18 Burst results for "Bill Sprigs"

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

07:28 min | 4 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Thirty nine and fifty eight biontech shot up eight and eight tenths percent today after the biotech firm raised. Its goal for the number of vaccines. It will produce companies aiming for two and a half billion doses manufactured by the end of this year compared to its earlier prediction of two point. Three two point. Four billion on vaccine partner pfizer off one point three percent today johnson johnson down six tenths percent bonds basically steady yield on the ten year treasury. Note one point seven two percent. You're listening to marketplace this marketplace. Podcast is supported by tommy. John if it's not supporting you it doesn't belong in your life. Time for some spring cleaning. Toss out last year sagging elastic underwear and step into some new tommy. John hammock pouch underwear with dozens of comfort innovations. Once you've tried. Tommy john underwear. You're never going back tommy. John doesn't have customers. They have fanatics right. Now you'll get twenty five dollars off. Sitewide at tommy john dot com slash market. That's twenty five dollars off sitewide on underwear and lounge wear at tommy john dot com slash market. Tommy john dot com slash market. See site for details and by the d'amore mckim school of business at northeastern university. A world class business school preparing leaders to thrive in the digital economy further. Your potential through experience driven learning and combination of skills. No other business. School can provide combined technology analytics and creative problem solving with experienced driven learning. Its business education. Reimagined take your next step at northeastern dot. Edu slash be more. That's northeastern dot edu slash be more. This is marketplace. I'm kai ryssdal one of the biggest human migration stories of the past twenty years or so has been people from the chinese countryside moving to the cities looking for economic opportunity. Hundreds of millions of people have done that. A year of this pandemic though has pushed some of those people back out of the cities as marketplace jennifer pack reports now from shanghai real estate agent. Erica wears his hair short and slightly toss oil paired with a fitted black jacket. He blends in easily in shanghai. But he's a second class citizen here. It really counts like finding a spouse. We went to the marriage market at people's park on a weekend. Just before the covid nineteen lockdown. Parents advertise their unmarried children's qualities on handwritten notes and tacked them on umbrellas. Erica read one of the ads. Joe lenient nineteen ninety. One single female hot spotlight three pale. Skin beauty has a masters degree. From newcastle university. In the uk turned to money and assets things people in china readily talk about since she works in shanghai's education and training secto income at around thirty thousand dollars a year on an apartment in shanghai seeking an unmarried man with a bachelor degree ohio. Erica is a college graduate but he. He's not an eligible candidate mostly because his residential registration is in the chinese countryside. Rather than in shanghai which limits his ability to buy a home get any future children into schools or retire here. That's a deal. Breaker for many shanghai berents including this mother standing nearby shanghai if he's not registered to shanghai that won't work. My daughter has an apartment. He or she has registered to shanghai as a good job. A good education. I wanna son-in-law with the same background as her. That may sound harsh. But eric hook gets her point opportunity. Is everything here. that's why he came to work in shanghai worship. I have a colleague who Seventy seven dollars in commission in one month. If i wanted to be like that i can change my life. N people without college degrees have far fewer opportunities so family from eastern jiangsu province worked in shanghai for years but low salaries and lack of shanghai. Registration eventually drove them out the sun so tall gong returned to the city as an adult and ended up in a factory that paid him less than nine thousand dollars a year. He quit after three months washington. That's how i feel lost. I don't know what to do. Show food and random very expensive so it's just so hard to survive here. He and eric who were outside of shanghai spending time with their families. When china went into lockdown. They couldn't return for months. And that's when eric Started to rethink his shanghai dream. You say to be in shanghai such a stressful city. And i've always wanted to be closer to my parents. He found another real estate job near his home village and with the help of his parents even bought an apartment woman goes to the honda hint. Not these new. My salary is higher than in shanghai. The company pays into my social security and my housing fund. Which i didn't get in my shanghai job. I also get perks like a cake for my birthday as for x. factory workers chow gone. He hasn't returned to shanghai either before he left the city last year. He and his friends stopped in a karaoke booth at a mall. It's a stress reliever. They chose a song from an eighties cantonese. Rock band called beyond about sticking your dreams soto cons. Dream is to make enough money to pay off his credit cards and gambling debts. He still trying to make it in other cities in shanghai. I'm jennifer pack for marketplace. We talked about the minimum wage bit yesterday. The origin story is what christie clark gave us how britain the fair labor standards act with specifically designed to make it hard for companies to pay the legal minimum and overtime pay but in this part two of her story. Chrissy explains that from the very beginning. There've been companies and whole industries that found the loopholes. Starting right when it was passed in nineteen thirty eight when agricultural and domestic workers were cut out at the time some lawmakers pointed to administrative reasons why farm and domestic workers were initially excluded from the minimum wage. Said it would be hard to make the law work in those jobs. Since they're hiring and payment was often informal without much recordkeeping. But there's another reason. Farm and domestic workers were excluded. That goes to something ugly. Bill sprigs is an economics professor at howard university. He's also the chief economist for the afl cio and he says in order to get the minimum wage law passed there had to be buying from politicians across the country including the southern democrats and they had a very particular world order. They were trying to enforce one of white supremacy. The south.

Bill sprigs Erica eric Chrissy Four billion twenty five dollars eric hook Thirty christie clark eight one month three percent Tommy john dot com Seventy seven dollars china Joe uk washington pfizer yesterday
"bill sprigs" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:38 min | 4 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Reveal

"Or permit to work to suffer or permit to work. When you employ someone you permit them to work or at least you suffer them. Work suffer as intolerate like in the phrase. I don't suffer fools which is just an awkward way of of talking now about what they meant is if if a company is knows works. Happening is in position to know what's happening. And it's benefiting them they're as an employer and that's i i couldn't even think of a way for congress to put it more. Broadly then a company that permit someone to work for it on its behalf and kate says he went back and actually read what lawmakers were thinking how worried they were about companies looking for ways to get around the definition of employ. She thinks the definition is kind of genius because it is so broad it acts like a blanket it assumes a worker is an employee who deserves minimum wage unless the people who hired the worker can prove otherwise but even as the minimum wage law was being written in this super broadway. There were businesses and industries that we're trying to get around paying minimum wage to their workers one of the most glaring examples with something written directly into the minimum wage law the exclusion of agriculture workers and domestic workers. Bill sprigs is an economics professor. At howard university also the chief economist for the afl cio and he says the reason those two job categories agricultural workers and domestic workers like housekeepers nannies. Were originally excluded from the minimum wage. Law goes.

Bill sprigs kate congress howard university two job one
"bill sprigs" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on KCRW

"But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. You got laid off from classes went virtual. I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the food pantry Truth from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back is a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment and we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession. That worries economists. Bill sprigs, he says many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. The longer someone's without a job, the harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid class and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover Those jobs. Here is co author Quay Lin Island Group. The progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take care of it out of the picture is so slow And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa into last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Superbly store. We got a visit from our supervisor, He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened, being soak it bombs a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years. We are in love, Toya. Has my Minnesota group places travel grinding to a halt last spring, Belisle has tried to keep busy, even organizing virtual tours. Showing me.

Sam Greenglass San Francisco Bud Johnson Carrie Belisle Toya 35 years Quay Lin Island Group Belisle Gloria Espinosa Johnson California last April six months three two years first Espinosa NPR January Minnesota
"bill sprigs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. Sites of great the people. I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. He got laid off from classes went virtual. I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the food pantry Truth from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back. It was a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment, and we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession that worries economists. Bill Sprigs, he says many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. Longer someone's without a job, The harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up in the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid less and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover those jobs. Here's co author Quay Lin Island group. The progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take care of it out of the picture is so slow And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa into last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. A super Be sure we got a visit from our supervisor. He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were going to be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened, Pienso que bottles a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers Cape because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35.

Sam Greenglass San Francisco Bill Sprigs Carrie Belisle Bud Johnson Gloria Espinosa Johnson 35 last April California six months three first two years NPR a year later Espinosa Quay Lin Island group One January
"bill sprigs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:16 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. You got laid off from classes, but virtual, I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the food pantry, it crude from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back. It was a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment, and we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession that worries economists. Bill Sprigs, he says many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. Longer someone's without a job, The harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid last and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover those jobs. Here's co author Quay Lin Island group. The progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take care of it out of the picture. Is so slow. And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa. Until last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Superbly store. We got a visit from our supervisor, He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened Bs. Okay, bombs a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need off additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years. We are in love, Toya. Has my Minnesota group like he's traveled. Grinding to a halt last spring. Belisle has tried to keep busy, even organizing virtual tours. Showing me Tuesday at two for my virtual presentation. About this week, she finally began a new full time job. What's good here at a vaccine? Put it in San Diego. It's just nice to To chat with people and especially people that are getting vaccinated because they're all so happy and excited. While knows this new job won't be permanent, she's hopeful tour Busses will start rolling again. And she can go back to work in the field She's loved for so many years. Sam bring Glass NPR news. It's W and my seat just.

Sam Greenglass Bill Sprigs San Diego San Francisco Carrie Belisle Bud Johnson 35 years Belisle Johnson Gloria Espinosa Toya California January six months last April Tuesday three Sam first millions
"bill sprigs" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:20 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. You got laid off from classes, but virtual I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the food pantry it truth from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when or if that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back. It was a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment and we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession. That worries economists. Bill sprigs, he says many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. The longer someone's without a job, the harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid less and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover Those jobs. Here is co author Quay Lin Island Group. The progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take care of it out of the picture is so slow And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa in Till last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Super. Be sure we got a visit from our supervisor. He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident shall be called back to her old job. When offices reopened, Pienso que bombs a necessity to move Chapman. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years..

Sam Greenglass San Francisco Carrie Belisle Bud Johnson 35 years Quay Lin Island Group Johnson Gloria Espinosa California six months three Espinosa two years first NPR Chapman last April a year later McKenzie One
"bill sprigs" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:08 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on KCRW

"Reopen and vaccinations speed up. But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. You got laid off from classes, but virtual, I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the pre pantry truth from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back. It was a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment. And we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession that worries economists. Bill Sprigs, he says. Many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. The longer someone's without a job, the harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid class and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. Ah McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover those jobs. Here's co author Quay Lin Island group, the progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take of it out of the picture. Is so slow. And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa into last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Superbly store. We got a visit from our supervisor, He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened, be instructed bombs, a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years. We are in love, Toya. Has my Minnesota group like he's traveled. Grinding to a halt last spring, Belisle has tried to keep busy, even organizing virtual tours Join me Tuesday at two for my virtual presentation about counselor Deck finally began a new full time job. What's good here at a vaccine? Put it in San Diego. It's just nice to To chat with people and especially people that are getting vaccinated because they're all so happy and excited. While knows this new job won't be permanent, she's hopeful tour Busses will start rolling again. And she can go back to work in the field She's loved for so many years. Sam bring Glass NPR news.

Bill Sprigs Sam Greenglass Tuesday Bud Johnson Carrie Belisle Gloria Espinosa 35 years Belisle San Francisco California Toya Janet Woodcock January six months Food and Drug Administration last April Johnson Woodcock three first
"bill sprigs" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:15 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on KCRW

"Use by you by the FDA. One is over the counter to require prescription. How good are they do they work? If they do work? How will it test works depends on the situation that it's in. For example, if a test would have one in 104 Positive. If you test those very large number of people who didn't have the virus, you would have more false positives right then true positives. But if you tested a whole lot of people who have the virus that you have a lot more true positives. So it's very confusing to the general public. But in general, they work for what they're intended for, which is for home use for people that they don't have toe go to the doctors or go outside or whatever, and have a test, which prompts the question of why the FDA has not authorized more of them there. They're cheap. You're saying they work. These rapid tests are rapid. And they're widely available in other countries. Why not here? Well, we again respond to applications that are given to us. There are standards that have to be met. And it can be tricky to do these tests. They're also going to be more vulnerable, many of them to variance in, so we're going to have to keep surveillance over them because they may become less accurate, In fact, if variants become prevalent Your agency has acknowledged early missteps with antibody tests a different tests, but many of them were allowed to be used without review. And I do wonder. Is that weighing on your decision? Is that holding back more rapid authorization of Auntie Gin tests? No, I don't think so. I think There are a number of quite a number of applications and before us that they need to satisfy our standards and conditions before we would authorize them. You know, the American public deserves tests that are reliable and we'll do what they say they're going to do under enable I do want to ask. I said a Zay was introducing you that the FDA has made some missteps has buckled to political pressure misrepresented basic science. I was referring to incidents last year, including when Scientists. A bunch of scientists came out and said the FDA had grossly misrepresented data on blood plasma and how effective that could be in treating covert patients, for example. You were in charge now on an interim basis for now, have you made changes that should Cause Americans to be more confident that the FDA is going to accurately represent science and data. Well, I believe that right now we are really free of political pressure that we're making science and database decisions and that will continue with the convalescent plasma. I believe it was more of a Error in description rather than a deliberate misrepresentation. But again is when you came in and took over. Were there any changes where you looked around and thought we need to do this differently? Well, I'm doing a lot of things different, but that's because among very well familiar with the agency. But I believe the agency processes are very robust and we have great assurance that our scientific processes will go on independently. That is Dr Janet Woodcock. She is acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. Dr Woodcock thank you very much for your time and for joining us, we appreciate it. Thanks for the opportunity. American jobs are starting to come back as businesses reopen and vaccinations speed up. But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. You got laid off from classes, but virtual, I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the pre pantry truth from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back. It was a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment. And we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession that worries economists. Bill Sprigs, he says. Many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. The longer someone's without a job, the harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid class and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. Ah McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover those jobs. Here's co author Quay Lin Island group, the progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take of it out of the picture. Is so slow. And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa into last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Superbly store. We got a visit from our supervisor, He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened, be instructed bombs, a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years. We are in love, Toya. Has my Minnesota group like he's traveled. Grinding to a halt last spring, Belisle has tried to keep busy, even organizing virtual tours Join me Tuesday at.

Bill Sprigs Sam Greenglass Tuesday Bud Johnson Carrie Belisle Gloria Espinosa 35 years Belisle San Francisco California Toya Janet Woodcock January six months Food and Drug Administration last April Johnson Woodcock three first
Long-term Unemployment Remains High Despite American Jobs Returning

All Things Considered

04:08 min | 5 months ago

Long-term Unemployment Remains High Despite American Jobs Returning

"Reopen and vaccinations speed up. But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. You got laid off from classes, but virtual, I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the pre pantry truth from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to coming back. It was a great job in January 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment. And we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession that worries economists. Bill Sprigs, he says. Many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. The longer someone's without a job, the harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid class and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. Ah McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover those jobs. Here's co author Quay Lin Island group, the progress we see on closing the gender gap, even take of it out of the picture. Is so slow. And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa into last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Superbly store. We got a visit from our supervisor, He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened, be instructed bombs, a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years. We are in love, Toya. Has my Minnesota group like he's traveled. Grinding to a halt last spring, Belisle has tried to keep busy, even organizing virtual tours Join me Tuesday at two for my virtual presentation about counselor Deck finally began a new full time job. What's good here at a vaccine? Put it in San Diego. It's just nice to To chat with people and especially people that are getting vaccinated because they're all so happy and excited. While knows this new job won't be permanent, she's hopeful tour Busses will start rolling again. And she can go back to work in the field She's loved for so many years. Sam bring Glass NPR news.

Sam Greenglass Bud Johnson Bill Sprigs Ah Mckenzie Quay Lin Island University Of Delaware NPR Gloria Espinosa Johnson Carrie Belisle Espinosa Belisle San Francisco Chapman Toya Minnesota California San Diego Sam Bring Npr News
"bill sprigs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But there are millions of people who lost their jobs at the beginning of the pandemic and who are still unemployed. NPR's Sam Greenglass reports. Asked Bud Johnson what he liked about his job driving a transit bus at the University of Delaware, and he uses a single word. Everything. The sights are great. The people I work for the great and it's just a pleasant atmosphere. But he hasn't had that in almost a year. Now. He got laid off from classes went virtual. I eat two meals a day instead of three. I do go to the food pantry accrued from them. Johnson hasn't been called back yet or been told when, or If that will happen. I am looking forward to come. In fact, it was a great job in February 4 million people had been unemployed for six months or more. It's what economists call long term unemployment. And we haven't seen levels this high since the great recession that worries economists. Bill Sprigs, he says. Many employers stigmatize people who haven't worked in months. The longer someone's without a job, the harder it is to find a new one. So rather than the typical way you think of a line working you show up at the movie theater. I'm first in line. I've been here I'm next. It works in the opposite. The people who are newly unemployed get the first in line and what's worse, this will likely hit vulnerable workers even harder. Women and people of color have lost the most jobs during the pandemic. They already tend to be paid less and so long term unemployment can scar their earnings permanently. McKenzie study predicted It could also take two years longer for them to recover Those jobs. Here is co author Quay Lin Island Group. The progress we see on closing the gender gap even take care of it out of the picture. Is so slow. And so then you pause that slow glacial progress and you make negative progress. It was deeply discouraging. There's another worry too. What if certain jobs don't ever come back? How people work and live has been changing dramatically during the pandemic, and that shaken up all kinds of jobs. One of the biggest shifts has been more people working from home. That's had ripple effects for Gloria Espinosa into last April. She cleaned offices in San Francisco. Superbly store. We got a visit from our supervisor, He gathered us all on the parking lot, and he talked to us and tell us that we were gonna be laid off. I was wondering God, why us? It was like receiving a bucket of cold water. That's the way I felt a year later, the employees whose work spaces she wants clean, are still remote. And so Espinosa is still unemployed. She knows there's no guarantee, but she feels confident she will be called back to her old job when offices reopened, be instructed bombs, a necessity to move Chapman on the whole. I think that actually is going to be probably the need of additional workers because we're gonna have to make sure that we can provide that. Extra clean a space that the workers deserve. On the other end of California, Carrie Belisle wonders what her work will look like in the future. She's been a tour guide for 35 years. We are in love, Toya. Hey, how's my Minnesota group Places travel grinding to a halt last spring? Belisle has tried to keep busy. Even organizing virtual tour. Join me Tuesday at two for my virtual presentation about this week's holiday finally began a new full time job. Everything looks good here and a vaccine. Put it in San Diego. Just nice toe. To chat with people and especially people that are getting vaccinated because they're all so happy and excited. While knows this new job won't be permanent, she's hopeful tour Busses will start rolling again. And she can go back to work in the field She's loved for so many years. Sam bring Glass NPR news. It's.

Sam Greenglass Bill Sprigs San Diego San Francisco Carrie Belisle Bud Johnson 35 years Quay Lin Island Group February Johnson Belisle California Toya Gloria Espinosa Tuesday last April six months three Espinosa first
"bill sprigs" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

07:52 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"One generation only with the debt of that mistake. So i think as a matter of equity we have to wait that sleek clean for that generation so we can move on so we can have a reasonable policy to educate americans going forward when we come back after a break. I want to follow up on that since you mentioned student debt because i pulled the clip from president biden. Cnn town hall. On tuesday night. In which. I think he didn't give the question from the audience. The answer she was looking for on an aggressive enough debt relief program from him. So i'm going to play that and since you brought it up get you to follow up But professor sprigs we have thirty seconds before we have to take that break. Do you wanna elaborate elaborate on lease number one since it's your number one to. It's not one that people here all the time. What would that look like. In thirty seconds restoring democracy with the little d important for workers to have a voice and the whole system of our economy and we currently have locked workers a. That's why we have these distortions politically. This is america. are we ready. That was a very efficient follow-up. Answer thank you very much. And we'll continue in a minute. It's america are we ready. Are thursday night national call in show for the first one hundred days of the biden presidency. I'm brian lehrer. Today is day thirty and we're asking. Are we ready to build the economy back better and more just than it was before the pandemic. My guests are thea. Lee president of the economic policy institute. Think-tank and william spriggs chief economist for the afl cio former assistant secretary of labor under president obama and howard university economics professor. And the question for you. Callers is what would economic justice look like in your life or in your line of work and watch the policy from president biden. That could help make that a reality. Eight four four seven. Four five talk and calvin in atlanta. You're on america. Are we ready. How calvin thanks so much for calling in. hi brian. Thank you so much for taking my call. what Economic justice would look like for me Would be equitable access. to the accumulation of investment capital for african americans And a policy. That i think would be helpful in that. Regard is to require the federal reserve bank and the securities exchange commission to to to require disclosure of what corporate entities are investing In the african american community that would improve the quality of life in that community And and improve the ability to create wealth how i would say by disclosing those investments for example you have the community reinvestment. Act you have. In the case of the securities exchange commission things that are being disclosed to investors in terms of Corporations behavior how they're investing some of their their their funds. You know many of these corporations have of venture capital funds and other kinds of funds And even at the Ilya my scenario or traffic Communities in terms of how they're investing those dollars to a metric Not just financial Quantitative metrics but also qualitative metrics that include the deep impact on quality of life. Kevin thank you so much for that. Let's go next to samuel in windham connecticut samuel. You're on america. Are we ready. Hi there hi. Thank you so much for taking my call I would just like to say that. The best way for equality for economic diversity. All right Economical quality from my mind would either be through just from my own experience. Some form of higher level rental assistance than what is available through the states. I know that my fiance. And i are just above the level where we are. We don't count or aren't able to apply for any of ours State programs in connecticut or through some form of a stipend for childcare than we just recently had our first daughter and i. It is a blessing that i was able to find a work from home position at the beginning of the pandemic. But if i was not able to work from home where i can you know. Take care of her and watch her during that. Hey we would not be able to afford both rent and child care. Do you want to put a number on it. Would you be willing to do that since you're calling for a high threshold to be eligible for rental assistance. So currently the two of us make around forty thousand dollars for the year and we are just making our thousand dollar per month rent though perhaps going up to forty five or fifty thousand that way if your rent is you know one thousand or fifteen hundred dollars per month depending on your area. We are pretty blessed to be in a lower rent area. I get it and well. I thought you were gonna say something more than that. Forty thousand four family of three is really low and it's definitely low in connecticut. So thea lee. Would you like to comment on that set of callers and anything else you want it. Sure and Thanks thanks to both the callers. I think in in terms of what daniel was raised them with rental assistance childcare pants so on i mean this is really a result of the fact that wages haven't grown in the united states for a couple of decades as much as they ought to have this. It's a wealthy economy. It's a healthy economy or it's growing economy and yet average working people haven't gotten share and all the costs are squeezing people. Education healthcare rent Child care and so we need to do both things. We need to boost people's incumbent and we need to figure out how we can make sure that some of these essentials of life are affordable smokes. And i appreciate the call. From calvin as well in terms of trying to make more information available about what corporations doing and where the investments are happened because we can see that. There's a lot of inequity in particularly along racial lines that that happened in terms of multinational corporations and investment roles and. I do think that i'm actually interested. Bill sprigs has to say on this. The federal reserve could be playing a role to ensure more or equity more justice. More transparency than. We have right now professor spreadsheet. Td yes and we have a consumer financial protection board precisely because the federal reserve views to do its job. Many people did not know go was one of the major. Civil rights organise civil rights enforcement agencies in the government. What we're about and it doesn't sound like a bureaucratic soup the consumer financial protection board. That's that thing that elizabeth warren thought up and promoted that is supposed to prevent people from finance sector abuse correct. That's correct it's to prevent predatory behavior on the.

Forty thousand Kevin atlanta brian lehrer tuesday night daniel elizabeth warren calvin Today william spriggs one thousand brian two fifty thousand thursday night fifteen hundred dollars One generation biden first daughter united states
"bill sprigs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:36 min | 5 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Back in the classroom, and the CDC is scheduled to release new guidelines just over an hour from right now about that returned the classroom. We spoke with former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers yesterday, and he said the teachers unions, it's just may need to consider changing their position. Teacher union interests that have resisted going back to school have really been putting their own material benefit. Head of the interests of their kids on that is not the best tradition of the teaching profession. Some cases they're absolutely right to be focused on what's necessary before we move forward, But I sure like to see a much more collaborative spirit. Between teachers and school district's to get people back to school. We welcome now. Richard Trump Card. He's president of 12.5 Million member every Bell CEO. So Richard Great to have you back with us. You heard Larry say, And in fairness, they need to be concerned with safety. But the teachers used at least some of them may have gone too far. Does he have a point? First of all, I think, Larry Mr Point completely Look, educators, David are asking for five or six basic things. They're asking for a metric for community infection rates that'll trigger it for temporary closures if they go up there, asking for rigorous testing infrastructure. They're asking for a back the vaccine schedule Now they're not saying vaccines are a prerequisite, but they're saying there are priority. And if we don't have all the mitigation, ventilation pp and everything, then they becoming increasingly essential. And then, of course, adequate planning and ventilation mask and pee pee and social distancing, And the last thing is, ah combinations for people who are at high risk or care for someone who is at high risk. Because David, this is ah, very complex situation and those in high risk or taking care of people in high risk, really do need to have special attention paid to them. So they're working together. You know, they come to agreements in Chicago in Boston and New York and San Francisco. They're they're making considerable progress in Philadelphia. They are working together, but those basics have to be in place. The Federal Reserve chair Jay Powell. I'm sure if you were paying attention today, an event here in New York at the Economic Club New York, said that he is really concerned the job situation something you raised with us pretty much every week. But 9.9 million people are out of jobs that work before the pandemic. He called for maybe a federal jobs program National jobs program. Is that plausible and what would it look like? Well, it's not only plausible. I think President Biden's already proposed to one jobs program, if you will is contained in his rescue package and one in the reform package. We're talking about infrastructure. If we start doing infrastructure, that's AH gigantic jobs program if we start adjusting climate crisis That could be very, very important Job creator. If we do it the right way. Look, the clean energy economy First of all, has to be built on family supporting union jobs. And I think the president's made that clear. But in both of those it is rescue package and the reform package for recovery package. Both of those are jobs package is David was. Let's talk about that, just for a moment because we've talked before. And you said that you can sort of reach three, train some of the union workers from fossil fuel jobs and put him over in the climate jobs. What about this Keystone XL pipeline because you took issue with President Biden when he said that, in fact, he was going to shut that down. I did. I disagreed with one the basic decision, Although it didn't come it surprise to us because we knew he was going to do it. It promised to do that. But I also thought he did it the wrong way, because I I thought he should have paired that with job creation, and then he did. Because just a few days later, he issued an executive order on and he started fulfilling his commitment to address the climate crisis with the urgency it demands. Placing the needs of working people in communities at the center of every effort. Look, it's critical that we create good jobs in advance of any action that cause reductions in employment and fossil fuel production and use areas, working families and communities want to know, and they quite frankly deserved to know. That doing what's necessary to flight fight climate change won't resolve in rampant unemployment or reduced standard of living for them and their families. And so what? His Executive order make clear is that he understands both of those and he's going to do them simultaneously. We deeply appreciate his call to invest in coal, another fossil, full communities to create good jobs in new industries. And by cleaning up abandoned mines and wells. Those can create literally hundreds of thousands of jobs, and they could be good paying jobs if their union jobs. Because what we can't do David is take down on industry that pays very, very good wage with good benefits and replace it with an industry that pays one third wages and note none of the benefits because all you do there is create another problem for the one you're trying to solve and create a permanent underclass. I had poverty ribbon Aryan include increased rather inequality. None of those things are good for the economy, and none of those things are sustainable In the long run, Richard we have a very specific case in the Keystone XL pipeline. Take us through that part of the problem is that there were a lot of union jobs that would have been created by that pipeline that now will not get created. Can you take literally the people? By and large that would have had those jobs, retrain them and put them into other jobs. Are are we looking at that sort of one for one transference? Well, in many cases, David, you don't even have to retrain them. People are running equipment can can run equipment, reclaiming minds and old wells doing other stuff. So you can do that. Very, very simply. What you have to do is have the money. And the resource is committed by Congress to actually clean up those areas and create those jobs because you can't make you can't say I want to take your job on the promise that you may get one a couple of years down the road. People that do pipeline work can do reclamation work. They can fix leaks and seats. They could do a number of the things that need to be done in this country to upgrade our infrastructure and improve the quality of our client of our climate, our environment on so some of those just transfer right over, particularly if the money is there to do mine reclamation on jobs like that in the area. Richard. Finally, you've been a big supporter of President Trump. You've done him a lot of good. Is he going to return the favor by basically taking away one of your one of your economist? There's talk about Mr Springs going over to the Federal Reserve. First of all I think you were talking about President Biden Say President shop. I beg your pardon? President Biden should have been a big supporter of President Trump. Sorry, sir. I didn't mean that. Well, you know, Look, I don't know. You know, you don't know about India rumors. But here's what I do know if they take big Bill sprigs, and they put him on the federal Board of Governors. He's more than qualified and to the Federal Board of Governors will have a worker's voice there that they sorely need. They need to understand how their decisions actually impact people at the community level. Not at the grassroots level. Bill Sprigs would bring that voice to that organization to the border governors and make it far more effective and far more representative America whether it happens or not the decision of the president And if he should choose Bill sprigs Would gleefully tell. Build it do the best he can in service of his country and in service of this administration. Okay, Richard, Thank you so very much. Want to make sure At least I get your name right? That is President Richard Trump of the FBL CIA coming up a Bloomberg News Investigative.

David Jay Powell Richard Trump Chicago Congress Bill Sprigs New York Larry San Francisco five Philadelphia Boston Richard yesterday Bill sprigs today Bell Federal Board of Governors FBL Springs
"bill sprigs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 8 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here is your week ending moment of economic context. It comes to us from Bill Sprigs. He's a professor of economics at Howard University. Adam on the show a couple of months ago when he pointed out this morning, and I should say this is in compliance with the policy of this program that if we stop talking about this, we're going to stop talking about this professor Sprigs pointed out this morning. The unemployment rate for black men in this economy was 10.3% last month rumor nationally it is 6.7% the national unemployment rate for high school dropouts, by the way. 9% even b. J Liederman does the music Mr Bergalis, the executive producer of the program, Nancy Kass, it is the managing director of news. I'm kind result will see you Monday. Every weekend. Everybody all right. This'll is a PM coming up next on the California report Hosts Sasha Coca brings us the story of a transgender asylum seekers quest to come to California. California report magazine starts after Look at traffic, including some trouble in San Jose, Here's Julie de Fish. It's a four vehicle racks South and 2 80 Meridian Avenue. The sense of left lane taking away Now we've got a big back up to Saratoga Avenue. Staying in the South Bay South and 8 80 before broke our road. Ah, car in the center Divide in a pickup truck is still blocking the left lane That's up in the show The parish road off ramp from north and 6 80 vehicle fire. It's on the right shoulder. Julie de Fish working Q. E D Traffic support comes from European sleep works and support for KQED comes from Bridge Bank. Offering flexible financial solutions to entrepreneurs and to the technology and life sciences communities. Bridge Bank is a Division of Western Alliance make member F D I. C Bridge Bank be bold Venture Wisely and from maybe the French International School of Berkeley, now accepting applications for preschool kindergarten and the new middle school, International track, virtual information.

Bill Sprigs Bridge Bank Julie de Fish California Adam professor of economics French International School of Sasha Coca Howard University Nancy Kass professor KQED new middle school San Jose Division of Western Alliance managing director executive producer J Liederman
"bill sprigs" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:55 min | 8 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This final note on the way out today with airline miles basically useless as an incentive right now air travel being what it is. What is a credit card company to do to get people to sign up. Well one idea apparently is given bitcoin. The bitcoin rewards visa credit card is coming in january. Two hundred dollar annual fee in exchange. For which you'll get a percent and a half of your purchases back in bitcoin. Also two hundred and fifty dollars in bitcoin. If you spend three thousand dollars on the card in the first three months so just for some context here two hundred and fifty bucks. Gets you thirteen. One thousand of bitcoin at the close today are going but here is your week. Ending moment of economic context. It comes to us from bill sprigs. He's a professor of economics at howard. University had him on the show a couple of months ago and he pointed out this morning. I should say this is in compliance with the policy of this program. That if we stop talking about this we're gonna stop talking about this. Professor sprigs pointed out this morning. That the unemployment rate for black men in this economy was ten point three percent last month. Remember nationally it is six point seven percent the national unemployment rate for high school dropouts by the way nine percent even be j. liederman does the music native is the executive producer of the program. Nancy cast it is the managing director of news. I'm kai rozelle see monday. Been weaken everybody all right. This is apn as a marketplace listener. You already make fact based independent journalism apart of your daily routine now bring even more marketplace into your everyday with our new liquid assets mug yours today when you donate just sixty dollars or five dollars a month sip from your new mug with the satisfaction of knowing that you sustain the nonprofit news that you rely on please give now at marketplace dot org slash donate..

liederman kai rozelle sprigs apn Nancy
"bill sprigs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:44 min | 11 months ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Dear J. Powell was calling for more fiscal stimulus. How damaging is this delay that we've been experiencing? It's very damaging. Those who deal in commercial real estate are very nervous because people are going to be making the rent payments. The Correct sort of programmes that prevent evictions Don't address The cash flow issue of getting the rent payments. And then state and local governments right now are beginning their new fiscal year. They're way behind and they're facing new challenges because there's a big increase in unemployed workers is putting more pressure on their Medicaid budgets. So we're going to get weekly jobless claims tomorrow, and we know where the trend how it has been trending. Are you going inside the numbers to be able to kind of break out segments of the economy that air They're holding up reasonably well, some jobs that have been restored and where there still is still kind of critical weakness. Well, we haven't been able to use the unemployment numbers as well as we wish, because the system has been so overwhelmed, and a lot of people are applying again and again and again. And there are people who are being denied The regular payments, then apply for the pandemic Unemployment assistance, which was designed for low wage workers, who wouldn't normally qualify and for the self employed. The numbers have been so jumbled, but when they tell us basically is that we're still having too many layoffs where you're not sure how many but too many, and we do know from faster data that we get from Payroll services that have given us access to more immediate data that the recovery has plateau owed The hours data that we got from the last pee less report showed. This is well. So we're very nervous at the F L. C because the plateau has been and construction and manufacturing when it comes to hours. And those are the areas outside those that were immediately affected by social distancing. Like what we experience with restaurants, hotels, entertainment. Bill When we continue the conversation, let's talk a little bit about inflation or the lack of it, and when they're there's any correlation between stubbornly low of inflation and Less. Union membership will have more with Bill sprigs of the CEO coming up. This's Bloomberg The following is how long will it take for the economy.

Bill Bloomberg J. Powell self employed Union CEO F L. C
"bill sprigs" Discussed on This Is Uncomfortable

This Is Uncomfortable

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on This Is Uncomfortable

"Were excluded left a lasting legacy of inequality a generation of certain workers who didn't get the same safety nets that everyone else had that had a huge impact on their ability to weather hard times to build wealth to climb up the economic ladder and by the time. Farm workers and domestic workers were included in unemployment insurance. There were plenty of other ways that black people and other people of color were shut out of the system. And there still are 'cause yeah. The language of the law has changed. But we still see this idea that this is just for people who we think deserve it. Play out in just about everything. The unemployment insurance system does so now. We're going to talk about ways. The state unemployment systems have kept people out in more recent times for one. There are all these complicated eligibility requirements. Right there's a lot of fine print you have to show you lost your job through no fault of your own that you're actively looking for work you've had a stable work history and you've made a minimum amount of money also connor. The historian says that certain groups Pretty Hard. Nonwhite workers are more likely to be part. Time employed and because minority workers are more prone to precarious employment. They are more likely not to be eligible in the first place for unemployment insurance. Sounds like the people who are in the most precarious employment positions and the people who don't have access to unemployment insurance. That is exactly right. People who are in a precarious position have the least access to them. That's the way our system works. During the great recession in two thousand eight unemployment was highest for black workers. Black workers had a much lower rate for receiving unemployment insurance about twenty four percent compared with whites thirty three percent and since the great recession there are all these other restrictions states put into their systems that made it harder to get benefits like in Florida to get unemployment benefits. People normally have to prove they've already applied to at least five jobs in Michigan. State system disqualified people if they didn't state the exact same reason for losing their job that their employer put Wisconsin passed a law. That said if an employee makes the same mistake more than once after being warned they can be considered fired for cause and denied unemployment benefits. Some states say they've had to do this because their unemployment benefit trust funds are running out of money the way the system was designed as you would collect the tax when things were well lots of people employed and you would end up this reserve and then in an economic downturn you would draw down on the reserve but bill sprig says in the last. Few decades states have been lowering unemployment taxes as a way to lure companies to set up shop but lower taxes means less money in the unemployment benefits fund to pay out so states are left with this dilemma at the raise taxes or cut benefits and the sad story is states. Choose let's cut benefits. Which is where all those eligibility requirements commit getting harder to qualify in their fewer benefits to pay out. And for the people who do qualify. There's always the option. Just pay them less. Which brings us to the second way. State Employment Systems have come to limit access to unemployment benefits in recent times in the US. The unemployment insurance system was always designed to make benefits temporary and to pay just a fraction of what your job paid so in the US benefits normally last six months but since the great recession states have chipped away at the generosity of even those limited benefits. North Carolina dropped. Its limit to three months. As far as money goes you can get as low as twenty four percent of your average wage. In recent years the lowest benefit has been in Mississippi which maxes out at two hundred thirty five bucks a week the highest Massachusetts has been up to seven hundred forty two dollars per week and these decisions about unemployment benefits about how long they should last and how much they should be pretty quickly scratch at this deeper question that I've started thinking of as the leasing question. Some people wonder if unemployment benefits are too generous. Will people be so happy to be out of work that the WanNa Stop Working Bob Newhart? The comedian actually has a bit about this. I was once worked for the Illinois State. Unemployment compensation for this work behind the counter and we street. We got sixty dollars a week. And the Cleveland said time fifty locked and they only had to come in one day a week so I arranged got round up coming in one day. I mean that's kind of a comedic side of this but the reality is people value their time. They've they value their families. That's Matt White Anger at Longtime Congressional staffer and Republican Policy Guy. Who's now at the American Enterprise Institute and he says sure the Bob Newhart bit is for laughs. But he thinks it's a serious issue to clearly the closer you get to saying that we're going to pay somebody as much in benefits not to work as they were getting in their paycheck while they were working a lot of people are. GonNa look at that and say well why bother? Why should I go to work? Don't actually even Matt says that given how our system works fundamentally at least in normal times you know people wanna work and they want the security of work which is a lot more secure than clicking unemployment benefits. When it comes to the amount of money people get from unemployment benefits. What research shows is that higher payments could lead some unemployed workers to stay out of work a little longer but higher payments also let unemployed people spend more which in turn allows businesses to create more jobs. Larry Cats the Harvard. Economist has actually studied this. And if you compare a state with a higher benefit versus estate with a lower one evidence suggests overall the unemployment rate won't be higher even if people get more money when they're out of work as for how long benefits last some people do tend to stay unemployed a little bit longer if their benefits last longer partly because they're able to hold out for a better job but Larry says those delays in finding a job they can be offset by more active support so helping people search for jobs training and other things seem to more than offset that so. That's what we know about things work in normal times but of course we are not in normal times during pandemic we want people to stay home and so politicians on both sides of the aisle agreed that we wanna make unemployment benefits generous enough. That people can stay home and not have to look for work at least at first the cares act. The huge coronavirus relief package Congress passed in late. March has put some temporary changes on. How unemployment benefits work right? Now you don't have to prove you're looking for Newark. And there's a new special type of unemployment benefit for part time. Workers for who to little to usually qualify and for independent contractors. Congress also made benefits last thirteen weeks longer than whatever? The state time limit is one of the most controversial things. Congress did giving an extra six hundred dollars a week on top of steep unemployment benefit and in some places that extra six hundred dollars a week would mean some lower income workers like service and retail and fast food workers might.

Bob Newhart Congress US Matt White State Employment Systems Illinois State Larry Cats Michigan Wisconsin North Carolina connor Cleveland Mississippi American Enterprise Institute Newark Massachusetts
"bill sprigs" Discussed on The Uncertain Hour

The Uncertain Hour

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on The Uncertain Hour

"Jobs were excluded left a lasting legacy of inequality generation of certain workers. Who didn't get the same safety nets that everyone else had? That had a huge impact on their ability to whether hard times to build wealth to climb up the economic ladder and by the time farm workers and domestic workers were included in unemployment. Insurance there were plenty of other ways that black people and other people of color were shut out of the system and there still are 'cause yeah the language of the war has changed but we still see this idea that this is just for people who think deserve it. Play out in just about everything. The unemployment insurance system does so. Now we're GonNa talk about ways. The state unemployment systems have kept people out in more recent times for one. There are all these complicated eligibility requirements. Right there's a lot of fine print show you lost your job through no fault of your own that you're actively looking for work you've had a stable work history and you've made a minimum amount of money also connor. The historian says that certain groups pretty hard non white workers are more likely to be part. Time employed and because minority workers are more prone to precarious employment. They are more likely not to be eligible in the first place for unemployment. Insurance sounds like the people are in the most precarious employment positions of the people who don't have access to unemployment insurance. That is exactly right. People who are in a precarious position have the least access to them. That's the way our system works. During the great recession in two thousand eight unemployment was highest for black workers. Black workers had a much lower rate for receiving unemployment insurance about twenty four percent compared with thirty three percent and since the great recession there are all these other restrictions states put into their systems that made it harder to get benefits like in Florida to get unemployment benefits. People normally have to prove they've already applied to at least five jobs in Michigan. State system disqualified people if they didn't state the exact same reason for losing their job that their employer put Wisconsin passed a law. That said if an employee makes the same mistake more than once after being warned they can be considered fired for cause and denied unemployment benefits. Some states say they've had to do this because their unemployment benefit trust funds are running out of money the way the system was designed as you would collect the tax when things were well. Lots of people on -ployed and you would bid up this reserve and then in an economic downturn you would draw down on the reserve but bill sprig says in the last. Few decades states have been lowering unemployment taxes as a way to lurk companies to set up shop but lower taxes means less money in the unemployment benefits fund to pay out so states are left with this dilemma raise. Taxes or cut benefits and the sad story is states choose. Let's cut benefits. Which is where all those eligibility requirements commit get harder to in their fewer benefits to pay out. And for the people who do qualify. There's always the option. Just pay them less. Which brings us to the second way. State unemployment systems have come to limit access to unemployment benefits in recent times in the US. The unemployment insurance system was always designed to make benefits temporary and to pay just a fraction of what your job paid so on average in the US normally last months but since the great recession states have chipped away at the generosity of even those limited benefits. North Carolina dropped. Its limit to three months. As far as money goes you can get as low as twenty four percent of your average wage. In recent years the lowest benefit has been in Mississippi which maxes out at two hundred thirty five bucks a week the highest Massachusetts has been up to seven hundred forty two dollars per week and these decisions about unemployment benefits about how long they should last and how much they should be pretty quickly scratch at this deeper question that I've started thinking of as the laziness question. Some people wonder if unemployment benefits are too generous. Will people be so happy to be out of work that the WanNa Stop Working Bob Newhart but comedian actually has a bit about this? I was once worked for the Illinois. State unemployment compensation for work behind the counter and we got. We got sixty dollars a week. And the claiming said time thought fifty five. They had to come in one day a week so arranged you got fired wound up coming in one day week and that's kind of a comedic side of this but the reality is people value their time. They value their families. That's white anger longtime congressional staffer and Republican Policy Guy. Who's now at the American Enterprise Institute and he says sure the Bob Newhart bit is for laughs. But he thinks it's a serious issue to clearly the closer you get to saying that we're GONNA pay somebody as much in benefits not to work as they were getting in their paycheck while they were working. A lot of people are gonNA look at that and say well why bother? Why should I go to work? Don't actually even Matt says that given how our system works fundamentally at least in normal times you know people want to work and they want the security of work which is a lot more secure than collecting unemployment benefits. When it comes to the amount of money people get from unemployment benefits. What research shows is that higher payments could lead some unemployed workers to stay out of work a little longer but higher payments also let unemployed people spend more which in turn allows businesses to create more jobs. There recounts counts the Harvard. Economist has actually studied this. And if you compare state with a higher benefit versus estate with a lower one evidence suggests overall the unemployment rate won't be higher even if people get more money when they're out of work as for how long benefits last some people do tend to stay unemployed a little bit longer if their benefits last longer partly because they're able to hold out for a better job but Larry says those delays in finding a job offset by more active support so helping people search for jobs training and other things seem to more than offset that so. That's what we know about how things work in normal times but of course we are not normal times during pandemic we want people to stay home.

Bob Newhart US Wisconsin Michigan connor American Enterprise Institute North Carolina Harvard Mississippi Illinois Matt bill sprig Massachusetts Florida Larry
"bill sprigs" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

16:12 min | 2 years ago

"bill sprigs" Discussed on KGO 810

"Dude i'm pat thurston okay so the numbers on the economy look good we're always hearing that you know this is the best well especially if donald trump is saying the word best economy in the history of the universe or some such thing and also the unemployment numbers are also always being touted as being at historic low levels the numbers of people who are unemployed i have heard people say that in essence we are at full employment today in the united states of america which is really great if it's true professor williams sprigs recently wrote a piece headlined women and african americans are being hit hardest by declining jobs i was fascinated by the idea of declining jobs when we're supposed to be at historic low levels of unemployment bill sprigs as chief is the chief economist at the a._f._l. c._i._o. he is also a professor of economics at howard university and he joins us now professor thank you so much for being with us today but having me i'm delighted to have you so first let's talk about how these statistics are being reported first of all and and please help me if i'm wrong because i'm certainly not an economist and i don't understand economists economics all that well but seems to me that many years ago perhaps as long ago as the reagan administration there was a change made in how you measured unemployment and reported unemployment numbers and that that change was made to make the numbers of peer better To be more encouraging. Is that true? but the only real kind of change has been a struggled to understand people who are marginally attached to the labor market it's shown up in this recovery that a lot of people who say they're not in the labor force as the expansion two cold appeared in jobs which suggests that they weren't really not in the labor force because you go from the labor force to suddenly you have a job you have to look some right so This downturn labor, I participation collapsed. and i think we've had a hard time getting a clearer picture on who's really not in the labor force meaning they're not engaged really not looking whereas as people who are discouraged i suspect discouraged because the wage offers that they're looking at just aren't good enough to get them to want to worry about it yeah so what pointed did all of this crash so much with the people who are looking for work did that happen during the recession during the obama administration or was it prior to that That was prior to that, because the recession started before Obama IBM. Right. Republicans act like the recession was on Obama's watch way. He came into office. The unemployment rate was rising rapidly and that. Cimber combat January. We were at the very depths when we were losing, you know, well, over five hundred thousand jobs a month. Right. So that. trainwreck was already in the middle of happening when he took office and so in the midst of watching all your neighbors lose jobs wages plummeting of course people sort of gave up looking and we haven't gotten them all the way back in the labor force yet they measured when they're talking about unemployment figures so you have to be somebody who is looking for a job in order to be counted as unemployed Who I am? I get rolled all the time, because people think the unemployment rate for people getting unemployment benefits. Right. That's not true. the the unemployment rate has absolutely positively euros zilch not a nothing to do with who gets unemployment benefits the benefit is a separate question separate issue right now we were at a record low share of people who are unemployed and getting unemployed benefit how do we know who is unemployed according to the definition that they use the people who are not working but are looking for work how do we know at those figures are so it's it's a survey it's a huge monthly survey that's done by the census bureau for the bureau of labor statistics the first question they ask is whether you did something for which you got paid last week and if you say yes that means you have a job whether it was part time two hours or three hours doesn't matter you said you got paid so your employees And then the follow up question is did you actively look for work? And people say that diversely looked they get checked unemployed. Then they ask a series of questions after that. To gauge why you might not have been looking, and that's where things get fuzzy because. some people may be a student who say i was a fulltime student but of course if they come across a very high paying job they may suddenly appear the next month as employees right it could be a woman who's in and women's labor force participation the real barometer is the way to understand what the labor market is functioning well labor force participation for women started to to to to take off in the nineteen seventies and it continued that way through the end of the nineties and then we had the we session at the beginning of this century around two thousand one and labor force participation for win moment flat than we had this recession and labor force participation rate full and sell and when the economy was doing well during the recovery went twenty eleven through about twenty fifteen twenty sixteen twenty seventeen you saw women who are unemployed the following month in the labor flow data they were far more likely to get a job then they were to give up looking now that's witched so now women who are unemployed are far more likely to say i give up there no jobs than they are to land job and that's a clear signal that something's wrong it's it's clear that it's harder to find work otherwise we sit still see the powder we did with the labor mark was stronger and that's what we saw in april numbers april numbers every wonderful two hundred thousand jobs well the household survey was saying something different in the household survey people were saying we don't see any jobs and we give up we quick and employment rate fell in april because people just said we're not gonna look anymore and the other clue that it's difficult was the share of people who are long term unemployed has been going up meaning that the people out there looking actively trying to find a job the average time it's taking them to find a job is getting longer so that's another clue that things aren't quite what they need to be in order for the labor market to be going into direction that has been rosy as we are being told but listen bill i want i want to know something a little more specific i i'm so happy that you're chief economist at the a._f._l. c._i._o. his you probably know this information it feels to me like there are more people people who have more than one job not because they really want to have more than one job but because that's what they need in order to make ends meet it seems to me that people are underemployed that people are not making the kind of money that they need to make and that they're not making the kind of money in real dollars that they used to make i mean even in tough times it just feels to me as if people are not getting rewarded for the work that they're performing so that they can live a decent life so they can take part in the american dream so they can buy a house you try to buy a house in the bay area bell you just try it's so hard for people so what about that i mean are real wages actually keeping pace the way they should no not at all for this link of recovery or the stage of recovery because the unemployment rate Is below four percent. It's been that way for months. that should start to give pressure on raising wages right wage increase last was a little bit less than the previous month it's been wanting a little both three percent in nominal terms not real terms and and that's better than would it have been doing but that's not strong enough that's not where it should be disappointed when you look in the past recoveries at this point they should be well above four percent and it's it's not the problem people are having is that so many firms relatives to the past have gone to irregular schedule so a lot of people would like to have two jobs you can't have two jobs if my employer is gonna give me a schedule and and so the multiple job holders and they do track multiple job holders picked up during the recovery because wages weren't high and there were lots of people who are trying to put together the number of hours doing that it's the fear of people having multiple jobs is that some record it's it's currently around five and a half percent of women women would tend to work part time more than men and such more common for women to be multiple job holders than men women also get paid less than men so in order to put together enough i always they they need to have the jobs but and that's higher than it was five point five percent higher than it was last year when it was five point one percent for when but but that's still a low number given the other thing you were talking about which is there's a lot of underemployment out there when congress is debating raising the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour to share women who are going to benefit is astounding because so many women who have associate degrees Getting paid below fifteen dollars an hour. and this recovery has highlighted that if you don't have labor unions if you don't have the ability to bargain for higher wages the labor market itself isn't going to generate then employers still were not feeling that they have to raise wages in order to keep workers and you know that's one of the reasons that unions are so important to us they were they changed the lives of americans when unions really were strong when a when a lot of people who are involved in the labor force where union members it change people's lives for a lot of reasons one was because you've got a fair wage another was that you got benefits and one of the reasons people aren't getting fair wages these days is because employers are cutting back on hours so that they don't have to provide benefits they can call people part time workers they get them just that the limit of of working what's considered fulltime so that they don't have to provide benefits to people and by god it happens at my company here and i am i'm horrified by that luckily my job i'm in a union and i wouldn't give that up because it gives me so many protections but union membership is declining in non government jobs how why why is that happening when people need unions so much more now than they did maybe twenty thirty years ago well it's a trim over the last twenty to thirty years going back to the nineteen eighties in large part because we changed the deal with unions and the government's view about workers being able to exercise that right and it is a late to join a union we did in number ways but the primary way was that we took away the ability of unions to strike and that took away the bargaining power right that is your power your power and and the number of states that have turned against the rights of workers to organize by becoming right to work is increased which undermines the ability of the union to function right to work simply means i get the benefits of being a union member i get someone to protect me from being dismissed i get someone to bargain for a higher wage i get health benefits and the retirement benefits but i don't have to pay me dues so it's like you didn't pay for what you get exactly so of course that makes it harder to organize and the result has been this hostility that films always said against union has become increased because they know they actually can keep unions from forming their ability to hold captive meetings until people you'd better not join the union their ability to threaten workers know that years later they believe intially get dragged into the netflix relations coordinator eventually have to pay some back pay that they may oh pork or this is the strategy that they've been pursuing and so it's very hard for workers to organize thinks it just stinks it's it stinks and the issue is even if you aren't the union member union set the standard so employers understood you know what i gotta be nice to you because that's the way the job is defined because these other people are in unions and that's what they get paid and i gotta come close to that and i have to come close to that when it comes to benefits so so you see in the decline in union density it's not just union members who suffer instant nine members everybody will go down as well i need to take a commercial break but can you stay for a couple of minutes because where we have not talked about is the is the impact on african americans in declining jobs so can we cover that to have a few minutes a few minutes rettig well i'm gonna put you on hold him and take a little break and we will come right back and we're gonna come back with williamsburg's williamsburg's is chief economist at c._i._o. he's also a professor of economics at howard university this is k. g. o. pat thurston on k. g. o. eight ten hour here gentleman's.

Obama professor bureau of labor chief economist pat thurston united states donald trump howard university professor of economics obama administration america reagan administration fifteen dollars four percent twenty thirty years eight ten hour three percent