsuit claims

WBBM Evening News

02:58 min | 5 months ago

Mother with mental health symptoms died in jail from 'torturous' neglect, lawsuit claims

"Now to a disturbing story about a woman who died behind bars in Washington state the merits Rodriguez was a mother of five much of her ordeal was caught on video here she is late in twenty seventeen on one of her last days alive in surveillance footage first broadcast by our Seattle affiliate Cairo she wound up naked hallucinating and in apparent distress after four days of alleged neglect Nikki but he spoke to Rodriguez's son Nicky wire wishy arrested that is the big question according to the family's lawsuit Rodriguez was suffering from a cold mental health episode when her husband called nine one one that's when police arrived and arrested her for fourth degree assault demerits Rodriguez's husband what in medical help when he plays this nine one one call in late twenty seventeen she's having a psychiatric problem and isn't behaving normally she's being violent and has already hit me twice and I need a medic instead police arrived first and carried Rodriguez into the Washington state jail known as score Jose Martek is the mother of five the only son I was upset and I was angry my mother never been arrested jail surveillance video shows his mother at one point undressing at times you seem crawling appearing to vomit and banging on the door after about four days she is found dead in her cell as far as you know how did your mom been diagnosed with a mental disorder yes she has three guys as family says she had previously been diagnosed and treated for bipolar disorder why is your family filed a lawsuit to bring justice to what has happened and so people can know about these type of situations that are happening in the jail system I feel like all of this could have been prevented the family's lawsuit claims Rodriguez eventually died from an easily diagnosable and treatable metabolic condition called keto acidosis I describe it as a window into hell I mean it's a terrible video family attorney neat being says scores staff was unable to communicate with Rodriguez when somebody is so mentally ill that they can't communicate then that's a sign of a really big problem in a statement to CBS news the facility extended its condolences to all involved saying since this incident our employees have received comprehensive training in crisis intervention it says according to the police department no malicious criminal acts contributed to her death as a general rule the courts have determined an inmate must be charged with a crime or released within seventy two hours of arrest Rodriguez was incarcerated for one hundred three hours before her death and never was formally charged since the incident according to scores website to what other people have died of the jail and according to their website the death in those two cases the cause is

Rodriguez Cairo Nikki Nicky Assault Jose Martek Family Attorney Washington Seattle CBS
Is Loneliness a Mental Health Issue?

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

08:54 min | 5 months ago

Is Loneliness a Mental Health Issue?

"I'd like to introduce my co host who lives with depression. Jackie Zimmerman and I'm going to introduce my co-host Gabe lives with bipolar disorder. Jackie people find it hard to believe that I am a lonely guy and I think the reason the people find it hard to believe is because I'm surrounded by so many people I'm married. I have a great co host and friend in you whenever I'm seeing out in public lick. I'm on stage or I'm giving speeches. They see my social media presence which is really really filled up and they think there's a guy that has a lot of people in his life air. Go not lonely well. I think that we live in a really interesting time right now. At a time when we are more connected than ever with social media texting video chats all of these things we would think that the opportunity for loneliness would be much smaller now right we. We can connect anywhere at anytime to anybody. But that's not the a case right the stats about loneliness are kind of overwhelming right. Now I have a saying that I can feel alone in a crowded room and I'm surprised at how often I say. Say That and people were like me too because again we tend to think of loneliness only as not being surrounded by other people. I think this is a good place to a throw in. Maybe a little bit of a definition or an interpretation of loneliness because when we were talking about this episode and talking about like what is loneliness. What does it feel like like? It's really hard to define loneliness without saying lonely. It's really really hard to define exactly what it is. So this definition. I think it's great which says it's the discrepancy Z.. Between One's desired level of connection and once actual level of connection which I think is a really brilliant way to frame. What loneliness is that? That is a really brilliant way but Jackie what's your definition of loneliness. Okay so full disclosure. I wrote this down and down. I've told her because shooter okay. I wrote it down because when I tried to talk about loneliness I run out of words. I can't describe it. It's very we sort of like. It's an emptiness in my brain that I just can't like get out so I wrote it down and I think loneliness is like ultimate despair. It's having so many thoughts and feelings. That are desperate to get out of you but feeling like you have to keep choking them down over and over loneliness looking everywhere anywhere for a helping hand but keeping keeping your eyes closed while you spin around feeling like nobody wants to help you you can feel the presence of their hands but can never feel their actual touch. I listened to everything that you said and and I can acknowledge its beauty and I can hear the pain in your voice and it has like a symbolism to it that maybe as a writer or a content creator. I just really really respect. But I'm not connecting to you like to you Jackie. My definition of loneliness is that I feel that people people don't connect to me. I can be in a room with so many people but I don't feel like any of them like me. I don't feel like any of them. mm-hmm understand me. I don't feel like any of them. Want to lake or understand me. I think people are just kind of bouncing around my orbit getting what they want for me and then moving on I insure my definition of loneliness is a complete disconnect from the people around me and my definition one of extreme loneliness is a disconnect from the people around me who I should in fact not feel disconnected from like family or friends or my wife. Do you feel like if you reached out to those people though and you were like. Hey I really need to talk to you. They would listen. Oh Yeah. That's what sucks about loneliness rate. It's not about not talking to people. I think that there is this misconception that loneliness social isolation that's nonsense. If loneliness was social isolation elation every single person could defeat loneliness simply by leaving their house. Go to Burger. King go to McDonalds go to starbucks go to a restaurant. There's going to be people everywhere everywhere. Some of the loneliest people that I have ever talked to are surrounded by dozens of people every day via their jobs jobs. They have families they have children. We have to get away from this idea that loneliness is social isolation social isolation can certainly lead the loneliness but but social isolation just means that you are socially isolated there are many people like. I don't know my grandfather. That could not lay eyes on another human for a week and he would not be one iota. What a lonely? In fact he's annoyed when other people show up he's the opposite of Gape. But the reason I asked you that is because in my definition of loneliness. I'm surrounded founded by people who are actively trying to help right. I have my sister reaching out. I've got Adam I've got friends who are like. Hey how's it going and I want to tell them what's happening but I feel like I can't. It's like I desperately WanNa share these awful feelings that I have but I just feel like I can't and to me that's what what loneliness is. Is this wanting to share yourself with somebody and not being able to. I can agree with that but let me take it a step farther. Do you feel empowered to tell them. mm-hmm no like you said they're reaching out and they want to help and you feel guilty for not letting them but clearly. You don't want their help. Isn't that the ultimate in disconnect. I WANNA be so connected to somebody that when they say oh my God gave. You're so anxious and you're so depressed and you're clearly crying what do you need. I can look up and say nothing. Please go away and they say I understand. I'll come back in a couple of hours like that's the level that I want what I have now is. What can I do to help you? Nothing are you sure. Let me do all of these things that you clearly don't want because I have no understanding of what you're going through so I'm just going to do a whole bunch of Internet memes. Some things to make you better. They're trying to help. And now I feel guilty that I'm not accepting their help but clearly that's proof they don't understand me because I don't want their help and and they don't understand that see. I don't feel guilty. Everything that is wrong with my brain is rooted in worth so I feel like if they ask me how they can help. And I'm like Oh well you could help me with all these things than become a burden on them and then they're gonna be annoyed with me and then they're never going to ask if I want help again because they just wish that I would stop calling them. So it's it's a lot of self isolation for sure because I'm purposely pushing them away I'm purposely saying I don't want your help but I don't want their help because I'm afraid that by accepting their help I'm going to eventually push them away. You know it makes a whole lot of sense. One of the things that you're describing there is a self fulfilling prophecy. Yes you're afraid to go down the road that might help you because it could push them away but by refusing to go down that road. You're just pushing them away. Sooner the pushing away in the scenario that you described is actually on you. Because you're just like I don't want to risk it so I'm GonNa put you away now rather than potentially I could push you away later by accepting your help and my describing this correctly. Oh one hundred percent and this is not a rational thought process. How many times have we talked about like anxiety or depression? None of it makes sense. It's not something that you would go. Oh Yeah I totally understand that. It just is completely irrational but it brings me to a question that I think is really important based on this conversation in our differing experiences. Do you think loneliness is a choice This is a really tough question for me to answer. Because here's why yes. I absolutely think loneliness is a choice choice now. I can already hear the counter argument to that. Nobody understands me. I'm alone. People aren't giving me what I want. I'm isolated. I don't have the ability to make friends I'm on on and on and on and on all my God that's a really good point so no no. Loneliness is not a choice now. I can already hear the counter argument to that. Well you're invited to parties and you don't go you get on dating APPs to look for love and you're just you only will date supermodels. Who are thirty years younger than you and have? PhD's you're just not willing willing to accept anything you literally shove people away like in the example that you gave Jackie and then say on. I'm so lonely. In that case case it is a choice. So what do I do with that. You give me your opinion on whether or not loneliness is a choice. I think the loneliness can be a choice I do. But here's the thing that makes me not popular at parties. I think that depression can be a choice as well and now everybody freaks out the like. Oh my God. Depression is a medical disease. You don't choose. Who would choose this? Well right I completely agree with that but there are things that you can do to make it better and you have a choice. People are like well. It's a really really hard choice. I I never said. It was an easy choice. I said that there are things that we can do to improve our circumstances. Loneliness works that way too. There are the things that we can do to improve our circumstances

Jackie Zimmerman Social Isolation Depression Bipolar Disorder Gabe Adam Gape Burger Mcdonalds King Writer Starbucks PHD Content Creator
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

12:39 min | 5 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Mom Brain

"Let's say two. Am GonNa Mess Up Your Circadian Rhythm. And that's why people with bipolar don't do well with swing shift or night shift Kinda work at tends to make sick so you can also look at bipolar as Circadian Rhythm Illness. hormonally hormones externally effect us if we take estrogen really rough on US really so I always recommend like an Iud non-chemical IUD condoms etcetera. But it's not the other way. It's not a hormonal illness. That's it's a neurotransmitter illness. So hormonally it's there. But Estrogen and testosterone are not the reason for bipolar females who have depression shen because of estrogen issues miscarriage. Put every single thing that can happen. That's actually not the same kind of depression that you have in bipolar depression. Bipolar depression is always tinged with mania. Traditional depression can have a lot better treatment than we with bipolar depression. You can use is anti depressants. lightboxes food exercise amino acids a lot of those tend to make us manic so hormonally. It's complicated complicated. Yeah but it's not a hormone illness. Yeah that's so interesting. It's a phenomenally interesting illness. I I try to say to myself so awful to have it. It's so awful. That's why I want to work on prevention. 'CAUSE treatment that you aren't I'm making it. I will let us at least. So here's what I say. That prevention so have you guys studied or learned about epigenetics K. F. Genetics so exciting epigenetics is the belief that we have the ability to determine what jeans flip on inside of our bodies so bipolar can be a naturally occurring genetic illness. It wasn't me. I had no trauma. Nothing happened one day. I'm sixteen years old and I started getting sick. It's it's in my family by the way in so epigenetics very exciting most of the researchers implants. But it's moving forward. Says you are born with a certain set of genes and but they haven't flipped on yet some on some off. We know for sure that certain substances put into a child where the family has bipolar. Polar can flip on the bipolar gene genes. We don't know what they are yet. So prevention if you have bipolar in the family tree you do not give children an anti-depressants if there's by pulling the family tree you must find other treatments no steroids so my nephew seventeen has acne. He has a family member number and anti with four on bipolar. If he goes in and they shoot him up with prednisone in that acne. He's not had but he's had depression. But no mania can make a manic and the bipolar I pour flips on the head. Once it's on it's on it's on once is on a tie stimulants. Add meds so here. You've got this kid you think the child's got add. And you're like well. Let's put him on a stimulant. No check for bipolar in the family tree. Because if you put a child with bipolar Lesean mom or dad or grandparent bipolar. I pull you give him stimulants. You might flip on a gene that never would have turned on unfortunately high. THC Marijuana it's our biggest problem in bipolar disorder. Today without without absolutely it's a stimulating hallucinogenic so many of my clients come to me with kids. Who have heard the cannabis industry say this is a wonderful drug? I use it. You'll relax using it for the right. Reasons have always had depression. Anxiety bipolar in the family tree. Start using weed bipolar. It's an enormous problem. Oh I know shocking. To is that every like the C. B. do oils and this is so if you use a hip product product. I tested all. It seems to be okay so it's marijuana and because of the way marijuana is grown and the way that it's not regulated at all. If you get a gummy for example I just tell. Oh my clients keep away from dummies. Because we don't know what's in them. Plus you want evolving right you have to keep away from THC. If you have bipolar or schizophrenia. And the family tree it will make Sick and you know. We talked about bipolar one. Bipolar too if you have bipolar to genetically and you use a lot of weed it'll pop you into bipolar one. And you you stay there it is. I cannot begin to tell you. And it's so great to have people ask questions and talk about this honestly because when I started seeing this about ten ten years ago no one would talk about Giuliani. What you're talking about weeds? I'm like well everything that I smoked in the eighties and what I've tried now. I'm sorry it's not the same stuff. This is industrial industrial. I don't know what the stuff is. So we stay away from it in the bipolar community or we should wise like lithium not in the same category of stimulating a brain into take what they give people at saying. That's why it's it's effective. It seems a good question so lithium so there are no bipolar disorder. Medications isn't that astonishing. Every single thing when used for bipolar is off label. So you have epilepsy. Medications Depakote Tegretol lameck tall that they found help the mood that used in bipolar. You have anti psychotics originally created for Psychosis and people with Schizophrenia Sarah Halzack brexit found out that they helped mania as well. Lithium is is the only thing on the market. That's just for bipolar. And it's not a drug it's assault and nobody's quite sure how it works but remember when people is take the bath cures in the Roman Roman times and stuff those were lithium baths and lithium. The problem with lithium. Is that it fabulous shoes. I'm sorry Probably Lithium is that it just hit your kidneys like a like a steam train and does this so when I have to use lithium for my Menia yeah I don't take it all of the time I managed almost all of my menial my own. It just makes you hungry and it makes you over weight for some people but then others can take lithium. Never have an episode again with no side effects and nobody's quite sure how it works. Yeah I know people are listening riveted to this episode because it's You're right. It's not something that people have openly spoken about For Very Long. And there's so much to learn if it's much more common it's employing it's very common and I think people are just on high high alert period about mental health and at or sickness in their children's specifically this with regards to a lower grade but depression higher suicide rates I mean An an unavoidable onslaught of things that could make you feel very disenchanted. And why why go on and I. I'm curious if you'd be be willing to talk a little bit about. What are you seeing in the world of just a depression in children depression in young adults? And how can parents who are concerned I mean I. I've heard horrible horrible stories from friends who have older kids or relatives and things where you know their parents sleeping in the bed Roy with their teenage children. Because they're so scared for them. And you know the the nonstop Bullying that God does exist through social media that does exist in on on a grand on a small scale on a daily basis for these kids. Like what do you what do you see and are there any advice you can give to parents who are struggling with something like that in their kids or they're seeing something like them their kids. The first thing is is that we introduce something. The Internet having no idea how it was going to impact mental health. And I would say it's been fifty. Fifty fifty percent has been phenomenal. I started the in fact the first bipolar blog. So it's just it's phenomenal what it's done for my career. I wrote the first book first woman right a self help book and so think about somebody who can't go get a regular job and work in a fabulous place in because of my bipolar. It gave me a career. Then you have all the chat suit used have ten fifteen years ago I got to see thousands and thousands dozens of symptoms. Far More than the doctor. Everywhere would start to do that. So that's positive then on the other side I put a post up underneath. Somebody goes you should die. You're part of Pharma. You're you're you suck. I'm GonNa make your site shutdown and it hits you like I'm a grownup. Imagine what's like your preaching and you're like who are and you're like I'm a nice person and you're just trying to help you. I'm not even making any money. And and then you have to learn year after year. I don't read reviews. I try not to look at comments. I have other people look so we've opened up a world where people can be the judge so quickly online we I think we have to do is parents have to start controlling the social media more. Know your nine year old does not need a cell phone. There might be the pressure and you might have unhappy child. But I'm sorry. No they don't they don't need to be on a tablet at age two and three that has not been fixed so that they can't go and look. I mean little kids will find porn. Don't ask me how they do it. They'll type in booby or something and they'll find it or they talk to Siri. That's yes Siri off. Because has my kids. They can't spell them in my oldest one kinda man there was can't and there's like. Hey Siri show me a picture of your life and we know they're all listening so we've added that in but on the other hand could it be that this issue always been here and now we just have texts and video showing it. I don't I what we do not have more bipolar. So there's a positive bipolar is not increasing. It's the same as it's always been a genetic illness you really. Don't give yourself bipolar polar. It's not like that but what I see really. Increasing in terms of of depression is the kind of dramatic anxious. Depression that involves involves cutting and a lot of really upset emotional regulation kind of depression. which is a little bit different than bipolar depression? I think that is more of a product of the Internet. So if we start talking to kids when they're two or three years old and we go. This is a brain. This is a need. This is an elbow Abo- if you fall and skin your knee. Here's what happened if your brain's not feeling well you might have a thought like I don't WanNa go to school. Nobody likes me. So let's let's discuss that in the same way we discuss. If you skin your knee what does it mean. I don't have any friends I don't want to go to school. Is that real. You don't have any friends you don't want to go to school or sent Breen's for the malfunctioning. My nephew seventeen. That's how I raise helped. Raise him I started at age two and we were talking about depression so when his depression arrived we were hoping it was skipping. It didn't skip him. He's got pouring depression. Anxiety and both sides of the family I was able to go. It looks like today is one of those days. Remember how we talked about depression. Shen what are you need. Were Not GonNa talk about any other stuff. We're talking about the depression and he'll talk to me. So the secret is introducing the concept of the wayward brain. Two very young children. They can get it if they can understand why you throw up or that if you cut yourself you can't stick your finger in it. Why can't they understand that the brain is not always telling the truth? I say to all parents especially if there's by porn the family. We talk openly openly about suicidal thoughts. If you ever have the thought of jumping out a window come see me your brain's not working and I know that sounds scary but if you've got serious suicidal battled depression in your family or bipolar or schizophrenia. That has to be talked about so my nephew David. At night we talked about suicide all the time. I'll go any kids. Having trouble. He goes well. I talked to one or two of them. uh-huh and this one's doing this or that becomes normal. It's dinner table topic. That's a good way to look at it. Talk about it at the dinner table. How's your brain today? Yeah being nice to you being mean to you. What's it doing was also amazing that you not only in your life turned what you're born with into a way to help other people and you're teaching? Your nephew did the same thing. You're taking something that you know. What maybe you wouldn't have chosen? He probably wouldn't chosen. But you know you're you're turning into into something that that can really really help a lot of other people. I'm I'm curious about You know if you're seeing something in your teen In yourself in your spouse else in your three year old and I mean it's easier I wanna say it's easier through. LV can make your three year old. Do certain things go to therapy and stuff like that. But just in terms of this I I see that you have problems. Sixteen year old and where we need to go get help and they say I don't have that I don't have that those the kids that go school shoot up schools. Those the kids go do this. I don't have that I don't have that does disability right and they refused to seek help. There's really nothing that you can do if somebody's refusing to seek help because it seems like so much of it has to to be self motivated so it seems that way first of all. Let's not wait till sixteen so anybody. Who's listening who has really young kids?.

depression bipolar depression bipolar disorder bipolar testosterone US Polar stimulant Psychosis marijuana Marijuana prednisone K. F. Genetics assault Lesean cannabis Anxiety
Scientists discover how gene mutation causes autism and intellectual disability

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:27 sec | 7 months ago

Scientists discover how gene mutation causes autism and intellectual disability

"Is easy according to the study a gene called U. S. P. nynex controls a network of proteins the these proteins modify cell structures that regulate how nerves communicate with each other and interpret information researchers say that the mutation of this process of that early postnatal brain development they say its link to autism spectrum disorder bipolar disorder and schizophrenia scientists say with this new knowledge there's greater possibility of the development of

U. S. P. Nynex
Kanye West Unveils Opera 'Nebuchadnezzar'

Jason and Alexis

02:40 min | 7 months ago

Kanye West Unveils Opera 'Nebuchadnezzar'

"What's funny was doing all well he does everything you know he's a new venture is that he is really turn to Christ which is great for him you know he did Sunday service which is turn into like a tour that goes around most recently was on the jewel seeing show that big mega church in Houston Texas will now randomly at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday his opera will be opening that's right his what his opera okay so he can he's a songwriter is a rap resisting public speaker producer fashion designer and now he nat opera composer to his resume he has created an opera called Nebuchadnezzar which if you're not by believe me I'm not by help me sincerely king Nebuchadnezzar it has to do it's it goes way back to this he is a real king six century BC is the biblical story of the this Babylonian king from the book of Daniel and it's just a tale of Nebuchadnezzar who conquered Jerusalem he enlists Daniel as a servant and eventually descent into madness which kind of sounds like so basically he has a lot of people on board to help him with this his Sunday service squad is going to take the stage there are going to be the singer is also an indie band called infinity song it's a mix of opera fine art modern dance and gospel music he also has a woman who is a Vanessa Beecroft she's worked with him for quite a while since two thousand eight is a performance artist stole it I mean this is incredible it's like he just can't stop creating and I don't want to yeah go ahead no no please no I I know that you know he is a he is diagnosed with bipolar disorder and they go through cycles of mania and where they stay up for days you know and they're two different kinds of bipolar disorder and you can look that up on her own there's bi polar wanna bipolar too he's seems to have symptoms of bipolar one where he goes into a lot of mania for for days and we're he'll like stay up all night and want to create and it's just like a flood of ideas that are like unstoppable you can't sleep and all that kind of stuff that's what he I mean it's classic bi polar disorder with somebody who has the platform and the tools and the notoriety in the fame to actually follow through with their

Texas Daniel Jerusalem Vanessa Beecroft Bipolar Disorder Houston Hollywood Producer Six Century
Former Georgia Officer Who Killed a Naked Veteran is Convicted, but Not of Murder

Michael Medved

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Former Georgia Officer Who Killed a Naked Veteran is Convicted, but Not of Murder

"Robert chip all sin was responding to a call of a naked man behaving erratically outside Atlanta area apartment complex in March of twenty fifteen that's when he fatally shot twenty six year old Anthony hill an Air Force veteran who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and PTSD all sin was found guilty of the three other crimes he was charged with aggravated assault violation of oath of office and making a false

Robert Chip Ptsd Assault Atlanta Air Force Twenty Six Year
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

03:26 min | 10 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"It's my first episode because I thought Oh how perfect for this that we're both saying this she and I I was on the phone with my pharmacist. 'cause I was shooting in Atlanta and I was like I need my medicine. All what medicine do you need. I'm having the problems too. I said Oh I'm bipolar lamictal and she's she's like what she goes. I am too while she was. I've never met another actress that has it and it was the first time that either one of us had met someone our age female male actress Amway. We're doing a movie together. We're just like what is going on. That's gotTa feel so wonderful. Do not feel alone yeah. She's super. She's always been and open about it. She wrote a book called the emotion airy and it's like a table top book. It's durable. It's all made up words that have emotions and feelings and it's just incredible that she was able to open up about it and then I was and she was like let's have you do this podcast. I'll be on it like let's talk about it and so one of the catalysts for you start your PA yeah because I didn't have anyone else that was open to talk about it and so I asked her you know. Will you come on the course so now that you you were saying that you constantly have to be kind of like adjusting your medication. It's not like once you find that cocktail. You can be on it for twenty years or maybe you can. Is that how it works. Yeah I mean I've letting so I mean for me. I know that it can be adjusted. I do know that when you're pregnant you can't be on medication but I have been told I haram right that had. Ucla they have a special area for that. They have doctors that specialize with pregnant women who are bipolar a polar that have to be off medicine and so they don't give you the medicine but they there's something that they do to track it and make sure and that I've also heard from another doctor that when you are pregnant your brain actually with bipolar disorder tricks yourself that your normal again because it's focusing all on the baby flicked flicked really weird after being pregnant and seeing all the crazy things that your body goes through that doesn't surprise me really. I'm how just even out yeah surprise me. Our bodies are incredible. There's so much that we do that. It does without us even knowing that I can see that but I love knowing that there is a plane go. There's a place you can go because you wouldn't even think if you don't struggle with bipolar disorder you wouldn't even go to what would you do if you can't be on medication and you have you're having baby. There's so many different levels. Have you ever thought of it. Yeah and you know. I don't know the statistics once again but I've been told that you know. The odds are pretty high that your your kid will have bipolar disorder as well. It's genetic my father had you my grandmother had it you know and they never admitted to it and they never got brought medicine but it's all genetic and I don't know if it skips it. You know generation. I have no idea but I've always had to come to accept that fact that since I was diagnosed and read that that okay this is an option so whatever partner I choose to be with if I choose to have a child this needs to be upfront and honest and the first time I met my boyfriend the I think three sentences in the conversation I said hi I'm bipolar. Just you know like this is never we're going away and he's like cool. Guy Greg is four years later here. We love it. Hey guys we're gonNA take a quick break. We'll be right back in just a minute in.

bipolar disorder Guy Greg Atlanta Ucla partner twenty years four years
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

11:36 min | 10 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Hey guys is it's canvas nope. I just lied. It's Kayla because candice is away shooting a movie in Atlanta and we are so excited for her and today we have an amazing mazing co-host or I haven't amusing coast who you guys have heard on our podcast before she has her own podcast and she's just all around bad ass awesome person. Jen Zabriskie's Rousey is an intro. I'm just over here. Eating peanut butter filled pretzels having a time chatting it up so we'd Mutatis was going to be gone and instantly. I thought okay. I'm just going to see if there's a chance that Jen's available and you immediately. We're like I got you. You have a brand new baby and I'm going to be there for you and I'm so grateful people. You're such a good friend anytime. This is just like such a delight. I feel like I'm filling in for Kelly Ripa or like the fourth hour on the Asia. Essentially the today show yeah. It's great things for having me over guys. Today we sat down with Alice hundred tourist. Sahni who is fascinating. She has her own podcast coming out called emotionality canal support and she's really candid and really open about her battle with bipolar disorder and we haven't done a mental mental health episode so this is something that really speaks to us and we were really excited to sit down with her gentleman you had any experience with anything like this and yeah no absolutely. I mean listen. I'm a weekly therapy. Gal but I have anxiety and I do the whole the whole Shebang now meditate. I I I take Xanax when when needed Is this a diagnosis. You were actually diagnosed with anxiety little yeah. I think it's you know when I fill out my insurance paperwork. I think I'm a F four point one or something the diagnosis code or something like that for my anxiety so yeah but it's really funny when you were asking me about my mental health journey for myself and I was like no. It just seems like very casual like I don't really have anything but it's like. Oh you know. Sometimes I feel like I can breathe and I lie on the floor and wish wish I was dead very serious but you know I think the whole thing is is like I have had those moments and have had these experiences and yet I'm just sitting here and having a great day and having a great time with you and can feel calm and present and really vibrant in my own life and I feel like you. We know it's not one or the other. These things are all present. Yeah and that's one thing that's so cool. That Allesandro does is she. Just released speaks openly about about her experience and is just just this light. She's so bubbly and so awesome so you guys stay tuned our conversation with coming up and we are here with one hundred Donnie. Thank you for coming. We take your sign my name right. Oh of course you're one of the few and far between what do you get. I Alexandra like very like that in tourist seaney or get lots of lots of different ones. I get Alexandra. Even though there's s in there air that's weird cut off your intro intro. That's the thing that's a conversation. That's good but one thing I love so much about your podcast. Emotionality Canal support is that you are really open and candid and that's why we are here directionally challenged to and I know you had such a journey to getting to to the point to find that you are bipolar and we really want to have an awareness of mental health episode with you because you are just a ray of light and you. You've so much to share so talk. Take take us through the very beginning and the whole journey. I'm going to start crying guys okay. I'll do a quickened and like little short snippet version. I was diagnosed when I was twenty two years old at the time I was on a show called CAPRA which was the Prequel Prequel to battle star Galactica. I had billboards all over Los Angeles New York London all over the world and if I showed it to you you'll probably remember because I was naked with an apple pie. Yes and I had jet black hair. I was the most naked girl in Hollywood and I also played fifteen on the show so very confusing different times. Obviously this was a couple years ago but at the moment I was going through so many ups and downs and I had no idea what was wrong with me. I had a moment when I was eighteen months old. I Would Bang my head against the wall for no reason my mom had no idea and everyone's like Oh. She's having Tam Trans like it's not a big deal. This is what babies do do. They like. I knew mom. This seems a little aggressive serve. As a Martin reprising allied with very very concerned Yes am and she took me to all sorts of doctors and they said no no she's fine so this started needed when you were eighteen months even probably before with like frustrations and not being able to speak and so they now looking back at it. They say that there was like an explosion explosion inside me and I didn't know how to react to it as a kid because I didn't have the vocabulary to put it together and so it turned into rage than when I was five live I had a problem crossing thresholds so I couldn't leave from one side of my house to the other one sided the door to the other I couldn't I was a huge dancer there and did karate and I did my math and I was. I had to do everything perfect so if I left the house and I wasn't better that day than I was before I would like punish myself and I couldn't survive doing it so take like two hours for me to go from one side of the door to the next and once I was on the other side. The door is great like everything was relaxed. I forgot about it might not took me hypnotherapy. It's like we did the whole deal and they said again owner. No she's just what's like a very over achieving child and so my mom saying okay once again this is really weird but we'll just go with it and she tried to get as much help as she possibly probably could and then when I hit puberty that's when it really was coming to the surface again going on with puberty anyway so much and that was the whole confusing thing is doctor's like Oh. It's hormones. They thought I was depressed. Even though I didn't have signed depression so they put me on anti depressants witch. If you're bipolar makes the highs yes you're shaking your head. You know girl makes those highs higher lows lower so which caused me fifteen with a learner's permit to try to kill myself by driving off. Mojo rise and I was never a suicidal person that was never a thought of my brain but I literally left the house in a fit of rage and that was my only escape. It was not a thought process like nothing nothing and knock on wood. It was okay because I hit the rock at the certain way where my car up the mountain instead of down the mat-su actually did did the whole like there was not a moment of Oh. I shouldn't do this now. I was just like fucked accounts wear now. You can believe that actually I was just like this. Is it like I'm just is going to take you through your drove off drove like we used to live off mall and so I was driving like in a fit of rage like just like angry and I was like I can't do this anymore. Four and I turned my wheel and I meant to go left to go off mall and to just like our listeners who don't live Mojo and is really wind. It goes all the way up the Canyon so there's some cliffs so you can very easily at any time. Just drive your car right off and that's where a lot of bad things happen on Mahala unholy putting the movie Mojo dry but you go up to my windows like yeah. There was like the on the road like one side was the cliff going down on one was was like a higher mountain like area and so because my tire hit Iraq instead of it going left down it went up and so my car got stuck stuck up and it took to tow trucks and four hours and they shut down all and drive to get an hell so kinda chic guys like that's kind of a moment not Jim. Oh this is like a life. This is your lifetime TV business time. Moment was a turning point for everyone in your family like okay. Now we'll hit. You said that it was just an accident. Got At this point you. You're not on the show yet. You're not on county okay so this is easily the actress and I was I had done a pilot for Joel Silver. just finished that everything was fine. It was literally because I was on these antidepressant and so going a little head for everyone out there. That is why bipolar disorder is the last mental illness to be on a checklist for doctors and depression is usually the first so a lot of children and teens and even even adults are being misdiagnose getting put on antidepressants which are making it even worse so the manic episodes or even worse so you didn't tell so you you don't know what's happening. They put you on antidepressants. You know that this takes you to a place. You've never been before and then you cover it by saying. It was an accident sedan at this point. What what goes through your head. What are you thinking are you. Do you know there's something innately worst that needs to be diagnosed or do you not know I don't know because I think what we're doing is right but there's also a part of I don't know if it's just for bipolar disorder but for me specifically weekly and I have friends who are as well diagnosed the same in have this problem but are not GonNa generalize it because I am not at all but you experience blackouts like I don't remember Knbr fifteen to probably eighteen anything. I don't remember I had full-blown relationships with people. I don't remember the relationship photos. Don't jog your memory. I remembrances. I remember the photos and I'll be that kind of remembers that moment but broads don't remember broad strokes. I don't remember dating people while all forget. People's names sounds which is like normal but still like very much so where it's like a full blackout due to the medication you're on or that wasn't on medicine yeah what was just it was just part of lights and that's why. I don't know if it's for everyone bipolar but the four people that I'm friends with but I do know experience the same things but at different for times in their life like one of my friends David who who's a Co host on my show. He's we do a segment together. He doesn't remember college because it it was pre- diagnoses and diagnosis sonneborn but it was pre pre that and that's why he doesn't remember any of that time how long after after this accident when you're fifteen did you remain on antidepressants. I gotTA pretty soon as after pretty soon after because it wasn't helping me but getting into your Britney Spears this is a kind of fun correlation at the same time that she was going through her driving on Mojo shaving her head all of that stuff with wiz within the two years of when I was doing these things so when she was driving and was up for three days on end. I didn't think anything was wrong with that because I would do that as well. I'd say up for three days. Straight not have even ten minutes of sleep and be totally fine and the crash for two weeks in like not leave the bed. Wow so that's why when I was at so that's with Britney Spears because I was like the same person I mean I.

bipolar disorder Jen Zabriskie Britney Spears depression Alexandra Kelly Ripa Kayla Atlanta Sahni Allesandro Iraq Donnie Asia Mojo Tam Trans CAPRA Los Angeles candice Hollywood
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"Well, absolutely. But how soon is too soon? This is the million. Dollar question. How latest too late now? I mean, I think that question is worth at least a half a million dollars as you know. I'm married. I'm married to KENDALL. She's my third wife. My first wife, I never told because I was an untreated bipolar. And we never knew I had it. My second wife told me that I had bipolar disorder. So that was convenience. But my third wife, I knew that I had bi-polar disorder. I was living. Well, and I was looking for a long term relationship. I was looking to date, and I did a few people before I got married before the right one came along. And I had this idea in my head that the third date was the right date to tell I don't know why I came up with that plan. But it was always the third date except for KENDALL. I don't know. I told KENDALL via text message before we ever met. Well, I guess it went well, then I mean it worked out sheeting those she wasn't like new phone. It is. I often wonder though, like I started off chatting with like one of our other friends, and they were like all hell, no, just change your named KENDALL. And you can have this guy. Her name is actually Mary Beth. Just just on bay. That's that is in the living room with a different name light. You the entire time. Yeah. The reason I say this is because it just goes to show you the best laid plans. Honestly, the reason that I told her via text messages because I just had yet another bad experience not really tied living with bipolar disorder. Just. You know, I I had a couple of bad dates with somebody. And as like, you know, I I don't really want to date, but I had been emailing back and forth. And I I don't believe in ghosts people. I think that's wrong. So I was just kind of trying to sabotage it. I thought if I sent a text message and said, hey, I live with my polar disorder that she would ghost me or just kind of fizzle out from there. But that didn't happen. I guess she writes, you gave I she was willing to have a date with me. I mean. I guess this did not deter her from having a first date, and he just suave. Rico that swamped BI polar guy that text message suave texting. The thing is I I'm never going to get the opportunity to try it again. I mean, should I like for science purposes? Should I open up an account on like? Okay, cupid and just start sending. Hey, I'm bipolar text. Mel the no longer lonely site. Remember that night? I do remember that site. Yes. Are you? No longer lonely, Michelle. Yes. I'm no longer lonely. Now, how did you tell your significant other that you were a wack job? Sorry..

KENDALL bipolar disorder Mary Beth Michelle Rico Mel million dollars
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Like, you know, like, let's say you see client, and you realize like, okay, I think some of this that that you're presenting with maybe a bipolar disorder. I know sometimes that comes with like heightened like emotionality. And how do you work with the client who may be struggling with some of these? So a lot of my work is focused working with clients who do have some challenges with regards select moon regulation. So that's not just by all of this order, but also, but like now disorder or the trait of online personality disorder, and I often really start the same place with them that I would with any client that I have, you know, what do you want out of your life? You know, what can you want your life to look like, you know, what is the vision that you have or you want to be how do you want to be seen in the world? How you show up in the world. And then we really talk about what's working for them. Not. But I've seen not with family ease not with whoever referred to me like what eighty but. No, what is working you in your life in what is not working, and we start from that point. Oftentimes when we really delve into. Their mood changes the cycles behaviors that are not giving them the results that they want for their life. That's where we're able to really do the work on change in behavior on increasing adherents in the medication that you're prescribed on, you know, even verbalizing discussing with Dr changes to the medication that a more in really engaging in their treatment in not being passive receivers. Oh treatment. But you know, really thinking about what they want a house with cheated on Easter levels Ubani different tools. I love the way that you put them Eliza because I think kind of going back to what you said earlier around kind of receiving one of these agnosio, it kind of feels like, oh, my life is over like, you know, kind of doom and you're really talking about the treatment. Looking like, how do we actually get you to be able to live more of the life that you want in focusing on symptoms and making changes in behaviors as opposed to focusing on the diagnosis, right? Like, really? Wanting to actually get you to chain of these behaviors. So that you're not as impacted by the diagnosis, right? Exactly. Also allowing people to see like you can have a full life. I think a lot of times remember, you know, and clients resisted most is because they assume that this means that you never gonna be able to work it never gonna be able to have children. It never gonna be able to do the things that you want to do life dream. But there are many people who are working in rivalry very successful with, you know, many different mental health diagnosis, it's really about engaging in the things that you need to engage in for you to feel better. And you know, being clear about that with yourself about what that is as opposed to simply trying to run away from it. So what are some of those things that you started tackle like what are some of the behaviors that frequently come up that you do work with your clients on trying to change or manage? So a lot of it has to do with. Anger in the education that comes either from being in a managed aides or the ability note, like the decrease in functioning that comes from being in a depressive state, those rapid mood changes in the habit that it can sort of recall your interpersonal relationships your work relationships functioning school. I have a lot of clients who are in college or pursuing master's degrees, and the changes are in prevent down from, you know, making schedules meaning nine, and, you know, doing the things that they want to do to school for some reason, I tracked hire cheaper from our quiets wannabe straight as this. They wanted to well all the time. And so oftentimes just feeling is all being don't have any control and that the people in their life. Whether it's Esser award parent don't understand that. And then they feed the negative consequences from that. So I really really work with them on being able to. Two one understand for themselves. What's happening to be able to identify triggers before the triggers actually become problematic grind? So if you're having a symptom onset typically, there are minor changes in your life that will happen before.

bipolar disorder Eliza Esser
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Can live a long and happy and successful life on my terms, not on the terms of bipolar disorder, not on the terms of of genetic brain disease that that puts me on. A disadvantage of dealing with emotions on a day-to-day basis without ability to have stability in my life. I can preserve and enhance the relationships around the either my current one or new ones that I can look forward to in my life and and that individual can go forth and be artistic or quirky, or sexy, or funny, or private, or introverted or extroverted, whatever they're meant to be in their life, but they can discover that person that they're meant to be separate and apart from bipolar disorder. And that's really the exciting part. And then I think it also gives people in opportunity much in the way that people like yourself are interested in helping other people give people who have bipolar disorder and seven and life and opportunity to help others and to recognize when bipolar, any kind of mental illness maybe going on in somebody around them, either a co worker or neighbor or another future family member loved one. But they can recognize that and help that person walk through their pain and lead them to positive treatment experience so they can benefit and grow as well. So it's not just about what you do for yourself. It's open how you pay that forward to others and create just a stronger community around us of which you know I'm very excited about this show. Does that many other opportunities are available for people to not feel alone, and when you've gone through treatment, if you've gone through the suffering and the challenges and the bumps in the road, you have an opportunity to help other people and there's nothing better than that. Really appreciate that. Thank you so much for being on our show, Michael. It's been a lot of fun. Well, thank you..

bipolar disorder Michael
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"It's okay to talk to your doctor about how your medications may be affecting this. So we're having a an ongoing discussion that respects each other in that grand bargain that we started. And is that person kind of goes through whatever sort of crisis they may be going through that kind of aggravating, either those kind of more typical emotions or maybe aggravating the disorder itself. It's it's again an open dialogue. It's collaborative and help that person. Ultimately, the stay on course with what they need to do going forward in their treatment. So that brings up one saying, we see this too often is that people who get to that point where they're in maintenance as you say, but then they decide, hey, I'm doing great. I don't need these pills anymore. This is something that we need to get through people's heads. I think that, you know, this is a lifelong condition and you will need these pills. But we, we hear all the time people going off their meds and having to start all over again almost. And is this something that you address in your in your program? I absolutely so. Yes, yes, absolutely address it. This is part of what it is to have bipolar disorder. Just like I talked about denial as an expected. Part of that pre stabilization phase with the two of you brought up is a typical feature stabilisation. So as a person moves into that phase of care, I absolutely talk to them about their eventual inevitable desire to get off medication. And and I do sit again as part of what it is to manage polar your life that doesn't make you bad because you've had thoughts about getting off your medication. It makes you quite typical if you will in the process and what I what I usually do. My patience is is I tell them, look, you're going to think about it doesn't mean you're going to necessarily get get off of them, but you're going to think about it at some point or another, and and if and when you do let me know if you're currently therapy, bring it up. If for some reason you know we have had sessions and while give me a call, here's my phone number always. Call me when you feel this way because chances are something else is coming up in your life. The needs to be discussed beyond medications itself, because there's a particular reason why at some point you had that thought it is inevitable, but how you put it on your personal time line says something about what you're dealing with in your life, and I wanna talk about that too. Before you make that decision of whether or not you're gonna go if your mess. Now through all of the through education, they've had up to the point. They certainly know what the research is, and they certainly know my position with regard to having medications and being on them through the lifespan. But I wanna have an open dialogue about what brought them to that particular point. Whenever they arrive at that point that they stay in communication with their therapy team, their treatment team and the people who love them and care for them not to be in a judgmental way not to say, hey, you better not do this or else, but the open up dialogue about what might be going on in their life right now that sort of aggravating that thought, if you will. So you've walked us through the three steps and now you. Got a person that is that is out there living their life. What does their life look like? Now the day, their family, everybody's made it what is the prognosis for somebody with bipolar disorder to lead a relatively normal life? That's the question that if me an opportunity to give everybody good news, the good news is that bipolar disorder is very manageable disease illness, and it is in my opinion, and a lot of people have problems with those words and I get that. So I try to be careful with that and it's not meant to, you know it all to to the stigmatize it to help people understand that this is something that I have just like I could have any kind of medical disorder that's not psychiatric in nature, but something that I have to attend to, and I.

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"bipolar disorder" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Now. What do you mean? By owning the bipolar acknowledging that that you have it, and that you have to cope with it in some way. Absolutely. In fact, denial of bipolar in the bipolar diagnosis is very common among patients and loved ones around them, and it's important to be able to construct a treatment and confront the denial not necessarily the person who may be scared of the diagnosis of what it means to him or her through their lifespan. There really understand that that's a unique part of bipolar disorder that needs to be addressed. So owning bipolar is to work through that denial and take that responsibility necessary for patient and family. Through that lifelong process of both healing through the consequences of bipolar disorder that also managing a lifelong mental disorder, and and everything that's necessary to do that. Well, is there a common trait for people who may be a become bipolar? Well, it is a genetic disorder. So the foundations of bipolar disorder are hereditary they're coded and the person's DNA, essentially and a very complicated way. But in in a in a basic way of understanding mardi it's important for people to know true, bipolar disorder. If you will. Has its genetic foundations, and it influences how the brain develops ultimately in handling emotional regulation and mood states typically at some point in that person's development. We usually see this and adolescence early adulthood, but also a little bit later in women who might have a postpartum onset of bipolar. Both symptoms can begin to emerge with certain catalysts that can permit those symptoms. If you will to eventually emerge and the disorder kind of takes place without genetic piece typically, we don't see people that have the same kind of classic bipolar disorder as we do with people who have that genetic conditions. The name of the book is called owning bipolar. How patients and families can take control of bipolar disorder, the author Michael pitch, Michael? Thank you so much for your time. Thank you very much Marty five forty four has we check in early check in with Justin Adams in and bring up an.

bipolar disorder Michael pitch Justin Adams Marty
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"And bifida amount of mallow select strain b b twelve resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of psychiatric rehospitalization individuals recently discharged following hospitalization for mania the probiotic compound was well tolerated and had low levels of side effects the junked of usa provider next might represent a major addition to the therapeutic art manteris material for the management of mania and other mood disorders and i'm gonna highlight a major addition because this does not mean that okay stop your meds and just take a probiotic these patients who ended up bouncing back into the hospital these patients i assure you were discharged on full boat of medication so the probiotics had a addon on affect to the medication they're already taken medication that was of little efficacy for twenty four out of thirty three patients because manic depression is a very very serious and sometimes hard to treat condition especially in patients who are prone to hospitalization i i get patients who suffer from bipolar disorder one of the reasons i get patients is that i treated a patient many years ago for bipolar disorder and he had a terrific success in terms of getting off medications and normalizing his life and he wrote about it in forbes magazine and he mentioned that i was dr since then because of that little article i've had a steady stream of patients for that condition they're challenging patients but they really respond well to diet lifestyle certain key supplements fish oil especially helpful it's been shown to be helpful in bipolar disorder but this amazing result with probiotics suggests that the condition is very very amenable to natural support and the very very exciting study and guay to something that is very powerful restoration of gut health you know we don't know precisely why there's a relationship between probiotics and mental disorders or mental health but we knew that the condition of the gut can influence the release of toxic compounds in the bloodstream that circulate to all the organs the body including the brain and brain toxicity can cause mental derangement and one of the most powerful ways to address leaky gut syndrome altered intestinal permeability is with colostrum and so very excited to share with you of some news about the benefits of nature's most powerful superfood which is colostrum this is an attritional supplement that i now recommend and use that's clinically proven to maintain optimal immune function of course the condition of the gut relates to our defenses against viruses and.

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"bipolar disorder" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Like we put our hands off the table and do concentration roy raise it off the ground i can look at an object this does not does not relate to what we're discussing tonight or if it does what they told me is that like i have a bipolar disorder and i wrote this letter and in this you know like a computer has real time they didn't have real time and they're progressing were real time in a bi polar disorder your mind like the electrons or neutrons and your brain off slow and you can't even really think and then why around i wouldn't yeah i mean that's one doctors interpretation who probably isn't into too much of the metaphysical but these types of abilities are something that are more easily explained in this ancient science of creation another words if you can sync it it can be right not only that but it in other words your your mind or your unconscious somehow is controlling the fields of your body the at the theoretical level that you're another words there's more your body than just the physical there's an aura or whatever the extends outward and if a person has billie to learn to use to manipulate that you can for example create ethereal gradients in the vicinity of an object and cause it to move when i say a gradient i mean in other words a force field that's what what is a force field where you're doing you're you're making a gradient in the ether and in this science it actually can explain what force is what causes things to move this is something the physics doesn't do it just puts the mathematical equations there but it doesn't tell you what happens the best way to to understand it is imagine a chemical reaction wave.

bipolar disorder billie
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"To try some of these things and i i can do it in my my dad can do it like we put our hands off the table and do concentration really raise it up off the ground i can look at an object oh man this does not does not relate to what we're discussing tonight or if it does what they told me is that like i have a bipolar disorder and i wrote this letter and in this you know like a computer has real time i mean didn't have real time and they're progressing were real time in a bi polar disorder your mind like the electrons or neutrons in your brain shoot off slow and you can't even really think and then turn around i wouldn't yeah i mean that's one doctors interpretation who probably isn't into too much of the metaphysical but these types of abilities are something that are more easily explained in this ancient science of creation another words if you can sync it it can be right not only that but it's another words your your mind or your unconscious somehow is controlling the fields of your body the at the theoretical level that you're another words there's more your body just the physical there's an aura or whatever the extends outward and if a person has the ability to learn to you to manipulate that you can for example create feerick gradients in the vicinity of an object and cause it to move when i say a gradient i mean in other words a force field that's what what is a force field where you're doing you're you're making a gradient in the ether and in this science it actually can explain what force is what causes things to move this is something the physics doesn't do it just puts the mathematical equations air but doesn't tell you what happens the best way to to understand it is imagine a chemical reaction wave now imagine that there's a another gradient.

bipolar disorder
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I felt much more relaxed my dad of course being a doctor being surgeon new great psychiatrists for my sister he did not really believe in therapy though talk therapy he just said stay in your meds and smile and you'll be fine it was there was a lot of denial in general in in my during my upbringing my brother was diagnosed with well she she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and ended up taking her life after living with this really severe disorder for many many years she'd had enough my brother was diagnosed with what was it borderline personality disorder now at the time we all thought okay it's just borderline it's not really a mental illness it's like almost a mental illness that's what we thought so we were down we were in denial he convinced us that he didn't need any treatment or or therapy or anything and he ended up having a pretty sad life is a result of alcoholism and drugs and and mostly just a mental illness that was never really dealt with head on.

bipolar disorder
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"We're watching or listening to my podcast and it was this beautiful letter where she said my granddaughter was just diagnosed with bipolar disorder and i didn't know anything about and i think she said you know i'm paraphrasing but she said you know i tried to learn as much as i can but i still don't feel like i can connect with my granddaughter and have a conversation with her about this thing that is so prevalent in her life and after watching your podcast i went and picked up and brought her over the house and we sat and watched your podcast together because it was one where i was talking very openly about it and and she said that her granddaughter kept on pointing at the screen and saying yeah i've i've had that happen i felt that way and it was i gotta tell you that's more than any song that i've written that hit me you know and it made me realize this is what i have to be doing a half to be having real conversations with people about what really mad and i want my art to reflect that moving forward not that my art hasn't reflected that in the past but i think that this gives me a a sense of of approval to even maybe pushed that a little bit further to open up and be a little bit more honest in my art it'll be those things that'll be the thing that like yeah i think like i talked about ptsd but it's not until i was sitting with this guy backstage and he was talking about his ptsd and i'd always everyone told me i had ptsd but i've i was like i was in a war just that a tv show and then all of a sudden he's talking about showers in the morning and i was like oh wait i had those showers and about getting done and the feeling when you get done the day and you're like and i was like i know that feeling and the feeling when you are losing your shit and i was like oh my god i do have ptsd and then so i was like fuck it and it's like it's not like what my podcast is about but it is my pockets just about me and it's my journey or whatever with my friends or the conversations we have the guy.

bipolar disorder ptsd
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"So you uh you know we're pretty busy i i think that's incredible one of the things that we do here out in societies you know people with bipolar disorder shouldn't have children or people with mental illness shouldn't have children and then of course you know bipolar disorder is past genetically so you know of apparent with bipolar disorder is more likely to have a child with bipolar disorder how do you feel about all of the hats just the way that society sordo that feels about people and our position you know being parents acting acting agreed agreed area or you're not with you uh i mean i think people first of all i think people who suffer must be some people who live with bipolar disorder the most carrying passionate people there are i mean under since i i've been diagnosed i've met many people uh wrap our or and they're carrying their hard workers there compassionate you know and they're definitely equipped to be parents you know i my wife and i i'm agree parent i'll say it you know i i know how to raise i'll i'll know how to raise my boys i'm no doubt about it jesus wonderful i i couldn't agree more in i was one of the people that sort of bought into that stereotype that it people living with bipolar disorder shouldn't have kids in it's one of my i mean it's it's it's probably my biggest regrets now i believed what society was telling me rather than reflecting inward on my own abilities you know i i'm glad that you didn't suffer the same consequences because i'm sure your children are great and i'm i'm sure you're a great father i i'm glad that bipolar disorder didn't take that away from you.

bipolar disorder
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

Jenna & Julien Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

"It's just simple a lot of times he's just his simplify things quipped does that k check it out click lincoln disruption thank you sponsors fontaine's ice have a clarification from the sorry you can have hallucinations with bipolar the didn't specify bipolar one or two uh you can have them as visual auditory tactile olfactory or can aesthetic uh hallucinations are more likely to be auditory than visual in people with bipolar disorder you're more likely to have hallucinations of you experience severe mood swings hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms are also more likely to happen with those with schizophrenia rather than those with bipolar disorder that's why people with bipolar disorder who have hallucinations can be incorrectly diagnose crowder so that says that it it auditory hallucinations are more common than visual ones so it is possible she was homeless in eating either visual or sound or both mm hmm in that if she had maybe had some other nations in the pass she could have been incorrectly diagnosed with schizophrenia but typically someone wouldn't diagnose you with schizophrenia in you just had bipolar him it's true but it's also not it's safe to say that just because she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder that she was the not also schizophrenic in was undiagnosed that is also possible either way dozen explain how she got not water tarp ended wanna clarify thank you that's important mark uh the next one is called the man from torrid this is still elicit this this is my favorite shit reserves from this is the anomaly in product com.

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"bipolar disorder" Discussed on GeekWire

GeekWire

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on GeekWire

"So the goal is to just get them activated again doing things that are either important or enjoyable so he helped them identify what what their values are one of the things that are meaningful to them and then start scheduling some activities in those areas the idea being that change starts outside an so do these things i and the the better feelings will follow from that jamie is currently working on a web at to help smokers with bipolar disorder quit and she hopes the technology could help overcome some of the issues unique to this group one of the issues with smokers with bipolar disorder in its is a serious mental illness and kinda coming up against that barrier again of people feeling leg third bigger issues at play here than smoking and not encouraging people to quit so treatment providers often don't even bring this up in conversation they're not talking about tobacco cessation so one of the ideas with using technology is well what if we sort of take some of this out of the hands of the treatment providers and not make them a bottleneck to getting treatment so if we develop a webbased intervention that's particularly targeted for the needs of people of bipolar disorder sort of justice some of those things that get in the way like the belief that smoking treats symptoms of the disorder that mental health will get worse when they quit um that that could be an extra help to them jamie and jonathan's work is fascinating because it isn't just psychology or technology alone it's a dynamic and unique blend of both of them there solving problems as both psychologists and developers a great example is engagement on one hand how do you keep someone engaged in their treatment.

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