29 Burst results for "Bingham"

Northwestern holds on to beat No. 10 Michigan St 64-62

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Northwestern holds on to beat No. 10 Michigan St 64-62

"Ryan Ryan young young delivered delivered eighteen eighteen points points and and eight eight rebounds rebounds as as northwestern northwestern pulled pulled off off a a sixty sixty four four sixty sixty two two upset upset of of tenth tenth ranked ranked Michigan Michigan state state east east Lansing Lansing the the Wildcats Wildcats held held on on after after Millie Millie call call missed missed a a three three pointer pointer with with four four seconds seconds left left and and Marcus Marcus Bingham Bingham failed failed to to hit hit the the front front end end of of a a one one on on one one with with seven seven tenths tenths of of a a second second to to play play the the Spartans Spartans had had won won nine nine in in a a row row before before northwestern northwestern pulled pulled off off its its first first road road win win over over a a top top ten ten team team in in nearly nearly five five years years Julius Julius marble marble had had a a career career high high eighteen eighteen points points for for the the Spartans Spartans I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Ryan Ryan Wildcats Wildcats Lansing Millie Millie Marcus Marcus Bingham Bingham Michigan Spartans Spartans Julius Julius Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
"bingham" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:41 min | 7 months ago

"bingham" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"But he let us seem because he was expecting. So we got back in the car, we talked to our team and we were like, really, win Chicago, we flew across America across the country to do this, and there is nothing. So we just started to trickle down the options here. It's like either he's either he's covering and he knows that we're there for him because he used his fake name of Ted dino, or he's doing meth and he's going to be really violent. Exactly. We came to the not smartest conclusion of going back again. Art went back by himself armed with only the camera gloves. No back up, nothing coal came ten times. He's not buzzing me, right? So I called the other neighbor. So I was like, hey, I have a delivery. Can you let me? So they let me. I weasel myself into the building. Going to his apartment, second floor, knocking on the door, no answering knocking on the door, and then you can hear when the gun getting loaded and stuff. And you see he opened wide open door and you know like when you drink by the bar at the bar, right? And somebody don't like you and you're like, hey, meet me behind the bar. We're ready to fight. You know that position when you like your hands? Almost this. Absolutely. Absolutely three times a week. By the way, they have a whole South Park about this. Where the guys are going out in the parklands fighting like this. Yeah, we become bigger. We expand ourselves. Right. So he wide opened the door and the first thing that I can smell. It's a weed factory in my face. That's smell like. And these dude, and I see big gun right next to his balls. And swart behind him hanging on a wall, right? And I was like, this is fucking drug dealer apartment. He's not happy. And he was like, what a fuck are you like, you know, why did you come here? You are, my boys are on the way. I already called my boys, my crews in a way. I told you. I don't know who said dino. If you have any problems called police FBI, what a fuck else do we need from me? And I was like, okay, and my Google glasses record everything, but my eyes is right next to his balls because that's where the weapon is, right? So I took into him with my glasses, but my eye line is on his garage now. And I was like, art, you have to talk to him like as a kid, he have to feel that you're not dangerous because I don't want to get shocked. And everything that comes out of my mouth has to be processed 69 69 time a second, make sure those words would not spike him to the behavior to shock me. And I talked through the whole process, I was like, listen, I know, this is, you know, maybe it's not you by why would these why your address is listed on a you start to confront them about the scam? Yes, absolutely. Yeah. So the door hats off to him. Holy shit. Speaking. Meanwhile me and the camera guy are still outside because we made the decision to be here. We are very happy with you. So basically I told him we independent filmmakers and we scanners. We flew from Los Angeles to here to find forster house. There is no fossil house, but somehow package is coming to your house. And if there is weird packages coming to my house, I want to know why my address is on the dark market sold. He was like, I don't give a fuck. It's not my problem. I'm not at dino. Like I said, my crew is on his on its way. And what is your ID? You know, so anyways, we talk and I was like, dude, why don't we doing Justin do this? And this is weird that anyways. So I left, right? So after we let you go. Let me go calm down. He wasn't the same defensive, very defensive. But you know, like, when there is a gun between two guys and that elephant in the room that every single time when you talk, it all comes about how fast you can run or how fast what we're going to do, you have to tackle him because if you're going to start running, he can shoot you in the back. So all these stuff. So you're keeping the balance of your value of your speech, right? You're talking about the same subject, but your mind is already okay. You go up, the rooftop can be exactly. It can be blocked. If you go down, he can shoot you and they're like, okay, maybe you need to jump and tackle him. And you know, so all these stuff going through, but anyways, after that, when we got in the car, I was like, brother, we were getting hot. First of all, let's get the fuck outta here. That's number one. Number two, when we're getting home, we buying bulletproof vests. Oh, yeah, yeah. Yeah, that was that was that just another day. So now you are flag jackets. While the problem is the problem that we run into very rarely, we were very rarely get local addresses. So with flying, you know, we need some assistance finding out the laws of vest. You can't wear it. Can you imagine the yellow like you're going to LAX and you have bulletproof vests in the box? Who cares? Well, they control whether they're not you wear a bulletproof vest. That's great. We just, we just finding a way to stay safe to do these properly. Tell attorneys what's going on law enforcement. And so one of the signs that my mental health was not good during COVID is I started watching religiously. And by the way, this is not what I'm going to talk about. What We Do in the Shadows is back. That's a good thing. That's a good one. Also, I just like to tell our guests that you are not allowed to wear it, but you can take it as a carry on. Carry on. How about that? Yeah. Okay. Aren't there restrictions in certain states though about what kind of caliber you can even have in your possession? Well, yes, but that would be under the purview of the state where you want to land. Right. TSA only cares about what's going on. I will talk to you later about why you know all that Gary..

Ted dino dino forster house swart South Park Chicago FBI America Google Los Angeles Justin TSA Gary
"bingham" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:08 min | 7 months ago

"bingham" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"In the summertime, when it was barely an ochi, white nights, when during the night, it's the same. I think it was like June. It wasn't the long, long days. It was like ten o'clock. But it didn't matter to me, because the rich, you know, maybe you explained this to me. The bill they have just miles of buildings that are like Paris, like about 8 stories high. And it's clearly he fashioned it all up to Versailles in Paris. And that's what he wanted. He did it. But there are miles of buildings. What are they doing in those buildings? I didn't see any commerce going on. Those all living environments. And there's sort of a downtown area near the port, right with sky rise up. And that's where the business is, I guess, right? Yes, absolutely. But, you know, let's put this way. Everything is beautiful because it's an absolutely tourist and this is culture. This is the soul of Russia, right? It's absolutely sounds peterborough. Some picture book. The thing is, you walk on those streets, everything look amazing, fresh, beautiful, but you go around the building and you can see that, well, that's what I was, that's what I was feeling. And as I know, why? Why not? Because of it because of inspection when when governments spend so much money and you're supposed to build bridges, streets, you have to paint the houses, you have to paint the theodores, or whatever museums, they do that because the person usually whoever, you know, president, vice president, whoever in politics, they will drive by, they say, okay. They might need that spend. Great. But those money was like, so if somebody comes from a communist system, did you have any thoughts on what was going on in Wuhan when they were locking everybody down and breaking people into did you experience? What did you think was going on there? Wuhan when the virus broke out, Wuhan, China, which opened. Right. The government's reaction was sort of extraordinary. Did you have any thoughts about what was going on there? We just sort of observing it. Did you think, oh, I know what this is. Again, living here for 13 years. And I read Russian newspapers, I read watching sometimes Russian televisions and stuff. I just getting sick and tired of politics and politics is so deep. And again, having that perspective until I moved to America, I had absolutely different vision. But my vision was different because I kind of grew up in Europe, right? I played in so many different countries and travel a lot and tournaments and all this stuff. But again, my the thing is, my dream, my body was living in Soviet Union, but my soul always been in America. So I knew no matter what, filmmaking, basketball, I want to play an NBA. I want to come to Los Angeles. You saw the culture. So absolutely. This is my America was my soul, and finally, when my body united with my soul, the hep is a person the happiest kid on earth, living in America. This happy accident, this particular documentary film. I told my brother, he became not blood related brother, but I told him, I was like, look, people think about Russia, gangsters. Are we talking about Ashton brother? It's gay. Right. You're the brother. He's my brother, but not by. He's long before truly. But I told I told him, I was like, look at these F these politics. After these everything what's going on, your American, I'm Russian, we became friends, doesn't matter nothing about these skin color, nothing about the culture, nothing about what presidents and country think about us. We're doing something to help people our religion, our culture, I think. And we're entertaining the whole goal at the beginning was just entertainment, and that's what you're able to do together. Doing what you want to do. You're not allowing people telling us we be Friends or not. I think we worked together so well too, just from the get go, because we're such different people with such vastly different accent help you when you're doing the face to face stuff. I'm just curious. Like to play it in my head and pretend like I am him. I don't know. I mean, having a guy show up with a Russian accent adds a little bit. Oh yeah, yeah. Well yeah, as far as the time goes, he's an amazing asset in that sense. I imagine push them back a little bit. The guy with the gun in Florida. Yeah, they tend to talk a little more when art is the one when you have a 6 foot four Russian sent a bad mood at your front door. You have to give that switch when you can be nice and also take advantage of you. Goofy is freaking gooba, you'll ever meet in your life. I've never met a Russian that smiles and laughs and can be so freaking goofy. But when it's time to do business or time to do what you got to do and establish your presence in whatever Ukrainian Belarus, the happy happy. Do you think or a Russian? I think that's just Russian weasel here. As we call it. You know what? Because Ryan's Russian, I mean, ethnic Russians are a little more and it's very easy to explain. When you'll even condition that weather when it's like, in the wintertime, it's dark up to 2.3 o'clock, right? Everything is great. There is no sun. There is no money. People are pulled people fighting for there is no opportunity. People are ready to eat each other, right? Yeah. It's like literally. No opportunities. And then you come to America to sign in California and everybody is like with a big smiles. How you doing? How's your day? Also in Russia to smile at somebody's sort of like weird. Exactly. Exactly. I can not trust you. But Ukraine, it's more south. That's what I'm saying. Exactly. Because I see I've seen Ukrainians. I just think of them. I'm paying attention now because my heritage is something I've noticed they seem a little more like having a good time. Absolutely. Absolutely. When you buy the ocean, you know, like when you have these beautiful weather, again, Odessa. It's called the Black Sea. Black Sea, that's right. Here's the ocean. It's a black Black Sea. Yes. But I could go back in time and meet you prior to U.S. days. It compared to what I know now. Well with the stress of the last year, it's no wonder.

Wuhan U.S. Paris Russia peterborough Soviet Union Ashton NBA China basketball Los Angeles Europe government Belarus Florida Ryan Black Sea California Odessa
"bingham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:14 min | 8 months ago

"bingham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Who better to have with me today than the woman who coordinated this country's vaccine rollout dame. Kate bingham is my first guest this morning. The former chair of the uk vaccine task force and as boris johnson currently stateside getting ready for his first time in the oval office as prime minister for a meeting with president biden is defiant in his defense. If the uk's boost vaccine program despite hundreds of millions of people worldwide not having a single dose. It's worth remembering that. Millions in this country also haven't had a single dose by choice the latest high profile example being that of the strictly come dancing professional dancers report out today in the sun claims. There are now three dancers who haven't been jabbed but my question to you then is how has your relationship changed with colleagues friends and family who have chosen not to get vaccinated at all. I've spoken to you before on this program about how you convince those that you love in your life and care about to get jobs. What strategies of work. We exchanged tips. We heard from a behavioral psychologist on this matter. But moving away from trying to convince which i have to say to summarize compensation is a very difficult thing to do almost impossible. It seems what are you doing about those in your life. Who aren't guessing jabs whether you work with them live with them related to them. Friendship groups are you still seeing them. Are you talking to them. Has it changed things. Do you specs their decision. Or you're trying to just live with all you scared about seeing them. As we go into the windsor he scared about them. Seeing older people in your life vulnerable vulnerable people in your life. Tax meet at women's are on eight four eight. Four four tax will be charged. Standard message right. Do check for those costs on social media. it's bbc at bbc. Women's are or email me through our website. As i say my i guess today dame kate bingham the former chair of the uk vaccine taskforce are taught her very shortly indeed also on today's program the twenty six year old woman making history and waves as the australian of the We'll tell you all about a woman called grace tame and love heartbreak and live music from the singer. Songwriter martha wainwright who will be performing live in the actual studio which is such a treat. Because we've had so few guests allowed to come in because of the time that we are living in some martha wainwright currently tuning up voice. I heard it just before award since the to come and sing highlighter. Song for us but covered boost. The jobs are now being offered across the k. Twelve to fifteen year olds are now being vaccinated in schools. And it is the work that began with dame kate bingham appointed chair of the uk vaccine task force at the beginning of the pandemic by boris johnson and reported directly to him prior to this unpaid role. She worked for thirty years in the biotech industry..

Kate bingham president biden uk boris johnson dame kate bingham bbc martha wainwright uk vaccine task force
"bingham" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

08:25 min | 11 months ago

"bingham" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"And community education while andy loves all things feline her affinity for helping. The weakest and most vulnerable drives her passion for orphaned newborn kittens. Andy has personally fostered nearly one thousand kittens under two weeks. Old and specializes in neonatal critical. Care and he had like to welcome you to the show. Hi stacey thanks for having me so before we dive into all of this great stuff about neonatal kittens. How did you become passionate about cats. I always loved cats. Ever since. I was little. I always loved Whether it was does outside in my community or you know when i was Pride on eight or nine. We started having cats nurse family. I've always loved them. And united passionate about units when north carolina air just started seeing. How many of these orphan newborn kittens being outside and how hard it was to. I'm able to provide good care for them in just so i started doing that and Just have loved every moment of it. When was that. When was that you sort of discovered neonates and started volunteering or helping out. So i started. Fostering units About five years ago and Doesn't sound like very long. But i've been fostering units a very high volume since then so he about five years ago when i started taking meyer. Neonates haven't slept a whole lot. Since i tell you what i'm going to be brutally honest and say that the bottle feeding thing is something i have never done because i appreciate my sleep so much more than i could ever ever do that unfortunately for kids it's just it's amazing what folks do for kittens. During the course of the night i had two kids One of my kids then sleep through the night. She was six and a half. And so i learned to be a real fan of a of six hours of sleep. Straight was a very exciting thing. So i i know you can appreciate that so you are an amazing person. Thank you so much for taking care of so many kittens. And i will say the folks that do enjoy doing bottle bottle babes as i call them. There's just a significant tribal folks that fostering regular kittens just is not the same. Why do you think that is. I mean in in the foster care space one would think. Oh well we'll just foster anything. But we really have developed Our subcategories of their some folks that like to do bottle behaves there other ones that just they love it when a kitten hisses at them they just they really teach us issues. Like it's like almost getting kissed by a kitten when someone misses at you and they get all excited and i call those like the fluff and fold foster homes you know. How do we go in these different directions. Do you have any sense as to how to identify these folks. Well you know. I think for me. It's really matter I really saw that. There was just this really desperate need for people who were willing to make up every two hours who are willing to take on kittens who are so fragile in you know. Have a very high mortality rate honestly. So i had the time to do it. I have the ability to learn the skills. I had the ability to wake up every few hours. I know luckily happy that we need to set a somewhat flexible schedule. So for me In the beginning. I felt like i was almost obligated to do that. Work because these kids needed at searched desperately and i have to do it so i felt like i should. But you know there's there's something really special about getting a kitten when it's just you know few hours older few days very than he now reverts to all the amount that kid grows and changes in the first forty six weeks of his life as amazing. You know you go. from this. Little tiny being the kittens to a kitten us running around and using litterbox learning how to eaten play. Bowel happens in just a few weeks. So you really. If you're taking these kittens nor so a tiny you get to see this really dramatic change and you get to really understand that that happened the because you were willing to wake up every couple of our staff to give them nutrition to give them medical care not love and it's just that i feel like it's just so much more You know the impact you're making is so much more obvious than older kittens so you started doing this five years ago. But you decided to start a nonprofit organization the ester neonatal kitten alliance about two two and a half years ago a year ago year and a half ago so even even sooner than that. So it's a very young organization. Was there a specific reason that you felt you needed to go from sort of individual into organization. What was the plan around that. Yes so when i had been fostering otherwise i had actually been working with another organization which was at a bigger general animal rescue. And what i saw i was working. There was that when kittens were when you neonates. Were coming in the door. It really created a emergency situation every time it's not of course you know we're located north carolina's so this happens all the time south kinzer reading castleberry constantly so You know. I was watching every time. These unions Door a lot of staff they're doing it has to go into immediate. Like what is this kitten need and you know a lot of the staff. There weren't Trained on how you give these kids proper care. So i happen to be working. That day was fine in his. I wasn't working that day. Sometimes it was fine and sometimes it really wasn't you know it just seemed like there was just a very obvious gap union that this organization was funded. Dave did a great job with the other animals in their care. There was just this very obvious gap Needs so when i left that organization united airlines just thinking about what my next move was and i you know it is kinda kept coming back to this thought you know. Wouldn't it be great if i could workfront organization that with neonates. The is that such a huge problem in this area. United beginning it's too bad that organization doesn't exist and i just me like i'm the person to start an organization. Ten years of experience working nonprofits profits. I have to know all different roles and nonprofits I just decided that this was just what the obvious stat. In the way that. I could really make the biggest impact on neonates in my region to support these organizations who are doing such great jobs. they just don't have the clamber specific resource instant credits indians. So basically you identified a problem or not a problem but an issue of concern and then you believed in the fact that you could make change and create that change which is what has happened with a lot of us. We all see stuff and we're like you know what. I think we can do this in a little different way and it will work better for everybody and just just go ahead and do it. And that's really what's so exciting. Lot of people say oh well with such a young organization you don't get access to fundraising to to money to to that kind of thing and we actually had had a conversation about a couple of weeks ago or whatever about how your fundraising capabilities have been pretty solid because who can say no to a cute little kitten and so so you've got probably one leg up on the folks. Maybe that have the big. Tom cat in the trap And trying to do their good work that way but still you have also looked at ways of doing fundraising for young organization. And trying to build up your coffers and resources from that standpoint but for others that have new organizations whether they're doing tr or adoption rescue or new nate kitten rescue or or just thinking about starting a new organization you know what sort of tips and tricks if you have any tricks.

Dave Andy eight six hours united airlines two kids stacey One United Ten years five years ago nine six and a half a year ago year and a half ago first forty six weeks two and a half years ago north carolina one leg couple of weeks ago kids
Yaa Gyasi Discusses Her Latest Book, Transcendent Kingdom

Little Atoms

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Yaa Gyasi Discusses Her Latest Book, Transcendent Kingdom

"Was born in ghana amazed in huntsville alabama process novel. Going was a sunday times bestseller. The national book critics circle award for best first novel and was shortlisted for the pen. Robert w bingham prize for fiction. Twenty seventeen she was selected as one of granta's best young american novelists and in two thousand nineteen the bbc's elected her debut is one of the hundred novels that shape. Our world and latest novel is transcendent kingdom. And that's what we're going to talk about today. Y'all welcome to little atoms. Thank you thanks for having me. Tell me festival how you would describe this novel. So transcendent kingdom is about a woman named gifty who is completing a phd At stanford and neuroscience and she studies phenomenon called neural circuitry of reward seeking behavior which for lay people just means that she said he's things like addiction and depression and it's at a time in her life when her own mother who is quite depressed has come to stay with her so she finds herself taking care of her mother while also doing this research while also reflecting on her childhood particularly the circumstances that led up to her beloved older brothers passing from an opioid overdose and sets a book about Family about mother daughter relationships about immigration about religion and about science knows your debut. Homegoing was a a historical epic a sprawling multigenerational story. This one. obviously as you've just described it covers some big issues big ideas in it but it's focused down on a one single family and indeed a family. That's getting smaller not getting larger year. It never it didn't really feel like a conscious choice and from the beginning of transcendent kingdom. It just seemed like a more intimate story like a smaller canvas. In that way. I wanted to focus on the way that trauma works in a family Which is a theme homegoing as well But in this case it was a much smaller and lay. It just felt natural. I think so much of transcendent. Them is about the ways that isolation has affected this one woman gifted life and in order to kind of capture that isolation loneliness a needed the i needed the smaller scale Gifted just isn't a character. Who has this kind of abundant family life. Her family moves to the states before she's born and once they get here they're kind of cut off from the larger extended family ongoing obviously had characters who were also cut off from family. But i feel like the point of that book was to kind of showed this broader family to show the family tree in its fullness to see the way that these cutoffs impact the individual Transcendent kingdom were just starting with the single branch and that set so gifty as you said. She's a nervous scientist. He's on on a day carrying out a particular experiments and this is a real thing. Tell us what it is. She's doing and where where this came for. You used it in the book share and so years conducting this experiment. While i think i call it in the book like a behavioral testing chamber Basically she puts mice into this chamber that she's created and she trains the mice to press a lever for a word in this case. It's like a chocolate milk drink when they pressed the lever the milk floods into the straw. They're all excited. And then after some time she changes conditions so sometimes when they press the lever they get the drink and other times when they pressed the lever. They get a mild foot shock instead. And there's no pattern to it. So the mice never figure out when or why beat shocks happening And what she discovers is that some of the mice stop pressing leper but others. Don't stop those mice. The who are effectively addicted to drink are the ones that she uses to study the neural pathways that are involved in addiction. in a a came to this Research via my own best friend. Her name is tina ken. She is a a neuroscientist herself. And when i started writing this book we were both living in california as she was finishing up her. Phd at stanford. I should mention. She's a friend from childhood so just kind of random that she ended up at stanford which is my my own alma mater But at any rate she was finishing her. Phd bear and around that time she had a major paper published that i wanted to read I thought that i understood what she did. But while i tried and failed to read the paper. I realized that i had no idea what she did And so. I just kind of asked if she would allow me to shadow her and her lab at that point. I didn't really know that. I was writing a book just kind of wanted to get a better understanding of research And thankfully and graciously she said yes. And so i spent the day with her and The day i went she was performing this surgery on her mice. That detail in the opening pages transcendent kingdom. And i just found it. So fascinating. Counter research fascinating. The whole process was unlike anything. Obviously that i ever spend my day thinking about. And i found that those places where your own curiosity is sparks places that feel incredibly different but also for tile are the best places to lean into for for creative worth so it felt natural to want to know more. It felt natural to to try to think about it to fiction so

Robert W Bingham Gifty National Book Critics Circle A Stanford Huntsville Ghana Alabama BBC Depression Tina Ken California
"bingham" Discussed on 90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on 90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

"Her wings would get pro-life never the legs. You have to turn me rotisserie rotisserie Noel for a rotisserie. And it's funny. Cuz the next time we would video chat like a quarter of your face would still be white. Well, we've learned now for next year. Yeah, so they're playing. Okay. So now here's the other thing. It's a hose, right and they're like, oh it's a hose of whole home water. Okay, I guess maybe they bless the hose. Maybe they've left the right. Yeah, and then Bingham says, hey love him. This is a quote. Her evil spirit is afraid of being cast out. That's why she don't want to get wet. Okay, but that's hilarious. But also in the same sentence, he loves her and wants to be with her forever. He doesn't he doesn't at all. Big that she really irks the shit out of him actually. Oh my God, so she's like give me the baby give me the baby and she's crying and then he says re she's annoying person. She's selfish and only here for her son. That's a quote and he doesn't know if he's going to propose. And then yeah, then she says to him and he's like, you know, are you mad at me? What's the problem and she's like you did wrong today? You are bad boy. You did he pee on the carpet and you did pay boy. What but why does she treat him like that? It's disgusting. Well, she said the event was not good for the baby. She has a point. Okay, but she does have a point but the way she talks to him. I don't go for it at all. No, I don't either but he wants to stay. He's like, well I'm staying, you know, whether or not yeah, so they go to his brother's house, which is nearby for her to breastfeed the baby. She has to pick up her entire maxi dress to bra. Yes. This might not have been the best outfit Choice know I would have like cut a flap me too. I would have that is like a deep V. Yes, maybe more in a tank top underneath it and then popped it out. Exactly same time. Just saying he said that he's going to celebrate without her. Hmm. Okay. She takes the baby. She picks the baby up after she's brushing him. This kid is in a full. Long sleeve. Yeah footie pajama. Like he must be so overheated good he's soaking wet and it's not. Holy water my friend. No, it's not home. So she gives the baby to his sister. She's like here hold this kid and she goes over to him and she hugs him and tell him she loves him. Cuz she realized she was being a bitch. Okay, but now he proposes to her right now. Here's the thing. Yeah. It's in a lime juice. Okay Tracy when he took it out, I'm thinking like there's something wrong here. Is this supposed to a a lemon? Okay. I'm going to tell you something about that in a second. So you propose Eternal. I'm she says yes, and then like ten minutes later. His friends come over with his sinuses. Will you marry me? Well, that was great timing great. Great timing. Now. I'm going to tell you something. Yeah our good friend Gabrielle. Uh-huh. She was ordering her groceries right during the height of the pandemic and she ordered lemons and the shopper. That was Hispanic chose limes and said, okay and gave her limes and she was like no I wanted lemons and the person was like yes, these are lemons. Also interesting. She told me that her Puerto Rican friend also calls limes lemons. Really? That's so interesting. Okay. So what I need you guys to do you guys that are listening if you know of this or ever heard of this or maybe you know, your culture calls limes lemons, like can you help tell me if this is a thing or if you know, they're just confused. I love limes. I love limes and lemons. Yeah, I prefer limes over lemons. You have a lemon tree. I'm looking at it right now Harry. He's right next to me. Oh Harry, he's he's rooting. He there are so many flowers on him right now. It's wild. Is he outside right now? No right now, I'm back from inside. His last night was very cold. Yeah. He had a better on. Yeah. It was too cold for him. Ariella would have dressed him a lot warmer. She would have put a fleece on him. She would have she would have put a hunting cap on an Elmer Fudd hat. Oh my God, speaking of people who should never be together. Let's talk about Devon and June that always Junie. All right, so it's their wedding day. Mhm. Okay.

Bingham
"bingham" Discussed on 90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on 90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

"I only her wings would get pro-life never the legs. You have to turn me rotisserie rotisserie Noel for a rotisserie. And it's funny. Cuz the next time we would video chat like a quarter of your face would still be white. Well, we've learned now for next year. Yeah, so they're playing. Okay. So now here's the other thing. It's a hose, right and they're like, oh it's a hose of whole home water. Okay, I guess maybe they bless the hose. Maybe they've left the right. Yeah, and then Bingham says, hey love him. This is a quote. Her evil spirit is afraid of being cast out. That's why she don't want to get wet. Okay, but that's hilarious. But also in the same sentence, he loves her and wants to be with her forever. He doesn't he doesn't at all. Big that she really irks the shit out of him actually. Oh my God, so she's like give me the baby give me the baby and she's crying and then he says re she's annoying person. She's selfish and only here for her son. That's a quote and he doesn't know if he's going to propose. And then yeah, then she says to him and he's like, you know, are you mad at me? What's the problem and she's like you did wrong today? You are bad boy. You did he pee on the carpet and you did pay boy. What but why does she treat him like that? It's disgusting. Well, she said the event was not good for the baby. She has a point. Okay, but she does have a point but the way she talks to him. I don't go for it at all. No, I don't either but he wants to stay. He's like, well I'm staying, you know, whether or not yeah, so they go to his brother's house, which is nearby for her to breastfeed the baby. She has to pick up her entire maxi dress to bra. Yes. This might not have been the best outfit Choice know I would have like cut a flap me too. I would have that is like a deep V. Yes, maybe more in a tank top underneath it and then popped it out. Exactly same time. Just saying he said that he's going to celebrate without her. Hmm. Okay. She takes the baby. She picks the baby up after she's brushing him. This kid is in a full. Long sleeve. Yeah footie pajama. Like he must be so overheated good he's soaking wet and it's not. Holy water my friend. No, it's not home. So she gives the baby to his sister. She's like here hold this kid and she goes over to him and she hugs him and tell him she loves him..

Bingham
Britain to evaluate data for potential vaccines

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Britain to evaluate data for potential vaccines

"The checkout of Britain's coronavirus vaccine task force says data value aging the efficacy and safety of the two most advanced candidates should be available in early December Kate Bingham has told a parliamentary committee the dates on the two vaccine candidates developed by Oxford university and AstraZeneca and Pfizer and B. O. N. tech should be available by then after that the vaccine candidates will need regulatory approval Bingham says if the developers get that we have the possibility of deploying by year end well being check talk one of the scientists behind another vaccine developed by imperial college London this is possible several vaccines will be needed to stop the pandemic Charles Taylor this month London

Kate Bingham B. O. N. Tech Britain Astrazeneca Oxford University Pfizer Bingham Imperial College London Charles Taylor
"bingham" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"Learned <Speech_Male> that Stephanie Bingham <Speech_Male> the moment <Speech_Male> she grew <Speech_Male> up to the moment. She <Speech_Male> got in college. <Speech_Music_Male> She <Speech_Music_Male> was a dancer <Speech_Male> and by the <Speech_Male> time she actually got to college. <Speech_Male> She <Speech_Music_Male> was doing a little number <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> called <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The Monster Mash <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what's a bunch of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kids drinking <Speech_Music_Male> and ripping <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> as many <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> substances <Speech_Male> as humanly <Speech_Music_Male> possible <Speech_Music_Male> also opening <Speech_Music_Male> up portals <Music> by accident <Music> wage. <Speech_Music_Male> Huh? <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Look we need to be <Speech_Male> paying attention to what's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> happening in Kentucky. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Clearly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you know, I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I don't think about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kentucky enough. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Male> dead thinking about <Speech_Music_Male> it. Now, <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> you know, if <Speech_Male> you're listening to this and <Speech_Music_Male> looking for University, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I went to Mi you <Speech_Male> I didn't get <Speech_Music_Male> to open <Speech_Music_Male> a portal with <Speech_Music_Male> a Ouija board and <Speech_Music_Male> I bought A lot of money <Speech_Music_Male> to go to that school. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm still paying <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ridiculous. <Speech_Music_Male> What a rip <Speech_Music_Male> off <Speech_Music_Male> either way <Speech_Music_Male> Stephanie Bingham <Speech_Music_Male> really <Speech_Music_Male> she blew <Speech_Music_Male> my mind with her experiences. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Like I said, <Speech_Male> I have no <Speech_Male> I do not have <Speech_Music_Male> experiences <Speech_Music_Male> directly with <Speech_Music_Male> these Realms. <Speech_Music_Male> However, <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Stephanie is clearly. <Speech_Music_Male> She's invited to talk <Speech_Music_Male> at game. This is about <Speech_Male> these things and <Speech_Music_Male> she <Speech_Male> experiences <Speech_Male> them <Speech_Male> first-hand all the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> time. <Speech_Male> They're around <SpeakerChange> her constantly. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> Wow, <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> how do <Speech_Male> you raise kids in that world <Speech_Music_Male> detail <Speech_Music_Male> the kids. <Speech_Music_Male> Hm. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I wonder <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> what the psychic parenting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> protocol <Speech_Music_Male> is. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Either way Stephanie <Speech_Male> Bingham loved <Speech_Male> having her on <Speech_Male> gotta have her on again. <Speech_Male> I want to know <Speech_Music_Male> about the history of vampires. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm sure she'll <Speech_Music_Male> give us some good stuff. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so <Speech_Music_Male> much for listening <Speech_Male> tomorrow <Speech_Male> Halloween <Speech_Music_Male> or the episode following <Speech_Music_Male> this in the future. <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> will be speaking <Speech_Music_Male> with a <Speech_Male> in human <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Essence <Speech_Music_Male> coming through another human <Speech_Male> being we're <Speech_Male> going to have hypnosis. <Speech_Male> There's going to be <Speech_Male> aliens. <Speech_Music_Male> It's everything you want <Speech_Male> on open Loops <Speech_Male> this episode. <Speech_Male> Thank you Stephanie <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for coming on <Speech_Music_Male> it was everything I <Speech_Male> wanted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> trick or treat <Speech_Music_Male> smell my feet. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> Have a good one. <Music>

Stephanie Bingham Kentucky. Mi
"bingham" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"Learned <Speech_Male> that Stephanie Bingham <Speech_Male> the moment <Speech_Male> she grew <Speech_Male> up to the moment. She <Speech_Male> got in college. <Speech_Music_Male> She <Speech_Music_Male> was a dancer <Speech_Male> and by the <Speech_Male> time she actually got to college. <Speech_Male> She <Speech_Music_Male> was doing a little number <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> called <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The Monster Mash <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what's a bunch of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kids drinking <Speech_Music_Male> and ripping <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> as many <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> substances <Speech_Male> as humanly <Speech_Music_Male> possible <Speech_Music_Male> also opening <Speech_Music_Male> up portals <Music> by accident <Music> wage. <Speech_Music_Male> Huh? <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Look we need to be <Speech_Male> paying attention to what's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> happening in Kentucky. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Clearly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you know, I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I don't think about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kentucky enough. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Male> dead thinking about <Speech_Music_Male> it. Now, <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> you know, if <Speech_Male> you're listening to this and <Speech_Music_Male> looking for University, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I went to Mi you <Speech_Male> I didn't get <Speech_Music_Male> to open <Speech_Music_Male> a portal with <Speech_Music_Male> a Ouija board and <Speech_Music_Male> I bought A lot of money <Speech_Music_Male> to go to that school. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm still paying <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ridiculous. <Speech_Music_Male> What a rip <Speech_Music_Male> off <Speech_Music_Male> either way <Speech_Music_Male> Stephanie Bingham <Speech_Music_Male> really <Speech_Music_Male> she blew <Speech_Music_Male> my mind with her experiences. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Like I said, <Speech_Male> I have no <Speech_Male> I do not have <Speech_Music_Male> experiences <Speech_Music_Male> directly with <Speech_Music_Male> these Realms. <Speech_Music_Male> However, <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Stephanie is clearly. <Speech_Music_Male> She's invited to talk <Speech_Music_Male> at game. This is about <Speech_Male> these things and <Speech_Music_Male> she <Speech_Male> experiences <Speech_Male> them <Speech_Male> first-hand all the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> time. <Speech_Male> They're around <SpeakerChange> her constantly. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> Wow, <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> how do <Speech_Male> you raise kids in that world <Speech_Music_Male> detail <Speech_Music_Male> the kids. <Speech_Music_Male> Hm. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I wonder <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> what the psychic parenting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> protocol <Speech_Music_Male> is. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Either way Stephanie <Speech_Male> Bingham loved <Speech_Male> having her on <Speech_Male> gotta have her on again. <Speech_Male> I want to know <Speech_Music_Male> about the history of vampires. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm sure she'll <Speech_Music_Male> give us some good stuff. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so <Speech_Music_Male> much for listening <Speech_Male> tomorrow <Speech_Male> Halloween <Speech_Music_Male> or the episode following <Speech_Music_Male> this in the future. <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> will be speaking <Speech_Music_Male> with a <Speech_Male> in human <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Essence <Speech_Music_Male> coming through another human <Speech_Male> being we're <Speech_Male> going to have hypnosis. <Speech_Male> There's going to be <Speech_Male> aliens. <Speech_Music_Male> It's everything you want <Speech_Male> on open Loops <Speech_Male> this episode. <Speech_Male> Thank you Stephanie <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for coming on <Speech_Music_Male> it was everything I <Speech_Male> wanted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> trick or treat <Speech_Music_Male> smell my feet. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> Have a good one. <Music>

Stephanie Bingham Kentucky. Mi
"bingham" Discussed on The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

"Great. So you're all over social media. You got summer closure. I'm excited about your newsletter funny one wants to sign up for that. I encourage you to bring out to miss Bingham. She's pretty amazing. I've had a chance to connect with her. She's been to my lovely home. Talk that gave her some ideas. So I'm excited to see them implemented in to see what she creates here in the near future. Yeah. Yeah. Like I said, we've got got some pretty cool stuff coming up. I'm excited well and it has been a pleasure. Thank you so much for being on you too. Thanks so much Tony. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm excited about the one new thing a project. I know you got other things in the pipeline. Most people in quarantine gained weight and some people wrote a book. So and some people are losing weight like myself off. So the book is going to be huge. So if you haven't subscribed to and binghams newsletter, I strongly encourage you to her book is almost completed according to what she told me anyways, so if you haven't subscribed be the first to get notified, I know it's kind of an exclusive thing that she's doing for just her subscribers for the launch so get on her liquid. Read her book. Leave her a nice review. I'm sure she'd appreciate it. Other than that, and you have anything to add I don't think you so much for having me. I appreciate it. We're very welcome have an amazing day and bring them every month with the one new thing project. Thanks guys like you later. Bye..

Tony Bingham
"bingham" Discussed on The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

"Everybody to another exciting Becky Tony marketing podcast. My name is Tony and I am your host for those of you that do not know who I am or what I do. I show home-based business owners how to leverage technology to grow your business online using the power of the internet and social media page. If you have a business and you want more exposure you are in the right spot. We are back with another exciting guessed. Her name is Anne Bingham. She has a couple different businesses and she is here today to talk about those so everybody welcome and Bingham to the show and are you there? I am hi there. Hi Ann. How are you today? I'm great. Thanks for having me. Yeah. Thank you for making wage. Time I know things are kind of crazy they are but you know what? I always love to chatting with you. And so yeah, I'm just really happy to be here. Yeah. I'm excited to have Ian while before we get into the juicy stuff about your business and who you are and all that. I'd like to know what I'm sure the audience would like to know a little bit about you as a person. Can you elaborate a little bit Yeah, so I am I'm a mom. I have two amazing grown children. So yes, those of you who have younger kids and teenagers. I promise you it is every bit worth it is there is life on the outside and and it's pretty spectacular on the other side. I've been married to my husband Rob for twenty-seven years. We've been together for thirty years and we met in college and we've been really dead. Just have the that marriage that you know makes everybody ill we still like to spend time together hold hands and you know, all of those just wonderful things. I don't really know how we do it. But it's it's a great relationship. He's my very best friend in the world. We live in South Saint Louis. We live just a couple of blocks away from Soulard in a historic house a hundred and thirty years old and with our Pitbull our kids are by-and-large moved out. My daughter has a nice place. My son is in his last semester at Rolla and yes, we live with our rescued Pitbull and we lived about a mile and a half or so from the neighborhood that I grew up in. So I think that's my life in a in a snapshot right now outside of work wage. Um, and yeah, then the work side is I'm currently a I guess the easiest way to say it is I am a full-time yoga instructor and freelance Adventurer I guess is the easiest way to say it started doing that when I retired from being a preschool director and teacher I did that for about 30 years and gave that up because of a chronic illness. So that's kind of what landed me where I am now awesome. Well, let's talk a little bit about yoga is yeah some people like to do yoga has some health benefits. I guess. My first question to you man is with covideo around are you offering virtual class? I am yeah, so there's so covid has changed a lot about the way that we exercise and the way that we met a lot of things right and so I do virtual classes, but the way that I do them is a bit different. So I do see two things and one is I do private sessions for for folks individually online. And the other thing that I do is I do a kids class on Thursdays and Fridays because one of the things that we know is that Covetous really hitting our kids in a very really unprecedented Thursday. So the reason that I'm doing online classes like this is because when you're doing a there's lots off Studios out there right now that are doing online classes, but when you're doing that you're in effect watching an instructor and you're not really getting a great deal of feedback from that instructor on how you are holding a pose or how you were moving your body and that can provide some problems. If you're not if you're not doing a pose in the proper form you can end up getting injured you might find yourself in a class. That's maybe not appropriate for you. It might be too easy. It might be too hard and so doing a class with me individually. First of all, there's a little humor to it. Like it's just you and me wage. It's just like two people hanging out and then we personalize absolutely everything to you so that I can actually see what you're doing. And I can say, you know, maybe move your foot a little bit further to the left or to the right or if that feels like it's not feeling good. Then let's use a block or something like that. Maybe make that feel a little bit better for your body and give you what you need. So that's why we're doing those personal sessions rather than kind of group sessions.

instructor Philadelphia Washington st. Louis
Interview with Ann Bingham

The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

06:00 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Ann Bingham

"Everybody to another exciting Becky Tony marketing podcast. My name is Tony and I am your host for those of you that do not know who I am or what I do. I show home-based business owners how to leverage technology to grow your business online using the power of the internet and social media page. If you have a business and you want more exposure you are in the right spot. We are back with another exciting guessed. Her name is Anne Bingham. She has a couple different businesses and she is here today to talk about those so everybody welcome and Bingham to the show and are you there? I am hi there. Hi Ann. How are you today? I'm great. Thanks for having me. Yeah. Thank you for making wage. Time I know things are kind of crazy they are but you know what? I always love to chatting with you. And so yeah, I'm just really happy to be here. Yeah. I'm excited to have Ian while before we get into the juicy stuff about your business and who you are and all that. I'd like to know what I'm sure the audience would like to know a little bit about you as a person. Can you elaborate a little bit Yeah, so I am I'm a mom. I have two amazing grown children. So yes, those of you who have younger kids and teenagers. I promise you it is every bit worth it is there is life on the outside and and it's pretty spectacular on the other side. I've been married to my husband Rob for twenty-seven years. We've been together for thirty years and we met in college and we've been really dead. Just have the that marriage that you know makes everybody ill we still like to spend time together hold hands and you know, all of those just wonderful things. I don't really know how we do it. But it's it's a great relationship. He's my very best friend in the world. We live in South Saint Louis. We live just a couple of blocks away from Soulard in a historic house a hundred and thirty years old and with our Pitbull our kids are by-and-large moved out. My daughter has a nice place. My son is in his last semester at Rolla and yes, we live with our rescued Pitbull and we lived about a mile and a half or so from the neighborhood that I grew up in. So I think that's my life in a in a snapshot right now outside of work wage. Um, and yeah, then the work side is I'm currently a I guess the easiest way to say it is I am a full-time yoga instructor and freelance Adventurer I guess is the easiest way to say it started doing that when I retired from being a preschool director and teacher I did that for about 30 years and gave that up because of a chronic illness. So that's kind of what landed me where I am now awesome. Well, let's talk a little bit about yoga is yeah some people like to do yoga has some health benefits. I guess. My first question to you man is with covideo around are you offering virtual class? I am yeah, so there's so covid has changed a lot about the way that we exercise and the way that we met a lot of things right and so I do virtual classes, but the way that I do them is a bit different. So I do see two things and one is I do private sessions for for folks individually online. And the other thing that I do is I do a kids class on Thursdays and Fridays because one of the things that we know is that Covetous really hitting our kids in a very really unprecedented Thursday. So the reason that I'm doing online classes like this is because when you're doing a there's lots off Studios out there right now that are doing online classes, but when you're doing that you're in effect watching an instructor and you're not really getting a great deal of feedback from that instructor on how you are holding a pose or how you were moving your body and that can provide some problems. If you're not if you're not doing a pose in the proper form you can end up getting injured you might find yourself in a class. That's maybe not appropriate for you. It might be too easy. It might be too hard and so doing a class with me individually. First of all, there's a little humor to it. Like it's just you and me wage. It's just like two people hanging out and then we personalize absolutely everything to you so that I can actually see what you're doing. And I can say, you know, maybe move your foot a little bit further to the left or to the right or if that feels like it's not feeling good. Then let's use a block or something like that. Maybe make that feel a little bit better for your body and give you what you need. So that's why we're doing those personal sessions rather than kind of group sessions.

Anne Bingham Instructor Becky Tony ANN Tony Rolla Soulard IAN ROB South Saint Louis Director
"bingham" Discussed on The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

"If you have a business and you want more exposure you are in the right spot. We are back with another exciting guessed. Her name is Anne Bingham. She has a couple different businesses and she is here today to talk about those so everybody welcome and Bingham to the show and are you there? I am hi there. Hi Ann. How are you today? I'm great. Thanks for having me. Yeah. Thank you for making wage. Time I know things are kind of crazy they are but you know what? I always love to chatting with you. And so yeah, I'm just really happy to be here. Yeah. I'm excited to have Ian while before we get into the juicy stuff about your business and who you are and all that. I'd like to know what I'm sure the audience would like to know a little bit about you as a person. Can you elaborate a little bit Yeah, so I am I'm a mom. I have two amazing grown children. So yes, those of you who have younger kids and teenagers. I promise you it is every bit worth it is there is life on the outside and and it's pretty spectacular on the other side. I've been married to my husband Rob for twenty-seven years. We've been together for thirty years and we met in college and we've been really dead. Just have the that marriage that you know makes everybody ill we still like to spend time together hold hands and you know, all of those just wonderful things. I don't really know how we do it. But it's it's a great relationship. He's my very best friend in the world. We live in South Saint Louis. We live just a couple of blocks away from Soulard in a historic house a hundred and thirty years old and with our Pitbull our kids are by-and-large moved out. My daughter has a nice place. My son is in his last semester at Rolla and yes, we live with our rescued Pitbull and we lived about a mile and a half or so from the neighborhood that I grew up in. So I think that's my life in a in a snapshot right now outside of work wage. Um, and yeah, then the work side is I'm currently a I guess the easiest way to say it is I am a full-time yoga instructor and freelance Adventurer I guess is the easiest way to say it started doing that when I retired from being a preschool director and teacher I did that for about 30 years and gave that up because of a chronic illness. So that's kind of what landed me where I am now awesome. Well, let's talk a little bit about yoga is yeah some people like to do yoga has some health benefits. I guess. My first question to you man is with covideo around are you offering virtual class? I am yeah, so there's so covid has.

Anne Bingham Ann Rolla Soulard Ian South Saint Louis Rob instructor director
WHO: Letting virus spread to reach herd immunity is "unethical"

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:25 min | 1 year ago

WHO: Letting virus spread to reach herd immunity is "unethical"

"As the covid nineteen pandemic has been sucked ever further. into. The deeply tedious culture wars polarizing many Western democracies they gathering climate has been made on behalf of so called herd immunity. This is the fairy which holds that if nature is permitted to take its course, within reason, sufficient antibodies will be distributed among the populace to reduce the viruses spread to a manageable kroll. The World Health Organization has now sat emphatically upon this view who chief Ted, Ross Cabrera's calling herd immunity scientifically, and ethically problematic one joined with more by Dr. Chris Smith. Our Health and science correspondent also virologist Cambridge University. Chris, he calls it scientifically and ethically problematic I. Think the ethical problem is pretty easy to spot, which is that you know a great many people would need to die. What's the actual scientific problem here if you would just taking a brutally utilitarian approach? Well I think really it's a lack of knowledge the moment we think that about ten percent of the world's population. So perhaps even as many as a billion people rounds bit more than ten percent have had the infection, but we don't know, and the reason we don't know is because in order to work out with people have had it or not we have to do antibody tests and antibodies. And you can think of this as the analogy is a bit like footprints left in the snow when you've had an infection, a person who has had it and cleared it no longer has any virus detect, but the footprints of the vars having been there all the antibodies left in your immune response. If you take those antibodies, that's a sure fire marker, you must have encountered whatever the infection is that you're interested in the problem is that it's not clear to us that when we test people for antibodies, all we rarely detecting all the people that have really been infected or have. We missed some have we missed. A few are more people responding in ways where they might antibodies the we're looking for. We just don't know at the moment. So scientifically, we don't really know what we're tackling here. We don't know what the long term consequences of coronavirus infection are. They may be trivial. They may not at least for proportion of people there is this phenomenon dubbed. Long Cove where people have post infection, inflammatory syndromes and symptoms that can go on for months. Now, we don't know what fraction of the population get that or whether certain people are more susceptible to that younger people older people we don't know. So scientifically, medically, there are issues here. If we understood the thing completely you'd say, well, we know exactly what we're getting into. Sign. On the dotted line or not whereas with this, it's a black box. We don't know what's inside on the subject of understanding things completely where are you on the UK's most recent? Of restrictions lay his TIA's and levels. The U. K. seeking to make things clearer because they've been criticisms levelled at the government for having rules that people not even prime minister. An Very Scottish MP's can remember, and as a result, this is leading to confusion transgressions and that's translating into more spread of the virus. So in order to gain a tighter grip on the virus, the outbreaks in various parts of the country, this tiered system has been introduced to on tier two tier three also dubbed medium high, very high risk and the idea is that everybody across. The country has a baseline of medium risk and so anybody who's not in special restrictions at the moment is medium but in other parts of the country where there are special measures needed, you have this way of escalating up to high risk and the threshold is said to be one hundred per hundred thousand people in the population who are affected in order to trigger that escalation and I think part of this is not just that the people everywhere know where they stand they know how prepare for if they're area becomes. A higher risk area local planners can put in place policies but also means that more control can be potentially devolved to local authorities and local actors because there, there's a lot of knowledge on the ground are very skilled people in public health and so on who could work more strategically locally and I think some of these measures do open the door to more of that kind of thing. But again, it's it's produced the usual anticipated reaction of people. As I'm away confused today blame them people are confused there's lots of. Uncertainty and no one likes this sort of change when you've just got used to work in one way and then morals come in and people are obviously trying to to make sense of how exactly this is or isn't going to work the thing that would of course stops or savers from having to try and understand what the government is telling. US would be a vaccine in has been bad news I guess on that front, which is Johnson and Johnson suspending trials of their vaccine. Do we know why that happened? Nobody's worth bearing in mind that this happens all the time. When we're developing drugs, foams, companies go into the drug development vaccine manufacturing process expecting to fail ninety percent of the time not because they're not good at what they do. It's because they're very good at what they do that they succeed ten percent of the time, but it's a very tough. Challenge with very rigorous standards and west safety is an absolute priorities of red line that you can't cross safety and ethics. So as soon as you have a trial running if there's anything untoward, the the safe thing to do that point is you hope the trial you investigate and you appoint somebody independent of the trial who is an independent observer who will Come, in they would appraise the situation and then they'll cite note we can. We can say this is not because of the drug this is because of natural occurrences something you can resume your trial but on safety grounds, you always hope thing investigate and then make a decision and this happens a lot to happen to Astra Zeneca a couple of months ago. A month or so ago with with their co vaccine and investigators came end, they found that there were cases reported. There was a new case of a of a condition transverse lightest, which is an inflammatory condition of the central nervous system. They were able to say, well, because this happened sporadically in the population, there's no reason to suspect that this was caused. By the vaccine in this case. So we'll resume the trial. It may be that this the same will happen for. Johnson. And Johnson's vaccine trial. So is there any consensus really among you and your fellow boffins about likely timeframe for vaccine will I've asked a couple of people this one person who is working on behalf of one of the regulators to keep. Tabs on one of the vaccine projects. Another person who's actually in the finance sector has been having conversations with the pharmaceutical companies at the front runner in this and both interestingly guy very similar time windows suggesting that about of next year was the most likely time by which we would have data assuming that the data that is provided are provided shows. The vaccines work I mean. Let's assume that because that's a big. If an it's necessary if assuming everything works, then you've got to go through various checks and balances and take a lot of boxes from a safety point of view which takes time and so that's why they're saying probably midway through next year, and then there's the whole issue of WHO's going. To get vaccinated because in a report in the Financial Times last week Kate. Bingham who's the vaccine taskforce lead said an acknowledged that about thirty million people are front runners for receiving vaccines. But where does that leave the other thirty five, million not? No, no information has been provided. Yes. On on what the government strategy is going to be.

Johnson Government Dr. Chris Smith Cambridge University World Health Organization Astra Zeneca UK Long Cove Financial Times TED Ross Cabrera Bingham Prime Minister Kate
"bingham" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on Pantheon

"Just released a live album has this song called blood on the album but you on the cosmic Cajun's from Saturn there is a song called blood moon right and if s Louis about that I have no idea. He is blood moon is that appear Improv? No, okay oh well. No I think Louis. Knows what he was doing. Like going Oh that's what he's doing. I mean, you know. It was like. When those things work They're great and when they don't work, it's like you know Jazz Odyssey at Knott's Berry farm. And Hopefully we're. We're. We're on a level that even when it's Play long to make it horrible if it really isn't working such. It's fine because his kind of continuing. The the whole tradition well, not really. I've had. Louise been a guest on the podcast I've had his cousins. The Rayo brothers have been on I've had Johnny Campos came on. Yeah he when when weeks island came out he he was on, we spoke with him and now you. So this I'm. Almost feel like part of his family at this point because it had so many people involved in his music on your well. You know you get Brian's got a cool thing coming out with a harp player. In cassie Watson is really killing it, and so maybe you'll get a chance to talk to them and get everybody in the entire. That'll be great. What have you been up to besides getting? Stuff up your nose for Kobe, have you been working on anything while everything's been on lockdown? Oh. Yeah. Well, I mean we I've finished this. You know the Mammalia makers is funny because when we we're going to do this live record and I was like. Okay I'm GonNa Hook up work bring gear and I got that and we got you know good Mike Preempts. He set it up. We gotTA sounding good. That was really like I'm a guitar player on this I'm not like. Okay fine. So then somebody was gonna mix it. They mix them That's not it's not right and somebody else started. That's not right. So then it was like, okay, fuck it. I'll start. So I worked on. NIREX. You know I wanNA know how the sausage is made. Of just wanted to have fun and play guitar and abandoned. Up worked on that, and that was like you know a good amount of work because we had. Four sets to listen to shed to make rafts of four sets listen to Davis to that throwing your two cents.

Louis Johnny Campos Kobe Berry farm cassie Watson Louise Brian Davis Mike
"bingham" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on Pantheon

"That he brought Andrei in to be sort of the music director. But let's just say we were in. We had this house in the lower ninth ward right on the industrial. Canal. Industrial Channel they call it. C. T. C., they call it cross to cal. Okay. The CDC boys didn't come visit. US. and. So we would set up in there and we had a low pro tools. Reagan was early pro tools two thousand one, and so we had musicians and sinclair brought some dude came from Detroit. And we were in the middle of building my new studio that have a place. I don't even know if I had a place to live at that point but. Andre. Andre was in the midst of being Andrei and so we'd have good days and bad days and the if it if we stay under the If we stayed in one fifth Bacardi in two walks in the neighborhood. It was a good day I. We recorded tons of stuff in the musician became really frustrated 'cause. He would disappear come back and tell him to do something completely different the next time so. Wild we had a good and then I would have to drive the singers back to near the airport every day you know as one of those like jobs where I was more like. I would run around and get food I would go this I think it'd be. there. Was a producer on that. What I just recorded. I don't really know. That's the thing remember. What do you do all these things that you but Andrei? Brilliant Guy and you know the in theory. The in what do you call it folklore. aretha Franklin's boyfriend when they were teenagers. Really. So. Think about that one he. He was talented enough on a large music scale to conduct sale Franklin's choir. God. And then all those great forty fives and all the Raunchy stuff that he did out of that you know. It's so you see you know the. The closeness of Heaven and Hell. One of the elements that I didn't even I didn't actually realize you worked on that I. Liked. It came out really just. In researching this. Realize it. You're involved in it is James bloomers album a bad blood in the city. I just recorded it in Vernon. Vernon played on it and Vernon. Charlie played Charlie Byrne played. Violin. And Leon I remember that old session it was pretty pretty great. I'm.

Andrei aretha Franklin Vernon Charlie Byrne Bacardi Andre CDC Reagan director James bloomers Detroit Leon US. C. T. C. producer sinclair
"bingham" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on Pantheon

"WHO's in their vote amount? Of Water election. Days. Now. Biggest Here from deeper digs and rocker archaeology John Are you registered to vote? I know I am. Headcount is a nonpartisan organization that works with the music and entertainment industry to get fans to vote. Top date or check your voter registration status go to headcount dot org or you'll find all the information you need to be ready for election day? At, headcount dot org you can also check your registration status because I don't know if you know this but millions of people get purged from the voter rolls every year. Everyone should check their registration status every year. The deadline.

Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Benham was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon, a country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent. While they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations. Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery. And so for every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care, and that quote a medical procedure like a hysterectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. Bingham's lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights. She says, been, um, sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course. Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Win says the long term medical implications are not clear, but the procedure could prevent been him from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away. I'm a person's life and then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention, just rob sir of so much more than her time, wind says been, um complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose.

Pauline Benham Georgia Congress Bingham Irwin County Detention Center WIN Joel Rose Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Amis Pramila Gioia Paul Pauline Venom Pauline NPR Cameroon Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative
ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:49 min | 1 year ago

ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Have come to light this week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Venom was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent while they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations, Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery, and so far every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the Homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care and that quote a medical procedure like a history. Ectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. The venoms lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, she says been, um sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course, Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Wind says the long term medical implications are not clear. But the procedure could prevent venom from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away from a person's life. And then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention. Just rob serve so much more than her time, Wind says Been, UM complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose. NPR news

Pauline Venom Georgia Congress Joel Rose Irwin County Detention Center Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Wind Amis NPR Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Pramila Gioia Paul Cameroon Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative America Jaipal
"bingham" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Americana style. Ryan Bingham tells us how he moved from riding bulls to winning an Oscar Grammy and a Golden Globe singer songwriter Valerie Eco. Me explains why she's inspired by her Cameroonian roofs. We'll hear from British folk supremo Sam Lee about songs learned from Romany Gypsies. The festival's creative producer, Donald Shore, tells us what makes a Celtic connection on the East pointers share the importance of music to the inhabitants of Prince Edward Island in Canada's remote North Atlantic. A lot of the people on it come from long musical background and a big part of growing up is playing music. Especially during the colder months that test traditional music from island. Theo Irish folk Group Dervish have taken their sound around the world from the glass Debris Festival in the UK to rock in Rio in Brazil, even in impromptu session at the Great Wall of China. 2019 was a big year for dervish. They were given a lifetime achievement award by the BBC and to celebrate 30 years of being a band. They brought out a new album, The Great Irish Songbook, which features collaborations with best selling singer songwriters David Gray and Steve alone. Because Andrea core and even the international Irish actor Brendan Gleeson, the Merry month of May home I started left the girls that you broke when they're not on.

Prince Edward Island Valerie Eco Ryan Bingham Brendan Gleeson Romany Gypsies lifetime achievement award Sam Lee Grammy Donald Shore David Gray Oscar Rio Andrea North Atlantic producer Canada UK BBC Brazil Steve
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 1 year ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
"bingham" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"bingham" Discussed on WJR 760

"Bingham Farms. Can great to have you here. It's always good to be in the show with you, Dean. All right. So the Steve Miller band we put that in here fly like an eagle because by the time people get to experience can the Wealth management that you provide the clarity that you provide the proactive tax planning that your in house SEPA does. They get to feel that freedom they get to feel like they're flying like an eagle. Because a lot of times when you're doing that for looking tax planning, you're discovering, you know, 2 $300,000 of tax savings over a lifetime and That is a area of financial planning that is so underserved, So it's awesome that you have that available right there in your office. Dean. You know, it's just interesting because people always focus on the investments. They always focus on the stock market. And the really interesting thing is what happens if you focus in on the strategy, and the strategy is what I'm talking about right now is taxes like you're bringing up taxes are so overlooked in such a large wealth transfer in out on a person's overall financial planning. It's something a lot of people have control over but never had that discussion with your advisor. Just recently. We've had people even come in and say what has never talked to me about this? Why? I don't know, either. They don't know or they can't for some reason, right well, and there's a lot of people that are in our industry can if they don't have the expertise of the sepia sitting next to them, right. To look over the financial plan once it's created, then they're going to miss something, and I given analogy like this. It's like you're walking down the street. And there a cz bags of money. That you're just walking past. And you're walking past it because you don't know what's there and a lot of times can when you do your financial planning, and you bring that SEPA in to review your financial plan from attacks perspective. That sepia finds those bags of money. Sometimes there's a few $100 in those bags. Sometimes there's a few $1000 in those bags, but it's your money that you can keep and not send off Uncle Sam and so part of the planning process. The strategy. The art of financial planning is to identify all of those tax savings opportunities. And that's something that people have far more control of them what they realize. No, I think those bags of money that you're talking about don't necessarily have dollar signs on the outside of the bag. It's inside the bag. You don't know what's inside the bag, so it's easy to step over it. But if you don't open it up and see what's in there, you'll never know. And really those low stacks. Strategies are what's inside the bag and that the overall impact could be like you said earlier, huge. No, it is. I mean, and you think about it. Most people think about taxes in from a like a year to your standpoint, right? So when I'm doing my 2020 tax return, I'm looking at what happened in 2020. So we're not just talking about a preparation of a tax return and How can I affect what already happened last year? What we're talking about is creating that financial plan and a good financial plan is going to take into consideration the rest of your life. We don't know how long we're going to live. But we make some assumptions when we create the financial plan, and the tax strategies are five years, 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, sometimes 30 plus years long. And we know that tax codes are gonna change. But we've got to start applying the strategies now for what's happening in the future and the people that are, you know, 5 to 10 years out from retirement. If you could get to those people and walked him through the tax strategies that they need to be employing now in orderto have a much more tax efficient. Retirement. That's really where most of the power comes in. It's not to say that those of you that are already retired. There aren't strategies for you. But the majority of the Work that can be done and the biggest effects that can be had or for those of you that are 5 to 10 years out from retirement. So if you're in that situation, and you've got at least $500,000 safer retirement call right now get a second opinion from Kanazawa in his sepia there at Aswell Financial Group 877544 15 16 877544 15 16. Call Now ask for your free second opinion. 877544 15 16. I mean, it's it's not the question of the prepare what I want to make sure that the listeners know is we're not questioning the prepare. We're not questioning the accuracy of the tax return. What we're questioning is the outcome of what that tax return does and what the future years could do. So it's not accuracy that we're looking at. I think we've had some some people call him think. Jesus. Is there something wrong with my prepare the guy who's doing by character? Not we know that that's that's not what we're talking about. That left hand doesn't know what the right hand's doing. And if you have the sepia in you, office working alongside with the financial advisor, that's a huge Game changer. Some people think we're picking on the repair and we're really not the texture maybe done, but there might be oversight in that text prepared doesn't know what the total picture looks like, so they don't know how to do multiyear forward looking forecasting. Well, here's this's nothing. I'm glad you brought that can could you make a great point? What happens is that people do what they do throughout the year and then they gather their documents, and they take him into the C P A. And then the CPS prepares the tax return based on what that person did the year before. So history. It's history. It's reporting history. Right? So what's what's happening is that there are opportunities being missed things that should have been done the year before that weren't Right? Because they didn't know to ask when they do the financial planning process with you using the guided retirement system, and then they have to see Papa there you're you're talking to them throughout the year, saying these are things you do and they know your clients and okay, Okay, I'm gonna call Kenneth. I'm gonna ask him. Okay, We're going to buy a new vehicle. Where should we get the money from? What's going to be the most tax efficient way to do this? Or You know, we're going to buy a new vacation where we want to increase our income. Where do we get the money from all these questions that they should be asking the C P. A. They don't because the CPS doesn't know what their entire financial life looks like. And that's why the opportunities were missed so often. Well, and that's why I said earlier. The left hand needs to know what the right hand's doing. It's just impossible and not having that financial planner adviser Working along hand in hand with the tax prepare is is really an oversight, and I like you said earlier, just when we started this segment out. It could be 102 103 100,000 or more. I mean, sometimes we I don't want to over inflate the numbers, but it could be a lot more than that, over the course of a lifetime. Knowing what strategy used to be, you know, flies in with your specific plan without without having a financial plan. You'll never know that it's not about you know, X versus why mutual fund or stock or whatever, it's all about the strategy. Wall Street's not going to tell you that no care about that. They just want your money. It's the art. Of course, is the science exact. It is the art and there is an art to it 100% and that's why we did a show based on these, you know, online retirement calculators or the online do it yourself Wills or the online do it yourself tax returns, right? Things get missed right? And you know the online financial planning programs that say, Well, this program's free and it'll help you calculate what you need to do what the question is. How much is free going to cost you Right, because it's going to miss so many different things, and you're going to get bad information, and it's going to cost you a heck of a lot more than working with a professional financial adviser like Ken and his group. They're at all so well. If Ananta Group 10 free. I was morning night night last night. Nothing. Nothing's free. Here's the deal, kid. I think people if they say Well, if I go to work if I go to guy's over a swallow, and then they get their CPU work inside by side..

SEPA advisor Dean CPS Aswell Financial Group Steve Miller Bingham Farms Ananta Group orderto Kanazawa Papa Ken Kenneth
Gotham Awards: 'Marriage Story,' 'The Farewell,' 'Uncut Gems' Lead Nominations

The Big Picture

12:45 min | 2 years ago

Gotham Awards: 'Marriage Story,' 'The Farewell,' 'Uncut Gems' Lead Nominations

"Okay Amanda the Gotham awards what do you know about the Gospel awards they are New York based yes is Gotham is a stand in for New York and uh-huh well done thank you and they are an indie film awards and they always have the ceremony pretty early in the season and their speed teaches are often really vibrant and kind of make some noise that people are usually recapping them are doing videos of the acceptance speeches that's right the nominations are usually driven by journalists and critics whereas the awards themselves are usually chosen by people in the New York Film Community this year's collection of films is sure thing and I think it highlights the New York versus La Aspect of this award show I would say that this is a very good collection of films but not terribly represented of of where Oscar is going to be going this year so let's just mentioned a couple of the categories we can talk about what we see and if any of this really ultimately matters to the big race that we talk about on the show all the time so for best feature Lulu longs farewell The safdie brothers uncut gems trae rituals waves Noah Baumbach marriage story and Lawrence Ghaffari as hustlers now as a human man these are five of my favorite movies of the year you truly love to see you love to see it now Ah I think this list has been somewhat criticized for being the eight twenty four awards share and also Noah Baumbach a former eight hundred four filmmaker himself so there's a lot of lineage there but I don't necessarily I mean I think marriage story is pretty much a lock for best picture and you've got a chance to see it over the weekend so that we may be we can t some of that conversation talk about it but yes these other films I think the farewells probably the one that has been tabbed to have the best chance at best picture but do you see a world in which I guess these early awards shows do more than just you know sort of celebrate the films that we expect to not be recognized come Globes and an Oscar season or or do you think that this is just a forebear to what's coming I think this is probably people sharing their passions for the most part and doesn't shift a lot the only notable storyline in the future category for me as Hustler's being here because that means that people really are taking it seriously as a a capital f film in addition to a great kind unexpected box office hit featuring Jennifer Lopez sue and we talked about that a little bit of the time of Jennifer Lopez seems like an Oscar contender people take it seriously it seemed like the answer to that is yes in some ways yes but on the other hand Jennifer Lopez not nominated for Gotham you know just kind of fascinating what are you going to do with you ran does in the film community I don't know it is people expressing themselves yeah I mean there's a lot of very admirable choices kind of up and down we don't have to run through every single category here I think one thing I like about the Gotham is is that it does a lot of awards that I really wish the Oscars would do for example they have the Bingham Ray breakthrough director award and the nominees here are kind of interesting collection of people couple of films I haven't even seen Lord Clermont on Air am I pronouncing that correctly thank you can Jones's here we had him on the show earlier this year Joe Talbot from the last Bachman in San Francisco also on the show Olivia Wilde this year for book smart and films for burning came which is a film I haven't even seen yet which is yeah been released so that this is sort of like in the spirit of the indie spirits meets the Oscars meets the New York film critics are I tend to think of this award show and I think the award selves our health quite early at the end of this year as opposed to early next year and you'll be able to stream them live on the Internet and you'll get to see some of those acceptance speeches that talking about but it does feel a little bit of a lucky to be here kind of award Andre Holland you're nominated for high flying bird and be pretty surprised Andre Holmes nominated for best actor Best Actress Likewise Mary Kay Place for Diana Elisabeth Moss for her smell these are performances that will be on craigslist MHM maybe on your lists I haven't seen her smile yet I need to do that I will do that before the end of the year I'm saying it in public so that will actually happen and probably how do you feel about being in this moment this period of award season where we're like right at the were at the gates worth the Don excited I think you and I kind of went through a marathon in the last week and so we have seen most everything which is great there are a few outstanding films talk about and there are a few on my list that I haven't seen because they were at festivals and haven't really been screening for critics yet but we've seen a majority of things and I definitely just had a week where I just saw elise and I was like wow cinema I was very moved by a lot of films that I saw and so in that sense I feel hopeful and excited and you're like movies are great we have all the movies and then I started trying to make my Oscar predictions and started thinking about all of the politics and like reading from what Academy voters I had to say and it creeping sense of dread also and anger and resentment started creeping in so I would say it's a complex emotional time for me personally how are you feeling I have the same exact feeling as you and it's for that reason that we have decided at the back half of this show to make predictions make bold reckless quite likely very stupid predict predictions because as you said we've seen almost everything last week you and I got a chance to see the Irishman let me just tell you the Irishman is good. You should see the Irishman you had a chance to see marriage three yes we had a chance to see knives out which I don't think we'll be a part of the awards conversation but which was fantastic it lived up to my hopes and dreams have been screaming about it on a podcast for two months so those to receive we see something else we saw little women little women of course of course little women so all of these movies have now been put in front of us let here's here's a very short list of the movies that neither of us have seen thus more because we've done a pretty good job of doing our homework to this moment but so far we still haven't seen nineteen seventeen seventy four one film we haven't ritual Clint Eastwood's portrait of the man who was accused of the Atlanta Olympics bombing we haven't seen cats it's fine that you put this on this sliced by Mattia cats cats come in cat season is nearly upon us we haven't seen dark waters which I think is going to start screening this week we've not seen star wars episode nine the rise of Skywalker uh-huh I did read a bit of box office prognostication about episode nine today it was kind of kind of kind of grim interesting it was like this will is on track to be the lowest grossing of the sued thus far on its opening weekend maybe it's because everybody knows what's GonNa Happen I read some fan fiction or not some fan fiction no like can we just used to lead them into it yeah I read some fan fiction you know what I read some predictions based on nothing speculation is what I read about Star Wars that was essentially conviction and I got really upset about it I told you about this already we had this conversation with no let's not do that yeah but I don't know it people I it seems like people are interested in what happens I'm interested in what happens was the was it that ray is a rookie was it no it's Ray in Cairo and fuck just like the weight again pure speculation but let me go on record saying I do not want this as the really casual star wars fan who does can't remember the title of Episode Nine Not for me it's not what you want the only other movie I can think of that we haven't seen that is going to be competing this year barring maybe you're frozen to in the atom akara categories clemency which is Alfred movie that premiered at Sundance and has gotten reviews and I it was pointed out to me that there to death row movies this year with just mercy and clemency which is kind of interesting but that's only six movies between the two of US we've done a nice job hopefully we'll have a peaceful December probably not as we go through all of our takes which of these sixty think is most likely to to mess up the the narrative is we're going to break down later in the show I have on the document that I made I have one thousand nine hundred seventeen written several different times with like twenty question marks it was I just I don't know what to do with it. It is obviously a world war one epic with really athletic filmmaker gang directed by Salmon News which is Oscar Bait shot by Roger Deakins which is how you know it really is and they haven't they're releasing the behind the scenes rich of him just like running and trenches they're really leaning into we worked really hard to make us you know and it's a very showy style of directing yes their narrative is the effort yes which is an interesting thing we hear a different version of that with someone like Joaquin Phoenix and his performance in the joker we heard all about how he lost fifty pounds and he contorted his body and he I mean this physical transformation this is the full-scale movie version right of what sacrifices were made to achieve something yes and it's so funny because the the movie is not out for still another three months but I think that's really smart and the reason I have twenty question marks is because is it too late in the Oscar season to kind of really breakthrough because the people haven't seen it and the Oscars season is like a full months earlier this year and then was your so we're in a really crunched situation I think we have learned time and time again that it is harder the later you get in the season more crowded it is it's harder to get people invested in your movie you've just created a wonderful segue for our next segment let's go to stock stock down if it goes bust you can make ten to one twenty

Oscar Gotham New York Amanda Oscar Bait Joaquin Phoenix Salmon News Roger Deakins Fifty Pounds Three Months Two Months
"bingham" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"bingham" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"All of arc or a backpack more before we were playing we had to empty everything else uh-huh and they went around and checked and made sure we didn't have anything in there. You know if you were supposed to have one pair of socks you add on for socks. <hes> you know to shirt shed ed to shirts no no food or nothing like that so they did. They did check hall roger. We got frisk with africa. Guests guess that was because of the kelp and the beef jerky thing for africa the next season we got body. I felt like going through t._s._a. Shirt that didn't often again told you that they just wanted to free elated. I'd really looking. I understand that you know since the you know if they had it and i don't like i said i cannot say for sure he did. I wouldn't on that crap but when i went in that room and seeing who it was i shut the door behind me because i wanted to ask him and i just asked him point blank and they all said that he did have so. I don't know okay haven't seen or heard from kale stamps show. Nobody has no. Where's camping deb okay from roger. Thank you bird dobbs birds anymore questions for roger. Well let me tell you a little bit about what i'm doing now. As you all <hes> of course yeah no both your hitched. I'm building a wedding venue on my par- whoa we called bingham got a seventy acre farm twenty eight miles south of cincinnati. He's right in kentucky right off the interstate building a wedding venue. That'll sleep three hundred people hitching dressing rooms a fancy gazebo out back and <hes> you know fame. I want to get hitched in another few months here in the construction phase right now in fact that's where i was at seven o'clock morning till come back up here. Let them thirty.

bingham roger africa kentucky cincinnati seventy acre
GOP immigration bill fails; vote on 2nd measure put off

Herman Cain

01:03 min | 4 years ago

GOP immigration bill fails; vote on 2nd measure put off

"Swing police will find the two men who attacked her inside of a roth store when she was shopping was doing some shopping with the lady suction money my own business when dina bingham says two men threw a blanket over her head and started violently shaking her how long you're following me because i didn't see him but everything happened very very quickly because i started fighting fighting the blanket off surveillance pictures show them in entered the roster on stone mountain highway one with a blanket in hand bingham has no idea why it happened or why they picked her i know they came in next door with the intention of doing harm and it decided to choose me when at county sandra parish wsb now speaking of shopping the supreme court says states can now force online shoppers to pay sales tax wsb consumer expert clark howard says this'll cause issues for online realtors bigger retailers with this means is that they are no longer going to have the price advantage over traditional bricks and mortar five to four ruling thursday is a win for states who said they we're losing out on billions of dollars annually now sticking with costs and prices the european union is set to start slapping tariffs on three point four billion dollars in american problem products though range from whiskey to motorcycles to peanuts and cranberries meanwhile the us will start taxing thirty four billion dollars in chinese goods beijing has vowed to retaliate with its own tariff says well and still struggling for votes wbz jamie dupree reports that republicans putting off the second house votes on immigration reform until next week two point oh after seeing a more conservative immigration bill go down to defeat gop leaders are now tweaking his second bill for a vote next week republican carlos correa belo every member of this house could find an excuse to vote against this bill but that's the problem with immigration that nothing's ever been good at his house republicans try to get something almost anything on immigration reform over to the senate jaime's blog wsbradiocom has more on the immigration bill and his new.

Dina Bingham European Union United States Beijing Jamie Dupree Carlos Correa Jaime Stone Mountain Sandra Parish Clark Howard GOP Senate Thirty Four Billion Dollars Four Billion Dollars
Al Bingham, Dan Gorenstein and Apple discussed on

02:34 min | 4 years ago

Al Bingham, Dan Gorenstein and Apple discussed on

"Means even less profit for insurers in a typical year companies will raise premiums to keep up with rising healthcare costs somewhere around the mid single digits but with a threat that healthy people will ditch the market that's not happening says al bingham with weekly consulting you know you're looking at something like nigga hi teams that his best guess at the national average given insurance growing comfort with this market bingham says if there were less uncertainty this year he need expect increases to be about half of what he's expecting i'm dan gorenstein for marketplace coming up it's just not why you go to restaurants that it's never at the level of the other food in the place the ice cream sunday and why it must be stopped but first let's do the numbers down one and three tenths percent today three hundred and thirty two points twenty four thousand to sixty two the nasdaq up one point seven percent one hundred twenty one point seventy two oh nine s and p five hundred picked up about one point two percent thirty three points ended things at twenty six sixty three four the week gone by the dow off twotenths percent the nasdaq rose one and a quarter percent the s and p five hundred down about t tenths percent good week it was for apple though the stock jumped another four percent today thanks for warren buffett he disclosed he's been on a seventy five million shares shopping spree in the first quarter buffet shareholders benefited as well picture hathaway stock closed up nearly two percent higher google make that alphabet i guess that more than two percent facebook packed on more than one percent as well bonds were steady yield on the ten year treasury two point nine five percents you're listening to marketplace marketplace is supported by snp global market intelligence delivering essential data and insights to business and financial professionals snp global market intelligence know what matters and by c three iot the software platform for digital transformation using artificial intelligence and iot to solve previously unsolvable business problems learn more at c three iot dot com and by magnolia pictures and participant media's czar bg a documentary portrait of the life and career of supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg now playing in select theaters.

Al Bingham Dan Gorenstein Apple Google Facebook Participant Media Ruth Bader Ginsburg Warren Buffett SNP Two Percent Seven Percent Four Percent One Percent Ten Year
Academic behind Facebook breach says he is a 'scapegoat': BBC

Today

01:14 min | 4 years ago

Academic behind Facebook breach says he is a 'scapegoat': BBC

"The academic at the heart of all of this later in the program but inside the guardian which is continuing to lead on on the story initially broken by its sister paper the observer the cambridge analytica files it has been a talking to a a a platform platform operations manager at facebook who is responsible for policing data breaches by third party software developers and he says that he warned senior facebook executives that it's lax approach to data protection risked a major breach my concerns he says where that all of the data that left facebook service to developers could not be monitored by facebook so we had no idea what developers were doing with the data new women infanta lies their husbands by leaving lists of instructions on how to run the house while they're way head teacher has warned according to the daily mail vicky bingham of south hampstead high school has hit out of those who micromanage tar such as play dates even chopping vegetables she says mothers often had demanding jobs need help but they believe the household routine will fall apart if they let their husbands take charge and she's worn that men's domestic ineptitude is a myth and women should learn to trust their hubs more i'm sure you never needed any any list.

Operations Manager Facebook Vicky Bingham South Hampstead High School