36 Burst results for "Bipolar Disorder"

Fresh update on "bipolar disorder" discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:01 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "bipolar disorder" discussed on Today, Explained

"I was defensive. I mean, I had first I thought, well, you know, it takes a long time. This is research is a marathon. It's not a sprint, and we need to know much more before we can do much better. But I also recognize that he was speaking for a lot of people who had that same feeling that this wasn't just a science problem. This was an urgent public health crisis that didn't just require that we know more, but that we do better with what we know right now. And that urgency is not the way we do science generally. At doctor insel direction, the NiMH and its billions of dollars in government funding had pivoted to focus less on behavioral research and more on genetic research into what causes illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. And they made some stunning scientific advances while looking into genes, the problem was doctor insel started to realize those advances weren't doing very much at all for patients. Science was looking for causes, millions of people he says we're suffering the effects. 17 years ago, the federal government established a research project with the ambitious goal of mapping the entire human genome. When I arrived at NIH in 2002, the big breakthrough was the completion of the human genome project about 6 months later. Genetic mapping researchers know more than ever about the hereditary influences behind cancer and heart disease and diabetes and many other conditions. Every area was looking at that new map we had of the human genome and saying, how can we use that to understand not only the inheritance and the biology, but the opportunity to identify new targets for treatment. Scope and long-term potential, the human genome project has been compared to the Apollo project. Sometimes that works really well. And in the case of autism, I think we were able to find a range of new targets, some of which are now leading to new treatments. What was surprising in the studies of the anxiety disorders that may be highly irritable or bipolar illness, which is more heritable than hypertension or diabetes. Is that we found lots of signals, but no kind of no treatment targets. The signals we found were signals about risk, and there were so many of them, actually, rather than finding just a few, we found so many each of which contributed a very small amount. So was that a mistake to go after that? Well, of course not. The whole nature of science with reason we call it research is we don't know what we're going to find. In this case, we found lots of stuff, but we didn't find what we were looking for, which was the kind of high profile high impact molecular target that could be used for a new class of treatments. And one of the points I make in the book is we've got pretty good treatments right now. For me, they egregious piece of this is not that we don't have anything to offer. It's got plenty of stuff to offer. We're just not doing it. And so again, this is not an NiMH problem. This is a problem of a health system that's badly broken. I think many Americans would agree with you that getting healthcare feels like a maze. But psychiatry is also, as you know, a nascent field, just a couple decades ago, people would be treated with lobotomies. How far have we come in providing therapies that are safe and effective? We've come very far. We have medications that are show efficacy that they have a significant statistically significant effect in a randomized clinical trial. And that's been established for over 20 some antidepressants and for multiple antipsychotics. We also have pretty good data on safety. The difference though between efficacy and effectiveness is what these medications do in the real world if people don't take them, they may be efficacious, but they're not effective, and that's often the case with these medicines where in some cases, in some studies, 50% of people stop their medication before it's shown its full value. But why? Why do people stop taking their medication two main reasons? One is because the medicine works and the symptoms go away. So why when you stop it? And we have a model that tends to think that this is just about treating symptoms and so you don't need it if you don't have the symptoms. The second is that almost all the medications in psychiatry have side effects that people don't like. They're not, you know, we've traded one set of side effects for another. A lot of people have that sense of brain fog or they're sedated or they gain weight or they have sexual side effects. And you know, nobody wants that. So it's often this very awkward balance between finding something that works in something that doesn't have a side effect that makes you feel worse. And it's, those are tough decisions to make and there's a lot of trial and error and stop this one, start that one, change the dose, put two medicines together. The point I've tried to make in the book is that when we talk about treatment for these illnesses, we need to start talking about more than medication. We have psychological treatments. We have other treatments that are really quite important and can be effective and also safe. And there's no reason not to combine them. So optimal care would involve both medication and psychological treatment. Recovery is something very different. It's helping people to really build a life and I can't stress how significant this is for people with serious mental illness. And the recovery model is I talk about requires the three P's that is people place and purpose. These aren't covered by insurance. There's no pill for this, but social support having a sanctuary where you can recover where you can, you can heal, and then having a reason to recover, having a purpose having a mission, incredibly important for young people who have a mental illness to feel like they have a purpose as well. And our healthcare system rarely engages on those three ps or understands the importance of doing so much more than just pushing another medication. I'm wondering, in an ideal world, this gentleman who has a son who's struggling with schizophrenia and ricocheting between hospitalization and homelessness and incarceration, what kind of outcome in an ideal world, in what it sounds like you're saying is potentially a buildable world. What kind of outcome does that lead to for him? It's a year potentially multiyear commitment to making sure that he gets decent healthcare that he has a decent place to live, that he's getting not just medication, but he has to be on medication most of the time. Most individuals who are going to need that. But much more comprehensive, what we call whole person care, the deals with a range of issues, some of which may be cognitive, some of which may have to do with the fact that he needs job training or he needs an education to be able to get the skills that will allow him not to be unemployed and disabled. I have sent the Congress today a series of proposals to help fight mental illness and mental retardation. The United States really took on this problem in the early 1960s under president Kennedy, who in the last act that he signed the community mental health act on October 31st of 1963 before.

Insel Bipolar Illness Diabetes Schizophrenia Nimh Human Genome Project Bipolar Disorder NIH Sprint Federal Government Heart Disease Hypertension Autism Cancer Congress President Kennedy United States
Is Pure Evil the Reason Behind Mass Murderers?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:34 min | Last month

Is Pure Evil the Reason Behind Mass Murderers?

"But you have to ask yourself how is it explainable other than the existence of pure evil You say oh it's mental health is it Is it mental health Because let me tell you something again I hate citing education two days in a row so it's going to have to stop for at least another 6 months Because it's just weak people cite their education when they can't explain an argument without relying on their CV right But for a moment forgive me folks there are a lot of people who have serious mental health disorders Schizophrenia is schizoaffective disorders personality issues bipolar disorder TBIs There are a lot of people who have serious cerebral damage They don't go out and murder a bunch of 9 year olds You know and you say well maybe it's just like the video games and the entertainment Well like I said yesterday I don't think a lot of that stuff helps but I don't blame them I mean I like video games growing up I used to watch Chuck Norris movies and James Bond movies You know my dad let me watch invasion USA when I was I don't know how old I was 8 9 There was a lot of dead bodies in that I never went out and be like wow that would be cool if I could whack a few people That never happened either So if it's not the mental health and it's not the video games it is not the violent movies Is it some combination of it all I mean maybe evil is the explanation

Schizoaffective Disorders Schizophrenia Chuck Norris James Bond USA
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

05:22 min | 11 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Lower cholesterol so i find that when people understand that mental health issues are a mind body issue. Not just a mind or a spiritual issue than it helps. People find their their grounding to have conversations with other people. So i'd say the first thing i say to people is and i asked them like. Does your family know that you're on medication. They'll say you know. I i feel kinda funny telling them and then i'll what makes you feel funny. Okay your family may see this as a spiritual failure that you are on medication. Your family may see this as a weakness ray but what they say that to you if you fell and broke your ankle would they say if you only prayed harder. Your ankle would heal quicker or you wouldn't feel any pain at all right so we kind of have to talk through some of the by sees that that we grew up with and then we have to talk through will what sorts of cutting shape that conversation to honor your experience as somebody who is dealing with a mind body issue. And how do you simultaneously. Let them know. look i after. I take my medication by nine pm. I need to be asleep if i have bipolar disorder. I have to sleep. So i need help with the kids. Because if i don't get my sleep..

bipolar disorder
Bipolar Disorder: Depressed, Mentally Ill & Famous

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

02:23 min | 11 months ago

Bipolar Disorder: Depressed, Mentally Ill & Famous

"Bernard sizzles. Sonny corinthos gorgeous star. Abc's hit soap opera. General hospital in real life. The devoted family man has been married to his sweetheart paula for fourteen years and they live a quiet life in los angeles with their two daughters. But maurice's life isn't as picture-perfect as it seems every day behind the scenes. Maurice battles mental illness that once left him violent suicidal and at its worst locked inside a mental institution wondering if he'd ever get out so maurice's struggle with the demons of his bipolar disorder began in his early twenties just as he was beginning is acting career. I think the real start of it was I woke up in my friends apartment. And i was drinking and i was crying uncontrollably. I think i'm losing my mind. That was just beginning of the battle inside maurice bernard's brain at twenty two. He slipped into what he calls the dark side and turned violent against his mother. Kind of physical by the arm. When i looked at my dad. And i said that i was the devil and i was yelling at him. Scary it my mind was was racing undermines. Now it's kind of like being in a nightmare and not being able to wake up. They had to admit me. I went to a psychiatric hospital. I was strapped down in the wheelchair. Remember waking up in the sunlight was coming through. The window. Could barely hear. I died in manhattan. He was trapped in his own nightmare heavily medicated and restrained in solitary confinement in a mental institution. I remember having lots of and then ending in that state. You almost feel like it's always gonna to be that way. So why is life worth living. Maurice was diagnosed as manic depressive. What's happening inside of you. You almost feel like you. You wanna explode. You have so much emotion so much energy almost like drug. The high you get from it but for maurice. The manic highs are always followed by deep paralyzing depression. I had no confidence. You look in the mirror and you you still the same person but it doesn't matter. It's what's happening inside. It's just an enormous enormous amount of

Bernard Sizzles Sonny Corinthos Maurice Maurice Bernard Paula ABC Los Angeles Manhattan Manic Depressive Depression
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Calm Conversations

Calm Conversations

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Calm Conversations

"Also comment of shopped medications and some of them do eventually goff education. A desk with you know planning concise landing in collaborative planning with their psychiatrists sell and even when they do go off medication than also. It's about crafting. About what are the cat treatment or care plans to continue windy. goff medication. So is it talking therapy. Or is it of gaining support from their families In france right. So i think You know it's quite careful planning together with a psychiatrist when they do. Go off Medication yeah i can imagine so and you know i i i have seen that. I've been feeling better and the past couple of since you know i guess. Five years ago. I was arrested for theft aside and i. My psychiatrist has actually floated the idea of trying to reduce my medication at with me. Hope to eventually get off it. But i'm so afraid of of even trying. Because i don't want to run the risk of relapsing again. Yeah and i. I do wonder whether better it's just me over. It's yeah i don't know whether this concept of self stigmatization is something comes up for your clients. But i recognize that this diagnosis that. I have as well as the medication i won. It really feels i. I really feel that. I need to be super super careful about the risks. I expose myself to. And any stresses i take. What are your thoughts on this self. Stick with those even. Yeah i think you know. That's that's really quite common When you know some some by clients actually cannot say that. Hey you know. I don't think i can do this. Because of mental condition. Or you know. I have kind of a rejected. Opportunities are promotion in onto depriving themselves from lots of other opportunities You know because they believe that Not normal decay recover and sometimes you know the stigma A lot more from dim south than from deputies owner from from dep losses in this a lot of different levels of stick my here right now. We're kind of many on. The societal level bipolar disorder itself is not really whiteley understood. Come from myself. I found it really really difficult to talk to talk about bipolar disorder with my boss and within the ten tential people i was dating right. And so how how do you get people along this to overcome the self stigmatization. Yeah gets a really quick question. And i think going back to kind of what do therapy Remember when i mentioned that sometimes when we experienced things in our lives we develop certain core beliefs by ourselves right end. What kind of dubious Relook at altus thoughts in all these beliefs and see what the sand or a more objective way of looking at ourselves are perceiving the situation. So sometimes it's about kind of getting them to things. You cannot doing experiments just to test out their predictions to see if it's true or not right Most often the actually realized that. Hey that's actually just prediction. That's kind of Developed because of the kind of the critical thoughts. I haven't but myself the coleman myself but actually is not quite true. I said the more try out the morning tests predictions more the moldy realize that it doesn't really quite happen Up may be wall objective way of looking at situations and then they would slowly Changed perception and constantly giving us a chance. Okay yeah i mean. I i see where you're coming from this kind of brings to mind some hypotheses. I was testing right in my income. Reach idea and this is related to the so. Yeah it was. It was really really hard for me to kind of bring up this topic right. Because i was so afraid of sharing that i have this condition to take care of right and there was actually one time where i those one time. I decided not to share with the buzzer. Knows dating so this was Pretty fresh shop. When i pretty fresh my diagnosis and often so when i started dating this person i was hypothetic so i was like the life of the party. I wasn't sleeping very much. I was very fun and then About three months. After that. I kind of Into a depressive episode and then he pretty much doubt he sits sabrina. I i don't know who you are and content. You like this. This is not the one. I thought you are very and it was super hurtful. And that kind of beat me clemma and honestly i. I actually didn't share about a minute noses at that point And only in the past two and a half yours. I decided that i decided that. Okay you know what. I'm just going to be super upfront about it and just share with whoever. I'm beating or even new fence right okay. So i have bipolar disorder. This is what it is and You know feel free to ask questions and feel free to walk away. If you're uncomfortable with it It was very liberating for me. But at the same time it's it was super super scary to share but Yeah and i get. I guess it's been helpful because semen on one hand. It's it means. I don't have to carry the button this secret right so i don't have to keep a secret and at the same time it's also allow me to pretty much. Let go off. Any expectations The relationship just putting you ice off of it mad. That's lovely in a really curious. You know how they get from not wanting to share to getting the courage to kind of share it and you know it's almost like take you a little bit you know. I have this i don't know. Actually i think. I just think i was reading this This article by mark minson Art of not giving. Now i think we get we get We get censored here so And i realize yet. I think just by giving less fs. There's nothing to lose really. And the the was the worst case scenario is that the person walks away and says no. I can't handle this and that's also actually the best case in. Reo because you don't have to deal with you. Don't have to deal with their. You know their worries our insecurities of being a partner lisa down the if if see an episode comes up so so far it's working and Yeah.

bipolar disorder goff whiteley dep france coleman sabrina mark minson lisa
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Calm Conversations

Calm Conversations

08:16 min | 11 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Calm Conversations

"What you mean when you sharing your that definition right bud when i finally got my bipolar disorder that noses. It really helped me. Make sense of the changing moods and behaviors. I was experiencing But at the same time it felt impossible to imagine that. I would ever be able to live a normal life or so-called normal life again. I was very worried about what i would relapse or if my condition but robotussin so i really wanted to find out from you whether this was a concern. That's shared by the clients that you see. Yeah i think you know similar to yourself. A lot of my clients asked the same question you know. Can i recover candidate normal life. Can i get back to well before So you know they. They do first thoughts as well and What would trigger those thoughts for them. I think i don't times it's kind of being in the depressive episode where they feel sansa hopelessness and helplessness in that slot. Kind of living depression does to you. Right gives you the sense of hopelessness. So i think a lot of it is kind of attributed to to dead depressive episode And and also i guess You know i think. There's a lot of stigma around you know mood disorders bipolar people. They recover from it or that of efficacy is really really low And i think a client also kind of asking All sharing the hassle experiences web was shunned or rejected by potential hotness in a win wendy's shed that they have bipolar or who disorders. So i think all those of Yeah give think right. Perhaps you know maybe did not normal and maybe they can lead a normal life like other people. Yeah definitely i mean you know for me. At least when i think to my personal experience i slipped. This was when i was twenty six. I pretty much hit my hit Button and i kind of had to let go of all the aspirations that head of having a successful career of finding a life partner of during a nest egg for the life. I want to have all of these milestones are events are really really key to i. Guess to someone who's in the twenty so even thought to use right And and having that kind of diagnosis or setback seemed view. Made me feel like okay. You know. I have to let go of everything and life will. I can never expect to have a normal life ever again right. So how how do you help. Your clients reframe their perspective to. What's their diagnosis. I think to begin with we have a conversation about what recovery is And i think the two types of recovery in how i see right. The first is what we call symptomatic recovery. Meaning you know. You don't have any symptoms or yes. Induced reduction anti other type of recovery is kind of war. Your personal recovery right may are able to manage. Your economic conditions are able to manage your bipolar to continue to lead a meaningful life. Yes i think a lot of times. It just starts off by having a conversation. What what is recovering mean for you. And and what is the normal life. Because i think we all have different lives in an electoral Exists actually on the very different lives. What defense attorneys. So i think that's kind of asking your on my clients. You know what what is recovery like for them in and what. I got gold sooner. And what additional term. Unitel knowlton goals. And how can we continue to achieve debt now while managing the symptoms bipolar disorder. I think wow okay. That was a really good breakdown. I really liked that you. You brought down the recovery process into two right. These domestic recovery end the personal recovery. And maybe we can kind of tackled this this conversation from going. You know going into two different parts right so with regards to symptomatic recovery on. What does that process look like. And how do you guide your clients through that recovery process. So i think the first thing we have to is determine if israeli by who disorder or is it some kind of difficult tuesday experiencing so we went up. Typically do a psychological assessment to kind of understand. Why the mental meats. Are there any other comb abilities experiencing in terms of the mental conditions. Like maybe you know. Ocd onion indicted is orders. Anything like that so once you get a good understanding that yes it. Is you know appalachia disorder that they primarily kind of Experiencing dan you know. We might kind of dan. Consider sub treatment options for them so most people who have becua- to disorder. Do kind of go on to get some pharmacology. Goal treatment. Meaning medication And then so we might refer them to a psychiatrist who to kind of get medication or remind also that Recommend them to attend psychological therapies like huntington behavioral therapy which has been proven to be quite effective in supporting with bipolar disorder I think reflecting on my own journey right You're right in saying that. What really helped us. treatment on two fronts Having that that Well on on one hand. Having that help from my therapist was really helpful to reframe my thoughts on a lot of critical thoughts that were coming and and you know not helping me get better and on the other hand i did seek help from my psychiatrists and i still do now right and i have been negation amoud stabilizes for the past few years i also notice that you mentioned houma it-it-it's so how does this Walk you know. I have spoken to some friends who have bipolar disorder along with other other symptoms and other commodities. What does treatment like for them. That's a great question. So there might be cool mobility such as the providence of other mental conditions. Like you know some other types of anxiety disorder this So what happens in treatment emmys for the psychological part of things instead refocused on on eating one before the other so we look at. What is the primary difficulty today experiencing so bipolar disorder to our is it maybe. ocd mine. So that's one thing that we ask in in therapy to to ascertain that and you know we kinda magic one question right so this to come dishes. That are suffering from If i if one day i wave my magic one end you know your. Ocd kind of Recovers would you experience by kona to and vice versa right so none of the times the client with angel to me actually inc bipolar disorder. That is you know maintaining ucd. So that's rambis. Dan treat bipolar disorder.

robotussin Unitel knowlton symptoms bipolar disorder appalachia disorder wendy depression huntington behavioral bipolar disorder dan houma anxiety disorder rambis Dan
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Calm Conversations

Calm Conversations

02:35 min | 11 months ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Calm Conversations

"Today. I'm really really looking forward to our conversation. I have a lot of questions for you. And i'm hoping that you'll be able to shed some light on on the condition. I live with bipolar disorder. Man hopefully give us all some hope that one can live well with this and perhaps even five whom so before we get started. Could you share a bit about yourself and what you do sure. So i'm dr polina. Messinia critical psychology leadoff serious ecological sub assists at the rea- community I completed my doctorate studies including psychology the uk anti focus on providing psychological For clients experiencing mood in exactly disorders and post traumatic stress. This orders so that's great. You're the perfect person to speak to about this big question i have. I i try all right. So we're talking about bipolar disorder So i would like to understand a bit more about bipolar disorder. What does it look like. And how does it present itself from boston to blessing shore so bipolar disorder is one of the four basic types of bipolar disorder. End in general bipolar disorders. Mental condition affects your mood. Many people can of experienced a being from one extreme to the other so experiencing very low routes a depression to fitting maniac. All episodes of mania feeling very high in over two so particularly bipolar. Latitude is order if someone else to be diagnosis debt do experience just to conditions so at least one hypothetic episode and at least one depressive episode. Yes some. I'm definitely familiar with that police. You know so when i was in my depressive state and i was able to work in kind of refusing to get out of bed it was really reading difficult And at that point. I was reluctantly relying on parents. Do to carry bills. Fbi professional help. I.

bipolar disorder dr polina uk boston depression Fbi
Conductor with Bipolar Disorder Launches Orchestra To Battle Mental Health Stigma

The Psych Central Show

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Conductor with Bipolar Disorder Launches Orchestra To Battle Mental Health Stigma

"Today we have ronald brownstein. Mr brownstein is the music director of me. Too and a graduate of juilliard conducted the san francisco symphony berlin philharmonic and the oslo philharmonic. Just to name a few. Mr brownstein was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in nineteen eighty five. He launched me too because of his desire to support others who struggled to maintain good mental health. Mr brownstein welcome to the show. Thank you you have conducted major orchestras all around the world. And you are on a trajectory to being a lead conductor when you disclosed your diagnosis of bipolar disorder. And then you were shunned by the classical music community. Was this the experience that caused you to start me too. Well it wasn't like. I decided to start me too. I got basically fired from a job. Because of my mentally ill. I knew that i would never get up conducting chop again But it wasn't like a decision. It's just i felt that i run out of options So i had to create a new option which was to make my own of of people like me. And i guess it was not as though there was a formal launch. We just set out a press release and we waited to see if anyone would show up and a few people did. People were frankly sitting on on cold folding chairs all purpose community space at the beginning. We didn't really know what we're doing. And no one knew what would happen So anyways long short. I said everyone down on the floor and we talked about a parameters was just simply that wanted to make an orchestra that stigma free context in which we would be ourselves and not have to hide our illness so Kind of started like that

Mr Brownstein Ronald Brownstein San Francisco Symphony Berlin Oslo Philharmonic Bipolar Disorder
Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

"Rare for a scientific paper to fetch much on the black market. These days but i got the kisco was no ordinary psychiatrist. This is a book that has been made into many editions by cycads clinics. But if you go to latin america mimeograph versions are xerox versions on the market access for three hundred dollars like market for this book brazilians particularly loved so that in defiance of the even the the sim and that monograph he's talking about is currently selling for seven hundred to nine hundred dollars on amazon. It was an issue of the psychiatric clinics of north america. That gop guest edited in nineteen ninety nine and a paper that he wrote in that issue became one of his most influential and controversial in it he laid out a spectrum of bipolar disorders from the most manic psychotic extreme that schizo affective disorder two cases of bipolar that are only unleashed by substance abuse antidepressants or brain atrophy from dementia. Excuse me affective bipolar psychotic less than skis. Affective psychotic bipolar one bipolar to. There's something we call the half because there are psychosomatic less type. Which is medication associated Type for which is hyperthermic with depression. Because they people looking at the press is for the half which is substance used as five. Which is the knicks states. There's a pipe. Six which is in the context of dementia all but two of those categories have actually been absorbed into the dsm which now includes bipolar one disorder bipolar two disorder psychopathic disorder which views as the temperamental underpinning of borderline personality disorder and calls in his list bipolar two and a half when it occurs with the longer depressions of bipolar to then what about his bipolar three well antidepressant. Induced mania is now categorized as bipolar disorder in dsm five largely based on the research of gop and others who showed that over ninety percent of patients with antidepressant induce mania. Go on to develop full bipolar disorder with long term. Follow up a switching on the presence indicate by piloting. Now finally this and five is going to accept that then. He had bipolar four. That's hyperthermic the real charismatic. Hypo manic type temperament with depression. Okay this one didn't make it into the dsm actually and bipolar four and a half substance induced by polar disorder which is now categorized in the bipolar chapter india. Sem bipolar five depression with mixed features which was recognized for the first time in. Dsm five bipolar. Six mania in the context of dementia got believed that the brain atrophy of dementia could unleash a latent bipolar disorder in people with genetic or other risks for bipolar. But this category is not recognized in. Dsm unless you count as bipolar due to a general medical condition and yet you can hear in that court. That hookup is not satisfied. He's looking for a fight. He says his conceptualization was done in defiance of dsm that in defiance of the even the newly sm was a passionate man wore his heart on his sleeve. I am not very much of a political individual. Actually shy individual. Relatively speaking intellectuals tend to be. Yes oh you did do poetry and art. I saw on your cv you you. You were a poet and artist. Right of. I would say a young man. Everybody lies poetry. But some you fall in love with my wife. I always thought that way because When we were college students she said to me you one of those people who can bring science and art together and she said that's the ultimate aim of all our knowledge and i think that She she really saw something in me that time and predicted that my career would rise in methodic way bob Would only seventeen in college.

Bipolar Dementia Affective Psychotic Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Disorder Psychopathic Disorder GOP Depression Xerox Latin America North America Knicks Amazon Latent Bipolar Disorder Mania India Bob Would
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Mental Health and Wealth Show

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Mental Health and Wealth Show

"It's a standing organization in buffalo and nationally. And we've had other you know local black leaders and and so it's becoming a program that is really touching on topics and such matter that is really important to the local community that can drive people to action which is a lot. We don't talk a lot about voter education and the reason why people need to vote so it's really evolved. In a way that i love it. I enjoy it. You know it's such as. I talked about my experience of being in the hospital all those years. I was in college and i graduated from buffalo. Say college with a degree in broadcasting. Even though i was big hospitalized how was years so joe. Like there's this. Is this really right up my alley. Even though it's many years later but the show focus is said is around addressing the needs of the local community but seeing that's on facebook it goes has a broader audience which is pretty cool. That's awesome. that's such a full circle moment for you absolutely love that i love that. So you're talking about serving the african american community and something that i'm interested in talking about further is what are the barriers and stigmas that black men in particular face when trying to get mental health. Care i know an episode two. I spoke with sinclair. Caesar who also suffers from bipolar disorder and he was talking a lot about kind of the culture where you don't show your problems you know. Just talk to god about it and some curious. What your perspective is you know what are the barriers and stigmas that black men face when trying to get mental health care. Yeah i did hear your interview with sinclair. I thought excellent the he'd brought up a lot of good points in that you know. I think the culture among african americans in general a lot of actor ties back to slavery and history of of slavery that came around over four hundred years ago where there's a condition actually called post traumatic slave syndrome. Let's theory from dr joyce gray and so she posits that. Essentially there are a lot of the meld at behaviors or reactions that happen amongst afro-americans as a result of this history of slavery and crow. Police brutality and so forth but for afro-american. Men what happens. Is that basically being black in america already is is stigmatized and so we know that for men. They carry the weight of knowing that they're at risk. So when you think about it. There's this idea of stress so being stressed is a black man is an everyday thing. So we know that stress releases russa's cortisol which then affects our body. You know it oh adrenaline fire.

buffalo sinclair Caesar african american community facebook russa dr joyce gray cortisol bipolar disorder slave syndrome america
A Conversation With Michael Broussard

The Healing Place Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Michael Broussard

"Welcome everybody to the healing place. Podcast i'm your host here. Well brock and very excited to help with me today. Michael her son. He is the founder of ask sex abuse survivor which started out as a one man. Show about childhood sexual abuse that it is now so much more. So welcome michael. I appreciate that it's good to be here. It's good to be having a conversation with somebody who's coming from the same place that that that connection it makes a richer conversation for sure we were just talking before hitting record about that. Street cred and survivors Being able to talk about it from a survivors perspective and our own healing journey. So yes talk about what. What got you into this. Where where you're going with that in what you spend doing well back in two thousand fourteen. I had been in therapy for a number of years with a trauma informed therapist and that was a major change for me because i had given up on therapy many times and i didn't realize it was because i was with the wrong kind of therapists. I blame myself for failure. I should have healed. So i get into into therapy with somebody who actually knows how to help me. Who knows how to use the yard. And all these other things. So i can reconnect with lamb and we get to two thousand fourteen. And we've we've. We've diagnosed bipolar disorder. And the cpt sti and all these other things that was dealing with. And i felt more centered in terms of. I knew what. I was what my challenges were and i knew a lot of coping skills that i learned in therapy and i turned there. But it's nice that you know what i wanna do. I wanna do a stage show like a play and i wanted to be interactive. I wanna be able to have people be able to ask questions of me throughout the presentation and had also drive away present so every time it's different and so every time we have a conversation about child sexual abuse and about healing and therefore we've done something important as valuables and she looked at me. She's like you're going to ruin everything you're gonna destroy everything you're going to let people ask you questions please. Don't i said you don't understand dr blair. I'm theater artist. This is how i process things. Including how i process healing so this is a great healing moment for me to say i'm going to do this on stage and the questions. It is such an important thing for me to get people to discuss. These things and to have survivors involve that discussion of non survivors involvement discussion and with great trepidation. Houston okay. that's fine. And essentially we developed a story in therapy from that point out it'll be developed to play in the way it was going to be framed hill at and what it didn't know at the time was the day that i went into. Tell her about this. She was planning on telling me she was retiring. She get it. She's got a lot of a lot of a long career helping a lot of people. It was about time. She retired good for her right. She didn't say anything about retirement after she heard this. I never knew that you've been planning to retire. She stayed on. And i kept seeing her way past retirement without knowing it and then she came to the show and she sat in the front row. And i've had that that rock of support it was like my wife and my therapist fro center and it was amazing because that helped me. Give me some strength to do what i wanted to do. And to conduct the question and answer parts of the show in a way that was productive in a way that actually got the conversation moving and at the end. I can hug from christie. And i get a hug from dr blair and first performance. It worked exactly like. I wanted to work which nothing in. My life has ever done that. You gotta just think twelve times screw up eleven and twelve good. This was like bam people are talking. Survivors are saying things like we to survivor who she was sitting with her boyfriend and he didn't know and during one of the breaks the feedback breaks. She talked about being a survivor. And that's when he found out

Dr Blair Brock Bipolar Disorder Michael Fro Center Houston Christie
A Conversation With Michael Broussard

The Healing Place Podcast

04:12 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Michael Broussard

"Welcome everybody to the healing place. Podcast i'm your host here. Well brock and very excited to help with me today. Michael her son. He is the founder of ask sex abuse survivor which started out as a one man. Show about childhood sexual abuse that it is now so much more. So welcome michael. I appreciate that it's good to be here. It's good to be having a conversation with somebody who's coming from the same place that that that connection it makes a richer conversation for sure we were just talking before hitting record about that. Street cred and survivors Being able to talk about it from a survivors perspective and our own healing journey. So yes talk about what. What got you into this. Where where you're going with that in what you spend doing well back in two thousand fourteen. I had been in therapy for a number of years with a trauma informed therapist and that was a major change for me because i had given up on therapy many times and i didn't realize it was because i was with the wrong kind of therapists. I blame myself for failure. I should have healed. So i get into into therapy with somebody who actually knows how to help me. Who knows how to use the yard. And all these other things. So i can reconnect with lamb and we get to two thousand fourteen. And we've we've. We've diagnosed bipolar disorder. And the cpt sti and all these other things that was dealing with. And i felt more centered in terms of. I knew what. I was what my challenges were and i knew a lot of coping skills that i learned in therapy and i turned there. But it's nice that you know what i wanna do. I wanna do a stage show like a play and i wanted to be interactive. I wanna be able to have people be able to ask questions of me throughout the presentation and had also drive away present so every time it's different and so every time we have a conversation about child sexual abuse and about healing and therefore we've done something important as valuables and she looked at me. She's like you're going to ruin everything you're gonna destroy everything you're going to let people ask you questions please. Don't i said you don't understand dr blair. I'm theater artist. This is how i process things. Including how i process healing so this is a great healing moment for me to say i'm going to do this on stage and the questions. It is such an important thing for me to get people to discuss. These things and to have survivors involve that discussion of non survivors involvement discussion and with great trepidation. Houston okay. that's fine. And essentially we developed a story in therapy from that point out it'll be developed to play in the way it was going to be framed hill at and what it didn't know at the time was the day that i went into. Tell her about this. She was planning on telling me she was retiring. She get it. She's got a lot of a lot of a long career helping a lot of people. It was about time. She retired good for her right. She didn't say anything about retirement after she heard this. I never knew that you've been planning to retire. She stayed on. And i kept seeing her way past retirement without knowing it and then she came to the show and she sat in the front row. And i've had that that rock of support it was like my wife and my therapist fro center and it was amazing because that helped me. Give me some strength to do what i wanted to do. And to conduct the question and answer parts of the show in a way that was productive in a way that actually got the conversation moving and at the end. I can hug from christie. And i get a hug from dr blair and first performance. It worked exactly like. I wanted to work which nothing in. My life has ever done that.

Brock Dr Blair Bipolar Disorder Michael Houston Fro Center Christie
Sisters, 18 and 21, attacked Chicago store security guard, stabbing him 27 times after they refused to wear face masks

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Sisters, 18 and 21, attacked Chicago store security guard, stabbing him 27 times after they refused to wear face masks

"To Chicago Sisters accused of stabbing a store security guard twenty-seven time God after he asked them to wear a mask. Two sisters were charged with first degree attempted murder on Tuesday after they allegedly stabbed a security guard twenty seven times just said no you, right. After he asked to women to wear a mask and use the store provided hand sanitizer police say he's talk about an overreaction and. It's one overreaction to another over-reaction ultimately that's true. Yeah. But this is generally why businesses are told. You don't don't push people on this because people are freaking crazy clearly a Chicago Police Department spokesperson told NBC News that Jessica Hill and her sister J la initially got into a verbal altercation with the guard at a shoe store in Chicago after they refused to wear a mask the late Sunday afternoon incident turned physical get him between women and their shoes. You're. Not Wrong. When one of the sisters allegedly pulled out a knife and stabbed guard multiple times. Back Neck and arms police say oh man. Chicago police said that the thirty two year old victim was hospitalized at Mount Sinai Hospital in critical condition while the sisters were arrested and treated at a hospital nearby for minor injuries. According to police the women were in good condition and later boat at Cook County jail. And a bond hearing. Soak it. Circuit Court of Cook County. That is a lot of sees judge Mary. Maruko charged women with first degree attempted murder and order them to be held without bond. I don't know if it's first degree but. It's pretty outrageous. First degree premeditated. That's right. Yeah. Yeah. This doesn't sound like it was premeditated. For the moment second degree, the sisters a court appointed attorney could not be immediately reached for comment. But the Chicago Tribune reported that the defense lawyer argued that they were acting in self defense and that they have bipolar disorder, they have some kind of disorder for sure if someone asks you to put on a mask or something, you don't you don't whip out a knife stabbed twenty seven times that's mental illness. The defense attorney added that the pair had not intended to commit a crime nor that they have co a criminal record but the judge said the sheer numbers of stab wounds. Let's Concern Inc the Chicago, Sun? Times reported.

Chicago Chicago Police Department Chicago Tribune Bipolar Disorder Cook County Cook County Jail Attorney Mount Sinai Hospital Maruko Concern Inc Nbc News Mary Jessica Hill J La
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 1 year ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
What Patients Are Saying About Antipsychotic

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:24 min | 1 year ago

What Patients Are Saying About Antipsychotic

"In the early nineteen nineties about half of US patients with bipolar disorder took lithium now, it's closer to fifteen percent and the use of antipsychotic says more than doubled to fill that gap. A new survey reveals what patients think about these newcomers. This was an online survey of two hundred US adults who by their own report were diagnosed with bipolar one disorder and had taken an antipsychotic within the past year. Era Paul was the most common followed by Qu- Pina Spirit Own Olympian and Larizza on there are others that fell off after that. Overall people were satisfied with the efficacy but dissatisfied with the tolerability ninety, eight percent had at least one side effect on the NS psychotic and most of the side effects were not trivial. Ninety two percent felt the side effects had a negative effect on their relationships. Patients were embarrassed by the side effects. Particularly, anxiety weight gain followed by involuntary spasms or movements and trouble concentrating. I'm reminded here of Dr Magas Warning in June twenty nineteen issue on side effects that patients are not likely to put up with a side effect that they find socially embarrassing. The side effects that bothered people the most worrying Zaidi with gain and feeling like a Zombie or having no emotions And the rates of these three burdensome effects were large in the seventy percent range. ANTIPSYCHOTIC side effects carried over into all areas of life family, romance friendships, and work. Thirty to fifty percent felt that the anti psychotics impact their job sixty to seventy percent felt that the bipolar symptoms impacted their job. So from the patient's point of view, the side effects are a little better, but almost as bad as the disorder itself in the workplace. The bottom line while the PDR can tell us what side effects to expect surveys like this. Tell us just how damaging those side effects are. And the numbers here are much higher than what we see in the PDR. What's unclear is whether lithium or the Anti convulsants would raise the same level of complaint in

Bipolar Disorder Qu- Pina Spirit Own Olympian United States Dr Magas Zaidi Larizza Paul
Never Be Royals

Your Brain on Facts

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Never Be Royals

"It has been the habit of kings throughout the world to hire tasters to test their food on the off chance. Some oppressed masses poisoned it. But Henry, the eighth cast, a wider net with his paranoia. He wanted to be certain. No one was going to poison him transdermal either meaning through the skin. He ordered that every morning, the servant, the WHO changed the kings sheets had to kiss every part of the sheets, pillows and blankets they had touched to prove they hadn't smeared poison on them. They also had to test for poison on the cushion of his son. Edwards Chamber Pot. Though the historic record doesn't say how? My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. The term mad king re entered the common lexicon a few years back. Thanks to George R. Martin's Song of ice and fire books. We'd have more than enough examples from Europe alone to choose from. George. The third born in Seventeen thirty eight was the English king who lost the American colonies. Though anti-monarchists would record stories of bizarre behavior like George Mistaking and trees for Frederick the Great? The king really did have mental health problems that manifested themselves in different periods of his life. During these times, he suffered from insomnia and talked incessant nonsense for hours. It was not uncommon for a single sentence to contain four hundred words. It has long been suspected that King George suffered from Porfirio. A genetic metabolic disorder that causes depression hallucinations, constipation, purple urine, and severe abdominal pain. However, as will come up frequently today new evidence in theories undermined that original thinking. One of the medicines that king was treated with was Gentian. This plant with its deep blue flowers is still used today as a mild tonic that may turn the urine blue. His incessant liquidity as it was called and his habit of talking until foam ran from his mouth are features that can be seen today in patients with extreme cases of mania from psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Besides benign sounding herbal treatments, King George would be restrained in a chair with iron straps for hours. He was also bled forced to vomit and starved suffering under the humour old or four humors school, of medicine. A recent study based on the examination of King. George's hair shows high levels of arsenic administered to him as part of the cure, but would have served to only worsen his symptoms. In the last ten years of his life, his son and Heir George, the fourth served as regent. Fans of the show blackadder will remember George the fourth brilliantly portrayed by Hugh Laurie opposite the Tischler, Rowan Atkinson character. A somewhat annoying little side note when the play the madness of George the third was made into a film. In nineteen, ninety four, the title was changed to the madness of King George. Why for fear that American audiences would think it was a sequel and wouldn't go to see it because they hadn't seen the first two. When your business is running countries and even whole empires you WanNa keep that in the family and the best way to ensure that is to make sure everybody marries somebody there already related to. When you say it like that, it doesn't sound like such a good plan. But that was how royal houses conducted themselves for centuries to ensure they retained their fortunes in the days before even a basic understanding of genetics. When close relatives reproduce, it increases their offspring's chances of being affected by. Recessive traits for all kinds of physical and cognitive disabilities, including things like hemophilia and cystic fibrosis, as well as deformities like the Habsburg jaw. These incestuous pairings also run a greater risk of reduced fertility higher infant mortality, congenital birth defects, certain kinds of cancer suppressed immune systems, and overall smaller adult size. A condition referred to as pedigree collapse. Some royal families kept things closer-knit than others. Maria I of Portugal married her father's younger brother Pedro when she was twenty six and he was forty three. Their son and Heir Joseph married his aunt Maria Sister Benedetta. Therefore, Pedro's daughter-in-law sister

King George George R. Martin George Mistaking Henry Edwards Chamber Pot Pedro Maria I Bipolar Disorder Europe Heir Joseph Porfirio Maria Sister Benedetta Rowan Atkinson Hugh Laurie Abdominal Pain Depression
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Ramsey Call of the Day

Ramsey Call of the Day

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Ramsey Call of the Day

"Is with US and Richmond Virginia Hi Kisha. . How are you? ? I'm well, , how are you? ? Good how can we help? ? WELL THIS IS A. . Doctor John <hes>. . Alley but. . I have bipolar disorder <hes> among some other things and. . Through the years, , I've made a lot of bad decisions and mistakes when it comes to money. . <hes>. . Probably about five or six years ago I had a really bad episode and <hes> I got myself into a lot of guts. . <hes> and. . I'm still digging out of it and. . Basically. . I know the things I need I should be doing I need to be doing to get out of that I. . still have problems with the with my fire polar where impulsive. . <hes>. . That makes it hard sometimes but are digging. . Taking your medication. . <hes>. . I not on anything at the moment. . I'm kind of coming off of something describes something new. . Okay. . Can you working with the psychiatrists right now? ? Yeah I have to find a new one because my insurance just said, , they're not going to cover any more <laughter>. . So so you got it bipolar one diagnosis and they're saying they're not gonNA cover anymore. . They're not gonNA cover the people were saying okay. . Hi somebody new. . So that's number one number two. . Do you have somebody in your life that helps you be accountable? ? <hes>. . My boyfriend helps them my mother <hes>. . But I? ? I am single. . I live alone. . And I'm asking you. . I'm asking you like a boyfriend in a mom. . Those are often not great at they're good cheerleaders and they're good neighbours. . They're not great accountability Partners D of somebody that you trust that would hold your debit card for you. . Decide you have cash. . Here's what I'm getting and you've got to set up some boundaries in your life and barriers that make it very challenging for you when you're getting a manic state to do something that you're GonNa have to live with for two three, , five, six, , , seven years. . That's what I'm getting. . What I'm wanting to know what we need to do. . So you need to find somebody probably not a boyfriend are you in a church? ? and not at the moment. . Yeah you've got to find whether it's a church and a pastor whether it is a <hes>, , a bipolar group in your community that's got somebody that y'all can meet with regularly maybe it is your mom <hes> but somebody in your life that you can sit down and say, , I've got these Eileen this way when I'm having a manic state aniline this way when I'm in a super-low state and I need to set up some guardrails for myself but all this starts quite honestly Kisha you gotta you gotTa Take Your Medication and Vokes with bipolar one are notorious for getting in there and feeling better feeling a bit leveled out and then they quit and think everything's all good and then they. . They stop right and they go right back to where they were. . So that's my big recommendation to you is get with a psychiatrist asap someone that you trust not this just gonNA dopey up and say, all , right going this on your way who's going to talk to you learn about you and then you're gonNA have to get some accountability in your community. . That's GonNa, , help you when we're about to get off the rails Keisha, , your finances, , he'll only to the extent you try.

US Doctor John Alley Ramsey Eileen Dr. John Richmond Virginia Kisha
I Use Spending to Cope With My Bipolar Disorder

Ramsey Call of the Day

03:18 min | 2 years ago

I Use Spending to Cope With My Bipolar Disorder

"Is with US and Richmond Virginia Hi Kisha. How are you? I'm well, how are you? Good how can we help? WELL THIS IS A. Doctor John Alley but. I have bipolar disorder among some other things and. Through the years, I've made a lot of bad decisions and mistakes when it comes to money. Probably about five or six years ago I had a really bad episode and I got myself into a lot of guts. and. I'm still digging out of it and. Basically. I know the things I need I should be doing I need to be doing to get out of that I. still have problems with the with my fire polar where impulsive. That makes it hard sometimes but are digging. Taking your medication. I not on anything at the moment. I'm kind of coming off of something describes something new. Okay. Can you working with the psychiatrists right now? Yeah I have to find a new one because my insurance just said, they're not going to cover any more So so you got it bipolar one diagnosis and they're saying they're not gonNA cover anymore. They're not gonNA cover the people were saying okay. Hi somebody new. So that's number one number two. Do you have somebody in your life that helps you be accountable? My boyfriend helps them my mother But I? I am single. I live alone. And I'm asking you. I'm asking you like a boyfriend in a mom. Those are often not great at they're good cheerleaders and they're good neighbours. They're not great accountability Partners D of somebody that you trust that would hold your debit card for you. Decide you have cash. Here's what I'm getting and you've got to set up some boundaries in your life and barriers that make it very challenging for you when you're getting a manic state to do something that you're GonNa have to live with for two three, five, six, seven years. That's what I'm getting. What I'm wanting to know what we need to do. So you need to find somebody probably not a boyfriend are you in a church? and not at the moment. Yeah you've got to find whether it's a church and a pastor whether it is a a bipolar group in your community that's got somebody that y'all can meet with regularly maybe it is your mom but somebody in your life that you can sit down and say, I've got these Eileen this way when I'm having a manic state aniline this way when I'm in a super-low state and I need to set up some guardrails for myself but all this starts quite honestly Kisha you gotta you gotTa Take Your Medication and Vokes with bipolar one are notorious for getting in there and feeling better feeling a bit leveled out and then they quit and think everything's all good and then they. They stop right and they go right back to where they were. So that's my big recommendation to you is get with a psychiatrist asap someone that you trust not this just gonNA dopey up and say, all right going this on your way who's going to talk to you learn about you and then you're gonNA have to get some accountability in your community. That's GonNa, help you when we're about to get off the rails Keisha, your finances, he'll only to the extent you try.

Doctor John Alley Eileen United States Richmond Virginia Kisha
Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:52 min | 2 years ago

Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

"A grieving process. I'm sure many of you have heard about the stages of grief right I think most of us are familiar with that and we're definitely GONNA dig into those today and I want to work on some perspective around this because you know I am crazy about your mindset in your perspective being right because that so much sets in motion what your experience is going to be if your perspective is good and healthy and your mindset is good and healthy, you're going to have a much different experience all the way around in everything that you do so I really want to dig into some of that stuff too. And as people with addiction, we tend to be very sensitive and we like to blow things out of proportion good things and bad things. But even just the simple fact of being an alcoholic we go it way out of proportion and convince ourselves that our problem is so much worse than other people's problems and no one understands us and we got the short end of the stick and it's so hard to be one of us. And it is hard to be an alcoholic. But it isn't any more difficult than being a million other things. Also what is so hard for one person may not be challenging at all for someone else. So making it seem like your problems are so much bigger or more difficult really doesn't even make sense in it doesn't serve you to have that sort of perspective in that outlook on it. There are so many. Mental health struggles disabilities, special needs that people have where they would love to be in a position to have support groups all over the world where they know all they have to do is show up for free by the way. And their problem can be solved. I promise you people with major illness like cancer or COPD or Ms. They would love the opportunity to just walk into a support group and let people love and support them and have their illness become manageable and almost non-existent. Would love that. Opportunity. I bet people with chronic depression were some people with bipolar disorder schizophrenia. They would love to have a solution so simple that would manage all the symptoms. and. Allow them to live a comfortable and amazing life full of love and community and support. And just think about all of the you know autism all the hundreds of learning challenges and thousands of physical challenges. People get hurt and injured every day and it changes their lives for ever. I would be willing to bet all those people. would. Love to have a challenge where the solution was so straightforward. And required a little personal investment and energy and willingness. Instead of. A lifetime of pain and pharmaceuticals and declining quality of life. You see what I'm saying. As alcoholics, we paint this picture for ourselves that we're so unlucky that we have this thing that is so awful and terrible and Whoa is US feel bad for us because we can't drink alcohol. But when you put it in perspective. There are much bigger challenges you could be facing. And I promise you, you will have bigger challenges in your lifetime because it's just the nature of life life is challenging. Life is hard. I really want you to keep this in perspective. You can't drink alcohol. So what? You only care so much about alcohol because you have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Non Alcoholic people do not care about alcohol. They don't obsess over how will they ever have fun again if they don't drink, they don't obsess over not having a drink because their lives in their brains don't revolve around alcohol. There are thousands

Copd Bipolar Disorder
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Liminal Podcast

Liminal Podcast

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Liminal Podcast

"Who I needed to be. To support that relationship. Because I was batch crazy. As I said before you know I would drive the car through fast I literally believed that like lines on the road we're kind of like optional suggestions. I really dead. Now. I never died like I. Did kind of crazy anxiety swam in a river in January and almost got hypothermia. Fell Asleep driving many many many times as I head state of. You know. But I had that edge space of Oh. Something has gotta give. Some House together and we know it or how much time but the story is really pretty interesting. So you can cut out on a blank. We. Were Driving Julie my wife and I were driving to choir. We've along sue. Women's choir in about an hour north of where we lived and we drove there every week and we were on our way to choir and she was reading this book. Called when the voices stopped. That was about a man with schizophrenia. And he described how concept of voices. People don't understand that can manifest in many different ways and it doesn't necessarily mean that you sort of like perceive. A another being outside, your body talking to you. It can. Be. This sense of like some part of your. Talking at you that is. Separate from yourself even your like running now I know that. You can try to push against it, but then it's there and and I said. What do you mean those counters voices? And driving the car right we're going to and he says What do you mean? What do I mean? I've had that for the last twenty years. And he closed the book. Lap and then we arrived at choir and have to sing for two hours and. And then on the drive home, we had a very interesting. and. I. Guess. Dear friends who is an incredibly upstanding? Heroic. Hurson who's had viper a really long time. Is trained as a social worker. And so I, called him ten o'clock at night I called them and I said. Friend, I have a question for you. Like I think I might have bipolar maybe I don't know and and he was so calm. And he just went this book that's called the diagnostic statistical manual otherwise known as the DSM. I've heard of this. Yeah. People tough. The DSM three, four five. I've now. We're on four at the time and he simply red to me. The you have have four seven characteristics. Qualify as it were. As having a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. and. I had six of them. was four months. Yeah. And I was sucked up I was just so. Alike. I was happy. As I had said this, you know when I was eighteen and no one leader. And my wife knew it I, knew it. People who are close to me. We're not surprised. But I had had such a terrible experience when I was eighteen dealing address. that. I didn't want to. See anyone I didn't want to get help which also by the way is classic. Bipolar. Thing I WANNA know WANNA lose my my ups. Right? You don't WanNa lose your good times. But I did. And I was terrified I'm expecting to the to see this like Old. Like. None of the things that I'm going to say are in fact negatives. But they were a stereotype in my mind. I expected to see an older white. Guy With white hair and little glasses sort of you know inspecting me. As? The waiting room clipboard in hand. I was terrified. And the person who came out. Was Sky Dr, George Scott not see as an initial So not, third Scott but. He was a multi racial man from Detroit who had his hair in dreadlocks and you're the most adorable freckles I had ever seen. And we promptly, I shouldn't have said his name, but while high out there somewhere. African, cut it out if you want. I know it's fine. He was wonderful but I'm gonNA tell us saying that it's funny. We loved him so much and I both that we call him doctor Cutie Pants. And it turns out that he had a part time Gig as a DJ right like the hip hop Dj an psychiatric resident. What a blend while it was so awesome. Fantastic I. was like this is exactly what I needed. Was Somebody, who is completely relatable? He was close to my age. When he had to leave that rotation because it was a resident decried. And gave me a big hug like foot. And he you know he was the first person were prescribed medications that worked. It had some side effects that were not great, but it did. Turn off, the voices immediately was. So the first time in my life, there was not all this noise in my head and the weirdest thing that happened from that. Is that my literal physical hearing improved.

George Scott hypothermia bipolar disorder. Hurson Julie Detroit
Bipolar Disorder

Mentally Yours

05:11 min | 2 years ago

Bipolar Disorder

"Workman's Viola appreciate you taking the time out I had. Thank you very much for inviting me on new the heads of our Could you start by telling us about the charity team leads? I'm so bipolar. UK's been going for about fifty seven years on. It was founded by. To two women who? Were living with bipolar and effort will maybe the the when the corresponding on this was and they per letter in the press to saying how? Being alone, they did not to it to in that lots of different issues with the health service. Experience? Prejudice and discrimination. And, and they managed to get ready huge responsiveness, so hundreds of people responded, and they basically said a an initial support group based on in London. And then from that kind of spread like wildfire across the whole of the UK said it was. The base is a couple of people that went around setting up support groups. Putting note, says the price and just bringing together. People affected by bipolar. People living with the condition, but then close family members as well. And the philosophy behind it was the. Everyone's bipolar is different or unique, but. This. Common experiences that people have the allows them to be able to help. Manage the condition better so talking about education talking about. Treatment Mike diagnosis if they have call one yet. How did you of kind of mania and depression? So the idea was using the wisdom of the community to be able to kind of help each other to stay well. And full misery days the charities. Grown. We grew into about eighty-five face to face support groups across the country. We got an e community, which does the same thing so people affected by bipolar log on, and they talked to other people at anytime of the day I would call out just over five thousand members on that now, and then we also do telephone call by wants to talk to someone and is affected by bipolar. And get some advice than they can. They can bring up and we'll get them a cool. and. Obviously we've during nineteen. Though saves about to change, so we've got say you the face to face services, but we've been doing as in groups over over video coldest well. We talked to about one thousand five hundred people every month, and then we. We say that they tell us that probably about those about seven hundred moment or about. kind of uses to stay low and so Sadat's DOT says in a nutshell ready. Can you tell me a bit more about how you? The debt said in terms of the pandemic. changing how things work now intense that. so it could have been nine hundred. A massive impact on a child's. He's has done for Lauda I'm so the key one is. We've got to freeze up. A face to face groups and move towards a digital services. To being. A really does big big change for us, so zoom groups that we've done, and you've just run the monthly magazine groups run. They sometimes been allowed them more frequently for. Maybe once every two weeks than everyone. Rather than being for two free hours. They'll be tend to be about an hour because that's a limited people can do on June. we've also a lot more time into our social media on into our. Into a website. And, so we've seen our website topic having about a twenty percent increase and we've been doing is using it to a lot more articles out there for market dynamics from people that expense took about their experiences of living well with the during the nineteen. There's been a law research studies at all. Coming out. Around bipolar we, we want to involve out community in those, so we've been doing which motos. Identify, but I'm quite worried about how on affecting people with bipolar disorder. One of the things you found in a recent study is. Twice as many people if I totally disorder have been hospitalized, the suicide attempts than due to Cova, Simpson's. So, what are you doing at the moment? of support people and tackle. I, mean is really it is really worrying with them. We've covid nineteen the impetus having community. We seem that they increase in. Depression and anxiety and suicidal thinking as well and. We were asking people what? They were doing in terms of being able to. To excessive because he disappointed in this period, and Dan was very blonde, able to get access to the psychiatrist over to the GP. So what we enjoy charity is really getting the message out there. Gonorrhea community, I think it's really important and suicide that people go suicidal fools. It's. It's okay to talk about the suicide opposes. Will we really strongly discourage anyone to actually talk about cutting methods and so forth, and but talking about suicides? In Beta to reach out and get support, make such a massive difference with people.

Bipolar Disorder UK Depression Workman Simpson Gonorrhea London Sadat Viola Lauda Mike Monthly Magazine DAN Cova
Kim Kardashian West Releases Statement on Kanye’s Mental Health

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Kim Kardashian West Releases Statement on Kanye’s Mental Health

"Let's. Let's talk about a Reality Star Kim Kardashian West and her husband Kanye West have been in the news all week. You know talking about his campaign rally his Harriet Tubman statement, those twitter rants. Pale flew to Wyoming to check in on them. Well yesterday Kim broke her silence released a statement about con as mental health, especially with all of those hurtful comments that he has made about her her mom, you know and just a family altogether cam. She talked about Kanye struggle with bipolar, and she and the family are struggling with him as she asked for compassion and empathy can posted as many as you know Kanye has bipolar. Bipolar disorder anyone who has or has a loved one in their life, who who knows exactly incredibly complicated and painful. It is to understand. She went on to say that those that understand mental illness know that the family is powerless unless the member is a minor, Kim said that Kanye is brilliant, but complicated, and on top of being a black man and an artist who has experienced the painful loss of his mother Donda West back in. Two thousand seven. He has to deal with the pressure in isolation that is heightened by his bipolar disorder. She went on to say how the media and the public have to have compassionate empathy when it comes to mental health issues, and she thinks those that express concern, you know true genuine concern Connie, as well being and. That's it. You know it's just Really really sad, you know. Yeah it is. For the children I do in the whole John Him everyone, everyone. Yeah, you don't WanNa. See your husband. Go through things like that thinly meltdown. No, no, no, no Qurna oldness history. There's juice Rome. It's just a lot. He said a lot of hope for things about her. He you know yesterday or day before yesterday was talking about divorcing her, saying she had a private meeting with. Meek mill to talk about prison reform. And then she came back and said the meeting wasn't private. It was public He talked about wanting to divorce her. It is heavy. It has heavy. What is going on with them? Dude, but see I. Don't know anything about bipolar. I. Don't know anything about it. So. Maybe it causes you to do some things that I think is not smart. But I don't see discussing your private life publicly on social media repeatedly. Not, smart is has what they got to do with anything I. Mean Look Man that's got to be not the place to vent I. Mean who you trying to prove it to you. And you got take care of your business at home. Who you are. And, it's just unexcused. Unexcusable, sad thing. you. Don Lemon talked about early. You know to social media used to be a good thing. Then all of a sudden became toxic. So since we all who have good says noted is toxic. Why are you putting your life on the toxic platform and then? Kim Got to come in and say please be understanding well. Wait a minute. Hold on. Wait a minute hold. I understand what she said. That's perfectly right, but decided to those social media in a place of understanding. That, what daddy is!

Kim Kardashian West Kanye Connie Bipolar Harriet Tubman Twitter Wyoming Donda West Don Lemon Wanna
Kim Kardashian West addresses husband Kanye West's bipolar disorder

Mandy Connell

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Kim Kardashian West addresses husband Kanye West's bipolar disorder

"Speaking out about her husband, Kanye, after he went on Twitter rant, asking for a divorce and talking about his fears of being locked up. In a statement on Instagram, Kim Kardashian said, As many of you know, Kanye has bipolar disorder. Anyone who has this or has a loved one in their life. Who does knows how incredibly complicated and painful it is to understand. I understand Kanye is subject to criticism. She went on to say, because you're a public figure. And his actions at times can cause strong opinions and emotions. Those who are close with Kanye know his heart and understand his words sometimes do not align with his intentions. I kindly ask the media and public give us to compassion and empathy that is needed so that we can get through this. Kardashian called

Kanye Kim Kardashian Bipolar Disorder Twitter
Kim Kardashian West Releases Supportive Kanye Statement

Daily Pop

02:05 min | 2 years ago

Kim Kardashian West Releases Supportive Kanye Statement

"Kim Kardashian finally breaks her silence about Conway, now a short time ago, Kim posted a long statement on Instagram, calling the situation difficult and painful. She says she hasn't spoken about Connie's bipolar disorder before because she's very protective of him and their kids privacy Kim says families are powerless to help someone unless the person is willing to accept the help. She ends her statement asking for understanding and compassion. What was your reaction when you read this thing in full? I mean it's obviously kind of a continuation of what I said yesterday. The entire thing is really heartbreaking. I feel like what she put out. Was the most appropriate thing to say, which was basically as much as the statement was long. Listed facts didn't really say anything. It really was just like he's going through this. There's nothing I can really do I need a ride this out with my husband and my family. I'm asking you guys to ride this out as well and not make a mockery of what's going on. He's clearly very ill and just kind of be sensitive to what's going on. This is a real issue. This is not a storyline on a show. This is not something that's happening for publicity. This is somebody who's really going through some sort of manic episode and she's just asking for people to realize. The severity of the situation and I think that the best thing she could have done. I just think twenty twenty is the year of awareness. I think there's this is the year where you can't turn a blind eye to certain things, and you can't say that you don't know where you don't understand or I. Think the compassion around these illnesses are going to be our greater, too. So I think whereas in the past where people were claiming this and another Kanye rent or make this thing where he needs help and things. Things like that. People are actually are him becoming means on instagram and doing all the joking things now it's becoming more serious now. It's a little bit more serious that we're seeing this like. Hold up! He has a real problem. We can't start joking about this anymore. We need to reach out the open our arms to him and help him as much as we can. Because, this isn't just a memo on instagram anymore. This is real life.

Instagram Kim Kardashian Connie Manic Episode Conway Kanye Twenty Twenty
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

10:29 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Saying that everybody has been paying attention to Kanye West recently on DH. It's hard to know exactly how to talk about this story. But what we do on the Collina Bradley show typically is just admit what we know and what we don't know, and a lot of people have attributed really uncomfortable. Words, outbursts tweets from Kanye West as something related to his mental illness. We don't know that Colleen and I are not doctors. We're not people who are qualified in any sense of the word to talk about somebody's mental health. But what we do know is what's sitting in front of us, which is Kanye West has said some really uncomfortable and awkward things. And it appears that his other family that is the other half of his family. Kim Kardashian Kris Jenner have tried to intervene in his Ah Outbursts. Right? So, um, what is the latest today? Well, okay, So let's start at the very beginning. First of all, I can hear you Okay. Can you hear me? Okay. We're good, Awesome. Well, there was an outburst A Siri's of tweets that took place yesterday on DH that let a lot of people to be concerned. Obviously. I don't even know what this reasons like. I don't even know if we need to read through all of know that there's well you know, we can let's maybe in a circle around some of the just of it. He, um He said that Kim Had tried to involuntarily commit him, among other things, had threatened divorce because he spoke about their daughter. Um, and a bunch of other stuff, Holly. I know Holly was watching it in real time. Yeah, happen. Yeah, watching it. Maybe around 9 30 or 10 o'clock last night, and he was talking about all sorts of things, though he was going back and deleting some of the comments in real time. Some of the comments that he was deleting were involving Anna Wintour. His deal with the gap. Yeah. Having Shyla buff signed to be the model for his first easy collection for gap, So there were some business things That were taken off of Kanye's Twitter account in real time he even brought up Bill Cosby. It was like when I turned on Twitter last night. Briefly because, you know, I like the way you see. Turn on Twitter like you turn on Turn on the Twitter Last night I was watching Twitter. But I say that intentionally because, like I literally arrived a Twitter briefly because I don't sit on twitter anymore, like maybe I used to at some point Because it's like what I like. It's so much work to figure out what's going on, and it's never good. Right. So I turned up last night and I see things trending like Shaila buff Bill Cosby. Kanye like and I was like, what's going on? Well, they were all connected because these were the things that Kanye was tweeting about. And you know, a CZ. You guys have already mentioned he he brings up his family. He's bringing up totally unrelated topics. It is clear. That he is. It's It's what we've come to know is a typical Outburst of Kanye Rant on Twitter. What is fueling that? What is behind it? What is perhaps Perpetuating that we don't know And that's what we can't really comment on. But just looking at those tweets It's not good, right? So, um so I mean, I don't hesitate to even say what are we to make of this because I don't think it's ours to make anything of it. Again. As we've said on multiple occasions. We're not doctors were not medical professionals. We are Has Knowledgeable about the reality of what's going on with Kanye West. Is anybody else on DSO? And frankly, can I just I will just take it one step further and say I feel like it would be irresponsible and furthering a stigma to put Lee to smack labels on it on DH so well, we're just going to step back and look at what's actually happening. But what I find interesting and this is the thing that's been nagging at me. I brought it up yesterday and brought it up A couple different times is Kim Kardashians. Silence around it. Yeah, and and I think it's understandable in the sense that if let us because again, we're just assuming that's what we do. Let's assume that there's some sort of medical event happening. I'm sure one's impulse if you're in a relationship with someone who's having a medical event. Is to not Bring that out into the open right to address it directly in the open because you're trying behind the scenes to deal with the issue. You're not really concerned. We're not dealing with. You know your average individual in this moment. You're not dealing with you or me. We're dealing with Kim Kardashian, right? Who makes her living? Living out in the open. Now we know that what she's sharing out in the open is not what's actually going on, which is part of our criticism over all of the Kardashians. But I do think It's absolutely necessary in this moment that Kim Kardashian or at least it's not necessary. Not going to tell other people what to do. I will say there is a huge opportunity right now for Kim Kardashian. To speak publicly in a way that helps people who actually are supportive of Kanye West, who actually Um You know our fans of hiss and ended just a bunch of other people who may be affected by whatever's going on similarly, to just put something on the record publicly and from a woman who lives every other aspect of her life so publicly, it's it's It's noticeable that this part of her life is so absent. Her silence is very loud right now. Yeah, and you know, I second that and I also would add that the tactic that they seem to be employing and when I say they I'm talking about the Kardashians is the tactic that they always employ when they are looking Tio refute. A report about what's going on in and around their lives, which is to feed it to the tabloid media. So then what ends up happening is because this is covered by the mainstream media. At this 0.0, yeah, it always has been, but But now for a very good reason it's being covered by the mainstream media because he is has the sights on running for president. And so it's not the mainstream media is likely not going to look to team Z tto help. Them narrate the story. Yeah, well and also I don't know that it's Kim talking to teams. I think it's very much Chris Jenner and she's in crisis mode in terms of protecting the brand, and we talked a little bit about that yesterday. So I think when you see stuff come out of TMC. It's really because I'm sure Chris knows she can't. I mean, you can't talk about somebody else's medical conditions without their permission. Right. So in terms of like they're not going to go on the record unless You know they feel I mean, I think Kim is in a unique place where she can talk up. She's not to tell people what his medical diagnosis is to give some sort of explanation for how the world should react to what's going on on Twitter. Or she could just say literally. Kanye is Kanye, like, Let's assume nothing. Quote unquote is going on that there's nothing medically that we need that she's paying attention to, or anyone needs to pay attention to And it's just because I see a lot of people reacting to these tweets like, Oh, this isn't about mental illness. This is as if they know this isn't about mental illness. This is about a new album coming out in getting attention for his new album. I mean, I kind of don't believe that, but You know again, Kim Kardashian. Could put everything. Or could sort of put all of that that speculating to rest with some order to it, But clearly it's not doing anything positive for anyone to stay silent well, and you know, to kind of double back to the question that you just asked about, like publicity stunt or not really questioned, But the Sort of theory that some people have that this is about getting publicity for his next album. I just wanted to add that I read a headline today. I didn't read the report, nor did I read the report of the report. But I saw the headline and that's what we do in 2020. We can just report the headline that the gap is seriously considering their partnership with him. Because they've already seen a dip their stock, which makes total sense, and you know that's again why we speculated that you were seeing things come out of Teams because People are trying to give an explanation for what's going on because they see that this is when Kanye speaks like this. It has an effect on the projects around him, so regardless of what's causing it or fueling it It's having a re a world impact. It's why I would also criticize people on the other side who say you can't talk about any of this? Because this is you know, this is mental illness by blah, blah. And then they have their own particular thoughts on how you should be talking or not talking about mental illness to which I would say. But we don't know that so like to speculate about it, because it seems like that's that's almost. I mean, you're just putting things on, Kanye that you don't know, right? I mean, just because we know he has bipolar disorder. Does not mean that his bipolar disorder is influencing his Twitter account. And that's kind of what I mean by, like, furthering a stigma is that you know when you are a person who has been diagnosed with mental illness. The trap people will fall into is to blame everything on the mental illness and that furthers the stigma as well. Right. So there's this. There's you have to be where I think we're trying to be very careful about how we talk about this. When we

bipolar disorder Kanye Marky Mark Twitter Watson Elizabeth Reese Colleen Hollywood Jason Alexis Bradley
Is Kanye's Bipolar Disorder the reason behind his erratic behavior?

Colleen and Bradley

10:30 min | 2 years ago

Is Kanye's Bipolar Disorder the reason behind his erratic behavior?

"Saying that everybody has been paying attention to Kanye West recently on DH. It's hard to know exactly how to talk about this story. But what we do on the Collina Bradley show typically is just admit what we know and what we don't know, and a lot of people have attributed really uncomfortable. Words, outbursts tweets from Kanye West as something related to his mental illness. We don't know that Colleen and I are not doctors. We're not people who are qualified in any sense of the word to talk about somebody's mental health. But what we do know is what's sitting in front of us, which is Kanye West has said some really uncomfortable and awkward things. And it appears that his other family that is the other half of his family. Kim Kardashian Kris Jenner have tried to intervene in his Ah Outbursts. Right? So, um, what is the latest today? Well, okay, So let's start at the very beginning. First of all, I can hear you Okay. Can you hear me? Okay. We're good, Awesome. Well, there was an outburst A Siri's of tweets that took place yesterday on DH that let a lot of people to be concerned. Obviously. I don't even know what this reasons like. I don't even know if we need to read through all of know that there's well you know, we can let's maybe in a circle around some of the just of it. He, um He said that Kim Had tried to involuntarily commit him, among other things, had threatened divorce because he spoke about their daughter. Um, and a bunch of other stuff, Holly. I know Holly was watching it in real time. Yeah, happen. Yeah, watching it. Maybe around 9 30 or 10 o'clock last night, and he was talking about all sorts of things, though he was going back and deleting some of the comments in real time. Some of the comments that he was deleting were involving Anna Wintour. His deal with the gap. Yeah. Having Shyla buff signed to be the model for his first easy collection for gap, So there were some business things That were taken off of Kanye's Twitter account in real time he even brought up Bill Cosby. It was like when I turned on Twitter last night. Briefly because, you know, I like the way you see. Turn on Twitter like you turn on Turn on the Twitter Last night I was watching Twitter. But I say that intentionally because, like I literally arrived a Twitter briefly because I don't sit on twitter anymore, like maybe I used to at some point Because it's like what I like. It's so much work to figure out what's going on, and it's never good. Right. So I turned up last night and I see things trending like Shaila buff Bill Cosby. Kanye like and I was like, what's going on? Well, they were all connected because these were the things that Kanye was tweeting about. And you know, a CZ. You guys have already mentioned he he brings up his family. He's bringing up totally unrelated topics. It is clear. That he is. It's It's what we've come to know is a typical Outburst of Kanye Rant on Twitter. What is fueling that? What is behind it? What is perhaps Perpetuating that we don't know And that's what we can't really comment on. But just looking at those tweets It's not good, right? So, um so I mean, I don't hesitate to even say what are we to make of this because I don't think it's ours to make anything of it. Again. As we've said on multiple occasions. We're not doctors were not medical professionals. We are Has Knowledgeable about the reality of what's going on with Kanye West. Is anybody else on DSO? And frankly, can I just I will just take it one step further and say I feel like it would be irresponsible and furthering a stigma to put Lee to smack labels on it on DH so well, we're just going to step back and look at what's actually happening. But what I find interesting and this is the thing that's been nagging at me. I brought it up yesterday and brought it up A couple different times is Kim Kardashians. Silence around it. Yeah, and and I think it's understandable in the sense that if let us because again, we're just assuming that's what we do. Let's assume that there's some sort of medical event happening. I'm sure one's impulse if you're in a relationship with someone who's having a medical event. Is to not Bring that out into the open right to address it directly in the open because you're trying behind the scenes to deal with the issue. You're not really concerned. We're not dealing with. You know your average individual in this moment. You're not dealing with you or me. We're dealing with Kim Kardashian, right? Who makes her living? Living out in the open. Now we know that what she's sharing out in the open is not what's actually going on, which is part of our criticism over all of the Kardashians. But I do think It's absolutely necessary in this moment that Kim Kardashian or at least it's not necessary. Not going to tell other people what to do. I will say there is a huge opportunity right now for Kim Kardashian. To speak publicly in a way that helps people who actually are supportive of Kanye West, who actually Um You know our fans of hiss and ended just a bunch of other people who may be affected by whatever's going on similarly, to just put something on the record publicly and from a woman who lives every other aspect of her life so publicly, it's it's It's noticeable that this part of her life is so absent. Her silence is very loud right now. Yeah, and you know, I second that and I also would add that the tactic that they seem to be employing and when I say they I'm talking about the Kardashians is the tactic that they always employ when they are looking Tio refute. A report about what's going on in and around their lives, which is to feed it to the tabloid media. So then what ends up happening is because this is covered by the mainstream media. At this 0.0, yeah, it always has been, but But now for a very good reason it's being covered by the mainstream media because he is has the sights on running for president. And so it's not the mainstream media is likely not going to look to team Z tto help. Them narrate the story. Yeah, well and also I don't know that it's Kim talking to teams. I think it's very much Chris Jenner and she's in crisis mode in terms of protecting the brand, and we talked a little bit about that yesterday. So I think when you see stuff come out of TMC. It's really because I'm sure Chris knows she can't. I mean, you can't talk about somebody else's medical conditions without their permission. Right. So in terms of like they're not going to go on the record unless You know they feel I mean, I think Kim is in a unique place where she can talk up. She's not to tell people what his medical diagnosis is to give some sort of explanation for how the world should react to what's going on on Twitter. Or she could just say literally. Kanye is Kanye, like, Let's assume nothing. Quote unquote is going on that there's nothing medically that we need that she's paying attention to, or anyone needs to pay attention to And it's just because I see a lot of people reacting to these tweets like, Oh, this isn't about mental illness. This is as if they know this isn't about mental illness. This is about a new album coming out in getting attention for his new album. I mean, I kind of don't believe that, but You know again, Kim Kardashian. Could put everything. Or could sort of put all of that that speculating to rest with some order to it, But clearly it's not doing anything positive for anyone to stay silent well, and you know, to kind of double back to the question that you just asked about, like publicity stunt or not really questioned, But the Sort of theory that some people have that this is about getting publicity for his next album. I just wanted to add that I read a headline today. I didn't read the report, nor did I read the report of the report. But I saw the headline and that's what we do in 2020. We can just report the headline that the gap is seriously considering their partnership with him. Because they've already seen a dip their stock, which makes total sense, and you know that's again why we speculated that you were seeing things come out of Teams because People are trying to give an explanation for what's going on because they see that this is when Kanye speaks like this. It has an effect on the projects around him, so regardless of what's causing it or fueling it It's having a re a world impact. It's why I would also criticize people on the other side who say you can't talk about any of this? Because this is you know, this is mental illness by blah, blah. And then they have their own particular thoughts on how you should be talking or not talking about mental illness to which I would say. But we don't know that so like to speculate about it, because it seems like that's that's almost. I mean, you're just putting things on, Kanye that you don't know, right? I mean, just because we know he has bipolar disorder. Does not mean that his bipolar disorder is influencing his Twitter account. And that's kind of what I mean by, like, furthering a stigma is that you know when you are a person who has been diagnosed with mental illness. The trap people will fall into is to blame everything on the mental illness and that furthers the stigma as well. Right. So there's this. There's you have to be where I think we're trying to be very careful about how we talk about this. When we

Twitter Kanye West Kanye Kim Kardashian KIM Bill Cosby Holly Kim Had Kim Kardashians Anna Wintour Kris Jenner Colleen Bipolar Disorder Kardashians Chris Jenner Shyla Buff
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"Welcome to the car psychiatry podcast keeping psychiatry honest since two thousand and three. On critic and the Editor in Chief of the Carl Psychiatry. And I'm Kelly Newsom, a psychiatric nurse, practitioner and dedicated reader if every issue. This was a first. Erica Saunders from the University of Pennsylvania, Hershey and colleagues reported on preliminary results from a landmark trial. A dietary treatment of bipolar disorder. The diet she used his already been successfully tested in Migraines and to understand it. You need to know the difference between Omega three and Omega six fatty acids, both of these have important roles in health and brain function so neither one is good or bad. It's the balance that matters specifically. It's healthier to have more Omega three than Omega six, but in the typical western Diet that balances out of whack. There are fourteen to twenty five times more omega, six fatty acids than omega, three fatty acids in the Diet that most of us are consuming. This problem is made worse for people with bipolar disorder because they don't metabolize these fatty acids like the average person does. So Dr Saunders speculated that raising Omega three and lowering Omega six might improve mood in bipolar patients. We already know that, Omega three helps bipolar and depression as the popular supplement fish oil, which has proven effective in half a dozen Meta analyses although with a small affect size. What we've never seen is how a dietary approach will work, and what would happen if Omega six was intentionally lowered while we raise the Omega three. Both Omega six and Omega three are essential fatty acids, which means the body can't make them, so we need to get them from a dietary source and both play a role in brain development. and. Here's another interesting background fact mood stabilisers, actually lower Omega six levels and Omega six might cause depression by promoting inflammation while Omega three is anti-inflammatory. Now for the preliminary results of Dr Sanders trial, this was a randomized double blind controlled trial of eighty two patients with bipolar disorder that compared to diets. The treatment diet was high on her mega three and loan Omega Six. The other group, the control group was given Omega three and six in a ratio. The reflects the usual American Diet. Already one thing in that designs sets it apart from other studies in nutritional psychiatry, usually in these kinds of studies, the patients know if they're getting the dietary intervention. But in this study both groups were taught to eat a scientifically designed diet, which improves on the double blind, and these diets were very controlled. Not only did they have guidance from dieticians. They were also given much of the food. They ate such as snacks that were carefully calibrated to have the intended ratios of Omega three and six. This was a small study of eighty two patients thirty percent of whom dropped out with equal dropout rates in both arms. They were mainly white in the early forties with an equal male to female ratio about half were unemployed. They tended toward the slightly obese side with an average BMI of thirty. The outcome measure they used was unique subjects rated their mood daily on a smartphone, using a simple visual analog scale. They raided seven items mood, energy, thoughts, impulsivity, anxiety, irritability, and physical pain. They measured pain because Omega six can increase prostate Linden's which are associated with increased pain levels. The primary outcome was the degree that mood energy impulsively very day to day. So. That's actually three separate primary outcomes and the results she got were mixed. They were positive for variability in mood and energy, but negative for very ability and impulsivity, which actually improved in the control group. There is also no difference in an important secondary measure, the change in average mood from start to twelve weeks. This is an ongoing study with plans to follow these patients for an entire year, so these results are very preliminary. At only the twelve week interval we should know a lot more after year as the authors are also gathering a truck load of biomarkers related to the Diet including monthly stool cultures to look for changes in the microbiome blood tests for inflammatory markers, ACTA, graphic measures of movement kind of like a fitbit and even cerebrospinal fluid. The bottom line we know that a healthy diet helps depression, but we don't yet know which ingredients are the most important. This study is testing the idea that the Omega three to six ratio matters and bipolar disorder, and the results are too preliminary to draw conclusions at this time, but short of that we already have a diet that's ready for Palm, time and depression, the Mediterranean Diet, and from what we know about bipolar disorder. This diet should work there as well although it hasn't been clinically tested. The Mediterranean approach discourages the main foods that are driving the Omega six overload in society. Process snacks fast foods, cakes, fatty meats, and cured meats, and it has proven effective in three controlled trials of depression with moderate to large effect size. This diet does have some healthy foods that are surprisingly high in Omega six nuts, seeds Avocados and Tofu but worry. Not Those healthy foods have a healthy balance of Omega three as well. It's the junk food. That's causing the Omega six problem. We cover the Mediterranean Diet last year in an interview with the lead investigator, Felisa Jacka listened to our June, third, twenty nineteen podcast, or check out our may twenty nineteen issue it breaks down the specific. Food Recommendations as Dr, Jack as team altered the Mediterranean Diet to emphasize brain, friendly ingredients, and make it easier for people with depression to follow. Tune in tomorrow for new findings on an anti inflammatory medication in bipolar depression. We'll have more updates in a print issue including unpublished results on a new medication, PA-, bi-polar depression and a full review of the midafternoons finals in bipolar disorder. podcast listeners can get thirty dollars off the annual subscription with Promo Code podcast. That's only capitals. Subscription will earn you continuing education credits and help us stay free of industry support. Where trying out a new format this week by bringing, you shorted nuggets in daily episodes, and maybe we should keep a daily if you like it that way. Let us know by a review in your podcast store..

Omega bipolar disorder depression Mediterranean Diet bipolar depression impulsivity Erica Saunders bipolar Carl Psychiatry Kelly Newsom University of Pennsylvania Migraines Editor in Chief Hershey Dr Sanders Jack Felisa Jacka investigator
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on The Dictionary

"And that's eight hundred six five six hope that is a good number to know and I will find the the other suicide hotline number and I. Think There's a website to that I will put in. The show notes You know you never know what is going to come up in the dictionary. I I love the fact. That gets us on these random conversations. I've had some really great ones with people in. Unfortunately, they can't go on forever. The episode will have to end eventually so the last thing that we're GonNa do is I'm GonNa. Have you pick a word of the episode? That is your favorite or the one that stuck out at you the most in whatever way you choose. I will go ahead and read them. Just to give you a quick reminder, they are bio type biowarfare biowaste bioweapon by parental bipartisan bipartite bipeds, bipedal ISM by polity by phase, ick by fennel by tiny biplane by pod, bipolar and bipolar disorder. It's a tough call. Because some of those I didn't know and our quirky Channel One, but I I have these existing affections for things like bipedal ISM, and by plane it would have to be one or the other of those and I'm GonNa say biplane, because the biplane can have a bike beetle being in it. Often does actually really does if it's yeah emotion, yes, yes. So that, is it a by plane is the word of the episode. Thank you very much to Paul for being on. If you WANNA, know more about him or want to learn film from him. Read his booker here books I should say plural or hear his music or see his shows Go ahead and check out. The show notes I will put his much in there as I can so fall. Thank you very much for doing this. This was a lot of fun Spencer. It was my pleasure, and all those glowing things you said about me or coming right back at your brother. Thank you. I, appreciate it into all of you listeners, thank you rate and review and share, and all those things that people have to say at the end of their podcast episodes, and this has been sponsored dispensing information. Just say by cannot do that by oh. Yeah, that's perfect. By..

Paul bipolar disorder
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

14:06 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"Mental illness is a serious problem if we don't suffer from it, we know someone close to us who does today. We are joined by Justin peck. He's a professional and champion offroad racer, as well as an author, who has an incredible story. He's been through it. All he has bipolar disorder. I seemingly endless amount of injuries, broken bones, and an opiate addiction. He's overcome so much to get where he is. Today was surprised me about Justin is incredible self-awareness and determination. I don't wanna give it away, but his approach to treating his mental illness, isn't the route most people take, but the most important thing to learn from him, is that we need to listen to our bodies. What works for one person may or may not work for someone else. So buckle up because Justin took us on a hell of a ride. Oh. And here's a trigger warning. If hearing about suicide, and other topics related to mental illness and addiction, -able upset, you, you probably should skip this. Episode..

Justin peck bipolar disorder
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"That I saw with my dot with our doctors with bipolar. But I didn't understand it. And when I wrote my book, I had a chapter on schizophrenia and by on autism behavior. I did not have a chapter on bipolar. I didn't think I knew enough about it to write a chapter. So I decided to delve into it. And I spent years studying newer science around the world, and guess what I found I believe. I have discovered exactly what it is. There's always mysteries of bipolar that that have plagued people for more than one hundred years. For example, people don't understand why it's a late onset. The sorter usually comes after the age of sixteen and often comes suddenly in once a person develops bipolar disorder. It doesn't go away. It's there is a problem. The challenge the rest of their lives, and why for heavens sakes, do they suddenly start with mania? Why does the media get worse early on? And then why do they cycle or why don't they switch between mania in then sort of an opposite condition of depression? After several years of doing this. I think it's all right there. The neuroscientists have that the answers, and we have I believe we have solved all the mysteries of bipolar. And we now know exactly what it is. And I'm writing a book on it. And I went to the annual meeting of the of the APA the world's big meeting of the world psychiatrists and presented this at a new research section, and I was really disappointed. Nobody seemed to care lot. A psychiatrist with to say, well, this is really interesting, but I've got this patient coming next week who's got bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. How is this going to help them? The answer is no we what we've we know inter stand. What causes it? We know the mechanisms and and this should lead directly to far better. Therapies are. You a to say give gimme the lay person's view of what's called, bipolar. I'd I'd be happy to basically, it's what amounts to is that our our brain neurons are remarkable little guys they we've got these eighty billion of them. They can they have a remarkable ability to develop a high voltage called a potential ties scholar potential..

bipolar disorder schizophrenia APA one hundred years
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Recommended that a father give his four year old son marijuana cookies to control temper tantrums, and he's fighting like crazy to maintain his medical license, and it wasn't the pot recommendation. That is what got him into trouble. Giving a four year old pot. Is okay medically. What it was was something else entirely. Dr William idle men, a natural medicine physician know that is I guess it's a real doctor who decides to wake up one day and said, I'm not going to be a real doctor today, and here's some supplements. Here. Eat some tree bark. Everybody hold hands circle around the tree in Cinco bayou with what do they do? What are natural medicine physicians? Do have no idea. Anyway, what he got in trouble for was improperly diagnosing, the young boy with attention deficit, hyper hyperactivity disorder and bipolar disorder before recommending the marijuana. The medical board has actually ordered that license be revoked, but a Superior Court Judge issued a temporary stay allowing him to continue practicing medicine, but he can't treat patients under eighteen and he cannot use a cannabis treatment for adult patients without obtaining a medical history and conducting a medical examination of the patient. That was the problem. So father brings his candidacy the doctor was misbehaving school. And so he comes in and tells the doctor here's the problem, I have well vitamins practice centers on writing letters for patients who obtain medical marijuana. And he started doing this right after the state firstly legalize the drug for medical use. And he turned out to be one of those marijuana doctors after a thirty minute visit with the boy and his dad, the doctor writes in his chart the child had a probable combination of ADHD and bipolar disorder and should try cannabis small amounts and cookies. He had previously recommended cannabis for his dad's ADHD in bipolar disorder. Well, here was the negligence the medical board found him grossly negligent for doing diagnosing the kid without a diagnosis without an examination. Not consulting a psychiatrist what the hell does he know about ADHD? He's a natural medicine medicine physician. I'm surprised he didn't give him a just a chunk of rock and go here. Chew on this one. Yeah. Okay. Why not? Here's some bingo. Coa or bingo, Jayco, or whatever the hell they call that. That should work. Right. What.

marijuana cannabis bipolar disorder ADHD Cinco bayou Jayco Superior Court Dr William four year thirty minute one day
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Like, you know, like, let's say you see client, and you realize like, okay, I think some of this that that you're presenting with maybe a bipolar disorder. I know sometimes that comes with like heightened like emotionality. And how do you work with the client who may be struggling with some of these? So a lot of my work is focused working with clients who do have some challenges with regards select moon regulation. So that's not just by all of this order, but also, but like now disorder or the trait of online personality disorder, and I often really start the same place with them that I would with any client that I have, you know, what do you want out of your life? You know, what can you want your life to look like, you know, what is the vision that you have or you want to be how do you want to be seen in the world? How you show up in the world. And then we really talk about what's working for them. Not. But I've seen not with family ease not with whoever referred to me like what eighty but. No, what is working you in your life in what is not working, and we start from that point. Oftentimes when we really delve into. Their mood changes the cycles behaviors that are not giving them the results that they want for their life. That's where we're able to really do the work on change in behavior on increasing adherents in the medication that you're prescribed on, you know, even verbalizing discussing with Dr changes to the medication that a more in really engaging in their treatment in not being passive receivers. Oh treatment. But you know, really thinking about what they want a house with cheated on Easter levels Ubani different tools. I love the way that you put them Eliza because I think kind of going back to what you said earlier around kind of receiving one of these agnosio, it kind of feels like, oh, my life is over like, you know, kind of doom and you're really talking about the treatment. Looking like, how do we actually get you to be able to live more of the life that you want in focusing on symptoms and making changes in behaviors as opposed to focusing on the diagnosis, right? Like, really? Wanting to actually get you to chain of these behaviors. So that you're not as impacted by the diagnosis, right? Exactly. Also allowing people to see like you can have a full life. I think a lot of times remember, you know, and clients resisted most is because they assume that this means that you never gonna be able to work it never gonna be able to have children. It never gonna be able to do the things that you want to do life dream. But there are many people who are working in rivalry very successful with, you know, many different mental health diagnosis, it's really about engaging in the things that you need to engage in for you to feel better. And you know, being clear about that with yourself about what that is as opposed to simply trying to run away from it. So what are some of those things that you started tackle like what are some of the behaviors that frequently come up that you do work with your clients on trying to change or manage? So a lot of it has to do with. Anger in the education that comes either from being in a managed aides or the ability note, like the decrease in functioning that comes from being in a depressive state, those rapid mood changes in the habit that it can sort of recall your interpersonal relationships your work relationships functioning school. I have a lot of clients who are in college or pursuing master's degrees, and the changes are in prevent down from, you know, making schedules meaning nine, and, you know, doing the things that they want to do to school for some reason, I tracked hire cheaper from our quiets wannabe straight as this. They wanted to well all the time. And so oftentimes just feeling is all being don't have any control and that the people in their life. Whether it's Esser award parent don't understand that. And then they feed the negative consequences from that. So I really really work with them on being able to. Two one understand for themselves. What's happening to be able to identify triggers before the triggers actually become problematic grind? So if you're having a symptom onset typically, there are minor changes in your life that will happen before.

bipolar disorder Eliza Esser
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Please shared with us on social media using the hashtag TB g in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Melissa thank you for having me. I with fight today. Here I'm happy that you're here is will. And we are going to be tackling a lot of different topics and a lot of like highly requested topics and knew I wanted to bring on the perfect person to be able to really have a discussion about some of his. So I wanna start our conversation talking about having a bipolar disorder diagnosis. So for those people who are listening who may have heard by polar thrown around. But are not quite sure what that means. Can you tell us a little bit more about what it means when you receive a diagnosis of bipolar disorder? Go we're talking about polar disorder, Email many. Of us here that faith around quite often, the weather is bipolar need. So moody you by polar or you you know, that that really is not fuller by Olek really has to do with REU what we call manic or like, hyper manic and then periods of rushing while and they're typically cynical mood changes at meet specific criteria for duration frequency and intensity that that uncertainly lead to like functional impairment challenges and schoolwork with relationships and challenges in the way that you see a world. So when we're talking about like a manic phase, which is really sort of the crux of colour disorder when we're talking about manning, hyper manic, as is where we're talking about people who feel really really like they're super super elated in super super happy. For you know, periods of typically at least the week, right? They're happy. They feel like they can stay up where these at a time out fleet. They might be really and implies you're seeking behavior. So Harding sexual activity. You know, shopping all the time and the tons and tons of money thinking that you are grandiose or in a better life positioning, our client commitment, you know, they'll say, oh, I, you know, own this Bank, and I have a million dollars. I can do what I want. I can spend can travel, and they just kind of feel as though life is rate is no coming down from end. They typically feel they expressed feeling really really really happy. And then there the lows of it, which is depression, the sadness that no not being able to get out of bed not being able to function, and you know, most of us struggle with periodic. Mood swings. But the difference between bipolar disorder is these mood. Swings are really really out of control. You cannot manage your emotions at all you cannot function in the important areas of your life, so work school. If you have children to care for you are.

bipolar disorder Melissa Olek depression manning million dollars
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

09:57 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"For one of the biggest natural health stories of twenty eighteen was the emergence of probiotics as a very important factor in optimum health actual multiple. Studies showed that these so-called good bugs that we call them. Do a lot more than just keep our digestive and immune systems in good shape. For example, research has shown that probiotics can also help deal with allergies skin, conditions and mood disorders. And now a paper released by the American college of neuro psychopharmacology. Drum roll please neuro psychopharmacology says that program I've been practicing that all morning say the probiotics could help the millions of Americans suffering from bipolar disorder, which is huge. There's a lot of people that suffer from that. And that's not something that's easily dealt with high. No, we're very fortunate here on healing quest to have access to a world renowned micro biologist to help us understand the meaning of research developments like this one. We're talking about Kirin Krishnan of the justify probiotics. So Karen, welcome back to healing question. Happy new year. Thank you so much for having me. Oh, it's always our pleasure. So bipolar when we think about bipolar. We think about dramatic mood shifts from depression to manic behavior. How can probiotics help deal with that? Yeah. You know that is completely counterintuitive, and it has been counter intuitive to the medical profession for decades that things that are going on clearly in the brain can be impacted by tweeting other parts of the body. But after turns out, there's something that is really profound called the gut brain axis, and the gut brain axis is basically an intimate connection between the gut and the brain when I say that got I mean, the intestinal lining. And all of the microbes that exist in the intestine, which is closer one hundred trillion. Bacteria are concentrates are microbiome they have a direct connect to our brain. And as it turns out what they do in the gut directly impact how the brain functions. How how does that happen? Yeah. So that's the fascinating part. So there's a few different ways that the got in the brain connected one is through a neurological connection. So the bacteria in your gut tonight, actually produce neurotransmitters hormones and things like that that they can send up something called the Vegas nerves goes directly to your brain that directly impacts your mood. Your behaviors your food choices your outlook on life, all of the things that we saw up to be purely a a mind function. Now is turns out that good bacteria, and you got get influence that now the other way that it can influence it, and this is in particular importance to this to the issue of bipolar disorder us through inflammation. So it Milan, the gut bacteria can actually transmit toxins that will enter through the gut lining into the circulatory system and enter the brain and cause inflammation in the brain. And that inflammation. Has not only been shown to be impact call in bipolar disorder. But in other cognitive development issues as well like autism, spectrum disorders Parkinson's Alzheimer's, senile dementia, and so on that's a lot a lot. Yeah. I know. So it's really fascinating. When you think that these conditions over thought of to be dysfunctions in the brain are actually driven by inflammation in the gut and that that's the new finding. So are you finding that probiotics are actually helping people with bipolar disease? I mean, this is something that their doctors are recommending nocco yet. This is very new the studies on bipolar. Specifically are in the infancy in the case of depression. For example, would also of course, a thought to be a brain condition. Doctors over the last three to four years have been recommending certain types of probiotics for their patients. I know I work with a lot of psychologists and integrated medicine doctors that have used probiotics and diet alterations to treat their chronically depressed patients, but the same pathology so the same disease progression is present in bipolar disorder as well. So I would say. In the next two to three years. We'll start to see an increase use of probiotics dietary modifications and other things that impact the gut in the treatment of bipolar disorder. If you're just joining us, I'm ROY walking horse. I'm Judy Brooks. And you're listening to healing quest. And we're talking with microbiologists Kieran Krishnan about how probiotics could actually help us deal with bipolar disorder and not just bi-polar disorder. But this is a new study that we're just talking about it. Actually, we've talked to you before about the fact that probiotics are very helpful and dealing with depression and stress, so you know, inflammation, or over stimulation of the body's immune system seems to be a key factor in bipolar disorder. Is that what probiotics can really deal with that seems should be the biggest impact so far? Now, there are likely other things that we don't even know about like, I mentioned earlier there are your transmitters involved in in what the gut microbiome does to influence a brain. There are small proteins called pep. Tides that can be produced by the microbes in the gut that can actually influence a brain. But so far what the research is focusing on and has been showing is that the systemic inflammation that is initiated at the gut in the intestines by the by a dysfunctional microbiome is a big driver of the progression. And the and the progression of the disease, for example, if you are suffering from bipolar disorder, and what this is what the study showed in particular. They they took people that were hospitalized to bi-polar dysfunction or disorder and were treated in the hospital and then released and then day Cape pass to the people that were released a probiotic and the other half the CBO, and they found that the people on the probiotic had a much lower rate of regression of their out there improvements and having to come back to the hospital or the probiotic help reduce that re invigoration of symptoms. Are we talking about this four base probiotic is that what this? Study was on. Study was done on this with this four base probiotic. They developed a laboratory version of a probiotic so it it's hard to say, there's no there's no commercial tie to it. We can't go use this provided because it might be beneficial. But what we can say is that the path Olivetti so that disease progression that they studied that seems to be beneficial is that inflammatory progression in that comes to leaky gut. So with that in mind, you know, we know we studied the sports push for bass club attic. And we published a study showing that that same type of inflammatory response is negated by the spore based providing so in all likelihood it can work in a similar way and the spore by products just just to clarify for our listeners that actually Judy and I take is is called just thrive. That's something that you were involved in and it it hasn't been shown to really get all the way into the part of the intestine where the good stuff needs to happen. So just if anybody's wondering, okay, I can't get this from a lab. Well, you can get spore based probiotics right now that we think we'll have the same kind of a terrific result. Absolutely. And it's all about being able to stop that inflammation that that starts in the gut that becomes systemic. It's that same type of inflammation that can cause the inflammatory response in the brain, which seems to play a major role in these types of cognitive issues. I just wanna say that right now the standard treatment for bipolar disorder is like a combination of psychotherapy and prescription medications like mood stabilisers at anti psychotics. So I have to tell you something you said earlier was really heartening to me is that you're working with psychologist and integrative physicians who are recognizing the great power and benefits of probiotics when properly used and and that gives me a lot of hope the you know, that the MD's of the world are gonna wake up and start integrating were based probiotics into into what they give us because it's so natural. So I'm hoping that you're feeling equally optimistic. Yeah. Absolutely. And and it falls to me to make that happen. It becomes incumbent upon us to do the research to show them that it could be effective, right? And that's our role. So we do right now. We're doing fourteen human clinical trials us for probiotics on many different conditions. Right. So that that is a lot to manage. But the importance of that is those that's the language that the medical doctors speak. So when we can get that kind of information to them they start to realize what can really benefit their patients and at the end of the day. The vast majority of them are really only looking to benefit their patient. Right. Exactly. Oh, exactly. Yeah. Exactly. But you have to speak their language where we tried to. Excel. We try to do the research that speaks their language, and what we're showing more and more is that this type of inflammatory response in the gut that leaky gut that endotoxin that we've talked about on your show before that is the major driver of most of these conduct disorders, and we can stop that with the right probiotic once again, you've just given us so much information, and it's really enlightening for any of our listeners out there that are dealing with bipolar disorder or have family members or people that they know this is a good information to pass along to them. So thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you so much for having me as you look forward to doing it again. I think we'll be talking to you in a couple of weeks we've been talking with microbiologist in Christian about how probiotics could help millions of Americans deal with bipolar disorder. So if you wanna find more information on.

bipolar disorder bipolar disease Kieran Krishnan Judy Brooks Milan Karen American college Alzheimer CBO MD three years four years
"bipolar disorder" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"bipolar disorder" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Thing that our tell people is to try to develop a resilient and at the same time, we can to themselves and for family and friends to be what I call in. This is basically most hereditary, and it's not something. He's not he's not you're a bad character college. You have bipolar disorder. Physical chemistry. Voice, isn't that the truth? And I think there's so much confusion over the chemistry of the brain for. So so many people and the good thing is we know so much more. I came down with it in nineteen sixty three. Yeah. Yeah. And and you're right. It's such a difference from nineteen sixty three to what we see now today. And I love the way you said be kind especially relatives. Because I had this discussion actually with the wife of a famous doctor who had two children and one was wildly successful. The other one was battling all kinds of demons with five bipolar disorder. They didn't realize it, and they would constantly tell them. Why can't you get your act together? Why can't you do this? And they beat him up so much that eventually he ended up committing suicide. They didn't realize what he was going through. And they didn't they thought they were giving him tough love, and he just didn't have a direction, but it turned out that wasn't what it wasn't all. We'll see this situation is do you realize that there are more suicides in two thousand thirteen? They were forty one thousand one hundred and forty nine suicides and.

bipolar disorder