5 Burst results for "Bill Townsend"

"bill townsend" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:22 min | 4 months ago

"bill townsend" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Daddy dot com. You're listening to Chicago's afternoon news here on 7 20. W G. And I'm Steve Bertrand. Okay, You know how an ID of Lance's says you guys that every time she looks at the TV, she see someone getting jabbed with the needle. She could kind of drives you crazy. If you were to say that I swear to God when you guys were doing the news and sports and traffic and everything. I looked up at a TV monitor with half an eye ball, and it was a doctor, a nurse with a bright purple glove. And the syringe in her hand, and I thought it was a muppet with the needle in its mouth. I thought it was like some sort of hallucination with the vaccination I thought is like somehow reach two kids. There was some nut that giving someone a shot, but no Looking closer. Those were fingers. Have you seen this tip off thing in Cincinnati, Kevin University of Cincinnati and Xavier. I think I think they played on Saturday. Apparently, it's just annual thing wearing a rivalry. Yeah. Bill Townsend's are both teams in Cincinnati. And but the fans try to outdo each other with tips at restaurants that night. I had seen that I like that total of what they know of $6232 in tips. Um, one came from a Cincinnati fen $1200 tip on a $12 bill. Xavier fan gives $2000 on a $30 bill, and then they write a little note on it saying, you know, go X you or go You see bear catch for the wind. Things like that. I wonder how that started. So we should do nice things like we get all mad. A Packers fans and people get drunk and games and yelled profanities at one another fight each other. We should just do things like that. When it comes to our robbers just give back to the community. Well, maybe different rivalry, not the Packers so much. It must be some Cubs Sox. Can I just get a little hostile? But be nice Cubs Sox do that Everyone will benefit the city of Chicago. Okay, So do you guys. Are you familiar with the Impostor syndrome? No, no, not at all Married. Have anything to do with the show the imposter? No, it has nothing to do with it. I'm surprised there was a survey We saw recently, I think was 70% of people say that they have suffered from the impostor syndrome at one time or another in their lives. And the idea is that you're not really worthy of where you are. You're not deserving of where you are like your you have nightmares, So you're gonna wake up and people going to realize your fraud. Kevin, You never have the dream. I had a really weird work related dream last night. About what? I'm not gonna share. It Just brought it up. Was it a radio nightmare? Sort of Kinda. What is it? I can't say the here. OK, OK, So here's so there's an Imposter syndrome quiz. We're gonna talk to a psychologist. I believe he's a psychologist a little bit later. From the University of Pennsylvania about that, But are you worried people may find out that you're not really is capable as they think you are right. So that's the definition of the impostor syndrome. You sometimes feel pressure to know the answer to any professional questions. Someone might ask you that's hard for steps hard on a sports guy literally. Because I've done sports a long time ago, and everyone thinks they're sports expert, right and they try to touch they try to stump you. Well, especially now, just the way sports conversations go down with when you mix in Twitter and the way things can be right, taken out of context, or you can corner somebody into a Certain corner based off of a narrative that they've sort of manufactured because they were able to put out a couple tweets that clearly pin somebody against them. It's just it's just become so much different and it's It's so much more nasty. The sports conversation When for May I got into X. I love like Listen, his sports radio and like reading sports columns in the newspaper believer, not a red hard copy newspapers growing up and really Me, too. So It's just changed so much. I should do something more like like news broadcasts. That's easy. Really. It is easier because, well, it's changed as well. But it used to be easier than sports because everyone thought they were sports expert. Do you ever think that if you can do it, anybody can Mary, You never had that feeling. You should always think that anybody else could do your job. I think because that makes you work harder job, but that's a sign of that. You suffer from the impostor syndrome. I think you suffer from that When you're younger. When you're old. You don't even care anymore. You're like I don't care what people think. Do you agonize over even the smallest flaws in your work? Not anymore. I do very depends. Are those your laurels? You're sitting on over there, Mary, Just like If you make a mistake, just keep going. That's that's my motto. So nobody catches it. Okay? And when you have success, do you privately feel like you fooled them again? Don't know about fool that must feel guilty, though. Well, I think that's part of it, then. Yeah. I mean, I'm surprised you guys air is confident as you mean that you don't deserve to be incredible thing. Maybe nobody wants to say it out loud. If that's true, it's kind of personal. Paranoid. I mean, yeah. You make me nervous. Now I feel like Oh my God. It's a natural thing If 70% of people said that they feel this way, I don't think it's that unusual. Yeah, but I would say if there's success it's almost like okay. I was supposed to do that. I'm not gonna gloat about it. You secretly compare your abilities to those around you and feel like they're better than you. Used to a lot more than I do now agreed. I want to go back to Kevin's answer. What does that mean? Exactly? I think, because you I feel more confident in what I'm doing. Okay. Good. 0456 years ago you mentioned I started here something I don't know. I just think In the beginning you have doubts about your own talents, and then you immediately starts. You know, Measure yourself against other people. But then when you have get comfortable enough for confident, often changed a little. Don't you think this impostor thing has a lot to do a social media to know it didn't know because I talked about this with Kathy and Judy 20 years ago recently pressure. I think that we as a society as Americans put on ourselves. It's the same reason why we don't like to take vacation or we feel guilty. If we take a sick day. That's interesting. That's just a good work at last. No, no, it's not. No, the Europeans. They're so much better vacation. Well, that's true. So much better, But I will ask the doctor if it is sort of an American thing. Okay, Kevin, we're going to take a break last chance to share your dream. I really can't even fake it. I'll tell you after year. That's not an X rated No, It's just so like in in depth work related. That would only make sense that everybody that's on the show, so I'd be like I don't wanna get trouble for anything about John..

Kevin Cincinnati Packers Chicago Mary Sox Kevin University of Cincinnati Bill Townsend Steve Bertrand Lance Twitter Xavier Cubs University of Pennsylvania fraud John Kathy
"bill townsend" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"bill townsend" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Move. Yeah. You know, Bill Bill towns died on July twenty fifth nineteen sixty four. Okay. And. The gentleman who became by acclimation, the president of the roundtable on his death was home in Hamilton. And one thing I'll always loved about. This roundtable was the. How well versed in the language all these characters were they really were. You've you heard Bill Townsend. But home in Hamilton was a spectacular rider, a spectacular master of the English language as was Hamilton tap. And the things they wrote about one another about events there. We're we're classic. But this is what Holman Hamilton said at the first meeting of the roundtable after in September after Bill passed away. And he said he said this. Tonight. I would not say a word about the career of William H Townsend or about the charming books. He wrote or the professional triumphs. He scored these are in this fear of common knowledge now appreciation of them has appropriately passed into the public domain and posterity will be earth. Ultimate judge permit me instead to voice for you. What any of you his sincere friends would surely say let it be underscored here. And now that Bill Townsend in this organization built a solid community of spirit and s spray a delightful appreciation of man for man, a brotherliness a rare achievement of. Affection without the slightest sign of affection. This do we not agree is the best in Kentucky. This is friendship. Others might use the very words he used, but those same words would fall lifeless and dull he had a sense of timing a significant pause and awareness of contrast and a flare of drama if Kentucky inns have long combined in an amazingly attractive way characteristics of the earthly and genteel. Here was a man who above all others represented the quintessence of the combination. How rich the heritage how pervasive the influence? How meaningful the tradition? Even we cannot finally say, but who would deny that the colors in the tapestries have Kentucky's historic past seem less likely to fade because a Bill Townsend color, charm, imaginative excursions, tantalizing anecdotes and the zest for reporte. We experienced them all at first hand because we knew it. Ours is a treasure of cultural comradeship with a premium far beyond material calculation, and that salty son of Anderson county is that catalyst to whom we are all indebted like Mark Twain, whom in many ways Bill Townsend so strongly resembles may we not paraphrase the lines of the Australian, poet, Robert Richardson. Warm summer sun shine kindly here. Warm Sud southern wind blow softly here. Green sod above li-, light light good night. Dear friend, goodnight. Goodnight. That's an example, just how incredible. I'm people each list with how beautiful eulogy the most beautiful I ever read ever heard. But that's what he said in that night. The. The the the speaker for the roundtable was the the great historian bell Irvin. Wiley bell. Was a graduate of as berry and got his PHD at Yale. And. Taught it Louisiana state university. And. Then taught at Emory and people like Charlie Roland like Otis single, Terry. Who is president of the university of Kentucky, bud Robertson? They were all students Abell Wiley bell. Wiley was the dean literally the dean of American civil war history. And he wrote not only great books himself. Johnny Ravin, Billy yank to volumes. But he wrote two he edited tons of memoirs and diaries of mostly confederate soldiers because he came from Tennessee and bell was the speaker the night that home and gave that talk and bell got up and before he began his talk. He said built Townsend. Represents to me more of what I love about Kentucky than any human being. I've ever know. What attribute? So. That's a remarkable tribute from Bill. Yeah. Yeah. Wonderful and we've gone through a whole crowd of great presidents. I mean home, and of course, became the president for a significant period of time. I think more than ten years and after Hohmann iae buddy Thompson became president. He is an auction near here in town and real character total character and after him Charlie Roland became president of the roundtable. And of course, we know Charlie Charlie's hundred one year years old this month. He was president from nineteen eighty four until nineteen ninety four and Charlie like Bill Wylie came from east, Tennessee, bell Wiley, love Charlie roll out. He middle issue. But Charlie got his PHD at LSU after getting a master's degree at Vanderbilt, but. Charlie taught at Tulane university. And then became professor of history at the university of Kentucky, and he was above the last of a group of historians at the university all of whom were connected with around table who were among the greatest southern historians in America, one of one of the greatest departments of southern history and in the country and Charlie held forth at the roundtable for for ten years, and Charlie is still is a character. But he carried that torch on through until nineteen ninety four and then James clutter became president. And when he left Jack Cunningham longtime treasure the roundtable took over a lawyer here in town, and then I took over in nineteen two thousand thirteen that's the genealogy. The roundtable the roundtable. Mr.

Bill Townsend Bill Bill towns Charlie Charlie president Kentucky Charlie Roland Wiley bell bell Wiley Hamilton university of Kentucky Abell Wiley bell William H Townsend Bill Wylie Holman Hamilton Tennessee bell Irvin bell Anderson county LSU Vanderbilt
"bill townsend" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"bill townsend" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Round. Win viral viral viral in nineteen fifty three and it went viral thirty three and a third. By the way, their people to this day will come up to me at the roundtable or the places they do you have a copy of that speech. Bill towns, if you don't got one I can give you. I mean, it's just you can't imagine the number of people that don't copies of that to me. Unbelievable. So ours was founded in started in nineteen fifty three and let me let me tell you some of the people who are with him who. These are the founding spirits around hip, of course, Bill Townsend. He's he's holding forth in his own law. Herman Lee Donovan who was president of the university of Kentucky. I didn't know Dr Donovan, but he had a marvelous reputation in this town. Then eighty kirwin kirwin. I knew kirwin ABC kirwin was the was a historian did some extraordinarily fine work on John J Crittenden and then Johnny green of the orphan brigade. He's the one who originally edited that fine book kirwin came from Louisville. He played football at the university of Kentucky and became during World War Two the football coach, and you can imagine in the middle of World War Two. What Kentucky's football team was like not much. It wasn't much throughout my young life. But it must've been really at a low ebb during Curran's coaching tenure there and he became president of the university Kentucky. So he was there a great historian. But also, a an early administrator of the university of Kentucky a home in Hamilton was their home and became a very, dear dear friend of mine, and and. And Homan Homan came from Fort, Wayne, Indiana, he went to Williams College, and then got into journalism and was a a newspaper man for the Fort Wayne news, and while he was a newspaper man, he wrote the two volume biography of saccharine Taylor. And he was he's like Bill Townsend he had a profession, but he was so interested in history that he writes two volumes. The only Barbara Fay's Baga fee of Zachary Taylor ever done. I mean, far as I'm concerned, and then he decided in midlife I'm going to go I'm gonna get up. So he gets up at the university of Kentucky, and then becomes a professor. So he's attending this meeting as a fellow who is in his final years. It is getting his PHD. In history, and he became one of the most popular historians and professors ever at the university of Kentucky. And if you knew him, you'd know why he's was the perfect gentleman. A- terrific human being also present was another old friend for whom I worked for many years Hamilton tap. Dr tap came from Springfield Kentucky. Went to center. College was a graduate of the class of nineteen twenty two. And he was there for the famous football was there during nineteen twenty one the famous football game with Harvard, and I asked him once if he went he said, no I didn't go the game. But we went down to the Western Union office and listen for it. And they would they would announce as the cables came across. They would go out on the front straight announce Senator just gained two yards. Bobick Mellon took the ball to the right and his tackled around the thirty six yard line of. As close as you got. But. Ham as we all called him became a professor at the university of a longtime educator and became a professor at the university. But more than that, he became the head of the Kentucky life museum, which is now wave land state park out off the Hague mill pike, and I used to work for him out there. But he was he was president j Winston Cullman engineered developer and a amateur history. Really not amateurs were isn't words overused. He was a serious historian wrote a lot of pamphlets a lot of good books and was a great photographer. And so he wrote a lot of photographic works on Kentucky's history. Willard rouse Gylfason, the state geologist who I mean, he's one of the great historians of Kentucky's frontier. Period. Living in Frankfurt. He was a terrific character. A so these were the types that formed the Kentucky around nitsa talented group. A group to say I feel like the leadership still maintains a lot of talent a lot of connections with the university of Kentucky. There's a high level of academic excellence represented there and the roundtables able to draw speakers of just the highest caliber from all over the country. It's an amazing organization. What happened after that initial meeting? They had a second one in Herman Donovan's office at the university. And they're the same group elected the temporary officers and then in November of nineteen fifty three before forty five charter members they conducted their first meeting at the UK student union, and they voted to make those temporary officers permanent. And that was built Townsend as the as the president of the roundtable. And then Hamilton tap as the secretary. He was the secretary for twenty plus years, maybe say nineteen fifty three. Oh, I guess twenty two years. I mean, he was forever. The secretary around able he had a great way with words, which I'll read to you shortly. But. So Edward Dabney who is a banker here in town. The old First National Bank became the treasurer. And they were in the same building is built housing and then the head an executive committee. They put together and get these names Thomas Dyonisis Clark, Tom Clarke, the great story published. Multiple works on Kentucky history. An terrific. Character was one of the he was one of the founding executive committee members of it. Jay Winston, Cullman, Herman dodd-frank Frank rose who is president of Transylvania university. Even Philip Davidson who is president of the university of Louisville, and then Charles farms Lee, who was mayor of Louisville on the executive Willard rouse Gelson that was the crowd that was on the executive committee around any now even today at the meetings are members from Louisville Frankfort long every lurk Sinti, Anna Wease released on the tug fork. So the tradition of traveling to the to the meetings is still from across Kentucky is still it's still it's still mid still maintained. There was there's been something you could tell it as a ten year old attending a meeting downtown. Everyone in. There was one dressed up a number two. They all imbibed before the the meal, which was almost a tradition. It's a ceremoniously imbibed and then sat down for dinner, and we're waited on. They liked to have sit down dinner, and you could tell by just as young kid that these people were one seriously interested in the civil war. They may not know a lot about it. But they're serious interested in learning and they're gentlemen, it was all men then and they were kind to one another. They enjoyed one another's company and that camaraderie. Has been evident throughout the entire life of this organization. Yeah. And it's today persist today, we have men and lots of women who come. Yes. There's still a sense of there's a sense of formality as well as a sense of camaraderie, and it is a great occasion five times a year when people still do that. And like from the very beginning. We do only five meetings a year. This has been a tradition from the very beginning. And we made on in September November January March and may. So if nothing overburdened no-one a Monday night a Monday night. Yeah. And it always to you always depart and a timely way. Never it. It always ends round eight thirty after the speaker and the QNA after the dinners been served speaker gets up. It really is a great occasion move.

Kentucky university of Kentucky president Herman Lee Donovan Bill Townsend Louisville university Kentucky football Springfield Kentucky professor Kentucky life museum Bill towns Hamilton executive committee secretary Zachary Taylor Homan Homan university of Louisville Willard rouse Gylfason
"bill townsend" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

11:01 min | 2 years ago

"bill townsend" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Without. All sorts of nursing care, and those days, it was nice to have someone agree to help you and it was worth a lot. And for Ben hell, that's what he did. And Bill took care of him. And at the end Bill got the house gave it to his daughter and been out there. Many many times with Bill daughter and her husband, so lovely place. It's beautiful a lovely place. A Greek revival mansion building out eighteen fifty two beautiful place. So that's built towns, and what are some of the artifacts he collected? And where could we see them today? We'll. Some of the Lincoln artifacts. Let me give you a story. I like story. My first introduction with Bill. Townsend was in November nineteen fifty nine. Now, I would have been ten going on eleven and I went to the Kentucky civil war roundtable when it was it was being held in the gold room of the Lafayette hotel. Which is now the government building down on mainstream. Then it was a beautiful hotel Laureus ballrooms, and and the round table met in this the gold room, which is absolutely gorgeous. Anyway, my host who was also my the family doctor William team accent asked me would you like to go up and meet Mr. Townsend, and I said I'd love to. 'cause I'd heard about him. And so I went up there and up they're going up there with us was Dr maxim son film action who was a young chum of mine growing up and has been a friend of mine ever since is to this day and like his father. He's a loyal member the Kentucky civil war around table. So I went up to see this fellow in here is this this fellow with the three piece suit seated in the chair behind the speaker stand, and he sees us come up, and he turns in the chair. And he Wight white hair as he says shock of white hair. And he's got this three piece suit with his watch fob. And and he turns into goes, how are you young fellow? And I said, I'm fine. He says I'm Bill Townsend, and I said, well, I'm can't Brown. And this is my friend, Phil Maxon. And towns and shook Phil's hand. And he goes to me do you like a Lincoln? And I said, oh, yes. Mr. towns than I really do like ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Now, get this, folks. He then reaches into his pocket and pulls out a pocket watch. And he says to you know, who's watch this is and I go, no. And he turns it over and it has on the back a Lincoln. And he said, it's Abraham Lincoln's. And he says you see this crease up by the stem. And I said, yes, he says Tina how that crease got there. I said, no. And he says when Lincoln was shot in Ford's better. He said he slumped in the chair and major Rathbone who is his bodyguard ran over and tried to pull him out of the chair and the watch got caught. Now, can you imagine the effect of this on a ten year old kid? My eyes were just popping out of my head. I know we probably would have left head off after this little little deal with me. But he was wearing Lincoln's pocket watch. And then he said, do you know, who's cufflinks these are on? I said they Lincoln's to he says, they are they were he said he wore them the night. He was assassinated see Ben helm gave him those and Ben got him. Because I mean, he he was a. He lived a long time and in that family. The only other living member was raw. It was Abraham Lincoln's oldest son, Robert Robert Todd Lincoln, and Robert Todd would have had them and probably given them Ben Ben helm because there was no one else to take them. So the proven ons of them was darn good those were like artifacts. And those items today as I understand are in the Kentucky. Historical sino. The I have seen the watch at the condition. Historical. Yeah. It's actually in Frankfurt. Yeah. Cufflinks? We don't know. I don't know. And are the famous Lincoln collector of whose name escapes me. It'll come to me but out west actually, I think bought. A lot of the Lincoln artifacts from Mary Genevieve well after Bill passed away she had no way of knowing what to do with all of that. And it was extensive not only Lincoln, but all kinds of things related to cash. Clay, Kentucky, Anna Kentucky history. Bill is a huge collector. Yeah. So so when you met Mr. Townsend as a young boy. Yeah, he was the president was the president the Kentucky civil roundtable. So let's talk about what are these roundtables that you're referencing? What what how did these get going? The the God going frankly with the Chicago civil war roundtable this Chicago, civil war roundtable, the organization that Bill gave that famous speech to fragment which you just heard. He gave out in nineteen fifty two October of nineteen fifty two Chicago civil around table began not too far before then, and it's whole mission was simply to have meetings than like, Chicago roundtable were meeting monthly, but having meetings where they could invite notable speakers and then discuss the American civil war and give people an opportunity to to do that. And that roundtable was put together much like this one by people who had an academic interest in the civil war were academics. But also people who simply had an avocation interest in the civil war some people who had a commercial interest in the civil war like the the owner of the ABRAHAM LINCOLN bookshop in Chicago in Chicago, which is still being operated. A Ralph Newman was his name. And these people had huge interest in not just to sell things, but an interest themselves. That's what got them into the business of of running a bookshop like that. So all those kind of people came together in Chicago, they referred to it as a table because that was kind of the the vision of this something like king Arthur's of famous crew that sat around round table in Britain. And these were the select, and that's kind of the thought behind it. And once the Chicago civil war roundtable began going in earnest you saw some other start to spring up. The second one though was the Kentucky civil war roundtable. And what happened was Bill went up there and gave that speech, and he was so well. Saved. I mean, it was a tremendous. And he went up there with his old friend j Winston Cullman who is another really close friend of mine for years. We were great buddies other two of them went up there. Townsend and Coleman were inseparable, and he gave that talk and came back so fired up about the idea of an organization had just had speakers on the civil war that he decided why don't we form one? And so in October nineteen sixty nineteen fifty three. Bill Townsend called an informal group to his law office on main street and to discuss forming forming around table and by the way by nineteen October nineteen fifty three. That speech. He gave had already been put on thirty three and a third RPM records, and we're sold all over the country. Civil around him. Benefit of ABRAHAM LINCOLN books you. Yes. Yes. No man was recording. This unbeknownst Bill towns. And here's a funny story about that Bill. I mean, people were asking if you got the record that you of your of your of your speech, Bill goes, hell, no, hell, no. Like this. No one ever told me he was being recorded. He really got mad about it. And he threatened to sue Ralph Newman for for doing that. But then one day he gets a letter in the mail that up on the upper left of the envelope. Breeds the White House. And and he opened this envelope up and unfolds the letter, and it says, dear Mr. Townsend Mamie, and I have listened to your recording on caches, Marcellus clay, and we found it. The most entertaining speech we ever heard signed to David Eisenhower and with that he gave up all thoughts of suing round.

Bill Townsend ABRAHAM LINCOLN Kentucky Abraham Lincoln Mr. Townsend Mamie Robert Robert Todd Lincoln Lincoln Chicago Ralph Newman Ben hell ABRAHAM LINCOLN bookshop Ben Ben helm Phil Maxon White House David Eisenhower Ford Laureus Dr maxim Wight
"bill townsend" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"bill townsend" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Am seven fifty w sp every morning dope pandora recheck i twenty five delays at extravagant update less than three minutes now eight thirty nine our midtown temperature seventy three seventy one year old grandmothers arrested after leaving her two grandkids in the car while she was off shopping at costco sarah o'hara with cobb county police tells channel two action news they've seen a recent rise in hot carcases is a dangerous concern for the bills townsend claims the four nine year olds were only in the car for about twenty minutes but the kids say it was more like an hour townsend faces two counts of reckless conduct dekalb county couple is pleading for the return of their dog after burglars break into their home while they're at work for is seven pound yorkie who who was stolen when thieves kicked in the door to carlin cynthia heckman smoke rise home he was a ten year old dog looked like a puppy but he he was not a puppy he said oh don besides pepper electron ix jewelry and medical equipment were also stolen the couple suspects at least one large man is involved you to about a science fourteen footprint right up by the dead bolt kicked it once to to children's rings were also found in the driveway in dekalb county sandra parrish wsb you're college kids are using tobacco on campus tobacco free policies are on the rise at college and university campuses around the country cd's growing king says the number of smoke free campuses as increased quite a bit over the last five years more than doubled from about seven hundred and seventy five campuses back in two thousand twelve to well over two thousand campuses in two thousand seventeen he says smoke free policies are extremely important on college campuses since ninety nine percent of adult smokers start before.

sarah o'hara cynthia heckman costco cobb county townsend dekalb county sandra parrish seventy three seventy one year ninety nine percent four nine year twenty minutes seven fifty w three minutes seven pound five years ten year