25 Burst results for "Biller"

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Hey Doc, just a quick reminder that the demo success network is the number one community built for dentists by dentists. With direct access to myself and our team of awesome black belt coaches, members get answers in real time to the challenges we all face as clinicians and business owners. Another huge benefit to membership is our large vendor discounts. With over $1.5 billion in collective member revenue and over 1100 member dentists, we are able to negotiate the best prices on everything you need to run your dental practice. One of our members just reported to saving over $3900 per month since joining DSN. Sound intriguing? Just visit dental success network dot com forward slash Costas to set up a console with our team to show you how the resources inside DSN will cover your membership fees and then some. Dental success network dot com forward slash Costas, COS, TES. And that wraps it up for another episode of the dental panora podcast. Look forward to reconnecting on the next episode. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental preneur podcast. Check out true dental success dot com for full recaps of every show, a schedule of our live events, free video tutorials, and a whole host of practice building resources.

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

03:07 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Closet. Yeah. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I know. And for <Speech_Female> me personally, <Speech_Female> you know, I shared my missing <Speech_Female> tooth claws. <Speech_Female> I mean, <Speech_Female> waiting periods. <Speech_Female> I've made all the <Speech_Female> mistakes as well. <Speech_Female> I'd say <Speech_Female> with training people, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I kind of opposite <Speech_Female> from what Debbie said, <Speech_Female> but there's so <Speech_Female> many specifics <Speech_Female> that sometimes <Speech_Female> it's hard to <Speech_Female> remember them all. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And whether it's, <Speech_Female> you know, I don't have <Speech_Female> a specific, but <Speech_Female> I do know we had <Speech_Female> a verifier <Speech_Music_Female> and like with <Speech_Female> Delta dental, we only <Speech_Female> contract with one of <Speech_Female> their <Speech_Female> networks and <Speech_Female> seeing a plan and a <Speech_Female> patient came in. There <Speech_Female> was no benefits and <Speech_Female> sure enough it was <Speech_Female> Delta PPO <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I maybe <Speech_Female> didn't mention that <Speech_Female> part. So sometimes <Speech_Female> it's <Speech_Female> like there's so <Speech_Female> many little <Speech_Female> things and it's <Speech_Female> just, <Speech_Female> you know, that's <Speech_Female> my bad. <Speech_Female> That's my bad. I <Speech_Female> didn't tell you that. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Accountability though, <Speech_Female> see? <Speech_Female> Yep. <SpeakerChange> Yep. <Speech_Female> I think yeah, <Speech_Music_Female> and I think, you know, <Speech_Female> assuming that <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> just know things, <Speech_Music_Female> even if they've <Speech_Music_Female> been there for a bit, I think <Speech_Female> just assuming <Speech_Female> like I was joking with <Speech_Female> them, I've <Speech_Female> assumed I'll be like, oh, <Speech_Female> hey, what's that <Speech_Female> percentage? <Speech_Female> And I realized <Speech_Female> one time with somebody who <Speech_Female> wasn't in the billing department, <Speech_Female> but who had to <Speech_Female> at least understand <Speech_Female> some insurance stuff. <Speech_Female> She didn't understand <Speech_Female> how to get the percentage. <Speech_Female> I was like, oh, use a calculator. <Speech_Female> No, she didn't <Speech_Female> understand how to put <Speech_Female> the numbers in to get the <Speech_Female> percentage. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> no wonder, as <Speech_Female> a backup, like she just <Speech_Female> didn't even <Speech_Female> understand that. <Speech_Female> She wasn't in <Speech_Female> the billing department, but <Speech_Female> sometimes I just assume <Speech_Female> people know how to do <Speech_Female> things. <Speech_Female> So I think <Speech_Female> even <Speech_Female> in the billing department, somebody <Speech_Female> who is incredibly <Speech_Female> mathematically <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sound, <Speech_Female> that can <Speech_Female> that things that are <Silence> assumed <Speech_Female> by us, whether it <Speech_Female> be abbreviations, <Speech_Female> numbers, percentages, <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> think just making <Speech_Female> certain and verifying <Speech_Female> that do they <Speech_Female> understand and maybe a silly <Speech_Female> question, but <Speech_Female> do they do they <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> actually get it, a former <Speech_Female> bank line. So <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> but yeah, well, <Speech_Music_Female> I am grateful <Speech_Female> to everybody <Speech_Female> for spending <Speech_Female> their time <Speech_Female> talking about insurance <Speech_Female> and the <Speech_Female> great unknown <Speech_Female> for doctors. <Speech_Music_Female> Anything, you know, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to conclude with, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you know, Ashley, <Speech_Female> as we close out, <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> just, I mean, I mean, <Speech_Female> we've said it <Speech_Female> several times <Speech_Female> here, DS, and members you <Speech_Female> guys get FOA <Speech_Female> for a screaming deal <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> if you're listening <Speech_Female> to this and you've never <Speech_Female> heard of an ox academy <Speech_Female> visit runoffs academy <Speech_Male> dot com. Like I said, it's <Speech_Female> a great tool just <Speech_Female> to bridge that gap. <Speech_Male> And. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Awesome. Well, <Speech_Female> Ashley, thank you as always, <Speech_Music_Female> Allison, thank <Speech_Music_Female> you so much. She's <Speech_Music_Female> up here from Colorado <Speech_Female> Springs to hang <Speech_Female> out with us this afternoon. <Speech_Female> Actually. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Yes. <Speech_Female> And thank you, Debbie. <Speech_Female> As always, <Speech_Music_Female> she's always willing whenever <Speech_Female> I'm like, hey, I'm gonna throw <Speech_Female> you in. She's like, okay. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I think <Speech_Female> Debbie is our new unofficial <Speech_Female> third co host. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Right. <Speech_Female> Exactly. <Speech_Female> Whenever I'm <Speech_Female> like, oh, hey, can I just <Speech_Female> throw you in? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> She always <Speech_Music_Male> okay. I love it. <Speech_Music_Female> I love it. <Speech_Female> Awesome. <Speech_Female> Thank you, ladies so much. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> will be seeing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you guys <SpeakerChange> soon. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I know. See you <Music> <Advertisement> later, bye. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female>

Debbie Ashley Colorado
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Stuff so they don't necessarily have to hire that position. I think it can be really successful if intentional and implemented well and patiently. I think. And one thing that we touched on that I do want to conclude is, you know, I think not just having that one person overseeing ESS, which is important, I think, to make sure there's one person whether it be the doctor on Fridays, at least somebody checking in on the work that's being done. You know, something that's really important in our offices is whether you take all the PPOs or no PPOs, making sure that every different position knows at least basic level insurance. Our hygienists are able to pull up a chart and see the stuff that's applicable to their position, the DAs know what insurance stuff is applicable to their position. Because it's important that if there's only one person in the entire office who is just the overseer of all insurance, they are inundated all day long with can I do this? Can I do this? Can I do this? Can I do this? And the coolest thing is when Allison moved during the pandemic to three hours away, we got to figure out quickly, you know? Like, okay, where does everybody rely only on Allison when she was in the office? And so, you know, it's important we now have that as part of our basic training as every position learns a little bit of what's applicable to them for insurance. And they're expected to. And I think that's helpful if you're looking to either outsource or just have a really high performing team, I think. I think that's important. But yeah, I thought guys, we might conclude with the biggest mistakes we've all made when

Allison
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Was often sitting beside her in the very beginning. And then would give a little rope a little rope. And people always say, well, isn't it micromanaging? And I'm like, no. You have to be able to train them. Give them a little rope and tell them. I'm going to be checking back and this is what I'm going to be looking for. I can't wait for the day that I don't have to check back quite so much. But my other comment to that is always when people tell me, you know, you shouldn't micromanage. I agree, but I do think you should be able to audit and verify things. I don't really any point. My feeling is as if we picked Alison's reports and dug into them right now. She should be able to be like, oh yeah, this is why this is why this is why here's what's going on here. And without any defensiveness, that's how it should be, including my stuff, right? We should all be accountable for that. So as you're kind of going in through those check ins, I think it's super important. Yes, there's a balance between micromanaging thumb on them all the time and ensuring that they have the knowledge and confidence to move on to the next level. They can't have the confidence if those constant check ins auditing, checking isn't happening. They won't build that confidence. So in my mind, it's kind of the, it's the micromanaging. It's not, it's the check in to cost ratio, right? Like on those positions where if you're not checking in, you're straight up losing money is different than the front office text message that's being sent out that maybe you didn't like the verbiage quite so much. These are different levels of tasks that we're talking about here and they literally cost you more money if you are missing these mistakes. So yeah, it makes more sense to check in there and to be up front about it. I think that's the thing too. People don't want to be micromanaged, but they also respect expectations. So if you're like, hey, you know, I'm going to be checking in daily. I'm going to be checking in twice a day or whatever. Weekly. And then we're going to move to weekly, and then we're going to move to, if they understand that in the beginning, they will be checked often. It just sets the standard. And this is a very large portion of the revenue and it makes sense that it would have a higher level

Alison
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Position I bring on, it's almost like I just say to myself, all right, so and so came on. Here's my budget for I'm sure reduce mistakes, changes, dropped something. You know, it's almost like I have my own insurance policy in my head of just because it's going to happen. But do they repeat it? And are they honest about it for me? That's such a red flag. Yeah, just being like, gosh, I am so sorry. And how do they act about it? Shoot. I missed this. This is what happened. You know, I'm like, well yeah. Of course, tell me what you're gonna do different next time. Yeah. You know? And I do tell doctors like, I know it feels awful to lose that $467. Do not get me wrong, especially because you're extrapolating in your head, 467 times how many patients, but it's what you do with that that I think is truly the biggest deal. You know, because if they feel that level of stress from you, you know, I think you have to have that balance of being able to say like, oh, shoot. You're right. That's not great. But hey, thank you for telling me the truth. How do you see yourself wanting to do this differently next time? What do you think is going to be the difference maker next time? It's not ideal, but gosh, they'll probably never make that mistake again. They'll just make different ones. And that's okay too. But I do think they're almost has to be a little bit of a budget insurance policy in your head of these things will happen if they're human and they told you the truth. I had so much rather that than find out somehow later in an adjustment report, right? I'd rather just know. So yeah, so anything else though was 60 days, anything greater risk life that's different than before at this point. The only, I don't know if it's a green or red flag, but the only thing that I would say is resist the temptation to assume that they're ready to go on their own. I mean, just let out a little bit of rope and keep checking in. Keep checking work. I've done it. I've let that rope go too quickly. And it doesn't really benefit anyone. So just keep a tight rain, I think. Yeah, I agree with that. Well, I think you can say from experience now, because now she oversees people. And I think she can say when she's let the, you know, The Rain out too much, thinking this person knows what they're doing. It's totally. Yeah. Yeah, and I would say by this point, again, the understanding. And for me, that is just so important with this position specifically because, you know, I think there are some things that you can do and you can have a little understanding and still come across maybe as knowledgeable or an even kind of the quote that you were just saying where we'll find out. You know, I think that you can see the lack of understanding whether it's entering an EOB and having clear write offs and the write offs were entered or they missed them and if they understand it, the contracted fees and what in network means so there's definitely there's things that you can see in what they're doing that would show their level of understanding. And I would just want to be able to see that at this point that they're actually getting whether it's just the concepts. You know, not that mistakes aren't being made because they're going to be made. You know, we all have our stories and yes, we learned, you know, I remember missing a missing tooth clause and not finding out until that implant was not paid. Oh, it was painful. It was I had to have the conversation with the patient and I have never missed a missing tonight once again. We moved that closet to the top of our plans and it's an asterisk at the top of every plan now and we're not missing those anymore. But sometimes you do have to go through those things. But I would just want to make sure that they are understanding the concepts of insurance. And we didn't even talk about fees yet. But in network out of network, that's something that a lot of people do struggle with. But just again, making sure that they really are getting the understanding of these things. So that eventually they'll be able to kind of be an expert and explain all of these things. So well, and I would say for me, like 60 day in any position is like, I'm like, we shouldn't be waiting till 90 day to let this along. 90 day from an HR standpoint is I always tell them is really like the crux move that you don't want somebody to go beyond the 90 day that you know shouldn't have. Because it's so much harder from an HR standpoint. I think we know what we're all saying as far as firing and just benefits and unemployment. All of that just gets harder. So, you know, for me, at 60 days, if we're seeing just progress not to be had, truly not an understanding of some of the basics of insurance, putting things together, you know, we've had team members where, and I think we're all probably asking the exact same question, 17 times. It's not going to magically get better. So I do think it's 60 day, there needs to be a skills check in. To ensure that they can show they know how to do like. They can do it. It can comprehend it. Don't pass go and don't continue moving them on. If they're not fundamentally getting it. There may be oodles of mistakes, but if they're not fundamentally getting it, you shouldn't move them beyond 60 days. So well, and I think for check ins, I do think that's something we didn't quite address, but the same check ins that we've discussed with all the other positions may apply if not almost more. Because I do think Debbie was checking in pretty well daily.

Debbie
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

01:59 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Sure. Isn't that so true when you get that? And this concludes part one of our awesome webinar with Ashley Hirschfeld, Alison Debbie, and the great doctor summer cast member. Make sure you guys tune in tomorrow for part two and conclusion of this episode. This episode is being brought to you by my good friends over at McLaren and associates. McLaren and associates is the premier sell side advisory firm for dental practice owners seeking a DSO affiliation or private equity partnership. Their team is comprised of experienced cells side advisers whose sole focus is to educate practice owners regarding their EBITDA and practice value, then create a highly competitive environment among multiple DSO buyers to create multiple options to maximize your outcome from the sale. If you're interested in learning more about DSO transactions and the options available in today's marketplace, reach out to Brandon, moncrief at McLaren and associates at 5 one two 6 6 zero 8 5 zero 5 or go to dental transitions dot com that's 512-660-8505 or go to dental transitions dot com. This is one of the biggest decisions in a practice owner's journey, so make sure you're working with the best. McLaren and associates. And that wraps it up for another episode of the dental for our podcast. Look forward to reconnecting on the next episode. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental preneur podcast. Check out true dental success dot com for full recaps of every show, a schedule of our live events, free video tutorials, and a whole host of practice building resources.

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

06:13 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"So, well, and I think in that 30 days, first I'm going to ask Deb is there anything else you would add or subtract from probably not subtract but add into what Allison said as far as dental terminology basic plans just dental insurance in general what it's like and basic codes and insurance verification is anything else you would say no. Okay, that's a lot to work on within that 30 days. Is there any red flags you guys are looking at during that first 30 days when you're onboarding somebody, you know, I think about kind of our insurance certifier. Like, what are the, what are the potential green flags red flags that you're looking for in that first 30 days? Expectations of what looks good and maybe what doesn't because there's going to be lots of mistakes. They're not going to be awesome, especially if they don't have any dental experience. So what are the green flags and red flags for people who may be doing this? So a red flag for me would be as your teaching somebody all of the basics of insurance is they don't want to accept that information that you're giving them. Oh yeah, I know that. I know that. You know that they appear like they just know everything already. That would be a big red flag for me. I completely agree with that. And when people don't ask questions when you know that there's questions. I mean, you know, in the first 30 days, how can there not be questions whether you have insurance background or dental? There are so many questions and just that, you know, I know. Got it. No questions. That would be a red flag. And you're like, no, you don't. Well, you're going to tell you some of the things I think you may be interested in. Yeah. Well, and also, you know, maybe as you are starting them going on, you know, doing some really basic verifications, things like that. Again, a person that, you know, has said their detail oriented, you know, and there's a million in one details, even just with one plan. It's inevitable that things will get missed, but I'd say also if you are just kind of consistently seeing, you know, and not even super detailed, but just things being missed that are more obvious. Kind of consistently being missed and then faced with the answer of, yep, got it. No, I understand that, or those would be some red flags. I'm just wanting to maybe dive a little deeper into the fit and personality and things like that. Yeah. Anything else Ashley for red flags? Maybe defensiveness when there is errors, like versus you know, it's not a personal attack on you. We understand it happens, but like the automatic defensiveness, like lady said, this is part of the job and you have to have to be able to accept that there will be a mistake. And if you aren't open to that and you can't be easily frustrated by the having to make the phone call again, you know, kind of watching those things in the early days, I think, is important too. Yeah. And that's going to be hard for a person who doesn't have a mentor to make those mistakes and not when we have any feedback. Even for Allison, I think it was hard for her, you know, when mistakes were made. She took it really personal. And thought I'm doing a bad job. And so if an office is fortunate enough to have somebody mentor, I think you have to really create that safe space for that individual learning because it truly is just a massive undertaking, I think. But whatever mistakes there are to be made, I guarantee you I've made every single one. And that's why learning from her, you know, it's just so incredible because everybody. I mean, they truly create such a safe space that nobody was hard on me over mistakes. It was just, you know, my own self and that's how many people are on our team. Yeah, but as Debbie has said from the beginning, you know, just very open and that's kind of our culture too of like you have to try your gonna make mistakes. And that's okay. We have made all the mistakes and that is how we have learned. That's how we better our systems. That's how we grow. Every system and thing we do is from mistakes that we've learned from. But that is the key is that you learn and grow. And that was going to be my only other red flag is just, you know, something I've seen and maybe the person who is asking questions, but they ask the same question over and over and over. They don't have a notebook, they don't have a journal. They don't have, you know, because I do think it's really important. Everybody is going to learn and retain information differently. And we can try to help. We do, we try to help people figure out what system is going to work for them. But having somebody who knows, you know, we've got gals that they have their binder set up in the first 30 days and everything's laminated and that's how they learn other people have their notebooks and but I say having somebody that knows how they learn and they don't want to ask the repetitive questions. That's awesome. And the other side of it would be kind of a red flag. Finally, making the same mistakes over and over and over. I was going to say questions over and over and over for sure. Well, and you know how Ashley we joke that like Alistair comes up to some degree in all of our webinars, but it's true. He made a comment once that just stuck with me. You know, that person who I think doesn't say anything or doesn't ask a question or is very like, oh, no, no, no, I get it. His comment once was, you can let them know like, okay, good, I'm glad to hear that, 'cause we'll know for sure if you know that and exactly one week. And I was like, isn't that fun? Because he's like, don't worry. We'll know within one week if you are actually sure of yourself or not. So this is great. For

Allison Deb Ashley Debbie Alistair
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"BW, unlike what, I don't even know how sometimes I just say can I get the frequency for the PX? I mean, it was very humbling. You know, it took a lot of just pushing through and believing that I was going to get there and obviously I did. You know, it all clicked at some point, but. That person has got to. Be okay with failing. And making mistakes. And that's just part of it, I think, hopefully you do have a mentor that can work closely with them. But there's going to be mistakes. And well, and that's where, like I said, if the doctor at least knows some of the basics, it's helpful because really in that first month, I think what we kind of came down with is, or came down to was dental terminology, making sure they understand it, they understand the abbreviations. Really basic insurance verifications, understanding just the basics of dental insurance, like exclusions, just some of the basic codes is really all we're going to be doing in that first 30 days that they have no experience and no dental, but they have detail oriented type disposition numbers. They enjoy things like that. So yeah, I think that's actually a really good 30 days and that's a lot on their plate because it's just dental I was saying really just dental terminology is such great. We have a running joke in our office that we have acronyms for everything and then you throw the acronyms in for dental and it's like, it's overwhelming, you know? In our offices training with the front office. And even the whole office because our breakdowns in open dental, you know, they're full of the abbreviations. And even waiting periods WP, you know, missing tooth clause empty sea. But, you know, even just some of that where, I mean, when we're entering these time and time again, you're obviously abbreviating because it's my current takes up less room. But you know, we've done those trainings have little quizzes just to make sure that the whole office understands what they're reading when they go to look at a plant breakdown. And we have had some really funny, you know, comments of things that you have no idea what the abbreviation. Yeah. I think it's part of dental initiation. I mean, I have my story too, where I was being a personal assistant in the hygienist came in and she was like, FMD, FMX is SRP and I was like, you seem very upset and I don't know what any of that means. But this is what I also shameless plug. We have front office academy. One O one course, we have a dental billing specialist course in there just to just to, you know, utilize some virtual features to get them up to see speed in some capacity. And I feel like it's almost less intimidating to, 'cause nobody's pressuring them, you know, finish these videos, that type of thing too. So if you haven't checked out front off, academy at be sure you do that. Well, which is beautiful because I was going to say what happens if you don't have 'cause there's people listening right now who are like, well, Allison was able to rely on Debbie or like we even have other people in the office who just knew the basics like Amy, the lead hygienist that everybody knows about. She knows basically a lot of those things. But what happens if you don't have somebody in there 'cause there's people right now who are like, I gotta throw them in. Yeah. Well, I think we just said there's a resource right there where you can have that person potentially be training ahead of time before they ever come into the office or have them train while they're in the office, but there isn't somebody to necessarily help them. It's probably beneficial to have the front office academies, resources just to kind of help to at least get them up to speed. Yeah, bridge the gap, right? We're closing. It's not going to cover, you know, it's not going to be the same as actually getting on the phone and asking those questions, but it's going to bridge the gap and get some at least knowing what an FMX is. It's not the same as a BMX and it's not tied to riding bikes whatsoever. I didn't ask that. That wasn't my experience. So

FMD Allison Debbie Amy
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

05:07 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Or something, perhaps, but I know people don't want to necessarily call on their insurances, but I highly advise it. I really do highly advise doctors, you know, I've done it at several little points just to be able to see what the system is like. What are they actually up against? How long does it take? Because I hear so often, people will ask me, well, do you think it should even be taking that long? You know, where it's just taking them so much time, and I'm like, I've done it myself. And I literally been on the phone for 45 minutes, and then the call dropped. And I had to call back. And I got somebody else and I had to start all over. And it's only because I have the experience to recognize that, that I do think doctors, you know, I know that's not something you want to spend a potential Friday or doing, but try it. So that you can at least have an idea of when you're talking to them, you have an idea about that information. But going back to who you're looking for, it's helpful, I guess, my point is, is if you at least know what it takes to do some of this stuff. But then as you're looking for people, the one thing I want to add to what Allison said is because if I was a doctor sitting out there, I might be like, well, what happens if you find 75% of allicin, you know? You find somebody who's got great math skills, detail oriented, all of those things are checked, but honestly, they're really because sometimes that type of personality doesn't marry always with super great communication skills necessarily. They like the numbers they like those kind of things that they don't want to have to go communicate it. I did say it is possible, you know, for people listening to take somebody like that, have them do all of the numbers all of the details and give it to a great TC or an office manager or an SC scheduled coordinator and have them convey it to patients as long as we train all of our front office to know a little bit about insurance. But I do recognize that sometimes you won't find somebody who can is necessarily going to hit all those marks. Yeah. For sure. I wouldn't pass on somebody I would say who has all of that that maybe isn't completely stellar with their communication skills. I may figure out something else. But Debbie, anything else that when it comes to the person for this position, I mean they've got to have a certain level of perseverance, I think, because it's a tough job coming in and not knowing anything and at the end of the day, by competitors going to explode. So you've got to be able to. Just walk through that fire and knowing that you're finally going to get or learn everything you need to not everything. We still don't know everything. But you just have to have somebody that I think is pretty intent on learning and just forging through I think tenacity, right? Like they have to just be able to. You know, not take those long phone calls personally and just get the answers. Get the right answers. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because there's going to be so much learning involved, no matter what. Especially if it's somebody with very little or no experience, it's just like putting anybody into any of the positions in the dental office knew. It's all Greek. It feels like so. And correct me if I'm wrong too, Alison, this is something that's also it changes every year, right? So sometimes you've got this plan was doing this one thing and now it's not necessarily right, so it's not like it's always evolving. Always it's always changing. And even now I think after COVID with even the insurance companies being so short step, even the verification process looks different than what it looked like a couple of years ago. You know, there may be limiting their time on the phone or they're not speaking to offices to give them benefits. You can only get a facts and it's very limited. So even that is looking different. Which is such a beautiful point. We haven't even started diving into the actual media this, but you know, I do hear doctors often getting really upset because treatment plans are off or patient portions were off. And I'm here to say just knowing from what I know, they really are often giving wrong information or you can't speak to a representative at all. They're having to pull it from a breakdown and guess. So one thing that we've really instated is if a patient wants to know for sure, we give them the codes and say, hey, listen, this is the best we can get. We truly can't get any better than this. If you want to know for sure we're going to have you call them just so that you have a better idea. Ever dream about running a black belt level dental practice? About becoming the kind of leader that inspires the team to create a systemized orderly and profitable practice. Free of unnecessary stress and drama,

Allison SC Debbie Alison
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

04:49 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"A little about me. Which I'm like, I didn't tell her to say any of that, but I'm like, oh my gosh, do you feel the same way about Alison? If summer's pinching you or hurting you, blink twice. But I'm like, we feel like so ridiculously blessed to find somebody who fit the criteria. And she's just so much fun to actually get to hang around with. So, but yes, and Debbie, you need no introduction at this point, but really for you insurance and billing, when did you get involved in that at what point in your career? Well, I was kind of dropped right into it. The insurance billing coordinator position just didn't show up one day to work. So I liked it myself. I mean, what else was I going to do it? So I was just kind of, I mean, I learned everything the hard way made massive mistakes. I actually had no one to train me. So I called the insurance companies I remember putting in checks and I called the entrance companies and had them teach me how to walk through the EOB and what does this mean? What does this mean? So that's how I learned. And then what's funny is how I learned was because when I was having my very first surgery and I was literally in a wheelchair wearing sweatpants, I wheeled myself into the office and I was like, Debbie, you don't even really know me very well, but is there any way that you could teach me how to do insurance myself? Because I had never really had the opportunity. And I tell doctors that if you can actually understand the basics, it really does give you such a higher respect for the people who are doing it. And so I called on insurance stuff. When I would do it wrong, Debbie would be like, I'm going to have to have you call him back, or at least this is what we have to do is we have to call him back. After being on hold for 45 minutes, yep, you're going to have to call back. And so I took the time when I was in that wheelchair and stuff to kind of sit with Debbie and really learn all of it myself. And it's a really tough job at such a huge integral part that, you know, there are no small positions, but this one in particular is a really big position. So, and I do know that in many offices that might be listening or will listen to this. You know, I was telling them, you know, I know when we began too a long time ago that we didn't have the luxury of having a whole billing department or just a biller. It was, it was, yeah, it was the SC was, you know, Ashley, as well as I do. They're one person up front was the catch all person for everything. And if you were lucky you got maybe two people up front. And they both knew a little bit about insurance. So we do recognize that for some people out there, you know, it may not be that you have a whole billing department. This is still going to be applicable no matter where you are, kind of in the spectrum of how many people up front or if you're looking to kind of move somebody to a true billing position specifically. And we also, we also will be discussing, you know, how do you utilize outsourcing of things, which I know has become really popular. We'll dive into that as well, 'cause I know people sometimes have one front office, one outsourced person, what kind of talk through that. But anything Ashley from you before we kind of dive in. I think you've covered it the title of this is, you know, into the unknown, like you said, so many docs just don't understand it. And so it's funny when we talk about hiring unicorns and Alice and you're probably like a shiny platinum diamond crested unicorn. You know, like there's just so hard to find or you have to create your unicorn right here in crusting or diamonds. By training her in this, but you know, I think that I think yeah, no, I'm excited to dive in here. Yeah. Well, and I would say that's what I would say is yes, she is definitely an amazing diamond. I think though that it's not that you can't find the diamond, I think it's the time and intention to kind of working through a process to help them understand everything, which, you know, that's kind of the first thing we are going to dive into is how do you find somebody who has Allison's detail oriented tenacity and she knew no dental, by the way, either. So we've discussed it only 7000 times, but I'll do it 7001. That's, you know, yes, your ad, you know, what bait you're putting out there for who, but second to that is using some testing, which we talked about, which is we use criteria corp, and it actually really does delineate between the capabilities of people for this position. Because it shows you, you know, as we all know, how detail oriented they are

Debbie Alison Ashley Alice Allison criteria corp
"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

01:43 min | 3 months ago

"biller" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Of a great webinar. Straight out of the DSN vault hot off the press is this was just recorded yesterday. So I hope you guys get lots of value from this. Again, this is part one. Episode, hiring people without dental knowledge or without dental experience specifically for the billing department. All right guys, let me know what you think, have a great day. Welcome back everybody to another installment of the lady leader series. And Ashley, we are kind of concluding this whole thing that we started so many months ago because we were really been talking about with the current climate. How do we find higher and train up people to be in the dental field, especially with no experience? So we went through hiring universal training, we've done scheduling coordinators, DAs, and now we're going to be moving into the incredibly unknown elusive scary position for doctors, which is billing and insurance departments. I think we can all attest there's lots of questions from people about this department just because doctors are never really taught much about it. And so we're going to dive into it as best as we possibly can to cover. What do we do? How do we hire on board? Potential new people into the billing department. So to help, because obviously, I'm not even the well versed with this one. We've got our insurance lead with us. Allison, puppy, which I'll let her introduce herself. And then we've got, of course, Debbie Dodson, who was the trainer

Ashley Allison Debbie Dodson
Debbie Joins Dinesh to Discuss the Expulsion of Chesa Boudin

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Debbie Joins Dinesh to Discuss the Expulsion of Chesa Boudin

"Debbie and I have been talking about chesa boudin and chess are getting the boot from the voters of San Francisco. And you know, we've had some dealings indirectly. We don't know chessa. But I discovered just a many, many years ago when looking through some archives of some footage of chessa with Bill heirs and the Tsar of education in Venezuela and how interesting that dynamic was, you know, of course, is fluent in Spanish. So Tessa was interpreting for Bill as he was telling the Tsar of education in Venezuela. What he too wanted to do for the education system in America. And I thought that was just unbelievably amazing. I couldn't believe I found probably about 12 videos. Of that. And I was super excited to show them to you. That's how we met. And then subsequently, we were actually sitting across from Bel airs and bernadine Dorne, and restaurant in Chicago, and they were talking pretty affectionately about their family, billers, dad, as I recall. But then also chess on. They couldn't have been more proud of chessa because was the Adam was he already the DA? No, he wasn't the DA. No, but he was a rising figure. He was I think he had gone his law degree. He was, I think that he had just gotten his law degree. I could be wrong, but anyway, but it's really interesting how some of these and I don't even call him far left, I call him a communist. Yeah. I mean, Che Guevara on the background. These are communists. You know, I use the phrase and a couple of people wrote me there. It's the phrases, red diaper, baby. Which is a phrase coming out of the 20th century. Basically means that your parents communists. Right, the offspring of communist

Chessa Chesa Boudin Venezuela Chess Bel Airs Bernadine Dorne Bill Debbie Tessa San Francisco America Chicago Adam Che Guevara
"biller" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

07:58 min | 8 months ago

"biller" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Of Sue Henderson's mind became a $5 billion software company. It has been one month since athenahealth announced the deal to be acquired by veritas capital. Sue got a bit rich, but in the bargain, she saved the U.S. economy a small fortune. By selling medical billing software to doctor's offices, Athena health changed the U.S. healthcare system. Doctors would never again need their own medical biller. A single biller can now handle ten doctors. That biller is now in effect Sue Henderson. Many of our doctors basically said to us, look, you saved my career. I would have gone out of business if it hadn't been for you guys. But maybe the most telling response to the power of Sue Henderson came from a big health insurance company. Or anyway, that's what Todd park thought. So I get a call. One day, from a very powerful, very sophisticated national health insurance company, right? Way above average in terms of its technical and operational prowess. The insurance company had a bizarre request. They said, we'd like to license your rules engine from you. I said, I can't do that. I can't tell you what your competitor's insurance rules are. They said, no, no, no. We want to license our own rules from you. The insurance company itself didn't understand why it paid some medical claims and not others. It was relieved that someone had figured it out. I said, well, let me get this straight. You want to license your own billing rules from us. They said yes. I said, okay, it's a little crazy. Can you just explain to me why? They said, well, look, you know, I mean, we have a bunch of different systems. We bought a bunch of different insurers, you know, there's a ton of spaghetti code in these disparate systems. And we don't really know what the hell is in there. That's incredible. It's incredible. It's incredible. And after that one insurance company did that, did you find others also wanting to do it? It was too weird. We couldn't do it. Okay, to recap. This invisible woman becomes an expert in a subject no one really thinks of as especially important. Or even really a subject. And her expertise changes a massive industry. In retrospect, are at any moment were you surprised by your value, like your value to this new business? I don't think most of the time that I realized my value. I think I was enjoying what I was doing. And I don't think that I was thinking, wow, I'm pretty valuable here. And if I left, they'd be in big trouble. Sue Henderson saved Todd parkes first business. But if you ask Todd park, that was only the second most important thing she did for him. The most important thing she did for him was to lead him to a bigger idea. About where to find experts. Especially in a crisis. Sue doesn't run the healthcare system. She doesn't run a hospital system, but she doesn't run physician group. She doesn't run insurance company, right? But she has an incredibly good sense on the ground. Of what is going on in an instinct for what to do to make things better. So in the healthcare system, she is absolutely an L 6. The L 6 the level 6 the person 6 levels down from the top. The admirable crichtons that insight became Todd's new obsession. That you might never find the expert who knows what you badly need to know. Because she's buried under some big organization or system. She has no status. She might have a voice, but no one hears it. After his experience with Sue Henderson, Todd park basically became known as the guy who could find experts where no one else thought to look. This episode is supported by work check and original podcast from Atlassian. Makers of teamwork software, like jira, confluence, and Trello. Our workplaces today are full of lingo, tools and trends, promising to make our teams more efficient or in sync. But which actually deliver on that hype. Work check is a new podcast all about how and why you should transform the ways you work. Episode one is about the practice of dog fooding. Episode two is about internal hackathons. I listened to work check and was surprised to learn that the Facebook like button came out of an internal company hackathon. I think if you listen, you'll learn something surprising too. Listen to work check on Apple podcasts or anywhere you listen to podcasts. We'll also include a link in the show notes. My thanks to work check for their support. According to the latest research, 90% of employers plan to make enhancing the employee experience, a top priority in 2022. After all, a happy workplace is key to attracting and keeping great employees. We have the best employees here at pushkin and especially against the rules. And I like to think they're happy. And I like to think they're happy because they feel like their brains are accessed and they have the flexibility to do their job when they want to do their job. And there's no boss just sitting on their shoulder all the time. And on top of all that, we know we care about each other outside of work. And if you need to add more employees to your team, there's zip recruiter. They're matching technology helps you find the right people for your roles fast. And right now, you can try zip recruiter for free at zip recruiter dot com slash against. Zip recruiter uses its powerful technology to find and match the right candidates up with your job. Then it proactively presents these candidates to you. You can easily review these recommended candidates and invite your top choices to apply for your job, which encourages them to apply faster. No wonder zip recruiter is the number one rated hiring site in the U.S. based on G two ratings. Zip recruiters technology is so effective that four out of 5 employers who post on zip recruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. And now you could try zip recruiter for free at this exclusive web address. Zip recruiter dot com slash against. That's zip recruiter dot com slash against. Zip recruiter. The smartest way to hire. During his first term in office, president Obama addressed the American people. Hello, everybody. I want to talk with you about a new consumer website. Healthcare dot gov. It's a good resource for understanding the new law. And it offers a few simple tools to help you take your healthcare into your own hands. ObamaCare. Americans were now suddenly eligible to sign up for a new health insurance marketplace online on October 1st, 2013. Millions of uninsured Americans are going online. This is healthcare dot gov, hoping to enroll in the ObamaCare exchanges, but the websites have been experiencing technical glitches. Senior medical court. That's the sound of a crisis. Healthcare dot gov has crashed. It's not just embarrassing. It's a political disaster. After weeks of ignoring it, The White House finally admitting what everyone already.

Sue Henderson Todd park athenahealth veritas capital Todd parkes Sue U.S. biller Athena Trello Todd Facebook Apple president Obama White House
"biller" Discussed on Other People's Shoes

Other People's Shoes

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"biller" Discussed on Other People's Shoes

"I'll say this. I describe myself as a south contained hurricane. And i've always been. I've been a partick and christians everything question in think like make it make sense for me before i blindly five so i've had a voice. I've spoken my truth of. That's something always done. I think traveling that johnny with a heaviness and people constantly telling you know where you cannot be like this like tuna dawn that burden became heavier for me because not only did i see like okay. I am the reason for my parents voice. I also felt like. I cannot even be myself. I'm vice. I have a big personality that seems to offend people. Nothing i do is enough. Nothing i do makes people happy. And i think i say years seeking attention years looking for people. Succeed me rich man you know. I acted out. Which of course you knew came if consequences that i couldn't handle this then friday that narrative. You're not enough like you. can't you get things right. Because you're always being criticized guts point in my teens. All i wanted was to be loved in a way that i didn't have to be something someone else i wanted to be loved for me with all the stuff that comes with it right and is interesting ice. I call my stuff my ones. It's an honor to get to know me. But i'm to get today and if you can navigate through my properly the ones they don't deserve to rates in any right. I've learned ability years to embrace my dorms. They are what make me unique but my daughter ones as well as all that i carried so a lot in my teens you you seeing it trying to navigate the word as you learn who you are and as i was lying myself i was being rejected and that resulted in me not wanting to leave. I remember the data. And i tried to commit suicide. I was having an argument with my mother's husband. And i said i should just kill myself. And he said go ahead. I'll watch and he called everybody into the kitchen. And i stood there and i took a handful of us and i walked be house and that was wide dealt with people not take me seriously i all i wanted was to be loved and to be accepted for who abuse so i ended up in hospital having to drink chocolate hill in getting my stomach because that was a cry for attention that was blatantly model and ignored. I don't even know what to say that. How do you even go back and associate with somebody after that. I am not speaking to him in any form or fashion in twenty five years and i lived in his house. I did not speak to him again. After that you come back from that. I was taught from a young age to that. We should forgive others. That would be a tough forgive. That would truly be tougher. Have but some would say. Maybe that was. Just you being overdramatic. You mentioned that you haven't forgiven him. Why not i mean. i know. it's obvious because i sat on the outside. I need forgiveness. It's always about me. Not about the other person. But i hate is a very strong word but because of what i've aintree in relationship his actions i struggled to move forward and you part of my growth. You know i had other issues of other family members you know. My mother and i didn't speak for years. I've been able to move past. There is a sense when it comes to forgiveness you want. Somebody actually has remorse about what they've done. She cares about what they've done. My tricks is. I don't believe that he even cares about the impact. The negative impact that he made on my life. And that's what. I strung this while back a friend of mine. Who's a fellow podcast her. Name's amy watson is a very horrific story lot of trauma at parenting. She was at one point in time babysat by like serial killers. I mean it's just crazy crazy stuff. Girls got some crazy stuff. Love her dearly. Amy shoutout to you in amy's episode. I shared some lyrics from a song. Like i need to share them with you. In this moment biller so powerful. So i'm going to share them with the and then i'd love to get your response to them in an how may be really stiff. You're okay with that. The song is j. jj heller. But here's the song and says that will love you for you not for what you've done or what you will become. I will love you for you. I will give you the love the love that you never knew. What's your response to that. And i was like the story of my life really searching for that. Parson people to just love me for me. That's powerful and that's beautiful. He can find someone that leery just loves you for you. No strings attach no hidden agendas blast so do you believe that there is such a person that can do that. I do that. I love people for who they are. I am the person right. I know you are that person. But i'm wondering. Have you found you if you follow me. Have you found you who will do that for you. The love that you never knew. And so again i go back to that. Have you found that person who will love you the way that you never knew. And if so tell me about this person. He's my husband has battled through so much in this relationship. I met him and he was. He had some struggles laissez. And i think we were both in a space where we both wanted an opportunity to be loved and i think our relationship. We've vetted some amazing storm seattle And i i feel safe with him. I would say it's fresh time of arab. Been able to let my guard completely in a relationship because of things that i'm being pass within an abusive relationship from the age of fourteen and that shades even more sick parents said she viewed the world. Because i thought my husband was the person that was going to love me. Like i had never been loved before. And he used my desire for that to ensure me in these for years. I was full team and i met him and he was twenty eight and i know it. I had hit the jack hot. Here i have is manned to take her financially curve. Me sexually assaulted scene. And i felt like sign emmy. I had what i needed. Now that i'm healed and reflect back. I realized i was ended. Animal in the wild looking for shelter and this a pass predator.

amy watson Amy shoutout johnny jj heller biller Parson amy seattle emmy
"biller" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"biller" Discussed on Watts Involved

"Design engineering of visibly does other social components which along the way of the lost. But if you look at the origins of detection am imo attitudes where it must buildi- that mid deliverables solving problems of building. But it has evolved beyond that and this is where. Glad to kind of play biller. Wonderful stuff well. First off the end you need to route that next book because these are the stories that need to be told in this country. And that's gonna go a long way. I tended to another author just the other day thunder just up He is. He's just written a book called out of quattro which was all about The the prison camp and him as well these stories. We need to know not because we can look at them with shock and horror but it's time to pick off the scabs. Clean out the wounds and start talking to each other so thank you the end for taking the time out and having a test today. I really do appreciate it. The book is called. Get out of your mind lessons on embracing difference from south africa and beyond and it's byerly janda impact and klaus doppler the end once again. Thank you so much. Have a good one might sanctions on stage. I think here's went for years and yeah let's let's get talking wonderful stuff. They got my special guest. The luyanda gop get the book. Get out of your mind. Well with read and again we need to stop talking to each and every one of you look off yourselves. Take care and thank you for listening..

biller klaus south africa gop
"biller" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"biller" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"I do feel i like. I prefer a lighter leah. Which like. I'm getting like at the dinner table. Battling bunny about her boobs enter possible but job like i. This is the leah you know getting the i v to do the plasma bit with sonia. Like i'm feeling her again. I was in the beginning to no fault of her own. It just felt very heavy yet. It it's it. Looks like the internet has turned on but i didn't understand why she deceived. She seems to be offering more of the same. She doesn't bother me at all. And i i think he's a good friend to ebony and i guess a sweet person i really do. Yeah and i want her on the show. Let me also be clear about. Even when i'm not having fun with just like oh i still. I don't want to go and riley. She's in her. She's got the good. She's a housewife. I'm missing the tiki. Georgia's being thrown. And then you know in the running in the pool naked way. Say we're missing alcohol. Sobriety i understand that you said we. I said we meeting me akilah green. Thank you for being here. Any final thoughts. Are you excited for salt. Lake salt lake has an interview. That's a little dark for me. And i didn't think there could be such an dark shows. They think it's like verging into ninety day. Fiance territory so. I'm not sure it's incredible. Lisa barlow followed you answer. Did i tell you that. I don't even know that. yes i said. Stay away de interested. I think they can't have jim. Shaw that show. Let's nobody is there to call out jin shot and nobody it so it's not in the same way. The durant was not fun without Bethany like there's something not fun about a demon just running. Amok meredith marks is gonna ask the producer. Yes i do say something. Yeah and then marry. You know like assault level. We've got ramona abusing you know. He will work in service positions. They've got michael darby pinching asses. And now we've got a cult leader. Like subway may have been arrested for having a runaway in her house. And you remember the roller coaster ride not two days ago. We all went on for twenty four hours of madness in which we thought robert. Her grandfather husband was brothers to bill cosby. Mary's mary's i would. Of course this makes sense. Robert and biller brothers when people are like no they're not and that that would have broken. I enjoy the moments that i lived in that space. Really all you know. If someone says something i believe it immediately. Because it's it's sort of like. I believe i don't think with my brain. I think with my heart done like all housewives. News is just like the wild wild. It's like yeah. Oh gosh guys well here. We are approaching labor day. I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday guys too. And we'll be back on september seventh. Yeah can't wait a green. Thank you for joining us for sharing all of your your beautiful opinions and coming around. I'm hearing you on wendy. And i'm hearing you and you're the best round robin one which you know.

akilah green Lake salt lake Lisa barlow Amok meredith sonia michael darby riley Georgia jin durant Bethany Shaw ramona jim bill cosby biller robert Mary mary Robert
Senate's Key Vote Advances Biden's $1T Infrastructure Bill

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Senate's Key Vote Advances Biden's $1T Infrastructure Bill

"The Senate has taken a significant step toward passing a one trillion dollar infrastructure package the games are sixty seven the nays are twenty seven it was an important vote but a procedural one the motion is agreed to senator Tom Carper put it in perspective while we're grateful everybody voted for cloture it is not the end and but it takes a step closer to the one trillion dollar package would provide an injection of federal money for a range of public works programs from roads and bridges to broadband internet access drinking water and more this is a compromise product before casting a yes vote to proceed Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell offered this what are early stage when called internal improvement the core government responsibility the American people need roads bridges ports and airports to build their businesses biller travelers and build a lot more votes will be needed before final Senate passage Ben Thomas Washington

Senator Tom Carper Nays Senate Mitch Mcconnell Ben Thomas Washington
"biller" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

True Crime Brewery

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"biller" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

"Katie ended up being sentenced to twenty three years in prison. So that's near the top of the numbers for manslaughter. So the judge wasn't super lenient with her. No he wasn't well even now. Some people in utica including some of mary's own family members support katie. And believe she's innocent. But if you think about it. The idea that biller adam committed the crime and framed katie. Just doesn't make sense and seems highly unlikely. Whoa that's yes. They're just still have a tough time of why she would try to kill mary. Yeah and i think that's part of the problem is the motive is just so uncertain. She wants to get back at her ex boyfriend. And the best way to do that is to kill kills mother. Well maybe not just wanted to get back at him but wanting to get him back. She seemed to know that he would reach out to her. For comfort wants. His mother died. Were even when that happened. That didn't last well and maybe she didn't mean to kill mary. Maybe maybe she poisoned adam and he got really sick but got better and she thought well. I'll do that to mary and she'll get really sick but she'll get better. But during that animal turn to me here in a make us closer except for the computer or phone notation about figuring a lethal dosage of cultural true. That's true that would indicate that maybe they weren't trying to just make the person sick or maybe she was trying to avoid giving a lethal dose and trying to keep it under that and maybe mary being so much smaller and older her body just couldn't take it. Possibly but i don't think we'll ever know exactly what happened. Although the more i think about this case the more. I think that katy is responsible for putting that toxin in mary's body. Somehow i'm not sure of her motive. Honestly but i mean as you know you don't have to have a motive proven so the things that adam got from them. His mother's office and turned over to the police. Do they analyze for culture. Seen in any of those things. Well i'm sure if they did because would it even matter once. The chain of custody is broken and adams touched all that stuff and he was a suspect for awhile. Is it any a thing that they found out going to be valid or even matter. I don't know birch true boot. I would think it'd be nice to test anyway. And they may have. I'm not sure i know. They tested a lot of things. But i don't have a list of exactly what was tested. I just know there was dna on the bottle. And i know about the computer forensics. But i don't even know the level that was in mary's body. How much of that was in her body. Although obviously it was a lethal dose route but like some had suggested that the bill had done it she could have been given a second dose in the hospital. Maybe she would it's recovering and then she was given more your answer twisty case. It is in my opinion. Bill doesn't seem like he was trying to kill his wife. He seemed very broken after this. And no offense but mary sister. Kathleen didn't seem to be that exciting. She seemed kind of like a more claim independent woman. She didn't seem as exciting as mary. Well not that that means anything to you it made. She is more exciting to bill. Yes that's true..

mary biller adam katie utica Katie adam katy adams Kathleen Bill
"biller" Discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

The South Florida Morning Show

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"biller" Discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

"Pink. The singer yes. She's coming to their rescue. She says it wasn't much of a fine. It's only one hundred seventy five bucks each player but she says he's going to pay the fines and expressed her support and social media. Keep it up girl. She says i. It's hard to believe that the bikini is the official uniform for hand for beach. And what does it call. What is handball. i. I don't know you hit the ball with their hand. Who the hell. I don't know what is ample. I've never played handball. I know is they're indoor handball. There is indoor as an indoor. That's correct all right on the beach. So actually it's kind of hard because you're running. I mean running on the beach is not easy so bikini. That's correct how far you run. So it's it's a field so think of it soccer but you're using your hands instead of your feet. It's it's literally the same thing a soccer except you're throwing the ball instead of kicking just like a soccer ball or is it a little smaller yet smaller as an rubber ball. I believe so. And it's something where you know you can throw it and the goalie has to stop. Sometimes they get hit in the face and say the poor goalie. That's the job. You don't want cow so there you are a hit in the face. Knocked out rolling around your bikini and the sand all oil. It's collecting sandman show. Why do they play on sand. What what did they play on the beach. That question i cannot answer for your the. Is it like the soft sand lake. But it's really hard to run in or is it like the the wet sand. That's a little bit easier. I'm gonna go ahead and guess two things to your questions. There were one they make. The sand is easiest. Possible to run in and number two. I believe they played this on the beach. Because someone like biller. I decided that this would be a great sport for the beach. Set women to play in their bikinis. That's what it is. Someone did that. Let's just be honest about it. This is why they still have these events. It's one of the few things carrying not only nbc. I mean worldwide like like markets truly be networks. Yes it's a huge tune in it. Just is okay as norwegian beach handball players and pink ruin the last thing worth watching the olympics..

handball indoor handball biller nbc olympics
Data Engineering With Jean-Yves Stephan

Software Engineering Daily

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Data Engineering With Jean-Yves Stephan

"Welcome to the show. Thank you so much jeffrey. It's great to be here. Yeah it's great to have you. We've done numerous shows about spark. And i'd like to start off by just talking about the applications of spark in twenty twenty one especially in light of of other perhaps competing environments such as a data warehouse infrastructure. Tell me about the applications of spark today and how it fits into the overall ecosystem. Yeah that's a great question. So i think barak has a central place as a general framework for big data distributed computing main use cases. Are the engineering you know. Ut l. also spark streaming and then also as a general purpose tool for advanced an idex data science and for business intelligence. So you did. The most common billers in terms of volume definitely did engineering work lows. Etl steel you know batch et l. Still number one use case and in terms of you know how it evolves versus new technologies or data warehouses well using spark in the cloud over an object store using which we call d. league is still very popular. I think if you need the flexibility over programming language since you can use python scala with spark it's definitely steeled the go-to tool and the fact that and maybe we'll talk about this in the future but the fact that now you can deploy spark up of keys and debts some pain points that we used to have or going away. You know. Also make it a pretty standard architecture. For big data workloads most work with the sets over one hundred gigabytes.

Jeffrey Barak
Virginia man arrested at Washington DC checkpoint with 500 rounds of ammunition

WBZ Morning News

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Virginia man arrested at Washington DC checkpoint with 500 rounds of ammunition

"In Washington, U. S Capitol police arresting a Virginia man with an unregistered gun and more than 500 rounds of unregistered ammo. At an inauguration checkpoint, W USA reporter Kobe Satterfield tells us Westley Allan Biller claims he came to D. C to do security for the inauguration for documents, a viewer pulled up to a security checkpoint and showed an unauthorized inauguration credential. That's when officers noticed program details on dealers Trump and asked if he had anything that could hurt the officers. Court documents. A dealer told the officers about the gun and was then put in handcuffs. The moment they said, they're going to search canine eyes. Remember that it was in the vehicle. You know, since such a rush that day, and I was really nervous I was I really was because I know there's different laws. I don't know what the laws are in D. C. He says. In Virginia, he's a licensed carrier and never meant to cause any harm across his state line dealer has been released from jail and will only be allowed into Washington for court related matters.

U. S Capitol Police Kobe Satterfield Westley Allan Biller Virginia Washington USA Donald Trump
Can the Otto Aviation Celera 500L Deliver on Efficiency Promises?

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

04:14 min | 2 years ago

Can the Otto Aviation Celera 500L Deliver on Efficiency Promises?

"In our engineering segment, we're going to chat about first off the auto aviation Celera five hundred L. which their companies calling the most fuel-efficient commercially viable passenger aircraft in the world. Now if you were to if you're going to go back to elementary school and draw fish, were you make like the big loop and then you make the tail that's essentially what is aircraft looks like. And so it does look strikingly different looks kind of like a blimp it's got a you know a rear pusher propeller got some really long thin than wings but all these things have a very specific purpose. They say it extensively utilizes lamb and our flow over the fuselage wing and tail and that it can glide one hundred, twenty, five miles at thirty thousand feet, and so obviously with all this glide, you know the ability to glide so far. It's extremely fuel efficient. So Alan, you say this is almost like a rebirth of a previous jet is that true? If he remembers the Lear Fan in Lear Fan was bill lear late in his life Bill Lear. Was Building an aircraft out in Kansas I. Think it was Kansas. Composite Airplane and it looked very similar Lisa. had a just kind of a fish shaped fuselage propeller on the back and not as highly lambda flow wing at the time just because he didn't have the computers to do that stop but. Had A two engines. pity six kind of turboprop engines that were driving I think to recap inches ever driving through a transmission, a single propeller, the back. And? Just. The era in which it was being developed, it had difficulty the transmission had difficulty and or make it out carbon-fiber, which was really knew at that point that's before the the the beach starship in came out. So the be starship was sort of an outgrowth of the Lear Fan all the engineers that were around the learfield kind of jumped over to beach at the time to make the starship, they make the the premier in the horizon and everything else after that But. The aerodynamic design. Has Been a constant for a while. So it's not like this auto aviation is a necessarily a new idea as much as they have now, the computational power to do the Lamido flow thing and to make it super slippery to be very efficient, which biller didn't have during his lifetime. So, it's sort of a combination of old old school sort of Basic fundamental design I e one two engines so he can fly Keith propeller turning, but you want all they are an amick efficiency can get because you have the computers to do it. That's what it looks like to me So It doesn't look and I know the thing about here's the thing about. Aircraft shape I always find fascinating is there is a little bit of human psychology into the way that they signs aircraft. that. When you're putting down the amount of money to buy an airplane, some of that is a cool factor. Looks Cool Piaggio has been in this marketplace for a while. Piaggio is a very similar shaped aircraft. It's a pusher plane also in has kind of cool factor to it and it's talion in its is got all these things. So what you saying on does have go factor does not I don't know if this thing has cool factor is it look sometimes it's by sometimes by paint and so here's the thing that I knows I just painted all white, right? Yeah. Right and if I'm if I'm a marketing guy or marketing person and the guy. Giving anybody. Marketing Person At. A new aircraft company I want my aircraft of to be the coolest looking thing that anybody has ever seen. I want to to look like a Formula One race car that's what I'm looking. For and right now, it looks like a a bloated fish a little bit which is not particularly appealing to the eye. It is very efficient, Amex very efficient, but they gotta find a way to make it look cool also.

Lear Fan Bill Lear Piaggio Kansas Amex Alan Lisa. Keith
Game of Thrones Finale: Interview with 'GoT Thrones' Podcast

All Of It

04:11 min | 3 years ago

Game of Thrones Finale: Interview with 'GoT Thrones' Podcast

"To game of thrones, which is just Ed its final episode. Billy two hundred broadcasters have been showing around the world of the past eight years, or so it hugely popular as an idea. That's the most piracy show of the moment. It's about dragons, dynasties vying for power, lots of spectacular battles and imaginative murders with its massive budgets and production values. It's a bit more than TV. It's basically a series of films, which have been going on to safer just under ten years. It's a cult so, so ugly, a communal experience people have been watching this, and arguing about it all round the world. It's now ended now with all spoiler alert in mind. We gingerly crossed the Los Angeles and talk to the host of got thrones that GIO, teak game of thrones thrones, the game of thrones podcast, Alexandra August, welcome to the program. Eliana all shows must die. Sadly, but did this. One died in the right way. I am shocked at you are that it's deck the landing. I am I watched episode and I with Lee got about how well it executed the ending to a terrier that is completely incompatible. No, that is interesting because this lost series just to bring people who have been living on the moon such as me to follow. But I do know that there is being an awful lot of fuss from funds, saying, this launched show ain't so good. Using to say goes out on a bang. I mean, it's an incredible job for them to pull up eight years of characters and plots because if it was describe it for those who don't know it that will there's a lot of characters and a lot of plots they had a big job to bring it to an end and they. I mean you eight years, the plot, I say, sixteen years, I mean, this is a show that the source material has been working for, like, since the early ninety. And so the idea that it's not eight years plot. It's twenty years of thought that they brought to a close tonight and they did it very, very well. I mean kind of like especially since last week, which everyone like universally hated. They actually brought to a close of really well, and I'm kind of shocked that we're able to do it. But what about the idea that the result, Reggie a petition of a million signatures to remake the entire last season? But some people and they I mean what do you think about that? Do you understand why people are so agitated? Absolutely understand my biller. Why people are dated. I. Really understand why they think petition to remake I Stephen of television that network has put on, we'll actually do anything. Using the last episode much change. Some minds. I hope so I genuinely hope so it's only because it's not just a writer director and the actors are making the show. Keet rips and editors and. Writers, distant and other people that are part of this crew that are making this show. This is a communal effort involving hundreds upon hundreds of people, I want to ask about the communal because that is an interesting thing. I mean you host a blog for a community. Everyone said that communal TV was dead. It seems to have resurrected you can be another game of thrones. The can do this. Give it turns lightning about it's several different elements that have worked in a certain amount of time, and I think it could happen again. But I think that it would take a particular kind of genius to make it happen again. Well, genius is over for now. August there amongst the rubble of this amazing phenomenon game of thrones with the message. Spoiler alerts in mind. It might not be as bad as you think indeed. It might be

Alexandra August Billy Eliana Los Angeles Keet Reggie LEE Writer Director Eight Years Sixteen Years Twenty Years Ten Years
Should We Retest Licensed Drivers Periodically?

BrainStuff

04:54 min | 4 years ago

Should We Retest Licensed Drivers Periodically?

"You drive a car or sometimes take cabs or lifts or have ever been around cars, you've likely had at least a few frustrating or scary experiences with really bad drivers. You know, a Radic merging or u-turns or casual disrespect for stop signs speed limits or pedestrian right of way or perhaps not disrespect. But ignorance of in a twenty eleven study conducted by g MAC insurance nearly one in five drivers weren't able to pass a written test of basic driving knowledge, the sort that license applicants take. But even though most people past there were some glaring gaps in critical areas. Eighty five percent of those tested, for example. Couldn't name the correct thing to do when approaching a yellow traffic light and only one in four knew how to calculate the safe distance for following a vehicle. See the article version of the story at how stuff works dot com. If you want quiz yourself. Requiring experienced motorists to regularly demonstrate their competence isn't something that's ever been conducted on a widespread basis in the US or some states didn't even require novice drivers to pass a road test until the nineteen fifties. Only one St. Illinois has a law mandating road skills tests for license renewals. And that's only for motorists who have reached age seventy-five New Hampshire once had a similar age related testing requirement. But repealed it in two thousand eleven and Slovenia randomly selects a small sample of these states forty five and older drivers and requires them to undergo additional medical and vision exams based on those results they might have to take a driving test as well. Additionally, a handful of other states, Iowa, Missouri, Michigan and California allow officials to selectively require road tests, for license holders, whom they have reason to believe might be unsafe. We spoke by Email with Andrea Henry director of strategic communications and policy for the Iowa department of transportation, she explained the in her state quote drivers with valid licenses may be asked to demonstrate their driving ability prior to renewal due to changes in their health. This includes physical and mobility conditions as well as produced division and cognitive issues. Wild data on how many retests are conducted wasn't available. Most of those drivers end up getting renewals. Anyway, though, many have restricted privileges such as a lower personal speed limit or daytime driving only one obvious problem with regularly re-testing experienced drivers who numbered around two hundred ten million in two thousand nine the most recent year for which federal highway administration. Data was available is that they'd have to get in line with all of those first time applicants that would create even longer lines of testing stations that already have their hands full coping with nervous adolescent struggling to perform complex maneuvers like the dreaded reverse two point turnabout without hitting those little yellow cones. A lot of those youthful license applicants end up coming back for retests themselves as of twenty eleven in California. For example, forty two point seven percent of applicants flunked the knowledge test while thirty two percent bombed out on the skills test. The worst knowledge test performance was in Missouri. With a sixty one point four percent failure rate while mains would be motorists did the worst in driving skills with forty percent, not making the grade and the US generally has driving tests that are a lot easier than the ones used by the rest of the world in the Canadian province of British Columbia. For example, would be drivers have to undergo Forty-five minutes of testing on several different types of road. And also must verbally describe what specific road hazards are immediately beside their vehicles one block ahead and also behind them to test their awareness. There isn't a lot of evidence that additional testing over the years necessarily would improve safety on the roads. As the insurance institute for highway safety explains studies have yielded conflicting results on the question of whether age restrictions reduced the rate of crashes in Illinois they did. But in New Hampshire, they did it the rate of injury, causing crashes per one hundred million miles driven actually is highest among teenage drivers. And then decreases and levels out for decades before starting to rise again slightly among people in their seventies and eighties. That's not the pattern that you would see if many people saw their driving skills or knowledge deteriorate significantly in middle age. We also spoke by Email with Jake Nelson, triple as director of traffic, safety, advocacy, and research he said re-testing where if you fail the test. You lose the license has been shown to have zero safety impact on the drivers involved, and it has been shown to reduce mobility, by way of drivers voluntarily giving up their licenses due to fear of getting them taken away rather than any legitimate concerns about their driving. There's no justification through data and research for testing or screening at a certain age. One Gary biller, president of the national motorists association, which is a nationwide advocacy group is similarly skeptical about the value of re-testing experienced drivers. He said by Email safety statistics consistently show that the accident rates of drivers seventy years of age and older are not much different than those in the thirty five to sixty nine year age group by contrast

New Hampshire United States Missouri California Director National Motorists Association Slovenia Iowa Department Of Transportat St. Illinois Jake Nelson Illinois Andrea Henry Gary Biller Iowa British Columbia President Trump Michigan Eighty Five Percent Forty-Five Minutes
Leadership Language by Chris Westfall

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

11:50 min | 4 years ago

Leadership Language by Chris Westfall

"Entrepreneurs, business owners professionals who seek excellence, bringing them business classroom to you. It's the business builders show. Here's Marty wolf. Welcome to the business builders show with Martin wolf the show for entrepreneurs, business owners and business leaders. I Marty wolf your host for the business builders show along with my executive producer, DC Taylor. We will be your guides on this learning journey. Let me tell you my super objective in being with you today. I want to lose iast ethically share stories and information to inspire leaders so they can inspire of theirs. I'm proud to let you know we record the business builders show in the studios of ninety four, three FM the talker, which is part of bold gold media. And we are in Scranton Pennsylvania. The business builders show is distributed by c. suite radio. You can find our show and many other great shows at c. dash sweet radio dot com. Various podcast is a part of the c. suite radio network for more top business podcasts, visit c. Desk, sweet radio dot com. My special guest with me today is Chris Westfall. Hi, Chris. How are you sir? Doing great Marty, how are you? I'm doing fantastic. I've been looking forward to this conversation. We're going to be talking about your book on ounce that in a second, let me do kind of a formal introduction. Chris Westfall he is an internationally recognized business coach who regularly works with fortune one hundred companies as well as high growth businesses. Chris has appeared on c. n. n. ABC news and NBC TV in his writing has shown up in Forbes entrepreneur, success and other publications. Chris has customers like Cisco Hewlett Packard, Salesforce. The navy seals and many more. Here's something really interesting. Everything's been interesting up till then, but here's even more interesting. Chris Westfall has coached business billers onto shark tank dragons den in Canada and sharp. Shark tank Australia, and he's written a great book. The title of that book is leadership. Language to subtitle is using authentic communication to drive results. Chris again, welcome to the business builders show. Thank you, Marty, it's a pleasure to be here. Okay, so fundamental question, but it's always an important one. Who are you trying to help? What's this book? Again, leadership languages, the title. Maybe you needed help yourself. Maybe that's part of it or maybe you're experiencing something with clients so me, who do you who do you want to help with the book? Well, I think books always come from the author's experience, and certainly that's where this book started, but the objective is to reach out to two types of people. One actual leaders, people who are owners, entrepreneurs executives who have responsibilities for a team for an entire organization in many cases. And then the second group is aspirational leaders. Folks who may be aren't in the c. suite or haven't launched their business yet, but they know that it's on the agenda and it's something that they they want from themselves. So for for folks who look at their career, their life and look at business and say, I want to build something that's not here yet. That's that's really who this book is four. Interesting. I'm going to use a phrase. I'm going to mention a phrase that you mentioned throughout the book. I saw it as a theme now that's me saying that not you folks. You've said you said several times throughout the book you are never more than one thought away from innovation. Let me repeat that folks. You are never more than one thought away from innovation. So I want you to keep that in your head folks as you're listening to Chris talk because that kind of catch me kept me on the edge of my seat. Okay. So we have actual leaders who are doing big companies, small companies, everyone in in between and those who want to be leaders. You also. Kind of make a differentiation. I guess I'm going to ask it this way. So you talk about clients, but you also say clients can also be, you know, folks who you may be leading in the boy scout group. It could be someone it could be your own family. So is that true to or your thinking in terms of defining clients? Is that also part of your thought process when you wrote the book? Well, when you think about clients or another way, in other way to define client will be to say customer, and for me a customer isn't someone that you sell something to a customer is someone that you serve, and that's

Chris Westfall Marty Wolf Mccully Martin Wolf United States Executive Producer Scranton Pennsylvania MBA Australia Youtube Marnie Macaulay Cunningham Salesforce Callie Forbes Canada ABC Mcaleese Cisco Hewlett Packard