37 Burst results for "Billboard"

Fresh "Billboard" from News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:45 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Billboard" from News, Traffic and Weather

"Until six o'clock tomorrow morning. And in Lakewood roadwork on south found five has the exits. A thorn lane closed until 4 30 tomorrow morning as well. Our next couple traffic at 9 34 Comeau forecast also fantastic week on tap with highs in the low sixties tomorrow. Each day, starting to warm up by Sunday. We're talking mid seventies wall. The wall sunshine for the week overnight lows in the upper thirties, too low forties. With tonight's entertainment report. Here's Liz Warner is not Justin Bieber's album is back on top of the Billboard charts. His album Justice stayed on the top Billboard 200 albums chart for the second week. The 27 year old has had eight albums topped the charts Throughout his career, Bieber beat out Demi Lovato's dancing with the Devil, the art of starting over, which earned the number two spot. My friends and fellow that is a party Come on by Willie Nelson is launching a convention to help promote cannabis culture. It's called The Luck Summit Planting the Seed the inaugural event part of what.

Willie Nelson Demi Lovato Liz Warner Justin Bieber Sunday Bieber Tonight Lakewood Justice 27 Year Old Second Week Six O'clock Tomorrow Morning Each Day 4 30 Tomorrow Morning Mid Seventies Five Tomorrow Eight Albums Sixties 9 34 Comeau
DMX, Electrifying Rapper Who Defined 2000s Rap, Dies at 50

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 3 d ago

DMX, Electrifying Rapper Who Defined 2000s Rap, Dies at 50

"Has died. The AP is Oscar Wells. Gabriel Takes a look back at his career next came into the rap game right at the top. His 1998 studio debut. It's Dark and Hell is hot, started as number one on the Billboard chart. That multi platinum disc feature the hit rough Riders anthem, Get it Me Dog and stop being greedy and all. He dropped seven albums for them topped the charts picked up three Grammy nominations along the way he started in the 1998 movie Belly as well is an exit wounds with Steven Seagal and Cradle to the Grave with Jet Li. He and Lee were also in Romeo must Die with a Lia DMX. Emolia even teamed up for a song on the soundtrack to

Oscar Wells Gabriel AP Grammy Steven Seagal Jet Li Emolia LEE
Fresh update on "billboard" discussed on Donna and Steve

Donna and Steve

00:35 sec | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "billboard" discussed on Donna and Steve

"So what's new in your world? 12? Excuse me. Taylor. Swift has just released her fearless Taylor's version album and the lyrics to her video for the best day. It's full of never before in seeing family pictures and video. What? Yes, the tear jerking video shares family videos, just like the original video did when it was initially released in 2009. But this one has more videos that were not released with the original video of Taylor, taking her first steps, making gingerbread houses as well as footage of that her of excusing of her doing fearless and her recording and whatnot. So I think Steve might wanna check it out. It's best described Donna, you experience it, and then you talk to me about it. That's the better way. Well,.

2009 Taylor Steve Swift Donna First Steps
Rapper DMX on life support after heart attack, lawyer says

New Sounds

00:27 sec | Last week

Rapper DMX on life support after heart attack, lawyer says

"Is long time in New York based lawyer Murray Richmond says the rapper was on life support last night at a White Plains hospital at White Plains Hospital. Richmond says the artist had a heart attack. He said he could not confirm reports. DMX overdosed on drugs and was not sure what caused the heart attack. DMX made a splash and rap music in 1998 with his first studio album. It's Dark and Hell is Hot, which debuted at Number one on the Billboard 200 chart.

Murray Richmond White Plains Hospital Heart Attack New York Richmond
Is Zach Snyder's 'Justice League' a Good Movie?

The No Film School Podcast

09:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Is Zach Snyder's 'Justice League' a Good Movie?

"The very controversial for so many reasons for content reasons for formatting reasons i saw so many memes about the fact that it was reformatted. Four three zack zack. Snyder's justice league has officially dropped. We say dropped on the internet right. It's not like premiering a movie theater. It's just dropping on on. Streamers is fishy dropped on hbo. Max there's a complicated back story where zacks under had to leave mid production because of a family tragedy which is very sad judd app not try that patel just we took over just we apparently was a total asshole and there were all sorts of lawsuits. About what a dickey was and then you know. The film by many fans was not felt to reflects what zach snyder intended and there was long discussion of a zacks undercut image. Peo- max put in seventy million dollars to shoot a whole bunch more footage to make the zack snyder. Cut of justice league. Come out for years later. This is an interesting story because it is different. From a lot of directors cut stories. A lot of directors cut stories are ten years later. I'm grateful the studio give me access to the archive to rescan the negative and re-cut it is very rare in fact i can't think of an example where someone's like four years later. I got an extra seventy five million dollars to shoot additional footage to make an alternate movie like it is. Is there another example. That are missing where somebody got that. I don't know but what i do know. Is that in the history of film. There have been many many many directors cuts and extended editions and versions. That were revisited. We've talked about some of them here before. And most of our audience familiar with many of them It is not unheard of obviously for there to be something that prevents the original vision to be completed by the person who had it. And obviously there are many instances where somebody could go back and try and piece things together. Only orson welles. A number of times We even talked to. I talked to walter merch about going back in and recruiting and working on touch of evil. There are the magnificent emerson's with him as well. I think he's one of the early versions. Were early famous versions but bladerunner famously for anybody mir charles age And so much inbetween. It's such a common story but this one does stand apart because yeah he was given basically a massive feature film budget to make more of it his version of it and it is an interesting thing like will this happen more often. Will we get criminal. And saying actually i want to shoot a whole different ending too dark dark knight rises fifteen years later. Because i've rethought it. And i wanna go into a very complicated sort of relationship between the artists and the work when you remove the theatrical premiere and when you open up the idea of shooting original additional footage it is a it's vastly different so Full disclosure wasn't able to finish it have a two year olds. Get very sleepy very easily. Don't have four hours with two year. Old where i can watch the whole thing but universally in my social media of the people in my life everyone i know seems to have really enjoyed the new cup more than the last cut. I do not understand why people hate on sex neither so much. I genuinely enjoyed his dawn of the dead. I thought it was solid. I also am a like. I wanted to get into movies. Originally to make watchmen. When i was nice school. I don't hate his watchman. Cut like everyone else does. I don't understand whether so mad about it. I think people to hate sex. Neither for some reason that does not make sense to me. I'll also disclosed and then michelle. I know michelle is actually watched both right but so i have watched the new one. I watched the snyder cut. I did it. I made it through. Well di i not a big comic book movie fan. In general i have seen many of them though. And i did not see the original justice league so i had to do some research on what changed which was really interesting to me. I also actually really think highly of him from a visual standpoint. I find that even when he's not like a lot of the movies directed this one included. The material is just not great in my opinion but he's visually so committed to the bit that he does that his sequences really worked for me. And i think he's a great comic book movie director choice. Because i think he's really. His camera is like ballot. Check i think his action sequences are visually compelling. And i think his approach like to me the thing that felt the weakest about this. I mean obviously the some some major casting problems major script problems but all that aside i think it it mimicked. Some of what marvel does too much sometimes which i don't really like. They're some straight up. Like this is just an avenger. Seen but not as good. And i don't really love what it was in the first place personally but all my my personal take aside. I think filmmakers He is just he really doesn't. He's earnest he's not tongue in cheek and sometimes it gets a little silly and you might laugh. But i think his earnest approach to how dramatic he is with his camera like from dawn of the dead to the three hundred to a and tackling real quick charles before michelle I think that warner brothers is known to have some really tight released times. They don't have the same war chest that disney does for like they. They set these release dates. They they have to make them. I'm not going to get into the wise. And if sets really true but and that puts a lot of pressure on finishing something and delivering something. And i think that some of the the flaws in some of these dc comic book movies have to do with some of that some of us so anyway onto you. Michelle i f Well done on watching. The center is a endeavor. I i think i knew what the runtime was. But it doesn't click in my head until i was watching and the timeline at the bottom. It has like how long you've watched. And i miss read it. I thought it was much like when it said two and a half hours at the bottom. I thought that was a total Not they meant time that i had laughed and that was quite a surprise. So it's long. Don't don't kid yourself jack. Knifed mini series has parts could have been released in parts. My first input. If you will is i feel like i. Keep reading the quote snyder cut. That snyder wouldn't release in two thousand seventeen and i would argue that. I don't know this is i. Don't think this is at all what would have been released for so many reasons. It's a it's a post weeden post tragedy post. Hbo max snyder display. I don't think we would be able to release a for. I could be wrong. A four hour epic in a theater in twenty seventeen. I don't obviously say that. There are many teaser. There are changes are subtle there. Some people have pointed them out and in terms of very subtle and different. Like stolen changes. That i think are in there now. For example there's a billboard others billboard in the city at some point in the messages you're not alone and a lot of people have guessed that something that snyder put in in reference to his daughter. Like these little things that have been put in log away 'cause post years of reflection on it and i just don't think not content aside just the run time. I'm not sure how many people really yes for hours within a theatre. Let's do it. I don't know if we the same. i do. Think a really interesting experiment if anyone ever wants to ever play with this idea of same footage different story concept of how to edit something together. Because i started watching the josh sweden version the same evening. Don't do this same evening through off after watching case for a minute i thought you were. You said you meant side by side like you had to i. Four by three setup does allow you. I will say to have it on the side of my screen. As i was like doing some work so i will say the former three at least helpful in the arrangements of your browser window because like i'm not cutting anything off because it's not a letterbox or other format so the four by three is is is makes it easier to have the size. No i tried watching the conversion right. After some of the scenes giving away some of the scenes that feel pivotal in the story. Line are like thrown in the credits. The opening like oh i get with. This is going to do you. I don't know if i can sit through

Zach Snyder Zack Zack Walter Merch Mir Charles Michelle Zacks Dickey Judd Patel Snyder Orson Welles HBO Emerson MAX Justice League Max Snyder Warner Brothers
Melissa Febos On The Gray Area Of Sex And Consent

LGBTQ&A

05:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Melissa Febos On The Gray Area Of Sex And Consent

"I want to start off by talking about consent. Which all the stories deal with in some way you know. When it comes to sexual consent we tend to say things like yes means yes and no means no which simplifies things This book capture. What a truly shockingly complicated thing consent is and. I don't think we talk enough about that. Actually i think we talked about it quite a bit but we talk about it within a particular set of terms that in the process of writing this book and reflecting on it i realized don't leave a lot of space for sort of the grey areas in between and i have the experience where i went to cuddle party which i'm sure some of your listeners will be familiar with others not so much. It's pretty much what it sounds like. It's kind of like a sex party but just cutting no sex and what happened. Was i gave affirmative consent to a couple of strangers at the cuddle party cuddled with them. There is a great emphasis on consent at the cuddle party and we sort of did a whole workshop unconcerned before they cuddle party even commence and nonetheless. I consented to kabul with a couple of people that i wasn't really that excited to cuddle with and subsequently had like kind of a weird shitty experience and felt pretty gross afterwards and ended up sort of having this question for myself of y as a lifelong feminist someone who considers herself very fluent in issues around consent. Why had i said yes when i really would have preferred to say no. I set out to try to answer that question when i came up with was our experiences with consent. Don't fall into binary of yes or no good and bad right and in fact it's when you grow up in a culture where you're discouraged from ever saying no it's almost guaranteed that you're gonna have an experience of consenting to something that actually doesn't feel that good and for me it really opened up this larger topic of what what do you. Yes and no really mean in a culture where you're prescribed to say yes all the time. Also i think everyone has experienced of saying no and having to like managing emotions of the person in front of us and that can be a big challenge. Sometimes that makes you just say like instead but we don't teach how to deal with that exactly it's messy. I'm in a relationship now where it took like the whole first year of our relationship for me to get comfortable in a very welcoming environment to be like. I don't really feel like having sex right now. I'd like to stop now. And my partner is so encouraging and supportive of that. But i've spent so many years believing in experiencing that as a problem that took a lot of sort of talking in practice in bravery to undo it which is really sort of like one of the main obsessions challenges. Questions of the book. What kind of work does it taken. Is it possible to undo that kind of habituation or that kind of social conditioning. And i think like the answer i got as the reader is. Yes it's possible no. It's not easy and no. You might never be done doing that. Work right like all kinds of internal work. It might never be So you've an interesting perspective. I think as someone who is by and dates all genders just to talk about the male female binary for a second. How do you see consent. And what that means like different between men and women very broadly. Speaking my experience as a woman is that. I've been conditioned to be agreeable to accommodate other people's needs to prioritize my lover's desires ahead of my own and to say yes as much as possible array and so that could get complicated. Sometimes when you sleep with women everyone saying yes all the time. It also means that we have lots of orgasms like everybody has shit loads of orgasm. That's my experience of lesbian sex. At least at the you know after a certain age when you're comfortable asking for but it can also be sort of this like infinite feedback loop of accommodation. You know where. Nobody really wants to disappoint her upset. Anybody and so it's taken some work for for me to be able to set boundaries with women and to get them to do the same thing. And i think with man. It's like you know. I've been in a number of serious relationships with men and they were always very sensitive lake interested in affirmative consent but i really encountered a lot of what i call the book and d consent where i had so many scripts in my mind. We just live in such a heterosexual culture. That if you're having heterosexuals it's impossible not to have a million scripts downloaded into brain just from watching movies in commercials and seeing billboards and we know what it's supposed to look and sound like so i think when i've slept men it's been harder for me to get away from scripts and there's a level of performance that just turns on that i have a little bit more space from in sleeping with women

Cuddle Party Kabul
The story of Cars - Gary Numan

How Good It Is

05:51 min | 3 weeks ago

The story of Cars - Gary Numan

"Gary numan was at the forefront of a punk band called tube way army at the age of nineteen back in nineteen seventy seven. It wasn't long after that in nineteen seventy nine that the band appeared on the show. Top of the pops newman seven an interview with billboard magazine that. The appearance was a fluke. Top of the pops had a regular feature during which they showcase bands that were incoming and during the week in question. It was between them and simple minds. According to newman two-way army was selected. Because it was a more interesting band names and simple minds but the appearance led to the band's songs are friends electric. Which is what you're hearing now. Going to number one on the u k pop charts and stayed there for four weeks. It was also top ten in ireland. The netherlands and top twenty australia and several countries in europe bad. I know what you're thinking. Because i thought much the same thing you're thinking this sounds more like new wave than honking. It'd be kind of right and kind of not see here in the us. We have this image of punk music being all rapid fire. Hard cords and lyrical content. That advocates unindo spitting on your mother or some such but acts like patti smith. The ramones for runaways and i would even include early joe jackson. All part of the punk movement is wealth so while two way army had a little bit more sensitive it was still a punk band. That said numan did want to move away from punk and into more of a pop slash new kind of sound so he jettisoned the rest of the band and he began working solo album. Now when newman began work on what became the pleasure principle said his intention was to write a whole bunch of throwaway pop stuff for it because the previous album was just so heavy. Newman said the two thousand and eight interview with mojo magazine that the song was inspired by road rage. Not his other people's. He said he was in london and a couple of guys started peaking in his windows and for whatever reason they took a dislike to him so he had to take evasive action. He locked the doors he swerved onto the sidewalk scattering people everywhere even hit him scared them away any made his escape from. That incident occurred to him. That when you're in your car in the modern world you feel somehow safe. He said in a two thousand and one interview that quote. When you're in it. Your whole mentality is different in a car. it's your own little personal empire with four wheels on it unquote so while on its surface. It sounds like an ode to people getting around. It's really got a little bit of a darker intent to it. It's a feeling of isolation created by being in the vehicle. In retrospect gary numan has said that he don't really know why the song has done so well over the years he wrote it on bass guitar. He says and it took him about ten minutes to compose the keyboard. Parts came later. Voting had the main melody and the arrangement locked in pre quickly newman said in that. Same two thousand and one interview that he really couldn't even play bass so we bought a bass guitar in order to learn how to play properly. He never did get very good at the face. He says but those opening notes of cars was among the purse. Things he played did make a video for the song of course because nineteen seventy nine. But it's actually kind of hard to watch because of the video effects us which are a little bit on the silly side nowadays but they were pretty cutting edge then but when. Mtv launched in the summer of one thousand nine hundred eighty about a year later. They didn't have a lot of videos in their library. So this one got a lot of airplay early on and that meant that. The song's popularity kind of endured in the united states. The record was released in august of one thousand. Nine hundred seventy nine and went to the top of the charts in the uk and canada was a number nine record australia and on the billboard hot one hundred chart here in the us and a top forty record in a few other european countries the song has re chartered a few times over the years in the uk because of remixes being released now over. The years newman has updated a lot of his older material but cars seems to resist that kind of treatment. He said he's tried to update. But it doesn't sound any better too so when the heavy metal band fear factory approached him in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight about doing remix slash update. He was getting a little paranoid about having that one thousand nine hundred eighty s tag on fear factory. It turns out to have been playing the song shows since about nineteen ninety six so they sought his input. Newman said the experience was quite positive and actually learned a lot from it. The fear factory version is a little bit more guitar heavy which makes sense since aren't any guitars on the original version. And you've got every middle band here and in some verses newman's voice has actually been allowed to bubble up a little bit more prominently and at the same time. It's a weirdly bright recording considering fear factory's usual pretty good track the album is a whole is one of their bestsellers and the single did okay on the uk singles chart but it managed to reach number sixteen on the billboard mainstream rock chart and number thirty eight on the modern rock tracks chart and yes. There is a video and it's a little easier on the eyes and the nineteen seventy-nine version

Newman Billboard Magazine Gary Numan Unindo Army Mojo Magazine Joe Jackson Patti Smith Numan The Netherlands Australia Ireland United States Europe London UK MTV Canada
Billy Gene on Increasing Your Traffic

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Billy Gene on Increasing Your Traffic

"Jean maman. My i've got some stories i could tell about. You might come organically during our talk today. We'll see they're all good stories. Obviously they're all fun stories. But i wanna start because i love your story. I never get tired of hearing about it. But how you you. At one point. Fifty km debt. We're supposed to be honest. It's not super abnormal. I mean we have this. Massive college data. We get into credit card debt. We do stupid things all over the place but you went for fifty k. In debt running this wildly successful agency in downtown san diego. I've been to your office multiple times. I mean baller talked to us about how you made that transition on his the virus. Summarize it for everybody is number one just on the the mindset of asking for help period like no no one figured that out by themselves and so many times people think that's the case but tactically speaking because i'm tactics guy audience listening. They want the juice. It's got really good at its spending a dollar and tony into three period. I mean at the end of the day. Mike quote unquote secret weapon. It's just advertising. And you know who i got up from the most profitable companies in the world when you look at the balance sheet of All the fortune one thousand companies. The apple is the facebook the insurance companies the walmarts etc. What people don't realize that you see is not just the billions of dollars in sales. They spend billions of dollars in advertising. But when you go to small businesses the first thing you say is how customers. What did he say referrals. Every time. and it's just like the the most successful companies in the world legally have to tell you exactly how they're doing but we don't do it for a long time. it was. Low stuff was expensive right. Tv radio billboards. It just didn't make sense for a small business. But i mean honestly facebook youtube. It cost one to ten cents. You know to show somebody in advertisement one to ten cents e- you can show for five to fifteen bucks a thousand people your message. That was my big secret. So if i had something to so i would just literally make video ad with myself on an ask people to buy it and that's it i would just make more than spend so if i if i sold something. That was a thousand bucks. I'd probably spend two hundred bucks in advertising. And i just repeat the process over and over again so wildly. Simple like what we do. It's crazy but the difference is is. I was able to overcome the fear of losing money on ads. That's what stops people. they go. Well what if. I spend one hundred bucks on fire and it doesn't get a return then you try again. It doesn't make it not the path anymore. It just means you miss you get back up and you try it again until you find something that works and you keep repeating it now. You've had a lot of things that have worked over the years. You've had some things that happens but when you talk about that arbitrage of turning one dollar to three dollars you've obviously had a lot of those and there's a lot of examples you could give but you know. I just want one of your favorites like you know. This is almost too easy now. Of course all good things come to an end all arbitrage get tighter and close up over time of course but what was just one year like. This is almost too good to be true. I'm going to max out as long as i can. I mean there's been a fun one for everybody listened to because they probably won't think it's possible as take billboards for example. So i purchased billboards and a lot of people go why billboard like people don't spend money off of that and this is where people really have to get obsessed with it's about being created so quick story in san diego california. I bought four billboards. That cost me thirty. Six thousand bucks. And i ran a ma and that was for three and a half weeks. Just let that sink in thirty six grand for three weeks from frigging billboards that people drive by and so then people go like. How do you make money from him. Well what i did is. I made a call to action on it to go to a website and it was an automatic webinar. The same way that i would do facebook or instagram or youtube anyway and i was just like i wonder if anybody will obtain i wonder if anybody watch and they did and it made like ten thousand dollars back because what i was selling a thousand bucks so immediately people say okay. You lost money billy. Lost twenty. six thousand bucks maintains man. That's stupid. well. What i did is people for some reason. Give a lot of authority in position to billboards because they know they're expensive. And the companies that are doing. Billboards are the biggest companies in the world. Automatically think your official. I mean i still think of pete knows that guy will always be the real estate guy in san diego one hundred and so take that right. So what i did is i said okay. Well we're going to take. We rented a helicopter and we flew around. We went to helicopters and we flew around me and my cmo at the time and a helicopter. And my buddy paul filming from the other helicopter and we flew over all the billboards and we flew over all the billboards and we turn that into a facebook ad and then from that advertisement we brought in probably like a million bucks like throughout throughout using it over arbitrage being the. Yeah so it's just like how can you use. It wasn't just three weeks like you're able to use that footage forever the pictures of you in front of the billboard forever even today literally putting it up ironically today using that same clip of the helicopter and so people you got to start looking at your content as an asset the same way you do real estate people go. It's a real estate investment. And i can make money off of that again and again again. Same with your video. What's the difference. I'll tell you what the difference is videos. Cheaper video was easier to make. And you don't need to go through escrow so everybody if you're not using videos as is cash asset you're

Jean Maman Facebook San Diego Baller Youtube Tony Mike Apple Instagram California Billy Pete Paul
Drake Makes Historic Hot 100 Start at Nos. 1, 2 & 3, Led by 'What's Next'

the NewsWorthy

00:17 sec | 3 weeks ago

Drake Makes Historic Hot 100 Start at Nos. 1, 2 & 3, Led by 'What's Next'

"Hop artists. Drake is shaking up the pop music charts three times over. He's now the first artist ever today. Three new songs at the very top of the billboard. Hot one hundred chart time his songs. What's next once a needs and lemon pepper freestyle. Our numbers one two and three on the chart right

Drake
The Weeknd Is Boycotting the Grammys

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:50 min | Last month

The Weeknd Is Boycotting the Grammys

"Music's biggest stars, is boycotting this weekend's Grammy Awards. He's the artist behind one of the most listen to tunes ever spending 52 weeks in the top 10 of the billboard hot 100 lists. But the weekend is now saying Science Nora to Music's biggest night the best selling singer, announcing he intends to boycott all future Grammy ceremonies and will no longer permit his music to be considered for upcoming awards. This just months after the Grammys overlooked the Canadian artist completely shutting him out of all nominations following this snub the Grammy Award winning artist harshly criticizing the recording academy, calling them corrupt writing. You owe me my fans and the industry transparency. And the Grammy goes to critics have blessed the show before accusing the awards of being biased and out of touch. One of the things that has been very astonishing about all this is that three out of the last four Grammys have been racked by one scandal or another for the weekend, not to be nominated, either points to corruption or Severe dysfunction. Last year, former Recording Academy CEO Debra Dugan, ousted for alleged bullying filed a bombshell discrimination complaint against the recording academy, alleging the board manipulates the nominations process. I'm saying that the system should be transparent and that there are there are incidents of conflict of interest. That taints the results. Dugan also highlighting the longstanding struggle with gender inequality and lack of diversity when it comes to the most prestigious awards like album of the year. Saying those awards rarely go toe R and B stars like Beyonce or Kanye West. But instead, the winners tend to be in the rock, country and pop genres. But the weekends most recent statement taking it one step further, saying because of secret committees, I will no longer allow my label to submit my music to the Grammys. Something's wrong with that process. If an artist like the weekend can't even get nominated. It's something that needs to be fixed. The Super Bowl headliner is just the latest big name star to tune out the Grammys. Others include Drink, Justin Bieber and Nicki Minaj. Now. In response to the weekend statement, Harvey Mason Jr. Interim president and CEO of the Recording Academy, told The New York Times We are all disappointed when anyone is upset. We are constantly evolving. And this year as in past years, we're going to take a hard look at how to improve our awards process, including the nomination review Committee. It's ABC is Amy Robach reporting

Grammys Science Nora Grammy Ceremonies Severe Dysfunction Debra Dugan Grammy Awards Recording Academy Grammy Award Grammy Dugan Kanye West Beyonce Harvey Mason Jr. Super Bowl Nicki Minaj Justin Bieber The New York Times Nomination Review Committee Amy Robach ABC
Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit hard by COVID-19

Radio Boston

04:20 min | Last month

Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit hard by COVID-19

"You've seen them. It's a series of bright colorful billboards with powerful messages of hope in english and spanish like one in roslindale square big bright letters against a solid background. It ain't easy but keep going. The inside bill unsigned billboards. They've appeared in east boston. Roslindale roxbury dorchester. Boston communities hit particularly hard by covid nineteen and they are the work of gabriel sosa. So says grew up in miami and is now a visiting lecturer at the massachusetts college of art and design artist teacher translator and we spoke with gabriel sosa recently about his art. Heidi thanks for having me. It's great to have you so i there's so much i wanna talk about both in sort of form and message but let's start with message. It is a simple hopeful loving message. How did you land on it and sort of the variations of the messages. You're using it came from a long process. I was scheduled to have a public art project at some point in the spring or summer of twenty twenty i had been thinking about the different ways that that could take place and listen to the pandemic and then i really came upon this idea of. What can an artist offer right now. And i thought well you know arts can offer. Space for critical reflection can offer a space for comfort and is based on solidarity and then they use of the words. North fascinated me growing up in miami in a cuban american community. Those words are so intelligible cross spanish speaking countries. There's this kind of special flavor of solidarity with that. You can be standing in the long line and someone will look back at you. Either miami or havana. And say hey. North fosse's limits this way of saying you know. Hey i got you. That's where that spirit came from. And then it just seem logical thinking about my My bilingual miss my cultural mess and the large finnish speaking population in boston that it made sense to offer both in english and spanish. This new fascinating easy. Let's talk about this idea of solidarity. Which you you say. This work expresses these messages of hang in there. Keep going express. What does it mean to you. And and how do these billboards express a kind of solidarity. It means that you understand someone that you are wish them and hopefully that expresses itself in some way to be on on the same page to know where someone is coming from. Why is that so important right now. Well needless to say the world has changed right before our eyes were about a year into this pandemic things that seem sort of unthinkable or almost a little sifi for us have become normal and not only the pandemic but also in this country everything the twenty twenty brought us and i think just being able to to say to someone look i. I know what you're going through or i can sympathize with you. I think he's just one of the most important gestures that anyone can make. Let's talk about the medium. you chose for minute. We we just finished talking about the message. Producer jamie bologna. And i were both so struck by your choice to use billboards. I think we share a fondness for billboards and the you know that sort of passing way. They communicate with people in their communities in their daily life. What made you land on. Billboards came from a place of my being interested in text in the public space in this kind of range from things like bumper stickers window signs street signs painted on ashfall adopt myself. Would something i can do that. Shares message that considers social distancing that's visible and then sort of seemed like a logical option and there's also such a rich history of artists that have used billboards as a media. I mean there's spending coincides thrown is there's crew gird at scott so it was really exciting for me to tap into that traditions. Well

Gabriel Sosa Roslindale Square Miami Massachusetts College Of Art North Fosse Boston Dorchester Heidi Havana Jamie Bologna Scott
Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit particularly hard by COVID-19

Radio Boston

04:20 min | Last month

Gabriel Sosa's billboards offer messages of hope in Boston communities hit particularly hard by COVID-19

"You've seen them. It's a series of bright colorful billboards with powerful messages of hope in english and spanish like one in roslindale square big bright letters against a solid background. It ain't easy but keep going. The inside bill unsigned billboards. They've appeared in east boston. Roslindale roxbury dorchester. Boston communities hit particularly hard by covid nineteen and they are the work of gabriel sosa. So says grew up in miami and is now a visiting lecturer at the massachusetts college of art and design artist teacher translator and we spoke with gabriel sosa recently about his art. Heidi thanks for having me. It's great to have you so i there's so much i wanna talk about both in sort of form and message but let's start with message. It is a simple hopeful loving message. How did you land on it and sort of the variations of the messages. You're using it came from a long process. I was scheduled to have a public art project at some point in the spring or summer of twenty twenty i had been thinking about the different ways that that could take place and listen to the pandemic and then i really came upon this idea of. What can an artist offer right now. And i thought well you know arts can offer. Space for critical reflection can offer a space for comfort and is based on solidarity and then they use of the words. North fascinated me growing up in miami in a cuban american community. Those words are so intelligible cross spanish speaking countries. There's this kind of special flavor of solidarity with that. You can be standing in the long line and someone will look back at you. Either miami or havana. And say hey. North fosse's limits this way of saying you know. Hey i got you. That's where that spirit came from. And then it just seem logical thinking about my My bilingual miss my cultural mess and the large finnish speaking population in boston that it made sense to offer both in english and spanish. This new fascinating easy. Let's talk about this idea of solidarity. Which you you say. This work expresses these messages of hang in there. Keep going express. What does it mean to you. And and how do these billboards express a kind of solidarity. It means that you understand someone that you are wish them and hopefully that expresses itself in some way to be on on the same page to know where someone is coming from. Why is that so important right now. Well needless to say the world has changed right before our eyes were about a year into this pandemic things that seem sort of unthinkable or almost a little sifi for us have become normal and not only the pandemic but also in this country everything the twenty twenty brought us and i think just being able to to say to someone look i. I know what you're going through or i can sympathize with you. I think he's just one of the most important gestures that anyone can make. Let's talk about the medium. you chose for minute. We we just finished talking about the message. Producer jamie bologna. And i were both so struck by your choice to use billboards. I think we share a fondness for billboards and the you know that sort of passing way. They communicate with people in their communities in their daily life. What made you land on. Billboards came from a place of my being interested in text in the public space in this kind of range from things like bumper stickers window signs street signs painted on ashfall adopt myself. Would something i can do that. Shares message that considers social distancing that's visible and then sort of seemed like a logical option and there's also such a rich history of artists that have used billboards as a media. I mean there's spending coincides thrown is there's crew gird at scott so it was really exciting for me to tap into that traditions. Well

Gabriel Sosa Roslindale Square Miami Massachusetts College Of Art North Fosse Boston Dorchester Heidi Havana Jamie Bologna Scott
New York Gov. Cuomo Asks AG, Top Judge to Appoint Investigator

Voice of San Diego

00:57 sec | Last month

New York Gov. Cuomo Asks AG, Top Judge to Appoint Investigator

"The state's attorney general and chief justice to appoint an independent investigator to look into sexual harassment claims against the governor. This follows The New York Times report yesterday, which says a second former aide came forward to say Cuomo made inappropriate advances. The latest allegation comes from a former executive assistant to the embattled governor. Charlotte Bennett claims Andrew Cuomo asked her quote questions about her sex life and if she ever had sex with older men and quote, a 25 year old former aide said the 63 year old made the comments back in June in his office, but said the governor never physically touched her. Limo denied the claims and asked for an independent review. Into them. This comes to stays after the first claim of sexual harassment by Cuomo from Lindsey Boylan, this all while the controversy over his nursing home scandal continues a gun store owner and Albany put up a giant billboard along the highway calling for Cuomo to be impeached, who's actually stronger? Cpac's headline speech

Charlotte Bennett Cuomo Andrew Cuomo The New York Times Lindsey Boylan Limo Albany Cpac
New York billboard calls for Cuomo's impeachment amid controversies

Purity Products

00:38 sec | Last month

New York billboard calls for Cuomo's impeachment amid controversies

"A billboard in Albany calling for the impeachment of Governor Cuomo over his botched handling of nursing homes during the pandemic here, electronic billboard located along Interstate 70 87, a short distance from the state capital has been up since Tuesday and spells out impeach in large red letters next to an image of the governor. The New York Post reports. A local Gun store owner is paying $8500 a month for the sign. And he says he was motivated by a Cuomo AIDS admission that the governor deliberately withheld the total number of nursing home residents killed by the virus, as well as recent sexual harassment allegations made against the

Governor Cuomo The New York Post Albany Cuomo Aids
New York billboard calls for Cuomo's impeachment amid controversies

Radio Surgery

00:38 sec | Last month

New York billboard calls for Cuomo's impeachment amid controversies

"Impeachment of Governor Cuomo over his botched handling of nursing homes during the pandemic. Electronic billboard located along Interstate 70 87, a short distance from the state capital has been up since Tuesday and spells out impeach in large red letters next to an image of the governor. The New York Post reports a local gun store owners paying $8500 a month for the sign, and he says he was motivated by a Cuomo AIDS admission that the governor deliberately with Hold the total number of nursing home residents killed by the virus, as well as recent sexual harassment allegations made against the Governor. David Folk. Thomas

Governor Cuomo The New York Post Cuomo Aids David Folk Thomas
Teachers union resists parents’ push to reopen Los Angeles schools

Retirement & Income Radio

03:36 min | Last month

Teachers union resists parents’ push to reopen Los Angeles schools

"He's the president of California Policy Center, Celeste feeler. Parent union, overseeing this billboard calling for the zoom blackout. What is the biggest complaint or reason that the unions and teachers are giving Not to go back to the classroom, especially in light of the fact that we can get vaccines to every teacher in the L. A school district if we wanted, probably within a week. Is Sean. I want to point out that the vaccine when it was, you know, six months ago, before the vaccine looked like it would even be finished this year, when the only person really saying that it could happen was Donald Trump. The teachers union wasn't talking about vaccines. They were talking about a panoply of Bernie Sanders kinds of issues that would that would have to be satisfied before they go back to school. They weren't talking about vaccine. We're talking about the funding the police, they were talking about direct welfare payments to the undocumented, well packed the millionaire attacks universal basic income. Universal health care is a Bernie Sanders agenda, they said would be necessary before they would go back. What does that have to do with reading, writing, math and learning? What does any of that have to do with school? It's nothing purposes for the union is a distraction as the lessons that it really has nothing to do with it, But it's a distraction from the failure of the union to the liver education. In the best of times, the union has failed to deliver education deported in California. If you're rich, you can opt out and go to a private school. If you're middle class or schools are probably at least moderately. OK, if you're poor in California, you're getting the government cheese of education. It is Among the worst education systems in the country. Thank God for Mississippi. So what a lot of people don't understand. Is that the U. S. That is that is such a cheap shot against Mississippi. You live in the United Socialist State of California. Seriously where you know, people in California. Now, instead of saying, Hey, dude are saying Hey, comrade, go ahead. Not intended to the cheap shot who are friends of Mississippi just intended to say that the only thing keeping us from being number 51 in the country is the state of Mississippi. So when we do live in a socialist state, where the union's earn about a billion dollars per year, Shawn one billion with a B in union dues, and they spend that electing people I'm getting all this school boards, but we got the vaccine. Celeste. I'll let you answer that you have the vaccine. So what is there? Why the mysterious reluctance and resistance, Although Fauci said this week and blew me away, I'm not sure if even vaccinated grand parents can see their kids. I'm like what? Yes, but Maxine, then So, all right, so out, 30, you know, I way don't get it either. Um, you know, so, yes, You're right. The vaccine is there. They're actually pushed before other essential workers that have been working the entire time. So they're delaying this. It's like Is it about computers? That political? Uh you know, we just don't know. I mean, they have the opportunity to get their vaccine. We pushed them to the front of the line. Well, exactly, So they're the front of the line. They think I'm asking so they don't give a good reason for not wanting to go back in the classroom. There is no good reason is that we're concluding here. Right. There is no reason that our kids should not be in the classroom. I tend to agree with both of you. All right now, if the parents want to participate, I guess this just means that they just don't tune into the zoom classes

California Policy Center Celeste Feeler Bernie Sanders Mississippi California United Socialist State Donald Trump Sean Fauci Celeste Shawn Maxine
Dealing With Uncertainty With Kulap Vilaysack

First of All

05:05 min | Last month

Dealing With Uncertainty With Kulap Vilaysack

"Abandoning trash. I'm really really thrilled. Because go to make a unlike a ways through this podcast but you've honestly been on my list like a dream guests for a long time. Yeah accessible to you yes. We are all very busy. And for a lot of amazing reasons which i would love to like dive into because your career honestly i mean in my direct circle of of humans that i know like i truly admire and want to emulate your path really. Yeah oh that's very here especially when like last you know now. Three four years. I just haven't been able to like do the next thing. Things haven't worked out so really feel that way because you know maybe there's hope for me yet i will. I'm going to go off my vibes. I think i think i can't see anything not going for. Its ultimate highs. Good with you. I think my god in your mouth to the university. I'm channeling okay. And i'm putting it out there because i don't know it's just something about when got to meet you and then spend more time with you in our eight-plus group which i wanna get into a little bit in our in our shot but just like honestly like having witnessed what you've been able to do with like gazillion dollar properties in link and acting in like your ability to adapt and like your openness and the now your podcast like i'm basically prefacing this entire conversation right right up front yellow billboard a baby we're billboard out of this but it's just honestly there's a lot that kind of come up in my in my podcast that i don't even know how i got here because i thought it was like if i do. Ten episodes were good but like a big theme. That's emerged out of a lot of these conversations. The the the value of persistence and the ability to be resilient and pivot. And just keep going you know f. It's like completely like. I don't know what the hell is happening right now. Where we're just gonna go with. Yeah so i mean you do that to me. That's like the vibe. I get from you and just a lot of like joy and positivity and like let's handle us well for some. I think it's a it's a. it's a add. Certainly been around folks. have career trajectories have skyrocketed. It by the way all those people are hard workers with like with ability and Material to like take them up there But for me it's more of a long game. It's a steady you know. Isn't it for all of us. Seen folks they do you know and that is that is they're weighing in. It's you know it's part of my by doing is an end discipline is just. It's not mine. You're not my way and they are things you can't change for sure. That's the okay. I'm recognizing i would love to know how you've been navigating twenty the the joy that was twenty twenty I mean you know navigating you know if you know if there's just a boat that's not sinking but it's still as humanly possible makes it sound like there's like you know we're heading. We're on our way general floating. Yeah mine is more just sort of like a rafts that has not sell. No ores getting imagery right now. There's a point where the tide get really rough and you're like i got nothing man just going to end up where we end up was really boring if again not be ocean. Oh i should be clear. It's not the ocean we're body daughter. Is this what did this. Euro said health anytime. I laugh off after last year's been like i'm digging man. I'm digging. i'm digging up old. Sean spicer melissa mccarthy videos too like spark showing who i really do i really

Sean Spicer Melissa Mccarthy
George Strait is the second best selling country act

Larry Elder

00:28 sec | Last month

George Strait is the second best selling country act

"The second Best selling country act of all time. Hey, said 44. Billboard number one singles. Mork the most of any artist in any genre of music. 22 country Music awards more than any other country entertainer. He's been a star since maybe 1981 with a His debut was called unwound. 33 platinum albums to prove it.

Mork
'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:45 min | Last month

'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

"So nomad land is based on a nonfiction book of the same name by jessica bruder. It's about these folks who are in many cases older they're sort of battered by economic changes particularly the Economic meltdown of two thousand eight. They are left with very few options. And this fictional story about fern was written by khloe. jiao is also the director as we mentioned fern. This lifestyle is connected to her grief over her husband staff and it it leaves her at really the mercy of the weather and other people. She has no access to health. Care any kind of security. But there's also. I think it's safe to say a freedom in it that she appreciates at times She has a chance to see new things and be independent. There are a lot of kind of sweeping vistas of the western great plains and she starts to develop a relationship with a guy named dave. Who's played by david straight there and and obviously that complicates her wanderings somewhat. Glenn what did you think about nomad. Land. i mean this is pretty great right. I mean fair warning. It is unhurried. It is discursive it's also as you mentioned. It's in love with the natural environment which is very Khloe zhao thing. It's smartly a film that teaches you how to watch it because in those opening minutes we the audience are that woman that fern meets at the store. Were worried about her. Where the manager that gas station. We want her to find a shelter for the night. Because it's going to be cold She's been dealt a couple serious blows and the story of the film is her finding an equilibrium. It's not perfect and it's fragile and take some work to maintain we see the work it takes to maintain but he's got the strength and resolve to maintain it finds a community Found family which is something queer folk no little something about That said you take frances. Mcdormand out of the equation. I'm not sure. I'm still as invested. Because that actor is just an empathy engine. It just radiates from her Even when the role she's playing is more comedic as it is in fargo or even when it's a completely underwritten and onenote like it wasn't three billboards. There's not a trace of condescension in any role. She plays humankind essential or socioeconomic condescension. No actually remove no sense of judgment because francis. Mcdermott is a woman who graduated from the yale school of drama. She's married to a kohen brother. And what do the coen brothers love to do. More than make fun of a yokels. There's nothing about her holding fern at a remove when she's packing amazon boxes. That's fern packing amazon boxes. Even though it's france clearly packing boxes the scene where she goes on quite a bit about how she got more counter space in her van. E you play that wrong and that is a hollywood actor doing a ride along. That's fake but i mean there's something about are you just fall in love with firm. The way she smiles without opening her mouth There's such pain in it but there's joy now did i need fern to quote shakespeare at me. Nope did. I need the scene with her sister where she tells firm. That firm has always been strong in special and smart. Smells nice in this kind of puppies. I didn't need that either. Those moments felt like that was the film. Not trusting itself. Kind of putting on some training wheels So in the end. I think i was more taken by this amazing performance then by the movie itself. Interesting stephen i was taken by the amazing performance. And the film itself I think this is a wonderful piece of really subtle storytelling. It is so thoughtful. It is so respectful and careful and clever. You can tell that this movie. And it's makers spent time with its subjects and really got invested in their lives. This movie could have so easily tilted into mawkishness could so easily tilted into cynicism. It's so easily could've tilted into kind of capital. I issues based thundering and it never ever does. I mean it's funny. Glenn mentioned francis mcdormand's performance in three billboards outside ebbing missouri. The kind of purported to be about the real america kind of the real underbelly of america and it did so by throwing grotesques at us and this movie does the exact. It is a really human and lovely movie and its surrounds. Frances mcdormand and david strathern with nomads. With people who actually live this lifestyle and lets them tell their stories albeit fictionalised versions of their stories. And i just think that works beautifully. Well you can tell in spots when this movie is working with non-professional actors and you can kind of feel that but for the most part i just got totally lost in it. It is as glenn's had its unhurried. But i didn't find it slow at all. I loved this movie.

Jessica Bruder Khloe Zhao Jiao Khloe Fern Glenn Mcdormand Yale School Of Drama Amazon Dave Frances Mcdermott Fargo David Francis Francis Mcdormand Shakespeare France Hollywood Stephen
Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

Esports Network Podcast

04:59 min | 2 months ago

Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

"Any of these Sports networks other properties on this episode of the E Sports Network podcast for bringing back a gasp from about a year ago wage a little more bonetti. He's the co-founder and CEO of on zoo in a more. Welcome back to the Shelf. Hey meets great to be here tomorrow is on the show back in February of 2020 where we discussed the growth of in-game advertising age people who miss that show or too many of our new listeners since then on to his a platform that makes it easier for braids to get into video game worlds and for developers to open up more potential White spaces in their games for Grants Pass. I'll do is work with Publishers like Ubisoft at lide Castle to deliver Brayden moments for major. It's like Samsung Pepsi American Eagle and many more Esports. We've seen it gave ads take Auto larger role especially patiently League of Legends open up space in summoner's Rift and it was filled by MasterCard an Alienware among other partners and just this morning as a record this on Wednesday, February 10th, 2021 rocket League announced that Ford is going to take over there it gave Billboards for the upcoming which are major on zoo also had a big adults with this what the platform recently raised nine million dollars in additional capital in around Kool-Aid buyback Fetchers and hbse Ventures. There is participation by plenty more investors, of course, including Mark Merrill, one of the two founders of Riot games, this follows two other funny raises of three and five million. So in Mark Gratz of the race, first of all, what are the plans for this capital? Yeah, thank you Mitch. So as you said we raised 9 million dollars beatcraft is one of our previous investors are still leading gaming Esports v c. B c is a new VC which comes from the sport world and a lot of touchpoints around gaming and then other investors are wpp the biggest advertising group in the world, which is also like in the existing investor and Sony Innovation fund, you know, Sony is one of the biggest gaming groups in the world and the owner of PlayStation. So that's a privilege to have them on board Mark Romero the founder and chairman of road games on League of Legends. As you mentioned didn't call ins the founder and CEO of super awesome that recently got acquired by epic games and the Chicago Cubs. Yeah, the baseball team go Ventures and gainesville's and illumine Adventures. So a very crowded and exciting structure of invest investors to have on board. I'm a Cardinals fan so we'll let the dog So invested things slide, I guess but grats on all the different people who came together you mentioned before we started recording you were in the position that every founder kind of hopes. They find themselves in which is we have a few people. We have a different options for Capital so we can pick the people that make the most strategic sense for us going forward. What did you find from the mobile the different investors? What were you looking for? Especially as guiding parts of the company to push it Forward? Sure. So I mean, you know what this round was not about it was not about as fast as we could have fine as it like very very fast as what it was about bringing the best structure. Number one number two, it was about, you know to maximize shareholder value. We could raise almost double the amount but we didn't want to make sense. This is the amount of cash we need for next stage Rose and then in the future if it's a year from now or two years from now we can do another round off. For that makes sense. So we were not looking at at you know, these things it was more about we have a lot of confidence in him. Advertising is going to become a major business model for game divorce across all platforms, through PC Mobile and an important ads category four Brands media agencies and the ESPYs and and the question is how fast can that happen or more sneaking about big Brands big Publishers not easy companies to convince them to do something new. So when we meet partners that can help us to make this happen faster than wages. Are we get excited one form to partner is again investment one is a strategic partnership and they can elaborate more of some of the Partnerships we have in place and some of them is people who join our team. So that was what was guiding us and looking at the different, you know buckets of we are investors came from there is some you know, some like VCS and financial institutions. There is advertising and groups. There is game. Groups and there is a sports organizations that have a lot of touch point in going to become an important overlap in my opinion the next two years. And of course there is like with the values that we want to group represents and communicate us companies gauges as the leading investor for equal opportunity and Which choice for us an important to him and announcement to basically said if the world that was how we were looking at it that's a great place to be at

Bonetti Lide Castle Hbse Ventures Mark Merrill Mark Gratz Sony Innovation Mark Romero Road Games On League Of Legend Brayden Ubisoft Alienware WPP Mastercard Samsung Mitch Chicago Cubs Ford Gainesville
"billboard" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"billboard" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"The road you know perfectly so. The latest innovation I saw in billboards which I love and I think there should be more. Advertisers are no longer. Content with colonizing your retina they are now after your olfactory bulb was well in Mooresville North Carolina in two ten. A a steak restaurant. A GROCERY STORE advertised its. Stake. With a giant the billboard has a slab of meat on a fork and every day between seven and ten am and then four to seven pm time. The billboard released blasts of Of Charcoal. And stadiums. Shoots, it shoots stadiums, passing cars it shoots Sassy stay comes tweets know it emits the smell of black pepper and charcoal which I guess is as close as you can get to meet smell. I believe it. I don't think I wanNA smell meat on the highway maybe not I mean, this is the cinnabon. Racket right they just Elf. Yeah. They just push cinnabon smell throughout the malls that your conspiracy theory that cinnabon doesn't actually make a good smell. They're just blasting fakes. Abban. CINNABON gate. I think they're running a child porn. Refuge underneath the cinnamon drippin's. And that concludes billboard. Entry one to one, dot eight, zero, four, zero, three, certificate number five, zero, eight, six, one. In the omnibus. Future links in the unlikely event that social media is still exists in your era facebook twitter and instagram are archived at omnibus project. Our handed we're at Ken Jennings and add John Roderick. I'm also on instagram under my same name. You can email us. With your questions and comments. At The under the bus project at gmail.com. You can. Join other like-minded omnibus listeners. On facebook at the future Lynx group or if you are morally opposed to.

cinnabon billboard facebook olfactory bulb Mooresville North Carolina Ken Jennings John Roderick instagram
"billboard" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"billboard" Discussed on Planet Money

"He's <Music> definitely <Speech_Music_Female> after the last person <Speech_Female> testifies about the <Speech_Female> billboard. The city manager <Speech_Female> gets up <Speech_Female> tells the room basically. <Speech_Female> We know <Speech_Female> we messed up for. We're <Speech_Female> taking it down. <Speech_Female> No back and <Speech_Female> forth no excuses <Speech_Female> just <Speech_Female> we hear you <Speech_Female> will fix it. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Except <Speech_Female> they're the kind of mistakes <Speech_Female> that you can fix <Speech_Female> immediately. <Speech_Female> Take down the video. <Speech_Female> Delete the tweet. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And then <Speech_Female> they're billboards. <Speech_Female> What happened <Speech_Female> in the next few <SpeakerChange> days with <Speech_Female> the billboard <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> but nothing? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Female> kind of the problem. <Speech_Female> Nothing happened <Speech_Female> with for <Speech_Female> another week. <Speech_Female> What do you mean <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> th? There's <Speech_Female> only one <Speech_Female> billboard company <Speech_Female> certainly <Speech_Female> in town maybe <Speech_Female> in all of central <Speech_Female> Oregon <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> putting <SpeakerChange> up and <Speech_Female> taking down and billboard it <Speech_Male> is actually <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> job <Speech_Female> requiring <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> number of trained <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> claiming <Speech_Female> dangerous heights <Speech_Female> you know in so <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> when we <Speech_Female> asked that <Speech_Female> it be taken <Speech_Female> down <Speech_Female> only <Speech_Female> meant that <Speech_Female> we got in <Speech_Female> the queue <Speech_Female> to to <Speech_Female> have it taken down. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> The <Speech_Female> city also had to make <Speech_Female> a replacement image <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for the billboard <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> generic car traffic <Speech_Music_Female> which <Speech_Female> also took time <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> the billboard <Speech_Female> like a fourteen <Speech_Female> by forty eight foot <Speech_Female> monument <Speech_Female> to representational <Speech_Female> failure <Speech_Female> stays <Speech_Female> up for <Speech_Music_Female> two more more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> weeks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> during that time. Were <Speech_Music_Female> you driving past <Speech_Music_Female> it a lot like <Speech_Music_Female> what was Oh yup <Speech_Male> right yes. <Speech_Music_Male> That's one <Speech_Music_Male> of the thoroughfares I use. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Do <Speech_Female> you feel like you have any takeaways <Speech_Female> about billboards <Speech_Female> in general. I <Speech_Female> know it is the permanence <Speech_Female> of them. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Be Sure <Speech_Female> you like that picture. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> It <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> sure <Speech_Female> there are no typos. <Speech_Male> Because <Speech_Music_Male> you don't <Music> get another chance. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> The transportation <Speech_Female> survey by by <Speech_Music_Female> the way <Speech_Music_Female> actually <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> going great. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> got a couple <Speech_Female> thousand <SpeakerChange> people <Speech_Female> to take that survey <Speech_Female> how <Speech_Female> well I wonder if <Speech_Female> I wonder if the good response response <Speech_Female> has <Speech_Female> something to do with <Speech_Female> everybody <Speech_Female> hearing about <Silence> the billboard <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> could <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> be. That's definitely <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a possibility. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Take <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Care <Speech_Music_Female> what you billboard people <Speech_Music_Female> because if you get <Speech_Female> it wrong it may <Speech_Music_Female> be harder to take down <Speech_Music_Female> then you hope <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> send <Speech_Female> us your favorite <Speech_Female> billboard stories <Speech_Female> you can email us <Speech_Music_Female> at planet money at <Speech_Female> NPR dot. Org <Speech_Female> check out our <Speech_Female> instagram to see <Speech_Female> pictures of our very eerie <Speech_Female> owned planet money <Speech_Female> billboard in Times <Speech_Female> Square. We <Speech_Female> are on Instagram <Speech_Female> facebook and twitter <Speech_Female> all at planet <Speech_Female> money <Speech_Female> special thanks to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> John F <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Lehman and Catherine turn <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> goodest. She's a historian. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We spoke to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> who wrote a great book about the <Speech_Music_Female> history of billboards. <Speech_Music_Female> This episode <Speech_Female> was produced by Darren <Speech_Female> Woods and Liza <Speech_Female> Acre. Alex <Speech_Female> Goldmark is supervising <Speech_Female> producer and Brian. Brian <Speech_Female> I sat at. It's <Speech_Female> the show I'm Karen <Speech_Female> Deafen. This <Speech_Music_Female> is NPR. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks for <SpeakerChange> listening

"billboard" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"billboard" Discussed on Planet Money

"This is planet money from NPR. There is a long stretch of I. Eighty between Cheyenne Dan and Salt Lake City where I grew up that is almost nothing but highway and desert. I have driven this stretch a million times and over the holidays I was driving and again this time with my niece Katrine and my nephew Al Hundred John Reid received the majestic cargo train. It's natural habitat sir. David attenborough road trips eight miles and miles of mostly shrubs the occasional cargo train gene end billboards one set of billboards in particular large rooms. Great Rates Little America. My Niece Kaitlyn there. The billboards that we're seeing are all the same fancy truck stop slash hotel called Little America that is in the absolute middle of this middle of nowhere there for nearly a hundred miles these billboards show up every few minutes. Forty two miles to the little America. There's another one coming right up. After it and there in the desert we are a captive audience to running storyline of these billboards. Seventeen marble showers. Little even start intimidating them wings little America but there is one thing in particular that shows up on these billboards more than any other so often that people even write about this billboard in their online reviews of the truck style and this is the one that we've been decided about this. This one says seventy five cent cones fifteen miles little America rising up from the desert floor is a many many feet tall Paul delicious looking soft. Serve ice cream cone lawless world wing of that billboards like these have a special kind of place in our collective to road trip hearts. These days everyone online goes to the same websites. But once you get there we all get different personalized ads but with a billboard. Everyone drives this road. Sees the same ad and billboards they work the market for billboards continues to grow. There are currently about three hundred fifty thousand of them in America and more go up up every single day and one study. Found that billboards when you pair them with digital ads are more effective than print ads. And we're sorry to say than Radio Jio ads so it was probably inevitable that Katryn Alejandro and I did exactly as the billboards back into us to do all girl cheeses.

America Salt Lake City Al Hundred John Reid David attenborough NPR Katrine Kaitlyn Katryn Alejandro Radio Jio Paul
"billboard" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"billboard" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

"So this is a thirty for thirty podcasts challenge. I'm David Hooper from big PODCAST DOT com. My job is to help you grow big audience for your message in the way we are doing that on this series. It'd be a podcast series will help you to clarify your message. Which is the number one thing you can do Great audience you improve your delivery. You'll make more money solar podcasting put you out front. You become the featured expert who considered celebrity among listeners. You don't share that with anybody. It's all on you. It will. I'll give you increased flexibility. Release a twenty one. Change things up when you want. Raise your prices. Lower your prices. Whatever you want you have that ability when you have pillow podcast if you have not already done this and we're thirty days in so I sure hope you have? I want you to listen to the intro episode. I that explains the what and the why. Why is everything happening here? Big PODCAST DOT com slash subscribe. Has that it has all thirty exercises. I'm guiding you step by step through a process assess. This isn't just a bunch of random things that I want you to do. This is a process that takes you from uncomfortable unsure of yourself not clear on your message it will build your comfort. Increase your confidence and give you the clarity to deliver a message and give your message to the clarity. That listeners demand and so two big podcast dot com slash subscribe. Make sure you get all episodes previously on day. Twenty nine talked about your best ideas. Where do you get your ideas? And how can you get more ideas for the solo content that you can produce as I mentioned one of the things that you get when you gotTa Sola podcast. You've got complete control of your podcast. You've got flexibility ability. You can release episodes whenever you want. You can make them about whatever you want. But you're going to need content to do that and if you want a great exercise for creating unlimited content ideas as for your podcast listen today. Twenty nine be podcast dot com slash subscribe. Has that today the focus. I call this the final question because we are on day number thirty of the thirty day solar podcast challenge. Sometimes though if I'm doing an interview. This is the first question that I ask. I always ask my guest. What do you want listeners listeners? To know about you or at the end a related question is there something. I should have asked but didn't my job when I've got a guests on any of my shows it's to help spread his or her message when you have a guest you're introducing that guest to your audience. That may be the first time that audience has ever experienced this guest so you have a very important job of letting the audience know what that guest is about but even more important because this is the thirty day solo. podcast challenge is that you have the ability to let your audience know what you are about. So I've got a similar question for you if you had a huge billboard in Times Square on New Year's Eve and the whole world was watching what would that billboard say. What do you want the world to know about you a few days ago? I asked You the question. What do you want listeners to know about you? What do you like to work with? What kind of work do you do? This is something a little bit different. And here's why I'm talking about it here. This is why it's important as far as this billboard goes. This is the drug that I want you to be pounding all the time. They should be something that you go back to again. And again as long as you do your podcasts. Solo or otherwise and it should be obvious to listeners. What you want them him to think about this? I'm going to give you an example. This isn't something I would necessarily put on a billboard but this is something that I'm going to put here because this message is for you you. You're my audience. I don't speak to the world. Speak to very specific people in this case you being one of these people a podcast. You're trying to have a solo podcast. Her and my message is this this. You can do this. You have something great within you and there are people who are waiting to hear it but you need to get it to them and you need to deliver it in certain very clarified way for them to be able to receive it over the last thirty days we talked about better ways that you can deliver your message and we've worked on building your skills and your podcast personality so that message sticks if you want more specific advice for marketing your podcast other elements that you need need for podcast marketing. I can help you with those things too. I'M GONNA lose three of them right here. I have a book. That's the cheapest and easiest way to work with me. It's called big podcasts. Cast it's available wherever books are sold to go on Amazon Barnes and noble and you search for big podcast. You'll see it. Looks like a zebra black and white and like its name. It is big four hundred sixty three pages. It is a massive book and it has everything and like this course. I take you step by step to developing the content content that you will need to create a huge podcast. I also have other podcasts. Not just this one that focused on how you can better spread your message acid and get it out to people if you go into that. Url that. I've mentioned so many times during the series big podcast dot com slash subscribe. You may have seen these other podcasts. I've got a specific specific podcasts. For experts this is for people who want to build authorities spread a message. It's not just about podcasting but you'll see a lot of podcasting parallels. I think that you'll get that. PODCAST is called read. I've got a podcast called build a big podcast and I've got a number of thirty days. Specialty podcast are got a podcast jumpstart. I've got one interviewing. Yeah I've got this podcast that tells you how to be a better solo podcast or if you're really serious about marketing your podcast increasing influence spreading your message making more money with with your message. I've got several other options. Those are big podcast dot com so reach out. Let's keep connected. That is my message for you. I have built my entire career. I in the entertainment business now. More in the entrepreneurial business space on helping people build authority spread messages sell tickets tickets to live. Events create media that fans and listeners care about and making money with riders. I would love to help you and again the website big big PODCAST DOT com. If you want more information on how I can do that for you. Here is your action stuff. I want you to get your pin. Get your paper and I want you to write down how it is that you want to be known what you want to be known for and start incorporating those into your podcast into the emails that you right right into the names of the companies that you create. There's a reason that my company is called big podcast. It's very specific to podcasting. And it's very very specific to the type of podcast that you were going to get because of what happened. A BIG PODCAST DOT com. How can you incorporate these things in your episode? Titles how can can you incorporate these things in every single thing that you do. This isn't a one off message that you're going to say wants and never say it again again. I want you banging this drum. I want you to do it in every every single thing that you come up with every single speech that you give every single episode that you produce the emails that you send the conversations that you have the blog post that you write bang that drum people are waiting for you but they need to know that you are the person that can help them. You're the person who can entertain them that you are the person that they need need to go to an experience to get where they want to go. That is it almost for the thirty day. So podcast challenge. Tomorrow I will have a conclusion in. Just wrap all this up in a nice bow again. That linear message that you work on these episodes. I've got it for the entire series the beginning the middle and the end you work people up to something. Can you give them the meat and you wrap everything up. So there's a nice package and they feel like they've had a complete experience that is coming tomorrow. I want you to go to big PODCAST DOT COM uh-huh slash subscribe. Look at these other podcasts. At I've got the podcast that are about interviewing the podcast. That are about jumpstarting. Your podcast marketing. The podcast that are about spreading your message message in different ways other than podcasting again you're going to see a lot of parallels here this is going to help you have a complete business. A complete media company. Something that you'll find line is very powerful for getting your message out there and also making money with your ideas big podcasts dot com slash subscribe. Get the PODCAST toolkit. I'm constantly Stanley. Updating that right now twenty five templates social media templates. I've got my guest. Acquisition Process the way we guide guess through the process of getting on your episodes having in a great interview with you and pleading episodes out. There's a lot to it. I'm constantly updating it and you can get those updates when you go to podcast dot com slash subscribe and sign up for the mailing Celeste. Thank you so much for being part of the Thirty Day. Sola podcast challenge. I'll be back tomorrow for one last episode the conclusion to the Thirty Day Solo. PODCAST challenge. I'll see you then..

Thirty Day Solo David Hooper Times Square Amazon Barnes Stanley
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"During a time when you actually had be perfect to get a deal done. And even then sometimes it wasn't enough. I think there are so many people in business in the out of home business right now that all they nose up into the right. And I think it makes us so much more so much wiser, you know, I've been through to events that two thousand nine recession, and before that nine eleven I think it makes you so much more season so much wiser, if you've been through, at least one event, I wouldn't wish it on anyone, but it creates a seasoning that someone that for instance we have just entered business just doesn't have. Yeah, I, I agree. I hear people talk all the time about, you know, certain scarves, that they have, and what they've learned from those scars that made them better. You know operator business manager. Yes. Max, your firm, calill is a large radio TV and tower dealmaker. How does out of home compare with what your firm's been seeing in those other industries as a great question? You know, we do have nine brokers focus on various fields, collectively and individually, and it's interesting to see. See how these mediums have changed over time. I mean if you look at the current picture, there's been a lot of consolidation in TV and the business model, and TV has completely flipped over the last ten years, it wasn't that long ago where these networks like NBC CBS used to pay television station owners for carrying their content. Now. It's the complete opposite. Now TV station owners actually have to pay the networks for their content. And then they go to the cable providers to try to get money from them. So that's the very hostels probably not the right word, but it's a very tough business, and you look very closely at your contracts in affiliation agreements to try to get some perspective into your next one to three to five years, max are we starting to see some weakness, TV revenue was so strong for so long. Are we starting to see some week this TV revenue? I don't think weakness characterize it properly. I think it's hung in there pretty well. But it just it does seem like the whole focus of that business is on re trans right now. They still do very well during the political season. You know, you see spikes, on TV revenues and even years they can do very well there, but I think a lot of the revenue decline in traditional media is coming out of print. I think it's, you know, it's the worst kept secret out there that print revenues essentially in freefall next. I think I've been seeing a ten to fifteen percent isn't a year decline in newspapers and magazines. Both of those sectors are really hurt. There's no doubt about it. And there's still a lot of consolidation in that space as well. I think you've seen gatehouse has been very active. I read something the other day that they're talking about merging with Gannett. So I think folks are modeling that declining revenue base, and they're paying multiples, you know, inequalities with, when they think it's gonna get to zero though, if they see euro in six years, they're paying two or three times so they can get their investment back and then turn a profit before potentially hitting the bottom. Well that brings us to radio. What, what's your sense about radio and how it compares to out of him? Radio is an interesting point right now. They just had the two largest players, get out of bankruptcy. That would be, you know, Cumulus in, I heart media, and those two have been in some form of reorganization or bankruptcy for a very long time. So as those two companies, enter greener, pastures, I think there could be a little bit of buoyancy in that market again. It's not a revenue base. It's increasing double digits. I mean it's mostly flat to low single digits, but with the two big players being healthy again, I think there could be some, some change in that medium. Let's discuss out of home. There are free big players in the market. But how in general what trends are you seeing in the independent market with respect to out of home mergers and acquisitions, great question, you know, going back to radio and how it compares to outdoor? I think one other factor that we can see when you compare outdoor is you look at outdoor financials over time. And you see a lot of compression, and a lot of areas in their expenses, for instance lighting printing certain areas like that where they're becoming more efficient where on the radio side, you got licensing fees. You've got far more employees as an example. If you've got a radio group that's got a couple of million dollars in revenue, they could have thirty employee's. We've sold plenty of outdoor companies with greater revenues with one two, three four or five employees. So it's a much more efficient business. It brings me to the mind. Also of the comment, I've heard before that technology is a friend of out of home almost uniquely. Among the media businesses, you know, technology creates expense savings, it creates additional revenue by allowing us to take digital screens and generate more revenue by taking instead of putting one CLYDE on board. We put eight but it also you pointed out technology for out of home business creates expense savings like high fishing. See light. Which allow you to cut three quarters of the expenses in lighting a billboard. Exactly. And all these advances in technology like you look at satellite radio and Pandora and the fragmentation in the audio space. Those are serious headwinds that radio's taking head on when you talk about headwinds in the outdoor space. The only thing that I've heard, and I don't hear very often are these Thomas driving vehicles. What's going to happen, when it's a driverless car? And from my perspective as long as that vehicle stays in its current format. It's gonna help outdoor, you know, at frees. The driver up to look around outdoors getting a lot of good press for driving people to digital. She's got a laptop on your screen, and you see something on a billboard that drives you to the website that value could go up. Maximum flaunt telling people that every Sunday morning when I go to church, I get an autonomous car. My wife drives and my kids are sitting in the car and every Sunday morning. I look out the window. And I see billboards and I'm in autonomous car. And, you know, I just think of how out home thrives in areas with huge transit writing populations a bus or a subway is on Thomas vehicle, and yet out of home is vibrant. So I think we're going to look back and say this was a way overestimated threat to out of home. I think you're right. And I also don't think it's going to happen in most of the United States for decades. I mean if you go to the mid west, you know, most of the United States, I could see some penetration in dense urban areas like downtown Chicago, San Francisco, Manhattan. But it's not going to be rolled out in Texas anytime soon. Let's stop here.

Thomas United States business manager Gannett Texas NBC calill CBS CLYDE Pandora Chicago San Francisco Manhattan fifteen percent million dollars three quarters five years six years ten years
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

08:02 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"The channels customers prefer with the data and insight. They need so that they can be confident that we're delivering our y that's really what our top priority is making our customers successful and feeling good about how they're buying it. He's using. So you are using for I don't know why I had the idea that your strategy was sort of a walled garden approach without using a lot of partners in terms of selling programmatic -ly, but my right. I'm hearing that you do use multiple vendors for doing programmatic selling. Oh, yeah. No. I think that you might be thinking one of our competitors on that. Yes, we have three different SSP's that we're working with right now and more than twenty DSP's, although we, we absolutely are working on a fraud. Base. So it's maybe a little more of approach like Lamar multiple vendors as opposed to maybe an out front walled garden approach of where where it's at. Yeah, I mean, I think everybody's still evolving their models. And I'm not sure that we know enough about one either of those two parties are doing to be able to label them entirely. But yeah, I think we are looking at more of an open approach for the blurred mentioned that leverage is an issue for the company. I think the current leverage is a little of eight to one, but what do you think is a sustainable level of leverage for the company? And what does it do does earn its way there? Does it spin off some assets? But how does the company get to a sustainable level of leverage? If the great question the board wasn't even officially constituted when they call out. I think that back in February when we were out on the road refinancing are subordinated debt, the board laid out that statement you know, as we've said, on an earnings calls, we have lots of tools to improve this and, you know. You know that financing I just referred him. This more Nate notes was a big deal because a huge win. Yeah. Gave us a runway for another four years. Yes, as I think about what we're gonna do clearly growing. This is part of the puzzle. But I don't think it'll be the the entirety of it. I'm not really in a position to spend a lot of the moves that will make, but it's definitely a priority. And it's definitely, you know, when William Brian, and I catch up, it's something that we're always talking about in terms of, how are we to make progress against it? And we're really looking to get into that virtuous circle where you're generating free cash flow. You're paying down debt, you're working your way toward a more sustainable number. And I think if you look at our primary US competitors and you kind of factored in the required distributions that they make because their reits you wouldn't see the gap is large as it may be appears at first blush. So we've got work to do, but we're focused on it, and we have a great mix of tools and hand, and we're definitely prioritizing that, so that we can get into a more comfortable. The level of leverage. What does the US out whom industry have to do to get a bigger share of the total adspend isn't the US at-home industry at about three or four percent? And what does it have to do to move that number higher? You know what's interesting about that number is that it's kind of the average, if you look at the penetration of out of home in the New York or in a Los Angeles, it would be north of some of the numbers that you hear bandied about about international market. It's one of the things that I'm always making sure I'm keeping my team focused on is that there are markets in the United States with higher double digit percentages of out of home, but to your question about how do we continue to give a bigger share of ads Ben? I think there's a couple of cuts out it I'd I'd offer up to you. I saw you asked me before about traditional media. And while I don't think that right at this moment in time, we're necessarily taking money from traditional media. I think if you looked at the trend and you looked at out of home in the sheriff traditional media. You'd see that we actually have gotten bigger. Pretty interesting exercise. We run calculations on it would say that we picked up a couple of percentage points. It's a higher number than what you're thinking of the number of you're thinking of is against public told media. So that'd be the first thing is take a look at it against traditional media in terms of overall. I think you see us in the industry, taking the steps, we need, you know, we need to be accountable for delivering our ally. The advertisers have to believe every CMO is being told by their CEO that they have to show that return to we need to be able to participate in that we have to be flexible and how we sell, we can't just sell it one way and expect everybody's gonna beat door to us to get it. We've got to be multiple channels. We've gotta have creative ways of marketing our inventory. And we need to be visible with planners and strategists that shape, the campaign spending, that's something different than this business, a decade ago where it was a little bit more of if you build it, they'll come kind of dynamic, I think we have to be a lot more proactive getting in front of folks, and these are all things that clear channels working on. And And I. encouraged that I see the number of our competitors doing so as well. You know, finally on this, I think that the new GOP currency is going to be an important part in helping to further enable, this trend because it'll give us a more robust currency to base all of our sales on that everything else will will flow out of that. It seems like the new GIO path system is just the data. The information you can give to an advertiser will be so much Richard. Yeah. No, it will definitely help. The thing is pretty much all of the Atta home companies are doing some former another of data supplementation, and that's healthy because that's how pretty much every other media works you have a currency. But then you add to the currency studies about basket analysis or studies about footfall or studies about people tuning into shows. Those are all things that the individual companies, ultimately need to build tools on, but having a robust currency that we're all embracing, I think, is an important underpinning of it finally one or. Two or three of the biggest changes that you think will come to the out of home industry in the next five years. In other words, what are two or three things can be anything significant small systematic company-specific. What are two or three changes that you think will happen within the next five years in the US out home business, but it's a great question Dave. And I mean, there's so many changes that are already in flight. I think first and foremost, you're gonna see automation of trading attraction, and not necessarily purely from a programmatic real time bidding perspective. But starting to see some automated in between buyers and sellers, advertisers, agency got a lot more sophisticated in that area and on that I've been hearing, some anecdotal, I heard of a three six seven figure by in this last year. That happened. That was completely automatic just bang. Just happened. Yeah. And so it seems like we're getting there, it's coming but it's still a small fraction of total industry revenue. So I think you're going to see that get traction. And that's going to have a lot of knock on affect. One of the things we've seen is we've gotten into the programmatic space is, we've had advertisers, who went away, three or four years ago who are back now because they can buy the win that they wanna buy. It's just they need to have data. They need to have that flexibility, so I think that's a big one. I think the tool kit for our is going to continue to just explode because the interest in that by the advertisers is really unceasing and pretty much every tool, we've introduced we get a Pat on the head. And then what if you did this, and that, that creativity that people have in terms of the next thing, and the next tool is something that I think you're gonna see really blow out? And then I think finally, you're gonna see a lot more sophistication of advertisers, using our medium as an integrated part of their campaigns. And getting the full priming benefit. I think a lot of progress has been made in the last few years educating advertisers, about the priming impact on this medium. For digital TV for mobile, it really has powerful priming effects across the board, and I'm definitely hearing more and more, advertisers, talking about that, and embracing that and wanting to get that in their campaigns. And so that bodes well for us getting growth, you know from other medias. Well terrific that does it for this week? Thanks for being on the show, Scott. Thank you,.

US fraud Lamar Nate CEO GOP William Brian Scott Atta Richard Los Angeles Ben New York Dave five years four years four percent
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

10:49 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"And eventually get the highest possible price. So I would definitely encourage plant owners to do that another one would be to kind of hyper organize your files meaning dig in and make sure your financials are up to date, go through your files and make sure all of your leases in your permits and your advertising contracts or organized, you want to make sure that it's going to be very easy during the due diligence process to provide the information that you need to to the essential buyers, which to me in this environment of online that means setting up a dropbox folder or another online folder where information's very easily accessible eggs. Exactly, those secure sites are are important, then another one would be to go out and renegotiate any high rate leases. It's kind of like when you're buying a used car, and or civilian a used car and you're walking around and pointing out the dense in the dings, and well what about this and the tires? They need to be replaced high. Lease rates are usually one of the key factors that we start to talk about when we're in the middle of negotiation. So they'll point out this this site has a high lease rate. What are we gonna do about that? And do think we can get that renegotiated so that's one other item. And then Finally I would say well to a couple of other things one. We still have clients that are renting displays on a monthly basis instead of a four week period and just converting that monthly ad contract to a four week period contract adds one period per year and can. Generate an additional eight percent in revenue. So that's a selling point that you can either offer to a buyer where you can go out and start to convert those contracts before you take your signs to market. And then finally, consolidating your footprint or expanding your footprint and staying in your footprint is and always the right idea. But if you want to grow organically, and you want to maintain efficiencies, then look at your footprint, and are there stragglers are there signs that are outlying that you should sell or are there signs available to buy that would fit into your footprint nicely. So those are considerations that also kind of impact buying and selling decisions. No talk about how to value a billboard easement or a billboard. Lease billboard easement are the perpetual, right generally perpetual, right to go on a property and operate your sign and so- easement have three components. They have a utility easement. They have an access easement, and they have a visibility is meant or area. And those things can be purchased in perpetuity. If there's a lease in place already, then we look at the income that's coming in off of that lease and capitalize that income into a value. The lease income is typically discounted a little bit for minimal expenses management, accounting, legal, and maybe this new issue of taxes, but it's a pretty nominal reduc. Action in income. Maybe a percent ten percent. Then we capitalize that remaining net income into an indication of value. So that we can come up with the value of the lease or the value of a perpetual easement, and am I right that in many cases mobile Eastman, released can be worth more than an actual billboard. In terms of cash flow. Multiple. They can be multiples of net income on lease or for an easement are typically higher because there's less risk in a billboard lease or an easement. Most of the risk is borne by the sign owner, they have to go out and get advertisers. And they have to make sure that occupancy rates stay high, and they have competition and have to keep up with rates. And so they're taking on a lot more of the risk a landowner. Just collects a check. And so there's relatively low risk and the lower the risk the bed. Better the value in terms of capitalization rates and multiples landmark has been actively buying over Lisa's in Eastman. So I think they're up to six hundred thirteen billboard Lisa's or easement owned as December two thousand eighteen many out of them companies view them negatively, what's your take? Right. I think that they represent a threat to the industry, but not as big a threat as I originally thought when they first came out and started to make acquisitions I thought, wait a minute. Here's a group that is trying to control the underlying right to operate the sign on the property, and as they evolved, and as they started to accumulate leases, it became more and more apparent that their primary goal was to play margins which basically means to buy low and sell high and operate. In that gap or in that margin. And they're really looking for long term leases that have solid revenue stream. And I would say bigger, Lisa's pod. Seems like they don't want to see a lease lease. If it's got less than three hundred dollars a month in rent, for instance, exactly and even leases that have less than a year or five years, they want long-term leases. And so the idea that they might come in and buy short term leases and then call the billboard company and say, hey, we're going to raise your lease rates. And now it's going to be, you know, this huge amount of money that you can't afford that really hasn't materialized in. So I think some of the initial early fears about landmark have not been worn out that said when you start to accumulate six hundred leases there becomes this critical mass where you have more leverage and control in. And so if those leases become staggered or set to expire in a large groupings, then they can go to one particular sign owner and say, hey, we've got seventy five leases expiring. And if you don't raise your rates to X number of dollars, then you're going to lose these locations, and so their leverage or their their bargaining power is growing, and so that's more of a concern to me than their initial modus operandi, I would say that their long term outlook and the way they're packaging, those leases and pooling them for investors is a comfort to us. And it leads me to believe that they're not going to try to harness that into some kind of bargaining power. Let's with just a very short synopsis. I'll see on a home company, and you give me two to three cents opinion. Lamar Lamar is a well managed company that is conservative in the way, they approach acquisitions and leasing and cap ex and they've done an excellent job growing during this last few years out front. I'm a little bit surprised that out front hasn't been able to cut their operating expenses as much as I thought they would when they spun off into a repeat I think that there's more fat to cut there. But I also think that there little bit heavier. I think it's a little more difficult than I originally realized I think the large markets that they're in with more sophisticated landowners and more transit agreements in that kind of thing is going to make it a little harder for them to get as lean and have those fish int. Accompany is Lamar clear channel outdoor clear channel is in a real transition right now, it's going to be interesting to see how they emerge and the shape they take I had hoped for a little bit more dramatic announcements in changes. I think that we're probably going to see that in the next year or two, but it's going to be really interesting to see if they can make that transition to me their leverage is about seventy one. I think that's not sustainable. They need to be at about four or five. And I wonder if the way that's going to happen is they're going to spinoff internet, clear channel outdoor international will separate from clear channel outdoor America's. And hopefully in that separation that leverage will be down to a sustainable level. I think you're right. I think they tried to spin off as many markets as they could to try to create some cash and and pay. That down. But obviously that's not going to work at domestic markets that they sold. I don't think that's going to be enough. And I think you're right. I think it's probably a lit- between international and domestic at some point leak media outdoor the subsidiary Apostol. Yeah. We're watching link really closely. In fact, we just mapped all of their recent acquisitions, and we're looking at the pattern that they're building nationwide. And it's really interesting. There's a swath through a few states where they haven't made acquisitions yet, but they're closing in I suspect, and I like what they're doing. Paul. Thank you so much. That's all for this week and thanks for period on the show. Absolutely. Thanks, Dave preciado. Having me this podcast was sponsored by Dominy. A Dominy the easy way to sell billboards online out of home in your hands. You listen to episodes of the billboard insider podcast by visiting billboard insider dot com or by subscribing, the billboard insider podcast on itunes, or any of the usual podcast outlets. Are Email is billboard insider at gmaiLcom we'd love to hear from you. Thanks for listening, and I'll be back in a couple of weeks.

Lisa Lamar Lamar billboard Eastman Dave preciado Paul America Apostol four week three hundred dollars eight percent ten percent five years
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

13:49 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"At-home operator with about fifty five billboard faces. Could you make the case why does a small independent out of whom advertising company like me need you Pat, what does geo Pap do for me? So are so we are a member organization. So, you know, there's always a value of being a part of. Of a trade association. Whether it's AAA or GIO path. So that you have a seat at the table with the rest of the industry. I think that's great. We haven't buyers on our board. So there's certainly opportunities to network I think what brings a lot of smaller operators to our organization is we've lowered our Jews for operators. We created new tears for smaller businesses. But also because they're getting turned away a lot from agencies specifically because they're not measured or they're using circulation counts. So we do provide that in assessing the landscaping I had said earlier that we provide a lot of consultative work on behalf of our members. And I think that's also been a huge new value for some of our smaller. Operators is feeling like I can't afford a research person on my team know, there's maybe only two of us in a dog sitting in her office and all doing sales and changing the lightbulbs, but to be able to reach out to a team of researchers. Who you can consider part of your own team and say to them. Hey, I got someone in town who won't even take a meeting with me. Do you have any information that can help me at having someone here actually help curate content? So that you can get that meeting. So that you have something to send to that client that maybe perks that ears up or gets them to take a phone call. And we've had a lot of members who have used that service to great results, and I can tell you that from a practical point of view as small operator trying to get any national business without impressions data is next to impossible. They just don't want to deal with the impressions is the currency that they want when they're doing buys for. Sure. I also think a lot of them are quite frankly, using either our software or our data through another piece of software, and if you're not then GIO path measured. You're not even in the system. Am I right that more than half? Your members have fewer than fifty faces right now. That is true. We certainly skew on the smaller side of operators. That's a little known fact Kim, it's been a huge area of growth for us. Yeah. You know, certainly there's been a lot of interest in what we've been doing for measurement perspective. There's been a lot of buzz about the organization. We're really excited about it. Because nothing would make me happier than to have something. We did here as an organization change somebody's revenue by the end of the year and have them next year. Say know every penny that I paid GIO path made back. Well, let's switch gears a little bit and talk about the media rating council, the media rating counsels is looking at developing an independent set of out of home, measurement standards. What what's your take on what they're trying to do? Yeah. So George Ivy. The MARCY they've been really fabulous partners to us here at your paths. And quite frankly, they've been a really valuable resource to me in all the organizations that I've worked at throughout my research career big industry presence, really fabulous resource that we have to make sure that what people are saying they are doing is actually what they're doing Dylan maven who's my head of product. And I were involved in the work to create digital out of home standards. Went the MRC last year. We're continuing our active involvement in contributions is the organization works to develop standards now for the rest of the out of home. Formats, I think what they're doing is really important, you know, more and more companies are entering the ad of home ecosystem with measurement data on research solutions, whether it's attribution or sensor companies data targeting, and as there are more and more companies in the data landscape gets more complex. It's really important that everybody's following the same set of rules that were all speaking. The same language. I think you know, the out of home industry long before my time made what I think is a really amazing choice to measure likelihood to see impressions. So the geo path impressions are not. We just drove by the sign and were being counted you have to actually have a probability to look at a sign and that's important because if you've a poster and a bulletin on the same stretch of roadway, they don't have the same impressions if you're just counting circulation. Everybody has the same numbers on that road. So I think it's really important that the MR see is looking at what the out of home industry has curated and then creating rules in standards around the decision state industry has made making sure that we're all playing by the same moles. Now, once they come up with the set of standards. Am I right that agency or entity shoes to be audited by them for compliance with the standards, and what's your sense to how will GIO path approach that decision, certainly? So you can. So you can choose to follow the standards and not the M R C accredited. That's certainly option. Getting MRC accreditation is a huge investments not just financially depending upon the complexity of the audit. But also in terms of time, it's certainly a resource heavy thing that goes on basically haven't outside CPA firm that comes in for a priotity and assesses everything you have all of your documentation identifies. All the holes gaps that you're going to need to fill before you go through the total audit. It's time consuming. It's a long process, but it's really super valuable. So we have spoke we've had initial conversations with George about what it would look like. And what the right timing would be for a pre audit. And then you don't really go into the priotity phase without an intention to go through the full audit. So I guess, you know, once we're at that point, I will go to my board of directors and say, this is my. Recommendation that we pursue accreditation. This is what we think it will cost both financially and from a resource timing. Sam point let them vote in. Let's decide if we would like to have the new methodology accredited. So we watch this space for further developments. But in any case, it sounds like no matter what happens they'll be a set of standards that can help everybody to have a common currency for sure and that can only benefit the industry provides transparency, and it helps people who are coming in from outside who may have really interesting technology data solutions to understand. Well, can't here's my roadmap. Yes. I think the timings great because you know, as we are in the final stages of our measurement system were able to look to the standards and make sure that we're in alignment with what's being published now before we dot all the is cross all the t's. But also, you know, it's a great collaborative process. I think there are thirty different representatives from differ. Ecus parts of the ecosystem that participate in MARCY process on guidelines and really kudos to the patients. Anthony, Tori for managing that process with so many chefs. Well, yeah. But it's exciting. I love that. They're paying attention to out of home that we have a seat at the table at the mercy really important looks finish. Let's finish up with a segment of overrated or underrated. I'll say phrase and you say if it's overrated or underrated. And why we know there's no way I'm only going to be able to say one. All right. I want you to expand on on Thomas cars autonomous cars. I'm going to go with overrated. Why not because they're not a thing. However, I think that the entire landscape of transportation is changing and focusing on Thomas cars is only looking at a small portion of what's happening in transportation. So I'm doing a lot. Of analysis on jen's Ie's, so jen's ease are this coming out of college. Now, the oldest among them, and they are relying heavily on things like public transportation relying heavily on things like rideshare program. So really the way people are moving about the marketplace in general is changing. So I think it's important that yes, there there are investments being made in autonomous cars. There's investments being made in car technology in general, Mike, my husband gets Dunkin donuts ads on his dashboard right now. We just need to keep an eye on all of that landscape, all of the changes that are happening there because I think there's opportunities for out of home in that space, hyper targeting, hyper targeting is for out of home is overrated, which would sounds really reared coming from somebody who's working on audience targeting in out of home, probably. I have a huge soapbox soapbox issue about hyper targeting because I think at some point there was always a funnel purchase funnel. When I was studying advertising where there was a whole top of the funnel about driving awareness and building brand relationships with consumers and hyper targeting online came along. And everybody lost focus on that. Now, they just wanna GIO fence their competitors parking lots that I don't think that's a really good advertising strategy. I think being able to target is important, but hyper targeting for out of home. I think is missing the beauty that out of home can bring to the table especially in the larger formats where we're not a one to one channel avantage sees overrated. I say that they are not dying. They are just evolving like the rest of the advertising ecosystem were certainly in time of great change on the agency side, but we saw in other channels at agencies were wanted to advertisers. To bring the agency buying media buying in house. So they did that in a lot of ways. And now we see the pendulum swinging back in there saying, okay? This was a lot for us to manage in house. And now they're putting out searches for agencies. So there's always a back and forth. There's always a swing in a constant evolution the use of subway by direct to consumer companies, startups, certainly underrated. I just got off the subway and really was looking at all of the ads and reading all of the ads in my right that if you raise venture money, it's a condition must be a condition of funding that you blanket. I mean, you have to buy from Jeremy mail in in Neal. If it worked for doctors, it's more work for you. There's a lot everybody takes the subway in New York. It is not it is not not elitist. Everybody takes the subway. And then includes big decision makers that includes early adopters that includes all of the people that a start up would be going after for sure. To see I don't know how you could say privacy is either overrated or underrated. I think it's certainly something that we as an industry need to be squarely focused on that. I mean, look with the recent news right now of them having sensors in the seat Bax on airlines that whether or not they were on or off is really irrelevant because the Prescott ahold of it, and it became our airlines watching you while you're flying, which honestly, I can't think of anything more boring than to watch me while I'm on a plane. Yes. Yeah. And you look at what's happening at Facebook. What a nightmare out of home. We need to be better than that. We need to be better than that. And we are better than that. Just because you can do something as it mean, we should do something. And I think almost all of the voices in the industry are on board with that smart, cities smart cities. Are I'm going to say overrated. Not because I think that they're overrated thing because I think smart. Cities are just a subset of a big trend and that trend being the connected, everything I not a big fan of the internet of things expression. And I am saying that knowing that one of my dear friends runs the internet of things symposium. So I'll have to him an apology later. But I like the idea of everything being connected, but connected everything. And I think smart cities is just a piece of that. And we in out of home are in a really great position to play a huge role in the internet of everything given what an amazing geographic footprint. We already have an understanding of location in an understanding of the way people are moving. We really have. I think a leg up as these opportunities start to arise. So I think the smart cities gonna just be one of the first steps on a bigger path that of home is gonna play. Okay. That's it for this week. Thank you so much for being on the podcast. Thank you. Dave. And thank you dominate for sponsoring today. Our good friends over there. Vegas. Absolutely. And thank you to Lucas Jones branding production. This podcast was sponsored by Dombi. Dominy the easy way to sell billboards online out of home at your hands. You can listen to episodes of the billboard insider podcast by visiting billboard insider dot com or by subscribing to the billboard insider podcast on itunes, or any of the usual podcast outlets. Are Email is billboard insider at gmaiLcom we'd love to hear from you. And I wanna thank listeners. I've been getting some great ideas for interviews off your emails. Thanks for listening, and I'll be back in a couple of weeks.

MRC George Ivy jen billboard Pat Vegas CPA MARCY head of product Kim Dunkin donuts Facebook Dylan Lucas Jones M R C Dave Thomas Neal
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

11:33 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"Ad Omni's white label booking engine on your website. Melody, what are some of the common design mistakes that you see? I think lows in phone numbers being emphasized on out of home structures that are primary for murderous. I'm not saying they don't have their place. But unless it's vanity number. I don't believe most drivers had the time to write down phone number. And I don't feel that companies designer logos without of home in mind. So generally, they don't translate wealth outdoor you don't want when you write columns where you rate billboards. I think a common complaint you probably most common complaint is too small logo too small. You know, I think that is pedestrian facing structures like transit benches airports displays where it's easier as he smaller elements or more information. I think that that is good. But when you're dealing with a regular billboards or posters or digital. I don't believe that. There seem very well in less. Your client is coke who only needs to put their logo out there. Just for brain wreck. Ignition. Remember that we're out here, you're thirsty. Stop anywhere and get a coke. I think that the logos. Don't generally translate while. I think that what I call the golden egg is if your client's name is also their website. And if that's the case, then you can make that your focal point in one contact instead of adding the physical address and the phone number eight freeze at so much stays it lets the people just concert who they are in the remember that as they drive by the Google it on their own in. You'll be able to get all of that information. The phone address reviews about their business in more. I will tell you that I had client recently who had never done out of home. And they wanted to put the website on the board, which was also their name was great. They had a very vertical logo with their name super small. And it was not going to be seeing that was a fourteen mid forty bulletin. It was pretty low to the ground but the logo it was not good in. So I kept encouraging in just to focus on their website to do what I just said let people remember their name as they drag by into Google it. And he said why do I need outdoor if they're just gonna go to their phone? I said because without outdoor they wouldn't even know to Google you all of these platforms worked together for your advertising, an outdoor is the presence that never goes away. That is going to keep reminding people to go to your website to find out more information. VR there near the problems or mistakes people make when they're designing out of home. I think another one is people designing out of home without out of design experience. I received calls from business owners who hired a designer that didn't have out of him experience or the out of home company didn't employ designer in the client wasn't happy with their outcome. By the time the on her context knee. It's usually a rush because the running up on post you date or missed it. And they're willing to spend more money and time to get right? I think it's important when you hire someone that you've view works. You really get a sense of their design style in clients can see themselves whether they he'll confident with who they're working with. Melody, it seems to me there's a cost value relationship to out of home design, another word should get what you pay for. Can you impact that? I do believe that. I believe that you get what you don't pay for. I think that if you have someone that doesn't have the experience or a lot of plate or somebody who is only doing what the client wants. I think that that can be issue in a result in possibly pour out of home design your budget. Earlier ability Francis said it took you how many years she think to really understand good design. A took me about three years to really feel confident designing out of home. Yes. Again, the people that I trained mentor d- they didn't have out of home experience at all we have to start somewhere, but the art schools, for instance, I only saw maybe one out of home project in their portfolio. Leo, which was upsetting to me because I'm so passionate about a palm. And I think it's so important in so educating them on how to design it every time they're like, this is so different from everything that I've ever done because when people are designing on the computers in it's right in front of them. And this is four any designer agency. Anybody that's designing when you are sitting in for your computer putting these advertisements together. Clearly, you can read it looks good. But I would challenge you to use. You know, the oh AAA Dr tool or a tool where you can superimpose what you designed and look at that from a hundred three hundred six hundred feet away. And really see point you together is actually going to read on the street. I didn't A-block myself. Can you read this digital on my website? Site because I dry Ron all the time. And I look at outdoor and I wanna get a Diaz. I wanna see was working with didn't work in why? And that is so key when you're designing something to be able to look at what you yourself are doing an check yourself in make sure that it might look good on my screen, but I just looked at it six hundred feet away in I can't see anything. So melody gotta Klein gone out. I found a client. They they've never done out of home. They said we wanna do out at home. What do we have to do? What does it add have to look look like what we're really excited about out of home? How can I as small out home exact us out of whom designer most effectively in the process for me? It's giving me the opportunity to participate in the client credit call. This allows me to ask design questions that are not normally. Found a creative brief because each category of business will be different. This is when I can dive into who they are what they're selling. How we can emphasize the most critical elements to execute a great advertisement. It's when I go over a wishlist and bring that down to a tier level of importance. It's it's part of the out of home creative process. If we gain the client's trust, I believe they're more willing to give us creative freedom that allows me to design a more conceptual look over over informative because most new clients they tend to Ford their business card or small print ad an wanted to reform at home in generally, they they don't know how to apply these advertising platforms large format printing. And it's our job in this industry to help them understand that this work for this. But for out of home, we need to focus on just certain key elements. Terrific bellevue. I'd like to finish up the the interview with on overrated or underrated segment, so I'll share phrase, and you tell me if it's overrated underrated in why billboard stunts? I think they're underrated. I think that they're really fun. Doing teaser reveal for example, is something that I haven't seen done in a long time. And I try to do that with digital clients whenever it get the opportunity. They just gets gets people looking back over and over again at advertisements to see who's advertising. What's coming was all the excitement about in? That's the beauty of having teaser reveals that we get people continue relooking at our advertisers. Those stunts can be so memorable. I think of the vegetables stunt done up in Bishop in Grand Rapids, where the stunt was just a picture of a melon or a fruit. For one. What the heck is this turned into a campaign for the local grocery store playing up fresh produce. It's genius in. It's simple in its y. It's wire medium works. I need to get peep creates the buzz. I mean, it's it's it's wonderful. So I think it's underrated. I think people should be trying to sell more of that. But would extensions I think they're underrated. I think that if you can decline has the budget in the structure doesn't have restrictions and your operations team is able to handle the request. Then we should always be trying to upsell keep abilities of our industry billboards snipe. I think that a do these underrated as well. I think Snipes can really help advertiser that really is focused on their budget. Can you explain snipe to the audience? Of course, of course. I would explain it as a very big sticker on me give you an example, if an apartment complex is. In the process of leasing N opening new construction than an apartment complex can do a billboard and say leasing soon, and then they can come back a month later and put a snipe over it like a big sticker in instead of saying leasing soon it can say now open so the really getting that to one at of friendly budget priced. So I think that I think it's a great way for us to offer something like that to our clients thrift. And then the last over or under rated three d billboards. I think that they're amazing. I think it's what or at least I strive to do every time I designed something that can handle a prop that goes back to. If you're structure isn't how restrictions in your team is able handle it. We should always be trying to up sell that. Because it really sets that billboard apart from competitor. It creates so much buzz in the market, and it really brings so much presence to advertiser that is doing it. That's it for this week. Thanks for appearing on the podcast. Bill. Welcome. You can contact melody about your out of whom advertising needs at out of whom creative dot com. Thanks to Lucas Jones for editing production, this podcast was fostered by add on the ad on me the easy way to sell billboards online out of home in your hands. You could listen to episodes of the billboard insider podcast by visiting billboard insider dot com or by subscribing to the billboard insider podcast on itunes, Android, Google, podcast, Stitcher or Spotify. Our Email is billboard insider at gmaiLcom we'd love to hear from you will be back in couple of weeks with an interview with Kim Frank president of geo path.

Google Melody Omni billboard Lucas Jones Francis Leo Diaz Ron Spotify Kim Frank president bellevue Ford Grand Rapids Snipes itunes hundred three hundred six hund
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"Hi, I'm Dave Westberg. You're listening to the billboard insider podcast where I interview industry leaders about trends impacting the US out of home advertising business. This podcast is sponsored by add Omni at on the easy way to sell billboards online out of home in your hands. Today's guest is melody Roberts. She's the founder and CEO of out of home, creative album advertising design for based in Atlanta, Georgia, which designs billboards and Digital's to any non traditional media. Melody, isn't award-winning and OBI nominated designer who has been in the out of home industry since nineteen ninety nine. Welcome to the show. Melody, hi, Dave. Thank you for having me. It's a delight to have you. Can you talk a little bit about your background melody in? How you got into out of home? Sure. When I started design I was in high school I worked for an advertising agency in into computer graphics or printing company when I. Atlanta, I designed pre show onscreen advertising for regal cinemas nationwide. And that's my realize really enjoyed large format advertising at that time Eller media who was later purchased by clear channel approach needs to become their creative director in this led me to a fifteen year career as the southeast regional creative director and in two thousand fifteen I went out on my own watch out of from creative. Melody, what does a regional creative director do for clear channel. It was a hybrid role. I was the creative director for the Atlanta market. And as well as third as the regional creative director for the southeast where mentored in supported eleven designers across the region hard admire responsibilities were identifying in streamlining insufficient procedures of processes nationally to boost sales productivity and identify in design in present local advertising concepts international opportunities. She's terrific. So you advised a bunch of designers for fifteen years, what were some of the lessons, or what are some of the principles of good out of home design that have come out of your experience when I started out of design. I don't really think that I understood it myself completely for probably the first three years. I can't trying to understand this medium. It's so much different than anything that I believe that anybody will design there were a lot of people that I mentored there were a lot of people that I brought in from the art schools to enter that did not have a lot of experience with out of home. So it's something that it takes a while to understand. I believe that you either stay in his industry or you just simply use it as a stepping stone to your next career path, or if it's in design, it's something that I've learned over the. A years that it takes a lot of understanding what a client's needs are how to play said onto a structure, so people can see it and really take something away from it some type of emotion that gets them to watch back at that advertisement over and over again wonder some other things that are key to good out of home design strategic placement. Balance color. Contrast sizes scale in I think has reportedly emphasis on what should be be emphasized. This could be an image tagline website. It's really important to have a focal point to draw viewers attention to specific design element. That's that's quite a bit. Nobody can you unpack each of those items strategic placement is key because generally people read left, right? So for speaking about awards Digital's airport. Displays benches. Bus panels digital mobile, people are generally gonna read lecture. Right. So I'm going to normally put a lot of my content on the left, and I'm gonna put my injury on the right? If I'm designing transit that should a little bit because I'm gonna be working up to down. But we're you play something is key to how somebody internalizes it reads, it use it all of that whole encompass of how somebody takes in that advertise it you need to have your balance. Right. If I see something where fun billboard, for example. I call kind you chopped up into threes in you put content on the left, maybe an image in the middle in the more content on right steriods chopped up. And if somebody's driving seventy miles an hour on the interstate. I highly doubt we're going to be able to really have a good flow with that ad intake rate. Something that really needed to be emphasized on it that also is alignment you don't wanna have seeing that are not balanced in centered in aligned properly. It is off balance that can be very difficult to the is while Joe just balance me, you don't wanna visually overload, just one particular part of the blurred. Yes. And also I've seen advertisements that. I've rated for Bill Horne insider wear. I'll see a headline on the left or image in the middle. In-in starburst on the right? And then somebody's taken a phone number in an address in placed in in not directly the Niddle in in the website, not directly on the right? There's no there's no alignment or balance. They are. It's got have a proper flow for the I to go left right up to down. So I feel like colored contrast together. I mean, a lot of were always educate. Eating our clients in designers and count executives in leadership. You know, we're all working together to educate people that are new at home about what colors in contrast worked best in. They are different. When you talk about traditional versus digital. Let's start with traditional out of home or vinyl printed out of home. It gives some color rules them short. So on traditional I wouldn't normally put a bright red on a black background because dark colors dark colors, don't aren't usually visible, but on digital. I would put a bright red on black because when you go to that digital dimension. In contrast, a really hops in creates that urgency ended his beautiful really going back to traditional many kinda jump back and forth. Going for judicial something. Like a yellow font on top of like hot. Background that's gonna vibrate. It's not going to contrast properly by simply making that information white on that dark pink. It's going to give it proper contrast. And it's gonna look really really nice. So it's you wanna make sure that the is vibrating on colors that don't mix well together. And you also want to understand that the colors that we put our traditional are completely different than what we do with digital. Another example where that some clients will want that neon fluorescent green or yellow on vinyl, and it doesn't really translate because we're in four color process. So unless you're actually paying to have the color through the printer to be for us in her knee on I'm not sure you really going to get it. It's gonna come out muted on digital though, we can make it that beautiful vibrant yellow in that yellow green and fluorescent look. Working blue in. It it translate. Really, really? Well, Jerry popping Bellevue. One time were not happy with one of my billboards that used sky-blue talk about that. I think that it's important to understand the placement of board in what is surrounding. It is your board high up in all that is behind. It is the blue sky. Do you have a lot of Tracy on your board is the city your background behind your board? I think this is important with how your board is designed. If I am designing a board where the city is the hind it, I probably gonna us more vibrant colors like purples or dark pink or yellow, maybe even a white something that's going to assist. The board to step out of that SeaScape in put more focus on it. If I'm designing a board that is up in the sky in the only thing behind it is the sky, did I don't believe that you're borsch also be grew because it's going to. Washout background again, you need to bring it to the forefront in make it stand out using that same color. I don't think helps it unless you're specifically debt. Designing a look so that background of the board fades away so case by case basis. But generally might tip is don't use a light or sky blue when you're billboard backdrop is the sky make such how 'bout sizes scale the size and scale is so important with out of home because we have to focus on things that need to be read or seen very quickly. If it's motorists facing if I don't put enough emphasis on the size of something to be read in its missed than nobody's going to be able to see it. It's the same thing with the photo if we're trying to get a photo across as the main folk. Point in. It's very very small one thing that I always tell clients that want to incorporate your pitcher, for instance, I had a client past that always wanted their bodies on the board while it you're in a fourteen by forty the Lord on the interstate. You're gonna look very very tiny. So my tip there on size and scale is we always take the photograph from the chest up, and that way, I can really see your face. If that's what you're wanting to to get across or your product, we need to be able to scale it rights to it's creek sized for out of home. Otherwise, it's gonna come out to small in people are gonna miss it completely. Let's stop here for a word from our sponsor at Omni increases your billboard revenue by sewing unsold ads space at top dollar. Whether you have watched far from it co or Detrick billboards add on the easily integrates it started selling. His little one business day on the fastest growing out of home network of over sixty thousand digital screens visit ad Omni dot com or call eight four four AD L M N I to speak with an ad Omni. Billboards specialist mentioned this billboard insider podcast received one for year of ad

Digital melody Roberts director Atlanta Omni founder and CEO Dave Westberg US Georgia Bill Horne Detrick Niddle Joe Tracy
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

16:43 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"These white labelled booking engine on your website. Nancy what else is out there? What other big challenges are there for the industry? Well, we have a big case before the six circuit court of appeals. That's the call that Thomas case in it asks whether billboard law is constitutional for free, speech reasons, the case. Comes out of Tennessee. And it's important because it may actually make its way all the way to the US supreme court, our stake, the industry stake in this case is nothing less than the protection of property rights that are included in the current law and the high beautification act in the mirror laws, we expect a ruling from the US six circuit court of appeals later this year. So stay tuned on that one. That to me it's sort of like, you're better with the w the w tone. If for whatever reason Thomas overturns, the entire federal regulatory uprise is the risk that everything's up for potential negotiation and for being rewritten. So we have a we have regulatory scheme that seems to work in his predictable. And it would just throw things into chaos, and who knows what could emerge that is a possibility. The Thomas case itself revolves around the Tennessee did your -cation near act. And so is the six circuit does something it would affect Tennessee. And also the other states in that circuit. But if it ultimately would go to the US supreme court to the supreme court would say that that language is unconstitutional for free, speech reasons, we then would have to go in to figure out how to repair that. And that would lead us to the high beautification act in the great balance in the high beautification. Act that was constructed in the sixties was to say that billboards would be in commercial and industrial areas where other business takes place and government. If you want to remove those billboards you have to pay just compensation for them. And so it could upset that balance that has been in place for several decades attribution has been a big focus for the AAA want. You talk about attribution issues. Yet attribution research is important to our marketers. It helps them to understand how out of home impacts their objectives or their KPI's. We have research underway right now with a grocery brand and a quick service restaurant brand that attribution research will be released at the conference in may. And then will be doing additional attribution studies in the future. We wanna have a whole menu of these in. Disaster bution main basically being able to prove a link between the actual billboard ad an-and outcome exactly for instance, in out of home message, one type or another or a format one type or another may do better with a clear call to action man, a certain campaign might do better driving foot traffic. And so it's in order to get these kind of benchmarks that were doing. This study these studies, and then in addition the companies are doing a lot of attribution work as well. And we've been collecting those attribution studies from the out of home media companies, and we're working with professor in Texas, who's going to study all of these attribution studies in order to begin to develop benchmarks for out of home. Attribution coin Steuer incredible resource, you mantra blade provides for the industry in doing big picture. Emphasis any big picture Industry Research and then communicating to operators in the industry in two agencies and add buyers, the value of our home, exactly smart cities. Seems there seemed to be a million smart city conferences going on. What's the old triple as doing with respect to smart cities? But the oh AAA held a conference last year with all of the stakeholders in smart cities to understand where the whole movement is. And also where it will be going over the next few years, and where and how does out of home fit into it? Our challenge will be to adapt as a medium as cities morph into smart cities. So that we continue to be relevant a relevant agent in the delivery of information there's revenue sharing their all kinds of things going on. It is really very similar to our goal with Thomas vehicles because ultimately. As smart cities in a ton of vehicles, actually wind up being part of a similar thing in so our challenge there also will be to adapt. So that we continue to be relevant as the new technologies and new things move along. Cannabis talk about cannabis cannabis advertising issues cannabis is a growing category in those states where it's legal to advertise cannabis. It's still not legal at the federal level. But attitudes. Clearly have changed end are changing. Remember Nancy is that ten states permit cannabis advertising make marijuana legal in another thirty states permit medical marijuana, many of these states allow cannabis advertising in some fashion or another gossip exactly right? You have metrics. Exactly, right. I think we're going to see a trend to more and more states legalizing recreational and medical cannabis in therefore the demand for advertising will increase and so our challenge in navigating this new category will be similar to the way that we navigate with alcohol advertising where it'll be important to balance community standards with the right to promote a legal product. Sometimes just because you can doesn't mean you should you need to have an internal fill drawer your own ability, a set of internal guidelines as to what is not accepted. That's right. And you have no idea Dave over the years. How many times I have? Said that that exact phrase. Is seeking in. The annual out of home media conference is coming up may twenty two twenty second in Las Vegas. What are some of the big themes, and why should someone out of home plan to attend? Well, it's gonna be amazing. It's at the aria resort in Las Vegas. Will celebrate the best creative awards with the obese and our best people with the industry awards, but we're going to be inspiring all kinds of new ways of thinking understanding, for instance, why hot brands are migrating to out of home, Nick, Brian from Dennis ages is the keynote speaker he is going to talk about why out of home is of a justic brand. That's his term. We also have Amazon studios marketing head with us who in Amazon is by the way, the sixth largest out of home advertising. So you'll be able to talk with him and understand why tech Brown's like Amazon are using out of home will also they'll be doing affair. Amount of education and translation with new trends. Or emerging trends programmatic is a big theme on the main stage end in the workshops. We have direct to consumer businesses who will be talking about why they're using out of home. We're also going to be talking about diversity inclusivity, and what that means for the workplace in the marketplace. The planet committee has been really wonderful for this conference. They're very focused on take home value of the content. In fact, a tagline for the conference is don't let it stay in Vegas. So they will have take home sheets with take-home concepts, for instance, at the workshops the afternoon workshops, follow four tracks are twelve different workshops that are in the areas of analytics and business insights and data and thought leadership, and then of course, it will be my last conference. So I hope to see everyone there. Chance to wish Nancy. Well, you can't overestimate the value of the meet and mingle aspect of the conference. I remember two years ago in New Orleans. I was sitting in the front waiting for a talk to begin and gentleman walked up to me shook my hand sat down next to me and said, hi, Sean Riley. I mean, all the executives are there. Everyone seems to go, and it's just the meet and mingle is just a terrific opportunity. I agree. I I often think that as wonderful and rich as the content is there's a lot of business that takes place in a lot of context that are made as well. That are equally valuable absolutely Nancy. You mentioned diversity. Can you talk about where the out of home industry is doing a good job? Giving women opportunities sore. I'd be delighted I think we've made progress, but we need to do more. If you look at it from just a metrics perspective. I would guess the poem industry has done as. Good a job or better than much of the advertising or corporate world in giving women opportunities. But that doesn't mean it's good enough. I remember when I entered the industry in nineteen seventy eight there were four four when women in senior positions. And now there are hundreds you had a piece on a billboard insider about almost four hundred women in senior positions. And I think it was fifty eight tour actually running different operations was that. Right. You also published a story about how the out of the public auto media companies are doing better than the fortune five hundred for the number of women directors. So if you looked at it just a metrics were probably doing as good as but that doesn't mean it's where it should be. Yes. We can definitely do better in diversity and inclusivity will be a central theme at the Las Vegas conference. We've partnered with the female quotient, which is a female owned enterprise that's committed to advancing equality in the workplace. So they're gonna add important programming elements, including a female potion lounge that will be a side stage that has handled discussions career, counseling, etc. And then the CEO of the female potions. Shelly Zalis is going to be on the main stage talking to the most from two or three fortune five hundred companies who will end they'll be discussing the importance of diversity in today's ABC business. I think the national statistics are that women own thirty nine percent of all privately held firms in the United States. If you assume and the numbers may vary. I have six hundred independent out of home companies in my database, perhaps I've heard it's his highs thousand, but if you apply a thirty nine percent metric to six hundred two thousand firms we could add a lot of women owners, we still have room, and maybe that's a nudge to the industry to be able to add to the amount of women owners in the industry. We have a strong bench with several hundred women in senior executive positions as is an incredibly strong bench. So now the challenge is to move people from the bench out to actually running the team. I agree. I agree. And I think striding a spotlight on this issue for not only women, but also people of color can make the difference. The more we talk about it. The more we met. The more. We may be inclined to take action towards something. Exactly. Nancy? You've had an incredible almost thirty year career in out of home who have been some of your mentors. And what have you learned? Oh, goodness. What a question. I've been blessed by some amazing personal and professional mentors on the personal side. My mentors have been largely women starting with my mother who was a remarkable businesswoman. And several other women over the years. I treasure all that I learned from them. I also though in forever grateful for what I think of is my professional mentors my out of home mentors in it's actually forty years this year, Dave 'cause I went to navy in nineteen seventy eight in. So those mentors. I have just learned so much. I have been so blessed by working with Bob ney gli originally who think helped to reinvent this business back in those days from being a highway sign business to an ad medium. He taught me the power of out of home. But also the power urgency. He was someone who said, you know, you just don't wait tomorrow to do what you can do today. Already morale. Brought deep discipline in a service orientation to the business that I learned a great deal from. I couldn't ask for this question without mentioning Carl Eller and his focus on the creative impact of the medium. Bill Applebaum who is one of the best salesman ever in any business. And he zero lived the principal on I learned from him that nothing happens until a sale is made all of the Riley's are super savvy business people in I've worked closely with heaven senior, and then Kevin junior in Now, Sean Riley who is my bosses chairman of the AAA. And then maybe most important of all I'm grateful for the many family owned company leaders who are really like family to me people like Tom Norton who has been on the AAA board since the day. I arrived who was taught me so much and who always wants to do it. Right. Always wants to serve the community. And by the way of never had a Christmas Bill by that. Tom Norton doesn't call to wish me merry Christmas. So these these these people have become family over the time as well as mentors teachers leaders. You can go on and on the number of quality private firms in the business, just that's right. Every state house one. That's right. Nancy? What's what's next for you? Well, first of all I want to take all of these next months to thank this industry. In on this podcast today is industry is giving me such unforgettable opportunities. I've had a great ride. I wouldn't trade a single day of it even the most challenging day. But after forty years, it's time for a change. I'm ready for more time with my husband who has already retired this may sound a little corny, but we wake up every day. And celebrate the fact that we're together in we'd be idiots if we didn't feel that way. Because we're so lucky we love each other. We're healthy. We have choices it looking at retirement. There two words that come to mind, adventures and grandchildren. We have grandchildren, Minneapolis. And in Chicago. I also went -ticipant to corporate board service, which I've had to decline because I've been in this role in the past. And so I think I'll do some of that. And we're working on some nonprofits terrific. Do you have any unappointed words? Oh, if I had partying words my hope for the industry is that all of you would remember to stick together in push yourselves to do even better all the time for our customers our communities and the public. Conversation. Thank you so much for appearing on the podcast, Nancy, my pleasure. Good luck. Dave. Thank you in. Thanks to Lucas Jones editing and production. This episode was sponsored by a Dominy Dombi the easy way to sell billboards online out of home in your hands. You can listen to episodes of the billboard inside a podcast by visiting billboard insider dot com or by subscribing to the billboard insider podcast on apple podcast, Google, podcasts, Android, Stitcher Spotify or tune in. Our Email is billboard insider at gmaiLcom we'd love to hear from you. Please join me in a couple of weeks when I interview melody Roberts of out of home, creative on how to design effective out of home ads. See them.

Nancy Las Vegas US Thomas Dave cannabis Tennessee Sean Riley Tom Norton AAA medical cannabis Industry Research New Orleans Amazon Cannabis billboard Bill Applebaum Carl Eller
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"Enables people to go in for a very very affordable price to spec r and to come up with stuff. So when you can be on the road grab their laptop or tablet jump in grab a logo off the internet Teke snapshot with their phone Email that in walk in on the cast in at almost cold, call nature and have a set of one or two designs that really cost of a very forcible. I think they're public prices. A ninety nine dollars a month for the service IBO's got a seventy five dollars a month. And it's after about twenty designs, it's a dollar per design. That's done, and you know, many times just one speck art design will cost that in. We think that that's. A valuable service while so those are some of the kinds of things that we're focusing on those of them that we are get approached with. But I have to take an approach of agnostic, which ones can fit into our workload solution both of these solutions can fit into our daily proposal mechanisms that we call workflow with our apparatus machine over a period of time. Once we prove all the values of it. And those are just a few of them how about your cooperative marketing. I think that's a really interesting initiative where you're getting the all of the independent on home companies to an essence join a network, which allows them to in a unified way bid for some large national out of home advertising contracts. That's exactly right about ten years ago. Most of the friends that I haven't I be oh, no that my primary business was real estate broker and that I'm a bit of a database kind of person in was helpful in creating our database structure for our multiple listing service. Back in the mid nineties. They asked me, hey, Chris, why can't we put together a setup whereby we go out and collectively put our stuff together all are empty rural boards and try to compete against the big boys. And so it's been a decade long quest and four and a half years ago is when I hired apparatus media solutions to develop our core platform, and so whenever a company such as billboards utilizes the workflow solution when we sell aboard much less real estate person with Sela listing in hood, it would not be available on the list for people to go see the property on the next day. Same thing with our ill board a scenario is that when a local operator likely would sell it. It would go unavailable in the cloud in that whole mechanism that we've designed over this period of time has moved us rapidly into what is the I b o digital marketplace. Which is an essence setting up a very nice structure for be able to bring revenues to our. Are operated participate terrific. You are active in the actions. Sit on one of the committees for the media rating council, the MR C, which is one of the institutions that most people in out of home don't know anything about and they should can you talk about what am are ceased doing why an out of home company should care about it. Yes. That is a very very good point. Dave, I I didn't know about an after twenty years of being in the business in almost exclusively every industry veteran that I've talked to bar. None had never heard of the media writing cancel up until about six months ago. I learned about it of an interaction that I had with the CEO of without front. Randy szrious when he wrote a very article or your award insider back in January of twenty eighteen in looked at things that he wanted to bring up to that the industry needed to do in one of them was this kind of this area. So Andy introduced me to the media rating council in subsequent to that. We had the folks there come and speak at our last conference that resulted in the IB o becoming members of the media writing council of which nine asset on the board of directors among the digital out of home committee, and now the outta home standards committee most people. Realize that the meeting writing council has governed audience measurement in most other media since the sixties started with TV radio and governs, all the other things. The numbers that the Vokes us go through audits, invalidation and applicability towards standards that are derived as so currently our out of home standards committee is coming up with the auto home standard to be released. Sometime, we think in the second quarter of twenty nineteen and went doing such it will create a mechanism whereby the processes of how the audiences, you know, what age groups in etc. Come to see it. We think it is very important is really taking a stronghold in the digital out of home world now, which is primarily the networks and whatnot. But doesn't clued our digital billboards, and I can see a very significant reliance upon validated. Transparent accurate believable data that we? Received from the sources that provide them. So it's sort of third party verification of the methodology for computing impressions? Well, it's not the third party. It is the governing body. It's a it's a causa governmental council that that the United States government set up, and it it is in a spot where they really make up the rules for how that the standards are going to be created. And then they hire auditors to go into those that wish to be accredited to go through a rigorous accounting auditing process of how they come up with their audience measurements. So for example, in online digital some of the larger companies couple years ago stopped advertising with Google Facebook until they could prove that where ninety some odd percent of the traffic was being reported his audience was actually Bautzen faked in you know, a made up kinda numbers through maybe no fault of their own. But there wasn't any process subsequently. They are see has come in. On the digital out of home spice, and his is in the process of crediting, a number of different players that are in those fails. Why do they want to do that one asks because they need the advertisers to believe their numbers in take their money back than the demand for ties. I got you. What do you think out of home has to do in the next five years to thrive? We absolutely have to get behind the concept of office selling by audience right now, most of us that have been in billboards have sold on location. It's a great direction come into town. It's the best spot, its busiest, intersection, etc. But to take me for an example, if I could go to an advertiser inside that we have these five hundred locations across the country, and you Justin boots would be very well heeled to know that there are this many people that are fifty years old that might be have disposable income in really loved to wear cowboy boots. Hell Manny billboards could we sell on a platform. If we deliver that information back. So that is one of the things in the media rating council to give that comfort level is one of the reasons I'm so adamant and promoting that our industry group now geo path must get accredited and that any other entrance to the spice musket accredited. So that our advertisers believe us, and that we can be able to compete with the online that is fast moving in that direction while well, how about some other things it should happen. Couple of other things that I think that we need to have our data standardized. And by having people convert into the workflows helps us do that across all those platforms. Everybody has had RFK's that are in the operator business that come in for majors as we actually say waste millions and millions of key strokes. I couldn't agree. I couldn't agree more. Every single agency says here just fill out our spreadsheet just just fill out the twenty five different data points for every single sign. You want a bit and you don't have time as a small operator to respond differently to every single agency. It's just ridiculous. Right. And so that is one thing for the industry to do better in three to five year window is for some standardization of the key data points. This is me nodding vigorously, yes. And in. We recognize that the success ratio is less than out of twenty. And then you take a plant like look billboards in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Interlock if we have one agency by in a year, right? It just doesn't justify us to go into the models that are there now for audience measurement. And so we we must have audience measurement. And we must have an availability to reduce our what I lovingly call an equivalent to the United States government reduction of paperwork act agree. Okay. Chris I want to end the show with a under hype door over hyped. I'll give you a term you tell me if it's under hype the over and y geo geofencing, I think is probably over hyped for the regular world but under hyped as it relates to to out of home. We haven't used that. And that's one of the areas that are one of our initiatives is bringing mobile ads sales to our platform to fit into our workflow geofencing would work very nicely. I think with mobile phones that drive by our billboards time cars over hyped. Why? I think that there are a number of legal issues that would have to be overcome beforehand. I think that generally speaking it could work possibly well in more metro areas. But I'm gonna tell you what I like my duly diesel truck. I and I get in an hour. A recession in the us economy. Well, you know, nobody can really predict when that occurs, but you're familiar with a mortgage slash lemon business in the long interest rate cycle in currently we are at the bottom end of the forty year cycle that had been dropped. And we're probably two or three years into the upcycle the next four years that is going to be generally, speaking recessions, come along the way with that. Currently we're in the longest modern day recovery that than since we've been keeping records. So we could go into a recession at anytime. But it sure looks good at the start listen to the site. The economy's in in the some of the recent statistics jobs RAB, I'm hearing good things from Malla, my operators advertisers or failing good budgets are failing. Good. And so when does the recession count who knows it'll come, but what I do like about the billboard business is that we? Generally, speaking. When the bankers come knocking on the doors that want people to halons, you need to go out and advertise and get more business. And so it's a little bit countercyclical the be in the out of home business, if you're properly capitalized automated out of whom buying I think that that's probably over hyped in general because it's a sexy topic in the tech world as it relates to our out a home it's under hyped because of the complexity of where the splintering has led us in the data standardization. There's not been an easy way for them to connect to us up until relatively recently. Chris what do people what can people do if they would like to learn more about the Ibero USA? Oh that sample, Dave. They can go to our website IBO USA dot org and look around on that at some of the different things that we have involved with our group. There's a support contact support. Our phone number's five zero two two six twenty to thirty four or you can simply send an Email support at Ideo USA dot org. Simple process just have people call in. We'll have somebody called him back answer the questions tell him about the different levels in layers and different services and things that we have been more than happy to help anybody perfect. That's it for this week. Thanks for appearing on the podcast. Chris. Well, thanks for having me keep up the good job of over the last couple of three years. I know personally that I have learned learned a ton of things by your daily Email that comes out with a different topics in it. And I was thoroughly encourage any new person in we do in courage every new person to subscribe to the year service in similar stuff. Learn everything again about the business. Thanks so much and a check will be in the mail after we're done. Now, you can listen to episodes of the billboard insider podcast by visiting the billboard insider dot com website or by subscribing to the billboard inside a podcast on itunes, Stitcher or Google play. Our Email is billboard insider at gmaiLcom we'd love to hear from you. This podcast is brought to you by billboard loans dot com. Billboard loans, fast smart committed. Thanks for listening and see in a couple of weeks.

USA Chris Google Dave billboard IBO CEO Randy szrious Ardmore Oklahoma Justin boots Andy RFK Manny Sela
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

06:11 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"Dot com. Fast smart committed. Chris you mentioned that you run the ideal USA or the independent billboard operators. USA? What does it do? How does it help out of home companies? Well, first off the Ivy does mission is pretty simple. It's an effort to combine the synergies of a number of our nationwide. Operator associates cintas a harmonic way to maximize our efforts have some education and learning have Greg friends and learn how to be more profitable. Chris who who are the members of the Ibero USA? We have about one hundred sixty companies now that are either in our proper networking group. Or in a newer group for. A brand new or smaller companies investor companies companies that are in out of home that are not exactly in line with the companies that have been around forty or fifty years caller, IBO market club. And we're about fifty thousand faces is what the footprint represents maybe a thousand digital San with along with that comes in enormous amount of synergies. So this is a voice not for the public PM us. But it's the voice for the independent smaller out of home companies. Yes in smaller is how we started. And then one of our guys had five hundred boards and bought something at seven fifty. And then it was to fifteen hundred in somebody got over two thousand and we figured out size, while important doesn't necessarily change the character of the man or the woman that runs the companies we have found out too that some of the larger companies regional companies in a whatnot have been very successful. At what they're doing in the we've recognized that they bring some very important things to the table lessons to learn if. You will that if we're smart we will listen and having been a poor listener most of my life. I've learned that there one or two or three people that when they speak like e f Hutton in the old is I listen. Chris can you talk about some of the current initiatives? What's occupying you as the guy that's running the ideal? You would say. That changes on a daily basis. It seems we get what I call lovingly knocked Knox. When opportunity knocks at the door. You must be there to answer it most of us individually get a lot of inbound calls and things, but there's just no way that we can figure the wheat from the chaff and wet works, and what doesn't work. And so I the oh with our team of been blessed to have a good set of exacts in a great support by the group itself that we've been able to add several people to our administrative point here, and that's an abled may to answer more knock Knox. And so right off the shape. We've got growth we've got an interesting area or our health insurance initiative, and if you'd like for me to go into a little bit of detail at that. Please do. Yeah. All right. So whether or not you're a fan of our current government leadership or not a K, Donald Trump. The facts are that the economy is doing very much better than any time over the last decade with this new administration has come some changes to the health insurance arena. They opened. Up the insurance across state lines and more significantly extended huge benefit to big business, which they've appreciated our ability as an association to self insure new rules, go into effect the spring in effect. We are exploring this very complex environment as any new initiative Dave in such a regulated area. There are hurdles to leap past in. We think that we're going to be able to provide a solution to a problem that most of us independence of had brought along many. I've got to think that's a huge. You know, if you're a small very very small business getting insurance if you if you are two or three or four employees a lot of small out of home copies of that way. It's almost impossible to get cost effective insurance. So that's a that's a great initiative. Right. We expect to have some answers. We preliminary discussions with a reinsurer's are favorable in again, it's complex, but I should have some decisions in bay looking forward to talking with you in the near future about getting the word out will as eight materialized. Now, you may you mentioned how many members you have one hundred sixty. Yes, about one hundred sixty in seems like we're adding one or two week in some larger original type companies in some smaller companies come in. We were really agnostic. We don't mind what size. They are. We wanna help everybody out in the purpose of our group as it is networking group really wants to get together and have co op activities to the benefit of all let's talk about some of the caught activities. The way the way I see ideal USA differs, for instance, from a big trade group. Like, oh, AAA AAA is an advocacy in a lobbying body, but don't AAA charter is not to provide. Co-op type services to its members. That's just not something that focuses on where I've L USA is more of a cooperative model where it will provide services to its members talk about some of the things you're doing some of the products, which are of service to your members on. That's why a knock knock comes in. Somebody says gosh, we've got a one co billboard alerts which right Lil app developer that one of our budgets pointed out to me a year and a half or two ago met with them minutes. It's a simple thing where the you've got an empty billboard out in a rural location. That's one hundred miles from your office. You can't afford to send the sales out there shoot. We give them the latte lawn. The basic picture based within the system, and they are able to go out and crawl the names addresses from the business owners downhill from the or downstream from the location for a very affordable price of I think for our group of the public price would be a buck fifty a card, and I think ours is about a dollar ten card to terrific product. It's it it's a terrific product. And so then another one that's along a similar line is designed so important one of our operators devoid of rolling outdoor in cookeville. Tennessee has done terrifically well with digital in does very good designs. He's got a great a designer shine Hutton, and they have come up with a web platform or an app that is called tasty ad that enables

USA Chris Hutton Knox IBO cintas AAA AAA cookeville Donald Trump Tennessee Greg Dave L USA developer fifty years two week
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

10:08 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"Hi, I'm Dave Westberg. And you're listening to the board insider podcast where I interview industry leaders about trends impacting the US out of home advertising business. This podcast is sponsored by billboard loans dot com. A non Bank Bank, which provides financing the out of home advertising. Companies billboard loans has been lending to the out of home industry for over twenty two years, but we're loans fast smart committed. Today's guest is Chris Cowburn, Chris is general manager for look billboards and out of whom advertising company with more than one hundred and ten traditional faces and five digital billboards in Ardmore, Oklahoma, Chris's also general manager of the Ibero USA networking group, which promotes the interests of independent billboard operators in the US. And Chris is the only out of home executive. I know who wears cowboy boots to work. Welcome to the show. Chris. As a great intro. Dave, and yeah, the cowboy boots were in central Oklahoma and come up around to ranching community and some of those ranching farmer concepts and try to keep things simple. And a definitely want to be comfortable around, our advertisers. Renting, Chris how did you get any out of home advertising business? You know, we definitely didn't start out that way, basically, our family businesses, a real estate boutique sales operation that started back in the early seventies. So about forty eight years ago, as it turns out that one of our sales agents was a person that did some out of home, and we wound up getting a billboard by our office building way back in saw the benefits of that my personal background is that I'm in a construction management careers where I started out and did construction estimating on heavy instruction and moved into some project engineering and then slowly into managing couple high rise buildings in downtown Saint expect in the eighties in ninety. Came back to Ardmore to run our family business named after my mother Maureen who Tenneco does to taught me too hard work and persistence really does pay dividends. So I built houses run a mortgage. Brokerage for dozen or so years before the big crash and Denson real estate development. But I really have found that my true love is for the outta home world, which is a some of my design awareness capabilities kissed an aside was real estate a good background for what you do in out of home. Oh, really it enabled me to get very comfortable with the terms leases in ways to administer things and much like being property manager for high rise buildings that enabled me that do have coordinate of type things of scheduling elevator times in different tenant improvements. Basically juggling a million balls at the same time all toward a good outcome. That was a great Pratt for me to figure out how to juggle are really complex digital scheduler that we use now as well as cardinal. The cats will the US I tell us about look billboard. Sure billboard company in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Yeah. And that that's a fun thing to childhood friend of mine business partner. Now, Charlie clo- sat Muth may on a local tourism authority back in mid nineties way to try to grow the income for businesses Charlie is a gasoline jobber in say store, owner operator, and he really knows the value. Billboards has got him on the interstate and different places. We also had one outside of our offices. I mentioned which is now arrive yo headquarters share in Ardmore, Oklahoma, when the city fathers turned away our suggestion that they could have a revenue stream by managing billboards to fund the advertising marketing needed to grow the community. We decided to hack we got young kids will do it ourselves opportunity for you guys. We didn't think know much about how to do it. And so leeann somewhat artistic in design oriented myself we decided that we would drive up and down the interstate. And keep focused on the center lines of the roads. And whatever cost we would keep our eyes on the road and not look away if something caught a peripheral vision jumped in and pull the eyeballs out of our head whatever it was caused to the color combination. The picture a whatever it was we would turn and look at it. And make note of whatever was about that design that made note, that's why we named our company look billboards as in pull the eyeballs out of your head looks. And so we lovingly now call our customers lookers, and we like to have fun and even things very Chris you which is a bit unusual as as small as an independent out of home company in smaller market, you have five Digital's. Can you talk a little about that? How you've managed to grow your digital signs. And how you how you manage the digital signs? Sure. That was an interesting thing one or watch fire madman award back about ten years ago for this odd way that we come into doing are. Scheduling we've hired a consultant to said for small town at twenty five thousand sub Trade Center. My how many Digital's could we stand to have in that market? Definitely came back. One don't add more than one Trade Center ads gripe, but one we had three great locations, and we were trying to figure out how in the heck can we pick which one we picked one to the detriment of the others replaces Maya so we figured out with the tone at the time that there was a lot of nervousness about the different inefficacious type councils and whatnot said he fathers might not approve digital way decided that we would go in only if we could figure out how to rotate them we've got a had a successful rotary traditional poster plant that had worked well for the economy level that we have here allow people to move around to the different arterials. And we decided the only way that we would do digital as if we could figure out a way to rotate them on a network while at that point in time there were no available software packages. The manufacturers didn't know. How to do it in? We thought we were down now to relax after about two or three weeks thinking about it. I woke up in the middle of the night with an algorithm that enabled me to do something rather complex. It's a lot of work, but it enabled us to sell one contract and rotated every period of time like every four minutes every eight minutes to another location and in doing that we decided to launch three at the same time at the bottom of the market crisis back when the Dow Jones was about sixty six hundred we bought three Digital's in rolled forward in operated about one hundred twenty five percent of our pro forma for a couple of years labs own run out and that caused us to then add two more. So we have three boards that are triple play. And then there are two boards that we added that are the double play to to go after a baseball fame. And of course, if we wanted to do all five boards, we would combine the double play on the triple play together, we would have a grand slam. And so that has done very well for us over the years, and we're excited to be teaching a lot of our IB. Oh people. Think we're gonna conference coming up. We're going to have a session on Friday morning that will talk about are some of these different styles of going in selling in rural markets. One other interesting thing is maybe we'll talk about is how you manage your billboards as you grow your small, you can keep your all your data on an excel spreadsheet. But as you grows, you get above fifty faces you really need a better way to keep track of receivables, keep track of leases to keep crack of scheduling on your boards, and this becomes acute when your inventory goes up eight x per digital sign. How do you manage basically your software? How you run your billboards? What sort of software to use to help run your billboards about four and a half years ago? A gentleman named Jim own Iran. Next Media back on the east coast. Now is GM been a main president third Espy straight suggests that I talked to apparatus media solutions about a number of things that I tested at pro platform out back. It's a bit in we utilize that now that incorporates proposals instantly switches them into offers, which went signed have scan codes on there that we can scan into create automated billing records posting records for traditional and digital scheduling all in an automated fashion I used to spend a day day and a half doing my billing to make sure that I didn't miss something that everybody would posted get an invoice everybody. It came down didn't get it invoice, and it was fairly tedious. Now, I can say that most of the time my billing on a monthly basis takes about ninety seconds can take up to two or three minutes. If I forgotten to check something along the way, we got interrupted. But it is an enormous times. I time just from the billing, but it was also allowed me to put together a proposal in a minute two minutes in a very professional way and get that out. So the more proposals that I can send out the more hit ratio that I have revenues are good in bottom line is I'm more efficient have more time for my family in allows me, frankly. To spend a lion. Share my time managing the Ibero USA group as general manager less paperwork and less administrative Lia in more strategic executive type decisions sounds Ryan. And the paperwork goes piper less. Yes, I'll scan it's all automated. Now, the beauty is with one button to button clicks pushes to QuickBooks online. And automatically all your invoices are calculated in put into place, your CRM has managed one platform in updates QuickBooks online when you have changes in the apparatus system than that is the structure of scared for large large companies in the IBM platform is caused a scaled down simpler version that doesn't include real estate module, all the IB. Oh few sales which number of our folks are interested in and implementing now perfect. Thanks. Let's take a little break to pay the bills few things are more frustrating than having to educate your Bank around the out of advertising business liberal loans dotcom zone. By Trig is who have been lending to out of home advertising companies for twenty two years. We also own out of home advertising company. That means we will waste your time with stupid questions, we make loans based on your company's cash flow. And we understand that your billboards are worth way more than the steel billboard loans dot

Chris Cowburn Ardmore Oklahoma US Digital Dave Westberg general manager billboard Ibero USA executive Bank Bank Trade Center Charlie clo property manager baseball IBM Denson
"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

The Billboard Insider Podcast

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on The Billboard Insider Podcast

"Uh-huh. Hi, I'm Dave Wessberg. You're listening to the billboard inside a podcast where I interview industry leaders about trends impacting the US out of home advertising business. This podcast is sponsored by billboard loans dot com. A nonbank Bank which provides financing to out of home advertising. Companies board loans has been lending to the out of home industry for over twenty two years billboard loans. Fast smart, committed today's podcast guesses. John Weller John started his career as a CPA and has twenty two years experience lending to meet in out of home advertising companies. In addition to co publishing billboard inside or long with me. John operate lending funds that have made one hundred seventy one billion in loans to media out of home advertising businesses today. John's going to talk about the out of whom advertising debt markets and about the lending activities of billboard loans dot com are out of whom debt fund. Welcome to the show, John. Thanks davis. Nice to be here. John and you can start by talking about billboard loans. What does it do? And who is a typical borrower. Sure, Dave we operate billboard loans as a private commercial lender in adviser. And you know, simply stated we work with outdoor owner operators to assist them in meeting their growth goals and typically we can do that through new plant builds and financing of new plant builds targeted acquisitions and been a common theme lately. Digital conversions taking some of their best structures and converting them to digital mostly small mostly privately held. Absolutely, our focus is on owner operators, and those typically tend to be smaller local or regional operators and our sweet spot in terms of lending size is anywhere from his small as oh hundred thousand dollars up to we have one borrower this approaching a million dollars. You know, it's funny. We laugh I talked to my friends who go to places like New York. And land and Los Angeles, and I'm going to Jasper Alabama or Stephenville, Texas, or it's our borrowers are really small market. Absolutely. That's really what our target is. And that's where we do our best work, John as senior banker to the out of home business. How how do you evaluate the industry from the standpoint of of being a senior lender? Well, what thing I'll do initially point at difference. Which is a lot of commercial banks don't understand the outdoor business in as a result. They tend to shy away from it. We specialize in out of home. And that's because we understand the the business and had lots of years of experience at it. So the things we really appreciate about the outdoor industry is one. It's it has growing revenue as most of our listeners know outdoor. Has a best growth trend of traditional media. And it's making strong roads on even digital advertising. It has barriers to entry. And you know as a lender you like that? Because it means that you limit competition in the industries regulated. So the playing field is limited. And that does help greatly also with market values because his art harder to enter into a market. I recall seeing street authority article that called out Lamar today pointing out just that barriers Tantri which mean once you have a permit to operate a billboard. It is probably not going to be subject to a competing company building just down the street. Absolutely. And and while the business, you know, certainly has its complexities. It's a relatively simple business model, and can is one that could be adjusted or someone, you know, if there's a change in the marketplace or there's a change in the economy is pretty easy to shift to accommodate what? Ever obstacles, I run into end. It's a liquid market. And by that we mean it has good steady collections. Typically, the customers pay very well in particular, local and regional customers as a lot of our listeners know, we're really blessed with the fact that we don't run into a lot of that dead issues, and that other than national business, and of course, every advertising related business has the same issue with national business where you have to wait a little bit longer local and regional business tends to pay on very timely basis. What one of the things I I say about the industry that I enjoy say it's both boring and dynamic it's boring because of his consistency of cash flow, and it's dynamic because of digital in the possibilities that come from digital. And and the last thing is from a perception standpoint, it's really in the traditional media market. The perception of outdoor is one where there's a lot of. Possibilities now with the move into digital the banking community is becoming more aware of outdoor in the possibilities. That are available to the industry. So that's the upside what how about the risks. Well, like any business there are Cerberus said, you know, the most obvious ones are the cancellation of the lease where obviously that can be a significant issue for an operator and also for a lender as a look at it interest rate risk, and that's something that's becoming a little more prevalent as the Federal Reserve has raised their rates over the last year. So and as those interest rates increase, it makes it more difficult to service debt regulatory risk is one in obviously think just the other day or might have been yesterday. Or today, we published an article on the on the Thomas case, right? Dave. That's brad. This you spend heard, and you know, that's a significant regulatory case. That may have impact on our industry.

John Weller John Dave Wessberg billboard senior lender US nonbank Bank Federal Reserve davis Texas Cerberus New York Jasper Alabama Lamar Thomas
"billboard" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Hello. And welcome to misinformation trivia podcast for ladies and gents who have cool trivia sticking it to anoint teams a pop quiz. Where your hosts I'm Lauren. I'm julia. He jewel. Hello. How're things. Things are good. We don't convincing. Though. Everything's great. Great. I see you big computer in front of you. Yeah. My little computer didn't have enough power for this episode. So Damara one someone else who resides in the house, which I live. Oh, I see. So thank you again last week for your. Dash it's up to sewed. Oh, you're so. Well, I'm sure everybody is just raving about it still eating. Yeah. I've been getting a lot of being a lot of tweets saying, thank you. Oh, yes. I've been getting a lot of tweets able or mailing you bottles of perfume K K W body. There are so many like one fourth size bodies of Kim Kardashian around my home. It's disturbance serving. It's disturbing headless torsos. So you mentioned that that was the topic that had come up and confetti to prevent us from winnings. Buck sometimes so along the same line, a problem I've had and and really all of us is things that have to do with the billboard chart. So for have reason who pays attention to that. Well, a lot of people do. A lot of people like memorize these things or something. So I wanted to take a deeper dive into just what the heck are the billboard charts? That's we have so many dang trivia questions about what the hand. Then talk about some of the hit songs and artists and albums that have broken records, which seem ripe for trivia purposes. I love it. So today, we are topping the billboard charts. All right. The billboard charts. Billboard is in Tallec because that's the name of magazine. Okay. So it's not just like the thing on the side of the road billboard Icees like a colloquial reference. It's an actual name of publication. Billboard builds up the billboard charts. Tabulate the relative weekly popularity of songs and albums in the US and abroad. The results are published in billboard magazine in the billboard website provides additional weekly charts. And there are also year end charts, which as we approach the end of the year and things like Mr. Worldwide's, Rockin, your Ziv. He didn't have it last year. And I was so upset. The charts can be ranked according to sales streams or airplay and for main song charts such as the hot one hundred song chart all three pools of data that they have pulled together are used to compile the charts. And we'll talk about these specific charts in bit. So a little bit of background on January fourth nineteen thirty six. Billboard magazine published its very first music hit parade their first music popularity chart was calculated in July nineteen forty variety of song charts followed and they eventually consolidated into the hot one hundred by mid nineteen fifty eight the very first number one song on the hot one hundred K was the song. Poor little fool by Ricky Nelson. Okay. I think I have rookie Nelson..

billboard magazine Ricky Nelson Buck Kim Kardashian US Tallec Mr. Worldwide one hundred K
"billboard" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"billboard" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"And frankly i love her music i love her voice i love everything about kelly clarkson but she's not exactly some trendsetting hipster right now right like she's not on the cutting edge of everything last year ludicrous and vanessa hudgens like was vanessa to win the last time in a hedges was relevant enough to host anything high school musical the the year before that was ludicrous in sierra like the year before that was ludicrous in chrissy teagan so lewd as have been here before that was ludicrous like there is a point now i'm looking at this and say man if the best thing you've got going for you in your careers that you'd probably would be eligible to wrap on a bad country record or host the billboard music awards that's where ludicrous like i don't know which one which one it is but they're sort of a lack of relevance to the board awards at this point it makes me realize as somebody that has it tattooed on my arm because it was that important to me either blindly to me maybe i'm grumpy off my long but either it's become less significant than ever we'd become more transparent than ever or and this is my theory when i was a kid in the mid eighties to the mid nineties when i was a kid watching the billboard awards right there were more crate artists as what you think that's what i think i think you're being get off my lawn guy well i mean that's that's probably fair because we okay so take back to back when you were a kid who were the hot artists sam cook oh my god oh i really just come ask what's happening here okay let's look back at some some billboard winners billboard award winners in nineteen ninety janet jackson one eight in ninety one garth brooks one five you just the that was a particular herb him and mariah carey was blowing up michael jackson one in ninety two whitney one basically everything in phil collins also hosted ninety three i mean those are those are good i'm going to leave out ace abass in ninety four which.

sam cook janet jackson mariah carey michael jackson whitney phil collins kelly clarkson vanessa hudgens vanessa garth brooks