20 Episode results for "Bill Monroe"

Bourbon and Bluegrass Go Hand in Hand in Kentucky

Aerial America

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Bourbon and Bluegrass Go Hand in Hand in Kentucky

"It may be called the bluegrass state. But vast stretches of Kentucky a completely covered by trees. Trees that hide treasures of Kentucky history that our best spotted from the air. Like this legendary farmhouse west of Louisville. It's the childhood home of a man known as the father of bluegrass music Bill Monroe. Under the shade of this porch. The Monroe boys played the fiddle and guitar Bill. The youngest took to the mandolin like his mother who died when he was just ten legend has it that so much music was played in this house over the years that the fibers of the wood and its walls and rafters resume like instruments themselves. With his nineteen thirty nine ban. The bluegrass boys Monroe traveled the country combining elements of gospel blues folk songs and old Irish fiddling to create a new genre. He described as high lonesome sound a sound that's known to the world as bluegrass today. Just down the road from arose old farmhouse in the town of Roseanne musicians still gather every Friday night to honor Monroe's legacy and celebrate the heartfelt and the style GIC music that grew right out of Kentucky soil. Bill Monroe was born in nineteen eleven but his family first settled in Kentucky in the eighteen thirties by then another rural Kentucky tradition was in full swing and invention. That was already being boiled fermented and barreled all across the state, Kentucky bourbon. Woodford. Reserve is the oldest bourbon distillery in the state dating back to the late eighteenth century. It's one of many distilleries located on Kentucky's bourbon trail, including popular brands like wild Turkey, which dates back to eighteen sixty nine. When prohibition hit in the nineteen twenties Kentucky's bourbon makers were forced to close except for one. Thanks to some crafty repackaging the buffalo trace distillery here in Frankfurt sold its bourbon from additional use only or at least that's what it's labels claims. These days Kentucky's bourbon business is thriving from small new craft distilleries to establish names like four roses, which is now owned by Japanese liquor conglomerate the reason that Kentucky bourbon his famous around the world is it's consistently distinctive taste. That's because Kentucky bourbon maker's after follow four strict rules. First of all, they're bourbon has to be aged in new charred white oak barrels, which can spend ten years or more buildings cold rock houses like these. It has to be made from at least fifty one percent corn. It can't have any added coloring, and it has to be between forty and eighty percent alcohol, but there's one more thing that gives Kentucky bourbon its unique taste. It turns out that the same nutrient rich, limestone that helps thoroughbred horses grow into champions. Also makes the liquor here better sits at helps filter impurities from the water.

Kentucky Bill Monroe Louisville Roseanne Frankfurt fifty one percent eighty percent ten years
Brad Apple interviews banjo great Butch Robins

Acoustic Music Talk with Brad Apple

1:13:41 hr | 11 months ago

Brad Apple interviews banjo great Butch Robins

"Welcome to coup stig music. Where we explore the art of kucic music and musicians with your host brad apple. Hello folks and welcome to acoustic music. Talk the podcast. I'm your host brad apple and we'd like to welcome each and every of you. We have a great episode in store for you today. We have mr. Bush robins joining us and butch played with the father of bluegrass music. Mr bill monroe himself Bush did a couple of different stints with with bill in the bluegrass boys and after that bush had his own band called the bluegrass band. They some great recording and also bush has done a lot of great solo records through the years as well as special projects for hey holler back in the day. And so we're very delighted to have butch robins joining us today. So let's get into that interview. Well boots welcome to the show. Thank you so much for joining us. You know your careers followed for a long time now and we've had quite a long career playing bluegrass banjo and wondered if you could start out by telling us how you got started in music. What drew you to the banjo and bluegrass. And all that stuff okay. i'll look back through a half-century fog. And see if i can you something of that nature. I think i've started playing the banjo just to get my dad's attention. When he came back from the second world he and two of his brothers got the guy together with a guy named james davis and they all played music and a little band somewhere over round of welsh west virginia. And somehow or another. My dad drifted away from music. I guess part of it was because i busted his mandolin with a hammer sometime when i was three or four years old and he just never got ahead another instrument around the house until i was almost a teenager and that instrument came around the house in the form of guitar. That that's fella. James davis had loaned my dad to work on his playing a little bit so my dad and have an instrument around the house to pick and he was looking for instruments. Four james has two sons. Charles and tommy davis anymore than one of them to play a dobro and the other to play banjo and my dad just got on. This honey finally found that dobro in a pawn shop in spartanburg south carolina One of the national square necks and the neck was broken out of it so he repaired that and got that to james and was looking for banjo while the dave was looking for a banjo. Dobro was around the house. So i learned how to hit around and play a couple of three tune on that and My dad alone. You know something on the guitar and it was just a way of being with my dad. In a way that i hadn't before is playing music and and somehow or another week round up Seeing a couple of banjos but james wound up by the journals. A master tone fifties model master tone somewhere over west virginia. So a guy came in where. I had my first job in a barbershop. Pleasure north carolina one saturday. And we've been actively looking for a banjo and this guy comes in and says i heard you're looking for a banjo. I got one out in the car and it was an open back deal My dad voted for two dollars. Brought it home and the so ahead up with fishing line but he so the head of it up got a set of strings on it and we found a couple of people that around in the area down there Settled on one guy named homer israel. Who knew how to make a real good three finger roll and You know show me how to tune the banjo and all elementary stuff and started from there but it was. It was a way of getting attention from my dad. When i saw how interested he was in in tommy and charles's interest in music and everything. I sort of went along with that game. And that's that's sort of happened. Okay i guess You probably won't in fact in your book You talk about going to gay lax and places like that. I guess that was the next natural progression. Probably right as far as getting out to some pillars conventions and all. Yeah back then. There were defenders conventions the contests. And i started one of those. I had no. I don't think i've been playing much over year when i played in Forget it was uber and hayes and bascom lamar lunceford. Each of those guys was active in the asheville north carolina in the folk music and everything. And what them. I think it was hubert. Hayes had the us jamboree in the spring and then bascom. Lamar burton has the jamboree for the older folks. You know in the fall. And i wound up playing in that that one for the juniors one spring and i won this little cup on that something about a vote zone or something. They gave me an award far. And that was the first time that i've won contest. And then especially after. We moved out in north carolina here in virginia. At that point. I started playing regularly. Gay lacks union grove and some of the other festivals down around eight north carolina pinnacle north carolina and again. Those were not bluegrass festivals. Were visitors conventions they were contest. And i tried to explain to people hold about parking lot. Picking around the festival started happening. Those were because of the professionals happening in places like sunset park. And and some of the other you know places around the plants grow replaying sunset park and come out and play a matinee show and then they'd take a intermission. Couple hours you know in the show would start again. We'll do a couple of hours the wives and take the kids out to ride in the rides in the park and the guys would all go out in the parking lot and pick together. Yup and that's where most of that came from. You know you go around those fitters conventions you see some guys standing out there in the parking lot laying you. Walk up to them. They play the same tune for three or four hours. They were rehearsing for a contest. Because that thousand dollars for the winter the banjo contest or the fiddle contest or whatever it was. That was some money back in those days for you. Know guys for pickers and everything so they. They were serious about their their music. It wasn't a thing any jamming around or getting together and playing all happened after after the contest is over I remember the first time at Tug taylor and mike loans worth roger sprung. And i think harry west may have been in on the whole deal to west gate in nashville on saturday night. After the the little contest they had had over in the city culture tori earlier. They had west gate parking lot open themselves up. And these guys all went over there and i wound up his first place. I ever heard curtis burch play was playing the dobro and and those guys i just mentioned tut and and Mike loans worth and Roger sprung and all of them. I walked up to where there was a crowd and have curtis surrounded and he was just sitting there with the get thrown player. Doing some of the stuff on dobro. I've ever heard in my life and i hadn't heard line at that point you know but He just amazed me. It was a couple of years older than me not much but my goodness what a wonderful player he was. And then i wound up getting to play with him when i was in the new grass revival years after that. He was qatar player in that van. While i was there right as it kind of a sad point. There you'd mentioned bascom. Lamar lunceford a is kinda cool. Because you got to know some of the some of those old timers like that didn't you. I got to meet him with guys like this. You know they were sorted arm's length. I've made them and those they were during the course of the event because they would always be very active in. Its you know something like that thing over there in asheville the two things that they had to civic centers. Those guys were all backing. The dressing rooms anywhere. That was any play in coming along. They were all on billing about and meeting. Everybody and you know mean it was part of the musical heritage from over there was it was a whole different thing. The music is today in a. You know your comments you sent to me earlier. You were talking about what goes on today. It was a whole different world back then. And i mean i understand like bluegrass had been popular rows by building role in the mid forties and come into its own as a using form into its own. But we're not talking about it nearly as much as that as just the hand me down hillbilly music right. And it's what sort of it's the nature of the social skill that bluegrass music has come to me today. It's the way using gets passed down through generations. You know and like i said in those late night pickings after the contests and everything was tunes got shared from the folks who live in the asheville area with the folks from down in the charlotte area. The states for greens for area or richmond area. You know right so you get to know That was it was. It was different thing. Then yeah you got to know Is a tommy jarrell. Oh yeah tommy. Ya right here. My dad's became great friends My dad was Was an interesting and unique character and He and tommy became great friends. And it was He was a characterized. I i i'll just leave it at that. He was truly a character. The one thing that i carried on from him then carried into my music is. I wrote the tune of that. I wrote out a feeling cold. See niner and it's a pure saint minor tuning i strings in e flat. Second-string say third string center g strings innoc- and strings in g and It was the title to my first. Rounder album called it. Forty years light but i had learned that tuning from uncle. Tommy at gala tax. I think some kind of long time. I was fifteen or sixteen years old. He showed me the tuning and he used to play claw hammer banjo. You know ill-timed stuff. And i came home in the next couple of weeks after that. I wound up writing team and it was the first of any significance that i had ever written. And when when rounder asked me to record that i record forum i I dedicated to record snuffy jenkins and that was i. I called it forty years later. Because i wrote in her notes that back in my everything to have done would have been back. Forty years and set on the front porch and bay quit snuffy nose right. I love that tune to. That's that's awesome. Tune their and directly from tommy jarrell. Well that's neat to know that he's the one that Showed you that. I think in your book Which we're talking about. I'll be making references to your book. It's called what i know about what i know i think in the book you just said you learned it. Gay lacks one night. He didn't actually say tommy did it. I don't think but you might have but it was real weird that we're to fiddle players that that dabbled around on the banjo a little bit and tommy was the one that actually showed me sit down with me and explain to ten in but another one i heard play a doh about an old taylor and i'm willing to say it was like local old or something like that but Is a guy named buddy pendleton. Who was a real good fiddle player from down Around stuart virginia and he played a gene on the banjo and see monitoring as well. And i heard him that weekend. It was a couple of those guys who played in that over tommy way under was all that thrilled about it back. In those days. I came to be an appreciator later on Mainly when i heard a guy named is when lacey who played a melodic claw hammer style banjo and then there were those. Oh banjo players. There was one guy named wheel keys. I remember that. I heard he was a two thing banjo player that played a lot like string. Bean played when he was with bill monroe. So they were. There were odd styles around. You know like that that i saw and was witness to you know when when i was growing up because it was all different than i mean it was Their the music hasn't hadn't developed a whole lot of celebrity. You know you've had a few stars and the whole thing like because extreme band music like bill monroe in the southeast is a result of you know being able to be on the grand old opry be able to broadcast to a wide audience there and then you had the some of the bands that followed him. Like you know the flat scruggs band or the stanley brothers band and a lot of those guys. You had been members of his band when they came alone but at that point nobody had really developed a celebrity or a degree of celebrity out there where it was beyond that homegrown using that i talked about that had been passed down from generation to generation and shared around late night campfires or gathering. You know squire dances and such some of your early inclines. You've talked about some of them already. Who has maybe some more of your early influences. I i know you mentioned don reno before taught you some things. Oh yeah for years. Don reno hung the moon. I had i had never seen you know and and it wasn't necessarily as a banjo player in in this case. Even though he did. I mean he was so far advanced of anywhere that i was during that period of time. Then there's a lot of of his music. I just you know i did. I didn't understand it because it wasn't something that was natural to me. But what got me about him. And all through the thing is i actually saw him on state and you know often tell people that the worst thing that ever happened to don rain always the last ten years that he play because a lot of people only saw him during that period of time. They didn't see what he was when he was with red smiling. I mean the first country music i ever saw was in spartanburg south carolina homer israel and boomer law took me down to see that and it was only show. We walked in the auditorium and flat and scruggs. We're doing the martha white things. Open up their show. They opened the show and then mother mayvale carter came out and they played with her and did a short set then. There was an intermission and bill anderson. The country star had a number one record out at that point still and he was they. Were playing that on the charts and so he comes on starts right after the intermission and then reno and smiley came on. And i found out later. I never could understand that. Here's guy with a number one hit record close in the show. But i found out later on that all those country guys that new carlton. Then you bring on smiley with right. In their contracts they would not follow non-renewal red smiley show really. It was such an act. And i mean don not only had the thing about being an extremely innovative banjo player. But that thing that snuffy jenkins was that comedian. When dawn went into the chicken hawk roads. You know he would sneak off the stage while and read sonali do something in the rest of the band and play something. Don would come back dressed up as chicken hot rod and start to routines and then one by one the other members of the band disappear and they get in their garb to and Red smalley dressed in drag. He was pansy hot rod and One of them was jeff to do tighter they was of gay and john palmer was mud hot pockets in the pool of them. It was like watching the marx brothers and they had these routines built up. And i'll swear to god and it was like don explained to me one time it's like taking your audience for a ride on the rollercoaster in and he programmed out. When he did his shows his shows were all about establishing that link with an audience and what is found out later on with monroe was to a degree. You know that that was the most important thing about being alive for former is the report. You're building up with that audience. And it's where i learned to. You know. I love to play some of my tens four years later and rural retreat and some of those things but when i get in front of an audience they don't really mean anything to me the tune. The team doesn't mean anything sort of at all. I just as soon. Somebody haulers for foggy mountain breakdown. It's i as soon play. That is i would to play one of my two because it the once you're playing the music is just a vehicle for enhancing that interaction between the audience and the performer. You know and the ten really don't matter you know you don't own me. After playing scanner every music inner blues to open every show four years running. But i played in and i never got tired of it. You know and it was ten years after. I quit the band that i figured out. Why in hindsight and understanding that those shoes are just vehicles right to express for for an emotional expressing that emotional moment that exists between the performer and the audience and that was a wonderful thing to learn. And then when i started doing that also started translating data into making records. What are you doing because you know you mentioned some of my records out there. The first one i did was called forty years late and to me that record is jumps off the turn table at you and so i started trying to make every record that i made i. I was all intrigued by richard about by eric clapton back in those days when he was doing the ocean boulevard. Stuff the shelf sheriffs. And and all these in every record make out it come up with the stuff with derek and the dominos wonderful wonderful sound then all of a sudden it was reggae music out there and something completely different. So that's sort of what attracted me into trying to make records like that was to make each succeeding record me. Different from the previous. When you know you've got some yards for sure an and well. It's kind of neat. You know everything that i ever recorded. I think can still be purchased. So yeah it's kinda neat rounders got my stuff in their classic archive series out there in Some of the people who own myself now the. Hey hollered stuff have all got that available for folks. so it's kind of neat. i just. I'm working on one right now that i've made a different thing than anything that i've ever done before and i've got one piece of music that i'm sort of working on up that it's based on a five note oriental scale. I learned and it's expressing the interaction between the fiddle and the banjo. That often wondered on news that bluegrass country music at large and the subset of bluegrass music was carried overseas by the occupation forces after the second world war any japan. I never could figure out why. Bluegrass became a very popular ten to the japanese public. And i went over there. One time i was doing a trip and my friend yoshihiro rita got me out and showed me the scale and and showed me that that there's some of their traditional music was played on shinzan and blue and basically the shins on is that three cornered instruments. You know he plays with real heavy bombing. Bling bling sound like a banjo. Very staccato. sound and it blast you and has gone. it doesn't have much sustain to it. You know like that and then. The flute is an instrument of sustained where you can actually hold out sustained note and i got scratching. I end by komo mohel. That's the same interaction. Is fiddling banjo had in this celtic descendants other music of the of the southeastern united states. Same thing to fiddle in the band job banjos. Banjos got the staccato. Sound out there and the fiddles got the sustain where you can hold a note so anyhow. I'm trying to work on that piece of music to get that ready to finish this other one. Because all i used on on the record was a A real good drummer and Drummer keyboard player and could play the old hammond. B three organ real well and and a bass player. Very good bass player. So i'm looking forward to hearing that project when it's coming out i'll i'll see what i can do. It's an interesting. it's an interesting shot because it's just you know i'm just sailing banjo music and some of the songs i'm ready and that's i'm eight records for years. You know i spent a. I can tell you what. I spend a lot of money making david frear. David greer sounding good like he should be recorded. And some of those other guys. I was so lucky so many really really wonderful players agreed to play with me and david is just one prime example of that and when i could actually get him. In the studio there there were portions of his contribution to the ground centered focus record. Well i'm convinced as for the banjo. Music that i like. I don't know whether it was what david gut from his dad. Is that such wonderful banjo player. Or what but He is very high on my list of favorites people to ever have picked with in my life he's He's just a brilliant brilliant thailand. I would venture to say he probably knows more guitar than just about any fight picker going out there today. And he's his own deal. I mean when you get into a realm like he is getting into a place. Where maybe vassar clements was or kenny baker with his own. Sound out there. Distinguishable sound are in another world back in the day. When of an earl scruggs you know come along with that distinctive sound to themselves and and and you know just it was like a win you. I one time. God gave me this big box. I think it was something like a hundred and eighty five to reel tapes of the country. Kernels that. I wound up editing editing down into five albums what they ever did with that project. Was it ever released. Some of them are not. But it's like what to to hear the white clarin slight developed and here the brilliant talent that he was that the land. The players like tony rice. And then on this way you know right and david david data just use own unique person out there. There's nobody else i mean. It's a sound that nobody else can make that. He makes only guitar. And with his. You know you you ask on some of this stuff. You're were you sent me. These instant. everything You talk about History writing itself and all that the current bluegrass scene. And some of those things right there. All this stuff is sorta strange to me. Every once in a while i get out in dabble in that round realm a little bit but it. It's so different today than it was in my day when i was growing up with this thing and and seeing these unique people. And you know running into you'd ask about Monroe at one point and While bill monroe is in person employer. Your opinion made him made monroe such a musical genius. Yeah i was interested in your thinking on that. Well what what is the nature of genius in the first likes. It's an insight that that's a special insight that is derived from talent and aptitude and a dedicated work ethic of being able to do the same thing a hundred thousand times over and never get tired of each. And i often told people back years ago that i'd only met a couple of consummate geniuses and bluegrass music one of them being building rolling as and being built eat and the difference in their genius was like the difference in daylight and dark with bill keys. Everything reduced itself to a formula to a pattern. It had a number associated with it in one way. Or another in monroe's case it was just the unfolding of organized musical sound. You know you ask him what he starts. Playing on at ten guys can what he is. He's labrador hold up his mandolins play. Don't say that right there. He wouldn't have been even the name of the rain. Because it was just unfolding of that sound sounding you look at the builders out there today you got banjo. Builders who know everything but the numbers and they're absolutely wonderful building the best band jobs in the world right now some of those guys out there and and they are different to daylight and dark. You've got somebody. Steve uber out. There he can tell you the imf degree of everything's out there. Somebody like frank need. he's gonna pick up. These would knock on his hand and say that's gonna make good resonator for you right there you know. How do you classify those geniuses like that because everybody develops when they have that intellect where they have the talent. They have the aptitude and everything. Then how much do they educated. You know who's monroe. He was educated as a youngster. That the traveling preachers that taught the shape note singing. And i'm convinced there was one guy who worked for his father up in kentucky Hubert string field but he worked either in one of the saul meals at one. The pony minds up there and he was a classical mandolin. Player will the techniques monroe and play him completely from the risks. That trimble opening completely out of the wrist. It's classical technique right there. I heard him do a workshop. One time out in oregon eugene oregon when we were out there playing and Was no olympia washington. Maybe evergreen state college or something like that anyhow. He did a workshop and it was explaining how he breeds from his dom fram. When he was singing. I got back to nashville tennessee token to my friend cathy all about what i'd heard him say that she said everything he told you. There's the techniques they teach in college. You know classical singers. He was educated while you're another. He was educated. Maybe not with the lessons that bill keith was or some of the guys later on but you know they're they're geniuses is a fascinating marvel to me. It's just. I don't know i can't explain. Yeah what was it like taking direction. From from monroe. I know in your book. You mentioned one time. Y'all gonna do at christmas song. And he stopped and told you you're doing it right using you needed to make it sound like christmas plays christian. That's the end. And as far as i can recollect. That's one of the few times a ever said anything to me about. Not like he. He never gave me life direction at all and baker said he never you know he told me in his later years he said monroe never came to him. He thought it was an oddity. They've enrolled in every game him complaining about the banjo play. But i don't know what it was because i you know at times. He was a very temperamental man. He was very introverted person and he was very temperamental and he was emotionally driven every juncture. So i don't know and a lot of the A lot of the turmoil. Hope that happens when i was. There was just conflicts of personality more than it was any kind of musical con conflict. Right it was out there. I came from another generation and other worlds and he did. And when i came back to work for him in nineteen seventy seven. You know what. I went to work farm in nineteen sixty seven. I was very outta high school and had never been anywhere to be out from under my father's thumb. My father had gone. Every word was made so it was. You know dropped me off. The clarkston hotel in nashville tennessee. That was a better. But now. But when i came back in seventy seven i'd already been you know. I went to school for a couple years trying to dodge the draft. It didn't work. They got me anyhow. So i wound up going into military nineteen sixty nine. Got out in seventy one. After got out within six months. I've gone to nashville. Within the year. I was doing eighteen stations taylor had gotten the in some. Then we're working for people like leon russell and you know big time sessions down there then. I went to work for the new grass revival. After a deal there and been to las vegas working with the harry james bill harris. Show out there. So when i went back to work for him and seventy seven i was the season professional and it was a professional that day. I was a little bit on the wilder side in my younger days in monroe even care for that and he made no bones about it. But you know i constantly told him if you find somebody that do the job for you that i'm doing for the amount of money that you pay them. Tell me about it. And i'll be gone the next day but it never happened to you know i had. I had forced to the old homeless. You hit and i wrote that in my book. I will not relive that for you tonight. That was one of the awfullest office. Things i ever did in my life and when when it came time for me to make the shine hallelujah shine record. We made that. I record for hey holler once again from the top and it was my understanding from that thing that it sold something and it's brief. Stay out there on the thing that it's so something like sixty five thousand units out there for him and he came back to me on the gospel album. And i refuse to do it until i made my piece was monroe and i went to ralph. Stanley's festival down here. Maybe a hundred thirty hundred and forty miles from where i live and blake wiggins held my hand all one afternoon until we could. I could find a moment where there was nobody else around bill and when they finished up his show and the afternoon of the afternoon performances. Everybody who's going over. Carter's grave to have a little Ceremony that they would do down for him. Bill elder one left in the back of the stage and blake told me that was going to be my time so i went up and stood in the doorway so when monroe came to the doorway. You know he couldn't get past me and he just looked up at me and the first thing he said. What do you won't and i'll look back. It and i said mr old away i left. You was the awfullest that i've ever conducted myself in my life. I'm ashamed of it. I've come here to ask you forgiveness and to issue apologies for the way all that happened and he just looked at me and he's a well it's about time and after that i company them over to the loose ceremony for carter and everything and from dan until the end of his life I would go down and spend time with him and just sit around and watching. Play anytime that i could. You ask about genius before. How much of a genius have you got a beautiful. You can sit on of morning and you can start a tremolo going with your right hand and just these little phrases and pieces of melodies. Start popping out that. I've mandolin fingerboard. And if the sun comes out from behind the cloud or are goes in behind the cloud or the wind rustles the trees or a or chicken run across the yard. Something comes out of that mandolin to let you know that. Through one of his sensory input devices whether it be the eyes or ears and whatever. He was playing what he was seeing heavy people. Do you ever think that are in using the place where they can play music without even the vehicle of a team. That is incredible. That's the nature of his genius. Right there talks about monroe's Strength i know in your book till you related one time. Y'all were cleaning the grounds at bean blossom. Think it was in. Yeah there you wrote the drug me. We had to have a life post from renewed the barn. This was the first year that that had it and they were planning on a pretty big show suspend been having little things you know fifty seventy five people around for years. Well he decides he wants to get a telephone pole from over in the woods for the later where the stage had been years before but they had abandoned that they wanted to putting it back over there but he drags me over there me to go their way to get that. Oh he wrestled a no life. Oh out of the ground. Put me all say he got back about a third of the way to the heavy end of it and got back about a third the way into the poll or he was carrying most of the weight. Put me all the way on the end on the backside and he literally for an eighth of a mile anyhow and they quarter of a mile drug needs through old barbed wire fences was down in the bottom. There put to road through blackberries. Drove me back over there. I got very toward the legs out of my britches on and in is laughing amount. That was the end of the day. He mentioned something everybody throwing baseball. Let me he said to me up. They had an old concrete block. Outhouse behind the barn out there so he wants to throw a baseball and my boom sales. I didn't have more. Since i got a catcher's miss out he stood in front of that blackout house and started throwing the ball in and my next door neighbor. I mean up here at save them. We've got a farm club team for pittsburgh or philadelphia or somebody up here in salem. They used to be far. My next door neighbor In highschool went up and and try out for the team and made that forms of team. There so i called a guy who can throw a ball pretty hard but rose started cutting down on me with dan baseball. And the next thing you know about ten or fifteen minutes they started coming at me. Finally one come at me and it took my left arm in. Hold it up past mob side of my head and everything back and just looked out. I said mr ballard's. I need to be able to play this weekend. You might ought to back off on them a little bit. Well shoot you might as well wait. A red flag in front of a bull. Goes the next door. He cut loose and i just dumped it. I put my head to decide. They wouldn't ride flying by my and straight back up. We'll ricocheted hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me out. Time has ever knocked out in my throat. Lot not come him waving baseball glove in my face lane. There is laying on the ground. You all right bully but he Baker swears to me one time that the old man had a halt way to bore boreholes at three hundred fifty pounds and he had a creek running down. The road came up beside the creep to his house. The green on the other side of that road over there and he had one of those old things where it's like a wire going across the creek with the slats of wood down to keep driftwood or something going through it. Anyhow that hall got caught down there in a flood and baker soared that the old man went down. There rep his arms around that whole and listed it out of that creek. Goodness against against floodwater current. Well and i just you know he. He was amazingly strong even even You know what point he was. He had human whale like nobody else i've ever no. He was just absolutely amazing He had he had fallen in broken a hip. I think you know when he's open years real much. I went down to over long after that. We're maybe a year after that. We've gone down and i used to do my business. Planning real estate company owned an interest in and we just go down there and check in goodlettsville out there and motel set up our computers to do business planning and each morning. I'd go out to bill's house. Well after they sold his farm down there and the guy from the opera bodies and gave him a life estate on it. I gone down and helping rebuild it a chicken house build a little chicken coop for him on day. Do a business plan in the evening. I go out to his house in the more work on that little wiring the chickens and and all ever getting defense and pudding and he'd set out there with the concrete-block up on cnn just fuss. He argues me about the way that i was driving a nail. If it didn't suit he well. He read back saying something in that box or block. It was up on his in. He was setting. It flipped over backwards with you. And he hit on the ground right on his tailbone. This is on friday morning. Well i never used to bother him on saturday and sunday when i'd be down there because that was always these. Aubrey time always have out of town guest coming in. I just let him alone to his designs on that. I get back up with him on monday. The his caretaker called me up on sunday morning. And said you've got to come out of your farm bills. Got some real problems. If turned over he literally bruised his tailbone when he fell over on block. He got by friday night and thirty little bit saturday night in hurting the lot sunday in some real pain because of it so i wanted out and checked on him and so was i bill. Wait till tomorrow morning. Then we'll go back to the guy who repaired your broken hip so we did that monday morning. We in to see the guy there. They did x-rays on came back and told him hebrews these tailbone that it was going to be about four to six weeks but he'd be fine and bill said something about he said. I need for you to be pulling for me right now. And the doctor didn't understand what he was talking about. And mr munro. I don't understand. He said whether they've done sold off my farm and everything else. And i'm i'm really down right now. Just need for you. To be full. Informant goes i. I'm really low right now. Dr looks at him and said mr monroe and reached around behind him any pool down the x rays of his hip when he broken and when he broke it the pill head split completely apart in the darn thing. I don't have any idea how ever come back together. he said mr munro. I've treated over six hundred of these injuries in my career. He said i've never seen anything like you. And he said you're here you're pelvis is completely separated and this ball socket. Her this ball join will not go in there. I mean there's no way that it should have held. He's we put you back together in three and a half weeks. You were walking on a walker in six weeks. You were on a cane and eight weeks. You were walking unassisted. He said i'm going to be riding in medical journals about you for the rest of my life. I've never seen anybody with the healing power you brought to. And he was eight years old then. He was over eighty when that happened. Is that what you meant. I know in the radford university video series you said bill monroe was the hardest man you'd ever known as at some of the ways you're talking about right there. Well you know he was. He was unyieldingly You know when he made up his mind about something there was no changing it. I mean he was he was. You didn't have to worry about his position on anything. Changing debut warning of it like that old saying you know everybody laughs at him issue in the statement that ain't no part of nothing or he ain't no party nothing and everybody's life about it because the double negatives ended and everything like life's about it but they don't have a clue as to what he meant by that when he issued that statement about something or someone that means it wasn't worthy of another second of his mental time it was a waste of his life to even give it another salt and i saw him issued that statement to people that fifteen minutes before he'd been laughing and joking with one set statement. Come out about that person when they walked away from us and he made that statement about the person. Come back around. He wouldn't have anything to do with that. Was that was just a damn of it. Or what about Do you care to talk about when he got mad at you that time and wouldn't speak to you for like a month or whatever it was. Oh he went. They went for eleven weeks. He went from the bean blossom festival about a week after the bean blossom festival with thousands of me and didn't start talking to me again until labor day every rosie. Well go in a room dressing room and ask him for a note attention in mayonnaise note on that mandolin and walk off from it. Because that's how you doing. My tend to the harmonica seven spread on my fourth string with a and know the a on the first drink. And that's you know. When i get into that usually being gingy your be were anything else. But that's how to but that's all is going into not walk away. He wouldn't speak tests anyway. Time to come on. Both up and rosen. And he said i wanted to bluegrass voice to go out and do fifteen twenty minutes for their bring me on and i was sitting at the table in the place where cars fifteen or twenty and he won't back up there in front of me and slammed the sits down on that desk and he said boy. I've been some attitude to the last couple of months. I couldn't even talk to you. And i said well that's kind of obvious. Said you want fester on it some more. You want to get it out on the table right now. What's going on so he rattled on that. I would say something about his activities around town for him. Doing which i couldn't remember and through this whole fifteen to twenty minute tirade. That was going down there. He give accusing me of telling stuff that went on on the bus. That wasn't nobody else's business and everything else not give telling you know. I don't even think like that. I don't understand looked at me. He said well. You must've been all grown still for all those said well. I might have been. But i don't even think in those terms so we finally say it at this point all i can do if i said something that was outta line anywhere. Apologize for it as you that album be on my toes and they will never get happen again bloody block you know and all that so he finally accepts the apology as it were and says okay. We're we're just going on now and we'll put this behind this. We'll go on from here. We'll be friends okay. Fine about a month. Everything goes along all right and we were coming back from columbus ohio. Ohio caravanning with jim and jesse. They had been having some breath bus problems and they won't do if their bus broke down. They wanted to be able to ride back to nashville. Leaves bus driver. You know to get their bus on any case it back then but they needed to get back to town so we pulled in little truck stop restaurant over an airliner kentucky and jim and jim and grandkids are jesse mcreynolds. Sit down in front of bill and they started talking and i was a couple of people away on one side or another. We end tables up together. And jesse got to talking about how he jam with some of their shenanigans that they used to call is going to have to watch it. 'cause some of their band members were telling folks around town about what they've been doing monroe pups. We got one in our bunch like that too. My napkin put it on a plate. Went out fatema. Bill went out and sat down in the driver's seat monroe's versed warning the bus. I followed him okay table. He grabs out his cards and starts dealing out solitary hand. And i i just looked at him and i said i thought she said was going. Leave all that stuff than rose vice month. We're gonna be hanging onto him will. You didn't have no business saying what she did. I said i've done prior to apologize to. I said i've done. We've done been through this before. But but that time kenny wayne and now thank randy was in the band. Then they come august and they heard what was going on. They went to the back of the bus. Bill on starts us up and here. We go down the interstate and good ten minutes. We're going to each other tuesday night and finally he looks across the table. He's got him a hand to solitaire. Laid out there. He looks across the table. It may pose these glasses down over. The indies knows looks right and then he said you know that list flat was the worst guitar player i ever ate. Lester flatt got to do is. We're talking about this. Oh thank you said. Well we ain't getting nowhere with this other thing. I just thought i'd talk about guitar players fulla so that's that's the nature of what he was. I guess that could be real. You know and he did so many wonderful. It's like when any but ever come up to him and ask you. Who was his favorite guitar player or banjo. Player are fiddle player or anything like that. His cancer was. They were all good when they worked for me. And that's one thing that i thought. It was just absolutely wonderful of him is. He never played favorites. And i and i worked. There was getting banker in kenny. Baker got no concessions than anybody in the ban. Didn't get if you did your job as well as kenny baker did he is. You didn't have to put up with whole on of garbage. you know some. He was just he was an interesting study. I mean i worked with some very very talented people. He had leon. Russell was the to two of the most talented people i with. And and actually a lady there in nashville but the name of kathy kee album. I think she's got a master's degree in classical opera and everything. But she's you know she's a vocal coach and everything else but she as far as you know having the talent and aptitude i get all bluster nominee old man now in my time to be grouchy. All i won't to and it dawned on me back. I've been going on this premise for years. That ever since the fifties and all the child side child psychology stuff. Being alone you know. Most of the folks in this country been raised in their kids with a thing out there. Saying i don't care what you do when you grow up here. We just want you to be happy. We just won't thought to be happy. Enjoy your line will never going to check and see if you've got any aptitude or talent for whatever it. Is you think you want to do that makes you happy. We just want you to go. You know hell nowadays all you gotta do sit. And you see. Don't cause a ruckus. There's no child left behind thing twelve years later after you start you're gonna have a high school diploma. That's a piece of paper that says you're qualified to do something and then you go get you another four years of that and you get you moving sheepskin the hang out down there and you know that. Do the whole thing and you can do it if you just show up and do the work out there and see workers enough to make it happen as long as you're happy you know. I try to tell people down here in this little town. I live in got held. Several millions feet beta floor phase down here that was the furniture factories and the clothing meals and stuff like that setting empty. Everyone of our county administrators down here and everything else. Every piece of paper that comes across their desk they know exactly where decided they know exactly where to fill in the blanks. They know exactly what to write there. Because they're consciously competent of that. They've been trained to do it. But now you look at somebody can think outside the box that can put those most of the machinery steel in those factories. The granted down there and the people used to run that machine selected welfare right now but who can think outside the box and figure out how to put those machines back to running. Yeah you know. That's what talent and aptitude do. Do you still live in polaski virginia. Yeah county virginia alkaline. Would brad when you go on this thing. When i first saw earl scruggs playing banjo on tv. I step back. And i said i can do what that guy's doing. I was unconsciously incompetent after. I got a banjo on my hands after about a year so i got enough along the way making my little three finger groves knowing records. Walk up the street to play. Linford's house and i could accompany him when he was singing them. All hank williams songs. I was becoming consciously incompetent. I was becoming aware at that point. Some of the stuff. That i couldn't so i started playing in those contests and i go in the military not come out and within a year and a half to two years. I'm being able to get those eight lists sessions out there and doing some of those. I was becoming consciously competent but then something happened in. We'll run off. And i stepped out into another place and that went to work for building. Trust works for him for about two years. I could hear him working on his hand in the next room blaming the team and i put my banjo on and walk in that room and play it right back to because i had become unconsciously competent in that realm right there. Those are the four stages of development. You're only going to get to that phone stage of development if you have talent and aptitude and you're willing to put in the work that it takes to develop it going from unconsciously incompetent to consciously incompetent to consciously competent to unconsciously competent to get to that place and you know when you're seventy blows years old you said around and think about stuff like that i wanted to ask you butch in your video series you did for radford university you said You made a comment. And i wanted to get your further thoughts on this. You made the comment there that that you couldn't play bluegrass. You never could play it. What did you mean by that. You know when they started the genre vacation music back early. In the last century it was basically built on the genres will basically built on a rhythm played. And i don't have the nazi. Bluegrass is not the rhythm. Monroe laid to is not a natural rhythm for me. You know and. I don't think it is for anybody. He had such a developed sense of it and it was such a developed sense of the problem forms. It's like when you play the three quarter time they call it and wall sound. If you play blooming the kentucky it wasn't hard three quarters The as the two don't judge trying to do. John dazzled them down real hard three-quarter turns right around kentucky wallison and almost have a minuet do but he knows some differences. Like when you the the the rhythm of the march time that you would play during the first part of under a double legal and then go into that real streak to four the second part of you know down do them just gotten down. Doesn't start and and able to do. I mean was the pick and everything the rhythm that he had you know i i never could do. I could accompany it while it was alive. And i learned how to play with him very well. And i've got a couple of shows. Osbourne stood on that stage in eminence missouri and said that i did the best job of playing. That old man's music any banjo player that ever worked with him. I worked at it to do that. But by the same token take him away. I could only company. I can't do it. You're listening to acoustic music. Talk with your host brad apple. You know. I've talked about in those videos about The bluegrass music of today being more social skills than it is an art form and so social skill and an expression of ego choice engineering lost the continuity of rhythm minute you lost the the melodious lead lines in it. It's all just phrases and everything and it's like you know when you listen to some of the classic jazz the past the django reinhardt and stephane grappelli. You'd have stephane grappelli laying. You know a assembling of the melody the way it was and in jangle reinhardt. Playing phrases they played around through the structure of that. And you had those two things. To contrast nowadays you know how much music is out there when you hear an instrumental play jackson. Walk down the street and start humming. You know six eight bars or measures of the thing you know you can remember. I can remember a phrase here and there but as far as the the wonderful continuity of the melody and rhythm. I just don't see it. Yeah was wanting to ask you about your thoughts on the current. Bluegrass music sane. I know it's so much different now even in my lifetime it's changed a lot. You know the music here almost become a business. Now it's become a business you know is is your your degree of talent that you possess near as important to you is is the publicist. You have got a wonderful young players coming along. I've seen that young billy strengths. That's out there playing and everything. And i'm saying this stuff is beginnings where he played with his father on some stuff and just some wonderful play out there where he goes out to these festivals and plays with every band. That's there you know. He got his own act and got all these gets up with mccurry and he's the guy to just marvellously talented guy. But is he going to. Is he going to stand the test of time outs. Who knows you know. Is he going to make those businesses decisions that will allow him a career in it. I mean we get to see. Some people have busted their rear instigated. And marty stuart and ricky skaggs out there. Who are you know getting hall of fame recognition that they deserve for the careers that they've had. But i mean for somebody to last like a long time like that. It's really hard to know. Not many acts can can make it over ten fifteen years in professional music before they kind of disappear bluegrass when i started out when when i was starting out in the thanking. Finding out some sonny osborne and some of these guys talking about their goals that they were trying to do with their records. They released back then. If you had to hit record you could play off of it for ten years nowadays. You can't even play also the ten months. Yeah that's true. You know these young guys come to town Like dirks bentley. People like that. That i saw twenty years ago. This has been twenty years ago. When i look back to nashville down there in seoul him working around the station and and even wound up working a few frat parties around vanderbilt. Within and everything and at that point is god you know if you had your first record out and you didn't have at least one get on that first album and go on all right you get hit off at first of all when you second comes out you better get another one. Maybe two that next one or it's time to go home dropped. The whole the whole thing's different is not necessarily as you know. The the sales and marketing of the product now seems to be almost as important as the degree of talented selling. If not more important than the talented selling that kind of elise day. Yeah that kind of leads me. Which i was going. I wanted your thoughts on this You know as as a lover of this kind of music acoustic and bluegrass music Why why do you think it is-it bluegrass has never got the especially the money that it should have made you know same like you know especially one what what they call country music now. It used to be all all country music but kind of one country started going a different direction. It's almost like they were ashamed at bluegrass in away and bluegrass has never really made the money that in my issued be the most well paid music. You know so. But that's just my opinion but why do you think it is. The bluegrass has never got the creditor money that it's really should've been due due to the enormous talent. That's didn't that's in our music i would. I would pick things to look at like the material you know when you're talking about dead babies and heartbroken mama's and tear jerking and everything else. The music that content of the music in most cases doesn't make people feel good about themselves. You get right down to your and and the other part of it again you've got you've got a lot of people who are you know. Wonderful wonderful wonderful pickers but they. That's what they are they're pickers. They're not musicians. You know i could name i. I can only name to banjo players. And there's so many wonderful ones. I'm not even going get in main two of them right now that i've heard that i would really like to play with because i would like to feel what it's like to play with them. I this one thing to hear. Somebody is something else debate with somebody and be able to feel them on. They're playing to feel the rhythm that they've got. So i i don't know i don't know i can't answer that question. Yeah the the commercial potential on something. I don't know yeah. I mean what was the commercial think. What would the commercial potential of elvis presley been without. Tom parker being. You know when you look at roy when he was able to do. That's the whole thing. You know my whole big argument about calling this acoustic string band music. Bluegrass music in to me. Bluegrass music's bill monroe. You know i ask you. The other day was flattened grows and bluegrass band. Jimmy martin a bluegrass band. Jim and jesse the stanley brothers. Last interview that i can remember ralph stanley doing for jerry. Paul ain't and he had rows stanley says in their plainly. We never played bluegrass. We played mountain music. Jimmy martin's first record for decca. Mr gooden bluegrass mr good country. Which was one of the flat and scruggs. I records for mercury first album. The banner across the top country music until lows bluegrass festivals came along. Bluegrass music was the entire domain. Was bill monroe period and then when the bluegrass festival started getting popular and music. That we're playing. You know other playful playing variations and all these other deviations and they had like i ask young fella back in january i was doing a. Pbs thing Money raiser for a fm station up here in roanoke. And i told that young man. I said you somewhere about thirty resolved. What would you be like. What would you be doing if right now. You could do everything that bill monroe and doing his been able to do in his line. If you could play every ten that he played that you were just as prolific a composer is. He was everything else. What would be the first thing you'd be doing. And he looked at me right now. You would try to do something to distinguish your name. So people wouldn't be saying there is the leading exponent of bill. Monroe you've been doing. What christie lease and go out and create your own deal out there you know. It was just like those guys that hazel smith called the outlaw. They didn't come around. The grand ole opry when one of the grand ole opry performers to calm the attitude and the outlaws and started wearing these blue jeans these nudie suit jacket and a big cowboy hat on with the things out there and come in with bullshit across the marquees bus because he's going to be like outlaws was and that marquee and bus sort of didn't sit very well with women cooper in a bunch of those other timers around there. They go both windows office in. The pre-start was run into the office and citizens marquee show any longer. Be on the offered that outlaw much. They didn't come in to the opera. They didn't invade the country music world. They made their own stuff may created their own audience. Just like bela fleck. Wonderful wonderful job of creating his own audience in the subset of jazz music out there. Yeah you know if you could do everything somebody in that particular genre. Does the next thing you're going to be doing is looking how to set yourself apart in. That's one thing i don't. I don't know what is going to happen. I was saying music now. You know to me the music communication skill. It's the way some guy gets together. You know some guy from japan gets together with some guy from england some guy from texas some guy for minnesota. Some guy from new york under tree out in blossom and things. I'm old sauce. And when they're doing that they go through the same kind of spasm that the christian people go through when they say they're sharing fellowship that's the communication skill it and that's what's gonna keep it out there in the public consciousness all the time now whether it's ever if it internally generated itself star it may reach some kind of mania capacity out there. I don't know but to me. It's going to have to generate a star internally. I'm not talking about somebody who comes and goes over and becomes popular in country music music and comes back to its roots because that in itself almost demeaning connotation if your roots were that good why didn't you say there in the first place but if it internal internally generates historic maybe this guy billy streams is out there molly tuttle be. Who knows how. Many people out there capable of being a star. You know. that's a whole different deal when you get into that right when you get into these celebrity that that creates that whole thing there you know. Look at the demeanor. I mean look at monroe and how is entire lot. How statue esky the way. He stood the way he carries himself. You know it's work being a star. You're a when i saw on russell and i was around him. I mean he was the trump growth grossing. Us act traveling rock and roll act in this country and he ran from it. He ran from it. And that's why he went for a lotta years and he's laugh. You know elton. John came along at the end. East is career so to speak in the at least in the in the sunset evidence not the twilight of it and got him into rock and roll hall of fame. And something you ought to do is go on youtube out there and watch his acceptance speech where he talks about elton john coming by and find him laying in the ditch alongside the road line and taking him out to those back to those places where he could play for the big audiences again. It's hard being a star and once you've got one there it's you know what you've become star. It's even harder maintaining it especially for several decades. I guess it's a thing i guess. Monroe went through as did a lot of people. He went through huge slump. Like in the fifties when the rock and roll really started coming around. Rockin is damn near put them all out of business in the country music world. You know ralph rensselaer in carlton haney basically ralph friendly reorganizing and carlton. Haney created the venues for him to come back in. Those bluegrass testicles. You when he was. It's just like with roy ak- out there. Anything for roy. Got bigger than the grand ole opry equipped to grand ole opry. For a couple of years he went to hollywood and made movies was proudest things he had in his dressing room was a picture of him on broadway. Raleigh coming smoking boys on some broadway during their front act was ronald reagan. no you know when he came back at one time. I think he and fred rose actually owned the grand ole opry. At one time. They found him sitting at the head of the board of directors of the national life and casualty insurance company. I know that you talking about carlton haney. Is you this the other night. I wanted to talk about it again on here. One one thing. I thought was funny in your book. As you said carlton gather dollar performers at one festival up one time and he had this this great idea about doing like two different Well just get you to tell it to put together two troupes of them and you know take all the major hitters out there. Mungo that the country gentlemen. Thank the seldom seen burt. Active at this point is unbelievable it was in nineteen sixty nine it reads film and basically monroe at that point had gotten the sullivans to go in went down in alabama. They had a ten day festival down there. Relevant day festival over this place and bill had the ten day festival over bean blossom but called wanted to start at the circuit. And it would be if you can imagine imagine this circuit being like a clock and you don't one group of them started twelve o'clock and got another group of them start at six o'clock and with each of these venues that they're going to work around the clock they're going to be two festivals every year and all of the band's would get to play all the festivals that way so the one band goes from twelve to one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven backup and it's worked. Its hold series where the other one starts at six and works. Its way around back the five and that way every band has got the play all of moon basically a couple of acts out there. decided carlton was trying to take over the music and the idea just went. I think my role quit doing hardly any work for for carlton after that point and some of the others did too but you know carlton kept on with his shows and kept the thing going but it wasn't like it was before before that time i liked the way it was funny the way you put it in your book you said you wondered if they would ever figure out why one burger king went in on one corner that mcdonald's winning across the street or something like that. They don't understand that's that's the nature. There are so many of us in this country right now. All we gotta do this. Just get us itself in. Just get yourself in the place where the traffic hits public another option. We'd like to thank butch robins again for on our show today. We'd like to invite you all back next week for another great episode of acoustic music talk. We're gonna be talking to mandolin. Extraordinaire mr jimmy goudreau. Next week and talk about history in this music. I mean jimmy has played with the country. Gentlemen tony rice. Unit spectrum Chesapeake just to name a few and we're going to be talking to jimmy next week on acoustic music talk so please join us again next week until then be safe and we'll see you again. Thank you for listening to acoustic music. Talk join us again next week for another episode as we continue to explore the world of acoustic music.

monroe brad apple tommy roger sprung north carolina tommy jarrell snuffy jenkins don reno bill monroe James davis asheville bascom nashville Bush robins Mr bill monroe butch robins tommy davis national square bascom lamar lunceford Lamar burton
From Bluegrass to Newgrass: The Story Of Sam Bush

World Cafe

26:40 min | 2 years ago

From Bluegrass to Newgrass: The Story Of Sam Bush

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast. Hey, you're listening to world cafe. I'm Talia Slinger. My guest today is unusable pioneer of fiddle guitar banjo, and most notably, the mandolin player, who some consider the godfather of bluegrass music it. Sam Bush Sam is the subject of the documentary called revival. The Sam Bush story traces SAM's musical trajectory from this kid who grew up on the country and bluegrass in Kentucky to one of the founders of the ban, new grass revival to one of the key influencers in modern Americana, the film came out on the festival circuit in twenty fifteen. It was just released late last year on Amazon, and it features friends and admirers like Bela Fleck, moved Harris, crispy Lee of the punch brothers, Alison Krauss and the Abbott brothers. And they all have really nice things to say about Sam Bush, it was almost as if you're at your own wake without sounding odd about it. You know, I think growing up around acoustic music we've learned to be really giving with each other. And, and that's. It's part of the spirit of the whole film of the people. Yes. That my, my pals that came to testify about me on camera. But also, it's I think it's part of the, the way we grew up playing and jamming together and sit in a circle and learn to communicate. And, and maybe in that way, the world I grew up in the world of acoustic music that we all tend to support each other. I'd love for you to share a couple of the stories that we add that we hear told in the film in revival. The Sam Bush story, I'm starting with growing up in bowling green, Kentucky on a farm on some of the artists that, that I talk to say that they had to, you know rebel against their parents to make it in music or that, you know they had to sneak guitars into their bedrooms or hide records, under their dressers. You had quite an opposite experience where your dad was really supportive. Tell me a little bit about how he influenced your early musical education. We'll both both our parents. My mom played guitar. Pop play the fiddle in the mandolin, and nobody loves fiddle playing more than my dad, I'd never met anyone that love fiddling like him. He has a farmer. They were both farmers. And so he is the farmer that loved the fiddle, he would invite other fiddlers and guitar players to come over to our house in have just kind of fiddle jam sessions. He loved them and I was getting interested in playing the mandolin and my father listened to fiddle records by Tommy Jackson, vague grand ole Opry fiddler, and so on the on the fiddle tunes would also be a mandolin playing along. So I guess, somewhere along the line of love the sound of. Fiddling mandolin playing in unison. So Sam your dad, not only introducing this music, but he also helped to get on stage at the opera for the very first time like when you were really young, would you. Tell me, how old yes at the time down on Broadway in Nashville Mr. ROY Acuff had, you know, toured the world, so many years at this point, it takes us up to the seventies, Mr. aikoff started the museum exhibit and a so my dad came down. I guess I was somewhere around thirteen or fourteen came down from bowling green to Nashville. It's about sixty miles and we went in on a Saturday afternoon. And lo and behold, taking admission for the ROY aikoff exhibit was bashful. Brother Oswald Roy's right hand man on Dobro banjo. And you know, we we're fans and bashful, brother Oswald stake in the door. And of course, my dad's real friendly guy, and he and Oswal struck up a conversation that they. They were friends, the rest of their lives after that it was great. And my dad told Oswald up played the fiddle so went and found fiddle and play little tune for him. And he immediately got right on the telephone called. Mr. aikoff said ROY better get down here. We got a boy can fiddle so mistake of came down and later that night, put me on the show that came on at midnight on WGN radio after the grand ole Opry, and I was just totally freaked out in all I mean, and I got to be backstage at the Reimann auditorium, and it was the whole thing was pretty surreal. But so now we've made the acquaintance of Mr. cuff and, and, and they love to have fiddle jams between all his Opry performances. So I would get to hang out with the great fiddle player. Howdy Forrester that was Royce fiddle player in one of the greatest ever drew a bow. And so it was. After a couple years if getting come down. We my dad and I were standing there on a Friday night backstage, at the Reimann auditorium, and it'd be nice to me, Mr. aikoff went up to my dad and said, go get his fiddle put him on on play it. So all of a sudden, my dad walked up with the fiddle in the bow out of the case. He says Royce putting you on while you wanna play? And you know, I didn't I didn't have time to I didn't have time to get nervous. And so, I believe that night a plate at that night, a platoon, call drunken Billy goat that mystery cuff, particularly liked so played that one. And so I guess I was sixteen when mistake of let me play on the grand ole Opry. And then he actually ROY ak- who, who was known as the king of country music the year, you graduated high school in nineteen seventy actually offered you a job through your dad to play in his band. And, and that I mean to your dad, who thought of him as a hero that had to be just just the biggest deal in the world, and then you give a really surprising answer. Well, it was the biggest deal in the world to my dad, because, you know, me being eighteen years old in nineteen seventy. Let's see my heroes were Bill Monroe, Eric Clapton, the birds, you know, just it's different generation, my father's heros, were ROY Acuff, and Hank Williams. Hawk shock and Patsy Cline cowboy cope, he loved all those people. So yes, for my father to hear that, you know, for, for Mr. aikoff to offer me a job through my dad. We'll of course, my dad thought I should take that. Well, I was eighteen and. I was in love with the idea of bluegrass music, and mandolin. And it just wasn't the right thing. And I and honestly, I didn't wanna play in a band with people that were my father's eight and another thing was that the first trip they took was to Vietnam. And in nineteen seventy at age eighteen I was scared to death the thought of being in Vietnam, under any circumstances, so that to just it wasn't appealing. And I moved up to level started playing in the bluegrass alliance six five nights a week five or six nights a week planet, the red dog saloon and that's what we call going to bluegrass college. What'd you learn at bluegrass college, I learned I learned that you gotta play really fast and furious in a in a in a really crowded bar. We learn I think we learned to play as hard as we could on acoustic instruments, and what we did learn, though, was to, to get tough playing in front of an. Audience. Let's pick out a bluegrass alliance. Tune. Well, me, I never actually, we'd never actually I never actually recorded with one of their favorite tunes. My favorite tunes that they did was their version of the bluegrass alliance did of Bob Dylan song. You ain't going nowhere. You. Tomorrow. Alliance is, is what you call your bluegrass education, and then and then eventually you go on to sort of slip the genre on its head and break ground. And do the thing that I think, has defined the way that we think about US this innovative musician, which is forming the band, new grass revival will that came out. We, we were the. The bluegrass alliance was a five piece band, and we came to a parting of the ways with our fiddle player. And we wanted him to leave the band. Well, that's what we found out. He owned the name of the band, and so leaving the rest of us to go. Well, I guess we all quit then. So in that way, four guys quit a five piece band, and that, so we just started and tried to find a band name with the word new grass revival. We what it meant to us is that we were kind of continuing on a style that already was going, the people that had made new bluegrass like the osbournes in the Dillard's, Jim and Jesse. And so we, we just felt like we were kind of reviving what they already started. So we never claimed that we were the first ones to play a new kind of bluegrass. We just felt like we were helping help revive the style. Keep it going. Well, revival though, is sort of as a word sets up this tension, I guess that plays out throughout the documentary, and what you did in new grass revival with Bela, Fleck, John Cowan, and Pat Flynn your band, named basically sort of calls out that there's a change happening, and that may be the heroes who you all got into music because of did one thing, and that it's Morphing into another. So tell me a little bit about the, the tension, that you might have felt in those early new grass revival dates between the people you loved, and where you were going, well, you know, the, the other musicians always treated this great. We were totally accepted by the musicians, and I think one of the reasons that we were because everybody knew we knew how to play bluegrass and that we respected the roots. I mean, nobody loves Bill Monroe more than me and. And respected the roots of it. But there was no reason for us to play like them anymore. We knew right off the bat that we weren't suited just for old time bluegrass festivals. And then when we did play certain bluegrass vessels. They tend to put us on at midnight and one promoter who is particularly good to us named Carlton Haney. We'd ask Carlton, couldn't we play a little earlier and he'd say, well, you could always, but that's when yell people awake. So were like the late night jam band. Let's have a listen to, to what you were doing pick out a song from from from your first album. Maybe from from new grass revival, self titled nineteen seventy-two debut will, I l them. I think it actually might have started off with this tune friend. Ours from Louisville wrote it, and it wasn't like any other tune, we ever heard at the time called pennies in my pockets. I got hit. I got. I know. Win win. What we. Way was weekend. The head of the. Embarrassed against in the cafe. And talking a documentary revival. The Sam Bush story let's talk a bit about the signature mandolin sound that you are known for guess described by some people as, as chopping sweep. It's, it's rhythmically unlike anything else, and maybe before we talk about he developed that sound, you can, you can tell me if there's a piece of recorded material that you think really exemplifies with that is. Perhaps. Yeah. Because tried to learn to make a whole different thing. There's a, a song, excuse me, written by Peter Rolan that new grass revival did simply call revival. And there's a little sort of what we call the mandolin percussion solo. Part of it came from, you know, the loves of learning to play drums in the marching band, while one drum at a time drums in the marching, band and learning about rudiments and what happens and. And then the, the chop of the mantle and what we call the mandolin chop think we, you can pretty much see where that developed with Mr. Bill Monroe and somewhere around the late fifties early sixties. He started making a, a percussion backbeat shop, where he wasn't just strumming rhythm any more. Railway, man. Thank you. Be. And so all bluegrass male players. We all with the exception of Jesse mcreynolds. I think we've all tried to copy Bill Monroe's chop and then years later of all things as say about nineteen seventy five seventy six when I've heard the first record that turned me on by Bob Marley, and the Wailers it was natty dread. And the rhythm guitar playing in reggae music, just I couldn't believe what I was hearing a loved it. And really, it was Bob Marley personally playing that rhythm guitar that I loved, and that attracted me to reggae music, because it reminded me of Bill Monroe's, mandolin shop. So just rhythm play to me is, it's everything. And that's what I hope, when, when I play with people that they can take away of knowing that when, when you solo, I'm going to give you good rhythm at your peak in the film. We see this question on the cover of frets magazine, and it says are Nashville's virtuosos, too good for gold, and you say in the movie that this is sort of a general topic that magazines would ask you guys all the time about your musical proficiency, in whether that got in the way of, of commercial success, I am Agean, that would be such a weird thing to swallow or a hard thing to swallow. But I think it says something really important about what you guys did. And even maybe the way that we hear music now. So what did you make of that, at that time? Well, we I think we took great pride in it because even Mr. Jim Fogel song to head of capitol records here. Nashville signed us, and he actually told us he goes, I love what you guys do. At what you to change. It's up to you. Don't change anything change. Whatever you want. But he said you, you guys make the music. We'll try to sell it. And so I, I guess in a way in so capital would tell us. Yeah. You guys are your are integrity group. You're the group that gives us musical integrity. That would always make me wonder that mean we're not going to sell anything but, you know when you look at the time and the late eighties and seemingly the country market was the one, we should have gone in. That's been debated as an afterthought years later, g should should they have been sold more in the rock and roll market. I'm not sure I just know that we went along, and we made a living, and we had an audience. And in that way, I always felt we were successful. And, and so I think for us to I think our highest charting single in the country radio. Got to thirty six maybe with calling Baton Rouge. And probably could have gone higher. But capitol records found out we were breaking up and they stopped the promo. Did people see that you appraise? Easy to break up as a band at the time that you having your highest charting single with Colin Baton Rouge, and, and where you were at the time. Sure. It was it wasn't a well, I think it, it happened when it was time for it to stop in that we. Maybe we taken our music with the four of us as far as we could go one of the things that was occurring is that Bela Fleck is just, you know, of course, one of the most talented musicians on the earth, and he was writing so many tunes that we couldn't accommodate his writing he needed to go on and express himself with the flex and the first time I heard him play with the with the ban that would become the flick tomes a new had found is to space. If was great and so- bail was going on. And in that left John, and I really is to do at singers as the singers to think a lot about if we wanted to go on with it, and he and I both thought we need we needed to do something different. We both won't need a different scene. And so for me, I had no plan when the band broke up other than I was really hoping to stop traveling all at ever done travel since I got out of high school, so but that didn't happen. Because Emmylou Harris called up with the idea of starting an acoustic band and lo and behold, I ended up in EMMY loose ban. The Nash ramblers for the next five years. What's an ashram blur song, the treasure from that time, quite a few of them, because we when we made our live at the Reimann album that was truly EMMY just gave all the ban a lot of input in the material and the arrangements, and we worked together, and it was just such a labor of love that we went through for that record. And so I guess one of my favorites would be than this, this one. I got to suggest this song that we work it up, which was Bill Monroe tune the walls of time. Ninety two. Bush is here with me on the world cafe. And we're talking about his the documentary about him called revival. The Sam Bush story, the film made me think so much about what success is because it, it spans your career up until now. And there are so many different metrics that come up. Mike successes being influential on younger generations, and successes earning the respect of your peers and your elders and successes having friends successes doing what you love having your health being able to make a living. I'm wondering if the process of being part of this documentary changed the way that you define success for yourself at all. I don't think so because. Success. Okay now, now, one flip answer is success being able to buy two pair of blue jeans at the same time. That's, that's pretty good. But really, I just think. Success doesn't always transfer translate into in a wear. I am in show business or the amount of money that I'm trying to make for me. The success means that I am free to play the music. I choose. One of the things that you grapple with in the movie is the idea of being relevant petty stay relevant. And you say this great quote, you say that you're too young to or too old, to be young, and too young to be an old legend. So where does that? That's what, what does it say, I guess, or where does that leave? You now as somebody who's a working musician and then also a subject of documentary about how influential you are leave you now, it's, it's well, it's, it's, it's a government thing because, as you talk, I'm sixty six years old and s just hard. You know how'd you get that far? I mean, we say it in a saw Jeff black, and I wrote the song called circles around me how in the world did we get this far? And because I mean in, in so many ways, I still like a feel like I'm I'm still learning and I'm just trying to get better. I'm trying to get better as a singer and player. Well, let's go out on circles around me. And I'm glad that, that wherever you've been has landed you here today and I'm thankful to you, Sam for, for talking to me on the show. Thank you, tell you thankful to be with you. Here we go. Down through the grape. I heard someone saying. Hand on my shoulder. Just a little bit older. I remember. Brattle ten thousand feet above the San. News team ran sent count on my blessings, and thank the good friends that. Allen. The world. Style. Circles around me circles. That is circles around me. The title track to Sam is two thousand and nine record SAM's documentary called revival. The Sam Bush story is out on Amazon. Now, thanks so much to Sanford coming in to talk, and thanks to Sanford, influencing, so many bands that we now know and love, including the punch brothers, the brothers, both of whom are in that documentary. All right. Thanks bush. Thanks, our senior producer, Kimberly. Do not thanks to Klay who's with me in studio right now. Engineering. Thanks. I'm telling linger and this is the world cafe from NPR.

Sam Bush Sam Bush Sam Bill Monroe Nashville Mr. aikoff bowling NPR Oswald Roy Mr. ROY Acuff Reimann auditorium Bela Fleck Kentucky Amazon Emmylou Harris Jesse mcreynolds Mr. Jim Fogel Dulles International Airport Talia Slinger John Cowan WGN
Brad Apple interviews Mandolin Master Jimmy Gaudreau-Part One

Acoustic Music Talk with Brad Apple

46:35 min | 10 months ago

Brad Apple interviews Mandolin Master Jimmy Gaudreau-Part One

"Hey everybody this is becky buller and you're listening to acoustic music. Talk with brad apple. Welcome to coup stig music talk where we explore the art of acoustic music and musicians with your host brad apple. Hello folks and welcome to acoustic music. Talk i'm your host brad apple and i would like to welcome you to this week's episode. I'm very excited. Because i got to set down recently with fellow that's had such an illustrious career in this music and he is one of my all time heroes on the mandolin and he was one of the early members of the country gentlemen. He's had his own band with keith. Whitley and others. He was in jd. Crow and the new south and actually recruited keith. Whitley to the new south. When keith joined the band he's been with spectrum with glint lawson bela fleck and mark schatz and tony rice unit and many other bands. And i'll tell you we had such a great conversation in a long conversation that this is going to be two parts. This week is the first part. And i'm talking about mr jimmy goodrow and jimmy as had such a great career in bluegrass music. And as one of my all time. He rose on the mainland. I remember the first time. I saw him in person with tony rice unit. I was just so blown away. At how how tasteful and fluid and his mandolin playing was and of course all the records been telling me and other people as a also. So i was very happy. Get to sit down and do a telephone interview with jimmy recently. And we got to talk a lot about his career and his mantle and playing style. So we're going to go ahead and get into that interview now with jimmy goudreau. Well i guess. I'll start by asking you about your very first introduction into music boy got. You started playing did you. I've read somewhere that you started playing electric guitar. I is that right. Not i know Actually i kind of followed. My older brother He was playing Accordion in I never who wanted to get into that. And eventually he found out that he really wasn't interested in it either so he got into the tower before i did After i think one christmas he might have got a plastic. Arthur godfrey i guess is Who was it was Marketing ukulele and he had a plastic ukulele. That was his first introduction strings and he'd leave it sitting around and occasionally i pick it up and if it was in tune I remember he said something about. My dog has freeze if you can tune it. So that's that's pretty goofy. But that's i was like seven years old or something. Like that. And i picked up the early and was able to find a couple of records on it. That sounded pretty good. You know because. I thought the nose went together. And it didn't sound too awful to me and messed around with that for a while. Meanwhile he had gotten a guitar for christmas And electric guitar and that was pretty jealous of that and my parents said well. You know when your birthday comes. Maybe we'll get you a guitar because you know but it won't be anything electric or so. My first guitar was the Most end silver tone sears. Roebuck sold eight dollars. So that made completely out apply would and you know it was kinda rough playing and rough sounding but it was what i had to learn on so i played that thing for a couple of years. And meanwhile my brother was You know getting better and better on his electric guitar and of course. I wasn't allowed to touch that. You know Eventually when i got older I traded the get rid of the sears and roebuck guitar and got a sears and roebuck electric guitar which was a theme body And actually i'll tell you it was by dan. Electro so silver silverton was a brand name that they use for their marketing thing. But you know. They didn't actually manufacture instruments. I found out later that. Because i had seen a dan electro that looked exactly like my guitar. Nate somebody said oh. Yeah these things. Dan electrodes are fairly. Well regarded instrument. You know and and later on. I found out that if you still have one of those things was worth pretty good bucks and but like everything else you know. I traded up for way and and eventually ended up with a fender stratocaster in my teens. I guess because i had gotten into the band business really early Like thirteen hooked up with a couple of other guys and we were playing high school functions and Dances and little shows around town but You know had to have electric guitar because all your buddies are him. So yeah gotta gotta be able to compete right. And that was my introduction into not professional playing. I made a few bucks. So i guess i was a semi pro at the time. But still you know still going to school. Of course and I didn't know. Bluegrass was because being from rhode island. There just wasn't any any around that i knew of Until wii high school friend of mine got interested in it and and Wanted to learn to play banjo and i said andrew. What's what's this in these little. Don't you know it's like you know. There's a lot of folk music going on these days in bluegrass. And i said well i familiar with the folk music. If you're talking about like the kingston trio in beautiful. Mary and stuff like that and he says yeah. Yeah he is. That's going on as well. But you know there's things like bill monroe and flat and scruggs and jimmy martin and these people. He said well you know movies. I'm i'm interested in taking up banjo and i said fine. So would you like to go to a jam session as you mean to me. He said well you know you never know. He says you know how to play guitar. So many advocates are there that you can strom. And i said sure why not you know so went to this. Guy's house a another a mutual friend who is A couple of years ahead of us in high school and They were transplants from west. Virginia down near lewisburg and living in a nearby town air in rhode island every now and then they would throw jam sessions and invite all of their new grass. Picking friends over and that was my first exposure to that and mandolin. Because you know. I have learned a little bit from my friends just just a basic role on the banjo is just to see if i could do. You know not that. I really was dying to be banjo player. Anything but You know i. It was intriguing to watch this guy play anyway so we go to. The jam session breaks banjo and i happened to notice that. There's a what looks to be a mandolin Sitting on the couch in the living room and one of the other guys that get up and figure out how to play it. And i said i said i've never had my hands on one and said randy's fingers across the strings is appears to be in tune. Says wanted to just you know. Take it in mess with it. And and that's what i did so basically i guess you could call it the bill monroe approach or similarity that I came into mandolin. Plane by default in in monroe's case it was the instrument in his family that nobody else played. And you know he was. He was the last one in line. I guess so. He picked up the mandolin by default and and learned how to play it on his own because evidently he would listen to some of the local players around row zien and his uncle pen who played the fiddle and figure. This is to like a fiddle. So i can learn to play it. And that's basically what i did. You know i would watch the fiddle players. These jam sessions because it was. We're no wonder mandolin players and As a matter of fact the same guy that led me to the mandolin and he said You sing and i said yeah i in my rock and roll you know jimmy g. and the jaguars i i sing the highest part in the trio you know because we were doing beatles tunes and all kinds of stuff and and i did have back then he A higher range natural tanner. I guess you could say and he said well you. You should be playing mandolin because you know. That's the instrument that bill monroe plays and again this. So sloughs bill monroe. It's like i think. I've heard of this guy. But i don't you know i hadn't heard him play. I hadn't heard him sing at that point. And you know he was just. Oh he's the father of bluegrass. Oh well thanks for. Let me know. Because i didn't know before that and He said well. If you sing the highest part that you should be playing mandolin. Okay he says you home and mess around with it if you want to. So that's that's what i did. I took it home in learned a few chords and went back to the jam session and said well has learned some chords and started strumming these two finger chords and the guy says no you you you learn to play chop chords and i said what's that you know. And so he told me he said no. You use all four fingers after that. Look out because I- dangerous once. I learn how to chop courts in. He says you play on the off. Beat not on the on beat so I i got all my lessons in in about the same month you know i went from a non player to a guy who was trying to stand up front chopping cords out of time and basically the rest is history because You know i. I liked it after a while. Good into better or players you know i discovered there's more players around at these jam sessions and My banjo playing friends took me to a show any volunteer fire department. And he and he says well. Here's some other guys that are playing and they were pretty good There was actually a mandolin player. a young lady who lived locally who. Somebody taught how to play mandolin. She was much better than me much better so i just sat there and watched her play all night. Long and really I was getting the book by. I needed a better instrument and eventually got my hands on a Ah gibson eighteen model. Which i borrowed and i didn't buy that one after that I found that there was a music store over in plainfield connecticut. Which rhode island isn't that big and eastern connecticut kind of butts up against it. So it wasn't that far away so my friend. And i were over there and he said oh man yeah you. You need a better mandolin so I ended up by. I don't remember. I must've been making payments on it. Because i don't think i could afford. It was one hundred seventy five dollars and was gibson F to model whole. Yeah and it was much better than anything else that i was using or borrowing into time and that was my first purchased mandolin. You still have that one. No that's long gone But there is if somebody out there might actually be able to locate or have a copy of the first recording that. I didn't bluegrass. Because i joined a band I i was just barely good enough to be part of a band and it was called fred. Pike bill rawlings in the twin river boys and Somebody financed a good friend of ours. Financed our one and only lp at the time. And if if you look at the the photo on the front i by then. I was given to the right page of the nineteen before. I got into Bluegrass band no mustache very much. You know look like young kid. And i am holding that f- to mandolin and it's the only Photograph that i know of okay. We're we're even playing that as a matter of fact well well. that's cool. no. But that's how i got into bluegrass after you started learning more about grass in the artists there in what artists kind of mutter shaped your mandolin style after you started becoming more aware of other men in players john duffy to a certain extent His i've loved rhythm. Plano wasn't really all that keen on On the lead but My favorite player at the time was Bobby osborne and he still went on my favorite players Once idir tune that he wrote surefire I had to learn. You know. I i slow that thing down As much as they could we we just happened to have a turntable. At the time again it was my brother. It wasn't mine but that had a sixteen speed Thing on it sixteen thirty three. And then i think it also played forty fives and seventy eight so Anyway i long that thing down sixteen and started capturing the notes of that tune had no idea what a what i was doing except trying to mimic what i was hearing people. Straighten me out after a while. There's no you know exactly do net one right and whatever and i said well you know i'm trying to pick up again off of know the records that have gotten i haven't got that many records. Yeah that's a lot harder way to learn to well. Let's the way it was. You know there wasn't instruction books or that was aware of any anyway out there. No youtuber anything like that. No i had no idea One of the first ones that Started getting a claim was Bluegrass mandolin by Jack toddle and that came along. Well after started messing around with it by myself so i didn't even get to see What again is was regarded as the basic premise is that the rate for digital primer for Madelynn ling and And i never even found a copy of that later on. Because i got hooked up with this guy fred pike in the band and he was really a good accomplished player. I mean Guitar wise Banjo wise. i mean he played guitar. Like doc watson and he played banjo don reno and He knew enough about a mandolin to st me out about a lot of things and sit me down and show me what he knew about it a lot so i basically got my jobs in from him so a lot of ways you were self taught on on mainland is listed to your learning from what they were doing and yeah oh absolutely yeah he. He could only take me so far with in a lead wise. He said you know. Listen listen to you know. Be some of these players. Don't try to don't try to. Swipe veer licks note for note. And you know. I was already trying to do that. We bobby osborne so he said figuring out for yourself. You know if you want to be an individual or have your own. You know signature. Sound work on it. He said 'cause he's basically talking about himself. You know his. He taught himself how to play banjo and guitar. Like doc watson he You can do this. He says i. I don't have i can only take you so far and mandolin. You have to take it from there. So that's what i did. And so what i did and I not a shame to say. So that i took a lot of links that i was playing on my electric guitar and started playing these things and he said well there you go and he says he says it may be a guitar. Lick that you'll learn from lonnie mack. Or you know chat athens or somebody in but you still. You know figured out how to incorporate it on the mandolin and you're getting you're getting a pretty good sound their son you know. That's that's what i did. It worked out because you definitely have a signature style. I love your style mellon well. Thank you You know is. It's something that devolved Kind of on its own. And i was One more story fred. Pike's brother earl. They used to be a team. Way way back before. I knew them and The pike brothers but earl play kkr was one of the Distributors for rebel records in new england and therefore had a connection with dick freeland who owned and started that lee years ago and he was the guy that got the phone call after john duffy had quit or he turned in his notice to the country gentleman that they were looking for a replacement and duke. Freeland happened to be talking to rule. Pagans at John duffy is going to be the country. Gentlemen there's somebody coming in from roanoke that's gonna be trying out for the job. Turns out that was herschel sizemore. Who is a wonderful man. Lynn player in a great tenor singer but evidently he Was working for the Us ps at the time and Wanted to retirement and the job. And he didn't particularly want to relocate after after coming in and staying a couple of weeks in dc boys. He says i don't think. I'm ready to relocate the dc. it's a great band. Whatever you know. i'm sorry. I'm not trying to imitate his accent by any means but he's such a good player but he wanted to be back in roanoke with his family and go back to his job so they were in fix The country gentlemen. That is because they had a tour of japan lined up through wake seager who had connections over there and they needed to have somebody like yesterday again. Duke freeman tax his distributor earl pike up in connecticut and says it's their guy up there the police with your brother. That's pretty good early is yeah. He's he's getting to be pretty good and he's a good ten of singer and so east. Gimme his phone number and low and behold one night the phone rings and i my name is dick freeland and i really records and You know and Well i'm familiar with that. Because i've heard many a country gentleman recording by that time. I anyway you don't talk in nineteen sixty nine so You know. I was already into my twenties and He said well. John duffy has given his notice And we need a country gentleman Need mandolin player. The things tenor. You're interested and i said yes. Because i knew if i hesitated in and said i'll call you back. He would have just gone on to the next name. Whatever or you know that would have been hit. And i said yes i definitely am interested and he says how soon can you get down here. Try you know. We need to audition. And i said house like two days. Whatever and got on a plane. went down to came down here to dc area and Dick freeman pick me up at What was then just referred to as national airport and now it's regan national airport and We went down to Nearby andrea charlie waller. Rv bus parked. And i met with him. it farris. Who was the bass player. Time and eddie adcock and they said you know. I've been near like three or four minutes and gotten to know them and they should get that mandolin boy. Lucy what you know. So i had was familiar with some of their repertoire. Not all of this owned by any means you know but had listened to enough stuff that and then you only wanted to hear you know like a half a dozen tunes iced started naming them off the ones that i knew in the they got into. This is a story that i told to katy daily recently because he he Had heard this many many years ago. I told her about the this edition that We've charlie in the eighty. And ed and i said well bring bringing mary home. Of course you know. I'm fresh out a rhode island so I have had much more rhode island dis accent back. Then and when he came to the line. I looked all around the cop but mary wasn't. That charlie said wait. A minute sister. Doing fine with the mandolin blaine he. He says what you're gonna do something about that accent. A what what accident. Trying to funny and eddie cracked up. He's at now he's he should he says we'd like you playing and singing the want the job basically and i said yeah and So i didn't even go back home after that i stayed. I had enough clothes. We need you see says we got a job coming up like this weekend you need to brush up on some more are material and i said well You know charlie. I got the i got all the at home. He says. And you know you will be bunking in. He had a roommate a female friend at the time had a sewing room in their apartment and they had tiny cotton there and they said you can bunk in there until you find a place to live you know so that's we're I spent my days listening to country gentleman. Lp's in his apartment. I would be listening to the. Lp's while he was visiting to meet you practice and working on my accent so by the time gig came up on the weekend i could get at least through two sets of music and yeah the rest is history from there you know. I stayed with him up until nineteen seventy one so it was like from the frying pan directly into the fire lately. I guess you you. Did the japan tour with them also radically. Here's what happened. The one of the first things that they did was. They took me to the japanese embassy here. Dc to expedite getting my passport. I got it. I and i've still got it is a matter of fact and it's unstamped because the tour never happened Somewhere within the second week. I think of me being down here. Mike seeger cold. Charlie and eddie that was i guess. Bad news for you The tourist been cancelled and the reason that it was canceled is because john duffy wasn't going to be part of it. They thought that you know when they hired the country gentlemen that they were going to be getting the country gentleman with john duffy and okay. One of the reasons i found out later was that John had no desire to go to japan or he didn't want to even get on an airplane. He was not keen on flying. Yeah and he said. I just as soon leave the group and that's what he did okay but you know. They hadn't gotten the word yet that the tour had been cancelled. Because obviously they had taken me to get the passport and things and and You know it was disappointing for everybody. I i was looking forward to it. You know it just wasn't going to happen. I didn't get to go to japan i would. Gd crew and then leader with spectrum so dvd to sing and play in japan. A couple of times. Yeah what was it. Like working with. Charlie waller interesting he. He's pretty resourceful guy. A great singer that's really homed would became for lack of a better term. Really had to listen to the lead singers in the band's the mini bands that i played with throughout my career and listening close. You know you had to get their freezing down. And and charlie was really good at annunciation. He he didn't slur words or or you know go over things that you'd miss every word that he's on your and After hanging out with him and and playing many gigs. i've got the knack of it and one of the things that happened like in the second month. Maybe i was playing them. They had a regular gig at a club in downtown. Dc the george town section of dc call shamrock and they basically worked up all immaterial there before taking it out on the road and this was I think by then two nights a week. I think it was like monday. And tuesday or tuesday with yeah. I think it was a monday. And tuesday nights from nine one or nine to two. Maybe because we did four sets. I'll say after a night of that and it was like and then have to come back in the next night. One of the nights i showed up with comes strolling through the door and people whispering in somebody. Come over to me. And duffy's in the house and i said oh really and Sure enough right up in not in the very day it will but maybe one back john and his wife. Nancy was sitting there and I go directly to the kitchen area where you know we park our instrument cases and stuff like that and he said the young cock john. Duffy's house tonight. He said yeah. I know like so what you know you know you. You're in this job now. You got the job he. He's the seldom scene hasn't started yet so john was basically Doing repair work creon in instruments. Stuff for arlington music. I don't think he had intentions at the time of going back into band business but anyway he wanted to. He was curious enough to come down and Catch me shaking in my shoes at the shamrock. And i said i literally was i. I looked down at my pants leg and was waving like a flag and eighty six. Get over it you know. It's you know you know what you're doing calmed down you know. And so i managed to get through that set okay and then came out during the break and john signal overthrew stable. You know i met he and his wife and sit down. You know have a seat and join us. And i'm going. I'm sounded like jackie gleason hamas. I'm sitting at the table with john. W one of my euros. And the guy that i'm supposedly replacing and i hesitate to use that term because i am. I am the kid off the street in. Nobody feeling that me shoes. That's for sure. So i'm just trying to be me. And he says i like would you do want You know you're obviously. Get the tanner ranged down. Says i already heard the story from charlie about your accent so i said yeah we're gonna say them for rhode island's you. It'll come. don't worry about it you you worrying about too much and he says that's the if i can give you any tip at all he says it's you your mandolin. Playing is great but you. You're not selling it. And i said what do we mean. He's you're more technician. Is it appears that you are more of a technician. You are showman. And i said well. That's very likely goes You know. I'm like only into the nice second month on this job. And he said you gotta be able to sell it. He says you know you got me many years of Acclaim and And a reputation. He's he says. I was probably had a reputation of being a better showman than a mandolin player. You know i just kind of roll my eyes lucas at all. I don't know about that. You know 'cause i hadn't seen them perform you know i didn't know her records but you know he says work on that some and for the next fifty years worked on it and i had to work on it because you know i found out that i'm not a natural showman. More of a a guy that probably could play in many bands and did as signed me and as long as i didn't have to be the front man and i didn't. We've gentlemen either. Charlie assumed that. After john left so he was kinda working on that too. You know journalists. You know. I'm not natural that this either. So you know. John tells you to work on showmanship as i'm trying to do the same thing you know with the front man this group because he did it all years he he did it all and so you know we all kind of in the same boat and But we ended up doing a. The first recording was called new. Luke sound and by that time. Actually the i don't know the entire story but they had replaced It various as well as bass player And got a guy another in mcglaughlin to play bass and We we did our first recording for rebel of which. I didn't really have any say. So in selection of material or having. Eighty and charlie more eighty more so than charlie take those materials for that particular healthy and i believe that there's still Available rebel i think. Put it in a box. Set most of the material from that From that over recording. yeah and It's it's out there. I ended up doing three with During my tenure that group new-look new sound one wide receiver to cross which was A gospel Album and then was Golly i've joined think of the last one sound off. Yes it 'cause we we had. Our photo was taken over at fort washington next two week gigantic cannon. That was one that had the I had a lot to you re thinking some material for that and choose to which became kind of standards Bill emerson was the banjo player by that time. In and actually one white gruber to cross was the banjo player on that album as well. Yeah but he unearthed fox on the run which he had already did a previous recording with cliff waldron but it didn't go nearly as far or be or become is widely known as the country gentleman version news on sound off and the other one. The other two there was on there That became copied. Many times was a teacher children. I had just gotten from crosby stills. Nash and young. you're young on that recording in in None of the bluegrass groups picked it up A to that point. And i said luke boys. This is a natural for us here. Charlie liked it you know and that is a great ended up on that recording. So what year did you leave the country. Gentlemen the for the first time around nineteen seventy one seventy one and they have You know that's kind of a story that i don't it wasn't that i wanted to leave so bad with it. I was tired of playing the waiting. But eddie adcock had come back on the on the scene The seldom-seen up and running by that time. So they were. They were in the area playing gigs and Eddie after a mysterious disappearance shit for lack of a better term came back and wanted to start a band and he approached me. These you want a little bit more. Friedman in material and whatever he says i think we might be able to interest tony royce into coming with us. You know but anyway. That didn't happen but i had already. Kinda give it my notice to Charlie and go harrison bill gates the time and you know i just wanted to try something else and they said go ahead you know we don't we don't want to hold you back so That's when we formed the second generation and that for me was kinda shortly to just barely over ear because yes i did have some artistic freedom but some of the material that Eddie and Windy thatcher is Girlfriend at the time and lead singer for second generation. She was picking out some stuff too and the end of that first year. I didn't like the direction that the group was headed material wise And the fact that we were traveling too far for too little. Now put it bluntly you know. And he just You know we gotta give Kentucky as You know two hundred dollars or something like that and while while kidding we driving all the way out there for well. Yeah and actually. We were doing so many gigs out in that part of the country that we relocated van picked up and relocated to columbus ohio. And that didn't set. Well we need. I mean i. i adapted to barely but I didn't want to spend you know too many years out there and was looking for an opportunity to get. I liked the d. c. area. One day they came. When i just sold daddy i said look i. I don't like the direction this band is going. And i'm going to try something on my own and go for it. You know if you you know what to do something else. So i recruited Keith whitley at at the time. Carl jackson banjo still living in columbus and i recruited my old buddy bill rawlings. Who by the time he resurfaced in music he was the regional guitar player in red pike. Google rolling in the twin river boys. But when he came down to dc he had the opportunity to play bass with one of his heroes. Buzz busby and leon morris they needed a bass player and i. I said they're looking for baseball. And he says well just learn how to play bass so he learned how to play bass and I recruited him out of dc to come out and play some of the first lixin gigs with us around the columbus area and Strangely or ironically what happened The columbus ohio state fair was took place in northern part of columbus. And carlson will keep an eye going out there tonight and Wanna see glen campbell play and when his bandra clear is one of my heroes. Who says i. I really want to go in. Listen to and i you know kind of balked at i. I said i don't wanna i. I had other plans or something anyway. It was nice to kind of get those guys out of the house for a while. And i said you know. God going to have a great time anyway They came back that night. And i said how the show and he said Oh it was great. Glen campbell of courses greed keith. You know decided he says you. I'm i'm tired. I'm going so they were both staying with me at the time. would also respect. O keefe did in carlson. Tell you okay what's up. He says i got talking. Larry mcneely you saw me. You know as they were leaving stage. He motioned me over and he said. Hey carl how you doing good to see you. Use of yeah. I really enjoyed your banja planes. Will i gotta tell you something. I'm leaving soon. I've i've given glenn my notice in. He's in the market for a good really good banjo player. And i think you might fill the bill curls you said yeah you want to come back tomorrow in addition this is this is this. Is you know going to be a little tricky here. He says i'm here to play with keith. And jimmy grew this band. We already started up and up here so call you know laid out the facts and for is glen would like to audition me like tomorrow. And he says i'm going to tell you right upfront. He's i'm here. You got me your mississippi to play banjo win and stick to you know my word. you know. i'll i'll stay. We did if that's what you want. And i said carl is opportunities like this. Don't come along you like once in a lifetime for most people in and you got a chance of a lifetime is home. I'm not going to be your guy until you. Now you know figured the end of the addition stick with me. Go do that. Or addition and I'm sure you'll you'll do fine. In heat he says. I was hoping you'd say that you know so we. Yeah i think it was. One of the first hugs. He just put his arms and he was almost in tears. Said i was just so afraid that you know that. Not going to look at it that way and i said you know there you know and Make make me proud and he did. He has that job. Held it for many many years and You know that's well documented. The the the part that he played in glen campbell show from that point on. You know right up until practically i guess When passing anyway that's that's story. Thank you folks for tuning into this week's edition of acoustic music talk. Please join us again next week. For part two with jimmy goudreau. Next week we'll be talking about jimmy's tom. Jd crow and the new south the tony rice unit spectrum and many others. So please join us again next week until then please be safe out there. I'm your host. Brad apple dr. Thank you for listening to at coup stick music dog. Join us again next week for another episode as we continue to explore the world of acoustic music.

brad apple sears bill monroe rhode island john duffy tony rice bobby osborne keith dick freeland Whitley becky buller jimmy goudreau lawson bela fleck mark schatz mr jimmy goodrow charlie roebuck electric jimmy g doc watson
Friday, February 7, 2020

Up First

13:43 min | 1 year ago

Friday, February 7, 2020

"Are the full results from Iowa are finally in and it's essentially a tie. What kind of pressure will judge and Bernie Sanders get from the other candidates? That's in tonight's debate. And how will they take on each other. I'm Noel King here with Rachel Martin and this up I from NPR news. In China people are grieving for a doctor who raised early alarms about the corona virus. Meanwhile the government is racing to build more hospitals and family members told to report each other if they show symptoms and and a doctor says he was fired by the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee for Reporting Abuse Cases and decided that if I don't become part of the solution that I'm actually part of the problem now he's filing a lawsuit against the committee. Stay with us. We've got the news you need to start your day support for. NPR The following message. Come from Daniel. Wellington designed in Sweden Daniel Wellington classic timepieces and accessories are revered around the world for their quality and minimalist attic. Get fifteen percent off your first order at Daniel Wellington Dot Com slash. NPR support for this podcast and the following message come from salesforce. Customer Customer Relationship Management Solution committed to helping you deliver the personalized experiences that customers want salesforce bringing companies and customers customers together visit salesforce dot com slash learn more tonight seven Democratic candidates. Take the debate stage in New Hampshire ahead of the first primary very contest of the two thousand twenty race sets it. It's happening as their party. Deals with the debacle of the First Caucus. All the results are finally in from Iowa. And there's no decisive they've winner. So what could that mean for. Tonight's debate we're joined by. NPR political correspondent. Osma Hollywood. Who's GonNa tell us all the answers right? Osma you wish the answers are not something that has now become a part of this presidential contest. There was so much drama with the Iowa results. Let's start start there. Just tell us what the latest is so the latest Rachel is that we now have one hundred percent of precinct result so that means we have the entire observe results that we've been waiting for or I think what's the most astounding thing to me. Is that the Associated Press is saying it cannot call a winner that this is just really tight margins between the former mayor of South Bend Indiana p Buddha judge and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders in addition to the irregularities in this year's caucus process that it just doesn't think it's possible to determine a winner at this point so that's where we are so. How are the candidates responding? I mean we saw this is kind of vacuum of information. They tried to fill initially now that there is this this result this time essentially. What's the word from the candidates? So both superior degen Bernie Sanders have essentially declared victory You know I got an email from peabody j just campaign the subject line reads. We officially won the Iowa caucuses. I also got one then Bernie Sanders campaign saying how they're celebrating winning the popular vote and so that's essentially really what's happening MC Anders did have a pretty clear victory when we look at the popular. Vote this of course isn't exactly how delegates are differentiated and determine doled out there. Niwa the right and I've never heard of anyone delineating the popular vote in the Iowa Caucus before. Yeah and part of this is because we didn't really always have the specific raw vote totals. I'm this is something that the party brought about in part because of concerns from Bernie Sanders campaign in two thousand sixteen. A his campaign is now saying that not using the popular vote was just kind of an outdated arcane model and I would argue this is probably something both the Iowa Democratic Party and the DNC is going to have to look into moving forward but beyond the the two of them We Have Elizabeth Warren the Massachusetts senator who has been trying to reassure her voters. She came in third place. She's been trying to pitch herself as a unity candidate. Who could bring the party back together? And then perhaps most striking Joe Biden has really flatly called Iowa a Gut Punch and I was with him both in Iowa on that night and then does he flew into Manchester and it was just to me. Remarkable with how they were originally describing Iowa is being a good night and as we've seen results come out. It's pretty clear that it was not a good night night for the former vice president So looking ahead to the New Hampshire primary. What if anything do the the complicated Iowa results tell you about what we can expect New Hampshire so so it really reveals a pretty striking divide within the Democratic Party largely along progressive in moderate lines in many people thought that the moderate candidate in that situation we shouldn't would have been the former vice president Joe Biden but a fourth place finish for him in Iowa to be? Blunt is not where a lot of folks think. A front runner should be so. There are certainly very high expectations for Joe Biden to do well in New Hampshire. I will say that could be tough. A Bernie Sanders leads in the polls. He's from neighboring. Vermont and Hampshire is really the state that launched him in two thousand sixteen. He beat Hillary Clinton there by more than twenty points. Earlier this cycle I talked to a lot of New Hampshire. Progressives people told me they weren't sure if you should run again but it seems like a lot of them have have come around Let's take a listen to one guy. His name is Bert Cohen. No matter who the nominee is he's gonNA viciously call them him or her a socialist. I I was thinking you know. If when they hear that word they scatter like roaches. When you turn the light on that's not going to work? Bernie will stand and go on offense ends up Rachel his describing the fact that he feels like the Republicans president trump is going to call any candidate socialist as he began to think about that. He's like really I felt. He said that Bernie Sanders was the only one who would be able to stand up to those sorts of attend tonight asthma. I imagine we're GONNA see more pressure on Buddha judge than we have seen before I would say so really he has not been in the spotlight so far So much but the question I have is that fundamentally up debates this campaign cycle have not changed the trajectory. NPR's Osma holiday for us. Thank you alma happy. Do it the Wuhan doctor who tried to get the Chinese government to understand. The grave. THREAT OF CORONA virus has himself died from the disease and his death has left a lot of people in China grieving and furious about how the Chinese government tried to silence him. The virus meanwhile is still spreading China. State broadcaster is reporting that two newborn babies were infected. Did yesterday there. The youngest cases so far so China's trying to build more than twenty mass quarantine centers mostly in Wuhan and officials are asking family members to report each other other for quarantine. If they're showing symptoms at this point there are more than thirty one thousand confirmed cases just in China we've got NPR's. Emily hang on the line from Beijing. Emily Emily let's start with these quarantine centres. Who's being sent there there for people with mild symptoms of the virus? And they don't have much choice about going yesterday. China's vice as premier said one was in a state of war so officials needs to go door to door and inspect people to make sure that they were reporting symptoms and would get sent to quarantine these quarantine in centers are gyms their stadiums. That have a couple of hundred beds shoved into them and the reason why China needs them as because hospitals just overflowing so I mean how are people responding running are. Are these measures welcome. Are they starting to volunteer themselves or family members for quarantine. It's a mixed bag. The concern is what kind of care their family members are going to get in these wards. I talked to this woman. hunnam Panyu Fay earlier this week because she'd been trying to get three family members with the virus into hospitals unsuccessfully. So I asked her today which you consider consider these quarantine wards. Here's what she said. I I have to admit the conditions in these wards are alright they give you food they take your temperature but not call quarantine wards there where you put people's they die so local officials are pushing her to send her family members there. She is refused other. People are so desperate though that they'll take any care they can get and one of these people is don't were also from Han his sister. Dan has been diagnosed. She needs dialysis though for a pre existing condition and no clinical take an infected person. So he's trying to get her into award but here's what he said when I called him earlier than banking that you convey shirow. You'll may open saying I'm helpless worthy end of the road. I can't bear to watch all my loved ones. Die One by one. I have to do everything I think I can to save them has father. I should mention it had already died from a mysterious pneumonia disease. Right now. Has Local officials have stopped answering his calls. no-one will tell them how to get into award. And that suggests they're actually not enough room in the quarantine centres now. Wow so more than six hundred thousand people have died so far one of them. Was this doctor who who tried to warn the government about the severity of the corona virus. I mean the government basically ignored him now he himself has died is going to have any effect on how the Chinese the government responds. Moving forward. People have been unanimous in their tribute but it sparked the next stage which has total censorship all tributes to him that are critical of the party. Party of the government have been censored today on line well. NPR's Emily Fang from Beijing. Thank you emily. Thanks Rachel All right we wanna give you just a heads up about our last story today. It contains allegations of abuse of minors and it might be uncomfortable for some listeners. A former high ranking official at the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee says he was fired last year for raising concerns about out the issue of abuse of Olympic athletes. Dr Bill Monroe filed a whistleblower lawsuit. This week he says the organization isn't doing enough to keep athletes safe even even though it's been more than three years since that sexual abuse scandal involving Olympic gymnastics. Doctor Larry Nassar Impure Sports correspondent. Tom Goldman has been following on all this and joins us this morning. Hi Tom Hi Rachel. I'm just give us a little background. WHO IS BILL Moreau? Bill Monroe is a former vice president of sports medicine at The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee USO PC and he served in that role for ten years until he was fired last May now in his position he didn't treat patients. He says he got athlete patients in front of the right doctors. He also helped oversee Olympic sports medicine operations at Olympic Games. Panam Games aims big inner international events. Like that okay. So why does he say he was fired. Well he says because of his whistle blowing over the past couple of years at least Moreau repeatedly spoke up about what he alleged to be wrongdoing. It was especially important in his mind. Because the USO as you know came under fire. After the Larry Larry Nassar Scandal broke for not doing enough to protect athletes and Monroe says there was still bad. Stuff going on. Even after all the scrutiny and calls for Change His his lawsuit which he calls a whistle blower retaliation suit detail several instances including a case of statutory rape involving a fifteen year old female Paralympic Paralympic athlete that Monroe says the. USO didn't initially consider a crime an incident when a male Olympic coach was discovered naked in a Sauna Saana that was in a public space that US OPEC training center a team USA. Under eighteen female gymnastics team was in the building at the same time and the coach was only verbally reprimanded. Munro said he was amazed. The coach wasn't fired. Considering how we're in this period with Olympic sports were any hint of sexual abuse use or impropriety is supposed to be treated very seriously so what does marijuana out of this lawsuit a jury trial damages. He wants the USO to change. He wants a USO to have tougher rules and exert more control over the individual national governing bodies that it overseas so so the rules trickled down to those MGB's into the clubs below them into the tens of millions of athletes and coaches. Who aren't in the spotlight? But we're bad things can and do happen. He also wants the lawsuit to bring light to what he tried to do. Here is if another kid is raped or another athlete. Takes their our life and I didn't go to the Mat and do everything I could to force change. That's something I'd have to live with the rest of my life Rachel the US OPEC so far is only released. A statement about the lawsuit saying in part we regret the doctor. Moreau is attorney have misrepresented the causes of his separation. Reparation from the USO PC. We will honor their decision to see this matter through in the courts all right. NPR's Tom Goldman for us on that story. Thank you you're welcome okay. And that is a first for this Friday February seventh. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Newell King. Being apprentice produced by Mark Rivers are editors Muhamad elkhart H J. My our social strategist is Casey New Knicks and our executive producer is Kenya Young. And we understand Dan that the news does not stop when this podcast ends so follow us on twitter at up I for daily roundup of the most important stories today. Remember you can start your weekend with up. I Saturday's Ace Luis Garcia Navarro and Scott Simon. Walk you through the news you need for your weekend. It'll be here in the speed or wherever you get your podcasts. Have a great weekend It's Oscar season and we don't want you to show up on the red carpet unprepared that's why. NPR's pop culture happy hour is here to help you sort through the nominees and separate the best from the rest listen now now and we might even help you dominate your Oscars Pool.

Senator Bernie Sanders NPR Iowa China US Olympic and Paralympic Comm Rachel government BILL Moreau New Hampshire vice president Joe Biden Rachel Martin Dr Bill Monroe USO NPR Daniel Wellington Dot Com Tom Goldman Vermont OPEC Beijing
Daveed Diggs and Suzan-Lori Parks, In the Pines and supernumeraries

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

50:39 min | 2 years ago

Daveed Diggs and Suzan-Lori Parks, In the Pines and supernumeraries

"Today on studio three sixty why the outlandish premise of a black guy in America in two thousand nineteen asking to be in slaved becomes weirdly believable on state to me real-life is trippy. If you really look at it. There's some trippy stuff going on that Susan Lori parks. I talked to her about her new play white noise along with its big Star TV digs plus. A lead belly cover done on an MTV special got frozen into some of our imaginations as the version that all the other sons were kind of leading up to the long rich musical and social history at a great old American song before and after nirvana took a turn and making it there that and more is a head today on studio three sixty right after this. Every day. We talk about how innovative companies are reinventing the way business happens. But none of that is possible without the right people to enable it people who get packages to over one hundred and fifty million delivery points affordably and on time with the latest technology and expertise. So who can help you deliver the future of commerce, the United States postal service? See why they deliver more ecommerce packages to homes than anyone in the country at USPS dot com slash future. This is scheduled three sixty I'm Colonel. And I'm sitting on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. I level of guard. This Thomas Jefferson's vegetable, Dr I'd like to have the roasted chicken based very well done editing is all about timing. I try to get a little bit away from the actual subject much get sick, replace right? Three sixty with good Anderson. Play called white noise. Just premiered at the public theater in New York City. It's written by the Pulitzer prize winner. Susan, Lori parks, and it happens to be the best new play. I've seen in ages. White noise is that right now about four men and women who've been close friends since college to the white two of them black all educated. Progressive urban professionals dovey digs from Hamilton. And the two thousand eighteen film blind spotting plays. Leo, who's a black artist before the play begins Leo's been strolling through the city and some police stopped him for no good reason. And then roughed him up, and then the drama gets fantastical. Leo comes up with this over the top idea to protect himself. He asks his best friend Ralph to buy him enslave him because if he's a white man's property. He figures the white world, Mike. Leave him alone. Susan, Lori parks DVD digs are here. With me. Welcome to both of you. Thank you so much for having us, man. So Susan Laury. Yes. That implausible premise that could have gone in any number of directions. How fully formed was it? And when pop into your head it popped into my head in the ons Bacher theatre where it is now playing during a performance several performances I watched over and over of the last player had their father comes home from the wars, the enslaved, man. Who's to the hero is standing there? Wondering what is life is going to be like in the future when he is free? And when he is approached by law enforcement individuals, and when he tells them, I own myself will that be enough and his friend Smith a union soldier says, you know, I don't know if that's going to be enough. I don't know if they'll let you go, and I sat in the theater night after night watching that show and thought, oh, I have to write a show about the future. So you inspired yourself. Off. Yes. Nobody else is doing it for you. That's true. But you know, I start thinking about what kind of play is it. It's, you know, people say naturalism surrealism, it's supernatural. That's what I think it is. Because of that's makes people think there's ghosts involved. Oh, oh, well, see both scratch site. Then. But did you think my God this is going to be hard to pull off? I mean, you're drawn to problematic. Like, how's this going to happen? Yeah. Is but this one was a whopper. This is the hardest. This is the most difficult play ever written because not just because of the premise, but because I wanted to very much hold in my head in my heart in my mind, and my guts the opinions and a four very different characters. But nobody gets thrown under the bus. Everybody gets a solo everybody gets a moment where they extended monologue where they get to talk about their feelings. David did you knows his noise work? Yeah. I've been she's been my favorite playwrights thousand teenagers. So this was and how did you get to it as a teenager? Did you act in whatever plays? No, no, I do a a monologue from topdog underdog fraud dishes, though, aside from the brilliant writing and your Brian acting tech. Sneak of eat, it seems to me. You're incredible likability onstage. I don't know if you're like a blood real life, but certainly on stage less aren't you are incredibly likable up there as playing Leo I think it's important for us to like Leo off the top because we're he's the first person who's head. We get inside in the sort of experiment, of empathy that the is like we kind of have to. Everyone has to get on that ride. I think with Leo because his solo is I it's a conscious thing to be pretty interactive with the audience and to be charming and to be. But also that makes sense for Leo who who is a charming funny successful person. Who is all of a sudden not able to depend on that good school? Good grades. Right. And as charming as he is. And all that did not stop him from getting roughed up by the police. Right. I like what you're talking about the experiment, of empathy because if Leo solo at the beginning of the shows, the beginning of our experiment, with empathy we stretch that as far as we can because it toward the end of the show. We have the character. Ralph played by Tom Sadowski, his solo which is of a very different feeling, right. He finally taps into his latent, white anger and resentment, and it's sinister and terrifying. Sinister terrifying. Honest. Oh, and. He's he's telling us where he's at the character. Ralph was in writing the most vocal the most willing to speak his piece, and I was very grateful for wherever that character came from the the choice, you made that certainly made me feel okay, I'm going to buy this was when you decide that there. There would be a term limit on this enslavement period of DVD's character. Like, I wait house is what? And no it's going to be this period of time. That made me think. Okay, right. I'll buy this. Right. Oh, goody goody. Yeah. I mean, look at you. I'll buy this. And so Ralph might have. Ralph might have agreed to by Leo because the safety. Well, maybe we got you. We are living in a real life political moment that if we'd seen it in fiction for years ago. We'd go. I mean, we'll be seem almost as crazy as the reality of your plan. Right. How does let's be blunt the new out nece and prominence of white supremacy in America affect how you wrote it. If it did. I mean, I started, you know, in two thousand fourteen so those elements in our society in my experience, you know, have always been there. I've you know from jump always been aware of. Premacy element in our system. Logs were turnover. Exactly, the rocks have been turned over, but more. So it was not did make it more difficult to write. But I think it makes it more difficult to hear because I think I in when I go to the show and watch you guys the people were talking to in the theater are, you know, people who have attended the public theater, and there are certain kind of folk folk who are ready to folk were accustomed to examining themselves. That's my guess. Yeah. And so when we're asking them to consider the possibility of you going down this road that might be more difficult for them to hear and also like Michel, well, that's a whole other. That's a whole this character who has her online show in which she, you know, it's it's a version of what minstrels e the. Version of marketing sh she performs on her show. This kind of cartoony version of American blackness that is it at all the real her. Yeah. Considering the possibility of a black woman capitalizing on the bad stuff. But also, look I'm a rapper. I perform my blackness all the time. I think we all do. It's varying degrees. I think like the most sort of transgressive thing about her shows that it happens to be called ask a black, which you know, which like puts his character show in the play show. But I think other than that what what she's doing is not really any different than things and not only do we do for commercial reasons. But also that we do for status reasons within our own communities United saying, I perform my blackness in a different way around the black side of my family do around the white side of my family. We're all related, right? One of my favorite films of last year was the movie you co wrote and co starting blind spotting. In which you play a black guy with a white best friend with fraught relationship, and there's an episode of police violence, and I thought he's been here in the vicinity before did you see them that you're that movie and starting to do this play as connected pieces. I mean, I think a lot of artists that I I love are trying to examine wear this feeling of terror comes from and where the feeling of being unsafe comes from and trying to be really honest about our all of our own participations in that it is complicated. And we pretend that it's not. So that I think all of us who sort of fancy ourselves woke are tend to glaze over how difficult that actually send you like this is how we are. Because this is how we are had you read, did, you know, the book that came out as you're running this play the sellout. Paul Beattie's book. I. I know of Paul bady, of course. But I hadn't read somebody the other day said it's like the cell, and I was like, oh, well, it's his guy who in contemporary LA. You know, reset GRA gates his part of LA and ends up having a slave. And I thought, wow, this is like a John Rao boondock. There was an episode of boondocks. Bamboozle despite Lynn there is kind of like somebody could write their PHD thesis on this John how many well. And it's work that I that. I really don't think would ever could have been done before like twenty years ago. Oscar sets on the one we were having dinner awhile ago. Oskar Eustis your director have which is that particularly for theater like every play when it is performed as in conversation with the now writes the difference between doing a play in a movie, which is a time capsule. Right. And I thought that was really interesting. It also speaks something to win plays are written on that you can't perform them later. But that they are having a different conversation later because there in conversation with the moment that you're performing why you have to make changes to them and not changes to the words. But update you're thinking this play means. And so I think there is something about a like post political correctness movement moment where you know, where we've all gotten so far beyond that that we're frustrated by the term PC is a joke at this point. But when I was. Teenager was you know, so as a lot more complication of of language in terminology because we have because we've created all of these terms. It's sort of a fortress for our selves to feel good. Oh, I haven't mentioned that this. I think is probably the greatest play ever written about bowling. The first one I've seen. So. And his pal. Ralph played by Thomas hausky, we're college bowlers, and and and Ralph's a bowling alley air, and and they bowl they pay the whole. Three hours. Tell me about making that choice. You know, my my dad was army, and and we moved around a lot and wherever we went. There was always a bowling alley and bowling when I was growing up was was an activity that my parents appreciated, partly because it was a place where they could be social when they were new on the post on the base, you know. But also, there's a bowling alley. I've never seen it. But I heard in the White House somewhere. There's a bowling alley. So it feels to me like this American subterranean. It's it's maybe a part of the underground railroad America. I just said I just made that. The part of the underground railroad. Maybe a piece of it is a bowling alley. It's it's funny because bowling is kind of funny. But why well, I know a lot of reasons, and then it would be classes of me to to to enumerate them. But. I thought it was a what whatever reason I didn't know you're familiar childhood breath familiarity with bowling, but it seems like a perfect thing too. Because there's this kind of Connecticut violence at Hotson fifteen pound balls, which is like. Presses the play badminton would have been a bad choice. This is your plate. And I I haven't seen or read older players, but I've seen her read most of them, they they tend not to be strictly realistic this when Ramon them, your your novel is pretty realistic. Yeah. You're you're. You're screenwriting is pretty realistic with decide. Okay. I'm gonna do things in theater that can only be done in theater is that the way reason you go there of the forms in which I write cedar is the closest to real life, and I got real life to me is not realistic. To me real-life is trippy. If you really look at it. There's some trippy stuff going on. Film. It's it's a higher realism. Yeah. What what are the words? Heightened realism heightened now. Super realism real not not supernatural cat. Somebody got to that. I I like that. Coasts? So this has worked out. Well, having this kid who who fell in love with your work when he was seventeen being your show is like a happy ending or a happy beginning. I think I'm beginning friendship leased thrilled. And and I'm a little like, not embarrassed. But my team that read right now. You can see you. Susan, Lori parks play white noise with the Dick's at the public theater in New York. Coming up. Making a career out of being one of the extras who carries a spear at the opera possibly nobody's going to discover you even if you feel costume nicely. And, you know, nobody's going to ask you to sing in the next on the life of an unsung. Non singing hero of the opera world, a supernumerary. That's next in-studio three sixty. Studio three sixteen. As everybody knows in movies and TV the actress who stand in the background not saying anything are called extras, but in the nomenclature of opera and ballet their supernumeraries or simply supers. We all thought has libretto every opera has a story of the opera takes place in a historic context in differ. Aviv choirs to be brought to live on stage. Let's say. As a battle in the music. So a director might stage two hundred people too much across the stage, or we'll be seen in battle. For example, in ADA, his a huge triumphant March, the is music to you have to have soldiers crossing the states because that's the music describes you couldn't play the music and have not dozens and dozens of people cross the stage at that point. My name is Berlin, I work at the Metropolitan Opera and American ballet theatre as a super numerary supernumerary is on stage in the theater, what an extra would be in movies. It's also referred to as a spear Kerry because that's what you do. You carry a spiel, and you walk across the state or standing somewhere with, you know, possibly a sword or or a torch, but mostly it's just people that will fill the scene with a crowd. To be a successful supernumerary. You have to have sudden qualities like you have to be reliable, and you always have to get along with people like you have to be able to take direction. You have to understand that the opera's not necessarily about to. You know, you'll part is to be part of a story to fill the stage because there is a story an historic context to the opera, even if it doesn't specifically say a number of people in the score, it might be up to the director, the producer to say like a we have one hundred fifty people Marta to cross the state. So I started acting when I was ten beckon Germany as a child, I added later ballet lessons ended up dancing and supervising in LA productions and opera production spec in Germany, and then joined the army finished the army, then about a year later, I continued studying at the ballet kademi of Cologne. I came to New York in the summer of nineteen eighty nine and the following spring. I auditioned for American Bali theater as a super numerary and I've been in almost every production since. So at the opera house, you might get to besides carrying chairs and tables props toward shows sometimes moving parts of the scenery or sometimes you just pretending to move parts of the scenery. The pay structure is that you do get paid by act much is not all that high bucked this extra pay for if you carry a torch open flame extra for heavy carries. If you do states combat. Production of Turandot. It's the second scene at the second act in it's endless, and we stand Riddler seeing on on on on the hot lights. It's very bright seen everybody dressed in whites. Multiple layers of costuming masks, head pieces, if not bald caps possibly wigs. So it requires quite some discipline to stand there and impure the lights the heat the heat of the costume. And I do remember it just turned to the side as I see someone throwing up and because he was wearing a mask like everybody else. It's coming through the eye opening of the mask. But I think he was all right. One day someone into the upper house, as you know, Vaudin's with his friends ashes that he then threw off the balcony into the orchestra thinking that he was doing his friend favor spreading his office at the Metropolitan Opera house, which then ended up probably in a vacuum cleaner. So the opera house was not the final resting place for this person. Fleming singing Marietta's lead and was from the Mets one hundred and twenty fifth year gala celebration, we use move props. And once I was done I decided to go into the house and just watch the rest of the show unfold. Renna Fleming walks on stage and things this aria from an up it's called Ditoto start. So she's taught singing, and it's just so breathtakingly beautiful. I'm stunned that I have the pleasure to sit there and experience this and it's so beautifully executed. Eating really could cake or whatever your pleasures might be. It's unbelievable. I think I've been supernumerary for this long because I really to love the art form, and as a child amounted to be an opera singer and didn't become an opera singer, a more king at one of the most important opera houses in the world. So I have to understand that, you know. I'm there to move the story along I'm there to just fill the state little with life and Mike character. Possibly nobody's going to discover you, you know, even if you fill costume nicely, and, you know, nobody's going to ask you to dance and the next ballet or to sing in the next opera, but it's via boarding. It's an amazing place to be act and watch the art unfold live every day every night. And even if you don't speak the language is strong motion. There is a story that possibly touch us. You and thrills you and you'll part of that story. That was Berlin who works at the Metropolitan Opera as supernumerary, of course, it's syllables. And by the way, Iggy also performs a drag artist in clubs around New York City, most weekends that story part of our ongoing series about unsung heroes was produced by studio three sixties Morgan Flannery. So do you know somebody who's essential to making works of entertainment or art? But who is as they say below the line maybe way below and so never gets any kind of recognition. If so tell us their story in voice, mail or Email and send it to incoming at studio. Three sixty dot org. They might become arm next unsung hero. Coming up, the pines it represented something dangerous and something very dark and loneliness like a very lonely feeling. We dive into those enigmatic in ever lasting cold dark pines. That's next on studio. Three sixty. Studio three sixty. Black. Don't you live? Snow? I was sixteen years old when I heard the song black girl on the hit album by the British singer long. John Baldry, I had just discovered the blues. And there was something about those sad vodka tive pines that hooked me copiers later, those pines appeared again hooking me harder in a song from way before my time in the pines by Bill Monroe and the bluegrass boys, which sounded entirely different. But it turns out those are versions of the same song nineteenth century. American folk ballad that's gone by different names and lots of different artists have made their own. Studio three sixties, Lauren Hinson has the whole story. I was also a teenager. When I first heard the song. It was nineteen ninety four. It was April and Kurt Cobain had just killed himself. The weekend after his body was found MTV played nirvana unplug. Special on a loops. And this song. It was the last song of the set. Girl. It starts off with this question. That's more like an accusation. And the answer is dire. The sloan. And then later a man her husband is found dead decapitated of all things we don't know why. But whatever is happening with this girl. It is dark. But what's really striking about Cobain's performance is his emotional tenderness? It doesn't feel like angers propelling his question. It's it's more like grief and the way he delivered that song. It really felt like he was almost forseeing his own demise. Eric Weissberg is a music critic and professor of American studies at the university of Alabama, however, romance absurd that sounds nonetheless. I think that was a real experience that many people had watching that it felt special because it felt like it was a song that spoke to him Beth McCarthy Miller was the director of Nirvana's MTV unplugged. You know, when someone does a cover of a song, they like it kind of gives you a little glimpse into the artist. It gives a glimpse into like what kind of music they like, and what kind of music moves them and interests them. And it was so clear how much that song meant to him people were mesmerized, and you know, half the people in that room at no idea what that's was. Cockbain called the song. Where did you sleep last night? But it's more often called in the pines. Sometimes it's called black girl or my girl. It's a folk song and as such its origins are really foggy. But it was probably born from African Americans who were living along or east of the Appalachian mountains around the turn of the twentieth century. It's also what we might call a murder ballad, which is a European tradition. That stretches as far back as the renaissance. In Shakespeare's time when some gruesome slaying or rape occurred. The crime was transcribed and printed onto these large pieces of paper, which were then sold mistreats over time. The more popular tales of death would be set to music. Then when the English and Scottish began across the Atlantic. They brought this commemoration of shocking crimes with them when they settled along the Appalachians the European murder. Ballad became a bedrock of the American folk tradition. You can hear it in popular songs like long black veil, pretty Polly and Delia gone. Chateaux shadow Ren's. Watchers. Would list second judge she'd? Garner ballads, tell a wide variety of tragic tales, but they have a few things in common their stories, first and foremost, and at the heart of those stories is some sort of transgression most often made by a woman, she's done something that society deems untoward. She's cheated flirted state out too late or simply didn't return a man's favor. But then there's also the tone murder ballads are haunting mournful, of course. But there's this added level of creepy nece when a story about a gruesome death is being told either in harmony, so sweetly or almost crooning like Johnny cashed it and Delia gone. Got as for our murder ballad in the pines has its own collection of lira calling cards, which I came together in nineteen twenty six when a banjo is named doc Walsh makes very first commercial recording of the song. And right off the bat. He introduces us to one of the key elements of the song the pines. Never shy when the. Another element is the train this mysteriously long train. So. Washes version also includes those murder ballads elements like transgression and confrontation. Did you? And then an act of violence. Now. And then he'll. All right. Of the versions of in. The pines will include all of these elements artists in the decade succumb. We'll pick and choose depending on the story. They wanna tell or the mood. They want to vote but the pines that cold dark wilderness. It'll become the most common refrain that ties all the various versions together. I think the pines symbolizes wilderness. Elizabeth diesel vino is a professor of music at brea, college and Kentucky. I think it symbolizes a place where a person has just left to be by themselves and face what they are. And what they've done in the nineteen forties. Thong really starts to put down roots. Thanks to two major influential and lasting renditions of in the pines by two very important artists. The first is Bill Monroe, a Kentucky, man, amend Lynn player and singer songwriter. He would soon become known as the father of bluegrass in nineteen forty one Monroe records version of in the pines with his band, the bluegrass boys. I would call that recording kind of a pre blue grass era recording, you know, by that point Monroe was playing concerts, and he was selling records, and he was kind of a big deal in what we can think of as early country music Imon rose version, there's actually no mention of death or violence. So it does a skew the murder ballot elements of its predecessors and becomes a little bit sweeter and lighter in tone. But it does retain that sadness and a haunting quality thanks to the high harmonies of Monroe and the bluegrass boys telling this tale about a mysterious train that takes his level way. And what's more country than a heartbreak song? I think that's very much in character for the kinds of songs that Bill Monroe sang and that actually became part of the bluegrass repertoire the other pivotal musician for the song is the great early twentieth. Century folk and blues musician lead belly in the early nineteen hundred fled belly was already gaining a reputation for his music and talent in Louisiana and Texas, but as music really started to get a wider audience after he met the folklorist Alan Lomax in the nineteen thirties. Alan Lomax, actually toted lead belly around to play for society. People in New York. There's some videos of lead belly's singing Irene good night at this party with any singing to these women in these pink chiffon gown 's who are kind of hovering over him drinking champagne, and he's got this look on his face like these people really want me to sink this. Here in nineteen forty four in New York lead belly records, the first of at least a half dozen versions of in the pines which hill most often call where did you sleep last night or black girl or black gal she found a song? And he reinterpreted it and he made it his own. He sort of lose a fight it. If you listen to you here that he's using the flat third leg. There's the flat third in his versions lead belly leans into the darkness of the song. That lose a fight effect gives the song a sort of creepy feel like something's just not right? It's also musically really bear. It's just his voice and his guitar. It's lonely in his song lead belly addresses, either my girl or black girl, and that's probably depending on the white or black audiences. He was told to sing for at the time and lyrically he does away with the train entirely. Instead lead belly focuses on the confrontation and the murder. Loot lived a violent loaf. I mean, he was in jail for murder. This is very in character. I think for lead belly to sing a song about violence in about murder. The lead belly version. He's very much emphasizing the love gone wrong. Again, music critic and professor Eric Weisbart and the sense of. Being in the pines as being alienated from love alienated from life that way from this moment on the versions of in the pines follow either Monroe, a tender high lonesome country bluegrass song about a train and heartbreak or lead belly a musically stark lyrically bleak murder ballads that emphasizes 'isolation and death, and you can actually see a pattern emerge over time with each subsequent decade each generation picking tradition for themselves. So in the nineteen fifties and sixties the middle of the civil rights era. And the folk revival lead belly's version takes the mental with singers. Like, Josh white Bob Dylan and Joan Baez all telling their stories through it. Goo. Don't -magine the. Just reaching across racial lines was very much part of the civil rights era. And so it's not surprising that the lead belly version came around again in the fifties and sixties with all of its anger and all of its darkness following the cultural traumas of the nineteen sixties. The sounds of the seventies turn a corner. They celebrate peace and love and community with ornate, compositions, and harmony and this fits in really nicely with Bill Monroe's country bluegrass version, which becomes popular again. In that version. I think you're actually trying to summon some kind of communal spirit in the face of the world again, Eric Weisbart, it is on some level a heart songs a song people sing together. So version after version that you hear you can hear for women from the Carter family sing together. Dolly Parton in the moment from her nineteen seventies variety show that she was most proud of. Where she brought her parents in front of the camera, and they all sang in the pints together. Those versions there's harmony singing that sort of harmony, and you're kind of overcoming things rather than consumed by them. Then came the nineties and the advent of grunge music where the angst of punk at the anger of metal and the catchiness of rock. It was these musicians who reach back in time to connect with the darkness of lead belly's version. For the grunge people that lead belly version becomes a way to sort of explore kind of punk concepts of alien Asian. They really push that version to its most isolated alienated no exit place. Mark line. Again, is another Seattle grunge musician associated with the ban the screaming trees, and it was his father who had it original seventy eight RPM version of lead belly's recording of where did you sleep last night? Because his father was part of this folk revival. He plays the song. And he incurred cobaine record a version of it in nineteen ninety before Kurt Cobain's well-known at all clearly from that point forward. It's in Kurt Cobain's wheelhouse. Cobain's version raw performance from tortured rockstar wasn't indelible image, and it was sort of agreed upon at the time that it couldn't possibly be topped a lead belly cover done on MTV special got frozen into some of our imaginations as not just the most important version, but on that level as the version that all. All the other sons were kind of leading up to and that's not true, but I felt for but after Cobain, and perhaps because of him the song continues to attract new interpretations in multitudes, but with the new millennium, and the technological panic of y two k the horror of nine eleven and the advent of war artists urine once more for a return to tradition and found Monroe once again. Attraction to the mystery of the song singer songwriter Bill Callahan. Accorded aversion of in the pines on his two thousand five album called a river ate too much to love which he recorded under his moniker smog. Things aren't making takes three hours for the train to go by and plus the conductor do watch away. The cat. The time of day. He. Through is. I mean, that's like literally timeless and. The pines are constant. This kind of a kind of spirit versus flesh all those things are intransigent and impermanent, whereas the spiritual pines are as it turns out. Anything that we can know in the. In the. Never shy. So if you're taking a song, that's summoning these big abstract things, the pines the longest train I ever saw. And you stretch it out the way Bill Callahan us. As you're actually taking a position on music. That's pretty important bluegrass was sometimes called folk music and overdrive. What is Bill Callahan? Do takes a bluegrass song. And he turns off the overdrive. He he makes an indie version that is as slow as the bluegrass sound is driven Callahan's version is warm much like the Monroe predecessors of the nineteen seventies. It draws you in rather than pushes you away. But it still carries that mournful nece as it wistfully hearkens back to another time in history. It's not just about individuals as artists remaking the song. It's about the needs of different music scenes and the people who those seen speak to. So in one moment, it might be about the need of bluegrass to be kind of. Music that signifies tradition in the larger country were in another scene. It might be about how lead belly came down in the folk revival as it fed into rock to represent this kind of troubled figure who people who've felt troubled themselves identified with the pines it represented something dangerous and something very dark and loneliness. A very lonely feeling the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter exhibit different as is better known by his stage name fantastic negro his version of in the pines is a descendant of lead belly's, and it appears on his two thousand sixteen album the last days of Oakland. Negara's brother and cousin were both killed by gun violence when they were just teenagers. And it's those tragedies that inspired him to bring in the pines into the future. I've seen it happen over and over again. And it's always the women who are the strong ones as an artist. I felt like it would be great to pay homage to them through in the pines. And there was a version where I'd heard with a they'd also saying black girl don't lie to me where did you sleep last night? And that was the version that I wanted to do because. These are black women Baring our children where was that dark place. And how did you get through it? It's a place where the sun doesn't shine. How were you so strong that song adds one more reason why someone could be in the pines because lead belly sings the song to a black girl? Black girl black Cobain. It's my girl if it is a black girl, a black woman the fact that in this version by fantastic agreed up. She's there because the police killed her child, and it becomes a kind of black lives matter. Take on the song. That strikes me as as really interesting and really powerful. Shot. These songs whether they're hundred years old or whether they're six hundred years old, they live because they mean, something to the people who sing them and every hand that touches them takes it and holds it and molded differently. According to the experience of the singer today in our splintered digital streaming world nearly all of the two hundred plus variations of in the pines can be heard by any person at any time. And yet artists continue to cover it to reinterpret to tell their stories through it into put their sorrows in it. Think of a song like this that changes in everyone mile and over time. Let's see like an oracle. I have this message. I have to. I have to give it to. That story was produced by studio three six Lauren Hanson. You can check out our time wine and gigantic playlist of the various versions of in the pines at studio three sixty dot org. And that's it for this week show. Three sixty is a production of PRI public radio international in association with slate. Our executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman, our sound Engineering's Sanidad Lopez months. Our producers are Evan. Chump? Lauren Hanson, sham Kim Saunders. Tommy bizarre. Our production assistant is Morgan Flannery. I'm curt Anderson he was selling records, and he was kind of a big deal. Thanks very much for listening. Our public radio international next time on studio. Three sixty the opening line is just one of the most powerful pieces of rock n roll Jesus. Dad for somebody sends. Matten Patti Smith's bracing groundbreaking debut album horses. This is a statement of artistic purpose next time on studio. Three sixty. Stew must sins.

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Who's Benefiting From The Coronavirus Economic Relief Package?

Fresh Air

49:10 min | 1 year ago

Who's Benefiting From The Coronavirus Economic Relief Package?

"Thanks for listening to fresh air. We'd like to better understand who is listening. And how you are using podcasts. Please help us out by completing a short anonymous survey at NPR DOT ORG slash podcast. Survey one word. It takes less than ten minutes and really help support the show that's NPR dot org slash podcast survey word from whyy in Philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air. A small businesses and individuals struggle to obtain federal aid the wealthiest or poised to reap tens of billions of dollars in savings that's what investigative business journalists Jesse drucker reports in the New York Times. Today he'll explain how the economic rescue package is benefiting. The rich later we changed the mood in here. Some great music performed for us by Stefan Rumble and his trio. Rumbles music is inspired by the swing and impressionistic recordings of guitarist. Django REINHARDT. That's coming up on fresh air support for this podcast comes from the Neubauer family foundation supporting. Whyy's fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation as small businesses and individuals struggle to obtain federal aid. The wealthiest are poised to reap tens of billions of dollars in tax savings. The economic rescue package that became law last month is giving one hundred. Seventy four billion dollars in temporary tax breaks. They're intended to help small businesses but they're going overwhelmingly to rich individuals and large companies president trump and his son-in-law jared Kushner will likely benefit from these tax breaks. This is what my guest Jesse drucker reports in the New York Times. He's an investigative reporter for The Times Business Desk. He's been reporting on several of the trump administration's tax and economic programs Jesse Drucker. Welcome back to fresh air. How are you? I know you live in New York City. Which is the hot spot for the virus? Oh how're you doing We're hanging you know it's a stressful time. But we're okay. Good you've been writing about the tax breaks within the stimulus package. What are they officially supposed to achieve? Who is supposed to benefit from them? Well so a couple of days ago Senator Charles Grassley who is the Republican chairman of the Senate Finance Committee which is the Senate's Tax Writing Committee? He said he said the first and only goal of the CARROZZA tax relief was to help families dealing with stay home orders and to help businesses. Keep going so workers would have jobs to come back to when it is safe to do so. You know that's how it's been framed but if you spend a little time digging into some of the provisions you can actually see that there are some provisions in the stimulus. Bill that were geared towards big companies and wealthy individuals tax breaks that only affect wealthy individuals and some tax breaks that only going to affect companies and in some cases companies that may not have been affected or may not be affected at all by the pandemic. Can you give us an example? The single biggest tax break. That is going to help. Only wealthy people is something that will cost the government one hundred and thirty five billion dollars and this is a provision that will help people who own their businesses through partnerships or other similar structures who may have generated losses on their tax returns from their businesses which this gets extremely complicated but just because they have losses for tax purposes. It doesn't necessarily mean they have a money. Losing Company could actually potentially have a very profitable company but the provision will allow them to use those losses to offset the taxes. They might O on say games. They have in the stock market separately now. This is a benefit that exists for Americans currently prior to the cures act but it was capped and did not benefit people who made more than half a million dollars and now have uncapped that restriction temporarily as part of the Cameras Act and so as a result the only people that are going to benefit from this tax change or people that make at least half a million dollars in income outside of their businesses and just to put that in context that is literally the top one percent of tax payers so in other words the government in the cares act is going to give at one hundred and thirty five billion dollars in tax relief. Only two people that make at least half a million dollars. Only to the top one percent of tax payers in this country give us another example only benefits people or companies. That have a lot of money. So another example is there is a restriction on how much interest companies can deduct from their tax returns and that restriction only applies to companies. That have at least twenty five million dollars a year in receipts and again that restriction is going to be list lifted temporarily so that companies with at least twenty. Five million dollars in revenue are going to be able to maximize their interest. Deductions this particular restriction is something that has been lobbied on for the last couple of years by different companies who were seeking favorable regulations and the Treasury Department. What they ended up getting here was not exactly what they were seeking. But it's the same restriction that they were hoping to loosen up. This is a particular interest to the private equity industry. Which accumulates a lot of debt in order to make acquisitions and so the ability to deduct even more interest on that debt could be very beneficial for them. So you point out in your article that the trump business and jared Kushner's family's business are likely to benefit from the tax breaks in this new stimulus package. How are companies likely to benefit because one of the provisions that they put in the cures act is a provision that allows business owners to use losses from their business and use that to offset the tax bills? They might have from say selling stock and the stock market and the reason that that's potentially particularly beneficial for the real estate industry is that the concept of losses on your tax. Return is very complicated. It sounds like that someone who's losing money so they take a deduction as a result of those losses. That's not really how it works. In in real estate you can actually have in the real world. What is quite a profitable business that generates losses on tax returns because real estate developers get to write down the value of their buildings that turns into a deduction and the result is that people like your Kushner and Donald Trump to the degree that we have had some insight into their taxes over the last few years. We've seen that. They have reported big losses on their tax returns in in many cases. It's almost certainly the result of some of these provisions that let them write down the value of their buildings so the point is is that any tax law change you. May that gives people the ability to make maximum use of their losses is something that could very easily benefit real estate investors because they have so many losses and in the case of Jared Kushner Donald Trump. We don't have to speculate on that. We we know that in previous years they have reported big losses Which would put them in a position to benefit from this. So are the wealthy people in large companies who are benefiting from this new stimulus package which is designed to help people and businesses during the pandemic Do they have to improve in any way that they're suffering as a result of the pandemic? Oh No not at all. I mean one of the other provisions that is benefit will benefit be companies is whereas the potential benefit big companies is another provision that allows companies to make use of their losses and essentially. Roll them back. So for instance. If you report a loss in two thousand nineteen and profits in two thousand eighteen the stimulus act would let you file an amended tax return now and use the losses from one year against another year and get a refund. The thing about that provision is that I guess the theory is that this is a way to get cash into the hands of companies immediately. So they don't have to lay people off but it has potentially nothing to do at all with whether you've suffered from the pandemic that the fact that a company might have reported a loss on its tax return in two thousand nineteen or two thousand eighteen. Just a matter of sense you can see those years predate the pandemic but we've created a provision that will clearly benefit companies that May Not be hurt at all by the pandemic so you report that. Some of the tax cut provisions in the new stimulus bill and the stimulus. Bill is designed to help companies and individuals suffering as a result of the pandemic. Be report that some of the cuts in here for wealthy individuals enriched corporations. These were cuts. That were being lobbied for for a couple of years. Ever since the two thousand seventeen tax cut package that was passed and some corporations lobbyists didn't want those restrictions they've been working against those restrictions ever since so. Do you see this current stimulus package as a kind of opportunity just to give lobbyists and corporations what they've been asking for for a couple of years under the cover of the pandemic if you go back just over two years the end of two thousand seventeen. The Republicans in Congress passed really kind of landmark tax legislation which was then signed by president trump. That was very beneficial that handed out basically trillions of dollars in tax cuts to big companies into wealthy individuals and to some degree those trillions of dollars in tax cuts were offset in part by some new restrictions and new taxes. That Congress put in place what we've seen since then. Is that some of the new taxes that Congress passed to offset some of the big tax cuts that companies were given that in reality. What is happening is those taxes have been undercut by regulations that have been slowly coming out of the Treasury Department and now what we're having is in the cares act as part of a relief package to help companies and people hit by the pandemic even more of the restrictions that were put in place in twenty seventeen or kind of being whittled away. And so. It's almost like you kind of have this this gradual process over the last two years where you gave. Corporate America and wealthy individuals some big tax cuts in exchange. There had to be some stuff to offset those cuts and those offsets have been gradually whittled away by the Treasury Department through the regulatory process over the last couple of years. And now we're seeing. Even more of those restrictions being eroded in the stimulus package so the tax cuts which were once offset by some new taxes and some new restrictions are gradually being whittled away so that it was potentially going to be only benefits for big companies and wealthy individuals. One of the concerns that a lot of people had about this stimulus package. That's like trillions of dollars is that will there be over. We'll be going to the wrong people. will be used appropriately and president trump signed an executive order. Basically saying that he would basically ignore the oversight component that was written into the legislation in and he said that in his opinion violates his executive power constitutionally. So what kind of oversight are we left with? Well I mean the reality is in the form of the tax breaks. There's really no ability to see who's getting it right because I mean companies tax returns and people's tax returns are obviously private so there's no ability to see precisely which companies individuals are going to benefit from those tax breaks on the there's a big small business administration loan program and there. We actually have gotten a lot of insight into that because a fair number of publicly traded companies in general companies that known as ever heard of have applied for and gotten loans through that program. And so we've seen. There is a program that I think. Most people assume was geared towards you know the grocery store or the restaurant of dry cleaner around the corner that is severe brisk of going out of business that the companies that are getting those loans are actually pretty big companies with existing relationships with big banks. I mean one of the complications here is that the government is administering this loan program through banks and so banks are dealing with the people that were already there existing corporate customers. And you can see pretty sizable companies. You know not not the types of companies that I think people imagined when we heard about Lifelines for small businesses. We see pretty sizable companies like shake shack was the most notorious one getting these big loans. That are essentially underwritten by the government. We spent some time looking at the public filings of companies that disclose these loans and you see companies that are paying. Millions of dollars to their executives are getting millions of dollars in loans or companies that have paid multimillion dollar fines of the Justice. Department are now getting multi-million. Dollar loans Basically subsidized by the government. Do you think that that's just like an oversight like a mistake? That happened when the bill was being re written. Or do you think that was intentionally baked into the bill. I you know. I'm not sure I can really speak to that with respect to the loans. Frankly I mean obviously. This is a very complicated task to get done in a hurry. And it's both hard to fear kind of what restrictions the place and it's very difficult to figure out I think for the government just the mechanism for getting money to people in some cases and so going through banks. You can see why that would be appealing way to do it. as far as the shake shack of the world getting loans. I don't I can't really speak to whether Congress thought that was a good idea when they pass legislation with respect to some of the tax cuts the thing. That's interesting about that. Is that some of the tax cuts were talking about. Here are things that had basically been on the kind of corporate lobbyist wishlist for some time and so. I think what happens is when there's a crisis like this. There's a kind of fairly narrow menu what Congress is going to choose from. And it's a menu that is in large part been shaped by years of corporate lobbying. Right it's no. I don't think it's any accident that these provisions that we're talking about are things that have been in some form on the wishlist of lobbyists for years and in some cases. Actually we there are cases where companies and we wrote a story a few weeks ago. About how Adidas. Adidas lobbyist wrote an email to staffers in Congress trying to get a tax break people let people use Pretax Money for their gym memberships. And this is something that data had been pushing for for years but kind of under the cover of the pandemic. They thought this would be a good time to try this again. They did not. They were not successful in doing that. But I think that's the kind of most visible example of how some of the tax breaks that did make it into the legislation. Were things that were basically on the agenda for years and this was the opportunity to make the map and one of the Issues here is at a time when the government is spending trillions tax relief in the hopes of like preserving what's left of the economy and then stimulating the economy Own when we start to reopen By cutting so much taxes from the wealthy and from really big corporations are we gutting the finances of the government more than we need to. Oh we putting the government more in debt than we need to. Obviously we have sort of an unprecedented economic catastrophe. That's unfolding before our eyes and in theory the government. I mean the government could in theory have an unlimited ability to deal with some aspects of bad enough to prevent people from going hungry and keep money in people's wallets. They continue to pay their rent. Continue to feed their families. But if you view the amount of money that you have to Dole out as limited then clearly if you are giving one hundred and seventy billion dollars in tax cuts to wealthy people and big companies that potentially aren't hurt by the pandemic remained not needed. Then that leaves you with two potential problems. Right one is that that's money that may not be there for the government which you know kind of at this moment we see kind of how government is important or money that cannot be used for tax relief or other directly for other groups that might be more directly affected by the pandemic is there an economic fury underlying how like. Who's getting the tax cuts and y like for example during the Reagan administration? Whether you believe this to be true or not there was like what was called. Reaganomics trickle down Which was that you know if you gave a lot of money to like wealthy corporations to to big businesses the money will trickle down to the employees and everything would be good for the people who aren't wealthy because the money would would ultimately come to them and that would stimulate the economy etc Is there any kind of fury that we're hearing now to explain the tax cuts to people? Who are making a lot of money. I'm not aware of any real theory as to why the particular tax breaks that we've been talking about. Were in there. I'm not the theory behind say net operating losses or freeing-up restrictions on net operating losses. Is that it just will get. It has the potential to get money out into the economy very quickly. The counter argument is that it's why. Why would you target those particular companies when they may not even have been hurt by the pandemic? I'm not aware of any real fury for targeting any of these industries or any of the groups that are going to be affected by these other than the kind of broad goal of left. Get as much money flowing into the economy as possible. You've described some of these tax breaks for big business and wealthy individuals in the current stimulus package as being the result of lobbyists who are still trying to undo some of the restrictions from the twenty tax stimulus. Bill that already gave a lot of tax breaks to the wealthy So how do the tax lobbyists manage to get these kinds of restrictions in like how? How do they operate? And is there. Anybody lobbying on the other side so it's a really interesting and important question. You're asking him and I think that one of the things that is quite extraordinary about a lot of these tax provision that they are really only understood by a very small number of lobbyists tax attorneys and accountants and are probably not very well understood and not just by members of Congress but even the congressional staffers who are Who were working on them. And you basically have kind of giant components of economic policy and politics responsible for how wealth gets distributed in this country. That is really driven. By ultimately a very small number of people through provisions that are indecipherable. I think the most Americans The analogy that I always like to make. If you look at say the environment you know on the one side you may have energy companies and their side you may have Greenpeace and the Sierra Club. That there really isn't anything like that. There is no real public interest lobby on these kind of obscure corporate tax provisions And you can really see it playing out both in the regulations over the last couple of years in the Treasury Department and even in these kind of highly complicated provisions in the stimulus package. These are things that are driven by and really only understood by a very small number of tax lobbyists Jesse Drucker. Thank you very much for talking with us and stay. Well thank you Terry Jesse. Drucker is an investigative business reporter for the New York Times at we take a short break. We changed the mood with some great music performed for us by Tara Stefan. Rumble and his trio. Their music is inspired by the recordings Django Reinhardt. And the Quintet of the hot club of France made in the thirties and forties. I'm Terry Gross. And this is fresh Air Cairo's from NPR's how. I built this and each week on the show. During this unprecedented crisis Abi asking some of the top founders. And builders how they're dealing with the economic impact of the criminal virus and hear about some of the ways they're pivoting to fight it subscriber. Listen now to how I built this. We have an interview and performance. I think you're going to enjoy. The music is inspired by the first celebrated European jazz musician Guitarist Django Reinhardt. Who along with violinist defined Grappelli and their quintet of the Hot Club of France played infectious? Swing in the nineteen thirties and forties. Django is part of the Sindhi tribe. A subset of the ethnic minority known as Gypsies then mainly live in western Europe as a young man. Django is gravely burned in a caravan fire and almost lost his left hand. He only gained full dexterity in his first and second fingers yet went on to become one of the most influential guitarists in history. Tangos music has had a real resurgence in the past few decades in most major American cities. You can find a hot club band. Based on his our guests defined rumble takes his cues from Django but has a style of his own. He is a French born guitarist. Who Lives in the? Us Rumble has released many albums and composed music for the Woody Allen Film midnight in Paris before the pandemic our producer Sam. Berger invited rumble to our studio to play some music. He brought the other two members of trio guitars. Thor Jensen and bassist Arif Oilman Cohen Rumble had just released a CD recording. All of John Goes Solo. Compositions called Django impressionist. We'll get to that in a little. Bit Stefan Rumble. Thor Johnson and our I fomin cone. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you hello. Hi thanks for having so Jiang us. Music has grown in popularity over the last few decades here in the United States. Like pretty much any major city you go to has a hot club in it which is modeled after the quintet. Django had with the violinist Stefan Cappelli. But you know it's still not everyone knows as well no music. Would you mind playing something? That's a little more typical from his Cadillac. I think you're going to do minor swing so could you guys play that for us to three. Think pink her people do. Thank you blue. That was great. That was minor swing Mega Stefan Rumble. Thor Johnson and Art Cohen. So Django Reinhardt was born in Belgium in nineteen ten but moved to France. He was Sinti Gypsy in. The cities are the Gypsies that moved through Europe and and live in western Europe. Now when he was seventeen he was in a terrible fire that almost claimed his life. Can you tell us about that? So when he was eighteen he got Coat in a very terrible fire in his trailer. Eighteen eighteen. Yeah You came home one night. His wife had prolixity Lloyd flowers for them to sell at the market the next day and he dropped Kendall in the flowers and immediately caught fire and back then the trails way. He's got a whole lot you know. They want to just made of wood. Their caravans right. Yeah It immediately caught fire and saved his wife and his baby and covered himself with a with a cover on the left hand. And he's all left side good burn. There were fine but he burn He wanted to amputate his left arm at the hospital. His cousins took him out of the hospital and brought him to a different hospital who actually managed to save his arm and his leg. They Rebirth his burn with some like acid or something like that they re burn it to make it clean browns and that is a a left hand that was not one hundred percent functional so he could use the last two fingers of his hands. Pinky and the ring finger he could use them to complete a card but he could not really use them for soloing. There's not a lot of mobility in those fingers. Not a lot of mobility but enough to play these complex card that you're here in those improvisations and all he might have used them in. Soros a little bit one not so sure about that But for sure most of it is with two fingers right. There are a lot of colorful stories about Django. Some of them are probably not true. But do you have any favorites that you'd like to share or some of them are probably really true. Okay I like Django. Taking the plane for example being invited by By getting tired and taking the plane or like like that was his cigarettes Nola Gauge Guitar. Nothing just to deflate just got on arriving America expecting to have like A Guitar and everything. So there's a clear stories. They got the things you would do are when you can intensive which gives you a song is. I don't know my son is on have keys. My songs that cholera things like that like it was probably leaving because he was he traded. It was painting and playing music but he didn't know really how to read and write. He learned later on But he was probably functioning in a world of symbols and surrealists Gypsy bar or something like that which is fascinating. I don't know it's kind of like a world of dreams almost in the Gypsy culture in France and Western Europe. I think it's fair to say he's considered a hero. How important you think. His music is to their culture for the city's the other western Europe Gypsies especially there in France and Germany and Holland. He's got jingle is God. This is that's define rumble. Speaking with fresh air producer. Sam brigger will hear more of their interview and more music after a break. This is fresh air. The biggest story in the world is a science story and keeping up with all the latest corona virus research. It's along so on shortwave. We translate the science you need to know. Into short daily episodes. Listen and subscribe to shortwave from NPR. If you're just us we're listening to the interview. Our Producers San brigger recorded with Guitarist Ifan Rumble in our studio before the corona virus lockdown rumble brought to other members of his trio guitarist. Thorn Johnson and bassist Arif Omon Cohen Rumble has a new CD of Django Reinhardt Solo. Compositions these are more impressionistic pieces. That reveal a different side. From the swing. Recordings of the thirties and forties. The DJANGO Reinhardt was best known. For let's hear one of those impressionistic pieces. Improvisation to I will hear a little of John Goes. Nineteen thirty eight recording. Then we'll hear rumbles version from his album. Django LUMP Russian East No That was improvisation number two from guests Stefan rumbles new. Cd called Django. The impressionist and he's here in the studio and We have a tree today. We have his trio which includes Johnson on guitar and Ari Felman Cohen on Bass so some of these titles are like number one. Or improvisation number. Two so you'd kind of imagine that their improvised but some of these songs have been recorded by Django multiple times like improvisation for two was recorded three different times. The first was in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and the last time is a nineteen forty-six and those versions are almost identical right. Yes they are. So what do you make of that like? Where do you think these came from her? These things that he originally improvised and then he he tried to refine a little bit or I think There is always a gray area between improvisation and composition composition is when it completely Static it's done. We wrote down like every single not and it's composed but you know it's normal in music to have something composed but like play around with especially a solo thing Innocuous traits more complicated. Of course you know you play Symphony GonNa stop that can provide in part you know that's not gonna go. Well no that's not gonna go ahead for sure but these pieces are definitely not improvised in the sense like okay going to see Donna noodle something right. It's something that is very. They are all very well prepared. Dis affinity obviously played a lot. Probably at home you know. And they were carefully crafted in his mind. Why don't we hear one of your Compositions that sort of has a lot of influence from jangled music. I think at least I hear that in this long and this is called Prometheus from your twenty twelve album origins bill Great permit me theus composed by my guest. Fm Rummell who? I'm here in the studio being accompanied by Thor Johnson on guitar an Ra Felman Cohen. On Bass you're born in Paris but you grew up in Fulton blue Which is where. Django spent a lot of his time. In as you've said it's the home of impressionism. Can you tell us a little bit about your family so I grew up in actually in chocolate near time blow them? Blue is a forest. Actually so I and there is a town called Fontainbleau which is kind of like the city center and you have all kinds of little villages or around where people leave and they go to blow to work at all. It's very funny the way it's setup So I grabbed there until eighteen. Then we moved to Fontainebleau have two sisters and my mother from a very young insisted for us to play the piano. Classical she said music is part of education. That's that like mathematics. You'd want to read to write yulon music that's it. That's probably -cation. When did you start getting into Django? Reinhardt I know you've said his music if you're in France is just kind of in the air. But you didn't really pay much attention to it until you really did so. It's a funny thing. Because we all know Jenga High Not our fathers everyone was listening to Django. So it's kind of in the background but we didn't really care for it You know the difference between a an old seventy eight of Jangle and like the new eighties pop record. It was like very drastic back then and so you know as kids another one nine interested in that at all but I remember like going to have drinks when I was fifteen. Sixteen to the pub. And Bobby cannot was there you know in France which then we could let go sixteen That's Django Reinhardt. Son Yeah DJANGO REINHARDT SON. Us they're like they're like these people where they are. We knew his name. We cannot do the music from the background. So we're in touch with with him. You know plus there was the Django Reinhardt Festival every year in near Fontainbleau in somewhere and So when I was Eighteen about eighteen when I graduated from High School and when Dad Talk to my teacher and I said Okay I would really love to learn jazz So he said why don't to play minor swim by jungle and now because guitar. It's good for you so I said okay. And he showed me and it was like. Wow that sounds really cool so went to buy like that. First Jangle record and this time I really put it on. And he's into it and it my mind it's twice a Jingo Ji forty-nine so jingling from nineteen forty nine and Is version of net of Minor? Swing was exquisite. I've never heard that pain attention and being a bit of a better guitar player and musician and grown up and I suddenly realized that there was some magic in those that have never heard before Django Reinhardt. Seems like one of those people that Without him there's certain kinds of music that wouldn't exist like for instance without Bill Monroe. You don't have bluegrass without Charlie. Parker you don't have bebop without Django you don't have this style of music at all. Yeah it's beyond that the Jingle Oh jingle is a weird phenomenon. It's very different because there's no style jingles like You know if you're a pianist practice your produce and Fugu is going to be good so any way that's going to be a jingle brought a new understanding of the guitar a new. I hate to say tricks because Anna tricks but that I think things can I please so things like those kind of things you know on those kind of things the Hamernicks playing like that was the fake comics? The attitude and Like things like open string so he brought a lot of things like that Live like approaches of the guitar. Sound that we didn't have before Stefan rumbles speaking with fresh air producer. Sam brigger will hear more after a break. This is fresh air support for. Npr comes from whyy presenting the pulse. A podcast that takes you on adventures into unexpected corners of health and science plastic in the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full of fascinating stories and Big Ideas. The pulse available. Where you get your podcasts. Or at WHYY DOT ORG support for. Npr also comes from whyy presenting the PODCAST. Eleanor amplified and adventure series. Kids love here reporter. Eleanor outward crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts. Or at WHYY DOT Org. We're listening to the conversation and performance guitarist define rumble recorded with our producer Sam brigger before the pandemic rumble came to our studio with two other members of his trio guitarist. Thor Jensen bassist Ari Foam in Cohen I read an interview that you said that the way you practice and that the way you perform is very different and it kinda relates to your understanding of energy. Can you describe that? So in my Experience which is vital energy according to cheer. This is what I read in books by. Whatever I don't even know if it's related or not but the vital energy that you have is very precious for Performance. I think you have to be drained at the end of a performance like nudging physically like being in pain playing not drain like that but you have to feel drain inside. You have to almost drained. Spiritually like is something that that came out your emptying yourself perform exactly. It's a radius of the Chee and when I practice to accumulate Chee Eric to accumulate vital energy. So I think the practice as a very mentor. Space to fix problems is not a place to have a good time and play. I don't see practice has like a playful time. I think of it as like a very serving problem. Time and performance is the opposite. The performance is completely go. Because I don't WanNa feel like I'm practicing in a performance to win that perform. I want everything to be in place so there is nothing that retains the spirit to flow. You know there is that thing that flows and that she and I don't want it to be stopped by technical problems and all that stuff. Well I like to end with probably your best known composition this Bistro Fata and it was a theme song to Woody Allen's movie midnight in Paris. It's a really beautiful waltz in Francis some kind of scientists Cottam user. Can you tell us a little bit about what music means in a little bit about the song before you play so amused? That is Executive Bagpipe from center France from Ovarian. The word means. That means back yes. It's a specific kind of bagpipe that they used in central France and when they moved to Paris in the nineteenth century they brought also the accuser so dances songs and music so the Italians moved to Paris in the early part of the twentieth century. And they brought the accordion and they studied hanging with these guys from central France and this in playing music music on the accordion and most of it is waters. And there's also a great culture of war says in Paris plus the accordion is a very good for classical music. Surprising me and the Gypsies were around with do Benji guitars. All and something was born. That called amused so it's very wall. Soy ended wars and accordion and guitar ended an activity Jenga when he was thin. Become one of the first Music player that scooter is high. Became a performer says very ingrained in his musical culture. And in two thousand. Eleven Woody Allen ask me if I could composer waltz music awards were captured the soul of Paris. So I tried my best. I came up with the walls and he liked it. He put it said okay. It fits everywhere I want on the movie and that was let's great. They must be joke about Bagpipes accordions and Banjos up music together. Probably the same. You know back window broken. Why don't we hear it this has bistro fodder and thank you so much for coming in Stefan Rumble. Thor Johnson and I fomin cone. Thank you thank you thanks again. Thank you birth. That's define rumble with two other members of his trio guitarist. Thor Johnson and bassist Arif Omen Cohen Thing Rumbles Composition Bistro Fata rumble has to recent albums out called Django lump Rishon East and the DJANGO EXPERIMENT. Fine trio came to our studio before the pandemic and spoke with our producer. Sam Breath. We're proud to say that our new online archive which collects fresh air interviews. Dating all the way back to the seventies when we were a local show was just nominated for a Webby award the Internet highest honor on our archive site. You can search by guests topic and collection. You'll find it at fresh air archive dot org so check it out. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller our technical director and engineer as Audrey. Bentham our interviews and reviews or produced and edited by Emi Salad. Phyllis Myers San Brigger Lauren. Krenzler Simone Theresa Madden Lose. Eighty Thea challenor. And Seth Kelly our associate producer of digital media. Is Molly Seavy Nesper? Roberta shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry Gross.

Django Django Reinhardt France Fresh Air Thorn Johnson NPR Bill Monroe producer Congress Django Jesse Drucker Treasury Department Stefan Rumble Europe New York Times Tara Stefan jared Kushner
Ep 57 | Do You Have a Right to Online Privacy?

The Chad Prather Show

48:44 min | 2 years ago

Ep 57 | Do You Have a Right to Online Privacy?

"Faye guys, welcome to episode three of high balls with heating with my good friend Andrew Heaton, who is the host of blaze podcast media. I don't even know what we call it anymore. Something's off with Andrew Heaton. That's name mine. Welcome once again to studio. Twenty two here we are. I'm going to do a new show with party foul. Steve where we're not going to drink. We're going to smoke cigars is going to be called Fags with foul. There you go might use cigarettes every now and then I don't know. I'm not smoking cigarettes. You don't smoke a fag. No. Okay. When I lived in Scotland, this was one of the couple of things that threw me off. Yeah. Because the, the if you're in Scotland where you and I are now in Texas piston pissed off in the same thing. Right. But when I when I first moved moved to Scotland they'd say things like, well, I should back pissed means drunk in Scottish pissed off. Means angry pissed. I'm pissed me. I didn't know that. So this. Like all last night, I got so pissed shot myself and block out and I'd be like, oh my God. That I lost control through anger, and then the the Faguang because I didn't know that the fag is a nickname for cigarettes. I it's a pejorative where I'm from so they go a gusty. Hold Madrid manip- out back for the fog. And I go, I'm just gonna hold my drink and be quietly had sexual you do whatever you need to do. I'm visiting your country. If you've never had a fag in a back alley. You really should go to Scotland. Let me tell you this, the best place, you can get a fag in a back alley, or under a bridge, whatever twenty dollars is twenty dollars. So you spent tobacco back backup prices are very high. Yeah. Yeah. Ignore to get their show. Barney, Val Steve sitting over the peanut gallery, of course. Jennings's of their petting him factionally, making sure that he stays, just quite multisport, right there. There's certain words that I love, but usually come outta me, whenever I'm drinking whisky. That's why I love this show high balls with Heaton, and today's featured whiskey on high balls with Eaton is Fort Worth sex zone. T X whiskey. Not Texas whiskey. It is not endorsed by Rick Perry, Greg Abbott or the state of Texas, t X whiskey five whiskies in this bottle, not a single one less than five years old. It is America's first premium blended whisky, which means there's only whisky and the bottle kit. You some soup and become our sponsor because high balls with heating. Let me tell you that we can make high balls with any whiskey this out there, if they just give us money. Yeah. Yeah. I'll come back for whiskey and money. I but you know what? I'm a fan of the whiskey are you fan of the whistle? I'm very much. So, yeah, I like I'm. I'm a big scotch throughs east. I've got a square foot of land on the isle of Isla in Scotland, and I would like venture become a brand of Mr.. Don't you go when you go to Scotland, do you like set up a little altar on your square foot of land? You, you like Bill. I went there with I've got an adopted aunt, and uncle because I had a host family in so Arthur Guja when I told I call him having to be back in your neck of the woods, and I've got the script Atlanta's Arthur went will go their car will, we'll take a ferry and we went down there, and he built me this LEGO castle. So I had my own LEGO castle. So what I did was I put that up, and then I kicked over the flag of Russia, because everybody's got a different flag for their spot. So I felt I was I was representing America and my feudal dynasty. Did you play his in dragons? Yes. Yeah. He's really gonna have that vibe. Tell you what a dork I wasn't high school because I think the first time I came on your show, and I do generally feel this way, I described I described you to one of our workers the other day I went when I hang out with Chad. I feel like I'm hanging out with a cool high school. And he's like he's decided to, like, come hang out with him. I kind of feel like we're walking like weightlifting class and you're. Football and Cody done. How many bars are whatever the football coach just called you a smart bubble? The whole thing came in sit and have lunch with us. It's cool. I like that about leading him towards the bathroom swirly. No, I wouldn't ever leave. I anti bully one hundred percent although I am pro fag Jennings. I love you, my friend. I love you to love you, and I'm glad you're sitting in here, I'd like to note, by the way, heat point earlier affair in. Scotland is a homosexual. Oh well, I'll be an Ireland, so they were taking over the island. I'm going to spend June this year in Ireland because I just need to go that far away to get away from all you fools, and I love Ireland. I love Scotland, both great. I'll say airlines, Tadmor friendly, very friendly. The scotch are lovely, but they seem homicidal when you meet him 'cause you're, you're like, hey, how are you? Great our you like I'm fine. I like introduce USA mates. In my co with me, you're like I'm gonna get stabbed and it turns give drinks, they're nice, the Irish much more. Like, like, you know, they're much more serious when the Scottish, very Gerard Butler in in three hundred. You know what I mean? Like. Spartan, plus cut out. Yeah, you do not. I always want always wanna go into Bario Mexican whenever I try to do a Scottish accent. That's why admire you so much. Thank you. But you know what immigrants, go to Scotland to screw? Don't you look at my woman, my. Don't you want you looking at McQueen your mailing Glaswegian accent so hard? Right now that guy straight out of Glasgow. My name is tough to understand what you looking at my haunting girl, what you want me to run over your when my Jaffe. I think they just like that, just it's like him and Dundee. Oh. Yeah. Just like yeah. Let's take it to the head to the head. Okay. Let's go to the head. Let's see what the topic of the day is on high balls with Eaton. We don't know what it is. This is a head full of topics in here we go. Do you have a right to online privacy? Do you have a right to on line privacy? You know, I think all it depends. What are we doing online? I see. I'm I'm divided on this one, because I think I am on the one hand like I like privacy, and I want you to have it. But on the other hand, if I build a platform, it's my platform. Right. So if I build Chad book, which is a platform based on discussing Chad Prater sharing Chad Prater photos, I own that platform, I made it if you wanted to go do your own thing, you should. But I hear on chedda book, I control the Chad media, right? He really does have this, by the way, I also this is just be mentioning that everybody should Chad, Chad dot com. Log in go ahead and buy if I so up in time gives your debit and credit card there. It's like it's I, I have mixed feelings on this, because on the one hand. Yeah. I don't want. If you are, if you're running something yourself, if you came up with an idea, and you wanna do it, I, feel, very, very strongly about free enterprise. And the idea that you should be able to associate and run your businesses you see fit. I don't think that Facebook should be a utility or anything like that. Like they that's their thing and into the point where if Facebook or Twitter wants to kick off people like me it's, it's a private platform. They're their liberty to do that at the same time though. Like we're kind of getting this weird part of the twentieth century, where, like, I it's, it's I do feel like being creeped on by a bunch of different places. So I don't know. But right now, I'm leaning more towards the I don't care to be honest with you. Do you have an Alexa or anything like that, in your home or like a Google play, or one of those that you talked to? Yeah, that you have to feel a little bit nervous about not only do I not only do feel nervous. I, I become aware of what a horrible human being. I am because I'll you watch these old like sitcom or not sitcom these old drama. Where like, like there's people in a mansion and their Butler comes in and they're like you fool Matthews Matthews. You shouldn't have brought me brandy, the Stanley. Why would you do that? I never do that with people Starbucks in the get Alexa, and you're like no, I didn't say that electric light orchestra song, you idiot. And I'm just so mean to this robot. And I had no idea. How Meena was when there was no actual. When there's not a response, your I'm really mean. Yeah. When I say Neil diamond, and all of a sudden, I hear an onslaught of Abba going. He. Again, I wanted blue jeans. What's the same thing? River in blue. Sweet. Caroline, you were doing that karaoke the other day, I was doing the in and Elvis comes rest is I am a big fan of karaoke, we were doing. We should do carry I would love to do that. Let's us. Bertone or tenor. I I'm not a tenor. I'm a little more baritone that I'm a little more. We'll just kind of find it as we go. But if I do if I do patients and I'm in good voice from guns, N roses. I can get there. I hit my Maria in the car by Brooks, and Dunn. But I can't do an Cariocas surprises. You knows them Brooks and Dunn. I like Brooks and Dunn. I li- I love bluegrass. I love bluegrass. Until I went to Brooks and Dunn concert. And it was years ago. My great song. Yeah. Yeah. It is. I like bluegrass and I'm like Garth Brooks to some extent. I don't like I'm definitely more bluegrass than country. Like, I, I think bluegrass is the greatest. American was John, right? Yeah. It is. It is one, it's something that's purely American. Yeah. It's this great mix of different things too. Right. Because it's like Appalachia scotch-irish with African, there's all sorts of cool stuff that goes into it. Don't you don't you be African is in my bluegrass now. Chad. Well, is it comes from Chad? It comes from that, that Muslim country. Yeah, but you're right. No, it is in God bless bluegrass music, and I appreciate the resurgence that has had in recent years. I think when I when I die, I hope that rule Scruggs in the arc angels squirt meet of all Hala. Yeah, that is my that is how I see this, this concluding at a friend of mine who was from the holler in Kentucky. There's a lotta haulers in Kentucky, by the way. And he's very well known bluegrass musician, he was playing for Bill Monroe who is the father of Bill bluegrass music. And it was his first trip out of Kentucky down into Nashville Tennessee, he was staying at a hotel that he thought was fascinating because he'd never been out of the holler. And, and so he went down into the lobby with his little instamatic camera. And he took a picture of the clock. That was in the middle of the hotel lobby. And guess what that behind that clock driving down the street? Was a picture that he took of his future wife that he would marry wow, ten years later nice in that greatly. Yeah. Bluegrass music, people grasping is supernatural. It is African supernatural Caccia weird weird revelation. I have bluegrass and then I'll try get back to online privacy. But I do have a much better Pitney about bluegrass. 'cause when I lived in New York I was a regular at the bluegrass night in a story, you would not think that New York City would be a bluegrass hotbed. But actually, it is, is a couple of really good bluegrass nicer, and I would go to the story one, and I was there one night, I was the only person that jam so's only person that didn't plan instrument or was married to someone that was playing bluegrass music. And I had this thought the Beatles when they were in Hamburg. Right. Know who they were they early on the Beatles were hanging out in Hamburg. And I thought if there was some alternate universe, where the Beatles never left Hamburg. And I can go watch them. I'd be like this is amazing. I'm seeing the Beatles like right here right now. And people like you mean the fold guys planner basement and maybe go, what am I want coal things in my in my not appreciating in my life here. And I watching this rest. I was like, there's a couple of people here who I think are world class performers just didn't do there's a lot more than people realize, you, there is that element to it. And then you wind up looking at things and you're going, you know what, there are things that I've been shelter to my entire life. There are things that I haven't been exposed to Ricky Skaggs. He could play any instrument on the planet that has strings on it, and he's a bluegrass musician country, people know him as a country singer, but ease as a player, he's a bluegrass player. So the things that are out there that we don't know about if there was true online privacy. How many things would we not know about? I think if you make the choice to get online. I'm not talking about your business dealings, or your or your debit card numbers. But I'm saying if you wanna make your stuff public than it should be public. I think. Like I have not had a social media page, that has been in any way, privatized in over five years, so you take my friend, Kenny thacker, who took a picture unknowingly of his wife, ten years later, lit, who became Lynn thacker, even she didn't have privacy from an instamatic camera, because she chose to show in public. So I think that your own line presence should be just as public as your public appearance out in civilization in general. I think we're moving there. I think we're definitely moving there in that a lot of the things that I would now considering credibly private or I'm sorry, that my grandparents parents would have considered private pretty public about. And I, I wonder if we're moving to a point in our society, where a privacy is kind of an outdated notion. I'm not saying it's a good thing. But I think we might be moving. They're all the same. And so the idea might be we move towards a position where like everybody just, you know if if you look up, what kind of porn you like it's out there. At the same time you're not stigmatized for it ever lived porn wondered lying ever. Not once. Read about it looked born dot com. And thought now who's going to re tweet this, like, who's going to leave a comment because you have those options to do those things like you can go on any one of these porn sites be like, I'm going to re tweet what I'm watching today. One of my friends, I'm gonna leave a review what one of my friends, he's a stand up comedian. He if he does a meeting at his company, he will throw out names of porn actors in the meeting just to see if anybody picks up. So he'll say like a Ryan driller my Buddy Ryan driller there you. Yeah. He'll know I've been working really hard on the, the, the, I've been working hard on this file with Jenna Jameson, and we're really going to we're going to brief in Russian and he'll say, like someone go, hey. I look forward in that case, can, I also say who's coming on the podcast, very, very soon enough coming weeks on the Chad braver show. Yes, Jenna, Jameson a relentless in Roman well something's off. We'll talk about the headliner in. Yeah. We're doing high balls with Jenna. No one. No one. Okay. Just me anyway. So no. I agree with you on that. I think more and more Steve had something he had to say Steve. The today earlier I looked up Jinnah Tamous in, in Ron Jeremy, I was trying to figure out that they ever did afflict together. Ron Jeremy Jenna, Jameson try to still not sure though, we're going to re tweet it, though. Mom that because I was looking up some history, his party time, can I ask you questions top off no bottle mates? There was a proposal read a couple years ago that I thought was interesting, which was that everybody should be allowed to, to either dump their internet history at eighteen or changed their name at eighteen and I kind of like I kind of think we should have a culture where it it's this odd thing right now where, if you did something thirty two years ago that was a bad idea now that at the time wasn't you can really be raked over the coals. And I, I wonder if we shouldn't have either an age limit were a statute of limitations on stuff that may not be appropriate where if you like, I, I am, so I feel so bad for kids that went through high school that were the first generation with Facebook. I, I had Facebook in college, and I didn't have to go through that. I feel really sorry for them, like I kinda wanna give them a pass, if they said stupid stuff, they're seventeen and a half. I like it's out there, but I want I want to let them go. Well, that's beauty of. I I'm older than you. So I didn't have the internet in college, which is beautiful beautiful. We have forty anything, you know unless thirty five one hundred percent favorites bunny. We used to we used to pack people in the hatchback like we'd have so many guys when I was sixteen seventeen eighteen years. We had so many guys in the car, we put two or three of them in the trunk and drove around so, like, I'm sure like I'll put it out there now. Like I did stupid things like I remember one time in Columbia South Carolina. We had a kid he was so wound up in press down behind the hatchback under the glass like he couldn't move, and he was squeezed under the glass and we stopped for gas and there was a black new that walked up to us, and he had a cigarette. He's missing this tooth right here, and he had a cigarette Shelvin amid eleven had a fag right here in this gap, and he comes up, and he looks and he sees it white, boy, I'll stretched up in that back of that. Carney. Got around like get. And I was like just a couple more. So there you go heating. There are things we should know about me, but I'm gonna put it all out there. I have a question about frame with the with the coda chrome put the with the camera instamatic the clock that he took the picture of was it by any chance, hanging over the window of women's bathroom. No. This was like a big big clock like a centerpiece in this lobby back when people used to know how to tell time speaking of which party fell. I can tell Tom. Digital. Digital. Oh my Lord, Heaton. I got nothing. New friends and vans. Go to the Chad braider show. Go to off Andrew Heaton. Check us out our full on podcast and tune in again when we do another episode of high balls with Heaton. Cheers, my friend. Cheers. Hey, there's no privacy. Everybody. Welcome to a little short episode of the Chad breaker show podcast where we talk about things party. Val, Steve doesn't know about history, Steve, what does that have to be about history could be about anything? You don't know nothing. Nothing zero he no no nothing. I'm here crossing we like to prove okay, hoping to reason history, nineteen forty five way. That's who's born doesn't matter. You're like my wife trying to what song is that? I don't know the BG's that was before I was born, you should still note, the be no. You don't know the BG. Well, you can tell by the way, I use my woke, welcome latest, man. No time to talk. I know the song, thank you. Don't tell me you don't know berry give the BG's got turning, your white man card. Look here. Nineteen forty five forty five. Hang on. What was what countries made up the allied powers that one World War Two. The you're the big three, the big three the United States one. Gotta be more France. No, not Japan. No. Not Russia less. I'm doing process elimination not Mexico. They ain't help with nothing. Canada. They sit out to Willie kinda in Australia things out who else. Through here and see who sits, thanks, Switzerland in eight them. They sit everything out. Are you just gonna nail like this Mitch and every country on the planet that maybe wasn't involved with war? And by the way, all the ones, you've listened listed, we're pretty much part of their allies, but they sit out who Australia didn't sit out, but who, who. Who are the big three at the end of World War Two who are the allied powers America. Yeah. That's America for one. I don't know who number two, right? You've already messed up because Russia was one. They helped us out. They, they were our allies. They were no bag us. No, they became the bad guy. And then the third was probably Australian, no, the United Kingdom. Do you know who the leaders of those countries were no? How do you not know who the leader of America was nine hundred or you don't have to be there? Do you know who was the president of the United States at the end of World War Two Truman? No. He came after Lakers Lincoln Lincoln. Did you know that Lincoln was inducted into the wrestling hall of fame in nineteen Ninety-two? Because he he fought before he was president before he went into politics, he fought in over three hundred boxing matches. No, I missed that in history class. Did you know that that in ancient Egypt, they used to rub Honey on the citizens, whenever the pharaoh was out in public so that the flies would stay away from the Faroe? No. It didn't fascinating history can be now who was the president of the United States at the end of World War Two, he died right at the end of world. War two, he died right after the whole deal was done. He died. How did you had polio polio that guy? Yeah, yeah. Tung. Yeah. I need some help candidates del. No roseville. Yeah. That's what I was. What was his wife's name? Roosevelt's why Eleanor, so who was the leader of the UK of Great Britain, who was the prime minister? Prince diana. Oh, she done a car, crash, ninety two eighty eight ninety ninety six ninety seven ninety two so. Winston churchill. Okay. That. And who, who was the king of England at that time the king that king, then are what was his name? What was what was Ardal? Dardel. Picking number. I know his name his, his Royal name was George. He had a daughter whose name, she's the Queen now. Her name is cleaned right now right now. So you are alive right in the fact that you don't know anything. No. I do I can picture her Elizabeth, okay? She had a daughter in law name, Diana. Okay. So it was married to or son, whose name is Charles. Okay. I know Prince Charles is sure you do. What's his two boys names? William in hair. I was gonna say, say. So back to who was the leader of Russia at the end of World War Two at the end of the leader. Russia. Joseph stalin. Okay. There you go. The big three and where did they meet? Where did they come together to decide the fate of Nazi Germany and the rest of Europe in order to end World War Two? Was a start with why a why didn't help you at all. Not at all they met to y'all to say you it was called the Crimea conference. So welcome in nineteen forty five World War, Two ended Russia, the UK and the United States of America came together at y'all to with what was called the big three, the Crimea conference, and they decided the fate of post World War Two Germany, and what will be happening. We rebuilt the nation of Germany because again that to the point of after World War, One and the treaty of her side being world police we decided that it was the right and humanitarian aid thing to do humanitarian thing to do to go back in and rebuild the countries that had been destroyed during World War Two, so we destroy him rebuild them as now kill them all. Let God sort them. Do you know the phrase Carthaginians pieces? Is something I should know. Yeah. Oh, no. So the people of Carthage whenever they would go in and destroy, like, Carthage, Texas. No. This is not Carthage, Texas. Do you know do you know who the great Carthaginians leader was he had to cross the outs in order to conquer Rome as a Greek is name was Hannibal? Okay so only. Hannibal. Lector. Yeah. Or from the team. Right. Hannibal. Carthaginians peace means what you conquer a people that you plough under their lands. Their fields their cities and you pour salt all over at race from the face. They're grow. Now. He knows now he knows. Okay. So there's your little history lesson about the big three after World War Two from another episode of party foul. Dull no nothing. Everybody. I know you've been looking forward to another segment where we drink high balls with Heaton, my friend, Andrew, Heaton. Hello at mighty Heaton on Twitter. Are you on Instagram? Yeah. Are you microphone over to your drunk s I am on Instagram? It's like making my own coffee table book. It's beautiful. I like Instagram. Everybody's nice screams, like mostly, like puppies and women working out. Great. There's a lot of women working out. Yeah, good. Thank you. There's. There's girls fishing. And look, I've spent my entire life fishing. I don't want my betas crammed wedged up. My butt, the whole time I'm trying to reel in a four hundred pound Marlin, your what wedged that you're bathing made. My beta suit swimsuit. Okay. From Oklahoma to bathing suit is though bathing suit. They said, beta suit, and I thought that meant like your backup suit man's romp. I went into Frazier mode, and I was like you got your a suit, and your beta suit, and then you get your delta suits just had a genius idea, and I would love to get feedback from the people who listen and watch, don't you think that we should do a high balls with and segment? Wearing men's romper right there. I just heard a disturbance in the force. I just heard women thirty five to sixty five years old. The desperate, housewife set just screamed in unison. What's a Robert set one piece thing, remember a couple years ago that was kind of the deal Schwarzer shorts. But it was all the way is one piece all the way up to the men. We're going around in the robbers, which I don't know how you get out of that, and the bathroom stall and shimmy down. But it's like coveralls but was short. I that if I were in space that sounds like a jumpsuit Tomase that would make him walking to like, if you're wearing a catheter just p it will one of them tubes. I'd like how do they poop in space? They've got like a suction. This is this is the first thing we'll talk about today. They're like there's a growing scientific consensus that we should go back to the moon to get the feces bags. The astronauts left up there, here's why bear with me. The reason that, that's a decent idea is they've been up there now with fifty years. And so we wanna see what happens to 'Bacterial living inside of these living in vacuum in a very harsh environment. So they're so originally, the astronauts, just pooped in a bag and left. It was very difficult and I'd like didn't like doing it, but we left it up there on the moon. There's just doggie bags laying up on the moon. We wanna see what, what happened to the the, you know, radiated feces, the astronauts. So there had to be some oxygen in the bag where the poop went. Yeah. I would think that the methane would burn up a lot of the oxygen. How much oxygen does bacteria need? I don't know how much bacteria does Tang produce. It's it's a probiotic Tang yet. But if but if let's say they opened up a sterling. They're still still bacteria there that would indicate that, that life is actually very robust, because it can live in a in a bag on the moon. Well, now that the Miller report has been released in Trump is been cleared of collusion and obstruction. Man, I think we go with space force. And I say we get America back. Okay. All right. Let's go build a moon base. I'm on favor that do not. Dookie knocks. It's going really well, Candice left the room. And we immediately space guys, go to toilet humor. They always do. I I what do you find this crap out? Somebody sent it to me, literally, somebody who's you'd probably joy this that, like they listen to me the day before we had an episode on moon bases. And it didn't come up. So I'm really glad I got to bring it up here. That is like fantastic. Like fodder like news that no one cares about. But I think that that in and of itself, like justify that former space travel, I could justify that let's go get the poop back. Yeah. Go get the poop back and I guarantee you whoever's idea that was ladies. That's not the guy you wanna date because he'll probably be one of those freaky, guys. No, no, no, no, no. I'll tell you some stories off air, not about me, but about people, I know, repea-, creepy stuff. But there's suction in the in the thing, right? Now they've got like a reverse fan. It's it's like a dentist suction because it out except that you kinda like plug yourself into it, and it just. Party time. Hey, you know, I remember the what was it John Glenn, when he was in space, and he saw crystal particles that were glowing that were floating past the space craft and he couldn't figure out like what am I seeing here, and it was his frozen peop- articles that were floating past? Did he write a poem about the majesty of space and all that stuff? How this changes is about how beautiful universes. All that kind of thing. You actually hear that poem, if you play pink Floyd's dark side of the moon backwards. So I hear. Articles from him. On reflecting to my so me, and my purse would Levy listen to Hardrock referred. I'd here, John Glen when I was a kid, if American hero if you play it backwards that song's called dogs awards called American hero. Let's pick a topic straight out of the head and go to work. This is this is where it gets spendable, because I'm always scared. He's going to come up with something like Therrien the Iraqi this one's great for what we've been talking about. I've never done this. But I always want to say that, like we should reserve the right to put it back in the head. If it doesn't need to come out this if anything we are to sober for this one. Oh, god. What is real? And what is just our perception of reality? That's great for where at all right? Well, let me try to set this up. Let me see if I could toss it up. So shakespeare. Shakespeare said and I'm gonna paraphrase because I don't know Shakespeare for beta. But Shakespeare basically said at one of his plays he said they're far more things that we that we cannot see or feel that Voller things that are in this universe in the things that we can see feel. And so they're a basically saying can I drunk, try and get that one Shakespeare, the Horatio? There are more things out, dammit. What is more things and and dreams Jennings. You know this. Owner. They're having on earth than are dreamt of, in your philosophy, Horatio day. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you Jennings. I love you Jennings. I love you to executive executive producer editor producers well of the. Something's off with enter Heaton show. Yeah, there's far more. So let's set it up with that because I'm of the idea. I believe that people are, and you, you and I have a friendly opposition on the idea of the metaphysical, the spiritual religious, whatever you wanna call it. I feel like we are made up of body soul and spirit. Okay. I feel like we are I feel that there's a trike Kadhamy there of us. So, so I feel like your body is basically your mobile home that one day, you'll move out of either. Leave your soul is your is your mind your will in your volition. Your, your ability to choose, and I believe that your spirit. Is that inner nature that eternal thing about you, that was in the heart of God from the beginning or from before the beginning and will live forever with God now is at real is that made up? I think the average person who has religious bent is going to lean towards that you. Well, I'll tell you what. I find interesting about that. So my, my background's eastern orthodoxy time, but earlier and they would actually concur with you because I think a lot of the time, we now tend to say things like. I have body. Right. But if you go back to the early Christians, they would say, I am a body, and I am a soul, and I am a spirit, but they sort of view themselves, as not really having, like a balloon above suspended organic meat sack, but being a Triune component of things. And I, I would I would up today. I, I no longer sure that it was interesting that you kind of go to that. Yeah, I would I'm I'm, I'm more in the secular, you know, Adams and Infinity camp now. Bought chemicals in Infinity. We're I'll say that. I'm kinda softening though is I watched a, a documentary on dog cognition about three years ago and it like it kind of blew my mind because it so as like where I'm at right now, and I don't like this place, by the way, but at the moment, I'm in this, you know, it's, it's chemicals and Infinity. And that's it. There's no plan. And I, I watch this, this video on dog, cognition and dogs have pretty bad short term spatial memory. They'll like they'll, they did an experiment, where they put out dog bowls in an o'clock pattern and they swapped them all with meat, but there's only meeting, one of the dog would run to one. No, meat runner, the other one, no meat run back to where it been. No me like whereas we would go one by one to do it in the most efficient pattern. They also don't tend understand spatial relationships, which is why dogs wrap around trees when they're on a leash Sanderson, at least signifies walking they don't really understand the connection between you and the leash in the tree. And I watched that, and I thought, if don't could talk and you went, what is it like to have such a stunted view reality? What is it? Like, I think the dog would go, what are you talking about? I see the universe exactly how it is. And then I went wait a minute. What do I not know that's going on right now? There has to be a bunch of stuff like they're supposed to be eighteen dimensions or whatever. Like I'm only were like maybe four, I think, like got to be a bunch of things going on. So there's like there's a little bit of a intellectual humility, I think has to go into that of there's got to be, maybe it turns it can give people colds over the phone. I don't know the other thing I thought about, like let's say, like here's a mine experiment. This is a good three drinks in mind experiment. Let's say that your mood today can can actually affect you backwards in time to where if you just you have a terrible day, and for some reason that gives you a headache three weeks past Philly, like it's time space, butterfly effect into the space time. And you and I and I don't know how we'd ever figure that out because because we can only really suss out. We can only suss things. Out based on this kind of narrow bandwidth of causing affect right? But if but if they ever invert there's no way for us based on our current scientific method actually figure that out. So I think that we as humans again, and you're, you're talking about a dog's mind and, and obviously, our dimension is far deeper, is our the way our brain works. It works far more dimensions than what we do because because dogs are basically black white. I mean it's, it's, it's this way or that way, they don't have that cognizant, their, the new very so again, people, you know, be of Skinner wanted us to embrace behaviorisms based off Pavlov's experiments with the dog, or your ring, the bell the dog running, because the dog knows it's going to be fed, and therefore, if there are certain stimuli for us, and we're going to respond perfectly to that stimuli because we've been conditioned over and over to do that again. But but I don't embrace behaviorisms because I think that there are other things that stimulate us in motivate us to do those things with dog. Yeah. You can rub the clock with meet the bowls with me. And yeah, they're going to respond. That, but humans are a little bit different. So here's how we are as humans. I think that we see things on a time, timeline. For instance. We're here we begin were there. We end and there are all these significant things along the way. That's our perception of reality. That's what we think how what, but what if what if speaking of clocks with meat bowls, what if God again to, to, to, to, again, speak to where you come from philosophically in those theologically, that idea of God or what we know of a higher big, what if it's cyclical? What if it's cyclical like this, so that rather so you read something like the book of revelation, and you're like, oh, well, there's this time line here. This happens in the trumpet blows in an ends. No, no. What if it's always happening, what if this dick cycle is going on, and the Trump it's been blowing it's been blowing in the past. It's been blowing in the president blowing in the future. And so now what if our lives are that way? So I don't feel actually too far off from what you just said. I think that could my bad. Mood affect my headache. Three weeks ago, maybe not so much that, but if we are eternal beings, there's no reason to think that we can't have a reality that is far beyond what we see feel thinks your touch. And so we're, we're in this theory oil thing that's going on. That is this cosmic force around us that we have no concept of when I assume that's happening either way. Because I, I assume even if even if it's a big undirected cosmic. Void there's got to be stuff happening that I'm unaware of. And I do think there is a, a level of if I can't fathom that the universe is simple enough for me to understand that does not seem right to me. There's got to be stuff, not happening. It may not be directed. It might be directed. I don't know. But like I read a metaphor, the other day about a guy was was discussing how like chances are pretty good. That has got fauna doesn't know. And he's watching Netflix. I think that's probably pretty accurate. So, like, maybe I don't know. What's going, maybe there's some big Netflix show or something going on? I, I don't know. I'm just doing my thing, my all I gotta get to work. I gotta drive by car. That's my quivalent remember the end of min black. Whenever the thing comes out. It comes all the way out. Here's I don't remember it. Exactly. But here's the earth. Here's our New York City. And then boom, it comes out there's earth, and they're all in, and all of a sudden, we're just part of a marble, we're only aliens out there playing pool or we're in some locker and a train station somewhere, who knows, man who knows. I think that there is something inside of us. We're deep calls unto deep, and we are longing for answers and this, this desire to be eternal beings. You know, one day we should this mobile home this suitcase, if you will, and unpack all the stuff that's inside of us who knows. No hope you're right. Maybe we've been living the same three weeks for all of turn ity, and we're still in the same bed mood. Think about. But have you heard the theory that we're living in a simulation? Are you familiar with that? Well, it's the matrix, basically, I read this fascinating story, the other day where it was talking about how. We don't presently have quantum computing, and I don't fully understand what quantum computing is. But my my understanding now is that, like Trump plant forty chess little deeper. Yes. No, that is that is it exact exact one hundred percent one two ratio that nasty that I like. Because right now you've got with, with binary computers. It's one zero right with chronic computing. It could be one and zero or zero zero I apparently, it's far more complicated. What becomes is that, that type of thing or well, it's basically, if you read a headline that says, quantum computing has been invented at that point, you can infer that the computers, way faster, and has way, more memory than what we have in the real headline. You get a pit tension if you ever see a headline that says replica of earth made in simulation with quantum computing there, there it wouldn't be difficult. If you, if you made a, like a replica of earth you could plug into in VR, and you couldn't tell the difference right? You could make like a thousand of those, and it would make a difference within quantum computing. Because you've got that, that amount of space, and of processing power, and that point, if you like if there's a thousand fake earth's in a real earth. And there's just one real earth. What's the probability that I'm in the real ones pretty low? Right. So have you ever read that headline just assume that you're living in a simulation and? Have fun. Well, so you have movies that come out such as ready player one, which I like that's not my language. I don't understand this where these people plug into a game world and they go in and there's been these different movies that have come out, you know, everything from total recall to going back to Scharzenegger. I mean, and there's all these movies about what if we're plugged into some kind of system. And you look at these things. The thing that worries me is not. Is that a reality? Or is it even perceive reality? It's that people are thinking this way, and they want to pursue it like what is so wrong with the reality of your life, that you need to now exit that and live in a perceived reality? That's not real. So now if I'm fat guy that sits on a couch and only wants to watch, you know, reruns of Seinfeld, and eat popcorn leftover pizza, but I wanna plug in my VR, and I wanna go into that world and be, you know, a guy who's now having virtual sex with penthouse models is what I'm saying. It's the fact that we've gotten to a place where now we wanna make that real. When I wanna buy a robot wife, who come in, and be my sex slave and win. I'm happy to live with latex and lubrication for the rest of my life. That's, that's the problem that I have is that now we've exchanged the real for the perceived and that's not love. That's not affection. It's not sex. It's not what we were designed for. And that's the thing. So so again to your point, it doesn't it's one thing to say, well, these things are imagine. But the fact that these days were pursuing them is scary to me. God aside. Yeah. Spiritualism aside the fact that we as human beings are pursuing those things. Do you think that's a good thing or a bad thing? I mean you're single men many robots you got. As many as soon as I get a mortgage in my second one. No, I take a robot wife real quick. I think there's something to. There's something to trying to be present in the moment. Like I, I rather like Buddhism. I think Buddhism's a really cool philosophy and trying to be in peace with and okay with the world you're in, I think. A significant amount of suffering that we've got in this life is just people want stuff to stay how it is. And it doesn't it changes. And then another problem, we've got is we, we have an idea of what the idealized version of life would be. And we don't have that like to go back to dogs, like, so I volunteered, the, the animal shelter here in Dallas and like dogs don't have a sense of what if they don't have that? Right. So if you see like a lab, and walking this blind dog recently, the dog clearly is not thinking, gosh, I wish I could see it's just thrilled to be out on a walk. It's reality. And then, like, if I'm not done this. But if you see like a dog in a wheelchair they're thrilled. They've got a wheelchair. They're really happy because they're, they're not trying to project that, like, oh if only I had type thing. So I'd say escapism is probably bad and harmful for you. Yeah. Yeah. All right, man. We sit here and talk about this all day long. We really could because this is because you brought up a word. You said the word philosophy like you said, Buddhism, I like that as a philosophy philosophy. It's great like this idea that I can be one with the universe. That, that, that. Cockroach that runs across the floor might be my aunt Susie. You know, I don't wanna step on that cockroach because, you know, but again, it's a philosophy where people in India for years have been starving, because they won't you know, they won't kill the rats that he'd all the grain on the trains. And so now they're starving, because they're not gonna kill the rats and they won't kill the cows because again, that might be aunt Susie. So because again, it's all one with the universe. So I that's again, that's my reality versus perceived reality, as velocity is great until that philosophy falls in on itself. So is one of those perceived things like. To clarify most of India's, Hindu there, there are there is Buddhism rights, Hindu, it will get in your right. I jumped tracks on that, because that is Hinduism, which Hinduism is that, that's an element. That's, that's a whole other philosophy. You're right. Exactly on that. But we with with with Buddhism. I mean I like we're, we're we're split on Buddhism as I don't buy the metaphysical elements of it. Right. So they're like, I I've been to a bunch of Buddhist classes, fat and happy. Yes. Cricket you? I'll tell you what happy. I don't even care. You want her to be fat and says, all wanna read this avert like. I like to I think I think they're onto something with life is stressful. And you can you can avoid the stress by kind of letting things go and not fixating on things that are going to change. Anyway. I think there's something to. But I, I view more more like a psychological practice. When you get into all that stuff about pass lives and things like that. I think that's kind of a red herring. I almost think it's like like if you were really depressed right now, and you really got into genealogy it's like deal with the thing, that's bothering you. Right. So like, like to make a point. If the if the if the metaphysical side of it becomes this kind of alternate reality for you. I don't think that's helpful. But the basic tools of it, I think are really good. All right. There you go. Go read the bug of Gita. That's Hindu, too. I wanna Hindu see, that's the thing like Hindus Buddhists you only read books it is. You know, you just read books, you'd be fat and sassy, fat and happy. No shave your head BA fat and happy. And just you know every now and then you ring a Bill. In subsequent episodes. We didn't mention the fact but I came in and like a big saffron robe. Shaver the head thing might work better than this better than the frigging man romper. We were talking about earlier agreed on a plane. The other day, the guy was reading the bag of I the whatever it is. I don't know. I'm like, who reads this stuff? Here's a white dude about entail. You looking for fun with all Aji from me, being the secular perspective. If you if you don't buy any of it. It's got a lot of cool stuff in it. There's a monkey God. There's a lie. Arms. Medusa makes a cameo. Seena they fight. That's funny. All right. Well, hey, we're going to go have another drink. Something's off the injure heating at mighty Heaton on Twitter and on Instagram things you find out come check at the comfortable book, I defy everyone out there heavy big old, Drake. Get you some whiskey poops whatever you wanna call them. Did you know that your body you don't p out alcohol? You don't pay out alcohol UP out all the liquids, but alcohol, that's what your, your liver cannot filter, alcohol, it has to become solid waste. She which two things there's two -plication that one why ain't get the whiskey and too. That's why drunk drunkenness, sneaks up on you because it has to get to your colon, because it gets there almost as a solid matter. And that is where your system most absorbs the alcohol, and that folks is why you should be watching high balls with Heaton.

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EP 070 - Musician - The Substance of Bluegrass with Andy Sitze

Get A Grip On Life

47:43 min | 1 year ago

EP 070 - Musician - The Substance of Bluegrass with Andy Sitze

"Welcome back folks to get a grip on life podcasts. On today's show. I have andy sites of the flat river band or talk a little bit about music. The music business where music is going these. Today's but before we do that. I WanNa tell you a little bit about a special place up here in Toronto Canada CALCUTA Group Studios. What's get a grip studios while it's a fully virtual studio and we can produce sure podcasts? At a really low price. So if you've ever thought about producing a podcast and digital media digital video media or anything like that go to get a grip studios dot com. I ain't gonNA spell it for you son. Just go to get a GRIP STUDIOS DOT COM. Check it out folks. You'll andy what's up man. Ed thanks so much for having me today. No it's my pleasure man so tell me a little bit about how the Flat River Band came together. And I know you're trio and I know your your brothers but let's go a little deeper I. We're going to go so it all started back years ago. We have a we. I grew up in a family with grass will ban so when I say a family. Bluegrass Gospel Ban. I mean grandma played the Upright Bass. GRANDPA typically. The Dobro. Mama Sang Daddy Play Guitar. A brother played banjo my other brother. Clyde mainland it's just a full-on along Bluegrass Legit Bluegrass Gospel payment. Holly Hallelujah brother Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah absolutely absolutely absolutely so anyway. It started years ago in my grandfather. He took my two brothers to to get lessons from blind actually a blind instructor which was so cool which are really are He he took them. I was a little younger than night worse so I didn't start out as as early as they did But they they started out. A brother learned Banjo. Mother brother learned at any JOE. He learned to play mainland. My grandfather started taking us boys to Bluegrass festivals. So we would stay up all night long. They would they would jam and I and go different campfires and play music me on the other hand if I ever went with him because I was a little younger than them where I would probably go out and play tags that you you just can't beat those great night's that's how it all originated from there that's from and then from there we I guess you'd say the the the brother started getting a little better at their instruments and we we started a bluegrass aspel ban called the sites family which also had my grandfather and my grandmother in involved and we play many years at say theme parks like Silver Dollar City in Branson Missouri or Dollywood there pigeon orch which was A. What's one heck of experience? Where are you now right now? I am currently in Nashville Tennessee. Did you how did you grind. You know I didn't. I grew up in Missouri Southeast Missouri in a little town called Frederick Town Missouri. I grew up there. In Frederick town is that some Canadian so that's south of the Mason Dixon Line so you're a southerner a southerner southern accent accent gone so the flavor of this kind of music this this Bluegrass Gospel is it. A regional thing to the south of the US. I think it you know it. I think it kind of is I don't know bluegrass music though. Has You know it's just a wind but Bluegrass Gospel. I would say it probably is a regional thing that is the gospel part of it. Maybe maybe originated. Maybe what we call the last night. The Bible Bell Bible Belt Area. Possibly you know what I mean for from Gospel stuff. I don't know if I could give all the credit to the Bible belt but but nonetheless that's kind of the background of that but I I always find that a type of music comes from the soul of the people in a way there. You go right motown you know. That's that's a that there's something coming out of that from a region there's a there's a voice there's a movement there right absolutely what what is what is the. What is the source of this music? What is it? What part of the culture does it come from? Well as far as the culture you know I would say that. It goes back many many many years ago. But as far as the bluegrass portion what I can relate to is more so of earlier years like Bill Monroe and stuff like that people that are that are really is the father of bluegrass music. Which is which is Bill Monroe? That's kind of WHO I. I'm able to relight relate with really as far as meeting all bluegrass. Bluegrass Gospel Music from there At I you know I kind of skipped around a little bit as far as our or I didn't finish. Are you ready to go to that point yet. We were the brothers As size family as we started touring we started touring around the United States. You know we churches fairs and stuff like that. which was really cool? A lot like I said a lot of experiences from there from that point Probably about twelve eight eight to eight to ten years ago we started off into other areas of music where we would say not necessarily mentoring way out of it. But I guess you'd say are musical influences also expanded you know what I mean to expand it. And we brought right in other other other influences in our brain here as well as far as our influences goes in that kind of progress in what is called a progressive bluegrass so that progressive bluegrass in that style of Bluegrass. Bluegrass not traditional or so say people like bluegrass band. Maybe your web maybe some new grass replied. I don't know if you've ever heard of Mr not a new the BLUEGRASS. I'm new to this man guy I okay. So new grass revival Some of the remembers includes say Sam Bush. John let me ask you this. Let me ask you this from a Canadian boy up here in Candida. What would be the difference between sort of country and western and bluegrass country Western and bluegrass? Wow I don't know if I can really describe that country Western and BLUEGRASS. Let's not yeah well to be honest with you. I think country is kind of trended are in different areas. Yawn as far as your western Western I think it's probably a lot more traditional. Obviously not your Western music. Some of it may have a little bit of swings means launch in your your country Your country is It just depends whether traditional country or it's the new country or new country new countries very corporate it's like a strategy create gate music for the masses lax lacks a sense of authenticity to it. There's a couple people out there. I think that I that I would. I would like but you know. There's there's a you can see a corporate strategy a new country and how to create an artist in that I think it kind of I don't know if it's turnoff is the right word but it seems Kinda. It's it's become a form of Pop music if that Roy seats and so I'm just trying to from an outside. I'm trying to find UAE before we get deeper into the the flat river band. Because you haven't told me how that came about. Yeah what what what why people should be interested in in this. Bluegrass Aggress Gospel Music. Okay walk as far as our our our sound. Now it's not. We have some Gospel in our in our in our sound but we ventured from Bluegrass Gospel to country. Americana in the reason why the hell have I know ride. It's crazy. I wrote a story. So what the reason why we ventured into this area is because the tree now so mission the size family off. If we went from the science family as little kids in the three brothers we ventured into other areas as we got other influences wall. I said so. We ventured it into were. Were were now fill like we arrest are sound and to what we are today which is country Americana and I say that because our sound is completely it's completely different than what it was with. The SEINFELD is nothing nothing bad or or or or. I'm not saying that the bad about I'm just saying as as we get older and as things happen the three brothers because of our influences also does does that make sense yes musicians journeyman People go on a journey. I've interviewed a bunch of musicians dishes on on on this show. And what they all tell me. Is that the music is like the reflection of the the It's it's like the rhythm of their life and their experiences as they go through life they pick up different experiences which then become reflected in new sounds and new beats a new rhythms. And it sounds like you're on that same journey with your brothers. We are we we we were on the journey. I feel and we're still on the journey Oranje up but I'm just giving you the background. Yeah we flat Rabanne Country Americana Tree for Ten Years Yonsei. Ours'll it start to finish. You know like he asks you as far as how you're up in the what makes flat Rabanne who we are now is is our background. We can't deny we have some bluegrass roots in in our sound. I think that bluegrass refer not very far offer at. I mean we. We veered off of the we still have that. Ns It's in our veins. A having that in a course not bashful in preachy on you but also ah are Norden Seder all right which we bat and him and in our background influenced. That's what makes flat the band is today and I'm a Christian. I'm a Christian. I welcome that man. So don't worry about that. Awesome than that is great. That's good enough but I am. The heat is is is he. He is originally our today in in. God makes our sound of who we are. Today we are completed him. I'll I just say that. So from the science family to flat rubber band now is is what makes our sound. We didn't veer off too far. Is You know what I'm saying it. It's in vain. You can't deny now. Don't get me wrong. You can't probably play a flatten shrugged or some traditional bluegrass song. Right now Mainstream minagall rely by awesome in that but We Love Bluegrass music of the we. We do love it. But we've that makes a gleiberman out our country. We brought that in. We brought that into into our mainstream mainstream. What we feel is more mainstream? Shame sure somebody you know. It's interesting Mo music is to me is about two things it's either Worshiping God it's about love right and Mo- most good music whether how far back you go. It's either one of those two themes and the further back. You go the more is it is about. Oh God or it's about the struggle or also there's like the struggle of life in there too like the struggle which is kind of like a spiritual theme as well so it was like a spiritual side of music or worship side of music where people are are expressing their wonder at the universe or they're they're they're exercising feelings of affection or feelings of loss through Music Zik anyway and I always like to explore that a little bit with with musicians. What is the source of of your inspiration? So when you when you're writing a song song andy or your brothers you're sitting around. What what are you thinking you know? We need to put out a new album. OR WE'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA create a new song. What's the process? Says that goes into that. Well the process to go into that sometimes you know arm are honestly the main writer Holly Mike. My brothers right more more of our stuff. I do a lot of cooperating with him. I wrote a few songs. I do more Brothers right Mo- mo- majority of our songs but I will say as are as are co-writes go sometimes. Somebody brings an idea to the with a lot of times we find out that You know the idea comes from in the idea comes from a higher power. Just clicks like this is unexplained was like. You've got to write the idea. They're actually forget it. You know walks in it all starts with an idea of good winner of add one union saying match But but and as far as our music goes you know that you mentioned something about love the background what we've learned over the years its intention. What is our intent? We always questioned ourselves Wheat we have before in the past is what is somebody's intentions. Tensions alterior mogul. There can't be all through your mobile. It's our intent of our heart in one thing we learn as as Christie is is we've learned that there is not just our actions which help I'm K- it's our intent and God looks at the heart and it's our intention of a heart in what we set after. Did only only God knows your intentions man. That's that's exactly right that's exactly completely right. So that's why we questioned ourself. You know what I'm saying with is is is. What is our intent? It's our intent. Our intentions of our heart in only God knows the heart to Uh we have ill intentions or bitterness in our heart toward somebody. We're prime believers that that it affects you securitise. It does for sure. That's that's what they that's what the story of Cain and Abel is about absolutely wonder percent. You know what's interesting about the word intentions so he said intention or intentions. I always there's another song I think it starts off with. It's hard to rely on your good intentions. But but they it's interesting because often when I'm conversing with people and let's say somebody let's say somebody injures you in some way Andy and and You're you're bringing it up as a point in a conflict resolution scenario okay and they say to you well. That wasn't my intention okay. I'm immediately suspicious of that and I'll tell you why and I'm not saying that I I'll tell you why because I've never heard I've never been hurt by someone or injured by someone and have them say to me. That was my intention night. It's always not their intention right and so we the word intention is so often used to disguise malevolence you know when under injure one hundred percent you know and the way you spoke about it. It's like no no no. We're looking into our own intentions with God and we're trying to reflect that through through our music. Is that correct. I have that correct. That is one hundred percent correct hon. Do that's wonderful. That's one hundred percent correct and that is that is true in in in. I'm not just saying this is the is it as a tidbit long or anything like that with the three of us literally have had many manny hours. You can only imagine we're brothers Yanni so we were able to discuss them. Stop that maybe. Perhaps some people wouldn't be able to an event that anyway we've we've discussed many hours And of course this is just growing fiercely as well as as many hours as far as our intentions are and stuff like that and how important is because what we found out what we learn is. It's not just about a cool. They don't get me wrong. A Music Greg with great the Great Signature Right Signature Guitar. Riff it's awesome is co however it's more than that. It's about what we feel. You know it's about your intentions of that song. We want to encourage people to keep pressing on. We want encourage people to let the low. Hey there's hope coronet you know what I'm saying. Yeah for sure. There's hope another day and not only that we hope our songs reflect on more shall the painting something with substance versus the colby in a cool little I don't know to you know I totally get. And so you're you're trying to say something with your music. You're trying to send a message with your music. One hundred percent we try not to get too We do have some crossover stuff. We have some Gospel songs in. We'll have a gospel song in there and we'll we may have you know like on the slash project. We had a gospel song or took action. Say It's a I mean it is. It is possible song. We have a bluegrass on there. We try to let the lurch urge they for themselves versus ourselves. Our emotions as far as Getting from that makes sense. Allow we WANNA just tell the story with the music in lettuce. Speak to the person how close to speak to. Who writes the lyrics while it's mainly it we've had co writes on this last on this last project? We did Jed wrote a lot of the lot of the songs on this last one from ACA product general songs that we did a coal ride on one in general wrote another one called no. I'm listen I don't have seen action more prepared. That's okay no you're minutes it's a conversation. Let me you you guys so you know I kinda take this with what I'm interested in and so we live in interesting times. Andy Andy you know the situation I find so many people or it seems like so many people are at odds with one another other like to the point where they can't even converse with one another anymore. You can't sit in the same room you know the people are. The relationships are so toxic that get to politics and social issues that we have right now and I feel like you. Music can be a remedy to that music. It can bring people together one hundred percent. I completely agree A.. And that's kind of what I was talking to. We try not to personally get it. Get in front of some lyrics or or or anything like that. Because you know there's want the our songs speak to people how one how how Lord wants to receive it for sure not to get too political What would you try to? We are best not to do you know this year that we're all about love a similar one brothers were about. I Love Whereabouts Spreading the love. That's about and that's what we try to write songs about this. What we try to play songs about is encouraging people and Chongqing love? Because it's definitely needed it's needed is needed. You know what's funny is that so. Many people are living their lives every day lacking basic encouragement of a friend or family member so many people dude it sat. Yeah no you're right. You're exactly right. It is that in and I think as much as I love because without technology we wouldn't be able to do what we're doing right now alibi. Restaurant trading is so. It's a real thing in. I guess is really how we use it. You know what I'm saying. Are we using our technology to the good old into the better of Of Our culture an impression forward enlivening urges. Are We Erin people now with you. You know what I'm saying. I think it's you know you could say that backwards. You could say it's between whether we're using it or it is using US exactly exactly. Yeah I think that's a that's an important way to look at social media. I think in some senses a lot of people are being used by social media and captured by social media to be pushed to extreme parts. It's of their personality. Bitterness darkness anger at something. That really doesn't exist. This is why I love the podcast medium. Because I'll sit down with somebody that supposedly completely disagrees with everything I say and supposedly I completely disagree with everything they say but once we sit down with one another and we share the same air the same space the same photons or whatever it is a lot of a lot of anger and misunderstanding starts to evaporate as we see one another's facial expressions as we as we come to find common common ground with one another like. Oh I like this. The music is such a great place for that. Because oh I like this song. I like that song or whatever and I've always found that one of the great pleasures in life. Food is one of them. The music is another one and I found that when you open your hearts to New People one of the things will share with you is music the music that they like or or they'll play emusic for you and it's such a wonderful part of being human. Yeah Yeah Yeah definitely definitely true so for And it seemed like that has become Really almost like a almost therapy or able to. Yeah for sure. Sure absolutely so tell me about some. I see some of the big names that you guys have opened for here the Dixie. I see chicks Ricky skaggs. What's that like in? Is it really exciting to be on stage with those kinds of names. You Know I. It was really cool. We played played at a festival in. It's been years In in Kentucky with Ricky skaggs is thousands of images as you. So it's really sometimes you gotta sometimes you. You have to remind yourself you know. Hey we're all human. You know what I'm saying. But as far as as far as the dixie chicks might my brothers speak on room follows a really anri brothers it was. I could really talk bad about. Not your are my two brothers. You're going to hear me say my two brothers a lot I will today but my brothers they went to school with. which is the dixie chicks? Sure I went to Carl. It went to college with our matter of fact they had a blues band with her. Okay that they did in college many years ago It was funny today is of course you know. We also had a bluegrass fan and I think matter of fact she used to Ronnie. Is this years ago to on a per client bluegrass. The dixie chicks they were they were in country. They Kinda were known as more of a Bluegrass bluegrass. Not Yours. Zan Freak out but like I said we're all human we were on game midden. It's neat but You know realizing that they put the ants on the same way as we do our waistlines maybe a little bigger the man cool cool so do you guys when you guys do you have a following you know we do. We have a following. He just we haven't we hadn't been playing out a whole lot. We'd actually been China this Wyndham playing out of the what we call a smoke. It's it's a break Middle Acoustic Actions Security is former laidback venue We played smoke asses Amani Tennessee. We played there about once a month Last year her And that's how were we The planet here erasing. We're kind of backing off just a little bit. Because there's there's other places that were playing a lot more than next year in different other areas We were playing in other areas across across the the The US but it Kinda had slowed up just a little bit probably in two thousand fifteen but is picking back up again and I think that has to do with where the country country music the mainstream music man. You know what I'm saying Sir. Nice music ventured off. Aw from a traditional sense or or I shouldn't traditional sense to what what they call a row country. I should say bro Country Ask off what what I tell me. I'm not knocking it or or anything like that. It's just it's gone from. I don't I don't know what I don't Bro. Country is more main. I shouldn't even say mainstream. It's just a little bit more poppy. The pop music sure. Yeah country's gone pop a little bit. I agree with you on that totally. I'm so so this is not your so you're not a full time musician. You you have a day job that you work I do I work. Yeah I do work absolutely and how about your are you married I am I am married. I'm married I've got two little girls and I'm blessed nomination. So what's it like on the road. Though you bring your family with you you are do. Do they stay home. Jelly now typically not. We don't run the family's on the road typically You know usually what will end up. Dan is the guys will will leader. You get in the van or will get in the van load up in the van and head out. Aw or less us how it works drive it out driving. It's funny how many it's just the three of you in the banner. Do you have any the other non brothers now we got a Base lacquered Nice My brother plays a arm of the brother Plays Lead Guitar Mandolin. Then we bring out a drummer. Sometimes we'll bring out a utility guy another electric. Were still still be calm. Cool and you guys when you guys are going on the road you project your tour on your website and fans get excited and all that sort of stuff. Well we try. We try. We try to do that and we hope that they getting side. You know we try to interact as much as possible and even faceless wanted his become like I said about about the the we were talking about digital stuff which has been right in just depends on how you use it so it's been helpful. Music is has become which is good But it has become line what we say marketing sense music has become lack war so I guess it just depends depends on what flavor it is meaning. This music is free. Kenya on has become free as a marketing stain. Standpoint is fine on with the it has never been wire in his ars putting your music out there. There's so many people that play music and end. is really leveled the playing field independent artis. You know what I'm saying and level blank deal with say your major labels and stuff like that. Is it good for the music industry. While I don't know as far as I guess it just depends on what part of the industry resented if you're referring to say the the mainstream music industry decisions and the people who consume music. That's what probably is probably for them but of musicians in your independent artists in your New People that listen to music that the consumer or is good for them because it introducing them to more of a More music non saying more more different thousand music Years for years you know the against mainstream has really kind of controlled. What was out there so Tom Is definitely open. The door to a lot of different people and nothing against mainstream more independence arraigning calmer attack. Yeah for sure I mean the the state. It's interesting because you know if Sony music goes away the music doesn't go away right there. I found this when I was reading your bio. I found this really interesting because the way it's written is like that. You know someone when I'm Canadian should should know this. It's okay you know the Aaron mackerras. Okay who owns own your this in one thousand nine hundred thirty-four Gibson are be three now. Obviously that's a thing that people are interested in right. Yeah if you're a Banjo uh-huh guy you want to see that you're gonna WanNa see that. Nineteen thirty four Gibson. Our beat three. Like that's an attraction. Right I see where you're going this I got you. Yeah so like. Is that like part of the attraction to people are people like interested in seeing You guys you know wail on that Gibson rb three from nineteen thirty four. Well that was obviously placed in there for people. Say You Either follow bluegrass music. Or they know or they or they know who Eric Garissa sure how people who know who Eric. Garris is he plays with Rhonda Vincent which is pretty much the Kwena blue grass Plan her album the reason why I mentioned that RV The reason why that was mentioned is because that was the same Banjo in it may say in there. That was the same same Banjul that was played on a Sunny Osborne. I'm Lou was Rocky rocky top yet rocky. Top the University of Tennessee's theme song. And so these are. These are known people in the BLUEGRASS history of history of bluegrass grasp. Why would that? Why would that particular piece of musical instrument e so important to the fans of Bluegrass in most people with bluegrass? What we what I found out growing up in bluegrass music in? They have a They bluegrass is really a substance style is again isn't nothing negative on other showers but it's really So there's a story line there and so when their stories or more people are really interested in the story. Line background. Orange stuff in There's a sense of Of kind of respect for some of these people that blocked this music to the forefront was so that's where that's where I think that this is a uniquely American cultural phenomenon. We're looking at here. There's something to that you know. Roots of it are very very deep certain regions of the United States. That people are that. You're you're looking at the you're looking at the artistic expression of people in a sense in a certain region or area of the US you you know that is being expressed music. I tell me Oh tell me a little bit about the where is it here. I'm just looking at my notes here with that The the the album is in another world. It's actually codeless is is called every dog has its day okay so the but that persona returned to haul in another world is. That's a song on the album. Okay are you referring to the saw the album. Oh here we go walking longer. Written John is covering by us in John. Scott Sherrill. I don't know if you're familiar with his is winding he wrote. Say Hurricana Cumberland Road and do you remember that Shannon dougher. Do you remember that Song Ideal. Elton John I told you that I I'm out of this group. I'm totally from another universe. We're talking catching out among federal road on Daca learn on there too. Yep I listened to that one for a little bit beforehand before I came on Youtube and I I yeah. I listened to that one before I came on the interview here. You're talking about on third. No I'm talking. I'm just like I listened to the the John. Scott Sarah Song some fools just to get get a feel for the music talking. Yeah we're we're but where does that album. Every dog has his day. Where how did that come about? How old is it okay that that isn't branded? That is our that is our latest and and I mean near really really excited about it. I think an elephant in Aqaba as you as you go through music ended the or obviously learning ears different things so I would say this is probably our best mess our yet more excited about it. We're gots ritual really cool reviews on the project check in we can this get. Every dog has a little bit different than what we have and I say that then then I guess we're talking about of off about the airport in in in Wurley. Less are focused on his ajit. were making sure that arm were Warren wrong. Aw Yeah what was your intent. While not stated now that he wasn't because they were aren't aren't on this one here stew again Wants to encourage people to keep pressing board and you know our intentions that. That's that's our intentions on that last month and that's just like every dog has his day. You know I I may stem motto you in many hints your finger with a Hammer. Now that that He's in control in control. Keep pressing over and I. I started Monday off today. Speaking to mine eight-year-old. She's a little girl we were talking in. We were talk just about Out believe it or not and yes I do have conversations with my eight year olds thinking about I finally found l.. Somebody I can relate to. It's my eight year old so we were talking about earlier this morning. This is about time Smiley Smiley face and our intentions and what we set out to do this one here. The three of us. We just wanted to make sure we have on the previous ones I. This one's different than once before is just because we recorded different. If that makes sense in our in our intentions we wanted to make sure that it was obviously in line like the ones that this the reason why this is different because we recorded a little differently than what we did previous ones previously. Obviously what we would do is we will take a lead vocal. Run it through two. Come through run my vote will through inlet come. The other brother would come through this time. Here what we did is we did it all at one time. Not Around one might not all different times may have done what Mike some your ad libs and stuff on this particular time here on this particular album. Here we wait. We sound the songs all at wants. So we had in. There was a line. We would come back through and try to sing again because the reason why we did that is. We tried to tax her. Sure that ally approach Celso in in it's so difficult to caption that In other other ways like you said earlier it's not make Across so mainstream saying that it can produce music and sound overproduce overproduce. Actually can I think that Some of the my favorite music listened to now you can tell that they sat down on me with your instruments. Maybe they did through four ten twenty one hundred takes but when they sung the song they sung the song. You know what I'm saying. I think there's something something to that that is lacking when you're producing it after in a studio and mixing it together and trying to get it right. I think it loses an an element of authenticity in that in that sense so you produced this album as if it were alive show one hundred percent and you hit the nail right on the head you do lose. You tend to lose some I th. I think you do lose some authenticity of that and I believe that's why some of these people that are are poaching. Some songs online at Moves People's is big love that authenticity not only that because they can relate to short and I know too and there is no facade apple a narrow heading the same way but mine and they relate to do that Ursel Sanela Song. There's a sense of authenticity and their meaning. What they sing? It's not a song even though by this. This person this person saying the sound with again not not Bashing anybody in particular you know what I'm saying but I'm just saying we're speaking of authenticity in speaking about I think that authenticity to you'll find that were in Incheon. May Be in there somewhere as well. Sure saying what you know. What's interesting to me? Is that A lot of independent artists speak to that that same the word it is. If it's an idea or a concept that you're talking about they speak to it maybe speak to it. From a different directionally use different words you use intention and authenticity and you know come in some people would say it's coming from their hearts or it's from their soul or all these types of things. Why why is it that pop pop music is so popular? Then if it's yeah I I don't know what that is. Why is it so popular definitely not saying saying that pop? Music doesn't There isn't some that doesn't have heart or doesn't have so I'm definitely not saying that at all matter of fact when I say ah I think what. I'm saying that I'm not saying that. Everybody every songs like that. I'm not saying. Did you know that. Not Every independent song is from authentic placer from their heart and not every pop song is authentic. Yeah I agree with you but you know I think I believe in too good. I believe there's a good lead on on it and honestly there's a and I say that that that's why I say we need tribes. Just make the wrong beat great right. The line of Great Signature Lip will be guitar. Weird whatever that's awesome with all you get all of them to all the other that makes working tails off but we have nowadays in our range drink. Is We have a cool guitarist. In a cold beat non saying in that Tissot intention I dunno it just seems either one or two things either not authentic or so oversold zones overproduced. Yarns aren't sandwich. Makes that not real inviting you know. Yeah is your is your intention to become a full time musician. Is that that what you want to have happened. Yeah great that'd be fantastic. Maybe it would be a wouldn't now. Well maybe it would be a really hard life on the road every you know. Why do you know the way we played why I said as far as a whole all time? We haven't done the done X.. Flat Rubber Band we have done is full now was sites family. You know we've had we've done thirteen bluegrass salons Years ago and You know we've had the buses. We did the tour buses. We Rep here buses. We've done all that all that it but you're probably right you're not I. I don't know I think really the three of this probably would live. We would love to this saying sure I think a lot of that comes from two. We talked about earlier. Is Ours hard. Desire Arbizu is encouraged people that she pressing for them. I hope somebody's listening today. You know what I'm saying that what was the day I hope we. I'm encouraged them where you are. Whatever that's that's our intention in this life? And he cites encouraged me today to keep pressing forward they offer outnumber. Where can people find your music if they wanna get taste absolutely to platte river band dot Com? You can go to. You can just type in flat remember ban on Youtube. You're going to be able to hear bear to. You've got a video to up. There are Fisher. Music video for every dot has stay which was so cool because it it premiered on billboard which is also F- Eh. Yeah we're so blessed in arms that The the music they are audio version premiered in Billboard magazine in the The Video Mir talk premiered in Cabot Indians magazine but anyway the the the playroom dot COM platte river music as ours on facebook. We tried to go to all flat rubber band on a slips. We're we're trying to in Latin music. I believe on instagram. We try to do all social. Media's invalid in ourself opt to Keep up of that you know we want to interact with people In we We are so we try to on. Yeah it's fun so folks if you're listening to this right now and you want to find out more about the flat river band and all the links will be on the website get a grip on life dot com. We're GONNA linked to all their stuff there and you can click on instagram twitter. FACEBOOK flat Rabanne dot common will all be there and I'm GonNa say thank you to andy sites for spending some time with me today encouraging me to carry on to move forward. That's an important message in life if any thank you for being a guest shade it folks if you enjoyed this. There's other episodes on the ghetto grip on life dot com website. Check it out all crazy topics. I'm all over the place but I love musicians the most. Actually I love interviewing them my favorite. But have you ever thought of starting podcast. Hey Go to get studios dot com fully virtual income down here in Toronto in Toronto. And come down here if not you can do it. Virtually over the Internet have you heard of it. Yeah it's a new thing called the Internet can do it almost be in the same room like Andy and I just were but most importantly if you listen to this and you've come this far. I'm very grateful. Thank you for listening all the best.

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Episode 452: Bonus - Chris Hillman (of the Byrds)

RiYL

25:47 min | 3 months ago

Episode 452: Bonus - Chris Hillman (of the Byrds)

"That's kind of weird thing aging rock stars do i. I really don't or or or celebrities. I'm not celebrity burn. I never looked at it like that. Chris started because it wasn't it wasn't that active at that point. And i just remembered things i really was overly ambitious. I was gonna write to volumes. One was about growing up in the nineteen fifties and then go into the music became very lengthy. I had a manuscript done started working on seven years but it was done after two or three. And i just had it on the shelf and i finally said to my wife. I said maybe we should find an agency of somebody's interested in publishing it. Otherwise i'll just give it to the kids and the grandkids and at that same moment scott bomar. Bmg had heard. I was writing a memoir calls. Me is can i read some s. Send you a couple of chapters. He'd got right back and he said let's talk and he wanted to publish it and blessing said to me was we don't need co-writer that made my whole day. You know i'm not ernest. Hemingway but you know then you feel so off we went and then i sat down proceeded to rewrite it and trim it Pertinent facts connie. My wife was great editor. She come back and say this thing about this session. The flying number one. What song did you cut once. Don't right about that. I said you're right right about the song who played on it. Missile matt scott. Bomar was a great editor. He he has idea to open the whole story. The house fire. You know where we get that fire so that was the motivation. Why is the house. Fire the right place to open it. I think he looked at as looking at it. As a flashback. He opens up. This is. it's two thousand seventeen already on the road promoting my album. I did with tom. Petty biden mitalent in nashville in october. Tom is not in nationally. Died i find out about stroke. Quite hart was come back tours over. I'm out on my birthday. On december fourth two thousand seventeen and then my son law is a fireman gets a call. There's a fire starting up down. Another town All anyway that's the point. Fire was a huge firestorm. Seventy five mile are almost took out the city of ventura real close so scott opens the story with that and go back into a flashback which i liked because it sort of caught the readers. Reader's attention sounded. Like when you percent ouden started working on this as you said it's it may be set on shelf for a little while but it sounded like that would have been fine with you if you had just written it and if you know your immediate family was the only one who actually got a chance to read it as i say i wasn't jumping into a new career s A young hemingway. Or or william faulkner by any means nor could i be claimed to do something else they did. But hey it's that book is amazed me. I never anticipated a well as done in a second printing up after two months in. Its second in never anticipate that so it was great so many people have contacted me relate to that period of time in their life for close to my age or my age of out really good. It was a post world war two in america. Most things were really good. We had a really strong situation. Ike was in office. Nineteen has the third grade. I mean it was a good time to grow up in the states. Not the sameness going on right now. Did you find it to be a useful exercise on a personal level obviously stuck to it for awhile. No it was great after. It was what i thought was done. I remember something. I completely forgot to mention a doing this photo. Session with bill monroe. And then i put it in there under the caption of the photo and that was such a funny day. 'cause bill where we were singing together and i missed the lyric smacks me on the legs so fun like like my hero whose approval for my hero but yeah it was very cathartic minority come to grips with my dad's death and after having years of anger about that name was a really good guy wasn't like we haven't had an abusive father who killed got a great dad toss all will and i was very upset when he died for a long time and angry as we're side can do family and then i forgave finding one day i realized he was having a horrible issues in his life personally the way he chose. I forgave him. Life started to open up for me but it wasn't hard for me to go there. Describe him going to a hotel and taking sleeping pills. I come to grips with it so all of that in other things that happened in looking back on it all when you start looking back at things and they're in a certain ordering your life i went almighty. I said connie my wife. I said how did i get through that. I had no money at eighteen years old. With the scroll barker's san diego living in tijuana a survived. I survived it. We survived when my dad died. Mother sits astonishes. We have no money. We're gonna move. We're going to move to la. We survived 'cause we said okay. We had no other options to yup. The subtext of this locust. Don't don't give up throw the ball in unless you really exhausted everything and you'll know at that point whether you should continue on that but otherwise show. You'll find this a sorry for the cliche. The road to success is paved with failure. Will it hits. And i love the story of michael jordan. Not making his high school basketball team fabulous. Look what he did. It's one of those things when you look back on your life and everything that felt like an eternity or the end of the world but hindsight you broke through at a really young age. And you're a veteran of the industry at a really young age. You know you're early to mid twenties. I assume that reflecting on it. Perhaps those villiers start to feel less substantial were removed. You are from that. Yeah but then again when you re looking back at birds in time in the birds our god. That was great. I mean i. I was a lucky kit. Did i got into that band. Gloved by way that i did play could play the bass i think i took the first album to figure it out but but i i look back on the birds. I'm very close with roger mcglynn. Still we're very very close friends and david nighthawk to crosby. But what a great time and a great time in music the beatles come along nineteen sixty four basically healed our whole country after the kennedy assassination and they changed the music. They changed the culture fashion. And of course we started out like every other band emulating the beatles until we found our own signature style as we did. That was great time so we do that. In the book in context as things went along some of them were word as pleasants. The birds were sub type. Things like that. I would've done over. Of course we're all geniuses in hindsight does that also extend to be end of the birds. Well i mean is there. Is there regret or had it. Just run its course. I like i say i regret my exit from the burns was not a gentlemanly thing. I was very upset. It was just not happening. You see i got. I love graham. Parsons dearly and i forgave him. Probably seventy times seven to quote biblical but I really did. And he had. He had some talent but he wasted it. And it got to the point where we couldn't work together. But sometimes i look back go of a regret not taking more commanded of that situation readers but it didn't really matter that's all yesterday. It wasn't the only thing i did. I spent a year and a half inflamed reader brothers navy to in four grams In last was doomed from the beginning. So s downside I lost a lot of good guys. In two guys in the birth of who actually made it into their forties which i don't okay so weird thing to say but ram is at twenty seven and jimi hendrix had twenty seven a strange age for people i think he described the process of writing the book as in a sense being catharsis especially when it comes to dealing with the most difficult topics in your life like your father suicide somebody who did a blossom into a songwriter. Do you feel that your music has been able to be similar outlet for you. Oh you yeah. I mean right now if i was looking at the right this moment i'm not writing anything i'd probably will. Usually i would start writing when there was something a project to come along. Really get into writing songs miss. It was my outlet. Music saved my life really. I mean i was like i said earlier. I'd starving playing bluegrass which i loved playing mandolin. Scottsville scores eighteen years old. And when we got paid the first time you get paid to so your parents wonderful time and everybody you ten bucks. Couldn't believe we can paid to do this. Get paid to have fun and so yeah it was always thank god that music was there because i mean i was at an age where i was drafted two years in a row too. I would have been in vietnam if not dead but i was supporting my mom. My brother was already in the air force so I wasn't supposed to do that. I my heart goes out anybody that did have to but the music saved me. You mentioned that obviously huge sea change. That was the the beatles when it came to popular culture and the influence that had in the birds early on and you pointed this out in the past as well that you had had an interest in country music prior to the birds and the birds had done. Some country covers in some full covers. But really we talk about a shift in culture in terms of the popularity of country rock. People always to a one point. Two sweetheart of the rodeo. Do you feel that popular culture in the united states just wasn't ready for country rock up till that point. I don't know. I never thought of it that way. We had a huge country music In california because basically because of the mass migration in the thirties from the dust bowl and depression merle haggard bigger. Field started and buckle. it's coming out from texas and all that and in some ways Dwight yoakam stout On his radio show. It's quite quite studied in this. That was really doing country. Rock to i mean cutting rog was basically just a little more emphasis on backbeat and but wrote songs little bit different than real bucks songs for dancing. You're always up temple shovels you know and very similar to a country rock was where we took a song and we put just a little bit more back to a little more edge to it and you know i mean i had. I had to suffer through the birds being called folk rock before country rock. We went through the birds. New single is like oh god this is the best one raga rock. 'cause we have backwards guitar urge new singers jazz rocky miles. Okay everybody says it's lazy journalist. Turn blah blah rock. So i've learned to accept the term country. Rock sweet the rodeo. I think open the floodgates it and it was a good thing because it really. I mean. We went from there to the burrito brothers. Of course poco and then onward to the eagles who really carried it off quite well. I think they studied everybody else. Forgot what not to do but yeah it was a good time in basically just taking To three part harmony or backbeat if you wanted to analyze the term country rock. But now we're all under the umbrella of americana so it's okay. It's really what it is. Blues everything roots and we try to stay in a more certainly brothers tried to and develop out of a real love of roots music real country music and i must say the Brothers material in the first album is good grammar cooking on the riding sin city and all those songs and you know you you hit the mark with people. Cover your songs. It's the greatest compliment you could get as writer. Yeah you know you hit the mark of people covering songs. Also the hit the mark when bill monroe is telling you that you're doing a good job. That kind of validation goes a really long way. When you're starting a console. Me once digress. You're saying good well bucks way Get approval from one of your heroes. You know so. It was all great. I always had a good time. When i wasn't trying to be van. Morrison or bruce mentioned. I really wasn't good enough back in their early or late sixties. I learned how to sing. Better play better. I wasn't after that i was a fan player. I played i loved to play. Quintet quartet trio winter. I love being a musician. I bet he said tom petty's last interview. He says to this in los angeles times. Think chris like show business. I just don't think he liked eddie. Is your spot on. I didn't care about show business. I didn't care if i was in lizzy. He said chris christmas a real musician. He that's what he did really well. That was another great compliment. Come out and start writing songs in one of your first or at least first prominent songs is so you wanna be a rock and roll star. That was probably reflection of not. Just your feelings about the industry but your own place at having fun with it and that we just heard that on the radio before i started talking to you on petty's xm channel and a heartbreakers. Doing rock and roll star. Live great and they did it really good. But it's it's a funny lyric. It's like a here. We are a roger was about twenty four. I was about twenty two years old and we're writing about like we were old timers at been around the block fifty times but it was just a funny look at things. Do you feel at this point in your life that you're still learning when it comes to music. Oh god yeah on ever ever get you know. I've been wrestling with a managers almost sixty years. So i enjoy that. That's art at you. Get to where you just You know you start out as a musician emulating invading you start out playing lots of notes to send mccollum good i and then you get a little older and wiser and season and you play less notes and you play the melody and that's where you want to get to as a musician so yes i am learning and had some really good still in this day and i'm gentlemen asked away last year. Who was the guitarist in johnny carson's tonight show band. Bob bain was. His name was guitar player but he has to give me lessons jazz chords. I would never use that on stage but it was just fun to learn jazz. Cordial's complete need nudity. So but he was amazing musician. I know that you've been doing some teaching as well. I did for your coconuts for peace ranch. Couple years back. I had a great time and Most of my students were approximately forty. Five to seventy i had. I taught a class. You getting mandarin at songwriting. And i said to the first day. The first time i did it i said none of you are gonna be. I doubt if any of you're going to have a big career music. If you write a song at someone covers you win now. I may be wrong. I hope i am. But i want you all to remember something. Have fun with music. Whatever happens great. enjoy it. Embrace it and Wonderful people and the next time. I taught the all they all cut signed up and came back. So you're happy because already sold out my classes. But i had a good time. I love your mate. He said he's a good guy veteran. I got the sense that. Correct me. If i'm wrong but you were a reluctant frontman when it came to release sort of stepping out when it came to starting a band. That had your name on it. Is that something that you came to appreciate. While i was very shy. And i had. I might one of my dig regrets. Is i wish i had more confidence. But when gene clark opted to leave the birds. I was up in the front singing was i like i said earlier. Was i ready to front manner. Lead a band. no. I wasn't ready yet and and i i just enjoy doing and i had some great teachers as far as singing. David crosby Stephen stills so i learned out sing. I could sing. I could sing in tune when i went to learn how to really Put that vocal out with some meaning. And feeling i learned how to do that. And then by the time the desert rose band came along in nineteen eighty-four I did take over. Rita's after had to get graham kgo and we had turned the britos. darn good live last hour. We did last of the red hot. Rita's if you've never heard that you need to listen to that it's smoking okay. And so but then desert roseanne was where iran it Sang lead ran. The show ran the band and the first time we had a top ten country single. I actually did not believe it. I said this isn't close to happen. I'm the guy that plays in the backline and after that it just was gone and that was the longest. I've never been bands and eight years. And we're still france and when i do come to new york and play. I'll have john jorgenson and herb peterson. And i've been working with them over twenty five years since desert rose ban. I've known herb sixty years almost sixty years. So it's amazing thing and that's the joy of it all at the. I look back in on the career all that i was really blessed and very lucky. I had a great time i really get. I was very very lucky to have been able to do what i love to do. And go so go with as far as we go with. I talked to a lot of people in bands and and for the most part. I think they give me the same answer to this question that in order to really have a successful band there needs to be one person not necessarily run like a dictatorship but maybe to some degree who has the vision and who is sort of you know at least knows what direction to move things in and if you want to do it Analogy i mean it's like a slight. That's why the military is separate as you can't go out into a situation a dangerous combat situation everybody's leader one guy's got to see. Okay hold on. We're gonna do this from a city or you're the and yes. You can't be a dictator laying down for coney rules in the band. But you do have to put parameters which as i said earlier. I should have had more control the burritos. When it's with graham graham was a very strong guy had strong personality urge charming and very intelligent. And i love the guy while i should've roped in mandeville earlier. I should just rope. Demand literally add that last iran had been sent in taught him some behavior. Thanks because it got to where what happens in a band. I'm sure you've heard this one or another loses respect for the others or someone on the outside starts getting in their ear. When you don't need these people you can do this on your own. And that's what breaks up and so you look at the statistics. How many groups have stuck together. Stones negrete bans beach boys. brian. But i mean To bands nitty gritty dirt band in the rolling stones But yeah it's tough to thomson used to have a funny metaphor band is all four. Five members are holding paintbrush and painting the mona lisa. Smile trying to get to that. Where that's just what comes out and she can get there ones. You've felt there. Were just too many people in grams ear telling him that he was going to be star. I think the biggest problem with graham was said he had a yearly. Trust front of fifty five thousand dollars which was really as i did. Were found was a pittance to what he was really. Do they handle lot of money in that family. Fortune in. They robbed him a tennessee. Williams play the person's story but my point being is that graham never had to struggle everybody struggles in what they wanna do. You wanna be a writer. You want to be a singer actress. You're going to struggle for year two. If not more. But as i sent as i said earlier you keep going keep picking yourself up doing best how you learn how to do it. You develop the character now. You developed your art. That didn't have with graham because he always had that every january. Get that money The sad i mean you guys at twenty seven drug overdose so there was a sort of a doomsday thing about him and I tried emmylou harris tried and we could. We could save him. You know we turn an emmy told me she. She had fallen in love with him and but it didn't have a chance to tell him and he died before she could tell so when they were working together eating safari. The words being you roger. David is it. A case of especially with roger david of them. Both you know having gone out and had these careers and becomes having become stars at. It's just too difficult to kind of get egos into a room together to produce. I think at this point it doesn't we're not gonna ever play together in the as the birds to the fellows are gone It's best to leave it as a good memory. In after say agree with roger all along on that and i do like i say very close with roger. I do talk. Dave occasionally great guys. I have i old indiana mossy towards anybody. I work with living her debt. And i went out of my way to not denigrate anybody at all. I could written some things about. I want to strangle. I didn't feel that was relevant. I think it was more bring out what they could have been what they could have achieved. I was not the greatest musician singer. Songwriter but i got. I got some mileage. Because i i worked hard and that's what it's about it's at workout. Unfortunately gram two gram could have been the next white yoka. But dwight has this incredible work ethic and passion and e suffered dwight was a ups. Deliveryman got a record and he worked at struggled and suffered graham into. That's the difference and you compare them. I don't know cram had some a lot of talents. A great to write with great songs with it s about all like detail when it comes to sign rating. You haven't been incredibly productive in in the past year. Which i think is probably the case with a lot of us trip. Do you feel like there is a point or point will come where you will be able to process all this sort of stresses and heartbreaks of the past year through music. I guess there is. I don't know why would necessarily That as a subject matter. I've always waiting for somebody to write the ultimate goofball saw lockdown love or something like that. Wait for one of those canoe. Dance craze sleep in the nation lockdown. I i don't know you know in some ways. I enjoyed Not leaving the house. I had a good time. Mcguigan would think roger mcgowan left his house. It's march of two thousand twenty. But no i. i don't know i. We'll see what happens on that. I haven't thought about that. And yeah there'll be a time Okay i'm done And i think i have to measure that only if if it got to the point where people didn't wanna hear me. I wasn't really doing business or something. I'd probably make that decision but so far. We'll see if we get on the road again in september and play that out

scott bomar matt scott Petty biden bill monroe connie roger mcglynn david nighthawk pleasants Bomar jazz rocky miles william faulkner Bmg Hemingway graham chris christmas ernest xm channel ventura
[Unedited] Bren Brown with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

1:18:17 hr | 1 year ago

[Unedited] Bren Brown with Krista Tippett

"Support for on being with KRISTA. Tippett comes from the Fetzer Institute helping build the spiritual foundation for a loving world Fetzer envisions a world that embraces love as a guiding guiding principle and animating force for our lives a powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves others and the natural world learn more by visiting visiting Fetzer Dot. Org I'm KRISTA Tippett up next my unedited conversation with Bruna Brown and there is a shorter produced version of this wherever ever. You found this podcast. Hi It's Rene can you hear me. Hi Renee Hi Krista. So great talking talking to you. Oh I just I've been looking forward to it. I just. I'm so happy. Thank you and I have to say. I'm sorry for this delay. Although when I heard you're a little late late getting there I said Oh good then. I'm not late because I've been like just got off the road. You know the drill but I was so looking forward to like landing back to have this conversation with you well me too. I feel the same way. I'm just yeah I've just been looking forward to. It's a little bomb. When did this book come out in the Wilderness September of this year? So so you're kind of over the big big push are you are you. Are you on tour still. No I just wrapped up like the week before Thanksgiving okay. Good good so you rested gotten arrested. I have I have a couple more trips. Have I'm leaving this afternoon for San Francisco and I've got to go to Atlanta next week and then I'm done for the year which yeah you you know the story now. I used to you more than I do. I'm an off you you well. It's all natural and the The the is mutual and the travel is overrated. Yes it it is okay all right we should go here. We could just keep going on this for an hour. COULD BE SELF-INDULGENT Okay so let's just plunge right and and I you know I was. I was amazed I looked back at the transcript of the conversation we had in two thousand fifteen and I did not ask you the question. I always ask which is the spiritual backed background your childhood. I I asked you about about you. Know how how where you at trace in your in your childhood and in your earliest life and experience of shame but but I was looking for what your answer was in. That means we get to do it now. So and also it's all wrapped up in your writing about belonging so slipped wrapped up. It's all all wrapped up. It's right there so so so if I ask you about the spiritual background of your childhood expansively understood the. How would you start to tell that story? I would say that I was baptized in the Episcopal Church. And we ended up moving to New Orleans when I was probably chew and I and I was put into Catholic school Early on kindergarten. First Grade I was was one of the only non-catholics in the entire school Because this is a school kind of uptown New Orleans Very Catholic area and so do one day and there was a lot of struggle with belonging around not being Catholic because not only with not the non Catholic and the Catholic school while. And that was this like late late sixties that you moved to New Orleans that right. Yeah I mean people forget in the sixties still. I mean the whole Catholic it was it was radical for Catholics and Protestants Protestants talking to each other S. Yeah Okay I had friends. I had friends that I remember from that. I still have today from new New Orleans. Who said her parents didn't let her date Christians and I was like what is we are? We Are Christians right. You should know the other Christians are the non the non-catholic Christians got it okay. But I had this very interesting experience in fourth grade when I got pulled out of my classroom and I and brought into this small room and I was at holy name of Jesus and he would. I walked in the room. I literally. My breath just got pulled out of my lungs because I thought it was God when I first looked I was like. Oh my God. This is the ultimate trip to the principal's offices as God but what I realized is it was a bishop and the bishop kind of introduced himself and asked me my name and then an assistant or someone brought in a freshly mimeographed graft copy of the Nice in creed. We went over the Nice in creede line by line and then he said well done. You're Catholic and then send a note home to my parents. I'm Catholic now and so became Catholic. I guess in fourth grade and then my parents followed suit and kind of attended a Catholic Church off and on through high school went to a Catholic college and then And that was kind of in the eighties where it was the birth of the religious right and do as inflation happening between between politics and religion. That made no sense to me and so I completely laughed organized religion for maybe twenty five years right down my way back the Episcopal Church in where I'm a member. Now that's why I met you remember when I was at your couple years. Yeah I know as you write about You you've always been very I think I think one of the many reasons is that you were re Rita's people is that you you the things you write about and do your research on your also completely wheatley open about how they are things you struggle with and I think that often you your your research is a way for you to is is very a special way. You have to delve into the things that you're navigating. And then in fact we are all navigating. Let's turn to overturn the rest of us. And but so in this in in in in your more recent writing in your new book braving the Wilderness. You You you talk about your childhood and and you know the the the story you just told about religious belonging which was so much. The dynamics are so oh completely different in the nineteen sixties even though it isn't that long ago plus you had moved to New Orleans which in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine the whole notion of racial belonging was. Oh Oh how right at a head I have. It's you know yet again at a new tumultuous stage but in new tumultuous stage and and also your parents divorce and the feeling and the not belonging in your family and and And how that you know one thing you say is that you you do you name. That is a spiritual a spiritual crisis and you said not belonging in our families and of course so many of this have just so many different permutations on this as you say is one of the most dangerous hurts and it somehow like right there behind the fact that belonging such a crisis Globally and in our culture and in our all of our institutions. It's not really a question but I know you can take it from there. Yeah I I I I never thought about it really. I had never thought about the concept of not belonging. Even though I lived loved it I never thought about the concept of not belonging at home as being such a universal experience. A pain until until I don't know how long ago may be eight or nine years ago I was doing some research And I was in a middle school and I was doing focus focus groups with middle schoolers and I was. I was actually just interested in trying to understand the difference between belonging and fitting in. Because I I was very surprised to learn that one of the biggest barriers to belonging is fitting in. Is this need to kind of assess. The situation acclimate changed who we are an order to cajole people into giving us a sense of connection and acceptance and so I was asking guineas middle schoolers with the difference was between what they thought the difference was between fitting and belonging and they had these like incredibly simple and profound answers you know fitting in is is when you wanna be a part of something belonging when others want you Just they just rattled off the other and I was so taken aback Jack and then a young girl raised her hand and said you know mess. It's really hard not to fit in our belong at school but not belonging the at home is the worst and when she said that probably half the kids either burst into tears just put their heads down like unable to speak and I said can you tell me more about not belonging at home and it just started this conversation where kids were like similar talking about the feeling of it that it's the one place they fill the most left out. It's the one place they feel. The least accepted other. Kids gave examples samples. You know. My parents were really athletic popular. I'm not athletic. I'm not popular. I don't fit in with my family. I don't belong there And end just as thing washed over me of for a middle schooler and and you know that age no ah for middle school or to say hey not belonging here is tough but there's nothing worse than not belonging at home. You understood dude. I felt the magnitude of it in my bones ye make this This is just the way you make. This is observational. I think the way you make it a so helpfully said you know. It's partly because we are neuro biologically hardwired belonging connection and we're hardwired to one it and need it it so much that the first thing we do is sacrifice ourselves in who we are to achieve it. The irony right Yeah we were desperate for it. I think if you look at if you look from the Lens of neurobiology are even evolutionary biology As a social species to not be wanted and to not belong to the tribe or the clan or the group meant death. I mean I mean you know we are wired for the it is John Kaci OPO on the Chicago. Does this incredible work on loneliness. Says you know that the only will biological advantage we have over. Most other species are connection are belonging our ability collaborate plan being relationship with in special ways and so that desperate need to belong is not is not a neurosis or it's not a ego driven thing that need to belong and be a part of something greater than us is who we are in our DNA. And I love that. Also in fact the the the genius the source of the the genius of our species I mean that's the implication that's it emitted and set. Yeah what we do yet. We what we do to ensure that were accepted unfit in which is a totally hollow substitute for belonging. What we do to to ensure that we're accepted in fit in ensures that we have no sense of belonging so you use this language of true belonging So talk about what are the qualities of true belonging as opposed to that that the many things we do that feel like belonging but as you say are are hollow substitute for true belonging. What is that well you you know when I started looking in to belonging and I started really wanting to understand the bones of belonging? What does it mean what? How how do we like from Areso perspective And probably my own personal armor Really what what are the data here like what what exactly is happening here and I think the first thing that was surprising to me is that at the very heart and I think there's an amazing scene synergy between my work and your work around this topic because I think at the heart. Art belonging is spirituality and not religion not dogma but Spirituality Eh and a very important specific tenant of spirituality which I believe cuts across faith and denomination and belief system and by spirituality. I mean the deeply held belief that were inextricably connected to each other by something greater than us and that that thing that is greater than us is rooted in love and compassion. That there's something bigger than us and that we are connected to each other in in a way that cannot be severed and so when I started to look at belonging what I realized is that it is a spiritual spiritual practice and it's the spiritual practice of believing in ourselves and belonging to ourselves so fully holy that we find what sacred and not only being part of something like our DNA calls us to be but also we find sacred the need on occasion to stand alone in in our values in our beliefs when we're called to do that as well and so to me. This idea of true belonging is a type of belonging that never our requires us to be authentic or change who we are but a type of belonging that demands who we are that we be who we are even when we jeopardize connection with other people even when we have to say I disagree. That's not funny. I'm not on board right so I think all the way through this this thinking and writing you do and especially as it continues needs to develop use the word paradox a lot. I also overuse the word paradox. But the thing is like that sounds like a you know. Oh kind of an academic Hanson like an academic word but in fact it is just a description of the way life works and the fact that we are not like we are not a combination. One of either or's we are. We are just this multitude of both ends like right at any given moment jeff so so so so this thing. Belonging belonging the spiritual practice of belonging is also being able to stand alone when called to do so and then also like so just and the whole idea of being alone and the difference so earlier this year I was Like the contrast of that with loneliness which is this crisis this right but that that somehow also to combat this crisis of loneliness we have to learn this spiritual practice of being alone. That's part of being able to stand alone when we're called to do that. As part of the the practice of belonging. Yeah I mean it sounds so you you know it's like I always think about the Latin like paradox and like the source of the word means seemingly absurd but really true. You know like what we're both saying. ane sounds like crazy but I think our I think our need to push away the word paradox and the need to our need for either or not and is driven. By our lack of capacity vulnerability it's really hard to straddle the tension of yes and yeah it's really hard to straddle the yes I wanNA belong. I WANNA be a part of something bigger than me and I'm willing to stand alone when I need to. And it's also hard to say. Look what if loneliness. It is driven often by changing who we are being perfect saying what we're supposed to say doing what we're we're supposed to do. What if loneliness is driven in part by our lack of authenticity that I can go to a party and I can be the the bell of the ball and come home completely disconnected lonely anxious because never once during that experience because I myself I was who I want? I thought they wanted me to be you know and so I do think I don't want it to be true to be honest with you Kristie like I think in some ways. It kind of sucks that your level of true belonging can never be greater than your willingness to be brave and stand by yourself. I kinda hate it a little bit. But it's just what I found is just it's how men and women that have the highest levels of true belonging longing show up in their lives and you know to kind of get to the bigger picture here. I mean earlier this year I was talking to somebody about Hannah. Arendt and the origins of totalitarianism is so amazed to go back into that book and read her talking about loneliness as a modern phenomenon and sang things like loneliness is the breeding ground of terror. you do. I think it's really important. And you and I are both connected in some ways with these wonderful Young People Casper are kyle. Andy Thurston who working like see ending loneliness as a calling of their generation right because of the crisis in that generation and all of us You you know again like words like you. You know you make these distinctions that I think are helpful between standing alone and lonesome and lonely at those are not all the same thing now. I think you know for me. I think I feel more connected to myself. And everyone who matters to me in those moments when I am standing alone in the wilderness. Because that's what I have to do. Stand up for my values and my beliefs when I'm not not backing down when I'm not kidding someone's ass when I'm not a green just to shut down. An argument are really saying I hear you. I WANNA keep having the conversation. I just don't see it that way. in those moments I feel connected to myself I feel connected to other people I feel connected to something that is just current that runs under the ground. That were all standing on but in those moments when I sell myself out when I choose fitting in with someone over belonging to myself. I just don't know that there's a more lonely on the outside feeling that I can that I can imagine. Imagine my life I mean when you're with people I mean everyone knows this like in my family. We call the lonely feeling like we. We named it. So our kids could articulate particularly like that so interesting you like your new family. You'll say I've got that lonely feeling or your kids will say that lonely feeling. Yeah and they'll say you know I was with a group of friends and I had a lonely feeling and I think we all know everyone knows that experience of being surrounded by I people and feeling completely alone because I think you can be alone and with people because you're not connected to those people. There's no connection there so I love again. Caccia Pos definition of loneliness is being on the outside looking in when I stand up alone in the wilderness and take a stand on something I believe in or stand up for something. I don't think is right. I do think is right. I feel connected into every other person who's made the pilgrimage to the wilderness. People I know people I don't know but admire I don't feel lonely so so let's talk about how again we're in this deep territory paradox. How what you're ascribing is not the kind it is absolutely is the opposite of the standoffs that we have on every aside of every across the spectrum of our culture right now? It's like standing standing up for what we believe. In as a way of moving moving behind our defenses So so I think one way a good way to get into that. Is You know you have done this. Research on the elements belonging. I'm true belonging when that's really happening and one and so the first. The first element is people are hard to hate. Close up move in. So what you're talking about is not the stance of moving through the world being solitary and righteous self-righteous. Now Yeah I mean. I think one of the things that we've seen and you know I write about this in this chapter called High Lonesome which is like my favorite tradition and Bluegrass as high lonesome. Men's men's kind of Bill Monroe and this kind of wailing and sorrow captured in music. And I talked about this high lonesome culture that we're living in right now where we are the most sorted that we've ever been in terms of we. Most of us no longer even hang out with people that disagree with US politically ideologically outings Esso Esso. RT sorting sorted yes SORTA A- as opposed to be pretty sordid right now so I just wanted to make we've sorted ourselves to. Yes yes we've sorted ourselves into kind of ideological bunkers and more and more. We live next to people who believe like us we worship with we go to school with we go grocery shopping. We have really because we find because it's such a we find other people's beliefs so culturally offensive that we really don't want to be around people that think differently than us. And what's so crazy as how VAT hat kind of social demographic changing of sorting into these ideological bunkers tracks exactly with increasing rates of loneliness. And so I would argue that. This goes back to your paradox. I would argue that when we build ideological bunkers and we hide out behind them nine times out of ten. The only thing I have in common with the people behind those bunkers angers is that we all hate the same people and having shared hatred of the same people or the same. I call it common. I'm an enemy intimacy. Yeah that's a good phrase like our our connection is just an intimacy created by hating the same people is absolutely partly not sustainable. It's counterfeit connection. It's not real and the moment that you disagree you question you get curious you lean into the other side quote unquote to to to try to understand more and bill bridges. You're in in dangerous territory with the people behind the bunkers. So it's no it's not true belonging. Oh God it's not true belonging it's hustling of the worst magnitude. I mean it's just hustling and so my question was for the men and women who really carried the sense of true belonging in their hearts. They didn't negotiate it with the world. They carried it internally. They brought belonging wherever they went because of their because of their strength in their spiritual practice around it. What did they have in common? And so this first practice of tree belonging is is you know people are hate to their hard to hate. Close up move in like when you are really struggling with someone and it someone you're supposed to hate because ideolog ideology allergy belief. Move in. Get get curious get closer ask questions try to connect find something. Remind remind yourself of that spiritual belief of inextricable connection. How am I connected to you in a way that that is bigger and more primal than our politics so you know what I what I want to say here may just is be so obvious but I feel like saying it to underline it so you know again a minute ago we're talking about belonging and you were talking about you know the spiritual plaque practice of standing alone and standing up for what you believe When we're called to do so oh language like that right now in our culture points at a lot of posturing over and against right are not just posturing I mean there are things to stand up against in about right but but but Actually I think the real spiritual or at least a hand hand in hand with that the spiritual practice you're pointing at is reclaiming. Our belonging are human belonging and having a courage to a stand alone in our own groups to transcend that the kind of tribal politics is that fair. Yes that's exactly. I mean like it's exactly. It's exactly exactly right so that we defy the sorting something. We just say you're not gonNA live this way you know. I've probably been in front of let me think Realistically Twenty Five Thousand People. Since this book came out on a book tour across the United States and every time I ask audiences raise your hand. If you deeply love someone who's vote in two thousand sixteen. You find incomprehensible and ninety nine percent of hands go. Yeah and we have to find a way like you know that I ask how many of of you are willing to sever permanently relationship with the person you love because of their vote And maybe one or two hands goes. I'm I'm not. I'm personally not willing to do that. I have people. I love family members WHO's their politics on some issues? I find I really not. I just can't wrap my hat my head or my heart around it but I'm gonNA keep leaning in. I'm GonNa keep staying at for what I believe in and I'm going to keep leaning in With curiosity questions conversation Because I'm working from the premise that I am inextricably connected actors that person by something greater than me now. I'm not going to tolerate abuse or I'm I'm not gonNA tolerate dehumanizing language. I'm not going to have a curious. An open dialogue with someone who's politics insists on diminishing my humanity. Those are lines that were very clear with the research participants but short of that. I'm going to lean in and I'm going to stay curious. Yeah I mean boundaries is a big word in in your right now that and again it it can sound like a paradox but of course we all know it's true like boundaries and true belonging. Go together You Know Renee. I was I the question I wrote down when I was thinking I was thinking I want to ask for Nay. If she's surprised that we're in this place because I'm one of the few people feel one of the few people I know who is constantly in conversations about like. How did this happen saying just because I I think you and I both have always been watching the human condition angle of things and from the Human Condition Angle? If things we've been walking into this I was looking at At at the the transcript of our conversation in two thousand fifteen and you know I quoted something at your that you said that feeling vulnerable imperfect and afraid is human. It's when we lose our capacity to hold space for these struggles that we become dangerous and then I said it seemed to me now. That's one way to describe what is happening in our culture alter in political life and I feel like we have continued to walk into that to an extreme that I mean when I say I'm not surprised on dismayed heartbroken right but we could have seen this coming. I mean you want to read what you said then too because it's it's just so it's more true now you said I'm hoping it's not wishful thinking but I'm thinking we've grown Yeah you kind of agreed that on this micro however we're not our best selves in fear and the national conversation has been centered on what we are supposed to be afraid of and WHO's to blame for it and then you said I'm hoping it's not wishful thinking but I'm thinking we've grown weary of that. I think we're sick of being afraid and I think there's a growing silent majority of people who are really kind of thinking a very basic human level. I don't I wanNA spend my days like this. I don't WanNA spend every ounce of energy. I have ducking and weaving. I don't know where we'll go next. But I really believe with every fiber of my professional and personal self that we won't move forward without some honest conversations about who we are when we're in fear and what we're capable of doing to each other when we're afraid I mean they take it back. Do you want to know. I'm not surprised about where we are at all. I mean I mean. Is it possible that heartbroken and not surprised. Yeah you mean that. Hopefully that we were gonna well but you know we also have such short view of time. I mean I know I still yeah going. Yeah no I know I definitely stand by what I said and I do believe in the longer and the longer story. I think that's true but we are. I only WANNA take it back because you know I just. I'm not surprised at all. I remember there was a day. I I remember. There was a day where I looked at. Steve and I said my husband and said let let me tell you how this is going to go. And he's like I think you're crazy and I was like I know but he's like but I'm scared because you know people and and I said Yeah because the thing is we have been in such deep fear and let me tell you something when people are in in fear and in uncertainty and we live in we live in a culture that has no capacity for the vulnerable conversations. That have to come around that fear right for actually facing the fear right. Apricots Lake sledding pain and like fear show themselves as payment fear. That's right if you have. If you have a leader who will who leverages leverages. That fear gives you people to blame for it and then promises to deliver you from your pain and your fear by hurting the people that you blame that person will always win. I mean that person will always win I and that is if we are not otherwise tending to that fear in our midst right. Yes he's sitting there waiting to be spoken to somehow I'm how if it's burrowed metastasized. Then it can be leveraged. Now you hold fear in front of you and you. You say we're fearful. We're in so much uncertainty. There's so much change at such a rapid rate If you hold your in front of you it doesn't dictate your behavior. But I don't you know I think there's there's two things and it's interesting 'cause I was hoping we could talk about this because I would love to know you think about this and I think about it from not just politics politics and ideology right now but also things like the opiate addiction. I think we've lost because we've lost our capacity passively for pain and discomfort. We transform that pain into hatred and blame. It's like it's so much easier for people to cause pain. That is for them to feel their own pain right. Yeah when you talk about that but it takes courage to allow yourself. Allow yourself to feel pain. It's not smart a comfortable option. I mean the other thing I think is that we we actually we we reward outreach. And we treat outrage and anger. Her and argument as powerful respected fish oils in our life together and we don't reward reward or or create spaces where it would be actually trustworthy or reasonable to invite people to show their fear in their pain. Just as that right that vulnerability. It's funny because I think that's changing And I don't you know so one of the things. I'm super curious about Canada's interview you now I've got a lot of questions for Christa. I do a lot of questions all right. Here's a question for you that that kind of respect for the bombastic postured raging kind of thing as opposed to putting value on hard tension. Paradox paradox filled. Conver conversation that you just talked about so one place I see. This shifting is more and more in the corporate sector more and more there's there there is a waning tolerance for that kind of behavior in leadership. Yeah and it just for me. Begs the question that right now with the with the metoo movement and this reckoning we're having aroused house sexual violence and sexual harassment and assault of women we see again the corporate sector taking really firm stands on this while we see zero movement in the government and politicians. Yeah and we see corporate sector really questioning that their tolerance for the bombastic reaching shut people down speak at not to it's unusual. I guess for me. I wonder what's happening. Can you tell me what's happening No I'm well I'll just say a little bit and then I'm GonNa turn it back to you. So I I agree with you that that I think there's a generational shift altogether and and ironically workplaces and corporate sphere fear is more sensitive to that like it's bubbling up and having an effect whereas our political life is just such a in such a tangle so like that one place unfortunately that one place is where we look to see where leadership is and what's important and what's powerful but like we can just this good buckle our seatbelts like this is a twenty year process right so like I do think it's coming up in all kinds of places and it's real. I agree with you like you said this. Is the silent majority the growing silent majority of people. I think that is still there. I think it's stronger than it was two years ago. But we have this thing. This this This metastasized thing right that we have to. Somehow it has to work its way through our system all right so we're going to move on for me but like so so so I think this gets also too so the second element of belonging from your research again again feels like like a contradiction. But it's exactly what we need now just like you say. Speak Truth and I'm GonNa because this is public radio. I'm going to say it here but then we will miss a speaker to bullshit speak truth to be s and be civil which also like? We're going to have to come up with a whole new. Understanding of what civility is. Used words like muscular. An adventurous. Like how do you you. What is this civility? We have to develop which will let in pain and fear and true belonging so I really wrestled with that just for just for my knowledge so I should say BS is that right. Is that the better way to do this. Or they'll have to bleep you. Yeah okay. It won't be my. I believe. Definitely my most highbrow bleep for sure on public radio. I was really curious about what civility is and what it looks like to. I didn't I didn't come into the research I mean I didn't expect civility to merge in the research as has a big construction so when it did like this idea that we have to speak truth to be us we have to find a way in a culture where truth truth is becoming less and less important you know. We have to find a way to speak truth. Empirical Evidence Truth to be ass but we have to do it while we're while we're civil we have to civil while we're doing it otherwise. We're not accomplishing pushing it. So as I started looking doing a research review and trying to understand what civility was. I mean I came across this definition from a nonprofit but based in Houston the Institute for Civility in government that it's Casandra Donkey and Thomas. Thome TRAUMAS SPA. I've Both I think I go on a limb here I think both Presbyterian ministers actually I'm getting a yes. Yes Have have crafted this definition civility. I think is brilliant That civility is claiming carry for caring for one's identity needs and beliefs beliefs without degrading someone else's in the process. I mean it goes on for another like ten lines but if we could just get that part I think we'd have it nailed so claiming and carrying for my identity and my needs and my beliefs without degrading yours. I feel like you're like the third. The third leg of these these four elements belonging strong back soft front wild elkhart kind of starts to get out what that looks like Yeah I mean I think I think that to me I I heard A. I heard that the strong backsaw front from Joan Halifax who's WHO's a teacher and I it spoke to me at the time and I thought I don't know what that is but it sounds of course paradoxical and I don't like it Because it sounds hard. I'd rather have a strong front and a strong back in a strong everything right But then when I was doing this research I just it went back to my work on daring greatly and rising strong that what we need is a strong back. We need the courage and we need a soft front vulnerability. I have to our deepest human need is to be seen by other people to really really be seen and known by someone else. And if we're so armored up and we walked through the world with an armored front yeah we can't be seen and so I think when you go back speaking truth to be asked and being full it requires that strong back but it requires that soft fraud that is it. Am I crazy or do I remember reading in your book. Something that said one of the greatest acts of courage is to be vulnerable with someone John with whom we disagree. That's from Francis Kissling from your book. Right Yeah that's where I read it and I remember thinking thinking when i read it boy now. That's a measure of courage right there And I think that is that soft front but but it is also the strong back. I'm GONNA be vulnerable. Which means I'll lean into uncertainty? I'll lean into some risk. I'll lean into some emotional exposure but I have a a strong back and the wild heart for me is goes back to the wilderness that I'm not afraid of the Wilderness. I'm not afraid of that space where I share an opinion and I look around around and I'm just surrounded by you know the Wilderness. I'll see anybody standing next to me or behind me. It's just my opinion And it's my I believe and it's me and so I do think that's required for civility and the courage to speak truth that that that wild heart I love that language and that runs or something that you you you actually said when when we spoke last time and and it it. It's funny because I I think of this as a poem. It's five lines is like most of us are brave and afraid at exactly the same time all day long long and you talk about the wild heart is at one and the same time tough and tender and brave and afraid all at the same time. Yeah yeah it is I mean. That's that's literally. If I raise my kids to have that wild heart that can be you know. Grit and grace toughened tender excited and scared. I heard you know that can hold the tension of those things. That's all I can ask and and I'm sure this question comes up in as you're out there in the world talking to people when you when you talk about softness invulnerability and when we're talking about something like that in the context of our very heated at times dangerous Public Space You're not I think like the bow talk about why you are saying we have. We have to be brave. We have to be adventurous. But it's not about making yourself unsafe or it is it is and it's not like we're not all in certain situations like everybody is not called to have a soft heart in every situation. You know what I'm saying. I struggle with at this in. His question comes up because there are people who are on frontlines of danger to how do you like talk about like where those boundaries are and how to think about that distinction me. I think there are some real cultural issues. I think one of the greatest casualties of trauma is the loss loss of the ability to be vulnerable. And so when we define trauma as you know oppression sexism racism. I I have no choice but to leave my house with my armor on and carry the twenty tons of that through my day no matter how crippling it it is no matter how heavy it is because I am not physically safe in a world or this environment. I mean that's why I you know. I work with teachers features. Tell them all the time. You may be creating the only space and a child's life where he or she can walk in Ed hang up their backpack and hang their armor only for the hour or two hours. This child is with you. Can they literally take off off But what's I think again. The tension is that you know. The data driven definition of vulnerability is uncertainty uncertainty risk and emotional exposure and one of the things I talk about all the time when I'm working with leaders from CEOS to Special Forces troops always ask the same question most recently. NFL teams give me an example of courage that you've seen in your life or that you yourself have engaged in any act of bravery didn't that was not completely defined by vulnerability. GimMe one example of courage that you've ever witnessed that. Did Not require require uncertainty risk and emotional exposure. No one has to this this day even special forces I mean even when Navy Seals can't tell you then no one can tell you like because the problem is there is no courage without vulnerability but we're all we're all taught to be brave and there were all warned growing up to not be vulnerable. Yeah right and so. That's the rub up you know that's that's and so when you have bravery without vulnerability that's when you get what what we're looking at today all bluster all posturing no oh real courage You know I the I. It just recently Inter did it conversation with two people Including Whitney Chemical Kimball Cho who's part of something something called the national rural assembly which I had never heard of before and it's this Composed of a lot of people. Who are they call themselves homecomers? It's people in these in these in our towns and you know rural areas all over the country that are you know very simplistically put on the losing side of globalization globalization's equations and on the losing side of A lot of What's happened so quickly in this early century And we got this email and I was so moved by it and I thought oh I can bring this rene So here's what she said because it really it's like so it kind of brings this down to Earth what we're talking about here. Yeah she said I just listened to the episode and for someone living in a small small western town it was a lifesaver. I would really love to hear something. That is focused directly on how to cope with fear She said especially for progressives living in small rural conservative leaning towns with very little ethnic diversity there can be a pervading sense of fear both for ethnic minorities and for progressive activists in in addition as a writer I received my fair share of troll attacks on twitter and while this is an uncommon. I struggle a great deal with carrying fear while trying to continue doing my my work. I I WANNA say I want and I want you to respond to and I also want to say you're you're very careful and I appreciate this to to say that you know this kind of there's fear on on every side of our of our cultural equation so so this happens to be a progressive. So how would you feels to me like such an important question right that line between just staying safe and being courageous. Yeah I mean I think that I think there is fear on every side and I think we are very worst salves in fear we are the most dangerous to ourselves into each other and even to the people we love and were in fear. And so when you have a situation where you've got you're in a small town you're either an ethnic minority your progressive or whoever you are there's got got to the. Here's the thing that I thought was so important that while the inextricable connection between human beans cannot be severed it can be forgotten and we need moments of collective collective joy and we need moments and experiences of collective pain. We need to find ways to come together in those moments and in in small towns there have to be in big towns that we have to start having conversations. This is this is where the only place I can think of in small towns where people can come together and actually have conversations where people can make in hold space space for that our our our faith communities. And we're not doing it. They're not doing it and they often then get divided. They're often divide bubbles to right. Yeah but I would call upon. I mean I think physical safety look when I asked the men in women in the end that we research that who the participants for the research. What are the limits of moving close to people that you disagree with? The two big pieces were physical. Safety and dehumanisation. Okay and so I would say if your physical safety is at risk. I don't think it's smart. I mean I think if you're physical safety is at risk then. I think you're strong back in your soft front is about safety for you and for your family And to not understand that that's a truth for people is privilege a lot of people. Don't understand that that's a reality for a lot of folks but it. It is absolutely reality but this is also when I would call upon. You know you said something interesting earlier when I asked you the question about why is corporate America out ahead right now of. What's happening in politics and you said well they are? We keep looking to politics for what what leadership should look like. There's something around. Local civic leaders bringing together people in small rural rural towns about faith leaders bringing together people. I mean here's the thing this is my bet. Krista this is maybe two years we'll be talking again Okay we'll pull the transcript right now making it right now here she who chooses comfort over courage and facilitating conversations in towns and cities and synagogues and areas. Who Need it when you choose your own comfort over trying to bring people together and you're a leader either? A civic leader our faith leader. Your days of relevance are numbered. I really and truly young. Yeah it is. It is one of those things that you bring together people who are in conflict in fear each other. You're not gonNA do it perfectly. Officially you'RE GONNA YOU'RE GONNA be messy. It's not gonNA be Great. You'RE GONNA be on the receiving and a bunch of criticism for how you handled it but to not opt opt into facilitating that when that your role is a leader is the definition of privilege to say. I'm not GonNa do it because I can't do it perfectly and I can't ensure an ending that you know deserves a bow. That's just not brave and I I do believe in I. I do believe even this this this idea. You know what you said to me again. This girl growing silent majority like I think I think across our spectrum across political spectrum across every all of these chasms that we can name. There's so many more of us who long for that connection. Let's get back to for this belonging T- to stitch that back together again. So many more of us who want that then who who wants this division really. I think it's who wants that tried. It's is that rhetorical. You'll see the aunt Jimmy shot. I'll give it a shot is shot. I don't I think I think there are people who want it and I'll tell I'll tell tell you I. I think that there is a huge silent majority on both sides of the aisle who desperately want reconnection To come together to solve bigger problems and hating each other. I think that there are people that most of us the vast majority of us are desperate for it. That doesn't mean we have the skills to do it but I think we're desperate for it. Which is why? It's just a call to leaders of every sector to stand up. Create some space Callin help if you need data and start having the conversations but I absolutely believe that there is a small sliver of people all with a tremendous amount of power whose power rests completely on a stained divided right I I absolutely think that when you see an administration throwing fuel on fires around race around the NFL around poverty around around simple things where the only not the only if you stand back and watch it and don't engage in it. What you see is the purposeful creation of a divisive union a divided union and there are absolutely people whose power rests on that? And so but I don't think those people represent the majority of Liberals Conservatives Progressives Republicans Democrats. I think we're all much more than different. Yeah and I think this is a good way to to come into that fourth a pillar of true belonging from research to like bring this really close to the ground which is also where it happens right. I mean among humans probably in physical spaces Hold hands with strangers. There's a period in their hold hands with strangers. Talk talk about what that is what it's about. The research participants who had the highest levels of true belonging gene sought out experiences of collective joy and collective pain dirk time. The French sociologist called all this experience collective effervescence and interestingly he was trying to understand kind of the Voodoo magic that he believed happened in and churches like. What is this thing that where where people seem transcendent they're connected? They're kind of moving in unison. There's a cadence and song long and rhythm and he tried to understand what it was and what he realized is in this. What he named collective effervescence it's coming together and shared emotion? And we have that today. We have opportunity like like trust me. I'm from Houston. I know you've just gone through one of those experiences. Where rises up in for? Yeah I've gone through two so I've gone through Harvey which you know there. We are six feet of water in our street. My husband's in a kayak that happened to be in our garage. Because my son John had had a boy scout Kayak trip so he's in a Kayak pulling neighbors and pets out of houses We're one of only four houses houses left on our street. Everything else has been torn down since Harvey. Everyone lost everything You have the you know the Cajun Navy which just four hundred fishermen and women coming from Louisiana and you know swamp boats and jet skis and fishing boats pulling people out of houses never once during this tragedy city which is still unfolding here in Houston. We'll be paying for a long time around but never wanted someone say hey. I'm here to help. Who did you vote for? That just didn't happen. We just reached out and it was collective. It was collective pain. It was collective struggle but we saw hope and each other's is in stories. He's and then you fast forward. You know to baseball season. And we've had this incredible experience of collective joy with the Astros winning the world series. That's right yes it was. It was really it was just a short story. Like I'm at the last game in playoff game against the Yankees. I'm standing with another couple million. Steve and you know the game of inches as they say watching every every pitch watching every batter I cannot take my eyes off. I'm a big sports person. So I am glued and it's like the second to last batter and I stick my hand in my hand out and my husband's back pocket and I'm like kind of hold onto his rear. You know like ready and the guy next week. Excuse me Ma'am and it wasn't even my husband got got up to go to the bathroom. And when he came back and stood at the end of the aisle and but this guy go astros and it was just this this. What else are you seeing with? Strangers hugging strangers. High fiving people around you like these moments of collective joy and they sound and their moments serve Oliver Sacks says you know music needs no mediation at pierces the heart directly like at a concert. You know you're just singing your lungs out to you too. I'm holding hands with my kids who've never seen them before and they know one of my favorites you know and I start crying. Because he's playing one of my favorite songs from the war album. And then my son on Charlie gets teary eyed. And he says I know you love this mom. It's so great Again the connection between people is no. You can't separate but you can forget it. So define moments of collective joy and pain and to lean in those into this with strangers reminds us of that something bigger and trust is another subject. You've done a lot of research on talking about and you know I have to say I started a little late. But we're going to close but he was like. Where are we going Chris to? We'd like fifteen more minutes okay. Because we obviously can't go into a trust in a big way here but I do like it seems to me that in order for that those moments is also to to continue to to to start US As a people to restate us together or help us remember that are belonging to each other like you've you note in your research that trust is made made in very small moments. It seems to me it's also undone and you know but but but but when it's undone like how do you. What do you know about like can we? I don't know it just feels like that's a big one for us because so much there's been there in spent so much there've been so many hateful things said and again like if everybody even if everybody wasn't saying them they've landed all across the spectrum of us that so beautifully put. It's true no matter you know who said they've landed on us haven't they. Yeah you know I think one of the reasons I dug into trust is because again in my work with leaders and teams and organizations what I what I have observed in found. Is that if I work for you and you pull me into your office and you say look. We've got to work on some trust issues. Basically everything after the word trust is like the peanuts parents like Wont Wont Wont Wont Well. I can't hear anything after the word trust because when when you question someone's trustworthiness It just makes us really when Becca just makes us shutdown. We can't hear and so my goal was just try understand. What is the anatomy elements of trust? What is what are we talking about behaviorally when we talk about whether we trust someone or not? And so what we found is that trust is really about seven elements and we use the acronym braving and so trust is about boundaries reliability accountability confidentiality or. What we call the vault integrity non judgement and generosity and generous and my assumptions toward you when something goes wrong or do I immediately assume the worst about your intentions and so when I think trust is falling apart on a cultural level it's like one of those conversations? We're having right now again. The sexual harassment sexual violence reckoning in the metoo movement. Then everyone's like complain about the lack legitimacy in the in the policies will. We're we're so far away from apology time like yeah like we. We haven't even acknowledged what the hurt is. We haven't even acknowledged the pain that it's caused people. We've acknowledged that it's happened. But there's been no reckoning about the cost to these women and these men. Yeah yeah the cost of their psyche to their careers to their lives for their self worth and so to build trust again we have to think about those elements. How and where do we start building boundaries again and boundaries is like a big gauzy word? But it's a really simple thing what's okay and what's not okay. That's it. Here's what's okay. Here's what's not okay. That's reliable. That's really helpful. Yeah Yeah I think it really trust. Isn't I mean like yes. Of course it has an emotional cerebral level. But you're like these really practical steps towards impractical reliability reestablishing that you do what you say and you say what you do. Period there's reliability. There's accountability rather rather than blame our excuses are rationalizing you own it. You acknowledge the pain caused and you make amends and you make amends and what those are GonNa look like. I don't know I think it's probably at for civil court in the case of the metoo movement but you make sense there has to be immense if if you don't acknowledge the pain that you've caused specifically and you don't make amends for there's no apology. Yeah the vault I mean to me. That's about two things. The vault is about confidentiality and not only is it. You know if if I work for you you may call me and say you never know. We've done a lot of good trustworthy. There's one area we need to work on. This is the vault and I look at you and say God Krista and five years. I've never repeated one thing that you've shared with me to someone outside. I've never. I've always held her confidence. You know completely and then you say to me I believe you have Rene but the problem is you come into my office and you share information with me. That's not yours to share people. People don't understand the other side of confidentiality which is appropriate sharing. Who Story is that to own share and then integrity about practicing the values that we believe in we professor most important to us non judgement and asking for help are delivering delivering help? So hard trust is that I can ask you for help without feeling judged and I can need help without judging myself. Yeah which is hard. I'm a much better helper then. I am asking for help right then. I probably need more than I can offer help. which which is really a conundrum and then the last one is generosity? I work from a hypothesis. Generosity with you if things are not going well L. I.. Assume the best I can about your intention and your behavior and I ask you about it. So it's very specific perfect behavioral things. There's going to be no hallmark movie of re grown trust in this culture hugs. And it's done right will be no hugging well there May. Let's let their maybe hugging and there probably will be the hallmark movie but still it won't be the whole story So so I meant to bring your book into the studio with me and I I forgot but there I I did want and I'm just we're joined to a close now but there was a part of it where You you you were interviewing somebody who who. You're drawing out on these things. You're learning learning about how we do all this stuff and I think one thing I really appreciate about your writing is the and and you know you. I did actually write this down. You know you you'll you'll things like this. Were in your questions to her. You say one of my worst defenses when I get anxious or fearful in conflict is to put people on the stand I break into vicious lawyer mode and depose people so rather than listening. You know. It's terrible always ends badly. But it's how I get to being right and there was another one. This was going to read where you you talked about. How Oh you realize that when you're sitting with somebody having these tarred encounters you're just thinking ahead to what you're going to say next and then when people do that to you you hate it and I think the conversation was also also like this happens in our families right? It's this is about whether when if we go to civil gatherings so talk but some of the really practical things you know about how to how rat that back and like regain serve. Be Your be be the people we want to be in those moments. Yeah I think you're talking about interview that I did with Michelle Buck who teaches at Kellogg School of business at North Western and she was she teaches. I love the name of this. It doesn't it's not conflict resolution conflict formation which I think is great and so she. I asked her very specifically for the practical tips because I needed them for the holidays. Right but I I think the practical to me the the biggest takeaway that it sounds fluffy but it's actually very tangible the biggest takeaway from me in this book and and it actually changed how I parent my kids as well is. We've got to stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that we do not belong because we will always find it and you have to stop walking. We have to stop walking to the world looking for confirmation. That were not enough because you will always find it you will always. It's the confirmation by she will. If you're looking for confirmation you don't belong you're GONNA find it. You look for confirmation. You're not good enough you're gonNA find it. We don't negotiate our belonging externally. It's not something that we negotiate with other people or groups of people can give you. It's not knowing can give it this. We carry this in our heart And so the most tangible behaviors that I have found stay curious be kind and as Harriet Lerner has taught me listen with the exact same amount of passion that you want to be heard like really listen passionately like I think. I think I've heard you call generous listening. Yeah Yeah be be generous and you're listening like really even if it's I've really tried to change that in my life and it's been such a game changer. The only thing knits causes. I have to pause a lot now because I'm not working. I'm not working out my response in advance now but I'm actually people ask me something you know. They'll be talking about something hard now. Be really focusing listening. I'll be saying wait. Did you mean this or this and I'll be following up and they're like yeah. What do you think I'm like crap? I don't know I'm GonNa have to take a minute because I wasn't formulating plan early unusually But I I think it's key I think curiosity kindness and not negotiating gaynor belonging our self worth externally. I think that could do a lot to move us in the right direction. You know I just. I'm going to keep chewing on this. What you said when we first started talking about how our capacity for belonging not to start desire but our capacity is is like the genius of our species lies in that and so that's the larger context of what we're talking about and also about what we're talking about like doc hopefully is unfolding generational time if not in election cycle time? I want to ask you like in. You know I'll tell you say this him at this I love I you know when you talk about how we need to find points of connection enjoy even with strangers especially with strangers right now. See about how Dorothy Day. I love this picture of her with the San Francisco earthquake. She's eight years old. I think watching people coming over in boats from Oakland and like she as as a child like she sees that everybody around her all. These adults is know how to take care of strangers. They knew how to do this all along. Her question was. Why can't we live this way all the time I know and I feel like what you're doing with your research in in a very practical way is like kind of shining a light on what it would take like? They actually so they actually that we have it in us and kind of breaking that down right. I mean talking about the anatomy of trust or These these very practical tools of behavior and how we are with each other So and so. I know you're out there having that conversation with that longing that is so alive so I just WanNa ask you like as we close you know what right now and this may be very different this week from what it was last week like you know right now. What what makes you despair? And we're we're you find your hope. I think my despair is that movie. I remember what movie it was where the line was. I can see dead people. I talking about somebody behind the glass. What is across the sixth sense? Yes so like I think my despair is I can see fear in people like I think that's kind of a maybe a gift from my work and maybe a curse I don't know but I think my despair is people still opt for causing pain rather than feeling it And that is. That's just hard for me you to seek as I can see it. I I. Just don't see the bolster confidant blustery person. I see the scared to death person holding on in a very desperate way. That's causing people paint. So I think that's hard. The hope is that when I think about Harvey and I think about the Dorothy Day thing that the quote quote I don't think when we're our best selves with each other. I don't think that's what's possible between people vol- I believe that's true between people and I don't think we have to work to make it true between people. I think we just have to get the stuff the way that stopping it from happening. Such a joy. Thank you so much have so many more questions for you. KRISTA meal sometime I would love that I do I really. I came in with the list. Well my colleague all except there's no chance in hell let's Yeah I don't I don't have a trip planned to Houston in time soon but I I would I'd love to. I hope we've just got it. We must surely our paths will cross in the flesh cry. I mean I feel like I kind of feel like I'm crossing passes. You're all the time right like you're out there and I'm reading you and I'm hearing you and hearing people talk about you and I'm having conversations about you so thank you so much Just continuing to do this and Yeah I'm just so glad you're out there and and we will talk against you and I'm sure I can't wait. Yeah thank you thank you beautiful rest of your day. You too have a have a great season. Thank you bye bye.

New Orleans US John Kaci OPO KRISTA Tippett Episcopal Church Houston Renee metastasized Steve NFL Catholic school Astros Catholic Church San Francisco Harvey Bill Monroe Bruna Brown Atlanta Lens of neurobiology
Jeff Calaway Ken Burns Country Music Part 1

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

57:27 min | 1 year ago

Jeff Calaway Ken Burns Country Music Part 1

"If you can write one son Like I'm so lonesome Mecca cry you know you've made your mark on history and on everyone who's going to follow so because my parents listen to so much country music My wife Linda was was going to talk about the girl from Tennessee she's long and she's tall. She came down from Birmingham on the road ice cannonball Abeche Canon Ball so you know I think from watching this and talking about it I I think he's he's a he's on that train alive wheel well first off introduce yourself in case someone jeff has been on the show a couple of times but just in case Tesla Yourself Jeff I grew up in the south I grew up country music and this PBS special was just excellent and brought back a lot of great memories of came down from Birmingham on coding sound for day as she rolled into the station year all the people say light and been a fan since probably fourteen I guess somewhere around there thirteen or fourteen and I have a winner I had to be here and you know what I've been thinking about this way too much after you asked me to do this and I think that Bruce Springsteen is on that one but today we are getting off the Bruce springsteen train and we're getting on the wabash cannonball we are Well My name is Jeff Callaway I am a huge Dork springsteen Fan and I've seen them hello everyone Atlanta too does she know why well by all she the combination cannonball she grandmother and and the people that I knew that little boy I am right there with you I I I grew up loving on and welcome to a new episode of settling Bruce Your podcast all about Bruce springsteen his music and mostly fans I am your host Jesse Jackson and I think we'll be able to leave them in I don't think we're leaving them entirely throughout this I know I don't think we are in fact that she says there's GonNa be songs you know that I don't and I said well yeah probably So I went into this just yeah with very high expectations and this this exceeded them you know we could Hawaii wonderful kid but I always tell people that bruce has been the one constant in my life since I was fourteen I think that's probably the best way to put it you're my buddy jeff is joining me and we're going to talk country music welcome to the show Jeff thank you jeff making up before I came on I I had really high expectations and he exceeded mine as well I just thought I know that I want to hang out with Rosanne cash and Marty Stuart I think that vocal on that song is about as good as anything he's ever recorded so they have they even into this well and I was going to bring up the way I felt was you know she got away from country music as she got older because her parents music right and yeah that's the way it actress civic from the Queen of flowing mountains to the south bills by she's mighty tall and handsome that I think that what I would argue is one of Bruce's greatest songs and certainly art and just talk country music Someday that would be I saw in cash actually I saw a springsteen in Kansas City increase clearwater and and rock bands before Bruce and I think those two were Kinda commentary and we were in the airport and Roseanne over their husband and the band and I was standing right behind her in Kansas City and I felt growing up my grandparents music and then really discovering bruce me too same thing I mean it's Kim Burns and everything he's done has been excellent and and knowing the people that were that he would be talking to watch I just did not say anything I didn't want to bother her but then I tweeted her and she was really really nice and that kind of wish that I just said hello but you know there's S. her father and that would be so ingrained in her and of course there's a wonderful story that she told where he started there on the but he started asking in my top five favorite songs land of hope and dreams is is specifically directly influenced by the Bluegrass for me and that's that's kind of what shaped my my musical tastes but it's interesting that you think rather than cashed having johnny her if you know if you knew this or she knew this song if she knew that phone and she didn't and then he made a list of one hundred songs that she had no rambler this train this hypocrites no midnight ramblers you know this train doesn't carry no liars Komo Velez Good when I was fourteen or whatever it led me back to my grandmother's Music Arlene it let me back to Johnny cash and Hank Williams and then eventually would he got free and and in even older music folk music so it is interesting you know and when you think of land of hope and dreams this train is for gamblers and for horrors and for the broken hearted kind of her musical education which eventually led to a great album where Bruce Thing Sea of heartbreak with her and you know what a great country Boise had sitting there I think they played the night before and I didn't want about him but but after watching that one of the things that Roseanne said that I thought was really interesting because Russian of this train is bound for glory bright does it this train is for glory this train this chain is bound for glory this train then you realize wow my grandmother had really great taste in music and and you realize how that music that storytelling that she loved that becomes the river he's playing Johnny cash song on fire I mean that music is ingrained in grain and him he's a sponge right I mean he ah yeah I know smokers talking about dogs a lot of people that bruce would be into and then to turn that into this that that song the original song is so and simplicity of the music really shaped what else to it shaped my brother my brother's older than me and he loves I think that's a direct influence of him saying that you know in in his version of a train Brown for glory or the land it just kind of taking the elements whether it's you know Chuck Berry or or Hank Williams he's you know playing a Hank Williams songs exclusive right it's pushing people out pushing people away off of the train and the fact that Bruce's welcoming everyone on that train I think you can make an don't ride nothing but the righteous in the holy this train is bound for glory this train and then the the lyrics are the chorus this train don't carry no game have hope dreams you know all are invited so yeah well again I totally I have a big grand great that is a beautiful song it's definitely steeped in a country Gospel folk tradition you know he's so good at that right now as you were saying that I I totally agree that's on you know what he got free covered it Hank Thompson covered into a lot of Like you were saying a lot of bluegrass artists but definitely hey where it's tight and it's just the right word and then even more so I think into the river and then Nebraska it is interesting he's a musical nerd like all of us and I think that's the great thing about his music is whether it's he has all of this welcome knowledge encyclopedic knowledge of British rocker and then as he got older blues and rb uh-huh we know this train don't jokes this train Brian adult dogs narrators and I had heard a lot of interviews with Ken Burns before it had come on this church and Rose Pine I this church as a kid and that is Bruce's way of we're all here in we've oh and then as he got older to discover country music and I think the biggest thing that country music good for him is making him a better think that he definitely learned that from those guys from Chicago from born to run in those and especially the earlier albums where he's just you know I mean we literally looking at a word dictionary for all of Sindh of God you know as one of the many versus I had to learn back in Sunday school at both Mill Creek bed documentaries were filmed with historians telling the story and he said in this one he had very oh the no I you know I'm thinking about this bringing back my southern roots you know view only like two or three official historians and everyone else were just musicians and I want to kind of jump up about what you talking about there were so many great editor of his work the simple finding someone like Merle haggard or Hank Williams or johnny cash like saying so much with so little and early version of that song he did say whores and ramblers you know like he's he tightened it a little bit as we move on I and one of the things he said he was so happy with is that in the past the show his welcomes everyone you know no one is kicking off the train except Said Dick Cheney right I saw in the making of that there was a a younger I don't remember what her position with the with the group was the filmmakers' but h- he took song and kind of use those two to twist and turn in the mold and I I definitely think your land drains it is a beautiful song that and he didn't need historians because the MS them musicians knew the history so much that's a much more Christian message right than the song that was written as a kind of Gospel you know welcoming everyone and you on the being the beauty of of this music right that it's not I think though many times the you know we think of just being White Guy Eric Music and having her on there I think was so crucial to and then you know Martha Stewart Martha Stewart is a Oh from from Ireland and from the slaves and then they're you know they're working together there in you know kids who are poor getting to know one another and people sneaking off to Black Churches Nino hearing this music and being out in the cotton fields and learning to Banjo and you know all of a sudden shortage of the glory of God is you know he's kind of saying hey we're all human and were there and it's just amazing John African American Lady on there and talking about you know the first episode is called the Rub and it basically just showing right for light and then to go from those three albums into all of a sudden darkness which is influenced by Punk and in country and and just seeing him get his chance and talking about the birds sweetheart of the Rodeo and that country rock scene in the late sixties and early seventies is spending my favorite music of all kinds and just I mean he is he's a walking history book and just hearing him talk I mean every time he came on I was like Oh man what's he going to say no I don't know like some type of vision quest tuck thing where he had his first two albums were flat and scruggs and Johnny cash and then he goes on to play for lesser black and then to go into you know Austin and Willie and Waylon and the outlaws and then yeah you know act than and to be so articulate in Roseanne to you know I mean yes Her father is you know on the Mount Rushmore there's there there is a moment later in the series where Emmylou Harris talking and it just gave me goosebumps. I'm a huge huge GRANDPA Stan first grade this train don't have gamblers reputation midnight ramblers train games Hazel Smith you know you're going to say you know just and I guess Mardian Roseanne Country Music but you could tell that her knowledge so extend past his and Ronnie crowd as well learning the federal and it it the the beginning of country music at the you know it is America we'll circle being broken is on the charts again You know so you talk about the rub so many of these artists appeared on Amazon it was just yeah they had literally an all-star cast of people telling stories that were you know just the scope of how far they took it you know from the first episode with the Rub whereas the Carter family and Jimmie Rodgers and is with their hair slicked back wearing nudie suits and you see how raw this music is and how it came from immigrants from all over from Mexico have coffee with Rana givens Rosanne Cash Marty Stuart and you know who else I loved was you know she was saying you know you have to get reaction Gooden's you have to get them and they were almost finished and then they're like Lucy we don't end in to have the you can just see the passion everyone yeah and like I'm of right there with you I want to go to a restaurant it's stories man and talking about that love and and how it's connected acing and how lucky that they got Merle haggard before he passed to share his story I that was then John McCain and I'm a huge fan fan but then when you have went and Marcellus talking about testament if you enjoyed this series that's about as good as it gets as far as letting you hear some of these artists I mean wreck on the highway tasing fully agree and just real quick I am a huge degrading van fans as well and the fact that driving off and would be And I guess though all of them but you just yes it would be great to sit down with Charley pride and Willie Nelson in this train don't can't resist this train okay yeah I think that no go go yeah I think it's interesting right dieu et on versions that I just loved look into your Johnny cash says if he's GonNa marry them one day he does I mean you know like you gotTa have made his own future at a lot of ways that taking the stairs over the line when it tortured secrecy nosy and and mother may bill is on that well and I can't yet and I've I've bought every version because they've gone back in all right so let's go back to the beginning I had a pretty good knowledge of Country Music and I certainly knew A little bit about Jimmy Rogers and the Carter family but I did not this debut Lino Twenties Thirties Forties very scratchy and and so Here Roy Echo thing that song is beautiful I was so happy they wanted the episodes highlighted that because you know they made it very clear you know hearing the The Great Peter Coyote go they they were not interested in being in front of the Mike they were there to back up these classic artists that was what they wanted to do and it's such a great story so yeah on an item now and you know for anybody listening to this you have to get well the circle being broken That is a walking I want to give it to plug is right by Peter Doggett a few years ago like I was saying with with Gram Parsons and but you know we all know where that leads for a beautiful heart wrenching version very clean a lot of those recording from the understand how they were the root of the country music tree how about you started just kept going back and back and back and then really where I found key rodgers and the Carter family and also I don't know John Will the circle be unbroken volume two volume three volume four there is a great John Hiatt Rosanne cash yeah I Bristol so there's a great our book called are you ready for the country save appeal Darden so let's go step the person who gathered this music it's really great with music from the Mid Twenties to mid thirties Jimmy Rogers on there's a lot of great music from that time period the Carter family on there so I'm really showing my nerdiness here on is GRANDPA and Michael from the monkeys Rick Nelson the grateful dead there was great during that period of time were were is my wife as regular listeners know but we're watching this together and we paused for a moment to get something to drink or go for it they see the word down to sign don't apologize family songs I don't get it and I said well I'll use this as an example before you know variety show on Saturday night we would go to bed without dinner You know and by watching the any johnny cash special which I was expected to I say this only slightly tongue in cheek if we didn't watch johnny cash is special and the Carter family were play than certainly you know June and her sisters but I was not aware of well because I knew the Carter Family just Miller of it and then if you watch into that and just started just digging into it as Nerdy as possible and doing so I like the dead recovering Merle Haggard and There was a lot of great crossover the hippies and were really into this kind of music so I really really got it johnny cash bio pic walk the line you know Mother Ray Bell is a big player you know kind of a different way to make play guitar And so one of the things that Linda brought up and Sarah and her strong voice and mother may bills you know strumming in her setting started doing a doctor who podcast every once in a while I try to watch a classic doctor WHO and I wouldn't get it it just seem cheesy that the story started gaining in ear or an eye for that kind of storytelling I began to enjoy it more and outbreak and she said you know I don't WanNa say this out loud but I'm not impressed with Jimmie rodgers the Carter you're from familiar with this and they didn't mention it but there's a box set from the Smithsonian Cody Anthology of American folk music Harry Smith was you know I have great appreciation for certainly for for their who they were as artists but let's just you'll never win a different kind of sound might ear has to adjust to it so I thought that was an interesting observation on her point in huge Merle Haggard Fan and like you were saying Johnny cash so I was familiar with a lot of the Jimmy Rodgers songs and once Ya get through all of the warbling and and the different savage yodel and things like that but but now I love it you know what I mean now it's align didn't seem good the special effects I said but then when we were going to cover it for the podcast I had to pay attention and and then as uh-huh of that you know when you first hear just you know the Carter family or you know Jimmy so I think you know when I first heard it I was probably in college and so yeah it it was the same thing for him and it took me a while to kind of you realize how important this music is you realize that they were the first to break out acts doc are hard to listen to I think just from the first time that you're hearing it but you know I knew a lot of the plan you know and and just the the quality of the David Rogers case but some writing and and in the Carter family in finding those songs and recorded them his as we're watching this I pause this kind of on the second one and I said bear with me just for a minute and she goes oh that's interesting so as we continue to listen she went oh will that one I like Oh that one I like and she goes maybe you're right maybe it's such a and I said junior who good friend of mine always talks about that you have to go to every jurors you're like what what is this and you kind of have to get used to it what are your thoughts on that yeah I think it's a lot of it is just the recording Yeah I've kind of got to where I can handle the actual recording about two and one of the things that I was also impressed jeff together it's it's all it's all built on each other and if you miss anything you're not GONNA get it and every time they would bring up Marvel Universe film you can't skip one because he always takes his fingers and meshes them you know like they they all fit beginning charm every heart in his crown I will and You and I really like I loved Him Burns baseball documentary up until yeah because you know you start talking about that and as you're listening to this you know Bob Wills and Western swing but there is a direct connection back to Someone that leads to Jimmy Rogers Rogers and then you say I grew up listening to Hank Williams she and I would make those fingers together like this truly is a branch this one that would have been my favorite documentary every five or six years I pull it out and I really watch it just out of joy to hear the stories and everything was one of the most satisfying parts of the documentary to me to show you kind of Kinda get that and you kind of go yeah like Elvis and the Beatles influence people but in this it truly is if you like as we were saying how it would be really really difficult to do something like this with a rock music because like you're saying there's so many you know and and the Carter family and and then You know the Buck Owens Lakers feel sound and then even the national sound homework a history lesson Chris this was just a joy and in fact we went to the first four episodes that had shown of it it all flows together there is a to B which leads to see which leads to d and that longhairs at the time and their respect for those people to and and the fact that Merle haggard saying I like civil war I like Vietnam I liked jazz but part of them almost felt like is wrong I thought was really interesting I mean he can make that discussion I mean I think it's in the argument for sure but you know I mean you have on our local PBS station and Linda's like man that's it we gotta wait till next week and I said well I thought I saw it was on structure if you do a family tree like it all goes back to these two artists yeah they laid the foundation that's a really interesting point you know I mean people can't even decide what the first rock song is can't Hank Williams junior bid for his dad creating the I nancy and I were talking about the the other day too we were out walking and talking about it and we were talking about how an it's a great way to put it you know and then the important records and on and on and on but you are exactly right with country I think that there is a buying you have the Jimmy Rogers Carter family laying the foundation in everybody else's building their house on top of that and yes I think that's a really great way to put it in and it truly shows the importance demand on Amazon so I went there and they said that you have to have like pbs pass key to see it Of these two acts and and you know I mean with the Carter family the fact that it extended to rent them that they were still playing with I five dollars a month sign and we ripped through the other four that Saturday we didn't want to wait because it was so fascinating Wanted to introduce people Bob Wills and he wanted to introduce people to Jimmy Rogers and so did Johnny just shows the respect they had for for those the forefathers from Texas but her her dad not and and so can you music was not something that she knew at all then sell insurance all know this I did not know that I didn't know that either and you basically loving this country music but but you know she would come and sit down and be like Oh yeah I know that person now and Oh that's interesting I didn't know that you know and Texas swing and I'm fascinated that with WCM this was just the well that's awesome it was at my wife she did not grow up with country music I mean she you know her parents while her mom was you know we've kind of talked a little bit about the rub and then the second episode hard times where it talks about singing cowboys and yeah I remember growing up hearing about is you would pay something very little per month Johnny and they end that they're on that need a greater and album it shows to someone like you know a band you know the you know the radio station was trying to figure out how it can promote because their own via life insurance company and it was one of those that I you know I heard people saying even if you're not interested in country music you should watch this that's hard for me to I don't I don't know if that would be the case because I I loved it so much so we got together and other than you know what you learn from Jerry Garcia and the dead and so as we were watching it she was it was just write stories which you know that's the best of country music as well as great stories yeah and so rocket eighty eight you see Chuck Berry Domino I mean you know there's there's all of this out there where does blue stop and then you know where it is rock begin and they talked about they would go on Saturday night they would walk through because back then before air conditioning people would have there and the guy would come to your door and collect the little five dollars thousand dollar life insurance policy the Metropolitan Opera and then them saying now it's time for the Grand Ole opry but the get that in full was a pretty interesting story and I'm like what a great thought and right and I'd always heard the story about the radio station playing the you know I can't believe how much of this I've learned through Osmosis and I would watch arson sounds like she become just sat down on the couch and just start watching it because she was so interested in it I do a Google search and you have to give sixty dollars a year or five dollars a month to your local TV station so Linda's gift card outs we're going we're donate and is open and you would take notice of WHO's listening to the Grand Ole opry on the radio and then on Monday that's the houses they would call on it's like a modern jazz band about the difference Solos and people taking turns I had never connected the dots but once he Growing and to hear Marcellus talk about that the way Western swing was almost story Bill Monroe you know Lester Flatt and Earl scruggs I did not know about the break-up them going together and and the story of how they came up with the term bluegrass had you heard that story yeah I you know you knew more about that than I did like going I didn't know that any of that story I just I took him that's the way I always thought of woody as well there's more of a country artist but yeah you know it's interesting because I think that that when your research well I knew quite a bit I'm a big got three you know like I thought it interesting with Marty Stuart again kind of you know Woody Guthrie other country artists but politics Folks Ed that I went oh yeah that's that's crazy how much that I remember the first I'm hearing Pennsylvania Roads and episode shows Like we were just talking about Jimmy Rogers and the Carter family kind of you know laying the foundation and the route but but now you're starting to see it branch out and people I just shows what a great and that Tommy Dunkin band was was remarkable and so you know in Texas on the Andy Griffith show but they're actually dillard's and they are amazing but and I I own some Bill Monroe albums Eight years I just I always loved and you know Earl scruggs later albums a really really good to where the birds are on there proscribed really pushed not only bluegrass but folk music and country music in kind of blurring the line between The extra swing being influenced by jazz and and you know just you can start to see that this this music is taking on a lot of big on and yeah in just all kind of American music he's one of my favorites so I I knew a lot of what they were talking about there in town great artists that the to the Yeah love that episode I getting to Bob Wills and Roy Acuff and then and you know it all goes back the money right but but then in the midst of that like all of these really pure that's right I kind of proud saying like yeah I did not know the country music just how rally they played and and how great they were in it pretty amazing though to have Bill Monroe and ended basically the term and that's kind of the same story of why it's Easter Band right that supposedly bruce was sitting on the car waiting hearing their names and then the same thing with quoted one of my favorite John Ford movies on the man who shot Liberty Valance in a later episode that When the legend art shown until where dreams Lester Flatt and scruggs and so you when you go to flat and scruggs you wouldn't say oh can you play one of the songs used Whiten scruggs fan I I love proscribed Stanley Brothers I love the Dillard's the band they play the darlings the legend becomes more property than the truth? You print the legend so this baby legend but supposedly Bill Monroe could not stand bad side as he seemed to carry a grudge for yeah and the story and I don't know if this is true or not but in some time as they like are they going to sing join your own John Rea- and to create it yourself I there's no denying how hey good looking you know cocoa heart

Jeff I Mardian Roseanne Country Music Bill Monroe Mecca Tennessee Linda Birmingham Hazel Smith America Tesla Ronnie John Rea Amazon five dollars thousand dollar sixty dollars Eight years six years one day Mill
Brad Apple Interviews bluegrass artist, Mark Newton

Acoustic Music Talk with Brad Apple

1:07:34 hr | 1 year ago

Brad Apple Interviews bluegrass artist, Mark Newton

"Welcome to at coup stig music where we explore the art of kucic music and musicians with your host. Brad apple hello friends and neighbors and welcome to another edition of acoustic music. Talk the podcast. I'm your host brad apple and so glad you join us again this week for another episode that we have in store for you. Our guest today is no stranger to people in the world of bluegrass. He's been in a lot of great bands in his career such as the knoxville grass. Virginia squires name. Just a couple from berry went on to have his own band under his own name and he did a lot of great recordings with that band. Also he's one ibm recorded event of the year for a project. He did a few years back called. Follow me back to the fold which was a tribute to the women in bluegrass music. A great record that was and mr mark. Newton is our guest today. He joined us by phone recently and sat down ahead quite a bit extended interview with mark. So let's get into that. Could you tell us how you got started out playing music like go back to your early days. Well i was you know. Born in nineteen fifty. Seven paducah kentucky. Which is where my mother's only was from and believe it or not. They were raised. I remember as a infant. I'll hell bent but Some reason i have a memory of going to church my being sitting there but my mother or or don't know what how i just remember. Music was a part of this service and my mother play piano and my day at you know these are the jinyan so he he come. He came from a family of eleven seven boys and four girls. All of them played for the most part all of them either saying well most of them play multiple instruments whether it would be guitar Fiddle banjo mail and you know shudder. And you know so. I was around all of that. We moved to virginia back to my day. It's home here. Brisburg virginia actually from stafford county. But that's just the surrounding counting from fredericksburg virginia which is like fifty miles. South of dc and You know and you know my dad late music and was in local bands and you know and listening tall mongols play and you know they were in to lou breast music in country music. You know this was you know in the sixties and and. I think we moved there. Nineteen sixty of believe. It was and so i was exposed all of this and as i got older i got a learned how to play guitar. So may i might be able to do this. Course dad we'd take the to Their early festivals before they would you call for the term as we don't and alcohol bluegrass festival they were just like you could see like in warrenton virginia thirty miles away where i was at or berryville. Virginia in warrenton culpeper virginia and You know just thirty some odd miles away. Both places and they would have shows on. Saturdays and sundays outdoor shows and so dad. We'd take me you might see You know george. Jones follow bother standard brothers. Or you might see buckle followed by renewing smiling or you might see you know what beer is followed by jimmy martin or whoever it might have been and you know in those days you go right up to the stage and you could touch these people or wherever in you know they come out and their nudie suits or whatever and you know. I created a lasting impression on me a big impression on me. I thought man. He's stars you know with all their stuff you know and So i was around early on and then my family we get together on the end laying saying us sort of fell into. If you i got to where. I can play guitar old enough Started playing with my dad's band and one thing led to another graduated and playing in local bands Around the fredericksburg area one in particular cabin hill which sort of like who'd unquote the no like. Organized amateur professional ban. If you will wore the same clothes no hat should we really. You know that type of thing and Put some thought into it. You know and it set list and end show and all that kind of stuff so then when i graduated in high from high school in seventy five i think it was Well no. That's be the case. But i i just i knew i wanted to play music for a living and you know i thought well. How can i pursue this. So one thing led to another. You know how the bluegrass community is you overtime whether you go to these festivals or what not you. Start meeting people your age. Although in those days there wasn't a lot of young people like you see gosh knows now. But you know you know. People like jimmy arnold or skaggs or rice or douglas. Or you know all those were all the same age so you go to these festivals and and you see these people you know close and personal and created impression on you thought manages is not only you know. Do they look for his music but they got a little different twist to their delivery. You know and Of course you know. Crows you know you listen to grow dole. And there's different ones. That were relational base but yet they had more contemporary flair with material with material. Arrangements vocally musically. You know the relationship all of that stuff so you know that you know it. It excited me to be able to see young people. My age do what i wanted to do. And you know. I started just james with people and you know getting to know people and Then and i think it was seventy seven. I think it was i i joined like my i quote unquote will professional band as far as bluegrass band. Which means we actually played extra amount of nature year state and give you know bluegrass festivals and recorded back. in those days we recorded with Raj sharply at the time. Was he had a little record. Label our firm. Virginia call which the lost and found was on it. I forget one the two other groups and you know that was a big deal to be on the same label. That lost and found was always like okay. Now we're talking young and so join them and and then that got me spread out a little bit more or you know. We were play dates in florida. Oh late you know. More established bluegrass festivals. In the you started meeting more people your age. You know such such when i met you know marty raybird and his family you know had a bluegrass fan. You started meeting all of these people and so from there. You know recorded a couple of records with them and and then one day of coercion mean these people. So james balian advocate friend. James was From horrible janu which hydrographer based out of richmond. Which horrible was. I don't know maybe listen hours drive. But at the time he was working with the country gentlemen it was a change and dole. Charlie and jerk doesn't stay for a while and so you know that that would be good friends with james and And of course the virtually or the first location was going on up insurance shirley virginia which was a a real popular bluegrass club. So i got to know you know the seldom scene. You know within eldredge john starling duffy. And so forth tom gray and my father chin You know so you making all these connections if you will and so all through musical journey and so it's just sort of started working in a way to were from one year to the next. I started you re attaining certain levels. And of course i was a vocalist. You'll lead singer and also harmony singer ali singer tennessee. Or whatever you know play guitar. Learn how to play mandolin. Then not sitting in with these guys or whatever. The james called me one day. It said he just got call from The knoxville grass agent and his name was gene procure auto and home. Russa has just left. Because paul with sunny bobby and they were looking for leading. It's har- singer and guitar player and He's gonna give them a call. And i just like i hadn't even been with hundred grasp year and a half you know and i got really wanna but it was. It was a stepping stone for me. Plus it was. I was able to go to tennessee and back in those days. You don't then. I met a whole other ways of musicians. You know m. stafford and they had a ban. I can't remember his name after it'll change. I keep one of the name out. But you know minute always different people you know and feel better which there you know in knoxville and lend laney was in the grass and so i'll dishes like be there which i thought was you know back in those days. Somebody's flight home in microwave. Major stuff yeah released. He was an so you know you. They gave me the job. That's job then. He put me on salary which was like unheard of. Couldn't believe that it was like it's like one hundred fifty dollars a week or something. But i was a young man. I didn't have no expenses. So man made it now. So i moved to knoxville. You know and then i started you know gain more recognition for lack of a better term as as a as a player singer and of course we recorded the painted lady record which that particular song to this day people associated with me sort of signature song. And you know they love record. You know then. Now you're in a part of the country. Were we buddies. Barbecue is a home Sort of Base where we play you know when we were traveling and they had all these different bands that would come through. And so i got to know skaggs better you know. Of course you know. Boom craig was actually yeah. J. growing newsouth is dead after that increase know. And so you just started you know. Continue to lead all these people. One thing led to another sunny. And bobby you know and so i work with them until i think nineteen eighty eighty one. I believe and i think what to do. After that i moved home and rector fredericksburg and that was when i was going to burn out stage and just need the break and Moved back home. And next thing. I know And then i freelance. So i would. I would go out. And i don't know just hang out with people go to the bertrand sitting with self scene or something you know do whatever and and But i but. I had a day job i worked at a music store and then one day Thunder remember how this took place somehow another. Oh i had met I guess. I'd met ricky and ronnie simpkins prior to moving back home because they were in a band called upland express and they came to buddies to play. And so that's when i met him originally and then time went by one day When i was at home. I get this call from donnie grove. Who was the original member of the grass which is member of seventy seven. I i eight and he was going through a whole band revamp and so in that band was done. He plays guitar runny on bass. Radio fiddle samuel banjo and they were looking for a singer. Tenor singer mail and player. And that's win Donny call did you have. Would you have any interest said well. Yeah i mean. I'm at home you down the road i said want us. Oh i did and We got together recorded a lot album. And then you're later we left but what what what happened was is the four of us. Mine is. Donnie decided to start living in virginia squires. was foreign and have been around nineteen eighty. I think so somewhere along and they might have been eighty two and And you know we thought well we can give this go. You know we thought we roll young and we had the same ideas in terms of musical approach and arrangements and material home balancing it from our traditional roots to our contemporary influences. In range of gordon of course now they call it a on what to use a term now cutting edge or something. Nobody was thinking about any of that stuff just playing music and enjoy it and You know we we We pursued that is then but we had to go on the department of defense for full about six or six down. In the caribbean we obligated committed with a high various and we had a manager l. hopper it should bush. I can book. It book y'all but but before you get back here when everybody gets on all you get together and come up with the name so you know. All this time went by. While we were on tour and caribbean nobody could come up with a name. We didn't know what to say. I mean they all sounded corny to us. Rookie don get on the pay. Phone like surveys. Full come back home and he says we says retail out. I mean we just don't have a name now say well. I've got just what you're going to be called. He says the virginia squires and rick. Look joe's thought. That's the most stupid thing i've ever heard on life because that's the time you know. If you're a sports fan the aba was going on in richmond. Virginia you had a basketball team back. Julius erving dr j. was part of that and they were called virginia squires but I think that's a good name because we were from virginia squires or something like southern. Gentlemen type thing you know so we can okay and it stunk. And then we started our journey and then You know we we kind of went from there and and we Sunny produced first independent Record sonny osborne and then sunny That was jimmy squares with the glass. I think and then sunny pitched us to rebel. And then we did. I don't know three or four record shop for that and that's kind of how that went down so you know just it just a one year to the next things just started happening for me and that's just that's a short shore right there. I tell you over. Want more you and you're not born made all it's all interesting What would be your favorite virginia squires record if you had to pick one mark warner Record you know a look at records. You hope that ever records that you record you get better you know the next project will be better than the last one but i think I think the virginia squires with the touch of class which was the independent record. We released was really an example. That showcased all of our talent at its peak locally usually arrangement was and lots of energy and a good balance of of of material that got out there and people started. You know thinking. Oh this is interesting. And and then after that are circuit record I can't remember what the name of that record is worse. I think terrain mountains and memories. I believe yeah mounted memories. And i think that record was another stepping so stone force but you know like all of our records for different reasons you know the hard times and heartache so it has good material on it and our thinking was third record. Whatever the gospel record all gospel record was. I'm working my way that record. I mean you know honestly listening to bill monroe. You know with all his core chats and it was a showcase of cappella quartets trios duets. straight ahead rub and like little white church or whatever in the face you know banjo and be you know so. I think that was a record of most of that material. Not all but probably or good friends. Sonny let them roll a lot of that stuff and We were proud. I think i think one of the things that you ask all everybody. You know the sammy rookie running myself. I think they would answer. That are material most of our material. You know we got that was original. And we've got you know a list of a good song. Writers that picture psalms and so we try to go into every record. You'll making sure that we got a nucleus of original material. And i think that helped you know further. Our airplane are career with the fan base on a national basis. To come into my mind songwriters that you guys recorded. A lot of their stuff was a random hilton. Larry mcpeek true. Yeah those that's those were the two. We'd all But yeah that's that's so true. You know i miss rantel your just. You know cold sheets rain. And he pitched us several of the songs and But then you know by the time and then. Of course larry mcpeek. I was a huge big brothers fan and and of course rookie and running raised right there. Wisdom south west. Virginia so ricky worked with the mutation and you know Larry in my would always be so supportive and pictures material. We did quite a few songs and So you're right And are gone to think as our hard times in heartaches record which came into play. By that time you know we had We hit become real good friends with john starling and john. John was always the he likes that stuff. I mean john would be the most happiest. I think in many ways to just listen to tapes. Listen to songs hours upon hours and finding that material that was one of his thinks he really enjoy doing so he would you know i of course He lived in the same town that i live in from fredericksburg. You know and Go to his house when we listen to ours and he you know we've come up. He not so. What do you think. I think this sounds like seventy guys so. We helped us to you. Know health along the way actually and You know and then. I think you know once time went on you know. I think at least from my perspective. I think when you're young you don't really think about sometimes the big picture and and in in what you have. Sometimes you get caught up just like having blinders on and you can't see the big picture and what's donald saying it's not the They put it. It's it's not the sum of the parts. It's it's nucleus. has the group says a whole. Yeah that makes this thing work and sometimes you can get away from that and you know i think in some ways. Young bands window exception. That's what happens and that's why you see but know we were. Also i think in some ways alpha's in other words we all you know very strong minded individual people and leaders so you know we were But but you know tony rice. And what and david brisbane. And all those guys they started you know hearing about us and so we play these festivals and next thing you look over there there. They are listening to us with a big smile on their face. And i'm thinking lord you know they're my heroes and the world would we have foolish but We became friends but you know we one year we were down in you florida which we played seemed like number of years twice a year and tony had just moved back from california and he was living crystal river which was only twenty miles away. But what you know. We haven't really spent a lot of tom round tony in my lifetime other than here and they're sort of acquaintances but and then you know once he got to know but you so far away you know and so we heard that he was moving back and so what would come out. Sit in with us and we were at this festival in same now is standing there next thing. I know there comes tony and what strolling up to us. And hey guys and it's like you know uh when you be hero standing in front of you is like okay and so sammy now both like lower the school and then he said in with us you know and and and his larry was there at the time to and You know who's a big thrill for us and next thing. I know you know we go by is housing jam. Whatever and then At that time. I think the ban was starting to individuals. Were thinking more. Good something else. I think one of the reasons to. It's just really difficult at least at that time. And i think in some ways it's still the case but young bans Trying to get through price of their performance fee a one year for the next can be challenging and so you end up playing with the same amount of money year in year out and you know promoters by and large in those days they you know it's like you ask for razors almost like you defend them something and we just never could get to get over the hump where we could get our day rate up to. Were get really make some some good money now. We had days that we did but generally speaking across the board was a challenge. And so you know. The other opportunity started presenting themselves to everybody. And that's when you know working running. Start at working. Tony and sammy sort of freelance. Therefore wall and i did the same thing and And then eventually you know sammy with the lonesome river band you arrest history there and then for me i eventually kind of took a hiatus and then i started coming back and that's when i did my living dream which you know had guest on it and it gave me an opportunity sort of throw my hat back in the rain and get airplay and build up You know wilma career up again and of course they bring it. Rebel was always good to me and he should should were and so for me on his label. And then the next record i did was Following back to the all driven to women and bluegrass which the idea came to be because a relies on the first record. I didn't have any women guest tonight. We're up around. I don't know you know. Like i like all waves and john starling. My goal version. Tony rice rookie running the shuttle. Who was on. That thing was a bunch of people and But i i thought. Had i miss this that you know 'cause i always like claire lynch and rhonda lynn mars and the whites and such so for so long. Been around these people most of my life and Nice i got into music. And i think that you know. That's when it dawned on me. That if i do another record well i'll do a tribute to load upper eastern. Thank goodness they all greet them run. All these lease in you know handsome. Some guys too but Next thing i know you know it was like when the may award for recording of event of the year and and now if you fast forward looking all the women that are leaders in that are banned leaders that are just you know Getting it you know and it's funny how you watch it evolve you know and But you know it was. It was a good record. I enjoy doing it. And i'm glad i did it a lot of work but no land to be able to release that and then from there i started my own band started recording records you in the morning then. Yeah you know. Music has been good to me. Like i said in the beginning. It's it's talking to people like you and you never. You never know how music affects people. You know i mean you know. I've been blessed in many ways to don't take this for granted but no me but you know you put me out there and you don't really realize how many people you touching in some cases or how it finds its place and You know it's a pretty special special thing. Oh no i can tell you this. Like i told you like an eighty six when i i kind of. I heard y'all on at a little rock radio. Kabc if they had a bluegrass night back at that time they did two or three nights. A week at bluegrass. But that's when i first started hearing you guys and became a quick immediate fan you know. Well what what what attract. What got you know far. What's what was the thing now. I'll turn into the interview. What was what attracted you to our music. I'm just curious just overall sound of it. As as a band. I loved the way l. Sounded in the course. The instrumental work was top notch on the vocals and it was just powerful. I liked the songs i heard. Energy So yeah i can tell you i can tell you that you're talking about influence course at eleven you know. That's a real formative time for me. I was just starting to play in virginia. Squires were huge to me. We're like my beatles. Everybody has to be influenced. I mean everybody has to be inspired by something you know and for me you know it started out like i said with my family but once i started discovering this music and who had all and going to these festivals and seat listening my dad's records i mean. He was a huge huge. Jimmy martin van so i became a huge jimmy martin fan and still am to this day and you know Jimmy had that drive to unlike anybody else that that plagiarism guitar. And you know when you start hearing that stuff and you start hearing you know. Paul william sing tenor and crawl on the banjo and timing and tightness and monroe. I always love monroe's fiddles you know and his chop and then of course the stanleys sort of deep full of sound mountains sound that you can only get. I think in some ways coming out of that cultural where they lived. You know it just it moves you. And that's what did it for me. But then when i heard you know skaggs or rice or people my age starting to play this music and how they played it not heard their tradition a new there. I could hear it. And they're playing and singing their traditional roots. But i could also hear them wanting sort of put their own stamp on the music and that was really Attractive to me and You know so. We all are well. We'll find it somehow another inspired. Yeah that's like me. i started. Listen i guess with me. It was more kind of call contemporary bluegrass back. Then with you guys and like the early lonesome ever banding for. Sammy was one of them. And of course then you know. Since then i've many years ago. I went back and i love the first generation artists to. Yeah well it took you there. I think i think anybody now often wondered If young people That are very talented. That are good. Extremely well This day in time you know whether they will find the roots of the music and the good ones will you know. But i remember sierra. All she worked with me. I don't know which was a junior in high school. And maybe some of her senior season and of course. Her mom had to travel with us. You know because she is way ahead which is fine you know let's shop which is all good because i put sierra. Because she's you know goes without saying what she knew but But we ride down the road. One day she had her Apart or whatever you call it listening to different songs you know and i said who you got on your list there you know and she said well i got lou highway and i got this ban in that van i said. Do you have any bill monroe or traditional music. I sit flat smirks wherever it might have been. I said you need to listen to that stuff. And because if you you know if you listen to contemporary amana players and if they have for additional rooks they basically just taking the traditional of what they learn you know like from bill monroe and just sort of jazzing it out so to speak contemporary short of influence and they have the ability to do that and she does too you know but so i you know but she she went back and she found it and now you know but you know i think people always ask stay famous. You think these young people will discover that and he says well if they want it but they'll go back and find the roots of it and you know so. That's that's important. I think is to understand where music comes from. Lester why and what you know. The foundation of ivan like la the music anymore Yeah you know I think that's all great. I i love of time. I mean to me The spirit of old time music fiddling than claw hammer. Whatever it is you know. It's just is something about it. That just moves me and i love that stuff. Always have and always. Yeah me too. Yeah i'm not. i'm not trying to be broadminded. When it comes to music in general and You know try to here here here here as to what it is you know. In other words. I love lou. I mean you know we'd go right on down the line different judges music and i can get something out most all of it to be quite honest with you now. I haven't presaged Personally with what. I listen to more frequently than others but but i think that's a good thing you know i think that that's why You know the virginia squires were popular. Because i think we had no so the boundaries. If if that's makes sense we just sort of took all of these ideas and put of put him in a song and let go and just sort of work you know and But you know. I grew up being beatles fan. I grew up being a stone fan. I you know allman brothers fan and the list goes on and on now so those were influencing to me and As a as a middle to late teenager early twenty you know so you know. I think that that that's what keeps the music alive. And now they. Lord have mercy. Gosh talented people. You know that. I just 'cause i guess because what the internet and they get access to music so quickly next thing i know they love it. So gosh china where you do that so quick. You didn't seem to my took me forever to learn that stuff. But i was in a whole different generation. You know in in many ways. I guess i was creating it at the same time it realizes you know and But i'm a fan of all the young people that that that have criminal along and You know whether molly tunnel or sierra just name a couple i was gonna ask you something. Mark back to the squires for a minute. The hard times and heartaches record see. I'm gonna get your thoughts on this to me. That was almost in a way kind of a forerunner in in some ways. What like alison krauss named lighter. Think about you guys headline war between the hearts and yeah. Oh mama please. Don't crime always seem. That record is kind of a bridge and when you were young reject record released. You remember like eighty seven. I think okay I think that's a fair assessment You know again you know. We came along at a time. Were a guess. In in many ways as i reflect back on it We were there was only came. Remember who who they were. But i was gonna say there's only maybe it was a handful of groups. Maybe the lonesome river ban us. Maybe a few others coming to my mind. That had that contemporary sort of approach. And i remember the first time i met alice a we met elsom. We mean the virginia squires up and again we were doing this tour When we had done several tours with sunny and bobby we would do like be the opening act and they would come in. You know traveled throughout the mid west and throughout texas and just different places and most particularly year. I guess it was somewhere. Eighty four five. I don't remember now but remember -tarian in john's last name but they were living in springfield run so were outside of suit. Saint louis i guess and They kept telling us about this. Young girl named alice krause. I said i didn't know she was at the time. And so anyhow well. We made arrangements for her to come and listen to you guys and get her upper place. She's a great fiddle player and singer and she was like Maybe sixteen seventeen. i dunno. Parents came and So okay that's cool. And so you know she did. She sat in with russian and We thought okay. Well what are we going to play and she said well it's place we georgia brown and twin into something with and we all looked each other. Okay so off. We went and that was the first time i i realized or talent no i. I've heard her but it didn't take long to though that her potential was there and And of course the rest was history. But i think i think that the knoxville grass which was abandoned that i was with and like seventy nine eighty one somewhere along that if you listen to that material i think that that was the forerunner of contemporary bluegrass. As we know it today. And i think the virginia squires you know several years later was an extension of that movement in that direction. And then once you know it's funny back to you know how people how you touch people how people listened to your music and think about any of that brand. When you're doing is just you're just doing it because it's fun you don't know what you just none of that registers until years later all of a sudden you start hearing about it you know how people peacocking for us is so he was you know the head of limited on the magazine and said he was so very complimentary at times she says you know you guys if you has stuck together you know no killing no telling what level you could achieve and i guess what he's trying to say is sometimes you get together. Sometimes they're special combinations of talent or whatever reason that come together and you can keep that together and you can move it forward you get proper management and direction and you put a team together. You know You know as i reflect back. I think i think we we. We could have not only continue to achieve another level or levels. But you know. I think we could've potentially. It's the cards fell right. You know that would visit hyper growth could achieve a lot of commercial success because we were at the time on the on the cusp of all of that. That's when you had you know vince. Gill and skaggs. Marty stuart and you know chief widdly and you know all being from the same generation that say that they you know were trying with their talent tremendous talent you know they were finding their place and you know sometimes you reflect back and you think Shoot you know. maybe. I'm a wish we could turn back the hands of time and i think we would have probably made different decisions collectively as a unit. But you know you don't know those things that time but you can't look back you gotta look forward you know but whatever we laughed you know I think we're all content with you know and hopefully it's still viable to certain degree. Even though it's been all these years later you know you know but they still played the records and so and in all fairness to think back at that time some of the older generation that was still around at that time and made up the fan base. They weren't as accepting of more contemporary bluegrass. At as people are now as probably yeah. Yeah that was true. That was one of the battles if you will that. We fought all the time when he came. But you know we could. We could get on stage and because of our energy or in many cases showmanship. Meaning a lot of ricky. You know jamie and different things that we do. Musically i mean we could entertain crowds of all ages and like trying to get the promoters to I mean we were popular when we go to festivals for getting them to. You know pay us. An increase was so was so hard. But i think if we had of somehow stuck it out. I'd like to think we would've would overcame that but you don't ever know yeah as funny mark when you're younger to like like i said when i was first here in the squires i said in school and order like what are they doing laura right this second. You know. it's funny you think one. Yeah i'm same way. You know people get on admired in. I mean it's interest specialist special. You know and anything to at that time i would thank you know that because you guys were making records you know and stuff that you must be making like money and stuff and look at. These guys are making all this money playing bluegrass as a kid. You know. you don't realize the real truth a lot of things. Well you know you could make x. Amount of dollars but you also have operating calls you come back then a whole lot as you start giving it up so yeah but You know it's it is what it is and and but nowadays. I think it's a little different You know in terms of pay scale and so forth. But i mean of course you're not got sound exchange. All the artists look forward to that. You know that's we to this day you know quarterly checks but off of those records which does a pretty good summer money and so i mean you know it's still paying off your but I don't know you know it's you know and of course i don't see sammy a whole lot. I i don't see any of the guys a whole lot. Might see sammy once or twice. A year may talk to him on the phone or whatever. The case may be saying things ronnie ricky. I don't communicate as much not that it's any particular reason. Just everybody's into their own world you know and But what would we do talk. It's almost like we immediately go back to those days. We're brothers. I mean it's it's old home week. You know we talk like very sincere one another and There's nothing that we can talk about. And so you know what brothers rather life. You're listening to acoustic music. Talk with your host brad. Apple was going to ask you a question before. I forget it. I've got it wrote down here voided like thirty three years for the answer. This one the heartaches record. How do you pronounce the name of that instrumental on there that you guys recorded. I'm trying to think which one is that. Makokha makoko navy. Okay yeah coconut no. It's like an indian name in japan. We wrote that. Rigging i wrote that. I forgot that was on We wrote that lord we went to like. I don't know the first year we were together or something. I can't remember now but somehow how another we ended up in iowa des festival that remember but it wasn't anybody and Really and truly don't thing we just to always you know nobody there so we just stayed in our hotel room. Most most of the time and ricky not that our instruments out. And i said try this and if you listened to it's almost it's got bits and parts but like i can't remember i think it's the second third part or whatever it was i did like a big von type of thing. And then you last sorta took bits and parts from fiddle teams if you will sort of put them all together and came out with this team you know is the title of that and we were in. I think we we stayed in mccolgan. I think it was was named after indian tribe and i don't know what Native american drive it try. That was out in iowa but macoca. That's you say well that's neat to know that there's a town named that. Thank so if i'm not mistaken now forgotten but i'm curious it. I'm sure when the name of that town or something close by. How'd y'all freewheeling that's all word that come from the first record that's came we. I heard that home in my gosh. I i heard that on. What was your name of that. The barn berlin vince. Gill and a few others did a record. And i wasn't name of those guys Out in california and the names is failing me but They they did. Freewheeling remember hearing that and also gonna shoot. That's that's good team. You know once we did a little faster and but that's how that came about. I wish i could remember that name of that ban but barn in Bench that ban. That's that's how they came trying to. Was it sundance. Maybe at sundance correct. Okay that's it was. I'll have to look you to google that and make sure i'm right about that because i'm almost certain i am. I just remember hearing and it could have been alive record but research that because it's been a while since i've thought of that. Okay have that. I believe that southern came about and gotcha hadn't even got two years yourself records but or your band records. But he'll he'll hillbilly. Hemingway stands out as a really great one to me too Yeah i was. That was the last record. Did you guys quote unquote artist. Van leer on spend fraudulent I really liked that record a lot. a thought that it really showcased my abilities. You know from that that. I made sure to that to that point and you know so. All of the arrangements and a lot of the songs were original adding percussion You know just overal feel of of the contemporary. That's really what i would like to done. You know the rest of my life. I guess if i did a certain sound You know i really liked failed at home with that sound. And you know having girl jackson come aboard. Of course a met you know early on and always admired carl's work and in his contribution you know from all years. He's been doing for seasonal boy and You know so all the records prior to that one either co-produced with the groups that i was in we collectively go for his together or up. If it was my solo records would produce that. But this was the first time i just really wanted to just be ours. I didn't want to think about you know producing and arranging. And i mean i had some input we talk about it but i just wanted to really focus on saying the best i could and and And getting that performance you know. Hopefully carl would be able to maximize my performance and you know also some of the phrasing. I never did in my life. You know because. I think a lot of times bluegrass. I think what happens. Is you get used to a certain way of doing things and you do that. Record after record after record. Sometimes i dunno from also sounding alike. Yeah and decarlo suggest some of the phrasing changes. Yeah you know he would say. Try this try. That and i've never done to be honest with you. Took me a while in some cases to do multiple takes before i could even get in. Sometimes he wears me out. It's like going into a torture chamber. Come out of there like you followed a grizzly bear. Something like us you know. He's all you want to go home and go to bed. You know again tomorrow but But that was the point of it and you can result. I think was was what i was after. And but that record my think. I'm grateful that you know day freeman. Put it out but at the same time. I really think that the record was way above the bluegrass. Say whereabout about their heads Yeah you know. I i think it was two. In retrospect i think i think it was just too do we. I mean we're not got airplane all of that and a lot of people but in the overall picture. I think that that record might be different this day in time. But i think. I think the approach to that record in the sound of that record was a little bit too contemporary for the bluegrass market. As we know it and a lot of the. Dj's agreed percentage of on a national basis. They didn't know what they were. They didn't know what they were here. And you know what. I mean if if it wasn't sort of You know some sort of traditional twist or whatever their taste were it was like they didn't get it and that's that's okay. You know. I liked it in. I think you know. Sometimes you get caught up with trying to play to somebody else in student what they feel. I don't think that that's what would music is all about as an artist. I think artist should just you know. Could his music down whatever that sounds like even his best effort and whatever comes out of it. That's what it is. And if they like it great if they don't well that's okay you know but has their own personal taste and opinions and so even though that's probably my menial you gosh we use many records you know you can go back and pick a song here. I mean they're all good for whatever that decade was or year was but for my own personal taste out of always felt that that recognition best one. I've ever done that's just my opinion. It's a great record. Great songs on it to yeah the production of it you know. I was really pleased with and The the big sound of it. You know the fullness of it but you know i've got some bluegrass sort of feel things on it. I mean it's it's all has more acoustic based on it. But you know. I mean i did some liberace you know. I can't remember some of the songs on it but man. I think we did a quartet of something on it that you know straight out of bill monroe quartet school and I can't remember that sewn think think about you. Whatever it was that sort of was bouncing e which came like a jimmy martin thing you know and but you know also had percussion on all of that stuff which i liked it because i thought that would be identification with painting lady record. You know back eighty eighty one. So i was all about trying to come up with doing all these. Welcome those type of approaches and Yeah oh no but So yeah. I mean that. That's a good record. I've always to this day. I can listen rex here. Sometimes you listened to records bread past records you think lord have mercy good at thinking about but then again you can listen. Go back and listen to that music and some of it sounds really good whereas you didn't like it at that time or it may because you just burn out but you got all these years later with fresh ears. And it's like when and But the hillbillies re he'll hillbilly inning record. I've always. I can listen to this day and not you know not i shall. I said that'd be disappointed. They'll be well. I got one concluding question for you. Okay what advice would you give young people out there. Listening that are thinking about a career in in this kind of music or any music for that matter I don't know just just stayed true to who you are. I guess You know tried to Play your music or singing music And be yourself. You know no limitations. You know don't record music record music and do your songs because that's who you are an artist and it's okay to do that but if you do it in a way to work you're trying to make somebody happy Like your record label and and that's fine line by the way because you know you've got other people that gonna have import but if you get somehow manage all that you know with a good producer or whatever the case may be and and just do your thing. I mean you know whatever that might be doesn't have to be fancy or could be could be just saying like you feel feel as and play like you whatever those ideas and those notes that come out. It's okay because to me. That's that's the magic of music. And i think that's why That's why they create created. Creativity comes from red. I believe because there's no limitation you know you you given this gift so put that gift how you feeling and just let the notes come out that makes sense oser be betrayed who you are. Be true to the rs that you are and And i think that will speak for itself. Alternate was as vice or not. But it's that's why. That's that's the way i feel about in this. You know i mean you have Naming these things. And i don't mean to but but you know yep kristie lease and you know chris. He played with the best of them. Whether it's rawhide or whatever but you know he's he's a young man that just has all the music in it in and he just you know puts it out there and there's many others to do the same thing and whatever level your just be true to who you are and i think you know if it's meant to be and the talents there no works out. Then there's no reason why the listener base out there won't You know won't enjoy -joy that and i got the business part they'll get me started on that because you know that's more kidding and target your your target audience and all that stuff and so there's lots of decisions that go into all of that but just strictly be an artist like you're sitting on the front porch in plain and saying you can get that on a. I mean how the guys used to do it back years ago. They didn't have any. You know this technology that is today they just got around one by saying yeah played live the dynamics all just pure rawal. And that's that's what you know. Let's work through artist do so. Yeah yeah he had. We'd like to thank mr mark. Newton again for joining us on the show today and giving us insights on his career music. We'd like to invite you all back next week. For another find episode of acoustic music talked to podcast until then please be safe. And we'll see you back here Welcome to acoustic music. We explore the art of acoustic music and musicians with your host brad apple.

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Brad Apple Interviews Flatpicking Guitar Legend, Dan Crary

Acoustic Music Talk with Brad Apple

47:05 min | 5 months ago

Brad Apple Interviews Flatpicking Guitar Legend, Dan Crary

"Jeff you're listening to acoustic music. Talk with brad apple. Welcome to coup stig music talk. We explore the art of acoustic music and musicians with your host. Brad apple i love folks and welcome to acoustic music talk. I'm your host brad apple and again we welcome you this week. We're going to be talking to mr. Dan carey if you're like me. Dan played such an important part in my flat picking history. I'll listen to him. Continually for a long time. Had all his records and a lot of his instructional materials. And i tell you when it came to flat picking fiddle tunes There's hardly any any better than dan. Carey he certainly set the stage for what flat picking guitar was to be when he started doing this Back many years ago. So dan and talk by phone the other day and we got to talk about his career his thoughts on flat picking guitar and the the history of it and his own experiences and bluegrass bands and as a so performer. So let's go ahead and get into that interview with dan carey dan. Thank you for being on the show again. I sure appreciate getting to talk to you. And you've been hero to myself and so many of us sat here in the flat picking and bluegrass world. And it's just a pleasure to have you on the show thank you. I'm glad to be here or dan. You have established yourself in. History is one of the leading. Innovators of flat pick guitar. And i was wondering if you could take back once again to the early days when you were starting out. What got you interested in the guitar. And what was it like back then when flat pick guitar really was unheard of. Let's see. I guess. I would take us back to two different times. One is when. I started to play the guitar as a kid when i was Sort of twelve years old. I'll take it back to that time. And then i'll take back to the days of when i was in bluegrass if Yes that would be a good answer. Because when i started playing in nineteen fifty two people can't really understand this but the guitar itself was really obscure not just flat picking and and there were. There were lots of guitars around But nobody was playing much lead on acoustic guitar and the leave that was being played was on electric guitar. Pretty much but Somehow i was lucky. And when i was twelve years older spinning the am radio and there was a program on a Kansas city. I think it was on On a station called The only think maybe maybe Candy see and there was an old boy named don sullivan who had Doing our country music radio show every day on am radio. It must have gone out over five states this station and back in those days one guy and guitar could have a radio show live if he had a sponsor and don sullivan goddess lahser and he was one of these old time to country music singers and he tuned his guitar a little bit low in order to accommodate his voice. I believe But it had a wonderful twangy. Jiang li Steel strings sound. And there was something about me. I didn't know anything about country music. I'd never been around it. But i love that south and Later in life. When i was working on a radio station myself in kansas city doesn't announcer. I told that story. And by gosh don sullivan colby. While i was on the air. And i got a chance to thank him personally for getting the interested into guitar. That was that was a funny world back then because because people just didn't play the acoustic guitar seriously on the other hand there was one guy who did in nineteen fifty two. there was one guy who played Steel string acoustic guitar seriously and he did it with a flat. Pick and i was hank snow and sometimes hank snow doesn't get credit for being one of the early flat pickers but but he's certainly was and He always played lead music on guitar And with his bands now now he could. He could afford to Hire a of top band and so forth and so on but But he always played lead guitar and further later in my life. I had an opportunity at a country. Music shows to be the mc. And i got to see him and stand about ten feet from him and and watch him Watch him do that stuff. So that was really great. Well somewhere along in there. I also heard bluegrass on. Am radio and if you can imagine if you can imagine bluegrass music on am radio back in the early nineteen fifties. Bluegrass was just part of country music. Right and It was not unusual for you to hear bluegrass bands on a on a country music. Show so i. I got to hear The stanley brothers. And i got to hear the lonesome. Pine fiddlers and got to hear plasma scruggs of course and and bill monroe and And i really took the bluegrass music but nobody was putting flat picking together with bluegrass at that point much. A little bit later on done reno did because reno the wonderful banjo guy also played guitar subplot. But i didn't hear don right now until quite a bit later so Those were my early exposure to our music they can and i loved it but it was a long time before i ever got to participate in bluegrass music. Or even see it live. And as as late as we Middle sixties when. I was living in california and going to school out there I had never seen live Any of the bluegrass bands. That i listen to on the radio. And i remember bill monroe and the bluegrass boys. We're going to come to california and play a concert. And i was standing outside the door of the concert hall with my tickets in my hand and they announced that monroe's bus had broken down and he wasn't going to get there so i still didn't get to see any of those but finally when i moved to louisville kentucky because there was a graduate school. They're gonna go to in louisville kentucky as they were a little bit closer to the music. And i got to go through a festival and see all my heroes finally and sixty about that. Same time. I met some guys with played in a bluegrass band and wanted us to form a band. And so some of the Some of the early guys in my life for people like lonnie peers and evil walker. And buddy spurlock danny jones and guys that we formed a bluegrass band in louisville kentucky and I was playing a little bit league with not very much because it just wasn't done and bluegrass music. There wasn't anybody much like was playing lead in an irregular Touring bluegrass band. That you would hear so alani pure of the The elder member of our band and our fiddle player said then you ought to play some lead on the qatar play. Somebody's fiddles So i said well. That's an interesting idea. So i started working out leads and We we got a gig there in louisville and we were playing five nights a week and i was trying to figure out some weeds up to play on the guitar. And i wasn't thinking about that. It was unusual or anything but then As it happened at at one of our local concerts the the carlton haney. I'm trying to think of that. Named carlton was the guy who sort of started the bluegrass festivals in the mid sixties Bluegrass festivals kind of invented in the sixties and carlton. haney was the first guy to put on these festivals and He heard our band and booked us at his His big festival in camp springs north carolina. I think it was or About nineteen sixty and sixty nine. I believe that was the first one. And so what that was like in answer to your question of what it was like back. There is that we played pretty well. But we were really scared. And i don't think we've. We played brilliantly at that festival. But as far as i know we were the only band there where the guitar player was playing breaks. Let taking just lose. Not part of it now. There were some guys there. They could play and You know there were. Charlie waller was there with the With the country gentlemen later he was. Charlie waller was one of the great rhythm players of grass music and later. He demonstrated that he gets left And so beautiful. It is make you cry. But he wasn't doing it at that festival and larry sparks with there with ralph stanley. And of course leary's works is a fabulous thicker and and we could have done it in those days but they just weren't having to do that and fill our our band had a big surprise effect and when when When i would take a guitar break people would sort of stop eating their sandwich and look up and and be surprised at that. I remember that That don reno and bill harrell. Who were who were camped over behind the stage. When we started playing played a guitar breaks. They came running to see who was doing that. I don't think the brakes were very good but the fact that we were the only event at the festival that was playing guitar breaks in nineteen. Sixty nine Got a lot of attention and so it. It helped our reputation and from then on we. We were expected to play guitar. Breaks and and i think that that Some other bands were sort of think about well That we could be doing that to of course then the gravy tar players who had not been allowed. The opportunity to to play guitar breaks Started Started saying well you know. Let's let's do a little bit of this. Who else do you remember coming on the scene shortly after you began flat. Picking dan man. That's a long time ago to remember. And i was doing a lot of other things at the time so i wasn't paying so much attention to the other bands. You know but of course one of the people who came out of woodworks As far as we were confirmed with tony rice and tony rice came out from california and About i guess this would be about nineteen. seventy three. Seventy four was discovered and started playing with j. b. o. Started playing. I i guess with the bluegrass alliance with my band. And then he started playing with jd. Crow and I'm might be wrong about the years but somewhere along in there Tony went back. He's from california and got discovered and he started playing bluegrass alliance and with jd crow and making those early appearances and of course when when he arrived on the scene man that was that was the last word and people do. The picking had certainly arrived at that point. Since we're talking about tony rats dan. I was wondering if you could Sharing the thoughts about tony special memories that you might have of him. I know you got to play with him a few times. Could you talk to us about tony. i wrote a. I wrote a little bit of a of a attributed. Coney rice and so i would refer people Tha that the that is online but Yeah tony and. I never got to be around each other very much. Because i was leaving and going to a different graduate school and he was just getting established in kentucky so we would bump into each other a little bit backstage at gigs. And so on and I always had nice conversations with him. And i got the play with tony On stage just very few times the walnut valley festival out in kansas That that holds the The national flood picking championship At their first best. Evil book Book me. I was at their very first festival. And also among the other amazing pickers and by the way. We have to talk about doc watson and context doc watson. Was there certainly before. I was a long time before but But they would. Doc watson and norman blake and me and they would put us on stage. They put us on stage to play together which was one of the more Terrifying experiences cut. If you're on stage with doc watson he wants to do something that is worthy of being in that presence also so at the first festival the three of us got to play together and then i think it was the next year or two years later that it was those three people and and they had booked tony rice to coney was there and i have a picture of all four of us onstage and and that was that was more flat. Picking music schick stick. It was absolutely great but But i think the thing that tony rice achieved is that his his music of sort of defined. I think tony a lot. Like A lot like scruggs earl scruggs of course was the central figure in the history of bluegrass music that defined what that music is like and there were a lot of people who who added to the definitions of bluegrass music. i think lesser flat added to it permanently. Bill monroe of course certainly permanently influenced bluegrass music. earl scruggs. I think any banjo player. And certainly my partner Bill evans will tell you this with the was the the key establishing figure and bluegrass music. And you can still hear The genius of earl scruggs. When you listen to the bluegrass music today being played by other people Only right. So i think did the same thing i think that his approach to bluegrass and and the The amazing solid bluesy ironic Things that that his genius thought up to play Actually made a permanent mark in bluegrass. Music that you still here today. So i certainly consider him to be one of the seminal permanent historic figures in our music and he and i always got along great and have conversations made a couple of recordings together and And i i was very very sorry to see us. So how long were you with the bluegrass alliance then Trying to think I was I was going to graduate. Theological school and louisville and I decided that. I needed to to take a different direction in my life at that. Time and And i went to a different graduate. School went and studied communication studies and Wound up doing that. But i had to go back to kansas to do it so i had to leave the bluegrass alliance. I think after two years. I think i was with them for two years and then i had to go back to this other school and they are reorganized at that point. Okay did you cut your first Bluegrass guitar record. When you were still with the alliance yes. I cut that with the them and at the behest of of money. Pierce again urged me to do that. And those guys happily were on that album with the and i. I love that album because all of the original Bluegrass alliance guys were on there. After you left the alliance and then you said you went back to kansas for some some schooling. How to jim about landing in california. Well my first job after graduate school i i was going to school to be a professor and The jobs that were opened to me when i finished my Graduate work there Number two precisely one and it happened to be in fullerton california. So i said yes to that and picked up and moved in the family to fullerton california where i be became a professor and spent thirty years a teaching students. They're at cal state fullerton and it happened to be about an hour. Down the freeway from byron birla. So that's how. I connected up with those guys and wound up in my second. Bluegrass fan was with The move to california to me very close to berlin and john hickman and those guys okay also was wondering what guitars you played early on in your career. And i know i'll get on into your signature model tyler here in a minute but i was wondering what kind of guitars you started out with. I know you you had a mossman for while. Yeah going back a little earlier. When i first joined the the bluegrass alliance the the one Sort of really a model guitar. That i had ever owned. I had gotten a gift when i was a kid. My family pooled their money and bought me a gibson j two hundred a guitar that i still have the beautiful guitar but it's not a very bluegrass guitar and It does not cut through with those other instruments like Like the of stereotypical and standard Mark d twenty eight. And so when i was playing with the alliance and i played with that guitar for a while. And they sort of my partner. Throw a look at that. And and we're thinking and finally not only thinking but saying that's not a real bluegrass. Are you need to have a d twenty eight so I played a guys. D twenty eight with the band and realize yes. It did sound quite differently. And that was kind of instruments that that you need to have when you're playing against banjos and fiddles and all of those instruments that You know. I don't know if people realize this but a bluegrass band is like it's a conspiracy to drown out the guitar and banjos and mandolins are quite a bit louder and so i for some time i burrow. Danny jones was a nice deep. There was the d thirty five. I think it was a d twenty eight anyway. I brought his guitar for awhile and he And i had a mandolin that he wanted to play. So we played each other's instruments for a while And eventually i had to get me a the twenty eight. And i had a couple of really nice nicely and then along about Well fairly early in my life. There along came. Stuart mossman Who was from kansas and from winfield kansas. A town where the walnut valley festival has happened for the last sort of forty eight years. And i'm awesome approached me about playing one of his instruments and he and i got to be good pals and so for for some years. I did play mossman guitars and on occasion. I still do. I still have a couple of them and And his idea was to make an instrument that was more balanced than The standard dreadnaught market guitars and and that was good because Again under the heading of a guitar that will cut through and Hold its own among all of those other Very very prominent instruments like fiddle advantages and so on Having a little bit more trouble in the mix was a good idea and the muslim guitars were quite good for that then as mossman I played those mossman guitars for some years. Muslim unfortunately became sick and passed away early in his life. And and about the time that the that the mosman company was Going into a retriever. Most guitars still exist right now. But but Somewhere along in there. The company went into retreat. And i don't know the history of it and mossman had passed away. Unfortunately and i met him. He was a good friend but he was also influenced will on other people and along came. Bob taylor of taylor guitars And when i met him and started listening to taylor guitar. I realize that That this guy was also genius guitar maker. And as i remember a conversation with bob taylor he says one of the things that mossman did was to show still the way that somebody could Come up with some new ideas in the acoustic guitar game. So somewhere along in the Yeah i'm again. I'm trying to get these days straight around late seventies Nineteen eighty something like that I played some taylor. Guitars had a conversation with bob. I thought there are twelve. String guitars were the greatest ones that i had ever played and the But their string guitars were again very heavily weighted on the bass side. And so. I had a conversation with bob about My need for a bluegrass guitar would be one would again compete with the other acoustic instruments in the band and sound great And blend in with a banjo and fiddle and so on so he said well. If that's your opinion how about if you and i make guitar. And so he. And i did and by he and i. He made the guitar. And i had the opinions and i remember writing down from from By home and fullerton california on the train to To san diego about five or six different times and Bob would have advanced the causal guitar and would want me to listen to it and we have a conversation about it. And so the Dan curry taylor. Guitar was was created in that process and I understand that Even though they're not making that guitar these days that it has become an item and and so The the dan carey so dan carey. has has become a historical figure. So has the dan query. That doesn't mean that. I'm not playing but but anyway there are dan carey qatar around for sale. I know people that that have bought them on the On the premium guitar markets And and that's where that history came about was as a sort of development from From my j two hundred to my e twenty eight Two of my mossman To my dan. Curry taylor. And i still play that. I'm still playing of cory. Taylor model if i remember correctly i've read before on the dan. Curry signature model tyler. The top is thinner. Actually in the braces are a little thicker. Yes that was that was. Bob's idea was to make the top center and the By a few thousand and the braces and what that produces is a shift in the till analogy Towards the treble. There's plenty of based on our As anybody who's ever tried to play one of them on a you know on a standard microphone will tell you to position. Just right to balance that base of a huge Ring that comes off of that guitar but it also has those mid range and treble Tone in that gives us the ballots and so for me balances volume is important and spo is balanced. And and i think we achieved that with that instrument. Yeah i would agree. The ones i've heard are are very balanced and really cut through the mix really nicely. I still like mine. In fact. I'm still playing the prototype. The bob and i worked on all of those weeks. It isn't it is in wonderful shape. Tim laura lawrence with one of one of the key. People at the taylor. Guitar company in those days has Adjusted and refreshed it and set it up for me. It sounds absolutely fabulous and And bob and i talk on the phone about that guitar every once in a while. What kind of pixie us dan. I had that downed ask you well. i have gone through. I started out with a very light and thin. Pick and then i went to heavy picks and i've tried everything anymore Sort of fender medium is thing and i turn it around a play on the corner of the throw around the corner you know and That seems to to to be the pick of choice anymore. I tried you know it's Unfortunately a tortoise shell picks are wonderful but they're a little bit different brittle and unfortunately a tortoise has to give its wife in order for you to have one so that was sort of unfortunate. And i decided to I evolved into playing with fender mediums. Actually okay you've made a lot of great recordings through the years. And i wanted to ask you in particular one of my favorites When it came out and still is is thunder. And i was going to ask you about that particular recording because that was sort of a departure in a way i would call it flavored more like some of the windham hill records that were coming out back years ago. How they had that record. Come about exactly at that time i was. I was making bluegrass records for a sitter hill records and The windham hill phenomenon. Him along with a kind of music that came to be known as new age music. I believe with the title. Am i right about that yesterday. I believe that's right. That's right. I'm trying to remember all of this this morning after only two cups of coffee. It's three hours earlier out here. So i'm still brushing the sleep Actually i'm i'm wide awake and happy to talk to you but I'm trying to remember way back to some of these events and and the coffee is kicking in. That's really good New age music featured quite a bit of acoustic guitar music and there were some new age guitar. Heroes so Very puff at sugar hill records than i Agree that i should Try my hand at making a new age. Plus picking album and the album called thunder. Ration- is the of that we I work with the billy. husky An amazing engineer at a studio up in oregon and And billion i created this album called thunder ration- which has its all guitar instrumentals. And it's flesh picking and it's melodic but we use a lot of studio effects and Try different arrangements and Did some overdubbed of Multiple guitar tracks and did some of that new agey stuff and yeah i. I'm still like to hear the underrated album Some of the music from that spill into my repertoire play live and so that's where that came from. I really like how you you redid. Lamb rock and you put the the different introduction and conclusion on it there for you got into the head of the tune there. That was really cool mark. Alum lime rock was on that album. That's that's right. Play that tune. I can't play it with all of those different effects but I still play the tune and still sounds nice on the recording. I think it does talk about your influence. I've had some of your instruction types before. And i know you talked a lot about a flamenco influence on your playing and especially in like the dynamics of flamenco players The greatest guitar performance of any kind. That i ever saw was a concert at william jewell college outside of kansas city missouri of qatar player. Whose name was who professional name of gets And i loved flamenco music. It was sort of the next thing. I loved after after bluegrass. And when i heard i i will make oglethorpe clear if i was just thumbed. I never was able to play flamenco myself. Because that's a different. That's completely horse of a different matter. You play with fingers and fingernails than you play with a completely different kind of guitar. So i was in admire of than i loved it and i still do they but i never really was able to play flamenco but there was some stuff that that i could learn from flamenco players including dynamics and tone and especially the dynamics of it and so i think i was influenced by that played russky out of with a pick and and bore down on on Some of the bass strings. Harder than i would have if i had not heard the flamenco players and heard what they do with that. So i think it was good for my plank to To listen to the guys and try and my own Country boy picking away to imitate some of their moves and then integrate that into know into some of the fiddle tunes and the bluegrass stuff and just as other players have have been heavily influenced by blues and bluegrass. I think i was a little influenced by five flamenco players. And by the way That night in williams college. I listened to sa- because for many years and had most of his albums and that night i got to see him live for the first time and he came out Responded with a big smile to the applause from the audience and tripped amazingly and almost Catastrophically over a sort of a piece of stage furniture that they had put out there by his chair. You know when. I go player just down in a chair and put put on a stool but for this concert they put some sort of a of a sound reflector out and as the beacon. Walking was chair before playing a note. He tripped gosh almighty over that Thing and almost went to the floor and on those smashes guitar but he caught himself out goodness and sat down and collected and sell for a minute and a in the middle of his first piece. He just stopped playing he. He lost it because he was still gravel from From almost falling to the floor and then after that it was likes to be got hold of himself and played the most seriously that i ever heard him play or any other guitar player. Wow and so it was a night. Where if the because head to recover himself after an accident. And i never seen anything like that. And i'm sure that experience with Was infused in everything. I did from an absolutely. I wanted to ask you dan. How do you feel about the direction. That the art of flack pick guitar is going nowadays. You think it's in good hands with the players we've got do you have particular new and up and coming players on the scene that you are aware of that. You are paying attention to these days man. You know if. I start naming names. I'm going leave some people off the list that ought to be on that list. but but You know the the the younger players coming along now and and female players. You know they're never used to be any female vickers now. There are really good ones and And so i. I think the young players and the female players are all doing exactly what they ought to be doing which is Loving the roots of the you can hear the roots of the music and they're playing and then they're reaching out and finding new things to do and i'm not gonna make a list because inevitably just just sitting here trying to make it up off you know off the cuff. I'd leave out some people. So just let me say were congratulations than to the new young players. You're not gonna hear me. Be one of those guys say. Oh this is the way we did it in our youth so you ought to do the same thing. Oh no. I think it's really great. And you know future audiences are going to figure out what the future of our music is. And that's the way it ought to be. You plays the people and you inspire them and if you get through to their hearts and their souls then your music will survive and prevail. And that's the way. Bill monroe it. And that's the way earl and lester and chubby wise. It's the way doc watson did it. And and so forth they found an audience and the interplay between the audience and the genius of the player created the music of today. And let me go back to doc watson. Can we do that for a minute. So all of that talk about well. Done reno was back there and And those other early players and so forth and then in the mid sixties We did what we did. Doc watson has been there all along not quite as early as well. Somewhere there in the fifties doc watson came on the scene and and everybody was completely blown away by what he was doing and so in some ways and some ways the most influential of all flesh pickers. Yeah i. i would say the most influential of all plastic doc watson. 'cause he was doing in in his world and i guess he would define it as the solo player and the the folk music and the old time music world doc watson was flat picking way way back there before anybody or any of the rest of us With the possible exception of don reno my Memory at the calendar is not quite precise enough to say Who came i m The actually one of the first flat pickers was Bill monroe who was Who was quite a serious or at one time in his life and Exclusively pretty much on the mandolin but bill played the guitar and he was. You know way way back there. But doc watson came along and The first i heard of him of course was in the fifties and dock. Was this This incredible musician who could pick He could flat pick. He could joins flatten scruggs on a columbia bluegrass album. That had to be fabulous and it was and and he could also work with with really deeply traditional musicians and fit right in with them. He was also a fabulous character who was smart and why and did amazing things and I i used to Enjoy sitting around backstage. And talking to doc watson he would tell me such what's interesting things about his life like one time he said you know dan. I've been building I've been building a shortwave antenna on my. I think he said on his garage and remember it wasn't it was a blind person and has been blind since childhood He did all kinds of things he worked on his house. He got up on ladders. And he installed the end. Tina for shortwave radio that he bought and i said that's really interesting. What got you interested in this. He said i decided. I wanted to listen to the bbc and another. You know there wasn't cable tv and and all of that and so if you want to listen to the bbc had to get shortwave radio and listen to it from from i guess from england and Doc decided that he wasn't getting the straight story from the news he said. I don't think the the news people are telling me the straight story or the whole story and he thought that the bbc would tell him that whole story. So doc watson the man whose whose hands were priceless in this world The guy who could not see from childhood was up on the roof of his garage installing the antenna. For a shortwave. Radio as i understood his story that he was telling me that he could listen to the bbc To get the news. Wow that's story. That's the kind of guy. He was and He he loved his son and his grandson and and his family I'll tell you another story about doc watson. The first time i saw him was way back in the sixties. When i was in louisville Playing with the bluegrass alliance the the bill monroe Festival grounds were just across the river. Up in indiana at Forget the name of the town in indiana but anyway not too far from the ohio river and i went up there for a festival. One day and doc watson is going to appear as accessible and dog did appear. I have a couple of pictures that i took him. I guess the first. That's the second time. I saw him alive and he had come to. Bean blossom indiana. That's the name of the town being awesome. He had ridden from north carolina to To indiana by himself with a guitar and his suitcase he had come up on the bus as a blind person the guy could get around and he he could depend on people to help him get off and on the right bus and make it to indiana and play. Gigs way back then go. He truly was one of the most monumental human beings and one of the most sweet brilliant powerful musicians That the world has ever seen and it was a great privilege of my to talk a little bit. Absolutely and i know he was on. You're jammed of i do record wasn't he. Yes he was. Yeah got got to play duet with him. Another scary session where you want to play something. That is worthy of being. In the same room with doc watson which was not Speaking of sessions dan. Let me ask you this when you go on the studio. Do you have a particular set up. you lack. Like a pair of microphones or anything particular. You just leave that to the engineer. Well i sort of leave it to the engineer but i also listen to it and uh and have a lot of opinions about billy oscar. I i worked when many sessions with billy and He he and i pretty much agreed on very high powered microphones and they needed to be in a couple of places. So the stereo. Mike's one was turtle pointed at the base side of guitar and another one was pointed more at the treble side of guitar. And then of course they were mixed in a beautiful stereo mix and I did leave that up to the engineer but with a lot of opinions from me well i know that the covid pandemic has affected all artists. But could you tell us what you working on right now or and what you plan on doing. Hopefully when this pandemic is over well. I've been on the phone with With a couple of really good pals of mine who are currently in a band with me. bill evans and wally. Barnevik are my current partners. We We have been completely flood orange for a year and not able to To find a gig just like everybody else but we've sort of kept in touch and we've promised each other that That we're going to get together the next time it's possible Our next gig that we actually have book is at the walnut valley festival in september. Were pretty sure that nothing else is going to happen before that. So we're we're actually supposed to be at the forty ninth and fiftieth of the walnut valley festival. And so we've been planning how we're going to get ready for that. I have not seen my partner for a year now and I'm sure i'm sure we're to fall back into it but we're going to need a little rehearsal time to remember the arrangements and So we've been on the phone planning to do that. And the present plan is that we may go to new mexico To do some some gigs and to do some warm up In september bill evans is the great banjo man and the guru to banjo players of the world fantastic player and a great guy. Wally barney is that soulful singer who can break your heart with a song and a solid man as well. And i just love to work with these guys. They are fantastic human beings and and really cool players. And we're scheming to come back. We're not gone yet. But we're we're gonna come back at ya and and play some tunes that'll As people use the sand bluegrass. It'll make you bleed from the ear and You guys have a recording together too. Don't you yes. We have a couple of them and now the most recent one i am i going to remember the title for this. Album is called Prime time which is very appropriate for for three guys who were in our generation and And you can get that from my website. If you care to do that. that'd be nice. What does dan carey. enjoy doing. Besides music do you have any hobbies or when you don't have something on the calendar to to play or do otherwise. What do you like doing. Well i like playing with my dog. So i have a couple of wonderful dogs. One of whom is Is a month that we Adopted from a shelter in lodi california. Whose name is lodi. And he's a he's a little mixed breed terrier and And we have another dog. Whose name is racy and razi is snuggle and And has a sort of extra hyper personality. I love playing with my dogs I'm i'm a bit of a reader when i can be and i like to read Kind of a a fan of medieval history. I like to read about all the weird stuff that went on back around the around the fourteenth fifteenth century. So that's fun Like to like to listen to. And i like to listen for mediaeval music. There's i guess. I could have become one of those guys that actually seriously studies. That's not but i've read some folks listen to that music a lot and that probably crept into my to my bluegrass. Music will so if you if you buy them on my records and that's a little mosque growing on the edge of the music may come from from reading some of that stuff about about knights and kings and and all of the follies of the fourteenth century. Yeah okay. I think there might be some of the influences on the thunder record. Come to think of it maybe could be. There's a little mosque growing around the edge of some of those tunes. Dan thank you so much for talking to me today. And being on the show and Is certainly been a pleasure having you and talking to you about your career in this music well thanks. I've enjoyed a little reminiscent going down. Memory lane with you too thanks and And all the best to you and that enterprise and You realize that There will be An extra reward in heaven for people that to get nice music and other people's lives and enriched my way so go on. Thanks everybody for listening to this week's episode of acoustic music. Talk we invite you back again. next time. we'll have another interesting conversation with one of the greats of the acoustic until then. Please stay safe out there. And i'm your host brad apple. Thank you for listening to at coup. Stick music talk. Join us again next week for another episode as we continue to explore the world of acoustic music.

bluegrass alliance doc watson mossman brad apple tony rice don sullivan california louisville Bill monroe dan Charlie waller dan carey tony walnut valley hank snow kentucky fullerton kansas don reno Brad apple
2020-11-24- KSR - Hour 2

KSR

47:26 min | 9 months ago

2020-11-24- KSR - Hour 2

"Everyone needs more vacation right. The new united gateway card knows how to take you away with great travel rewards and no annual fee. Ever the wait for vacation is over tap now or visit united gateway card dot com to apply. David stockton was stockton mortgage. The fisher mortgage provider for cash are headquartered in kentucky with local service and local decisions. We've been helping people finance for homes for twenty years and we would like to help you to purchase or refinance. If you've not taken advantage of these historically low rates. I could be missing out on substantial savings. These low rates will not last forever so go to stockton dot com or call eight eight nine one four. Two two seven six to get started in a number eight two nine. Equal housing lender talk radio. Ten eighty welcome to our to kentucky. Sports radio presented by stockton mortgage. Now here's matt johnson. Welcome back hour number. Two sports radio five five seven one eighty text machine simpson four to five four drew of surprise. Not a lot of people have written. Tell me they're going. I mean i have like four and a couple of people have suggested me. There are still tickets available for tomorrow night. Yeah i actually. I'm actually surprised. There's war i mean if you think about how many we talked about this for years. Not that many seats available if you take away the employees and university staff and players and everything else and then. There's no seats assume behind the bench because they're doing the big space doubt benches so that kind of temporary rose they pull out so then you're moving on up and at that point the prices and being able to just deferred till next year. You'd have to be really enthusiastic to want to go. Sit in a new area by yourself not many fans and still cough up quite a bit of money. One person writes man. I'm going to the games. I usually sit on row. A lower arena pretty good shannon right arena very good now on row s which is eighteen. rose higher. Haven't missed but a couple of games since nineteen seventy five. I'm looking forward to it. But i have no idea what it's going to be like so if the row a guy is on row ass ryan then. There's a lot of people that are going to be seeing new seats coming only. Yeah yeah i. I think the number somewhere eighteen hundred the number of fans get to go eighteen hundred but there people tell me there are still tickets available. I'll tell you if that were me. I would go down there and take that cardboard cutout and put it in a row s. That'd be down there on lake. That's not gonna argue back with me either. So you're gonna take him or herself to move the cardboard cutout that's mousy you're in cardboard cutout go out there. S you cardboard picture. Okay so i think chris rodriquez not right so apparently i didn't realize this. The depth chart came out yesterday. Ryan jayme davis was back on it. Chris rodriguez was not max. Duffy tweeted out last night. He's back with the team. So that's good but maybe it was. James davis that was the false positive. He's on the depth. Chart but rodriguez is not. Yeah that was definitely an omission. Rodriguez was not on there. She gained jamie davis back. Definitely helped because alabama exposed that spot for sure they did. That was where we took the the worst. That's right all right. San for the blue lights cross bluegrass tour sponsored by the kentucky department of highway safety. We're headed to rock castle county by the way tomorrow is rowan county. So you rowan county folks. If you have information please send it. Matt dot jones kentucky. Sports radio dot com. We i would love your row. Uncanny info rock castle canny ryan a lotta. People wrote me. But they had like the same two or three facts. So i'm not quite the debt i have for some of these other counties just so the rock is hard in rock castle county. Say it's our football. He has become a child. Chain like listen to you. Is that what they say. Well maybe what they they do have a huge rock right by the football statement and says that the rock is hard as opposed to a soft rock. They say that says that you're saying that says that at the school. Yes huge rock right by their football. Stadium it sticks out of the ground. Says the rock is hard interesting thing slogan. Our first fat is a thing. Well they are the rock castle rockets and the school is. They're kinda right by the road. And then you drive right by on our way to conley bottom and wayne kennedy precise it and all that all right right castle. Kenny was named after the rock castle river. This is one of those counties that is not named after a person. It is named after the rock castle river. Which was i think named. After a place in england but technically rock castle county ryan is named for the river one of them. You quizzed us on that one and now it's right. Mount vernon is there and it was named for george washington's mount vernon even though george washington never came to rot castle county although if you read the history some people claim he did and said if i lived in kentucky i would live here. I found no basis to magneto. Pictures didn't happen. I wanna see photo proof of george washington george washington coming coming seen the whole state. This is where i would've lived right here. Otherwise it's just a claim. Mount vernon is that it is the home ryan of parts of the daniel boone forest and also renfro valley now. Have you ever been to renfro valley. I've never been been drove right past it a million times but never been to it. There was a time that renfro valley was one of the like destination country music places. It's still there and they still do stuff. They still have the barn dance. But there was a time ryan. They got sort of the cram de la creme of music would come through renfro. Valued have the renfro valley saturday night. Barn dance and you'd go yeehaw and it started to go downhill. And then they added alcohol. A lot of the old timers stopped coming. Because of that. And i think they've never totally recovered after that even though they still get really good at x. Busloads of people even from an indiana would load up and come to renfro valley to hear the music is that right. Oh yeah yeah shannon. Have you ever been the renfro valley. Barn day i haven't but it sounds like a place i would like to visit. I'm trying to look up and see what kind of talent they're able to get these days. We'll just fine. Well you're not getting ebay these days. Yeah i'm on the website says it's all canceled of course due to cova half that was before it was kinda doesn't it. That's what i'm looking at. Give me a minute. i'll have it for. You can give us about some wicked. Pd page has a list of all kinds of names. I give some of the big ones. I'd have to scroll through and i was told shannon to go there but it's a lot of country names. You would recognize that i probably wouldn't. I just wanted to. Who's been there recently though because like you said they used to get all marty stuart was there for me a year or two ago because remember we were going to go. Don't you talked about it. That's the that's who. I can remember being there. Relatively reese but like back in the day. They got like ryan. Alabama when alabama was alabama big. When they were a thing. I mean they still exist. But it's not quite quite the same thing. It is the home ryan of the great salt. Peter cave please explain. Is it not self explanatory. The great salt peter game. I'm afraid to say i think it's sa. L. t r e. I'm assuming that salt. Peter if it's something else let me know but the great salt. Peter cave is where all of to make gunpowder ryan. You have to use the mineral salt peter. Okay right or you did back. In the day and american gunpowder that was used in the revolutionary war and in the war of eighteen. Twelve most of the gunpowder that kept our country. Free came from the salt. Peter in the great salt. Peter cave in rock castle county. You're kidding him. Came from just one cave assault. Peter caves out there. Can you name another one. I do not know. Thank you very much into you. Know of another salt peter. Kay don't think so anymore. Salty peter's exactly so the salt. Peter cave in rock castle county provided all the gun powder that kept our country Stay free in. Its early days so drew we need a salute to castle county for that and it was also the location for scenes from steven seagal movie. Fire down below a classic film from the seagal collection. They went cave in that. Yeah your big far down below. People think i didn't know steven seagal has been in that cave the The kentucky music hall of fame is in is in rock castle county. Did you know that ryan did not know that. So here's my question for you. Want you guys to put your heads together right now. The kentucky music hall of fame started in two thousand and five. And i want you to sit and think about look at kentucky history. Who do you think was the first class. The the initial class in two thousand and two. Excuse me of the kentucky. Music hall of fame. I will give you hint. There are twelve people if you guys could get five of them. I will consider it a success. So who are the legendary ones loretta. Lynn is one of the twelve. Okay grandpa jones nice. That's good two of the twelve eighty three more guys. That's pretty good. Let me just say. I didn't think you'd get grandpa jones. That's well done three more about tom. T hall tom. T hall is number. Three yeah boise have been learning on this blue lights across the bluegrass tour. two more. Can you get to more of the initial class of the kentucky. Music hall fe. I can't think of his name. But the grandpa jones's buddy scarecrow green bean. Yes sir pro and the tin man are not on the list. They did not make it. Unfortunately i mean he may be in but he wasn't in the first class first class all right. Let's scratch him out when you think there are three on here. You can get Ricky skaggs that's a good gas but no patty loveless good gas. She's in but not the first class the judge and but not the first that not happen Who else going once. Everley brothers twice everley brothers get one more good will be so proud. Everley brothers is one. That was my last. One definitely should get okay. There's one that. I know you can get think about kentucky music lore when i say kentucky music what could what would you think all right. I don't think they're going to get it. I was i. Gosh you got four. I thought you were going five a fifth one that you should have gotten bill monroe. Bill monroe yeah. I don't think i would've gotten probably gonna get here. The others the osborne brothers that did rocky top rosemary. Clooney red foley merle travis. I don't know who that is. John layer jean ritchie and bradley kincaid. I thought you might have been able to get bill monroe the osborne brothers. Or maybe i thought ryan might get rosemary clooney but we have four. We failed well. I'm not. I'm actually kind of to be honest with you. That's more than i thought you'd get. There was a big debate on the people emailing ryan. Do you think rock castle. County is eastern kentucky. I do not consider it eastern kentucky. I think it's like the the bridge that gets you to each kentucky. I don't consider it eastern kentucky you know but i think the people in rock castle county are more mountain than the people in london in laurel county. Now you're right so consider laurel canyon eastern kentucky. I don't consider rock castle county but if you were to go to those two places actually think it's a lot more kind of mounteney in rock castle county than it is in laurel county. Yeah mostly the flip flop spots because you're right. The people castle county seemed tend more towards mountain people. You're right yes. I think they're right but i don't put it in the mountains in eastern kentucky because it's just we never. They weren't in are they. Just never were part of us ryan. They they seem like they're more day invol- type Yeah but like that. Let's just trade make the trade flip them around their big event every year shannon and the antique tractor show. I like that you get there so antique that you can't ride them or you. Just look at them. I think you can ride 'em i think. You just have antique tractors and you can ride. And everybody celebrates the antique tractors. Could you would wanna go to with me. Yeah let's do it. When is it cancelled non today. I mean i'm not sure when it is. It's it'll happen at some point when i think rock castle county right. I think traffic jams. It feels like mount vernon has never not had a traffic jam. There has never been a month. I've been in kentucky for twenty four years. I seventy five and rock castle. County has not been traffic disaster. Never ever ever ever. It feels like to be honest with you. They've been doing they've been doing repair. Work on that section of i seventy five four forty years. Yes they end. It doesn't seem like they're ever gonna finish it and i would argue. I'm not even sure what they're trying to accomplish. That won't be. I don't know the number. They've been working on it. I remember like migrate. Grandparents told me stories of how their grandparents started working on that exit making it when daniel boone started working on that exit when he was around. I will say i've eaten at that taco bell at that exit a lot of films and it's a good taco bell. It's up on the hill drew. You know what. I'm talking about it scenic you can. I like to go to the drive through then park. My card have already one bill. Just overlooking from the top of the hill. I say that. I would say next to the taco bell in lexington i've eaten at the mount vernon taco bell likely more than any other taco bell in history. Now i will say this famous people. I found none. I mean shannon. None talk like i looked. I didn't find any. I found one christian band. I got seventh time down. I got somebody else here. Aren't you have another musician. Yeah yeah okay. Good we'll play both sides the christian band seventh time down ryan. I didn't find a famous person first county. I can say that about so. I want you folks from rock castle kennedy giving me somebody. It's a big enough canny. There should be famous. People but ryan. I looked and i looked. I got twelve emails. No one gave me a famous person. Wow yeah somebody needs to come through resident of rock castle county to help us out. I've got some athletes but no famous people. I have a big athlete. Yeah you got one for sure. Who's your big athlete drew. Connor smoke for the eight year. Old masters Dr shipping put champion. Yes we met. He came to our show played one on one with them for television. What me that's right up as you as you enter the. You've got a sideways. Should he won. The master's at eight years old masters drive chip and pied. And i guess technically he's still champion and that was last year he won. They didn't do it this year. So champion. yeah raining congratulations smoke. Who do you have athletes quickly. Sarah hammond she's the most decorated athlete. Probably a rock castle county was. She was missed basketball. She was kentucky's. I donald all american boy or girl. Not rex chapman. Not alan houston. Sarah hammond went to vail. Had a great career. There you know that yeah. Do you remember a guy named aaron cash. Was he playing basketball when you were there. Wasn't there when i was there okay. He's a he's probably the best men's basketball player i think he's they're all time. School went to transi. Couple of football players went and played for uk. Jason leisure leisure sound like sling blade. We talked and brad durham. That was that your sling blade impersonation. Okay hang on shane. Chain enclosure is with all closer is. Let's listen to ryan and see if we believe. This is like sleep way. Sounds like jason leisure rock castle. County does sound as like sling blade. That's boy died planet clip. I was transported back to the movies for frontier. I was just like it. i taste on two more. You earn aaron anderson probably the best overall athlete broadcasts county football basketball baseball. Let them just to state football. Titles and john know matt set the roof arena sweet sixteen single game scoring record. He scored thirty nine points in a game. The very next game king. Kelly coleman skate came out and scored like sixty seven like the very the very word for one heck of a day for it. We'll go if you have a famous. We got break. We're way over five zero two. Five seven one eighty. We'll take a break to talk about jones. And the crew called clark's pup and shop phone line at five zero two five seven one eighty or one eight seven seven nine. Four eight or so. Does the kentucky brandon tweet of the day by twenty matt k sports radio. Big blue and you kentucky. Sports radio on talk radio ten. Who is this. Gift of. Grace and brian burkey wrote as been writing me since august nineteenth on facebook. Plan this off facebook messenger right now but this is a good song though. So is this. Another christian singer craft to famous christian singers. It's what they do in. Rock castle is good surprise. Burkey what was the name of the group again gift. Grace couple things. Because i went way long lasting marcellus farm to fork is our restaurant there. We did our show their ryan. You remember that food was awesome at marcellus farm to fork. It was outstanding. We all loved it. We ate there after great. I would say if you ever there and you have time to get off from farther than the exit marcellus farm to fork awesome famous person. Somebody just hit me. John carr lofta. He's an award winning landscape designer. He got his start as a designer of rooftop gardens in new york city drew and he is from rock castle county the most famous person from the county see. We worried about famous people. That got sounds very famous. Nice contributions to the earth so if you like rooftop gardens giancarlo apparently ryan was one of the first people to ever create rooftop guards. Isn't that a good story. You're from rock castle county of very rural area and now you become famous for making rooftop gardens in new york city just goes to show you you never know where the next great idea will come from shannon. We have somebody who's going to the game. Yes right. I would put them on. Who's going you. who are you sir. Macklin what you're going to the game. Are you going to all the games or just tomorrow night. I was able to pick up tickets for the game tomorrow. Okay so what are you expecting. And what made you decide to go. well i didn't even realize that season was going to start this week and then when i realized that hop on seek and i saw there were tickets and i jumped on it immediately in terms of what to expect. I honestly have no idea. I kinda jumped on it. Because i wanted to kind of get a unique experience because i don't think we're going to get this It will be very unique. You're right you're right. Exactly where are you going to try to smuggle in water now now But i understand if you know the the health concerns but not myself. I'll be fine good. Okay well i'll tell you. What do you favor i gotta do. The post game show tomorrow night. Will you call and let me know what it was like. Yeah i'd be glad yeah. Please do okay. Because it's how many folks that will the will have who were actually inside so call tomorrow and let us know how it goes. all right. all right appreciate drew. Are you going to the game like do. I haven't been we have yes. I'm not going to the first. One jack is going but we will have someone there. Okay wonder how many how many credentials did they give for. Media gentlemen hurt fifteen not many we got one and some people didn't get any so it's not many all right. We'll take a break broadcast election. Day may be behind us. But that doesn't mean the shayna. The dude scorecard stop today's subject conway heaton. Let's start with the fact that they're the oldest car dealership in kentucky family owned and operated for one hundred one years plus one go to conway. Heating dot com and get qualified instantly for alone without impacting. Your credit and you'll save instantly one hundred dollars plus one hundred it's conway heaton eight ten north third street in bardstown and don't forget their home of the one million mile limited powertrain warranty plus one million so get out to conway. Their grades are high and their prices are low. You can always count on boone's butcher shop. Check them out on facebook for meat. Bundles and in-store specials this week burgers ozark cook country ham. Six eight pound average six ninety nine a pound center cut boneless pork loin nine to eleven pound average a dollar ninety nine a pound and other incredible specials. Butcher shop open monday through saturday nine. Am to six pm. With senior and at risk hours. Tuesday and thursday eight. Am to nine. Am one hundred old bloomfield bike in bardstown up see all their specials online at boone's butcher shop dot com genesis diamonds wants to make this truly magical holiday season and after the year. We've all gone through it right. 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Wow case tom don't believe that the now more of kentucky sports radio presented by stock mortgage. Here's match so this is seven time down. That is right yeah. They apparently a big deal in christian. Music sound good to that's right so They are broadcast candidate. I've been reading more brian. Giancarlo karloff does. He barely lives in lexington. Did you know yes. He is known as the gardener to the stars. He's done the gardens for martha stewart. Julianne moore edward norton. Mike myers the google complex. The kentucky governor's mansion maker's mark distillery and much more to begin. Giancarlo optus guard jared carlos stars and do my uh my backyard afford. I mean i don't know what his i don't know what he charges. I'm just gonna guess. If he's doing martha stewart and ed norton and juliette bore i. I don't know that he wants to do your tulips back using promo code. Or there's no there's no ks are promo code. I think dodd-frank auto dot com though where you could get a vehicle. Don franklin auto dot com find the best price for a vehicle for you. They're giving great deals as we get into black friday. You can find all you need it. Don franklin twenty four locations around the state sixteen different types of vehicles and they will give you up to a thousand dollars more on the trade for your vehicle so go shopping today. At don franklin auto dot com couple of notes report. We get the phones drew. I want to talk about our uk guys in the nba. I'm gonna tell you what happened with these days. Do you think it's a good decision or bad decision. Let's go through rondo. Signs with the atlanta hawks. Good or bad good. Because i think at this point his career rondo is trying to play for every team in the nba. And he's well on his way that l. guard. They signed that. Gosh dang it say signed somebody else to yeah since since they signed a gosh. Dang it talk as well nerlens. Noel is going to the knicks. What do you think this is very important for nerlens noel. He's on the of it being the end of his career. Katie pain can save him. He's got another chance to find some life in the nba. Here willie cauley. Stein has re signed with the dallas mavericks for two years. You'll like that. I don't know as much about how he plays in with them. But i mean that's where he already was. They kept him around. I guess that's a good thing. Just stay healthy. Darius miller traded to the oklahoma city thunder what about that. I was just reading that he might get traded again but anything that keeps darius in the nba on all four. We loved areas miller or he's already been trying to twice this year. He went from. No pelicans to milwaukee and then milwaukee to the thunder so many. She shouldn't get a permanent residence in oklahoma city yet. But whatever gets more checks dean fox signs of five year supermax deal one hundred ninety five million dollars a love that so much. Do you remember how we were screaming for the lakers to draft him and not lonzo ball and we were right. We were right. We really they get the lakers. Had darren fox right now in instead of what they have lonzo the moving around. You're right. john. Wall has asked to be traded from washington. The wizards have said they won't do. You think it would be good for wall to go somewhere else. Wall seems to have made it very clear. He doesn't want to be in washington. Guess whatever it gets him and happy situation he. he's had a rough heck. It wasn't been three years now this just to regardless he needs to find a good situation and get back to being john wall when you gabriel signs a deal with the pelicans. Good luck to win. This is the second team. Would you know really. it'll be in the league. i mean. I know i'm shy. I know bbn his soured on a little bit. I still root for win like everyone listening. I think we're all a little surprise. He's still out there on a team so good for him and then finally demarcus cousins signs with the houston rockets to join at least for now. Hardening westbrook what about that. The jersey should be here sometime next week. I'm very excited. I don't know how i mean. I don't know what they're doing with their roster and hardened and everything else. But i'm just glad we'll get see boogie again. Because with the those leg injuries he's had the last couple years i've been i've been worried. It might be the end in for him me too. I am happy about it. Billy evans ryan passed away played at uk on the undefeated team in nineteen fifty four. You may remember. That was the team that was undefeated refused to play in the ncaa tournament because the ncaa would not allow grad students to play and they had a couple of grad students on their team and they were like well if you won't let them play and we're not coming even though they were undefeated only the second team in uk history to finish undefeated of course but they didn't play in the tournament then he graduated fifty five and went and played on the olympic team and fifty six and won. A gold medal passed away at the age of eighty eight sort of forgotten. Uk really good player that was on very good teams and four said. I've never got to meet meeting. I wish i had just knew him from playing on those teams kinda got overshadowed by cliff. Hagan's a lot during that era but jersey retired to the rafters of referenda. That good of a player. They was honored one of the guys honored so kind of sad that i saw the note yesterday that he had passed. It was an interesting story about him. We you and i. You may remember this. We did a show at and we started looking around at the jerseys in the rafters and we said like we were asking. Who are these people because there were names. We didn't know you remember that. Oh yeah definitely. I remember that billy evans was one of the ones we said and he actually one of his family members wrote me and said and just gave me sort of his bio and said you know he would never write you to say this but i just wanted to do it and i wrote them back and then they sent me a nice note back. It was actually a very sweet conversation. That occurred one time when you and i were like. Who's billy evans. And it turns out. There was a great man kind of behind that name from berea nowadays maria he's passed. You know oscar and some people were between things out about him and came back became a successful businessman. Here's the only area so just sad note of kentucky basketball history yesterday. That's right who's next all right. We got daniel from rock castle. I don't think he lives there currently but he's from there. Okay hang on. Do we have someone that lives there. Currently i don't think so. No all right so. Somebody's got to do that for us. We can't let us in. Go ahead daniel matt longtime listener hollered. Who are what's up. Hey i'm i actually live in nashville but I would be remiss that longtime brush creek rusty yankel from iraq s kenny. We'll much did. I miss anything. Yeah yeah man. The biggest thing right now in rochester county is climax spring. Water my man. It is the cleanest spring water on this side of mississippi river. And there's been tested and verified. I've had the climax water they used to. I think didn't add didn't we shan't him for a while where we would say. You could get your climax from the climax spring water. Yeah you guys run that ad and since it's just us talking here nobody else listening that water gives you superpower makes you live longer but don't tell everybody that well i believe it. I remember doing those ads because they would ask me to scream the word climax drew. I don't know that. I screamed it as loud as they had hoped for a person. Maybe why that may be why they didn't Continue with us for a while. They didn't like how much was screaming. Climax another bit of rock castle lore You mentioned the daniel boone forest near where i grew up near brush creek. My grandma claimed there's daniel boone's footprints in iraq. That goes over a waterfall that he did that. Betty back long enough. And he was so powerful that his foot imprinted into this rock. Right so your grandma. Grandma claimed that he was so powerful. Daniel boone. He stood on iraq and his footprint stayed in the rock. Absolutely you can go. You can hike down to the where the little waterfall data. Look at the rock. I never saw it But biden story. Are you buying the daniel. Boone has footprints in the rocks in rock stubbed into wet cement. That's the only way he would have his footprint there all right. Well thank you very much. I'll make that my kentucky branded call today. Go to shop dot com. Listen there's some great specials on uk sweat shirts t shirts and hats etc for your Christmas your christmas Buying shop ks are dot com. you're not buying that shit by daniel boat this state. If i've learned anything this blue lights across the bluegrass store. Bluegrass whatever if learned anything at every county in the state will try to grab a piece. Ryan of abraham lincoln and daniel boone. Whatever they can do they must have been some travelling son of a gun because they traveled across the state visit. Every county stayed there eight. There did some special things. They're both of them. They the only people that should get daniel boone bell county. Because he came across the cumberland gap. We have a better claimed daniel boone than anybody else when you agree or now you're going to be fighting everybody else in the county. Everybody else is going to say something. They claim daniel boone county. They don't get the they can get over it. Did he come to boot. He came through the cumberland gap. Boonsboro right here by lexi. Did i go to fight you spiral but he did. He did make a dent in those rocks with paul bunyan. who's next. Let's go to mike. Mike still nobody from living rock castle. Canny shannon o. Ryan my grandma after we get my everybody else on the phone. You've got the hang up so that we get iraq castle okay go. We can't industry at the go ahead. Mike at i know will tell you talking about and the new song tactics twenty on asca somehow for. We're here don't worry about take and i was in North carolina where. I live temporary but and we went to a place called lake lure and it's actually the site this for your listeners. The site or they did the movies or Where he was dancing dirty dancing. Yes patrick swayze movie. It was the one he. Dan and people probably don't know aside is it means work was but it's not there anymore but it's really a beautiful place and i've been season ticket holder since There i wasn't offered year get off and get home. I'm gonna try to go to bog and do what you can. i hear. they're still tickets. Available so i think you should be able maybe to call and find out. I appreciate the call. We're gonna take a break. You say you do. Have somebody candy now. All right good. I didn't want this to end right here. we're in ours for goodness sake. We've almost gotten it. Get you some climax water and we'll be right back. This is more of the chaos are blue lights across the bluegrass county by county. Virtual tour presented by the kentucky office of highway safety after this to talk to matt jones. And the crew. Called the clark's pump and shop phone line at five to five seven one. Ten eighty one eight seven seven nine four eighty got. If it's in kentucky's it's on kentucky. Sports radio rock talk radio tanis to. That's a nice song now. He's this doesn't say somebody just sent this to me and said this is a rock castle song so i played it. Somebody just said that. We made the dan lebatardshow today right. How's that our won the seventeen fifty mark on the air. It's it's we're on the useless sound montage. Were you see you can find it. Shannon real quick our one of today's lebatardshow the useless sound montage at the seventeen fifty mark. Wonder why wha- what are we useless about. How do we feel about being called useless. Sound people are always nice to me. I talked to what's his face to guts and their producer. Sometimes how they lost. Its today show. It might have been like yesterday. Show would you say the seventeen fifty. Are you on it right now. Getting there was just play it. Let's just hear it together as a family here. All right just at seventeen twenty s plus the gonna wear the proper way wanna step in the stadiums fighting beat every week feels like somebody grabbed like a classic car in the garage. So you know what. Just wait until i get this new. If i'm being honest. I didn't fully understand what it took the ten seconds away here. Wait until i get these new wheels and then it's going to be ready to roll just like old times. People keep telling me that about tastes hill but both are there is a seventeen fifty murmur. People i don't see any evidence that he's going to do anything. Great with the new orleans saints in that position is overwhelming in a good way. What has he done besides run goal. Line suites that make people think he's going to succeed. They go ahead and made it. Who would have thought. The first time i'd be other dan lebatardshow talking about tastes hill. Who i had absolutely shannon no opinion about strongly one way or the what here they come in and they go i met. We gotta do taste hill here. What you're taking. I'm like i don't have a take on tesa meal and they got five minutes to come up with one so i start yelling about tasting hill. That was outstanding greatest. That's fine nice to make my the only time i've ever been on dan. Libertad was when they read my tweets from the rick. Pitino twat round around. I don't think that was. That's not a bad word isn't okay raw. Cow's account callers snags. Kid rock castle qian. How are you kidding. I'm doing all right man. How about you guys good. You live in rock castle. County live in mount garnet. Good gotta continue the streak. What i miss on rut castle. Well i'm not sure did. Uh i'm sure ryan a little bit. Our two thousand eleven girls state championship. He did not did not a hammond. That was it. You also said that. Sarah hammond was. The first became before rex. Chapman and she played in two thousand eleven. She was the first mcdonald's all american. You mean we never had a mcdonald's all american until two thousand eleven the first one. Yeah for the state of kentucky. I was shocked at that also. Looked it up go ahead sorry yeah Well one other thing a couple of other things. I want to point out about two thousand eleven. We were the first Girls basketball team will or lexington to win the state title in a decade. And we were. We were also the the first team in fifteen years to win it without a transfer st. mary's specific thing. Yeah well that's it should be very proud. Okay got you should be very proud. Because that's homegrown team. That wins the state title. That's right and anybody who knows about hometowns. It'd be a gas in the mountains right. That's exactly right. You agree with me. Rock castle county is culturally more eastern kentucky than laurel county. Oh absolutely laurel. County is a there. You're exactly right thank you very much. I appreciate it. They are very hostile. It's right. I did not realize that we never had a mcdonald's all american ryan until two thousand eleven and i did not announce not even know when they started at least in the early nineties. I think because you know the big thing was parade all american. Still though that is. That's kind of amazing to me that it would have taken It would have taken that long. But how can how can been on. They not well. They may not have had it then. That might have been before. But who's next. Let's go to zack. From rock castle zac. What's up zac. Hey man i've got a story for you all that renfro valley all right. I just got like a minute so make it the best. You can't in a minute okay. So long time ago whenever the pilgrims were coming in they stumbled upon a witch's cave and they they ended up killing that which they burned her at the state. Well that which she said before she died she said. Well i'm gonna. I'm gonna make a monster and so there's a valley monster roaming around renfro valley right now just looking for people to eight. I believe by that shannon. Yeah yeah. I don't wanna come there ya. I don't buy it. But i i like the idea of the story but i don't think there's a valley monster looking for people to eat sir while that's the way the tail goes well. There's a lotta tales. Thank you sir. Appreciate the call i love. How all these counties drew have something they think haunted here. It is a renfro valley monster high believe every one of them we have one hundred twenty counties so far we've had a ghost story all of them and i believe every single one hundred twenty monsters and that's exactly right. Let's go over a couple of things here first of all It's taco tuesday. Ryan ks bar you like that. Don't your big taco person. Love them and they are excellent. Taco tuesday back. Throw that out right. It's buffalo chicken sliders. Tuesday oh you get to orders of buffalo chicken sliders with house chips and two drinks for sixteen dollars. That's pretty. that's a really good isn't it. Yeah that's very good and the sliders are very good. It's my favorite of our carry out to people love. These buffalo chicken sliders love chicken sliders chips in two drinks for sixteen dollars. I didn't realize that's really good so that it doesn't roll off the tongue like taco tuesday but buffalo chicken sliders with house chips. Tuesday is happening right now. Lex geek is also happening if you need help you can. You should go to lex geek. They've been helping kentucky businesses for seventeen years. They were louisville geek in the louisville area and they have local employees who are passionate about. It and ready to help. Serve your central kentucky needs whether it cybersecurity disaster recovery equipment procurement or anything else. Twenty four seven support at lex geek dot com schedule. Your free consultation with lex geek. Lax g k dot com. Lex geek go rhino limit. Lex geek sliders. It's a wonderful. It's a wonderful tuesday right. I'm doing these buffalo chicken sliders one little popular thing. We've got when it comes to take out because they seemed to by the way. Did you see chop house in. Lexington is closing yes. I did see that used to work each you. Yeah i didn't know that you turkey on her. He worked there. Did you know that he was a host right. Yeah he was a host at the age of twenty four which is a good place. We'll miss it. Yeah it is. I'm really sad to see. That was a lexington institution. We will see you folks tomorrow. Round county symposium. Chinese menus needs more vacation right. The new united gateway card knows how to take you away with great travel rewards and no annual fee ever. The wait for vacation is over tap now or visit united gateway car dot com to apply.

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Kurt Vile Makes A Country Record

World Cafe

20:32 min | 6 months ago

Kurt Vile Makes A Country Record

"This message comes from. Npr sponsor nerdwallet. They bring together the smartest credit cards mortgage lenders and more so you can compare and shop all in one place. For all your money questions turned to the nerds at nerdwallet dot com. Thanks for listening to the world cafe. Pay i'm kaleo kurt. Vile had a plan. Nearly five years in the making he wanted to record a record in nashville. Not an indie. Rock record in nashville. A country one influenced by the music. He admired at the heart of it he hoped to have beloved icon. John prime join him for it now. He'd shared a stage with him trying new. He had recorded one of his songs before. But when it came time to getting his musical hero into the studio to record well. That's a story best left for vile to tell. Let's say it was more spur of the moment than you might expect. After a five year journey the result is a new collection of songs. Speed sound lonely cave. E ep which features two classics from the late john prime to originals from vile and to cover of country singer. Jack clement which will start our session off with originally written fifty years ago. Here's gone girl. It's kurt vile of the world catholic. She deliciously tall sorta belong girl She is delighted fully. Small sword of song gird. She freely admits to the world that she always the wrong girl. That's nothing compared to the fact that she is goan. That's gone girl. A song written by jack lemmon. It's from our guest kurt vile. His new record is speed. Sound lonely k v. I'm kaleo on the cafe curtain nice to speak again. Welcome back to the show. Yeah thanks for having me and congrats on the new record. Speed sound lonely k v. it's beautiful and i really. I really dig the vibe You called it your nashville record. And i think some people might Based on what they know about your musical past just go. What's lo fi indie rock guy. Do and make an nashville record. A country influenced Record can you take me a little bit back about where your fascination with country music started. Well it would spend in my blood through my dad. This whole time. I mean he played the basic country. greats you know like hank williams johnny cash etcetera. But he'd played more so bluegrass music like flat and scruggs and bill monroe and old time. Music collect doc watson in. I don't know you know over the past few years. I just got deeper into country through. George jones's autobiography. I lived to tell it all and all kinds of other front once you start. I've always red rock bios music vials so many people out of their minds. It's entertaining and they're so talented. But then once. I started reading about the country guys. It's almost like the rock and rollers. Seem like you know posers because they could play or sing circles around you and there were twenty times crazier often in. I don't know the longer version is just being able to pass through nashville and connect with people like john prying you know. I got into john prime in my early twenties and it has music. Hit me hard teeters. He's got he's obviously he's got his. He had one foot in country or more. But it's just a great songwriter. And okay that. That's also why the country in general it's just about the song they served the song the other short answer of widespread nashville ep. Because it was recorded in nashville. With one guy dave ferguson. Who used to work for jack. Lemmon who you just heard He's friends with john prime so they'll just me tapping into that world in organic way. You know couple. Trips to nashville. You know there And we're going to get into going down to nashville and and work in with dave ferguson. The other thing that i was curious about was that your first instrument and i think this is obviously speaks to the influence that your dad had was a banjo. yes while. I have a cousin who lived up the street from me. He was my first drummer and things. My cousin dan he plays in a band called fraud. Holler actually now who you might have played the I know they've they've played on your station but anyways when we were kids you know i would want to be in a band with him because he was in band and my dad. They said they're going to get. I wanted to guitar basically but than what one year they like said to me leno yet. We were going to give you a guitar this year. But you'll be really bad so you're not getting anything anyway. The next year. I got a banjo instead. Somehow i agreed to it through my cousin. Actually he said it'd be cool if i got one. I wasn't sure. But i. I played it like bitar more or less and now played like a banjo. I guess you could. Do you still have it. I still haven't i have a few more Banjo has made my records in the last couple of records. There's a song on believe him. Going down called outlaw. I'm an outlaw. Mets got banjo on the previous fooling bottle. It in has a song called. Come again and that's a banjo. Jam elect to break out the banjo. I don't do it all the time. But when i do get lost in it pretty much right away. So people were listening. They're breadcrumbs yet. That this might have that. This might have been coming. Yeah we're on the world cafe talking to kurt. Vile you mentioned. dave ferguson. who engineering. I mean i. I don't know if it's fair to say legend but he's incredibly well thought of and well considered nashville Tell us a little bit about Historian what interested you and working with him. Well honestly matt sweeney. Who's from the band shy of as but he plays with all kinds of people buying principally in different people. My label of matador. He's a friend of mine and i. I think i saw. That matt was playing with john at one point on instagram. Something and i was like what because he plays all kinds of people. It's not like. I was surprised but still is and i asked him. He's a the is spurred. So i talked to on the phone and i set out when a cover. The song spin the sound of loneliness by john brown. You know it and he's like alw- inside and out you know a good friend of mine. We're gonna have a good time kurt. There are a lot of great. John prime socks. There are a lot of phenomenal songs. Why do you love this song in particular. Why did you want to cover it. I wanted to cover it because it just spoke to me and You know it's a beautiful song. I love how he says he come- let you come early. Come big when you feel on small you come home straight and you come home curly. Who says that. He thinks that it's time for john prime in with such beautiful sort of melody but still rawal and human as possible in his voice also just Who else would think of that core. The you've broken the speed of the sound of loneliness that's just an example of one of nine songs. It's me and so many people on. That's why i wanted to do it. it is kurt. Vile speed of the sound of loneliness here on world cafe. You come come home early. Come on feel small straight and you come home. He did. Don't come home and nor heaven's name down broken the speed of sound long. You're out there on that speed of the sound of loneliness. It's kurt vile covering john prime. It's on his new record. Speed sound lonely. Cave e. e. p. You're listening to the world cafe. Kurt is our guest so the song was recorded four years ago or almost five years ago and if i read correctly there was an ulterior motive. Other than just covering the song because you enjoyed it. Is that correct. Well yeah my by that kind of made things a little dramatic. Oh okay but it's also true but you know it's like anybody cover. I hope you'll hear it. You know so. I think that sort of sums up the ep. Basically what i said was speed. The sound of loneliness recorded to get john's attention than you know whereas how lucky was recorded to get him in the studio which was four years later and the last song to report record for the ep. Speed of the sound of loneliness was the first song to be recorded for the epa. But that was me you know. I'm friends with them. Eileen tilson who works for john's label and she'd be talking for me and same with fergus. The one who showed him the song heard you know the next one. I finally met a music for play the song and i do like it and you know it was years before it came out with john john new had heard it sometime and he would sometimes have to be reminded. I'm like you know the next time. occurred i remember. I'm buddies with record your son. He's like oh. Yeah you know in the next thing you know. He's dedicating it to me on stage in newark or something. Wow what a trip. Yeah thing i'd Beautiful things like that Yes and we to jump forward. You know how lucky we do. Add on the prime song so lucky. I got to spend as much time with john. I didn't you know he. Finally you always sorta knew who it was but by the end there'd be no mistake in that it's me you know i. He showed off the studio and he was like a. You know. I love the sing with you. Kurt as if it happened all the time which is partly being a country gentleman partly like him at least definitely no known. It's me when i when he sees me totally. You make that leap from someone saying nice to see you wondering today. Even remember if they've met me before too nice to see you. Oh god you. Actually you know who i am and i wanna talk a little bit about the stuff in just a moment but first i were talking about john ryan and i. It's fair to say you know you're a big fan. You said you know you grew up in a kind of country loving slash bluegrass sort of household made. You gravitate to prime in particular will prime in particular hit me in my early twenties. Some i i had been writing finger picking songs i remember a move back to philadelphia was spent two years in boston. Basically where my wife was going to grad school. I was just driving forklift. Not i bought like gear. You know was able to afford deer in alone lot. So i learned finger picking and was writing finger picking songs. When i came back and moved back to philly again. i was. I played a show. I remember actually with that band frog. Holler who my cousin played in a time and and somebody there said i remind him of prime. Which probably just you know. I was finger picking and seeing. But either way i didn't know who was in fact adam as the war on drugs adam he who told me he's always said you sound like john brian. I didn't know who he was. But anyway i got some used. Brayton's hit some songs. Like sam stone in a hello in their heartbreakers. Masterpieces hit me right away. A member Pretty psychedelic summer in philly circa two thousand and three or four. I can't remember anymore. I was listening to it a lot beyond the park and come home in that kind of sneak back home and keep listening to those two songs over and over again even there's a a bio. I read after john passed. I happen to have this unauthorized biography. Which once i realize it was unauthorized. I put it down but then he passed away so it was comforting. And i read it. He would even say the same thing about sam stone early on. He said he'd play it at open mic and the first chorus. There's a hole in daddy's on where the money goes people would people would. I like lasts like you know. That's crazy by the second chorus. People are stirring or whatever they're paying attention by the third verse slash chorus. You could hear. Pin dropped the nets as basically just the way his songs are. You know they're so he such a soon serious guy And he's got great sense of humor to but at the same time you can say there's no bs about him. He's one of those guys. It's it's almost impossible to explain how he is so good at what he does And from the word economy to the humor to just being able to do cutting like like cutting lyrics that really really hit you. You know you brought up sandstone. Let's give our audience a little bit of a taste of it. So they can hear some of some of the brilliance of john. Prime samson here on the world cafe samsung came home to his wife and family surname conflict overseas the tan. They served shattered. Oh it's nerves. Little shrimp is name. The morphine ease. The pain in the grass grew around brain. Gave them all the car for the land where the purple heart and a monkey bank ruland. Daddy's on rawal money goes a little bit of sandstone. That is from john prime. We're talking to kurt. Vile here on the world cafe The new ep is called speed. Sound lonely k v ep. So you have this desire to play with him. In johnson's song you've played onstage with him a few times When did you actually get like the the hint from furger from whoever that he was going to join you for. How lucky. oh well. That was partly i mean. I knew i could get to ask for his virgin. Just give them a call. He's giving him a call Heat with say other. Like i tried to get on to come down. He doesn't want to witness session or something. But basically i went to nashville to finish up ep. We had four songs at the time. I thought maybe we just mixed four songs but in the back of my head i knew the would have more weight if we could do one. More song have trying on it. In the other main reason. I was going to see john at the grand ole opry for new year's eve and basically along the way i got invited to sit in on stage with a pit. How lucky again. I asked my friend. I lean how lucky she relayed the message. He said yeah. And then the first day of mixing verbs like would you wanna do. You wanna just makes me song. You wanna do another song. And i said to him Well i think he would have a whole lot more weight if we could get john over here to teach me how lucky and we could recorded as a duet you know like re person sorta new record it for called not literally said what do you do what he said. I'm watching the game. What what he said were wednesday game over it got seventies you. Come down here record. How lucky with You know since you're going to perform it on stage in couple of days and he's like all right and then he he was just staring within a couple of hours so he calls him says it will be on there in a couple of hours. Like what's what's the energy like. What's the vibe like energy. Asked me telling me. All kinds of you know hilarious. Good like nashville type store is that i can't even repeat on the radio. You know i understand best kind you know And i was stoked. I was as charming as possible. But honestly he'd be telling me the stories and like at the time. I could hardly hear him. I could hear them. But i couldn't find bring spinning. But then when he was gone out then i could basically understand what he said. Wanted sunk gambling odds flying the fact that he was their main thing. You know. that's amazing. Well we're gonna hear the the song in just a moment. One thing that did want to ask you. You said you knew you wanted to do. How lucky why did you of all the songs. Why was that the one that you are interested in do adding with him. Well let's just another That was just an extra one. I wanted tackle and a while. He was telling me awesome stories about how how locking basically he recorded that album. That how lucky is along with pink cadillac with them. Sam phillips of sun records son and sam phillips would come up. He wasn't involved with the sessions until he heard the song how lucky and then he got real many got on board and he He he loved that song. You know so. That's pretty amazing. He was telling me stories. Like it's pretty cool. Let's let's hear it a duet with john prime and kurt vile. It's how lucky here on the world today. Our wrong used to ship hand massive. All these things don't think remember a can't main again do duet with kurt. Vile john pine. How lucky it's here on the world cafe. The new ep slash album from kurt vile is speed. Sound lonely k v ep. Kurt it was an absolute pleasure to hear the stories and to hear the joy that that you got out of this and We're so stupid that you came on yet. Thanks so much for having me this. Great man and I'll see the studio eventually. Please do and by the way. Actually i i have to ask. Are we gonna are we. If you're a big kurt vile fan. Is there more music to look forward to in twenty twenty one. Oh yeah they'll definitely Some stuff i've been working on music nonstop. I've i've got recordings in in the can and i'm still working on new record There's there's going to be something we're gonna keep putting things out. Yep beautiful that's kurt vile. We will be back in a moment with more world cafe.

john prime nashville dave ferguson kurt john kaleo kurt Jack clement johnny cash etcetera bitar sam stone kurt vile matt sweeney John prime Holler rawal jack lemmon doc watson bill monroe Eileen tilson George jones
#1912: Witness Intimidation

Car Talk

54:03 min | 2 years ago

#1912: Witness Intimidation

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from the Annie E Casey foundation developing solutions to support strong families and communities to help ensure a brighter future for America's children. More information is available at eighty CF dot org. Hello and welcome to car talk on National Public Radio with us clicking click the brothers. And we're broadcasting this week from the center for rocket science here at car talk, very close, actually, look this. This is a letter from the NASA Lewis research center, where in Cleveland, my one of my favorite cities deed. Who's who? Is this guy David urban PHD? I mean, why after say any doctor David urban Dr David urban when Dr Anastas Pat called your show recently concerning a low gravity combustion question. He wanted to know what do you want to know if his engine out you would run in zero gravity gravity? Right. I was disappointed that he turned to you guys rather than the nation's center for excellence and microgravity combustion and fluid physics. Well, you obviously didn't really want the answer located at the and Lewis Richard Sennett here in Cleveland. And his question concerned whether his Audi ninety or his wife's Mazda miata would function on Nasr's, Casey, one thirty five low gravity aircraft, aka the vomit comet. I can see. As someone whose area of expertise is micro gravity. Never even heard the word before microgravity combustion research, and who was conducted numerous combustion experiments on the Casey one thirty five and who has also occasionally driven a car. I believe I am especially qualified to answer his question while to my knowledge, no one has made a detailed study of piston engine performance in microgravity. You will be gratified to hear that. Your response was largely correct luck is again. Since the fuel. Amex an engine cylinder burns very rapidly. In the Senate of cylinders are small the combustion process can be expected to be independent of gravity. We said that if this would not the case aircraft, piston engines would perform poorly doing acrobatic maneuvers as you to astutely parenthesis wasn't accidents. This guy's for saw everything we said you so Mayes the combustion process and the injectors can be expected to perform acceptably. However as only Tom seem to understand parenthesis. How unusual almost all other fluid systems will fail. Yeah. For your edification. I am enclosing two articles on microgravity combustion with lots of pictures for the dummy. David, david. It's always good to know that you lucked out at least once once a week at least a week. Well, let's see if we're gonna luck out today. Let's take a call. Let's talk to us. Our number is eight car talk. That's one eight two two seven eight two five five a lawyer on car talk. Hi, this is Julia from Austin, Texas. Julia. How are you? I'm okay. How are you doing good? You sound like you're a student. That's a very good guess, I'm actually an undergraduate at the university of Texas Austin. No kidding. But I'm about to graduate and a couple of months, so what? Well, I'm actually going to be getting two degrees. One in lieu arts in one of micro-biology, and how'd you to integrate these two fields of endeavors who I'm actually I'm going to med school? And when I graduate, I like to go into public health research have you gotten into medical school already. Yes. I'm actually gonna be going to south western this fall. Excellent. Excellent. Very good. Back pain. And it's REM you. Question if you ever need any medical question in the future. Give me a call. I just thought of a great show idea for chiropractor was doing a show it could be called back talk. You get it. You get it. Middle idea million already down. Yeah. We I hope nobody hurt because somebody. Oh, Manny way. Julia. We we've killed two minutes of your allotted three. What's up? Okay. We do my parents just bought me a Nissan Sentra of them. Yeah. I so happy to have it. But thing is that this is my first car, I realized that only in a car is just a huge, huge responsibility. And I know nothing about cars. So I was hoping that you could tell me the absolutely essential things. I need to know about owning and maintaining a car. You gotta walk at least twice a day. Yeah. It's only a car is not as bad as owning a dog. Okay. The way my brother. Discover with his dog a violation of the laws of. Dog. Dog puts out more than. Ten this be. I've measured it. Unfortunately, I have I have really measured and she's putting on one, and she takes I don't know how she can do this unless she's trying to tick me off. Anyway, getting back to your center. And you've scored another minute of your. Oh, I was going to say they're all if I were going to down check the oil once in a while. Okay. And look at the tires and make sure they're not flat catalyzed and the way you make sure they're not flat. Is you actually buy a tire pressure gauge? No, no, no. Well, you should take the current to somebody every three months, or so, you know, change the oil, for example, while it's they're they're gonna look around things. And of course, for the first several years in aren't gonna find anything wrong, obviously after that you need to get a little more diligent about it. But you'll have forgotten. That's you need to call us back when you halfway through medical school. And we'll tell you what to do from that point on because, but you really if you follow the maintenance schedule in the book, you really can't go to wrong. Okay. But more than that, you do need to check your tires, and you do need to familiarize yourself with what's under the hood. So you'll know how to check the oil, and you'll know how to check if this enough coolant didn't and all that you have someone who can show you the ropes while my parents live hours away. So, unfortunately, they're not here. But you're going to be going home for some holiday bring you Andrea something. You'll get the the rundown. Yeah. They'll show me. How to actually open the hood of my car. Hopefully. Yeah, we'll congratulations on getting into medical thanking and study hard. Okay. Don't forget us. Yeah. Thank you very much. And if you ever use the back talk idea cut me in. One eight cards over some great advice. Didn't we? We useless. I'm beginning to realize we useless. I don't know what we're here for what we asked a perfectly legitimate question. We hear to steer the ship. We directed her to her father. That's that. He is going to tell xactly he's gonna have that to put around her shoulders. It's time you learned about cars. Yeah. So that's all we have to of life directly to the answers. You kick the IDs. Yeah. And I realized us the risk is giving answers. God car talked eight. Seven eight two five five. Oh, you're on ship. Yeah. My name's Richard from the Orleans. How you doing Richard pretty good? What's happening? Well, I've got a seventy eight Toyota landcruiser, my wife is named at bam. Bam. Yeah. And it it backfires. And it's you driving it down the street, and it kinda hesitates. And then it backfires and the problem is when it backfires it's like a tank going off shoots flames, which is kind of alarming to my neighbors and walking down the street and so forth. And there's always backfire when you're exceleron thing. No because you can take your foot off the gas and just kind of be cruising in the engine oil will start kind of hesitating. So it gives you a warning. And then it backfires does this. You know, if this thing has an air pump on the motor. No, I do know it used to be a California missions vehicle thing. And all that stuff was clipped off all that by me. No, no. But but you've owned it for a long enough time to the didn't do this with all this stuff disconnected. Now. It's doing it. Right. I've had I've had it about five years and for the first two or three years. It didn't do this man. So how is mardi gras this year? Great. I remember this may help you. When we were kids we used to do a kind of a fun thing. It was fun for us. And we used to drive through the the at the time the Sumner tunnel here in Boston, which was a two lane tunnel. One lane led from Boston to east Boston under the channel directly north and take you directly north to east Boston eventually take to Logan airport, and this tunnel was I don't know is still still there. I don't know mile and a half long. It's pretty long, and when we were in the tunnel, which was partially downhill, we would turn the ignition. Switch off for a second to and then turn it back on and and scare the hell out of ten guys. The result of be the biggest explosion and ball of fire coming out of your tailpipe because what would happen is while you would had the key off the pistons were still going up and down and sucking gasoline into the into the cylinders, and of course, the. Valve's exhaust valves are opening in pushing that unburned gas into the exhaust system. So now when you when you got the key off, you're filling up the cylinders and the exhaust system with unburned gas, isn't that great. Back on and that I spark occurred. You would ignite on only the fuel in the cylinders, which is what supposed to happen. But a lot of that gasoline that was trapped in that confining exhaust system, and you would create a significant explosion. And it may be then that you have a fault with your admission system, even even a bad. Switch could cause this. But I think it'd be more likely would be intermittent spark. And that's why you feel beginning to miss exactly when you have the little miss. That's the equivalent of in my brother's example, turning off the ignition. Switch does Lou almost like suddenly. Yeah, you're all of a sudden you pulling a boat or something, right? I think this. This thing has an electron ignition system. It has something called an igniter. Probably probably I don't remember. I haven't worked on seventy eight Land Cruiser in a while. But that would be the thing I'd be most likely to suspect that signature, I would just replace the igniter because no one's going to be able to figure out if it's any good because it's. Transient problem as we call it. Yeah. But you might want to look at the switch. I that's a lot cheaper maybe easier to do. Excellent. But it is definitely in my humble opinion mission problem. Good luck, Richard. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Bye. Bye. One eight eight eight car talk. That's eight eight eight two seven eight two five five gut it. Hello, your car talk. Hi. Hi. Who's this? Sidney from Los Angeles Sydney is the second letter on I R A Y. It's why it's just like us strata. So anyway, Sidney what's up I've got a nineteen eighty nine Mitsubishi Montero, and it has this squeak. It was found kind of like. That's yeah. When I when I make a right or left hand, turn it goes. Like that really driving straight ahead at what speed all speeds speeds. That makes the first noise again, it was great. Or those sounds just like the donkey that I wrote the Grand Canyon. Yeah. As you speed up does this happen faster? No, no. There goes to ideas. And when it's parked, and I get out of it. It goes. Al-? Fortunately, you're gave him with. I was thinking maybe I needed to lose weight, and that had something to do we we're going to discuss that. Privately, of course. Well, you have either go ahead a control arm bushing that is badly in need of lubrication or worse than that a ball joint tyrod end, it's in the similar condition. Worse meeting more dangerous. It's a control arm bushing unlikely to lose a wheel. But if it's a ball, tyrod end, goodbye goodbye, Sydney. We this time next week. We could be reminiscing about you. About me. So I I think you need to get checked and be very very easy. Do the noise again that was great. It was really twenty one the first one. I can't. Your poor second rank amateur rank amateur listening to it for weeks. What's happening is as the as the vehicle bounces up and down on the road as you drive. The either the control on bushings are ball. Join our Tyron is moving obviously. And it's either worn out broken. Whatever are just simply needing vacation his vehicle sat for a long period of time without being driven. Yes. And then fight asked that question. I look good. I could've looked smart. That you didn't. And I think what did it is moisture got in the airline understand. There's not much moisture in Los Angeles. But whatever I think moisture going into the control arm bushings, and it rusted it, and it may be that you have to replace it. But sometimes they're penetrating lubricants that can free this up and make the noise go away. I mean, they'll find it. As one guy, we'll get underneath the vehicle and someone else will don't the big heavy three hundred pound guy will bounce up and down on the Fender and the guy on the neat will listen to you. And you can actually feel where it's coming from. And they'll know in two minutes where it is. And they'll get the juice side of the canon starts squirting everything. And it'll be gone. So this is trivial, Sydney trivial. Look that soon because it could be dangerous to find. If it were a bad ball joint the wheel could fall off. That's not trivial. Yeah. We'll have it looked at because it really could be dangerous and we can't afford to lose any list as one sixth sixteen percent of our total listening audience, that's a lot privilege. Are you are the noise? One more time. One more time. I love it. It's perfect. It is absolutely perfect. Thank you very much calling by. Okay, now Tommy do remember last week's puzzle. I didn't think so it concerns early American history and statistics, oh, I flunked the ticket. American history. So I have to take you were there. We'll be packing a minute. Ghana? Faking. Kid. And even though my yachties everywhere decide it's time to prune the family tree whenever they hear us say it, this is NPR. I'm Bob Boylan, host of NPR's all songs considered and creator of the tiny desk series. I have a message for unsigned musicians all across America entered the twenty nineteen tiny desk contest for a chance to play your very own tiny desk, concert it'll change your life. So no matter what kind of music you make we want to hear from you. Find out more at NPR dot org slash tiny desk. Contest you have until Sunday April fourteenth better. Hurry. We're back the car talk with us. Clicking click. The tap brothers. We hit talk, of course, of course, about cars car repair and the the answer to last week's puzzling. And here it has to do with early American history and statistics. That's what you sell math anyway. Okay districts, I suppose that bringing okay, I still have no idea what it is Christopher from Atlanta writes, my friend Mack says to me, I just read that three of the first five presidents of the United States died on the fourth of July. What do you think the odds of that happening? Are I say no idea, but I'll give you ten to one odds that I can name at least one of the three. Of course, he takes the bet. Now, he says he goes on says, I don't know anything about the first five presence, except at their names are what who's the first George Washington you go second though idea. Adams, Adam Joe on Adams. Oh, Jefferson, right Hami? Jefferson was three. Yeah. Okay. George Jefferson, George Washington, Madison. Right. Yeah. Dolley Madison Bill Monroe. In that order. Okay. Got it home. I justified offering my friend ten to one odds when guessing randomly I have only three and five chance of guessing correctly. So that's the question. What makes me so sure I can guess at least one of them on the first try. Prefaced by saying this was for the kids in the in the in the audience think so hits is supposed to know this. Well, if it hadn't been Monroe if Monroe hadn't been one of the three he was the fifth guy. Yeah. That's the guy. He's guessing. Oh, he hadn't been why would you have to say that? Why would you say three of the first five the thing would have said three of the I four Monroe must be one of them otherwise. Well, well, no, well, nothing could be you. What you said three of the first twenty exac, well that would have been pretty. Well, sure. But three of the of the first five you could have said that just to obfuscate. I would be true. No, he says he read it some place and wherever he read it would have said three of the I four if Monroe weren't among them. Yeah. You're right. Of course, don't try to cloud. The issue. Yeah. He he read it somewhere. If you read it somewhere. But if I were trying to trick you as you always are that would be. Three the first seven, and you would have picked up a seven you'd have been wrong. No, maybe maybe. Is it true? I have no idea. Did you check this, Catherine? Didn't check it. I don't believe layer. Did you check it? No, no, don't check tennis. It's probably know completely. No. All right. We'll get more mail. It doesn't win. We have a winner. Anyway. Okay. The winner this week is April. Ralph from league city, Texas and for having her correct answer chosen from among the thousands of correct answers that we got this week. April will get a twenty five dollar gift certificate to the car talk shameless commerce division with which as you know, she can get one and three quarters copies of bestselling marital counseling. Cd MENA from GM women from Ford all about couples and cars Indian three-quarters copies. This is the most brilliant marketing strategy anyone has ever devised we give people twenty five bucks and nothing cost. Twenty five bucks is pretty I mean, I taught marketing for forty. You didn't come. Man. Anyway, we'll we'll we'll have a new when you get those free free make -ation. Yeah. One night seven days. Working. Anyway, we'll have a new puzzle still to come. So stick around for that. In the meantime, you can call us about your car where at eight carts arc. That's eight two two seven eight two five five lawyer on car talk. Hi, I'm Dorothea. And I'm calling from bowls Burke, Pennsylvania Dorothea bulls virg- both Berg where three miles outside of state college home of the gut isolated centrally. Feel. I didn't grow up here all even here year sentence over. I think it's long term long term Thatta. Lena do who who you marry deserve this year. Oh, yeah. We're not going anywhere thought the Asari about that. Maybe we can help you plan your getaway. So what's up? Gonna cause running every day. Right, right. I have a nineteen ninety seven forty turbo Volvo wagon. We bought used just over three years ago. So is in great shape with about one hundred and fourteen thousand miles on it. Well about a year ago, I was in an accident and the car plowed across the front of my car and did about five thousand dollars damage which all Vos everything's expensive. So I guess I should. Hit two headlights wiper blades. Exactly that's just the the head like cover so ever since. Then we've noticed at least we're we're blaming it on this. I've had an oil leak, and it seemed kinda subtle and it's gotten a little worse. And my husband check some bolts, and he wants to put it on a lift and clean the engine to locate the leak and our old mechanic in Harrisburg. We're who we trusted where we moved from told me that I probably need to do a black light process, which he doesn't do Delic, dude. I'm the leak, but my husband said, if it turns out to be a rear seal, it's gonna be expensive, and maybe not worth for the age of our cards, one a black light it. He doesn't wanna know the results right now. I feel like if it if it happened since the accident, then if it's the place who fixed, it's fault. You can forget about that strategy. I don't think the accident caused the oil leak now if it did you'd never prove it. No, you can forget about that completely unless the block is cracked, for example, right unlikely. But your husband is unnecessarily alarmed because he hasn't his mind the words remained seal, which is the absolute worst possible place that the oil could be leaking from. But there are dozens if not more other places the oil could be leaking from which far more innocuous and less expensive to fix. Okay. Yeah. And there were a few places that. Likely candidates the valve cover and Cam seal awards one place the front seals the crank in Cam seals are another place. The remain seal. Is yet a third place except in most cases, the remain seal. Hardly ever leaks on Volvos and less and less something else. Mashed in the front right by an accident. Enlist something called the flame trap is plugged trap. Yeah. So have them checked the fl, and it may be just coincidentally. We always tell our customers when they complain. You're not gonna believe it. But this is purely coincidental. I'm going to go in there with my list and say this is what Quinn clocks check, the flame trap. If they don't if they're not familiar with Volvos. They won't know what the flame trap is. Okay. But if that is plugged up, it'll cause any of the seals sleep. But first causes the remain seal to leak we've had instances where we've replaced a plug flame trip and the leak has gone to zero really pray for the valve cover gasket valve cover. Get all the all the flame trap. Thank you. Dr thea fight by one eight eight eight car talk that's eight eight eight two two seven eight two five five. Hello, you're on car talk. This is Barry from down in Tampa bearing. Well, you're doing good. So what's up, man? I sort of missed where the road started. And the ditch started at the edge of the road, I managed to completely submerged the engine compartment on the car. All really this is some ditch. I did it was it's Florida. We have big ditches. Lake ditz. Yeah. Actually, we were neabry aided otherwise impaired. I have no good stories like that to go with it. I was on my way to do the laundry gonna have a story just barely hit the ditch. An alligator grabbed you pulled you down. Oh, never it's too late. Now, you're. Claiming I wish I like I said if I had a good story all be you should've called us. I. So the entire front of the car is down in the dish ditch and you didn't even get wet. Did my feet got wet? Yeah. Yeah. Filled up the floorboards. I got in the car, but actually didn't get to the seat of the car. It was steep angle. Okay. Guy got the whole scenario after the my mechanic drain about eight gallons of water out of ood everything. I actually thought it was running a little bit smoother than it had been before. I doused it. And he told me one of his secrets engines running rough to sprinkle water in it is. Yeah, he pulled off a small vacuum tube pulls on a little bit of water. And I was wondering if that's like something might mechanic has in his own mind. Or if that's true. It's a well known fact, in fact there are devices which you can actually buy to put water into the engine as you driving for this. And other reasons they use primarily in these elections to the what the water does it helps the bust up carbon deposits. So that as you as you put water into the engine, it will loosen up carbon. But you wouldn't wanna put it in like gallons? No. No, it's very possible that there was enough moisture in the intake, manifold, and whatever. So that it loosened up whatever carbon was in there. And as a result, the thing did run most Moodley sure a little, but it sure I'll be gone by. Now, you probably back to what you were decarbonised. It's running great. Except for the fact, the alternator imploded little related Clinton happen. The engine was running pretty well kind of a car was this the Ninety-three blazer. Well, you lucky that you had a blaze because head had something that we're closer to the ground, and you wouldn't have an engine anymore. Yeah. If it had something lighter. It might have skipped across the water. What would have happened as you would have sucked water into the engine? And then it would be good. Bye. Yeah. What are the pistons coming up would be trying to compress not air and gasoline, but air gas and water, and you would have bent the crankshaft and busted piston. And connecting rods and blown head gaskets. Nothing serious mind. So you were very lucky to have not sucked water into the engine. Oh, yeah. So eat. So it is it is running better because you have decarbonised the engine. Okay. And he he's right to a certain extent. And this is something you can do. I mean, we have used this from time to time in the shop. But now, we have these expensive chemicals in this fancy machine that does it. So we don't do it for free anymore charge. People. See a very great. Thank you. One eight car talk. That's eight eight eight two two seven eight two five five. Hello, you're on car talk. Hi, this is Lorraine and Saint Louis highly Ol- are they a on probably one of the only people around Couldn't Spell. So what's up? Well, I have an eight Acura legend, and it's making a funny noise. Kind of like a. Goes on for about five seconds, if I apply the break it usually stops. But not always it happens when you're driving along when I'm driving wrong, usually also happens, especially when I've I started up, and I'm pulling out of the driveway. Saint louis. Gotcha. So let me get this. Right. You pull out of the driveway. You begin to hear this? I have to describe as a scraping noise. No. I'm not much of a rattling kind of like if you put a baseball card. Folks of your bicycle that's right. And soon as you touch the brakes. Yeah. Pretty much so, but but not always it doesn't always stop. When I touched the brakes all really always stop on yet. This little brothers passing. About certain words. Life would be so simple. It doesn't always stop on your step on the breaks. Now. All right. Well, then then then, but which you get this number. Bake a cake dot. Well, I do have one other clue on this. Good good. We all the quiz. I started noticing this in about October. And it was just really bad throughout the winter. And now that the weather is perked up a little and temperatures have come up. I I'm not hearing. It is frequently hole with way, you think this noise is coming from well inside the engine compartment, very close to you. No, it actually sounds like it's probably about three feet forward of me. Shut up. For a minute. I thought my brother was hot on the trail. Why was his tail was pointing? But evidently, it didn't pan out. And when the when I I had noticed it. Is it won't happen? When you have the defrost or on now. Actually, one more time. Is it? Is it more likely to happen? When you have the frosting on. Birger? His thought it could be could be bad air conditioner. Compressor. That's three. This is my goal for this. This go for sound of a sound too, many possibilities distances good. I mean in the winter when the when the weather was not as friendly as you say, then I suspected you had the heater on all the time. And therefore the blow award was random to frostier ended the fraudster. And now that you said the weather whether has perked up a little bit. You've probably turned off the fan. No, I still run it. If you hit the if you had the air conditioner on you just running the heat actually have have air conditioner onto it hasn't made. The noise have made the noise you have to do an experiment. See if the noise goes away with the turn all that stuff off. Okay. And see if the noise disappears completely, okay? Lawyer goes away. Call us back. If it doesn't go away. Don't call us back. I don't want to talk to you. We don't want to see you again doc in all of the airwaves again. Thanks. It's been a lot of fun sport. By this new method of intimidating. Keep you want anything poor little pressure. We'll get desperate. Hey, Tommy, it's time we took a little break. So our favorite public radio stations can identify themselves and public radio listeners can take their fingers out of there. We'll be back with a brand new earth, shattering puzzle in just a minute. The great why? Had. A. To around one. And even though Goldilocks one who's been messing with her radio's precepts whenever she is up say it, this is NPR Hake before we get back to this. Classic car talk episode. Keep in mind that your favorite public radio station is still working every day to bring you up to date news and great new programs and believe it or not your old car can help them do it. That's right. That old heaped it's keeping your dipstick low and your Bank balance lower can be picked up wished your station and turned into something truly useful, obviously, not cards. Find out how easy it is. At car. Talk dot com slash vehicle donation. We're back. You're listening to car talk with us, click and collect the tablet brothers. And we hit a discuss cars car repair in the new puzzle. I hope it's as good as last week's. That was great, man. We're back listening. All right. Take it back. Yeah. No. That was as well. This is this is interesting. I think go ahead. You know, we all of us. Remember from our high school or junior high school physics or whatever that the the moon has a fraction of the earth's gravity. In fact, I think we're all told that it's a six that's the number. I remember and and win those NASA guys fake, the landing on the move, very careful to show, the the the astronauts bounding from one spot to another angle ruse well because a simple simple spring of the feet would take you many, many fever. Everyone became a, you know, a bra mean, how do they fake it springs springs in the shoe liars and wires what visible wide seen Peter Pan? So so through example, if you had a bathroom scale and you put your six hundred pound bend mother-in-law. I knew your. Oh, man. Put your six hundred pound Bengal tiger. Yeah. On this bathroom scale. And then you were transport the tiger in the bathroom scale to the moon. And they would weigh the the Bengal tiger or the mother-in-law would weigh one hundred one hundred pounds you with me. I'm with you on that. Yeah. But is there anything that you can think of that if measured in the same way would way more on the moon than it does on the earth? Now, if you think, you know, the answer, right? It on a postcard on the back of a twenty dollar Bill and send it to. I have I have one answer. There may be more than one. It only works. If the number is two. And his there deception in office Gatien, unclarified you. Now, if you think, you know, the answer read it on a postcard or in the back of a twenty dollar Bill and send it to puzzle tower car talk plaza boxed thirty five hundred Harvard square Cambridge our fair city Matt zero two two three eight or you can Email your answer to us from car talk dot com. Wait a minute. Wait a minute now office Gatien, you said if you is there anything you don't think of if you did the same thing would way more than what you said more on the moon. Yeah. More more. Not more than a sixth more more than it self more than it ways here. Yeah. I got you with me. Yes. Wow. Anyway, if you have a question about your mother would say, what are you crazy? If you have a question about your car or anything, we don't really care. We I'm I'm ready to talk about moving reviews anything. Yeah. How about a Dell? H h that was great. Call eight eight eight car talk that's eight two two seven eight two five five. Hello, you're on car talk. Hi. My name is Shawn Theun calling from Washington DC shanty. That's right. H A N T I S H A N T H H I and you calling from where? Washington. Oh, you a politician or lawyer not at all are you related to a politician or lawyer? In fact, I'm not a great junkie. It's a pleasure to talk to you. What's up? Well, let's see I've been living DC for a couple of years, and I've been traveling around by metro basically included meeting to work, but that's started to get to to become a drag. And then I'm ready to buy a car just that I have no place to park this car because I live in an apartment building. And there's just a limited parking. So I've been on this wait list for several months now seems to be very slow to turnover. Ideal solutions problem what I mean, it just came to me. I don't have these things just come to you apparently. Instead of buying this car yourself. You wanna go into partnership with someone you must demand that this person worked nights? So when you get home you pull up to the front door. He gets in the car takes it to work ENA. I actually curiously enough. I have a neighbor who actually works in my apartment and doesn't live. And so I thought I could apply that Luke factor. I want you to realize that none of my brothers speak. Anymore anymore? They used to it all pretty much ended with high. You must be the new guy that able say, yeah, I'm Tom and that would that was just about the intimate. Yeah. They don't wanna talk to me. I've tried talking to mind some of them complained that I play music to that. But. So I thought if anyone could come up with some creative ideas, it would be you guys. Zoroaster all possible. What kind of a car you buying? Well, I'm thinking maybe inequality in a court or maybe a pa- Saad. Do you have any thoughts on that either? Oh, I have some thoughts on that. Okay. I'm ready to hear them by the Passat is that right only because Hawn the accord is probably the most boring vehicle you will age fifteen or twenty years. By driving that thing for a week. I've test driven the Passats far. And that was actually pretty fun. I must admit is fun. The what's fun about it. I quit Lee. I haven't had fun driving in. Five years. No kidding. No. I mean, I can think of about five million things rather be doing Dr. Do you sit in the front seat of? I try to the back. That's fun. Maybe I've kind of lost my perspective washes you odds. Aviv men. Yeah. I mean, getting all view driving is a necessity to get from point a to point b that's an appointment given that it has to be done to we take whatever through we can to make a disability more exciting going with the Passat. Going with the Poseidon very excited. Reading endorsement we haven't solve your problem. I went through the same thing. I used to live in one of the suburbs sort of end of the city areas here around Boston called Brooklyn. It was a a wonderful place. I mean, everything was right knee. A by shopping. I could hop on the train and be in downtown Boston and eight minutes, and I had a car and you had to use the car sometimes because sometimes you're not going to downtown Boston going some of the direction. But again, there was no place to park it. So that if you like supermarket shopping you pull up in front of the apartment building and double park and put on the flashes. The police would come upstairs, a grocery bags the groceries balanced on your nose. And it was impossible if you parked on the street, they would come and steal. It was horrible. And there was only one solution to this and that to move, right? That's what happened to the world. You get the car because you have to have it. And then, you know, longer stay where you were because you don't have to be because you don't have to be there. So you move further away, which means you have to have the car, and then you're gonna have. Two of them. Because that one breaks you can't get to be to be there. You can't depend on a car that might not be dependent for me. If I had to give you advice. It would be don't buy the damn car. We we don't need all the cars. We have if you really wanna car come up here. I'll give you mine. I'm so sick of it. We don't need cars. We have more cars than people for God's sakes. All those people that drive me around right now, they're not they're not happy by giving new. They won't know. Your moods released six once a year. Just keep moving on. It is it is a good benchmark. You know, it's a good measure of how good the friends are point. If they're not friendly, the friends enough to schlep you around, and you don't need them cry. Don't forget you can rental car from time to time to us to enough. It's just that the first time I did that. I got right into a wreck. Oh, that's better the car that you. Okay. So that's usually the cons. Uh-huh. Rent. We have too many people with cars, we don't need any more cars, and you'll have much more fun on the metro you'll meet people you'll see people time to meditate you'll have time to read books that you can't do shouldn't do at least when you driving. They still not allow eating and drinking in the subways. Gosh. No. And I got a ticket for that. On the metro, you know, that our producer Doug Berman almost got a ticket for doing the same thing on the platform. And he was there drinking coffee munching on a Bego exactly what I was doing a woman came over to them and ask to see identification, and he was just about to give the identification when a scuffle broke out at the foreign of the platform, a coincidently the train shows up. He was able to escape it on the train and escapes his now a fugitive from Justice. I mean, we're ready. They're ready to turn out the hunters. If there was a reward of this guy's head. We have him down this shackled to the axle of accord right now, I'll see what I can do to raise awareness. An interesting. We're ready to extradite. Okay. Good luck shot the money doing something else. Avoid the car as long as you can. It's a horrible track. Okay. Well, thank you so much. Thank you. See one eight cards that's eight doubled to seventy eight to fifty five alot your car talk. This is John from Burlington. Burlington watt. Massachusetts kidding. Yeah. I didn't know anyone lived in Burlington. I thought they were just like malls. I have an ethical relational car problem. Oh goldman. Well, I haven't ninety four Pontiac grand prix with a hundred and forty thousand miles on it. And you want to sell to your mother-in-law. I would love to. The car runs. Great. It's mechanically impeccably kept. But the inside of the car is a mess. It has to three pounds of sand in it Dunkin donuts, rappers and cups and old newspapers bodies, everything is in that car who's driving this guy, you me and everything I love to keep it mechanically sound. But the rest, I really don't have much interest. I have a date coming up with a woman that I really like, but she's a little bit on the classy side, and my one side of my friends. Tell me I should clean the car because she won't even go near otherwise. And the other side of my friends tell me that that would be somewhat dishonest. And that she should just see me the way I am which is a messy car. What else about you is distasteful? I mean, how's your house? Is it a mess? It's kind of the same. I keep it neat. But not real clean. But mechanically everything is attended. Refrigerator works. You don't clean. The refrigerator know how how old are you? John. Thirty eight you have not been married. No do anything. Whatever it takes. Read the car move up. Another apartment for the weekend. I mean, this this this is a real dilemma. Yeah. Man. Well, it's a dilemma, except we guys we know what we will. All. Yeah. We should. We would all do the same thing. Yeah. We've fumigate the car clean up the house and take three showers, and we would do anything to make an impression on this classy woman, anything this may be your last chance. More important note, and sooner or later, she will find out that you misrepresented. But by then it may be all too late for her to dump you. So that kind of a strategy. How's the hairdo it? You got hair got good hair. You got a lot of it. I've been good hair where I got it. What I don't have enough of it. So you have you have good quantity and quality. Yes. How's the physique medium, you know, three year old guy? Yeah. For drivers. How would you describe yourself as cuddly? That's good a little bit less than cuddly. But a little bit more than felt when was the last date. I met her at church last week and went to dinner on on before her. When was the last date? Oh, my. What administration our? I used to like Reagan. I thought he. It was. So when you went out the last week you didn't drive. No, I met her at the restaurant. Good thinking. Yeah. What does? She drive a Lexus or you're done. Really? It's probably need is a pin ethical dilemma there's no question about it. But you know, what you have to do, and you can tell all your friends, right? I get your ethics. I. Yeah. My strategy is to get the deal done. And then she'll find out she'll go to find out anyway. That's right. But but she ought to have a chance to see your good qualities. I. Oh, okay. Yeah. Because that will ameliorate the mess. That's in your car at some point. She'll be mad in love with you. And then you show the car, she'll say all my God. But he'll sit and then she'll be able to laugh at it. Right. She'll say how how shall I was to think that something that was important to me? She'll be the shovel one exactly. And you'll just be the liar. That's it. Well, John, good luck. And you have to keep us posted. No matter what the outcome would better different. We even have you as a guest on stump the chumps be ready. Okay. Good luck. Thanks for the lie. Your butt off. Okay. Well, it's happened. Again. You have scorned at another perfectly good our listening to car talk. Our steamed producers Doug the subway fugitive a slave to fashioned Bongo boy Berman our associate producer, David the Cavs of Belleville green, and Catherine ferrall Bluecher fellows, our web lackey is Doug the old grey mayor assisted by Connie Bridgford. Our theme music is by David dog risen, and our technical spiritual. And menu adviser just back from his heroic. Storm tossed circumnavigation of the ralway marian's breakfast buffet, his John Bugsy Lawler, our public opinion. Polls poem rookie of murky research. Assistant by statistician Marge. Vera, March Novara our customer care Representative is hey, would you buzz off our interpretive dance instructor is tristen shout. Our staff alpinist is on top yet. Our staff on his Seymour Robbins are divorced car Carmine. Not yours are sexual harassment. Investigators Hank panky our meteorologist from the New Delhi offers. Luke out of Indo. Our director of Pavlovian research is about ringing our Russian chauffeur is Biko drop of the banker car talk plaza poker games. These Nikolai put in our C. Cushion tester is Mike Easter our chief counsel from law from DUI cheat them and how Louis do we don't do the kicker guard quoting grocery clerks in Harvard square. We're click and Clack the tap it brothers. Don't drive like my brother. My thanks listening. We'll be back next week. Bye. Bye. You can get a podcast of the show, which is number nineteen twelve. Subscribe to our weekly, podcast and checkout, Osita, inducing clothing and best of collections all over a car, talk dot com. Also this week had car talk dot com. We hit a hope you clean up your driveway a car that's long in the grill. The carts are vehicle donation program will totally for free and send the proceeds to your favorite NPR station. It's the good deed. You've been looking for to help justify that new Lexus during your car into the programs you love find out how at car talk dot com. Car production of Dewey, Chiba how and WB you are in Boston. And even though NPR listeners everywhere turned the tote bags inside out whenever they hear us say, this is NPR.

Boston National Public Radio Lewis Richard Sennett Dr David John Bugsy Lawler Texas America Doug Berman pistons Julia Tom Cleveland Bill Monroe university of Texas Austin Tommy Amex Saint Louis Luke Catherine ferrall Bluecher
2020-10-27- KSR - Hour 2

KSR

45:24 min | 10 months ago

2020-10-27- KSR - Hour 2

"Have. You heard about propane taxi propane tanks, propane grill tank home delivery service, and it's ridiculously easy to order a propane grill tanked delivered right to your door. Now's the perfect time of year to get outside and grill with family and close friends or heat up the patio. Make sure you've got propane for any occasion go to propane tanks, DOT COM use Promo Code tank ten and your first tank exchanges just ten dollars Promo Code tank ten for ten dollars tank exchange no delivery fees no commitment and no contact propane tax dot com propane grill tank home delivery Promo Code Tank Tan. To the second hour of Kentucky Sports Radio on Talk Radio Ten Eighty Now, here's Matt Your. Number Two Sports Radio Five, oh five, seven, one eighty aviation glass texts machine to Simpson four five, two, five, four am I wrong about this thing Ryan on the state legislators like am I wrong I don't understand why they get tickets. I said I didn't even realize they all got tickets until this all came up and it's ridiculous to think that each and every one of them were getting lower arena great seats to every home game since. I mean drew am I wrong? Side. With you I. Mean It's Great. What they're doing for our state gets some of its grateful. Whatever which side? No but I mean good for you. There you're doing your service, but that doesn't mean you should get every home game. Yeah. I can understand the governor having seats because I could understand the idea of you're representing the state there might even be like. Like Matt, Bevin would sometimes bring two games business leaders considering maybe bringing their business to Kentucky. I'm okay with that right I, actually understand that. That makes sense to me. But I don't think every state legislators just get to come to every game and lower arena seat. Yeah. Just because your elected official that gives you the right to come to every home game and I can guarantee you there crying whiny budget groove. Oh. Wait a minute. This that's how we found out about. This was one of them was one. Reason we know about it. Yeah, they're winding crank. Tickets a year we'll get fifteen percent capacity. Be Quiet go? Back. To. Your corner. It's time for the Blue Lights, cross Bluegrass tour sponsored by the Kentucky Department of Highway Safety. Don't drink and drive don't text and drive we're going to Ohio County Ryan when I say, Oh, how can he? What comes to your mind? The hottest KS are remote in the history of KS are remotes I forgot about that that was. I've never been. I don't think I've ever been hotter than I was it day. beaver Dam and there's a lot of you there. And you remember that and I feel like we all went through it together. Because at the end of it everyone was sweating profusely we all lost about twenty pounds at day. Yeah. There's a woman who gave us cold tells those kind of rubbery tells. If we didn't have those I. Think I might have passed out I don't know that I would have made it all up on hot stage that concrete it was ridiculously hot Ohio County is named after the Ohio River. It's one of the counties, the answer my question, the other day right which are not named after people Ohio Johnny is named after the Ohio River which it used to touch, but which it doesn't anymore. Gotcha. Yeah I'm GONNA, take them in my book. How can he was the hardest candy to write about and the reason drew was we went to Ohio County and we ask people who were like what's going on what's your county need like? Is there something that's that's happening and no one seemed to be anything but just happy. Everybody was just like you know what lifespan I asked, what's the biggest problem in the county and I'm not lying about this this woman said, well, when we have our festival in the summer, there's never enough porta-pottys. Trump's got to get fixed. Yeah. That's a tough problem. I mean think about that if that's the worst problem in your life that's pretty good. Isn't it? Yeah. So ably stopped in. Ohio County one hundred times but only in the median, the the beaver Dam truckstop best truckstop in Kentucky but I just want to say I think collectively of all the counties I went to in Kentucky this was the happiest one. So to the people of beaver Dam in Hartford, which are the two biggest towns I, salute you for your happiness because I didn't go this the only place I went to where literally no one complained about anything and Ryan, there's virtue in that. Yes, there is already. Talked about how you just what you said right there. So Hartford is the is the county seat and here's the. Here's the description of Hartford. This is their slogan home of two thousand Happy People and a few sore heads. We got to kick them out with the Happy County. They got sore heads over to Galley or something. Do you like that? Shane? It's not here to judge the slogan. So drew, do you like the slogan? Like that one and I think Shannon would like it to. beaver creek. The other town was created by this is on their website, a small but zealous group of Baptist who wanted a place to practice their faith and be happy. So they have beaver creek and beaver dam. When acid beaver creek I meant beaver. Dam. Creek. Is there a beaver creek and. I think I wrote that wrong? Of course, Beaver Dam has the beaver dam amphitheater, which drew gets a pretty amazing set of acts all things considered. I saw John Prime Their poison place snare. They get some country music actually had jason is Bell I. Think like for a place kind of in the middle of nowhere beaver dam amphitheater. First of all is an awesome location like I think it might be the best concert. Setting that I know of in Kentucky and they get great axe. Yeah, I haven't been there for a show but when we did our show there, I was shocked at how nice and be. A great place to watch a concert in a part of Kentucky. That's not exactly a tourist destination. So they're really doing well with that. Music Guy have you ever been there? No, but I'm trying to get waxing book there if you got any leave brother out. That's right. Your band is Waxy Ter-. have you played Wax Eater on the show? Yes. We have out of our like four album catalogue I. think There's about three clean songs we can play. I'd like to derive. More wax eater place over the next break. Well, the next break we have to play in Ohio, county Oh, you're right. You're but we will play a why we will play a Wack Cedar at some point, the home of bluegrass music because it's the home of Bill Monroe, Bill Monroe from their lot they consider themselves the home of bluegrass music and they have a barn out there that on Saturday nights I don't remember the name of it but on Saturday nights, people just go to the Bill Monroe Barn and they just pick and they grin and they do their bluegrass thing. Really. Every Saturday night they do this and that's what I told. Yes. That's cool. Didn't know that. They every year is the strawberry festival drew and would you like to know what they have at the strawberry? Festival. I'M GONNA guess. Strawberries. They what they do. They also crowned Miss Strawberry. Who they have a car show and Kentucky's largest tractor show. Interesting. I didn't know about any of this. So this he's to I've never been to a tractor show. But do we think that people just like bring out their best tractor car show I understand because cars are different. You have old cars, new cars and like. Fixed up cars but I'm not attractor Ga.. Are there enough variations of tractors that a tractor. Parade could give us it new and interesting tractors or is like a tractor like Motorola when you say Motorola's motorable is a tractor attractor. Probably know antique tractors that they have fixed up. That are still going would be interesting different ones of those will make it kind of interesting for a show. So you think it's like cars they have antique tractors. Sure. Yeah. Okay. Definitely is anyone have any of us been to attract her show? Just. Haven't carved out the time Piet. Elliott has wax Cedar played at a tractor show ever. We've played some strange venues news shows, but we've never played attractor show. They have a new beef Brady's. Drew in the bank there and I must say this I've been all over the country sometimes end up at people. Brady's there ain't a nicer beef o Brady's in this United States of America than the one that is there in Ohio County at the bank they I. Mean I mean this as somebody who has a sports bar and who appreciates him that beef o Brady's when they when beef o Brady's goes to the New York Stock Exchange and shows what they're up to. They should show the picture of the one and how can because they're rain a nicer one anywhere. I'm getting confused. You're skipping right over how it's in a bank. Feel. Like that's a big. That's a big big beef o Brady's. It's not in a bank I think it's an old bank. It's not. It's not current on a bank. Oh I thought you bet like you go in here needed a deposit this check and I'll have Your Cheese Burger and a beer. Now, twenty five dollar checks I don't know it's not the case it's not the case that it's bank slash beef o Brady's. Used to be a bank and now beef O'Brien like when you see a place that was obviously a pizza hut at one time in an old bank building. That's right. Right in the middle downtown. Very nice. Now, I do after having said a lot of Nice things I need to say one negative thing. Ryan they have the two worst websites in the state. I want you to go to them right now first of all, go to visit how County K Y dot Com. This is their tourism website. visit. County K Y, Dot Com, and tell me what you say. And I. See it to message saying get ready something really cool. Is Coming soon. Well. So I went back. It says something really cool. It's coming soon. Would you like to know when that website was created? No win two. Thousand Eleven. You've got to be kidding nine years to give me something. Cool. Well, boy must really be something. They've worked nine years on it see they shouldn't have said coming soon if they left off the soon, we would never say, say coming at some point something. Cool. Years to work on that website. I'll how county all right now go to Ohio County dot com. All right. Ohio canny. Oh. Boy. Website expired this account expired if you're the site owner put below to log so they the two websites, the official one and the tourism side one of them has cool stuff coming soon and the other one's expired. Need to work on that Ohio County I'm disappointed Ohio Candy I'm not mad I'm just disappointed. That's all I'm GONNA say finally they also have rough river supposedly the best place drew in Kentucky to Canoe is in Ohio County on the Rough River I've heard that too I've never been. Wish, we had Shannon. He's a big canoe guy. I'm sure he's been plenty of times but I've always seen pictures looks like a nice place. All right. Famous people a mentioned Bill Monroe Ray? Chapman Ryan the only the only baseball player to ever die in a game from a pitch. He was hitting head and killed Ray Chapman from Ohio County. Tragic Story. The pitcher was a submarine pitcher. and. Back in the day, they used to like scuff up the balls and get them dirty. What does that Amos submarine pitcher in sidearm okay. Gotcha. sidearm and he that kind of change the rules of baseball after that they kind of went now throw the ball out a lot and trying to get a fresh white baseball because they say he didn't even move. They say he didn't they don't. Even thinking saw it was a dirty roughed up baseball and sidearm pitcher threw it in there and hit him right in the side of the head Hillary said from Ohio County and finally why Herbs Criminal Brothers James Arp and Virgil Urp were both born in Ohio county older brothers they got out of Ohio County. Went to Illinois. Then why was born the three started their crime spree says I what. Was Born in Ohio County but James and Virgil ARP Ryan were really they went. County moved out for why it was born interesting. So. It's almost like they didn't get. You know they didn't get Payton or Eli. They got like they didn't. They didn't get why they got. James and Virgil I do like drew the name Virgil herb as as a person. Great name is better. Do you want to claim Wyatt Urp or you want to say he a? He lost his way somewhere else we he didn't start here. Well, I don't know James and Virgil did the same stuff and they're not even famous so I think you'd rather have you'd rather wide. So there you go. That is your Ohio. County. Tour you give a shout five to five, seven, one eighty hopefully someone from Ohio county will give us a call and you all should visit I'm telling you the Beaver Dam may but theater is the nicest place to listen to a concert you know in state we'll take back. To Talk. About. Jones and the crew call the Clark's and shop online at five Oh, two, five, seven, one, ten, eighty, or one, eight, seven, seven, nine, four, hundred, eighty or just the Kentucky Brandon KS or Tweet of the day by Twenty Matt at Kyiv. Sports. 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But to get to the right diagnosis, you have to break down for your doctor and get specific about the severity of your symptoms. VISIT IDENTIFY I dot Com to learn more and use the symptom checker to help change the conversation with your doctor brought to you by Abbvie. Come from far away. You're listening to Kentucky Sports Radio on talk. Radio. Ten Eighty. Bill Monroe Uncle Pin. He is of course from Ohio County and Interesting Enough Ryan. Local pen was about a man named Pendleton van diver also from Ohio. Interests. Yeah. Yeah. that. Yes this is a very famous bluegrass on. Do you know the Song Uncle Pin? No, do not. Sorry. Okay. I thought you might. That, you would make you more excited from Ohio County it clearly did not. To know. Yeah Ricky skaggs did a version of this song that was big to. Okay. Again Yeah. Scott Away. Apparently, we're law enforcement not criminals. This is what happens drew when I never seen tombstone. Yeah. That's true. I. Even said there lawman I love. Tombstone could movie should've known. I said they were criminals. Yeah I'm even making any worse. No I was implying that they're also criminals when I've seen tombstone a million times. How have you not seen tombstone never seen him and I know. People get on me about that, and now it's almost a point of pride now that I won't see it because everybody thinks it's so awesome and I have never seen it. Val kilmer back before he added a few and he Book came out same day his mind and I beat him and I still hope he knows that. We had the same release date. Have you seen Tombstone Ryan? Oh. Yeah. Val kilmer steals the show. He's awesome in it and is he wider P-. Not Wyatt Urp he's Kurt Russell's ridership. What's he? Yeah who's he? Doc Holliday. Is that the name? Longtime. Great Movie You remember is a great movie. I actually WANNA go watch it soon. Now Five, zero, two, five, seven, hundred, eighty, one person writes Matt I, think the legislators should not get the tickets but if they're going to get them, don't if they're really fans don't let them sit down low make him sit up high the tickets we don't use. A. Point. If you're such a big fan sit up top. But see they would cry and whine and complain don't WanNa. See it up they did. The thing is one of these days Ryan's GonNa, run for state legislature and you know you're gonNA use those tickets and if they took them from me, you would want to. Catch two more. I, assume all these legislators pay the K. Fund donation that everyone they're paid and that you know I do think they pay for them. I do think they pay for them but I don't know. Talk Casting your bet they don't have to pay. All that Ryan let's say you were no miss fan the SEC. Came out and apologized miss yesterday said that the s that the referees were wrong not to review that kick that bounced up and hit the Auburn Guy I didn't realize not only did they not rule it hitting babe even review it. And Lane Kit. So they said they apologized lane kiffin had re tweeted a tweet that was negative about SEC officiating. So even though they apologized and said, we're wrong they still find lane kiffin for criticizing the officials. Well I mean. That's kind of the protocol man you're hey, coach you. Should be the rule like. If the SEC. Objectively wrong and they admit they're wrong. How do you find a guy for saying they were wrong. I think just as the head coach you got to be. Careful. What? Why? Though I don't know. It's just kind of like, why go why is it? The officials are the only people on the planet that you can't criticize. If Lane kiffin criticized the president, the governor, the Faculty of Old Miss his players any human being on earth. Go the other players you anyone he doesn't get fun. But if you accu-, if you say that the officials screwed up, you get fined. Why does that make sense? Doesn't I'm not saying it's fair. That's just That's just protocol quickly care should it be? No it should especially on this case because lane kiffin said, hey, the replay messed up in one statement. The SEC said, Hey, the replay messed up Lincoln was right also lane kiffin. You're twenty, five thousand dollars. They. said the exact same thing he argued and still find him I don't even like Lane Kiffin. But that is so ridiculous that you can't say what is obvious they messed up. You can't say that. When did these officials become such delicate little bunnies that we can't talk about him We've talked about for years. Why? Why do officials not have to answer after a game? Everybody else has to answer four things why do they get off scot-free? Not Have to answer Wa questionable calls to the media and then yesterday in Lane Kiffin press conference he said I'm not even allowed to tell my players the explanation that was given to me. He's like I wish they could hear when I was just told. So does that mean he's not even out of tells locker room. Riddick that makes absolutely absolutely ridiculous that officials somehow are these like delicate little dolls that we can't even act like did anything wrong that there's somehow perfect beings that we know is not the case who's next. Bobbin Jamestown how are you? Bob? I go and guys either talking about the legislatures getting. COMP. Tickets by UK Athletics don't you think a little prayed Croak quo in there you know. Any legislate. Something for nothing. I'm sure there is, but that's also wrong I mean here's the thing we want our state legislators in theory to make the decisions about the University of Kentucky that are the best for the state. If it's the case that if they're worried, they'll lose their price tickets. If they do something that isn't what the UK administration want, that shouldn't be the case we don't let where we used to not let private companies do that that's starting to change, but we're supposed to like these folks are supposed to be unbiased, and if you give them seats on the floor at rob, they're know it's GonNa have an impact. Also, you know those legislators you don't see him at the Games. Most of the time they give them to their buddies for the same thing that's once again right about that, bob. I mean. You know. I guess there's a lot of things more important things to get worked up about but it's just an example of how things that are just like we just accept as a common practice. If you look at them are like well, why should they get those but they do anyway who's next? Jordan Jordan how are you Jordan? got a couple of quick things and then I'll hang up. I I know you haven't really talked about but I just think it's really cool. One of my college roommates his dad was the the lead architect for the Rangers Stadium. It's a Nice stadium these. Obviously showing a lot of it during the world series. I. Just got like thirty six. What's your other thing and I think instead of having you guys try to outrun the NFL players in pads you should all line up without pads and seeing the fasces. The first person that gets caught the NFL player gets tackled you have to deal with. A. Good Good Point Chris Paul Ryan's the fastest. Shane in second and then I don't know about between me and drew. But. We don't have to be fast faster than you. We don't want anybody to get tackled DJ metcalf L. None of us. Got Anybody. That's right. We'll take a break, five, two, five, seven, one, tonight I don't even know how can he person I get one? We'll be right back. Thanks for listening to Kentucky Sports Radio on Talk Radio Eighty. quarterback sports radio five to five, seven, one, eighty, the segment sponsored by Dan owes seasoning dot com you can have it for your tailgating cookouts, your parties it's an incredible seasoning. It has larger than life flavor think about the flavor you're used to. Tom's by fifty, throw out the sodium and Ryan Lemon you have Dano seasoning think about that. It's a Dan Party it's right. They Dano is of huge on tiktok seven, hundred, fifty, thousand followers they're teaching your recipes they're showing you dances, they're gonNA teach you all that stuff and Dano season is made with all the good stuff and none of the bad stuff. It's Dan. tastic. It's Dan Ariffin it's Dan might and it's Dan. It's all there. Dan OWES SEASONING DOT COM. They got flight to flavors choose from original and spicy checkout more Dan Oh seasoning dot com. All right. A couple little things before we. Get back the Game Kentucky and Georgia. Drew is at noon on Saturday. We are taking reservations starting now at KS bar. So if you would like to come watch the Kentucky Georgia game at the Bar. Ryan. You're watching it there. Saturday right correct. I. Will Be There Ryan will be there. So make your reservations. What's the phone number hours? Forget the phone number is eight, five, nine what Ryan. Five, five, four, six Oh, eight, one I believe that right? or You just say numbers I believe that's right. Can we double check that maybe just to be careful? So you don't. Call calling a grandma and saying cannot come watch the game. Eight, five, nine, five, five, four, six, zero, eight, one yeah. Got It well, done right eight, five, nine, five, five, four, six, zero, eight, one. Now make your reservation for the game Saturday and we are opening drew for breakfast. Those of you going to the game, we're going to open early nine am and have a KS bar breakfast for people before the game. I. Am among those people going to the game. So I will eat breakfast with our pregame show head over. We've never we haven't done that this year yet. We we've done at the last couple of years. The breakfast is always awesome they do like. If people were more early risers we would do this a lot more because there are breakfast is great, but we are doing breakfast. If you're going to the game, of course, can't tailgate come eat breakfast with us. We will open at nine am and Ron. We'll be doing our pre game show there during the breakfast Yep pre-game eight to ten in the morning another early one Saturday morning that is early. Now the other thing is today at two o'clock. I'm doing a debate with Scott Jennings that's Mitch McConnell's. Political consultant he and I are doing a debate for with the Kentucky. Chamber of Commerce it's online. I'll tweet out the link after the show you have to sign, sign up to do it and it's on zoom or whatever I don't know but it's easy to watch and those are always good fireworks and I've done it three or four times together, and we will be previewing the presidential race and the Senate race. Ryan me versus Scott. Jennings at two o'clock. This afternoon you guys are good together. You guys have a good little back and forth you guys usually kind of work well together. Debate. Stoop. Said on Saturday Ryan he quote wit to the extreme to get his team prepared because he didn't think they were ready to play and he said clearly, it didn't work. What do we think he meant by he went to the extreme? I don't know on the way to Tennessee they stopped at Cumberland University and did a little work out of the way. So I don't I don't know what they did Saturday for the Missouri Game but you know we were we talked about it on the pre-game show I think he was worried all week that they were preparing the way they should be. For that game and and even on Game Day he was obviously worried that something wasn't right. They weren't ready to play and it was obvious when the game started. He was right have you heard drew what what they did. Saturday morning stoop said he did things he had never done before to try to get his team ready and it just didn't work. Original guests was there going to stop and Paducah practice? We're just GONNA make this thing on the way the game but no, I have no clue. Yeah. It's counter I mean even the idiots like us that aren't even practice just look into that game I mean, we were saying that all week that this they could come out flat Freddie, mets, all Freddie, talk about for weeks. So to hear that they actually did it it's kind of it was a game that it was definitely a possibility. Well it did happen and. Doesn't look like stoops was able to make any sort of change that made it work. There's next. Bill in Ohio County Bill in Ohio County, how are you bill a? Matt. What's up so I've got a couple of more sports fair. Some allow county go for. We. Give any of yours. Did you not yet? Okay. We'll see what bill comes up with. Water who is John Oldham from Harper Kentucky he can. He was a player coach in Ad at Western Kentucky University. All right. Good deal what the other one and the windows living or not a man named John Gannon's who for my candidate, which is outside of a beaver dam. He was a player at Western Kentucky. University Research Coach of the Aba Louisville. Kentucky Colonels I. Did hear about him I to the cardinals. Question go ahead finish go. Ahead? Five and twelve and I coach on the also. Everybody's got their thing. What let me ask you what makes people know how county so happy I think I said like everybody when I went there was happy. Why do you think that is? On a good day. Happy. Most of the time. Yeah. Most of the time but you know just like any place else you know he's got the. People that want WanNa complain about you know just the smallest things that Mo-. Most of the time most people are happy. I like it. Well thank you very much. Bill I. Appreciate it. Thank you. All right. Thank you. What what I did I did he Did you have any athlete Ryan he did not mention. I had John Gibbons. Mariah Robinson Wilson. One of the greatest female basketball players at Murray state ever three-point leader top ten in points assists rebounds scored forty four points in a game at Murray state she's from Ohio County. Paul Decker probably their best basketball players come out of Ohio County he played. Oh, Open City University. Now the basketball coach there don't have county and Shelby Pike Barnes won the Belmont in the. Jockey in the hall of Fame Jockey is from Ohio County. Is that a woman? I think it's a guy. She'll be Pike Barnes won the. Horse not sure. This is back in the late eighteen hundred. Okay. All right. So this isn't a horse out of necessarily heard of. Yeah longtime ago. All right. Well, good. Well, tomorrow is Oldham counting. So be ready for all you folks in Oldham. The the the county that well, there's a lot to say about them and I'm looking forward to doing them tomorrow you ready for the world series tonight, right? Yes. Dodgers three to crazy weekend in the world series over the weekend. So it's been a good series to watch I've enjoyed it. Actually I have to I have no interest in these teams except pulling for Walker Bueller because he's from Lexington, but the Games have been fascinating. The guy tried to steal home the other night which I loved you had the air in game four airs that led the raise win on one play. It's been exciting. You know has been I don't know man I for for a series that on paper I didn't think I'd care about it. All this I feel like Ryan has been baseball at its best it has been yeah. The the raise with a bunch of no name guys in a low payroll but the get some guys that are throwing one hundred miles an hour. It has been fun to watch kind of fourth at three to raise win tonight we're going to have a game seven. So that's what I hope for I. Just Hope we can. Win and I game seven, Walker Bueller will pitch. Yes. Yeah. He's he's scheduled to pitch game seven. So that's what we got to hope for just if you don't care at all about it just get to a game seven. So the Lexington kid can take them out on the chance to win game seven. That'd be very exciting if he could like because if he won game seven after winning game three he he'd probably be MVP series. Don't he he might be MVP. Yeah. Because he looked really good on Friday night won that game. Drew if you've been watching it. Everything you all said, is all I know about the series because I just learned it I didn't even knows three two until today. Really. I did I did wake up Saturday morning and see all the tweets about the crazy ending and I was like, yeah. Whatever it's baseball couldn't have been that crazy and I didn't even look it up and finally saw that night on TV and it was like, wow, I had no clue that crazy game whatever that was it also shows how Go. Ahead is the swing in the entire series I've seen in US law at over twenty four hours later, sports or a game of inches. Was An inch from catching that ball in game four and Ryan series over at that point. Yeah. Yeah. He kicks it throws it home. He kicks it next thing you know raise windy game and we got a series boys. It's Goin' keeps going yeah. It's unbelievable five. Oh, two, five, seven, one, eighty Let's take a break. We'll be right back to the final segment. This is chaos. And you Qatar right play based in this fan base. To how about how about US having a famous musician right here here Ryan on this show. I didn't know this. Yes. I feel like we need to. You know pumped this up real more. What's the name of this song? This song is called. Rollie fingers you can find it on spotify band camp I tunes everywhere. There's something calling. There's something called a band camp Rollie fingers like the baseball baseball player huge baseball fans in waxy. PADRES. So you're you're a baseball fan. Yes and so why did you name this after Rollie fingers? I do not write the songs. This is the singers idea. He's a gigantic baseball fan who knows I don't even know what he's saying I've been in the band for twelve years so. So you're. You're saying the song do you don't know the words? He said not a clue some of. Love it very loud. Can't hear it. So like you're like, it doesn't matter the message of the song. So long as it's loud. Yeah exactly. I mean we were banned from a few venues in town for being loud. Oh. You're paying for being too last absolutely what you don't tell me which one but how do you get? What does that mean they? Why don't they just tell you to turn it down? Got Invited by venue to play a show but we were playing with also loud bands. The venue is known for sit down. Acoustic. Wine and chilling type of venue. All right. So Jeff Ruby's they were. Yeah. They weren't expecting the Wax Cedar and we played last and we're on our last song like thirty seconds left in the song and we would have been done. See the manager of the venue run down the back hall run over to the soundboard flip on the lights, turn off all the sound and say you guys are done. You guys are done. Can't come back into the. well, look at these rebels the whack Cedar, who knew Wow I. Don't, even know the words of the songs that Magnum. Very happy. Our second album is about the wire every song is about the wire the TV. So I don't know what the lyrics are. Singing. Elliott Qatar he doesn't understand We'll keep singing and you have no clue I. Bet they are. You know that wouldn't surprise me. I really like this. Thing that you got going on Elliott Five Oh two. Seven one, eighty, one birthrights map. I know you don't want to put the poll up on twitter. But. What do you think the average fan would say terry versus Joey who should start? What do you think Ryan? What do you think the average fan would say? I, think it's still heavily terry, but maybe well, let's take a poll on on on the text machine. You like that. Let's see before the show just send me one word Terry or Joey. That's it. That way it's not out in public like it doesn't get whatever. But just and I'll. I'll check seven, seven, two, seven, seven, four, five, two, five, four, just one word Terry or Joey. That's it. Drew what are you thinking show? Think Terry will win but it'll be a little closer than Ryan predicted. 'cause I like I said I really think our problems are receivers. It's not necessarily Teddy Terry. Tevi. But he's got to get better. He definitely gotta get better. Yeah I think this'll be the game that decides it for him I. Mean I do think there's a world where if he doesn't play well, Saturday, they say after the break, you know what we're going with Joey, which would be a real shame drew because of all the tears done for us I mean Terry has really accomplished so much for this program, I would hate to see it in in a negative fashion wouldn't you? Yeah. But the problem there is George Georgia. They're the best defense in the country and everyone bad against them so it's almost like I, hope they just say. Kentucky wins and surprises I mean if Terry plays bad throw it out because throw them away because he was bad against Georgia agree. Yeah. Right now so you could get, you could really say, Hey, this is this is your game go out. This is your chance, but it's it's Georgia. Right. So Terry or Joey, you give us the your thoughts and I'll let you know what happens who's next. Jordan Jordan. Are You George? I'm midnight house. WHAT'S UP I I know Ryan would run that yards faster. If he knew Julian tack, it was behind him. I don't think Julia Dacic catch him to be honest with you face to attack it I. Think if that happened Ryan I have confidence in you. You would win that race. yes I. Think I can win that one go ahead. You know, maybe how Ohio County websites for vulnerable the French after I know you all experienced that maybe they're just after the state of Kentucky I don't know anything else. Yep it really is just a receivers. I mean Josh I'll eat you know could have had that are red zone catch from Joey and it was a great pass and to at some point you just have to look at our big blue all the running back look at our strength and I'm sorry Eddie. Grand but. Carrying it has not been working and we gotta make that change. I mean you're gonNA. I JUST WANNA see US Ryan run the ball with Chris Rodriquez and see if it works consistently. Last year even two years ago with Benny. The offense was very simple hand the ball off until they stop it I don't know Ryan that I feel like we've done that this year at least since. We did it some against Auburn but since then I, don't feel like we've done that enough and I don't think we've done it ever with Chris. Rodriquez. And Missouri game that that was the game to do it. I think that we should have done it. Now, we got George drew said the best defense in the country it's going to be hard to do anything against them. Missouri. Gain Week to week run defense. We had crystal Rigas back there and you gave him the ball four times going into the fourth quarter when we were digging yourself out of a hall that was the mistake that they made. It looks like drew is right. It's about eighty twenty terry maybe even more than that. Maybe eighty five fifteen. That'd be Ryan was right? He was more. He thought be more Terry I thought it might be closer. Okay. Sorry. Got That confused but you know that's interesting because again on social media. You would think there's a louder Anti Terry Group but just looking at this and I've gotten hundreds of oats here on the text machine. I'd say it's Terry made even eighty, five, fifteen run. Well he he's he's guy he's the starter. You know we've seen Joey what four possessions but were you surprised that they put the or on the depth chart? On this week's chart said Terry Wilson or Joey Gatewood first time they've ever done that. Yeah. I wonder if that was even just a little gamesmanship on Kentucky's part try to try to do something to throw George off a little bit. You know stupid likes to do that a little bit. But do you worry that that makes it I mean. Like I I'd be worried about doing that and losing my quarterback. Yeah. They've done that with him ever since he got here seems like messing with his head pulling him out putting all your Smith in and. Saying publicly. You know that they're not going to be afraid to make a change a couple of times I mean, they put Danny Clarkin Missouri last time that's True Yeah Terry has been dealt with this since the beginning. That's true view exactly right about that. WHO's next. Done John How are you, John? Hey Matt how're you doing little thank carries a little dinged up. If anybody didn't know that also need to watch what Rodriguez does besides running the ball he last year he was a lead blocker for land and he does a lot of league blocking, locking and pass protection here. Do you think he's The argument that the staff will always say sometimes publicly, but mostly privately is. Age. As better. Picking up the blitz catching out of the backfield. I I haven't watched a lot of that with krantz because usually when Chris I'm trying to hope he gets the ball. Do you think Rodriguez is good at those as well? Rodriguez is better at blocking teeth. Last year he led he's a lead blocker for Orlando and he does a lot of that Now, this this watchet and Eddie Graham will He will say Rodriguez keep him a little fresher for the fourth quarter like he didn't Benny and run out the clock or put the game away. That's when Chris strongest at the end of the when the. Tired. But I still that still doesn't give him an excuse for why he wasn't in on that key drive against Missouri Saturday that's still frustrates me. But just remember Terry's little banged up now just a little information. All right I appreciate the call. That is true. You think that might be part of why the or is there. Ryan. Is that Terry is a little banged up maybe if more banged up than we realized that maybe maybe that is a reason why don't had to like that they put Chris Aj rose or Chris Rodriguez drew for the first time as well. Yeah I feel like the last. Three weeks maybe four weeks of our pre game shows in our football podcast. All we've been saying is give Chris Rodriguez the ball, and then the game happens and he doesn't get as much and then we just do it again the next week, and then we've done it again the next week we finally have or so maybe there will be a change but I'm not counting on it. Yeah. Well, drink. Sorry. I was GONNA add. kind of hard on rose here. Everything they said was right but there's also a third four and you know Rodriguez is your best option and we're still seeing rose in situations like that Yeah Don Franklin Kentucky's number one bind center. If you want to trade or sell your vehicle Don Franklin's family of dealerships will give you more for your vehicle the beat any written offer that you can come up with or they'll pay a hundred dollars. So that's great. You come to written offer and say you know Bob's Car. Hut over here is giving me X. and they'll say you know what I beat that or if they don't understand you hundred bucks and go here you go. Nice to meet Bob. So that's what they'll do it. Don Franklin. Auto Dot Com you get Franklin exclusive fifteen year five, hundred, thousand mile powertrain coverage on new and pre-owned vehicles. That's Don Franklin. Dot Com so there you go. Ryan tonight, his game six world series two o'clock is my. Thing with the Scott Jennings where we're talking about the world and it's TACO Tuesday bar. What more could you want exciting day to be a wild and guess what candle I have Right now. But Naked Green grass. Wow. It smells like. Green Seek Grad fresh cut grass. It's beautiful. Thank you all very much. We'll see later this big Kentucky Sports Radio. Was a place called the whole.

Chris Paul Ryan Ohio County Kentucky beaver Dam Matt I Kentucky Ryan Ohio Teddy Terry baseball Missouri Tennessee United States Scott Jennings Ohio beaver creek Bill Monroe official Ohio River
Ken Burns

Maltin On Movies

1:04:51 hr | 2 years ago

Ken Burns

"Hi everybody. We want to thank our sponsor legion. 'em they are a wonderful company. We love working with them. You can go to their website legion. 'em they're also on all all the various socials they do really fun meet ups <hes> you can talk to directors. You can become a part of the projects. They choose the even have a program right now. Where were you can help them find great movies to support so go to their website to learn more. We also want to remind you that we have a patriotic that we call multi on you join us. We have three dollars five dollars ten dollars twenty dollar options you can get newsletters from my dad <hes> all kinds of neat stuff behind the scenes hang out with us learn about who our guests are before anybody else and listened to the podcast before anybody else go patriot dot com slash multan on on movies for more information. That's patriot dot com slash maltin on movies. Hi everybody. I'm leonard maltin. I'm jesse milton. We're doing maltin on movies today. From from the wells fargo theatre at the autry museum of the american west and this is a place has deep meaning to me because i wife and i got to know gene autry and his wife jackie and joanne and monte hale and they're the people who built this museum. We watched it go up and it's a thrill to be here all the more so because our guest today is ken burns ken burns who was just produced a magnificent eight part series for p._b._s. called country music and you're gonna love it. It's all i can say you're going to love it. It's beautiful. It's really beautiful. I always laugh people people you say to them. What kind of music did you like. I like everything except opera in country. It's it's the go-to answer which is ridiculous. It's completely ridiculous. You know i i think what's happened is bad country music unlike most of the other forms has been segregated out of <hes> convenience and commerce into some <hes> you know silo where in fact it is like an atom in a molecule <hes> part of all american music. It's attached to jazz and the blues. It's attached to the rhythm men blues. It's attached to every single form of music and it is in fact one of the parents of rock and roll one of the significant parents one of things we learn doing this is is that <hes> every single one of the beatles their entrance into their interest in music was not <hes> you know working class british song. It was country music. Thank you know <hes> in fact <hes> ringo starr accredited gene autry as his single greatest influence in getting in you know and paul mccartney heartening liked <hes> the ballads of marty robbins and of course jon is going to like <hes> hank williams and and george was interested arrested chet atkins and his django reinhardt. That's jazz players guitar style so what you have is. This thing that is much much bigger than we think we narrow it down and say it's one thing when it's never been one thing it's always been many things and we meet people who came into our editing room of the last few years and instead you know huge fans of country music and left going. I had no idea i thought i knew about it now. I'm learning things people who'd say i really don't know about country music and then they'd say after watching the film you know i didn't realize how much about country music i knew how much of the songs of country music i loved then there are people who didn't like it and i had a friend and dear friend who came in and said canyon. I love everything down but country music shakes his head after a four day screening where we're doing an episode in the morning episode and the afternoon lots of blah blah and all that he was in a puddle sobbing. He's now comes back. He apologizes every time he sees me. Buys buys country music. You tell me now i'm going after the leuven brothers you know a passing reference of a great country duet brother harmonies in the forties and fifties that have been very influential among people in the know but that's awesome country music starts off as at least two different kinds of music and then goes after every other kind so it it is this. I'm never say you don't like it is to almost say i don't you don't make music yeah. Did you one logistical question. Did you know going in or when did you. When did you know that it was gonna take eight to our our segments to try to tell the story. Well you know <hes> first of all. I was a child of rock and roll and are in be done jazz because it wasn't something i knew about. I wanted to explore explore new territory my writer and co producer <hes> dayton dunkin knew a little bit more and kind of had a love hate relationship with with country fell out. Emmylou brought him back in fell out. Somebody else brought him back in julie dunphy. The other producer with me on the director is the is it knew very very little but so all us it was just this is being washed over by this one thing so what we do leonard is is we do things really differently. Which is we don't have a set research period followed led by a set shooting period out of <hes> scripting period out of which you've produced descript written in stone down from mount sinai which informs the shooting in the editing bumped done. We never stop researching and we never stop editing so we're out shooting the interviews without a script. We're not going to someone as many of my colleagues do and say hey. Can you get me to from paragraph to paragraph three on page six of episode seven so what happens is it becomes more organic as much as we're imposing what we're discovering on the material. The material is telling us what it needs. The stories that are fantastic from these interviews are driving how we're looking for still photographs or where we might be going for footage and that is a much more more organic. It's us a timely process. It's not just eight and a half eight episodes in sixteen and a half hours is eight years of work but it's all of our films are like that then require that kind of care and feeding. We also clearly in a country music. Don't add the music at the end but all the films the music is there and recorded as we begin editing because music music which is the art of the invisible has wint marcellus says in this film on country music is also the fastest art form. So why would you wait and do it as an afterthought. I thought everyone knows what it's like to turn down the volume on a on a horror film as as teenagers internet gown walking across the upstairs landing to the bathroom and you're going don't go other turn off the soundtrack and it's no longer as scary as as the situation warrants but if music is baked in as if it has the same significance as the still photographs the talking talking heads the sound effects the the motion pictures then that equal parody permits music to really live and so in all of our films which is unusual for documentary feel say oh where did that music come from the themed to the civil war of you know what what was that about so we do it that way in leading the material talk to us it then tells us we sort of win in thought six episodes in the last big series that date and i had worked on the national parks episodes but we sort of thought going it was seven and then early on we just wants the script is done and we go over two or three drafts just as words on the paper and and and then we do what's called a blind assembly. I'm the scratch generator we go in. We don't put any scratch so scratch. Narrator is the guy you're not gonna use. I'm the temporary guy cheap. I'm i i do it. Yes yes so venue not computer. I'm peter coyote store a ninety eight percent of the way through so you know if we change an to with oh i go reread that sense or that paragraph or that whole block of page and so we're we're listening to be without any pictures and if they're talking has they've all got jump cuts in it and we begin to see it's telling us what the shape of the story is in very early on in the blind assemblies. It was clear that <hes> one of our episodes was really going to be two when it was going to have to borrow from the next episode and split itself in half and we're going to have to figure out how gotta do ending for that. I won a new beginning for the other one and a new ending for the other one and then a new beginning for the one that used to have a good beginning and it's a pretty complicated moving goalposts post but that happens in almost every film so organically to answer your question in a brief nine part answer <hes> organically that we we volvo all of the material dictates and then after the blind assembly you start adding pictures and you begin to see in point of fact how these stories are going and what you have to do i mean filmmaking to the outsiders seems to be an additive process. You'd think that you're building a film. It's really subtractive particularly documentary. I live in new hampshire. We all live in new hampshire dayton eight and julie and i and we make maple syrup there and it takes forty gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup and so the cutting room floor is not filled with stuff stuff that doesn't work. It's wonderful stuff is just great it just as in the movie amadeus walk to many notes. I'm out of breath and you did all the talking. I i am thinking though because you said this to me yesterday specifically about photos house and how you use photos and that it's something you've never seen anything quite like you're known for this. Yes of course in the civil warrior. I <hes> magnum opus <hes> really established what people have come to expect as your style or your approach but you will take a photograph whether its matthew brady photograph or a or a family scrapbook photo and <hes> you i will tell us where to look you start in one spot so that we can take in what you want to see most significantly and then pull out or pan out or move over and show us the the larger picked literally the larger picture and you also do that with with a a lot of the stock footage. I'm thinking about the roosevelt's another great series you did where you'll use a vintage newsreel footage and you'll linger on it. Yes you'll linger longer than most documentarian lynnwood. They're just happy to have a snippet to show you to establish tabesh a place a time a location <hes> you'll take the time to let us really examine that footage so so an has more resonance because of that absolutely all meaning crews and duration the relationships you care most about the the work your proudest of has benefited did from your sustained attention and that cruise imperceptibly layers pearl i mean we we can physiologically as you know by the dynamics of persistence since a vision perceive these twenty four still photographs as as as in motion in motion picture but but the physiological perception does not in any way way extend to meaning meaning comes in duration and so for example the in our film in world war two that very very famous shot of the photographer on the beach at normandy looking back doc and there is an american dropping in at the edge of this surf well that's been on the top the sh- mortgage board of the tables at the national archives we asked them what did that originally come from where the original camera rolls and could we get the negative and could we see it so we found out that this one shot had been in some early newsreel and then that had been it and that's what people used but we found if it was you know a foot and a half long that piece of film we found about five or six feet and in it two more americans drop and that just exponentially compounds the meaning of it and that's what is you know <hes> you know an exaggerated example of what's going on so my dad was a cultural anthropologist but an amateur still photographer all of my teachers at hampshire college in amherst massachusetts were we're social documentary still photographers who kind of dabbled in filmmaking and certainly documentary filmmaking. I decide when i see my dad crying at odd man out by sir. Carol reed read after my mom died <hes> where i'd never seen him cry. That film was what i wanted to do at age twelve because i could see that if it gave my dad the safe if emotional haven to express himself in a way he hadn't when she was sick or when she died at the funeral i wanted to be in that business and that meant because of the tutorial he was giving me that i was going to be john ford howard hawks alfred hitchcock whatever it was and that i would become a feature filmmaker when i went to hampshire college college and people were trying to talk to me about the power of what is and what was in photography i took cinematic interest in how you might animate an old photograph graf and so i brought with me the undrained feature filmmaker that i was seeing that i was abandoning idea that a still photograph was not something to hold it arm's length until you got to some footage and better yet you had somebody explaining but it was <hes> a facsimile of reality so that picture those those those <hes> that was arrested moment of something was real so i realized i was again john ford. I had a master shot that also meant that had a long shot. I had a medium shot eddie close up. I hit a tilt at a pan. I had to reveal an insert detail and so you tell a story i mean if you're tilting along a body lying horizontally and you pass by by some six guns on face and come up to a dead confederate soldier at devil's den in gettysburg. That's a whole story in and of itself or you're looking at a <hes> a picture of a a young young boy <hes> and you're just wondering who this innocent thing as you go down and he's got to six guns stuffed into his waistband. You are telling a great story so my idea was that these still photographs lacking motion actually can be given motion and emotion <hes> with a kinesthetic aesthetic exercise of moving camera around and so that's what i've been doing to try to wake the dead and it's also saying there's an oral dimension to this that is to say are those troops tramping. Are those cannon firing back. Bat cracking is the crowd cheering are the ice cubes in the glass on the bar at the jazz club kling kling around so you're listening at the same time you're looking and imagining a world inside still photograph and if you do that then you're extending ending to your audience what all of movies are about which is the suspension of belief and you make it real. I mean i remember my first film called brooklyn bridge bridge. I had a i had a premiere at the brooklyn museum. I had to come with an open up. The folding chairs run the kodak pageant camera on a av cart in its casing the speaker was built in and had speaker wire down to the tripod. <hes> you know <hes> screen that you heard your father swear for the first time trying to get open and then afterwards they the the woman i thought insult me by saying. Would you like to go up and answer questions. I'm thinking what the nerve of this woman. I worked for five years in the film and she wants me to go up and answer questions. I just made this film so i can okay and then discovered instantaneously. I love it but the second question is little old lady in the audience she says where did you get those motion. Pictures of the building of the brooklyn bridge is it ma'am it was built between eighteen sixty nine and eighteen eighty three before the advent of motion pictures. Maybe you mean the paper clint collection from the library of congress. Thomas edited edison mounted camera on the front of the trains that used to go back and forth real trains not not subways but real trains back and forth between termini in brooklyn and manhattan. She goes no no no. I'm talking about the scouse those boats barges that brought the granite and they were lifted up by the by the men and all of that stuff and i said ma'am those are still photographs and she goes no they weren't in that moment. I went you've won shut up and so i just went to the next question because that's what we wanted to do. We wanted to animate and suspend the the the belief that this was a still photograph. We had the sound of the goals we had the distant wetted down shots of construction workers yelling and screaming. We had hammers hammers in the distance. We had the toy <hes> taught sound of all hoist pulling up hemp rope. You know we had the sound of a of a primitive air compressor that is trying to push the air out of the caissons where they were undermining the river all of that for her meant that she was looking at a motion picture and that's my first film and i went okay this works and your first conquest the first conquest yes and then and the and the first answer to a question <hes> so the film tom i think was broadcast in the spring may twenty four th which is the birthday of the opening of the brooklyn bridge in eighty two which would have been the ninety ninth birthday of the brooklyn bridge in of course the next here was the big hundred year celebration. Everybody thought you're so prescient and i said he started this thing. In seventy five. I looked twelve twelve years old. I go in to try to get a a thousand bucks from somebody and they said this child is trying to sell me the brooklyn bridge. No slam the door and i used to keep to binders. I swear to do binders each of them. You know three three or four inches thick of all the rejections for that one. He just found a folder of rejection letters that he kept yes from the saturday evening post. That's a keepsake well. You're still around and they aren't yeah that is wild. You know it was into what what's what's happened is over the time it's been you know mimicked which is wonderful. Steve jobs called me in in two thousand and two in next month january two thousand three every mac computers computer's going to have this ability to pan and zoom between your photographs. You can add music and i said oh that's cool. I'm not i'm kind of a <hes> a luddite and he said and and we'd like to to use the the working title. I said what's that and he goes. Ken burns effect. I said i don't do commercial endorsements ngos. What so we go back into his office. We talk for a long time and developed a friendship that lasted did for the rest of his life but i just don't feel comfortable <hes> with that but if you were at the end of the day i think with some prompting from him he ended up giving us several hundred thousand dollars or apple did over the next several years several hundred thousand dollars of hardware and software which a couple fell off the truck for our office but all the rest went went to <hes> <hes> nonprofits schools that could use a final cut pro couldn't afford it <hes> other people nonprofits that could use computer equipment the hardware and and i i it's it's given me some plausible deniability and it's really fun when people come up and say you saved my bar mitzvah dr european vacation you know when my mom's uh-huh memorial services happened. I screamed. I'm learning how to do very basic editing for us and my husband and i are sitting there and my best friend was showing me different things and she hits a button this is this is an eye movie. Ken ken burns effect and i do the dog that why what what happened. I'd never seen it before. A lot of people come up to me isn't been since january two thousand three but people come up to me see you're. The guy had no idea about documentaries. One poor little oh kitten kansas city came up to me once and he looked at me and he said he said you did lois and clark and did lewis and clark and the the drop in his face could been more than six years old. He thought he was dealing with the guy who made his favorite. You know remember remember when lewis and clark was on. I was told when i was a kid that an educated person is someone who knows everything about something and something about everything and by that standard you're the most educated guy i've ever met but you also have on top the curiosity yes and beyond that a gift and the gift of storytelling and <hes> do you know where that came from. I mean well. I had a good pedigree talked about. We'll tell about you know. After the fact when we finish a film we can talk about the sociology and the history and all that sort of stuff but the word history is mostly made up of the word story plus high a welcoming and but we're storytellers we just wanted to his master complex and you know something like country entry music or something like the vietnam war or the roosevelt is sort of a complex <hes> russian novel of multigenerational story of primary and secondary and tertiary characters that that you know we labor literally for years in the editing room to sort of make these complicated and seemingly seamless stories so we're very much interested in stories. I don't know leonard. I had an instant where i had a crisis in the early nineties and my late father in law was a a psychologist and i said i seem to be keeping my mother alive and he said what do you mean and i knew he already knew the answer to whatever it was and i said well she died on april twenty eighth and that that ever since i was a boy that date has approached but i've never been present for it and it's receded and i've been aware that i missed it and he goes. I bet you blew out your birthday candles wishing. She come back alive every birthday and i said yeah. How'd you know she goes. He goes into adulthood and i go yeah out. He known them now now. Flushing with embarrassment he says look what you do for a living you wake the dead. He made abraham lincoln jackie robinson. Come alive. Who do you think you're really trying to wake up and then it and then all of a sudden you realize there was this it sounds dime stores psychology but was coming from a reputable shrink. You know there is this <music> underlying sense that the past is not passed <hes> but present is faulkner suggested that we are too hung up on the idea of history repeating itself it never has or that were condemned to repeat what we don't remember doesn't work that way. What's really clear is that ecclesiastical asti the old testament says what has been will be again what has been done will be done again. There's nothing new under the sun which suggests that human nature never changes unfortunately and that human nature stat that human nature filled with greed and generosity and puritanism sometimes within the same person not between groups superimposes itself over the relative chaos of human events and you can perceive patterns and themes and motifs mark twain is supposed to have said history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes and i haven't done a project ever where i haven't finished it attending. I promise you entirely to the story and the mastery of the story in that moment and then lifted my head up and realize oh my god. It's talking about today too so when the when the vietnam war series came out in the summer or of two thousand seventeen <hes> you know where we'd been you know what had happened in january of seventeen in terms of the inauguration of a new administration. I said what if i told you that i had been working for ten and a half years about mass demonstrations taking place all across the country against the current administration about a white house in disarray obsessed i with leaks about a president certain the presses making up stories about him lying about a symmetrical warfare that confounds the mighty mite of the u._s. Military about huge huge big document drops of stolen classified material into the public sphere that destabilizes the political equation and accusations that a political party party reached out to a foreign power during the time of the national election to affect that election you would say i just made this ten part eighteen hours series on what had happened the last <hes> year and i said but all of those things were true when i began work on the vietnam project at the end of twenty wendy oh six and they were still true when we finished editorially locked the picture in december of twenty fifteen one month before the iowa caucus. It's amazing is truly amazing and i could do that leonard jesse with every film that i've made just say let me let me disguise it and and present it to you as a set of of this moment things and then tell you what the film is any film now so we all know your wonderful storyteller and a masterful filming and but you're you're also a good businessman <hes> and <hes> that's not a pejorative stale. Thank you it. It's a it's a statement of fact act because just before we turned on our recording equipment here you're saying you're working on seven films rise now. How do you work on seven films well. That's because as you have a game plan shorts out of sorts of the game ten year plan yeah yeah and <hes> because that's the only way you could possibly do all the work that is required as you say seamlessly record. I mean effortlessly in the end result to the viewer lot of effort goes in none of it shows and that's the point of any work of art <hes> but how did you acquire the sense that this was the way to go. Well well first of all. Let's put an asterisk next to businessmen because i've spent my entire professional life in public television. I've never saw investors your lousy business <music> i exactly underwriters right and so that's been a difficult task because if i would just shifted over to premium cable or now a streaming service i'd have an unlimited emited supply of money but there'd be a suit somewhere or turtleneck somewhere that would be deciding everything and that doesn't happen in public broadcasting and that's a really good thing and i'm able to do the work and in fact each film is the directors cut and if you don't like another way of putting this if you don't like a particular film. It's all my default so what i've done is i've lived in rural new hampshire since i moved up there with an uncut brooklyn bridge and stayed there because the amount the labor intensive nature of what we do and the expense of that of that means that we want to give bang for the buck. We don't need a big overhead. That new york would where l. a. would necessitate. We just want to focus on the work. We're doing we've created a wonderful community of people and i have four different producing groups so for examine dayton dayton duncan and julie dunphy. We've just spent eight years on country music but they're eight years on it. Solid i've been moving to lynn novick and sarah bought sign on the vietnam more i've been moving to sarah burns and david mcmahon for jackie robinson and before that the central park five and before a country music it was the dust bowl and before the vietnam it was prohibition so all of that and and another <hes> the roosevelt's was a producing team led by my principal editor <hes> paul barnes and we had done other things things before that on jack johnson elizabeth cady stanton so if you've got them all going. I don't if if if a producer is uncomfortable with the interview process i'll do all of them. If have a producer is good at it and wants to do it. I'll let them do you know. Ninety percent of them are thirty percent. I did thirty percent of country music and the seventy percent dayton and juliana dan. I'm perfectly happy but i don't miss screening and i don't miss an editing session and i make the final decisions about that and then i'm part of his evangelical road trip promoting the film so their mind and their economies to scale to different things so a lot of it is raising money. These are all zero sum games. There's no we're not permitted by. The government sources the government money to work in <hes> contingencies <hes> or profit margin. I've got paid a salary as an executive producer slash director actor and if the money runs out its comes outta my thing unless i'm able to raise more money and we get it from a corporate underwriter bank of america we get it from large foundations sion's like the pew charitable trust and the arthur vining davis foundations <hes> we get it from government. Granting agencies like the corporation for public broadcasting the national endowment for the arts. It's and we started an organization. Organization was started called the better angels society named after lincoln's first inaugural address aware we find individuals of wealth and small off private family foundation and those are the four legs of the stool. I spent a lot of time out there collecting that money and reinventing the wheel each time but were then allowed. What do you know if somebody's wide you h._b._o. They give you thirty million dollars in a second to vietnam and i said yeah but they wouldn't give me ten years to do it and that's what we needed to do it right or they. They wouldn't give me eight years on country music. They say okay. Here's your money. We get it with the rights and all the stuff and that's why it's so expensive and you got seven beatles songs in vietnam and seven bob dylan. We get got it. We got it but we need it in two and a half years and i i can't tie my shoe half years. I'm gonna go back because you said a name that is important sarah yeah <hes>. Do you remember what year you to met well. I know that you're thirty three years old and i remember the we we just put a short version of this <hes>. Our family knows cannon his family because we all attend the telluride film festival every year every year. I'll the labor day weekend in the glorious rocky mountains and that's how we met and that's how we continue can you to have an annual reunion. Yes and what i can date specifically is that you jesse your it is and your daughter daughter lily and <hes> candice bergen and louis miles daughter chloe right all were ten years old right when you sold lemonade <hes> behalf of the festival not for your own a prophet so for their all ten year olds and <hes> lilley was born in eighty six. I was just so so oh that would have been <hes> you know either. The eighty-seven probably i mean ninety seven <hes> that we're doing that. We i came in eighty five for the first time with huey long long. I came five years later in nineteen ninety and i have never not come this will be my thirty fifth straight year and i always see them walton's there and <hes> it's always as you you say it feels like a a huge family. Reunion people who love film full stop period wherever it comes from doesn't have to be hollywood it can be from iran or nigeria goria or china or wherever it is. We're interested in in good filmmaking. It can be from the past silent film animated film. It can be a documentary <hes> a dramatic film. It doesn't matter and and it is the best festival in the world because it's curated and you don't know what they're serving. As i going to a restaurant you just no the cook is good and you'll eat whatever they'll they'll bring you and so unlike any other festival on earth is this it's hard to get to. It's a supreme act of faith you arrive arrive and when the festival starts friday morning it's maybe the night before you have an inkling of what they're gonna show and there's something incredibly liberating about the of the spirit sure it <hes> of going into one of the most beautiful spots in all of america and the tension of saying you look up at the mountains over going into a dark room to do the great sacred the act of cinema which is a communion in the dark with strangers and and drink up art and that's where we found our love for each other is because we realize as we belong to that same family that just loves that indeed we do but jesse's now talking about through that continuity of years. This is is what's. I don't know that i've ever really talked film with you. In my lifetime i know could we talk family and we thought how are your girls and how are you doing and all all of that and so this is. It's actually kind of funny. I don't think i've ever really spoken to you in any kind of depth for sure about films normally we're all just hugging and enjoying each other's company so one of my four daughters my mazing just hang on a second i will tell you growing up with his girls was one of the most depressing being part of me because they never went through awkward. Stages were always beautiful so smart and just always very driven very driven event. They're g- they're great in my my oldest one's great els have turned out well and made me. Just you know a joyous grandma but one of the interesting thing is that my oldest sarah <hes> graduated from yale and i thought she was going to go to law school and instead she wanted to write a book about the subject of her senior thesis which had been focused focused on the five boys than boys black and hispanic who are falsely accused in the central park jogger case and no one had ever asked a question of them who are are you who what do you like and so she did and earned the trust of at least three of them and she said i want to write a book and i said that's great sweetie so i was her editor in the first few pages. I'm marking it up with lots of emanations. If lillie who was i think at that time a better writer had had said you know if i had mark page. We'd have a big huge fight but sir looked at it and said thanks dad by page four. She was beginning to find our voice but by page four. I said this is a film and <hes> i turned to my son in law her soon to be husband and said we need to make a film the three of us which we did. Which is you know been responsible support for bill de blasio the current mayor of new york of settling the lawsuit and giving the central park five <hes> some modest <hes> recompense pence for the lost years of the course that the coerced confessions <hes> gave to them the immediately said as soon as anderson what happened we didn't do it and what's is problematic about that is once you're convicted and sentenced when you arrive at parole and if you're still saying you didn't do it which they maintained to the end could if they'd said yeah we did it. We feel bad about it. They would have gotten out a lot but they refuse to and it was only the actual rapist who came forward as he was leaving and said look. I'm the guy who did it. You know and <hes> it's an amazing mazing story and then i think she got the bug and so we've segue into to <hes> jackie robinson who are now working on one mohammed ali and they've done one on their own the executive the producer on a public housing focusing on a particularly gruesome place in atlanta. That's been transformed into a wonderful place and all of the problems holmes attended in the history of that and they're going on to do other things with us together and that's one of the producing lines really nice day to work and we never had a fight. He's so funny. We'd have the dynamic where sometimes it would be the people with filmmaking experience dave in me who'd like gang up on but say no sarah or sometimes it would be the two young some people more often than not going dad you know like that and you go okay or or sometimes it might be daughter in and father who who had something and say no dave and and it just it was this loving and it's true and all that new i have this rule. There's no yelling you know. This is not brain surgery. He i guess i guess in brain brain surgery you cannot yell at somebody gives doesn't give you the right thing but it's not brain surgery and if you treat people that way you might be able to perform open heart surgery that is to say tolstoy said that art is the transfer of emotion from one person to the other and that's what we look for in our film in fact vince gill in our last episode said at the end of of the day all i've ever wanted out of music is to be moved and that he was speaking for me. I thought all i've ever wanted as filmmakers to move somebody and i i moved myself by the story and what's a country song but a three minute story <hes> just like rap. Just like rap will look at little nasdaq's. There's a whole big sur and cry and every reporter wants to interviews about the dynamics and the dialectic and the binary thing of isn't it bad bill barn wooden list him in this. I said it doesn't matter. It's the number one song nobody ever get. Everybody's you know when when when when ray charles you've had a chance in his distinguished career to make an album on his own terms nine hundred sixty two you know what he put out modern sounds in country and western music ed hank williams song. He took don gibson song. I can't stop loving you and the number. One hit of the summer of nineteen sixty two was ray charles singing at vince gill said head to us at that point in the film. He said he did more for country music than we did for him and he reminded us of how soulful our film is and if you take just want to back up and focus a little bit <hes> for second country music very briefly is that if you took all the people that might appear on mount rushmore of the early <hes> country music greats tapie carter of the carter family african american mentor lesley riddle. They traveled appalachia and a._p. Could remember the lyrics and lesley riddle could remember the memory and they bring him back to sarah may bail and they became the carter family. Jimmy rogers the saturday night to their sunday. Morning was influenced by african african-american. <hes> <hes> teachers all the way through bill monroe had <hes> arnold scholz had an african american mentor hank williams had rufus t he taught pain and gus cannon <hes> was the tutor of johnny cash so if you were just taking the first few decades of country music since the late twenties when jimmie rodgers and the carter family and were recorded. Everybody had an african american mentor so when we say this is a lily white music. It's not it's informed. Entirely just as jazz has is just as the blues is obviously rhythm loses as rock is infused with the american experience of music which is a friction a rub. Has we call our. I episode between black and white in the american south. You know the punchline is the fiddle comes from europe and the british isles the banjo comes from africa and is brought by slaves so the two central elements of the early country bands are fill in the banjo the rub the combination of cultures and when you say american music. You're not talking about homogeneous. <hes> you know rumanian folk dances. You're talking about a mix a mongrel of all these different things and it's always been that way and then country music set off just <hes> numerously tried to gobble up everything else and what you what you grapple with and what some of your interview subjects grappled with throughout the eight part series is what is country music and what isn't music and this is a never ending debate <hes> because people insist on label s right <hes> for business purposes yep just for just for report oriel purpose and i said before a uh-huh commerce inconvenience can really unintended lee segregate things and say well this isn't this isn't but it's not it's all with artists as a you know there's a brenda lee says well i i was rockabilly and then i was country and then i was folk and then i was rock and i just thought i was singing a song that i like to sing and it reminded me of something we heard louis louis armstrong had said when we were working on our jazz series at the end of the nineties he said there ain't but two kinds of music in this world good and bad music and good music you tap your foot to so if you like little nasdaq's then it's good right period full stop and by the way starting starting from the beginning at those three minute country songs are arias. Let their operatic thing. Opera is about a simple and basic of staff in what is you know. Harlan howard called country music three chords and the truth. It's not doesn't have the sophistication and the elegance of classical music and some forms jazz but the truth part is dealing with elemental human emotions the joy of birth the sorrow at death a broken heart losing love falling in love of anger jealousy being lonely seeking redemption from your your maker all of these things and what happens because we can't deal with the two four letter words. It's mostly about love and loss. Is we disguise it with you know part of what is an important sub-genre country music but we say oh no it's about good old boys boys and pickup trucks and hound dogs and six beer because it's really hard sometimes to sit in front of you know the lyric of hank. Williams called the hillbilly leash shakespeare. You hear that lonesome whip a- will he sounds too blue to fly. The midnight. Train is wine and low. I'm so lonesome i could cry the silence of a falling star lights up the purple sky and as i wonder where you are i'm so lonesome i could cry. I grew up listening to that song. Everybody heard that song of certain as an and but i never really absorb those lyrics and recognize them for what they are which is poetry poetry and beautiful haunting haunting poetry and that's part of what makes covers so fascinating right and that's why it's it's exciting. When i was growing up there was a whole series of punk goes blank punk goes pop punk goes rock punk goes acoustic and it was really interesting because hearing hearing a punk band cover hearing a punk band do kelly clarkson cover. It's like sometimes all you have to do is change it just that much and people suddenly listen to see an in a different light. The fact that johnny cash nine inch nails song hurt hurt that was one of his one of those beautiful things you've had breakings are breaking that song when he sings it you just and if i said he did. That's trent redner. That's nine inch nails. Sorry that's what yeah that's the guy who won again. When i was a kid. He was one of the ultimate yeah no no. I don't remember i'm sure sure i must have been exposed to this at some moment in my life but i did not remember do not remember seeing that photo from obviously television broadcast rest of johnny cash and louis armstrong playing together so in our first episode i episode <hes> jimmy rogers. The first grade super perserve country music has a song called blue yodel number nine standing on the corner no booze kind of blues song and he plays it with louis armstrong who's just been coming yeah and then when johnny cash has his late sixties early seventies national television show. He's bringing everybody on. He's bringing odeta. He's bringing james taylor. He's doing gospel song to the terror of the network in every show and he brings on louis armstrong and they do blue yodel number nine in our film and you just go the circle. Michael is unbroken. Yeah the circle is broken and what i think is there's a moment when charlie parker the founder of bebop this elaborate complicated thing not not not too dissimilar to what bill monroe did string music and making a whole new sub-genre call biba iming called cobb bluegrass. You got this bebop pioneer. He's on fifty second second street in the late forties and between sets he's feeding the jukebox we learned from nat hand off the great jazz critic in our jesse's and all the cats are turnaround. Hey why are you playing thing country songs. You know hank williams. I'm so lonesome i could try and birds listen to the stories and that's that that is in the end. The stories are how we edit human experience and project beyond ourselves and even beyond our lives in the case of people who have created the art of the invisible music or even anything else <hes> in the realm and we all seek the kind of feeling feeling of temporary immortality by the things that we've done extending beyond the borders of our our lives. That's a very satisfying very humid. I mean none of us are getting out of this alive and it's it could be reasonably presume that we could all be in a fetal position sucking her thumb at at that thing but we don't we raise children. We tend gardens. We make films we right. I'm so lonesome. I could cry and somehow charley. Pride says the opening of f._m. This country song you know that make you cry but it might make you feel you know good for doing it. That's what i believe in and i sort of think our eighth episode is free psychiatry tree. If you want a real cleanse get a box of kleenex put on episode eight and then just don't tell me that if the beginning of dwight and <hes> <hes> buck owens singing the streets of bakersfield into whitten talking about what it all means to come together and all these things into where have you been a story that written by john invesment sung by his wife kathy matteo into a vince gill go rest high on that mountain into the last as of johnny cash and i still miss someone. The second verse is so simple. I go out on a party to have a little fun but i find a darkened corner because i still miss someone one. I mean this is a haiku. This is like a spare as it could possibly be and i mean i. I'm a basket case. I i've seen this one hundred times. You know we as roseanne to sing it. At a concert film we did of kind of land yeah or d'oeuvres to the series where showed little clips. I was the host at the reimann and we had fourteen fifteen of the stars in the film singing kind of the history of country music various artists and roseanne saying i still miss someone and a where sobbing seven incredible for you to be at ryan do that well. You know it was great is at p._b._s. Was there with nine. Cameras are series is broadcast begins to be broadcast august episode. One is sunday september fifteenth but the previous sunday the eighth. They're running that concert and i everybody i've seen just bumped into around the country entry. Who was there we we did on march. Twenty seven said douse the best concert i've ever been to and when we're backstage while it was happening. All the artists go. We never do this. Why don't we do this. Why don't we have these reunions all the time. Why aren't we sitting in collecting the threads of our history and singing. I'm never had more fun than i had done and boy. He didn't do very well in the rehearsal but what he just knocked down apartment just now in the little red light came on and just it was this loving it was like thanksgiving in the kitchen backstage of the raymond was like being in the kitchen at thanksgiving p._s. Ah which leads to the word family yeah and it's mentioned many times in the film of many people and <hes> sometimes it's used a glibly loosely by people to describe a group of folks who get together create something <hes> but sometimes it's more like gypsy families pack for tents getting caravans and they move on but this is an enduring family is indeed with <hes> <hes> with many many threads and <hes> it's a metaphor but <hes> there there really is a family feeling doing yeah and and a and a through line component that they provide and my wife and i were watching we watched that last last episode just last night and <hes> we're clutching our hearts as we're watching it and and i can't i don't think there is another brand or john of music that engenders that specific feeling or shares it goes out of its way to share it directly rex lee with its fan. That's exactly right so there's little families like the carter. Cash family in the williams family and we've got hank as a subject. He's been dead since he was twenty nine. On january first fifty-three we've got a son aint junior and his daughter granddaughter <hes> holly and we've got lots of caches and carter's hanging around the film and then there's the family of the country music musicians who like gypsies as you say travel you know they may be at the operate saturday night not paid so well and then they travel around onto better paying gigs and time to get back to the next saturday night but then the extended family and this is the whole point of my work are the fans of the country music and there's no communication communication <hes> except among equals in the world. If i put you above me are puts you below me. I've ended the possibility of their being a connection and the great thing about country music stars and their fans as they understand that in fact our last episode is called. Don't get above your raisin which means old southern say oh don't get too big for your britches. Don't forget where you came from and they don't and fans reward them so that you know there's on the one hand the person who hasn't had a hit in thirty years who still beloved right. They're not disposed of and the new star is knows to be humble enough to come garth brooks did and sign nine autographs for twenty hours at a fanfare where you were expected to come and maybe signed for a couple of hours or somebody at the end of the line saying okay. Now we're done do ours is what everybody signs until everybody was happy over twenty hours. <hes> somebody in an earlier episode said you know you don't up to frank sinatra and say it's a great set set. You know frank but and i would extend this. You don't go up to toronto. Toscanini or leonard bernstein said lenny that second movement you really nailed or mic vast songs in your second set were fantastic but in country music that's exactly what they expect the old as a country music parks they'd write letters. Now we expect you to come over. We've got a ham and we got some potato salad and we'll see you know we'll feed you boys. You know they tell bill anderson and his his traveling band. I love that sense and so it gets to something i've been talking about in every film i've done. I have had the unique privilege of existing of working in this space. It's infinitely small and infinitely big between the two letter lower case plural pronoun us and it's capitalized version the u._s. so all of the intimacy of us all of the warmth and intimacy and also we and our but also the majesty that complexity the the complication and the controversy of the u._s. and so i spend that time in there and what we're interested in is what the latest story and arthur schlesinger said he said once in in complaint. There's too much pluribus and not enough onum. I'm in the business of onum and that means how do you create a family of everyone and that's the important thing so we're not cutting anybody's story and country music out by extending pulling back my proverbial real camera and showing the african-american dimension you're not you're not in any way changing the dynamics of it if you tell them more complicated story with undertow that's all part of what human life is. I have a little neon sign in the editing room that says it's complicated and it is and you know a filmmaker occur if you've got a good scene in his working you've don't want it. You don't wanna touch it but in point of fact i've learned over the decades issue do if you find out new information you have to touch it you have to you have to change it and maybe it destabilizes it and maybe it doesn't but that's what we're here for. Is we want. We don't want that superficial visual conventional wisdom about a thing we want you know went and said something to me and jazz went marcel says something to me jazz and he's throughout this this thing to <hes> he said sometimes a thing and the opposite of a thing or true at the same time. If you're a good storyteller you're able to work that got in and you can hold off on the judgment of either one for as long as you possibly can to sustain the impulse to be binary. Oh that's bad that's good and instead be accepting and therefore reconciling and i think that's what onum is not on a political level but on a on a on a deeply blay personal psychological and even spiritual level. That's what art does it. You know it says that it is one plus one every once in awhile equals three and that improbable calculus is what animates us that takes us up to our mountain in in the rocky mountains it drives us to museums it compels compels our relationship it might drive our faith but that improbable calculus as much as when you build that treehouse one has to equal to otherwise at treehouse doesn't doesn't work but in the things that matter most to us one in one equaling three is is everything everything the whole is greater than the sum some of the parts and and that means some of the parts are here and the whole is up here but we never say what's this and that ineffable something is what in whatever ever form of life we've decided to pursue whereafter and maybe you never get the answer but it's the pursuit of that happiness that is the definition and the process a couple years ago. I told you how unexpectedly moved. I was by the dust apple documentary you did and you tell me that a lot of people said that to you that they admire your other work as well and a ah hold it in high regard but somehow that story <hes> burned through cut to the bone do do you understand why will one of the easiest answers. I can tell you the same team that made country music made the dust bowl but i think what's interesting about the dust bowl and we forget is that as we're looking these people in their late eighties nineties and even late nineties. We're not looking at old people. We're looking at children and preteens. That's who we're looking at so you know memory has a funny way when you see these two brothers sitting together and they're describing the death of a sister that happened from the dust us pneumonia in southwestern kansas nil near elkhart. They're reliving it in the present and so that means they're no longer longer successful retired businessman you know on the offramp of their lives but in fact back to being children and you know when your kids you don't remember a lot of stuff when you get into adulthood what you do remember sometimes a really great moments where you went on a trip to a national park and you camped out oh you did exciting things but you also remember when your parents were freaked out or upset bo you remember that and what if you got these storms that are raging all the time manmade stores just because they tore up the topsoil and it's killing. Your cattle is killing your crops more important. It's killing your children. You remember this stuff and so i i think what makes that so. Unusually moving is the willingness of these people decades removed a century <hes> almost you uh-huh into the new millennium removed from these these these moments in the in the thirties reliving them again on camera not not knowing at the beginning of the sentence that they were going to break down at the end of it and and giving us that great gift of express memory that tells you the dynamics of it the way no narrator no expository superimpositions could possibly do and a lot of our job is just listening thing and getting out of the way of that good story and let it tell itself you know let let let merle haggard oooh work for year. Let white do all dwight yocum marty stuart mine. He's the unofficial historian of everything country music this thing that he believes. He's had two jobs in his life working for other people. You arrives at age fourteen at doing the morning. <hes> you know in downtown nashville not a time in an era where downtown nashville is a safe place place and the next night he's on the grand ole opry stage debut ing with earl scruggs and then so he plays scruggs and a little bit with bill monroe but this next boss is is johnny cash how and johnny cash's daddy starts his group and he has watched and he made himself a student of everything that came before that and so you know he's our zelic he he he. He's a real zelic who moves through the phone <hes> with this incredible thing plus his hair. They're still up and it still is so fantastic and then when he refers to bill monroe and what he could do on the mandolin he demonstrates. This is a child prodigy with so so there's cheshire net smile and there's there's nothing vain about it like when he's saying this is what charlie parker could do the same thing as saying this is what bill monroe and nobody could duplicate charlie parker right and and so there is marty stuart and he's getting bill monroe. It's amazing and he's got that twinkle and is it again that country. I'm not going to be too prideful. I'm not going to get above my raisin season but this is what he did and then your mind is kind of blown boil boy. Do you know what you'd like to do next. I know you have seven have another or are there other things that that that are interesting to your own. Everything is going to see if i were given a thousand years. Live wooden run out of topics in american history so we've got a three hour film halfway through editing on ernest hemingway. We'll have next year or early. <hes> twenty-one. We're working biography view of muhammad. Ali were working on a biography of benjamin franklin. We're doing a biography of the buffalo which is a kind of parallel parable of de extinction climate. Change is going to bring to our consciousness to do the for dozens of extinctions. Maybe you're not going to worry about this. Insect that butterfly or whatever but when a big mammal goes 'cause it's gonna be a big deal and here we had a moment where we had brought through our own actions heedlessness this thing that roamed across us the north american is actually a bison not a buffalo but it's called bison bison genus and species but we call them. The buffalo is important a symbol of us the us an upper case as the bald eagle and cultures would go out and couldn't find one and if it hadn't been for the creation of a national park yellowstone and a few ranches and a farm in new hampshire that had some breeding pairs they began and we just see it in the thing so i thought without having to mention climate change or having to mention de extinction and we could talk about what it was like an americans who heedlessly took this animal that had been sustaining life on the prairie native american life on the prairie for centuries stories if not millennia and then suddenly took it in just a couple of generations to the brink of extinction but then said you know what let's bring it back and they did said that shows you that concerted human effort onum not pluribus can actually ruin the day so that the next war. We're doing a hate to put it so crassly. Ashley is the american revolution which i sort of believe now we are to be fully invested in not just powdered wigs in philadelphia but what was happening in cow pens down in the carolinas. I know what was happening at munger hill really what was happening at saratoga and montreal what we're native americans. Which side were they going to be on. What we're african americans slaves doing british cynically said we'll free you and you know whose side are you on. And what does it mean to be an american. What is this new thing. In american. We're all brits right and and benjamin franklin's son stays loyal governor of new jersey until he's jailed and he's a spy for the british and i mean it's just it mean we call the civil war brother against brother. The american revolution is the brother against brother civil wars section against section because one section had slaves and felt they needed them the other one had run out of uses for them and said well. We're opposed to it now and you had that battle <hes> it's it's complicated and we're deep into it. We've done a lot of interviews very excited to tell that story and and i'm forgetting two or three actually underway shooting and i mean we're we're doing the history of l._b._j. And the great society we're getting the hook because because you have an event tonight or the autry will. I wish i didn't have the hook. This has been as pleasurable at a time. I've had on this roadshow. Well pleasure for us two big time and i should know this but i don't do indulge in you think this man has time for social media. Why don't ask answer my own questions so i don't really i have people who tweet for me expression every once in a while yogi berra dies and they said do you have something to say yeah you know but not it's not a daily thing and retreats tweet something that i like but i don't do it. I don't know how to do it. I don't have facebook or anything anything like that. I think there's an one of the we have a project and educational and and sort of general public project called onum <hes> which has an instagram account so lots of stuff gets tweeted out of. I guess under the vague rubric of me but you know i am you are looking at a dull boy whose loves my work and therefore doesn't work day guy alive no but you do. You're doing right now. You midway through the new york times crossword on saturday. Which is the hardest day of all in penn do every single day day on my end is my only little indulgence to to to to play except with my kids yeah well congratulations thinking thank you which is just magnificent and <hes> to restate the obvious debut september fifteenth fifteen. That's right a week before the concert will air on the credibility and then it'll be september fifteenth through the eighteenth episodes one two three and four and they're really good about it. They're gonna play both both episodes that that episode twice a night so at eight o'clock ten o'clock safety getting late. You watch the second show you go to bed early. You can watch the first show and then we'll repeat on on sunday the twenty second episodes five through eight two wednesday the twenty fifth and if like a certain member my family oh you mean streaming <hes> no no no no no no don't you for streaming. No no no you are heard to say. I don't really care about country music. Try episode so what i'll be there. Through episode eight guarantee you heard stories a good story and i think this is as good a story as we've ever stumbled across and it is available for streaming for free and their d._v._d.'s and blu rays available and there's a handsome companion book which were handed an hour ago so oh great and it's coming out just right after labor day and <hes> and the soundtrack of four cd set there is a two cd set that represents too much of a sophie's choice and then a one cd that i don't even wanna talk about because it just it feels like you've cut off three of your forearms but anyway the forty cd said is really you. You know it's like it's like a piece of bubble gum. That doesn't lose. It's flavor yeah yeah just like that. Do you know where they're all streaming. They're all on p._b._s. Dot and then eventually it will go to netflix but they make us all wanna be able to find yeah. They'll be able to find it and you can buy it at shot p._b._s. Dot org or amazon is always a good thing amen. Let me tell you know other dial could made any of my films now. It's very important to our story monday in little love you some twitter. <hes> leonard is at leonard on twitter at leonard maltin and i am jesse malton. It's an and an instagram as well and you can always go to leonard maltin dot com for book roundups and movie reviews all kinds of good stuff and what am i on twitter. We ask into the this. What am i on twitter. At ken burns i can go and unom instagram and we're on patria on now to we are so check that out. That's all get together in the ether indeed indeed what better place to be. Thank you again. Thanks pleasure housing fold ken and my pleasure my friends next week guy and see you in the mountains. Today's episode of maltin on movies is brought to you by legion m the world's first. I fan owned entertainment company if you love movies as much as we do why not own a piece of them find out more at w._w._w. Dot legion m dot com.

hank williams producer director sarah burns leonard jesse julie dunphy vietnam new hampshire louis louis armstrong brooklyn bridge dayton new york leonard maltin bill anderson leonard vince gill roosevelt gene autry bill monroe abraham lincoln
#147 - From American Aquarium.... its BJ BARHAM!!!

wellRED podcast

1:10:28 hr | 1 year ago

#147 - From American Aquarium.... its BJ BARHAM!!!

"What is going on everybody? It is your boy that show Corey Ryan Forester. Well read comedy. Dot Com E. L. L. R. E. D. COMEDY DOT COM. That's where you you can find out where we're going to be for the remainder of our two thousand nineteen tour but could really There's not a lot left so I'll just I'll save you some time. Just it's Nashville. We're GONNA be in Nashville December. Nineteen th through the twenty second at what I consider the best comedy club in the country. Zanies in Nashville. It is going to be our our special Christmas slash homecoming shows. Not only. Are you getting stand up. But YOU'RE GONNA get some sketches and you're going to get some in other insane thanks. Dj Lewis will be there there he may or may not have a sword that usually the case with DJ DJ comes with a disclaimer. That he may or may not have a sword but We're very proud of the show. It's going to be something a little a bit different so even if you've already seen us this year on this tour this will be a completely different show to Christmas. Show so come designee check that out to get you going fast. You can get them as well read. COMEDY DOT Com. Just click on the link there. Also you ca- it's Christmas time so you know what that means If you haven't already bought the redneck manifesto. Oh for everybody in your family. You can do that along with our critically acclaimed album well. Red Lob- from Lexington. I hope people know that. I'm fucking bullshit. When I say that I don't know no oh critic has a climb she it? I like it though. I'm proud of it. I'm super proud of that album What else is new I don't have an official date yet but stay tuned to all all of our facebook and instagram and twitter's because we will be releasing our latest comedy central sketch within the next week or two for sure uh-huh yeah and other than that. We're not going back on the road until March. We're writing some cool stuff for you. Guys were working on TV shows and sketches and podcast there. We'll do the podcast every week and again. I'm very sorry about last week. We had. We were filming the sketch on Tuesday when we normally record and then the next day I had a ton of meetings and I couldn't put it out and then we didn't get the files to light and it was a whole thing. Sounds so sorry that it only came. They came out and Saturday. That's me I try not to let that happen but this one is coming at Ya Just as promised on Wednesday morning and it's a great podcast. We have one of our just absolute favorite singer songwriters of all time. We all discovered him. I'm fairly certain independently But my God were so pumped up to have the one and the only BJ Barham or BJ Bar Ham. However you WANNA say it's bar but Barham drew had dread a joke about that in the podcast and you can enjoy? Here's the front man for American aquarium. One of our favorite band I love their entire. discography is great. You should buy it. All from antique hearts to the Bible in the bottle bones dances for the lonely small town. Hymns live in Raleigh. Burn flicker die which was produced by This guy you may have heard of him seeing China Asa fucking wolves at Terminal West things. Change we The boys met up with him in studio. Because he was out in Los Angeles working on his latest record with shooter Bucking Jennings. Is Lettuce record. We'll be lamentations. It will be out later next year. with a Ni- I sit down with BJ and we discussed growing up in the south and music and comedy and Yada Yada Yada Yada Yada it's fucking BJ bomb. You gotta listen and and Also go over and And by every single thing that American aquarium has ever put out and everything so that BJ's put out also just oh this portion worsened the podcast. I'm sorry almost Kurt everybody. Ever this portion of the podcast is always brought to you by smokey boys grilling dot com go to smoky girl dot COM to get all the rubs for all you mates and also it's car vodka dot com Jacksonville's first and only craft vodka distillery go check out what the show drinks and also Pollard Pollard. Some live Oak Whiskey My Buddy Paul the CEO their car vodka and lava. Whiskey just sent me a nice little package couple bottles of whisky that I'm I wanNA use to take to my buddy. Conrad Thompsons House this weekend for a little Christmas party. So appreciate you Paul. y'All go check all those things out. We love you and enjoy this conversation with our good buddy bay Jay Barham senior. The next day care must give the next at thanks. Some people got three big old kids. you're no judgment but like I just WANNA no. No you say you're eighteen months. I'll drink black coffee. We tell them about day. Care for full bore coffee Duma full-bore coffee like single origin. Kenyan are you out of your Goddamn Damn mind and I just I don't even mean like whatever I'm not worried about any kind of adverse effects on the kid or nothing I'm saying who in the Hale. Purposefully lack primes up eighteen month old last grade. It's like rocket fuel. Sh you crazy man when you come off the road. You're supposed to give him Benadryl the other direction this come home. You Winder up then you take off this is you. You know it's it's crazy because we do it. She'll wake up from a nap and we'll do it in the back yard and it's fun it's like winding up a fucking top and she just like run circles in the yard with the dog and and then she tires herself out. It's it's you can use it to your advantage. Crashes crashes like if you give coffee right before nab yeah. You're setting yourself up for failure if you give coughing and cutter loose. Outside that Shit's Vaughn well and also I think it's a eighteen month old girl we're talking about and I have two boys this and you know average fairly different monsters. Monsters operative word There will have been some kind of intro for this if Corey does his job although it seems to be the thing today as he might not because he's supposed to be or any isn't but this is B.J. Everybody Aj Front my answer your songwriter extraordinary American aquarium and Buddy of ours from North Carolina. Yes Sir American aquarium a band we have often thought about on this podcast. I what are you talking about the need him to you who did not he did. Not First of all okay maybe willing to grant you that. You are the one who introduced corey to them. You did not introduce me to that band I asked you about them and you already knew about Dan. I didn't work in reverse but I that that's a ninety two. Did Not introduce me think the record is dances for the lonely. Got It on vinyl recently on the thing. That was the first one I heard for some I saw you was. I was at my favorite festival in the world. At the time I still love it. The Bristol Rhythm and roots. That's a fan. We're doing it again this year and I WANNA go. It's always around my birthday but it's also you a weekend. We're almost always on the road. Haven't been able to go you. You guys played a bar that year. That was years ago. Oh Wow I believe it was the first time you were there. It was like a right there on that main. It's true you had on your your embroidered. Rose Rose Pedal Oik totally up your style. Now when I'm on the road by the way got to man and I I'd stolen from someone short sleeve. I got better arms and you and I do more pushups. He's got that makes it's a huge. I've been going ever since the the full sleeve tattoos. You gotTa go short sleeve because Hell. Yeah Anyway I said Super Close awkwardly introduced myself to you all that stuff And then the next time I saw you I think it was like completely it. was you know what I mean. It was like I couldn't get to the front. I didn't WanNA fight with the early days which his drunken debaucherous Malik. A punk rock woody from toy story. Who had vite you take your girlfriend? That probably is true. Oh absolutely but what I mean is it was one of those where I I guess. People just didn't know and the people that were there who trickled in from the festival it was immediate. It was like Oh shit. I'm glad I listen to my friend. Or whatever who brought me to this and then the next time I saw you packed the dancers for the lonely record was like the last record that there wasn't some kind of August buzz. Maybe 'cause that First Bristol. You could tell that there are people who are like I love Bill Monroe and then they walked like Holy Shit. This is an eighteen. Th on coffee looks like we just we. That's the fun part about planets. Traditional vessels for us is. We're a full blown like energetic rock and roll band so you'll see like oh that got got a mandolin banjo bands and yelled at me for ninety minutes. I knew going in honor being an I loved it but anyway I don't know courtroom and we sat here and why did on Corey for like close to fifteen minutes. They were fine like fuck it. Let's just go and then two minutes after we start Corey Texas. I'm here what's going on so anyway. Hopefully he'll join a minute or or he won't. I don't know what's going to happen How old were you when you formed and American aquarium has been to When I went to college you know went to college I started the band he hated Wilco? Hated WILCO was not inspired. Inspired by them at all. it's funny. We don't sound too much like Wilco. But like they were the ones it taught me that you could still kind of right really great songs and be weird as fuck right like The the idea of being like where I grew up raids villaret reads Ville North Carolina. Yes Sir It's a tiny little town right there in the middle of the estate and I thought there was to kind of musicians. There was like a creepy uncle who tried to play Banjo at the family reunion when he got drunk enough and then there was tim grow and there was no looking in between on either. Those musical family musical family nowhere near me had like an independent music. Venue southerners or you mean that was the Braga. Aw like in general. I just didn't know that like you could be a musician and not be famous instill make a living. What kind of did your mom or dad like? Listen listen to music and country like on the Radio Radio Coach so my dad had all the old record so my mom was really big and like rb Motown Stax Act stuff and then my dad was really like the outlaw stuff waylon willie and all that stuff but then growing up always listen to like ninety s country so like I was born and raised as long fucking. What's coming back now? What is what is being a huge reserves Sawyer Brown and Joe Diffey all that great great stuff like my dad was always like this? Ain't even real country music but like try to treat it like makes he looks like fucking senior compared to Ah. I know. We've talked about this on here. At least a few times And I- Belabor this shit to the death you know drunkenly with buddies of mine but it's just ongoing lack black thing. I wonder about my head because I same way as you kind of accept it was my mom that listen to the radio country stuff and well no like you said. You're my hi. Dad also hated it the whole time. He at the time he was like this. Ain't real contract day coach White Yokum Pussy they. My Dad called Vince. Ah I'm pretty sure assisting breathing in rustling around. My Dad hated he hated. Why did the nineties radio country? And he was all about like you know his shit was like scattered but also David Bowie and and David Byrne to talk and Act Weird Shit from back in the day but he also liked other stuff. That was new at the time Keke Doug third eye blind for example he fucking loved. Ram but he hated Joe. Dixie and Travis and all of them my Mama loved them so I had it all and then I've always had the same looking back like 'cause now that I'm in my thirties. Whatever like I cannot stand stand the shit that's on country radio now and I agree with what you said like compared to the shit? That's out there now. Those dudes in the nineties look like Waylon like you said I agree with that completely. But here's my question like I. I've always asked everybody. That's grew up similar to US musically this same thing how much of that if if any do you think like just is nostalgic by playing playing a role. Like if you were your your age now or Your Dad's age in the nineties when that was coming out for sure would you have felt the way you do about the shit. That's new today. You always tell people that stuff was like country. Music took a horrible horrible change in the eighties. it's where it started being commercialized. And that's where you start sort seeing a split between entertainers artists. Right and the thing I talked to is country music television. It used to be. It didn't matter what you fucking look like. You're a good songs and you sound article. You were country singer. Waylon Willie Merle there all ugly modifiers but they had great boys in the head. Great Song Person. He's land. I agree with you about Merle but then the eighties. They started making music videos. And then that started making a difference. You had to have a good John. You had to look good and tight jeans and you had to be able to kind of saying and so we that that was a snowball and so then I think a lot of those guys were still talented but I think it was just they were starting to be more of the entertainers of the country. Music quarrel like traditional like Randy Travis and Dwight Yoakam that we're still trying to keep true to the form but it just became more of like looking better and as we progress dress with Tom As our culture tends to do we started focusing more on the look and less on the talent and now we got to where we are to where it's just a bunch of dude. Good Lookin' can do. Okay but how about this. I looked up just out of curiosity. 'cause I was having a conversation with my wife or something about this whole deal and I just genuinely was curious what the like current billboard country charts looked like and this hot garbage. This is about three weeks ago maybe a month and so just a random selection as far as I'm concerned though because it just came randomly and I said well I'll just check it out. See what it is. I got on the Billboard Country Charts and do you know who was number one on the billboard country chart at that time about a month ago marshmallow that day J. J. Marshmallow rat. Well he ain't got jaw. His heads and marshmallow became a JAL. AH SMELLS AIn't got well that's the problem you run. I mean John's eventually get to my Mama. Led Helmet Yeah. Yeah Jack Kay snack food we fair. It was marshmallow featuring Kane. Brian yet who is very much brat. That thing yeah sure. He's you know he's just reminded me I gotta ask you. I did a twitter three while ago where I just turned all their names into fucking I turned every country. Artists name a pun like what came Brown at Cambridge. That's what his fans thank all law should be but fucked up but I did all country when recently and I don't know if you saw but my favorite one is yours which ones It will be Jay Bar Ham. These are three of my favorite things Hey Corey check in airplanes. Yeah we can hear you. What's up dude? Jingle Bells Jingle Bells I think we're getting to a place. Maybe I'm just being drill. Tell Ya can be the most cynical. I'm actually so contrarian that probably what's happened here is that everyone else got contrarian about it so now I've got a turnhill a little bit but you know we had saving country music like the theme and then also the website All these independent artist started making these records startled. Simpson's sort of carry the torch like standing outside of the CMA's bbut put also. He's got a Netflix special you. I've I've been to your concerts. You're doing well. We go see. Sarah shook and she's doing well like all these and we've talked about. We talked to Tyler. May Hanko about this a little bit too. I think the Internet and the current state of things has allowed space for. y'All am I am too for me now stopped hating so vocally on quote unquote broke country. Because I'm like well I don't listen to the fucking radio anymore. Haven't turned the radio on in my car in in years I used to do rant onstage. About how much they hate it. And then I realized that I wasn't doing anything positive out and change anything. I was preaching to people that they were at my show. Are they agreed with me. So I wasn't changing my mind and then I started looking at it like these people every summer. Go and play the enormous dome and your town. Whatever the ten to fifteen thousand dollars amphitheatre is and they sell it out? They make fifteen thousand people in every single town in America. Pretty happy for Friday. Not Kobe or pick-up trucks pretty girl short shorts. Whatever whatever like they get to turn off their brains from whatever mundane fucking tasks? They've been doing for five straight days and actually just kind of enjoy life and there's something kind of neat about that. These these people do that for them. I wish that I was big enough to do this for him. And actually have something. I consider important say about society but like at the end of the day. They're up there singing songs about trucks and pretty girls and making a lot of people. Happy you you've gone even further than me about it because for me because I'm a Narcisse. My whole thing was like well if I'm ranting about that I care about it just as much as the people who live exactly like the my my honest to God response should be who. Yeah right One thing that I realized about my attitude towards all that at a certain point was that like there's an equivalent Phenomenon I think most like hip hop heads would tell you and the in the world of rap music and hip hop meaning that like you know the fucking like mumble rap or before that the few the you know the the future style of all that shit whatever that like you know true connoisseurs of hip hop see that you're like this is the fucking degradation of the former minutes. God Damn Shame that this is J. Cole's last album. Yeah that's on. Nineteen eighty five which was all about that or whatever but he wasn't distracted it the whole time he was sorta like being and big brother mode about it but I really cause I like hip hop a lot to buy realizes certain point. I didn't I didn't care about that like like I would listen to the to the to radio rap and I would be able to tell like God. This is such cheesy mainstream. You know bullshit but you know I do WanNa dance right now. You know like and I I would enjoy it and I wouldn't get like offended by whereas like fucking Florida Georgia line just made them. I Corps when you say Joe not not really you mean. Let 'cause Louis let little John No because little John was like I was still the same age during a little John that like I was listening to what whoever you know what I mean like. I hadn't got point of anger towards popular and what I really angry when little Jonzon is all well it didn't it didn't reflect like my culture in any way percents people hear this and that's what I think. What Tennessee is you you know? What a major like that like? When he asked me what kind of music I play? And if I if I even hint country music and they're like Oh you like Sam and I'm like oh no like they're right like I actually sing songs that people out living in California people hear the accent and stuff and it's about so. Do you like country music and every single time I'm always like yes. I love it but before we go on. Let me clarify that. We probably are not talking about the same thing because it's overdrive or something you said that it's really great. Because I think them being so monolithic and and being big representation what country music is does carve without a good hole for us. 'cause there's people get tired of the same ten songs every hour on your local country station and so they go out and they try to find something something that sounds like that. That sounds that has a fiddle that has a pedal steel guitar but says something that speaks to them And that's where I think artists like us in Sergio. Bill and is bull are thriving is because we're kind of they're taking the big sunshine. They're talking about good things about being in the south like Alco beer on Friday. That in that with your Burger girl and we're operating in the shadows we're operating in that dark corner where we're talking about your uncle's addiction talking about divorce and we're talking about the wife taking the kids and we're talking about losing your we're talking about the fucked up part. They'll never talk about on country radio because it's not sunshine and paint south and it's really pretty way country. Radio likes to celebrate right the Friday nights in the south. I like to celebrate the Monday mornings realizing that your shit is mentioned as 'cause Sunday morning coming down which is it couldn't be a more country legendary they wouldn't play it on. CMT If it came out right now of course on now. I it's it's one of those things. The the rise of Shitty country music is the only reason I have a career. These days is because people have looked elsewhere. Big Need something. That's not a dodge truck commercial. I need something. Ah that actually speaks to me as other and when you start operating and I talked about like the shit that your mom doesn't like you to bring up at the table. You know he starts Aubert like well. The reasonable Bob. He's taking a nap is because he's been drinking for three days. Well that's quite literally Harrow. Career can see. Yeah that's how we conceived our career. I mean since like not just like Oh we kinda thought that we literally would chain smoke on a porch and say look man if Jason is bull can sell out the beacon theater in New York City. That's Madison Square Garden. But those people if they like that they would would lack how we do comedy. You know what I mean. No disrespect to Jeff. Foxworthy Larry the cable guy. I mean I will disrespect them if you want me to but like without any disrespect to them. They're just acknowledged this is what we're doing different and I won't actually disrespect Jeff Foxworthy Iraq court What we're doing different? There's a place place for that and like the people you just mentioned including yourself literally made us think that way or did me. Yeah no yeah. We always is used the music version of it as our analogy when we were yet drunkenly daydreaming at night. Whatever the word for that is after she have? y'All get a little more famous because memory meetings out here and we're actually tried to take a due to an American aquarium concert and when you were at a echo yea and I was like if you're trying to get us this come to this concert women and he's like I'm busy tonight. I bet you are bet you buddy. We'll work on it. We were tight. Torbay J. also when you when you were just saying that fake little parody of Modern country music. That was Does actually really fucking good and I want to hear that album all a joke like I've sat down and really applaud an hour to ride. I I think I could write a mainstream hit do it. You know daughter might get any see might not get a full ride and she does how you GonNa pay for it through story Brantley Gilbert. I don't even know who that is. Stones that's just right under different literally. We joke about it just man it must because it takes like seven dudes right one country hits like but backer it. I'd like nine riders or some Shit like that and you know it's it's spread the love. Thanks yeah but it blows my mind that like it took like more than like a kindergartner. Come up with that thing and like well Jaime Johnson he does it did. I don't know if I don't know if that's what blows my fucking mind and there's people that have made a career offers like putting a foot over there and and writing paying the bills with that Shit writing songs for other people who will stay David decent radio like Jamie Johnston rats the flag Seen it in color should have seen it in color. That's a pop country song but one. I like stuff like that. He never did anything. As far as I know like how honky-tonk Patong that specifically and blew my mind because I was like. Oh that's that's a different genre. Yeah you can't like it with a lot of the staples hits you can at least still backed up. And that's a well written song so happens again with Honky tonk but but Donka Dunk. Yeah you don't really have much room to fight for him but I don't think he knew. How many cash with us much? Because he wrote that song. I definitely feel like that was his whole deal. The whole town with that was like this. I'm sure he thought it was dumb ass you know. I think that might have been able to get into it. I mean I have heard that. He said that but if I were him I'd start that rumor to yeah. It's it's one of those things where we're I. I'm not gonNA knock too much just because I feel like I've got better things to do But I I am appreciative appreciative of them continuing to put the same try because it allows people did in my opinion like some of my friends and contemporaries like I feel like we have more to say a about the plight of the south. I feel like it gives us more of a people come to us like hungry for high tariff plight of the south. We were talking the other night you. You're you're out here recording and when you get done in the studio side not major who had had a comedy show. We went over to your AIRBNB. We hung out for a while and one point. We're talking about a guy who was like who is still around still doing it but it was kind of my entree into this world me personally When I was in high school aged and it's Chris Night Book Who is like a bad? Yeah total by US and I thought before like he was before his time like if he was like I coming out with type of shit that he was doing then but like now in this world. We're living in where you were saying where people are looking for that type of thing if you mean if we was young and had a John now I just made if he was just getting started now instead of fifteen years ago or whatever before there was like a market for the type of thing that y'all all do I feel like he got stuck in like that kind of weird because he was like the Steve or if he came out in the late eighties early nineties. I think he would have been wildly. Successful came out five years ago right. He was kind of the forefather for like riding really really great songs that nobody cared about right but he's still making well. He's got a great career like he's he still cared about four of them or something like that so I had to be true. Yeah like He. He's got guys like he's the kind of guy that people who are looking for authenticity and they're riding riding we go to cut. It was going to bring up at scares me though. Is that machine. You can't beat it you can't break it you can't get around it now that the machine exists. Yes we're talking about Nashville as you guys get more and more successful. I'm terrified of the fake version of you You cover me up. That that Moore Wallin Kid. He did like a like a pop version of cover really. I didn't even know it's pretty horrendous. But Jason's isn't came out and said like on twitter and stuff. He's just like man. Anybody wants to grandma's grandma songs you can listen to my version. We can Liz version. And he's like it's a lot more people to the table you know and I'm sure I'm sure the checks ain't bad right. Yeah what he's saying cover. We've been lucky about when they create you when Nashville Build Star Jeweler you in the lab and puts when they look at you guys in her like let's do that. And then they find the guy and like I say build him in a laboratory and then put that out there. What is GONNA look and sound l.? Mostly will be far enough of the curve and and I hope that people can see through that shit. You know it's like I. I think I don't think they'll care you don't think so. They didn't care when the happen. The guards I don't th the people were talking about right. Now there were real versions of them you know Brooks and Dunn was making phenomenal. Perfect studio records But before found machine figured out how to make phenomenal studio perfect records input Florida Georgia line in there. Whatever true yeah I like to think just for my own job safety? There's always going to be like this hard line. Between as he country there is a fan. They won't be able to replace y'all yeah what they'll do is they'll replace today's pop country stars with some version of you. Our this do things about the real dorks. Oh for sure and it was kind of like you know how and it was admittedly separated by a generation at least but the whole thing like outlaw country coming back a few years ago you know what I mean like. It was a huge deal with Jason Dane and Eric Church. Whatever we on like an outlaw tour? All Birch said outlaw country on it and stuff and they would like saying about in reference while an and Willie and all them back in the day and like obviously it wouldn't. It was not got out there. Wasn't nothing outlaw. Waylon ever wore bedazzle. Gene I'll go down that hill right. Well like that type of thing. Do you know what I mean Eh. But but again they're still kids in an origin or our subset of country music like the Independent Country Music Americana as the countries that call themselves out loud and my biggest thing is like if you have to even call yourself outlaw. Then you've you've lost point like the reason you know but get a bag on era and the reason they're Allah wouldn't because they robbed a bank and got away with Bang. It was because they weren't getting played on the radio so they went out and did what they went out and found on their own audience. But I get it because it's like alerting me I mean look if I read that and then I see your album cover and you've got on bedazzle jeans on Mike Right. Well throw that as far as I can. But if I hear one referred to as outlaw country and I know they're independent and they're underground and all that to me it's like oh they're alerting me to what I would now consider consider a sub genre of music because it got labelled as such you know what I mean like I would never say. Oh my buddy. Aj is an outlaw. But if somebody was asking me out kind of music I would say. Oh you remember the outlaw country guys and they go. Oh I know what that is and I get that. I think it's more like outliers. Outsiders insiders is outlaw. Well I'm also don't look as good on T. shirt though country country se. I'm also very biased. I'm not question person with name names right now. Someone was talking about his ex and her band calling themselves outlaw and pissing him off on twitter and his band is named named after stolen guns. And I'm like Bro. You're doing the same thing where you're stolen. You Ain't ever stole the pistol. You Ain't never had a pistol. Hi this is described. I don't want to name names but I'm GonNa name to people that you know very well and live in your home state All right my only with that. BJ is like the mad live. Ah I don't I don't blame him for naming his band after stolen guns and then I don't blame her for and it's like you guys are both going for the same ship it's like this is all a little bit. Fake that aside. I think outlaw country is a little useful as as John Reid identifier it has been bastardized completely. Yeah it's been taken advantage of to sell fucking shitty towns Zandt t-shirts as well but anyway. let's back up a little bit so all right. You're at what did you you know when you write. Tainting went to college that you wanted to get there and start a band. That you've been lagged up around with Rodney Silences Shit when you're in high school and that type of thing or what. I did whatever kid with emotions did I put some words on paper and they were all shooting and they were talking about how blue some girls is were and how she made me feel like I was in the night sky or whatever the fuck he tried to get busy and eh but at the end of the day I moved I went to college. I was majoring in political science and history. I had every intention going to law school That was my path I I I was ten or eleven. Abbas side of what I was going to do with my life I was going to be a liar and this was the path and so I got about a year in and started going going to shows a year in college year in college and started seeing people playing on my hand I can. I can write better that I can write songs so I started writing songs. Still shitty sounds sounds bow. Blue girls is worried all that bullshit but after a couple years I started writing some songs that people like outside of my friend. Group was like Manet's S.. Pretty good like you should play show and so I put a band together you know classic the. What's the name of the band? What are we gonNA put up on the marketing? I think I don't know. Let me think about so. I was listening Yankee Hotel. Foxtrot and the first line of that wilco records. I'm an American aquarium. Drinker a buddy of mine from high school was like Ma'am Eric. guerin be cool name nine as a cool. That's the name of the band thinking anything about it. And that was two thousand five ish and And then fast forward and once you name in your band and put a record out. You can't really go back and change the band name your kind of Stutter And so I'd say I made it through my junior year at NC state date. And then I got offered a tour and by two or I mean a very loose definition of the word to I got offered six shows in six different cities that weren't in North Carolina. Anna and I dropped out of college buggy. I was like we're going on tour and by two or I mean I went to Chicago and New York and Nashville and and I got bit by the bug. I got bit by standing in front of people telling stories and play songs and then I started dropped out of college and focused on. Okay fuck man lawyer Fuck School. Fuck academics I'm this is my calling. It was like a craft. It was just like keep riding shady stuff until it got better and then and then so on so on just to get a little bit nuts and bolts on the process of it. Because I'm fascinated by this type of thank you said you started going shows sandpaper. You're like hell. I could do better than that. What did that take the form of for you specifically at first sitting in a room mm-hmm with nothing and like the lyrics to learn how to play guitar? Okay that was well that was part of my question was I did you were. Oh you like you know a three Chord stromer already. You didn't you didn't know Shit. I grew up What what was I like? Did you have okay. I started singing in Church Church and then I started saying and school like I was in like all the choirs and like a drama kid theater kid so you had the musical ability era could saying I can pitch I. Could I had vocal training. I needed to train your fingers. You didn't have to train your hear your ear. I love music could sing and all I had to learn how to play an instrument to sing along to and so when I started doing that it was very much like watching. Like you know this is before youtube going online and finally accord short chart and this is the g And then this is a D.. I learned how to play. GD And then. When did you start? You learn like the first five chord you realize like Holy Shit. I can play the entire like hank senior cannon. This is great like I can be a country singer and then I think I've learned in the last fifteen years and really really just churched it up a seven in there every now and then but Grab a guy who can play the stem field. That's what that's what I learned is is is your goddamn outlaw. I I learned to surround myself with much more talented musicians in May because as long as my songwriting was as good as their guitar playing or their drummer in their base. I could had hold. Walk Right we'll so all right you sit in a room now. You know you've learned your co Worker Sitting Room Guitar and you you work your way through a songwriter right. And you have that and then do you go to the bathroom. And you're like all right. Here's what I've been working on. And they and they hear it and then the still guys like we think about this and throws that. That's how it's always been out. Bring them these like extremely skeletal words songs and then they kind of knew for sure and and even with this new record up until a month ago. The boys had never heard any of the songs I had the record written and then we met up in Raleigh for two days and I played them for them and then we built up a little bit more. We waited a month sat on it and came here. And then we're in the studio now shooter Jennings and we gave him like a day to kind of make notes. It's on what we already had. And then we just started record them and so it's fun to watch as a writer as a creator of these things in their infancy to watch them go from just like three cord folk songs like ruminations living room to these somebody who just liked music of like when I was younger but didn't know anything about it at all. I always just kind of assumed that Whoever the songwriter? What the guy that you had to do all every bit of that you know what a main mainly well? There's some people that do there's some people like like control freak songwriters that literally have every like they hear the bass like Brian Wilson with the before that way springsteen was that way they hear rants I believe was that way. They hear the fool song in their head. The Mount Rushmore. uh-huh Wilson Springs Day France. Kid Rock plays every fucking can bob's in barbary. She lays sweetness. He's like no. We are almost done. But Bob won't get off the base. He won't get off the bow of bomb It's one of those things where I I knew friends who you know. They hear the full band arrangement and they go in the studio with the band and kind of tell them what to do. Orion Adams like that are used to be. I don't know I think I've read that. I don't know yeah I've known for a while now that it doesn't work that way but it was weird like I always just assumed for whatever reason reason that one thing that I'm jealous of From what we do and what you do many things but one thing is you get the best of both of them in so like you're a writer who gets to write something. Take it to other people. They work it out you go into the studio shooter Jennings his fucking legend in his own right he tinkers with it then you put it out and that's that album and you get that from beginning to end the collaboration the only thing we have something like a sketch or whatever but then you also get what we get with stand up up which is a made this today and I worked on it for a little while and now I get to go out and put it out and get the validation and that's like put it in my fucking convenes. Oh that's why we do. It is being able to go share it with people and put it out in front of people and then if you if you do it the right way and you do it. Good enough people like people talk about how good it is. And I've I've been on both sides of it. I've put out records if you'll like. This is a a pile of forty five minute garbage and then put records out that like our last a couple records everything since birth. The Guy has yeah extremely well received by like critics or Christianity. I gotTa tell you they've all been fucking great. I gotTa tell you quit this story. Scott Nelson was a comedian Stand up with New York. I think he's like you know married quits. Answer whatever long hair beard. And he's not from the south he's from like maybe Vermont. Maybe maybe like a kind of rural but I don't even think that I think he grew up like in a suburb or whatever and he found out. I was an American Aquarium Fan. And just do just my favorite band we gotta go see him and all that Scott would do comedy in the most like timid character. He Him Scott. I work in an office. You just not not at all like a rock and roll L. or not southern at all and then we'd go to your shows like in New York he would get hammered. DRUNK MOM hammered drunk. And then the burn flicker dial and was like sincerely sincerely his favorite album of anything of all time. And you play. Burn flicker die and you know no different than the neon lights. This man Bro. Yeah telling jokes. Doing comedy were rocking. Fuck and row and I'm going I don't know Scott. I'm not sure if we did. We tell Dick Jokes basement. It's never gotten either of us. Lay Not one single single time but if you believe in your heart buddy that's all that matters here. Let's have another accent. I'm with Scott for the record that's Hours any song that light burn flicker die is like you know fucking live fast die young look over you know just out here rock and just doing a bunch of fucking rails and a bathroom and then coming up with like what guest do this Julie. Dad I've always to be twenty five again always associated. Oh she added Shit like that. Because that's what I do verse about how we AIN'T GONNA make it. Yeah on that one. Yeah that's how most of the records records are. It's like it's it's it's your writing at this point all my writing is pretty biographical and so it comes. You're sitting there. You're hammered and you're watching all your friends friends get successful and you're like we'll fucking. I'm never going to get and you start writing these songs. It's funny because like all the songs I wrote about that being a failure not doing well. We're the ones that they lifted. Yeah Burger dollars supposed to be our last record. Yeah it's an entire record about like okay this. If anybody ever wonders why we quit they can go back. And here's here's a documentation of. Wow we quit right. And it's just a song about like being a failure and like embracing failure and just like well. I guess you know that we weren't cut out for this and then we put it in everybody's like yeah. You can do this the rest of your life now. I'm like oh well that's all I got to ask for it in the song. Well that's what I'm saying when that when that album came out the three of us we're all we'd already met already buddies ready doing stand up already doing shows together in this type thing and like but also we all had jobs and everything soot Nothing's go like I. That's the reason. In addition it just being an awesome record. That's the reason that I loved it so much was because all those things I was feeling in my head to we art this is stupid we are rock and roll is we are wasting. I just texted me about how much that that record Mitt to me but I didn't go into detail and it was pretty much because of what Trey said it was around on. I want it had to been two thousand fifteen or whatever because I was I just moved back from New York where I went to think that I was you know I was going to make it as a comedian I got you know just went into debt got told immediately you know this ain't GonNa work you fuck and suck and I had to watch. I had to move my aunt into this House and fucking in Florida and I had to drive back by myself and I was feeling so down and I put that record on and was just like you know what fuck. Yeah I was GONNA say. I'm glad you're here. Most escort careened off the road and just been like fuck fuck you. We were laser. Jacksonville did have a little bit to actually bring that one up. That was when we talked about a lot. especially with Corey and everything because that buddy that goes in love it and like we we were. Don't stand too close to that because of that comes on your accidentally falling. We got which I've always wanted to Florida. I thought we were in Jacksonville. Florida Florida on tour a couple years ago now and I'm not gonNA hard into the details but it was a very Florida evening. Okay why Trash Florida. This year we had found ourselves in broaden alligator to show that gotten fi. Okay hitter with a truck. She don't work anymore. I don't mind saying the manager tried to get me to fucker occur in front of her husband. who was the sniper? So you know Florida asked to those are always the best. When the husbands they rely Chad of course smoked weed were high and stuff at one point while I was already thinking in my head one of them? I think drew like in the height of this Florida. Insanity sent sent me a text messages. Open it and if I can just survive one more than I was just like. Oh God you've done it to me we get the fuck Outta here. The reason could be Jackson north onto. That's very desolate place as well for many different different reasons Alabama too don't they. I think every I hate this for you buddy. I know about North Carolina's has that whiskey town record doesn't make it sound like a very fun. It was possible but assumed it was a military base there and it's literally every other military base outside liquor store gun in store straight public store gun store strip club the things the troops new. Yeah the things. All the troops need yeah And so the Jacksonville Florida. I was just writing because it was like at this kind of the epitome of like. Wow we were. Failing is like we would go to these towns and nobody would show up. So what will you do is just sit at the bar get hammered until he played and then we'd get up and play these. He's handled shit in front of people that were there and those popular like what the fuck was at before people there and we're like we're moving backwards and it's all because of her own doing and so that's why that's but it's funny because a year after that song I met my wife in Jacksonville. And you know I've literally learned that if you just put it in the song look changes because the wolves record or read about never having a house I was never going to have a house is in that twenty five and the next year about House House like puck. What what what did you just four into the MIC? You'd you'd Cory Cory just die. Are you asking me. If I farted in the Mi- yeah not enforcing the money did you you just do he put it in the future. I didn't do nothing. Matter of fact y'all were. y'All knew that's why you couldn't here my first response. I had it on commute so in case I farted case how far too far. AP MUTANT WE'LL BE. Can you put in a song. There's not a TV these show a comedy specifically represents your people and where you come and you would like to be on TV. He'll do that and somebody else will get it some younger very it made unilab rely on our last. I defended chick-fil-a on our last album. And now they they don't donate to gay gay heritage anymore so I take that for myself. Good job man. You did it. The chick-fil-a things crazy. We get so much shit because like we still eat chick fillet. Yeah because I think the hate them. Now it's not fun it's just They say it's still in there. It's doing chicken you can still taste the hate hates. What makes it good? I know you're about side that you can see its core. Has a corey has basically sort of about that notion but it was just something about hatred just makes chicken chicken better. You know it's funny because Because my wife's side of the family is very much a gay. And so always you get a Lotta Shit like if I'm on the road. Her whole side of the family is gay. Her unusual in a blanket. One day like her mother's lesbian Her two sisters Lesbians So that's pretty good. Yes but it's It's what one was I guess We're just mainly like books or something but you know I. It's a very like a female side of the family and And so my wife anytime. I needed CHICK-FIL-A. She takes a picture of immune sends it to my mother-in-law and I get like a like a sad face back and be like you shouldn't be eating there. I got lucky as far as that although some paypal would argue the opposite. I guess but I never liked Chick-fil-a to begin with because I had like two bad experiences and that's all it took for me. I won ever. I went to the OPRY Land Hotel and I guess it was just that location was shitty but it was garbage. It was cold they were about to close. It's an opulent hotel but still see it was called fucking Sook and so I was like that was like before they really popped. That was when she was still on the come up like two thousand three or so. I wrecked yeah right right and so two years later they start getting big. And I'm living in the major metropolitan area of Cookeville Tennessee. We're talking about the other night. Big Fancy said he dire tire and we got a Chick-fil-a when I was like twenty one twenty two so I was like oh seven eight and it was a huge deal in Cookeville. At the time I got a chick-fil-a flay and I was like man. Fuck that I remember it sucking but then one morning on my way to work I was like all right. I'll give it another shot. So he was up. I drive over there. Get to the draft. They're house I must not be too good. I'm fucking nobody here. Yeah it was a Sunday morning and I got out there and I was like what do you mean your club with the fuck. Is this shit and I found out that it was because of Jesus who I hate. That was just like a baby Jesus Preventative. You haven't listened to this man. Fuck this this place and then years later when all the guy stuff comes out not just saw all these people that I couldn't stand make make fucking moral stance by eight and a God. God Damn Fried Chicken Sandwich. That's my favorite is diabetes for Jesus you know and then when he's all me on Fuck Chick-fil-a so I don't have to I think a little left and then right do it anytime anytime. Like the fucking Nike Shit with right. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA burn all my shoot. It's like okay. I get it like there's companies visit. Make terrible fucking decisions with their money and who they give it to and it's like but do there's not gonNA targets not going out of business because they let anybody going any bathroom. It's like Nike's not going out of business because the right won't wear Nike tennis shoes. See that's what I'm saying about being lucky because I know I know my favorite `self if Chick-fil-a hip for me I would stay eaten it. Sorry uncle Tom let guy literally. Just it's too good but I just happened to not like it so I'm like so lucky with with y'all little Taco Bell Watch a sorry sorry China I'm with you. Yeah it's it's Taco Bell. Also man some of them by this a little bit Cliche Belabor Belabor this point all the time on this podcast but it's so true just like the fuck and I don't the system we live. Look Dude some people like Taco Bell came out how many poor people would give a single fuck if they had two dollars and that's what they could afford to eat for lunch that day any of them should have a they can hitting their goddamn fault. You know right. Yeah Dude for sure. Boycotting the luxuries of being upper middle class is getting two dollars ills and to not eat or or eating can do it and it does have an effect like more power to you. I'll give you a perfect example. Your home state. People told us not to come play there because because of a lot of folks cancelled shows there. Yeah H. B. to law but argument was trae launched on a rant about this very issue you and therefore attracted so many fans with this accent who are trans or have trans people in their lives and they want to see us and when we go to a show. Oh and do a show in Portland in ain't like you know we're there. We're having a good time making some people laugh but when we do shows in the south it is fucking Cathartic for some of those folks. Because they don't I have a voice and I canceled show and you know therefore what at that time eight hundred people in Asheville or in the surrounding area going to get a see us and that that amount of money whatever that is is going to be pulled from the state that's going to have no effect but on the flip side of that the boss. We're just talking about him or he cancelled a show. There that did have an effect right that respect the fuck out of Bruce Springsteen or doing that twenty thousand people go to the PNC arena China right. Now that's a that's that was my. That was the other part of my argument that we get messages saying that. You know you're going to be there. You shouldn't Alabama to after their whole abortion Ornstein thing and it's always been my. Hey what you said which I of course agree with about the people that are coming to see us there. Don't fuck with that shit either. I don't WanNa fuck them over but also so the powers that be you're trying to send a message to if someone tells them. Hey the fucking. Liberal Redneck is boycotting. They're going to be like a Hukou. Do and be the the liberal redneck. They're not coming fucking. It must be my birthday. That's good news news to like the bill. We also don't want us to be came in Alabama show beyond say played the show in North Carolina and then donate it's like the ACLU and and just like that's huge like when you're sitting there and you're like oh because she sold out like Carter Finley Stadium which is like twenty thousand people and then she just turns around and donates that to like trying to get this stupid fucking bathroom bill because it puts it. North Carolina believe it or not was a progressive state in the south in two thousand eight Korobov bombing upswing. It was the first north. Carolina flipped Democratic candidates since Carter it. Don't you think that's exactly. Why had the bathroom bill even fucking came up in the first place? Meaning those mother fuckers at the state level that you guys still had North Carolina. They thought it was like a big swain. Swayne that they took you know what I mean. We gotta do something to get to state back on track. And that's what they landed on. Because I just remember everywhere. We went from Wisconsin. It's go ch Asia and and it's hard because you know we had these pockets it just so happens to be where all of our the universities are. All the towns have major state and public universities are extremely progressive. Places like we're southern we like everything southerners like Love College. Football Nascar Fried Chicken can but we also love rights for everybody. Love like that kind of stuff and and it's weird because like the minority of our state Ah Somehow represents everybody. We'll actually talk one of the most One of the worst examples of that in Gerrymander. They've used he's like North Carolina. Well they finally did finally changed this upcoming election I the Supreme Court ruled that it was in fact illegal to draw giant in lines. And and just pick which you know districts how the districts were set up and so I mean we're literally the worst in the nation as far as every every comedy show took their hits at being like I was a hit was also like factual those are always the worst. Those are hard words to take there from Tennessee. The ones you laugh it and then you realize it's your true. Oh faulkner that's rough but it's supposed to be better in this next election but who says it's we're still very very much conservative state. And we just we were lucky. We live in that pocket of Raleigh. Durham Chapel Hill that is extremely progressive. And so so you know. We're the kind of people that lived in that Echo Chamber in the two thousand sixteen election. We're like others everywhere you go and Roger Chapel Hill. It was just all Clinton signs and then when you start and then when we'd leave for tour and get forty and once we get outside of White Chapel Hill and you start getting into the heart of North Carolina go. This is going to be a lot closer than anybody. Fifteen miles west East even thinks it's going to be and you'd see the exact same thing in Washington State Colorado state right. Yeah you know you're in Denver and obviously it's it's fuck in Legal Pot and Hillary signs John's but you get outside of Denver and it's like yeah I got a bunker ready for it right. Yeah that's that's what I would tell a lot of my liberal friends who they would in one sentence. Let's say this they were like yeah on my facebook and on my twitter I've blocked everybody. WHO LIKES DONALD TRUMP? I've blocked all there. And then the next sentence they they would say you know I just. I don't see there's no way trump's going to win because I just don't see the support for him like I say for him and I'm like yeah you fucking deleted that from your whole life life. I've meanwhile I just drove through forty states and I fucking promise you if if election signs mean anything this is GonNa win. Walk go for sure. Everybody in Raleigh Durham. They live in that echo chamber. Because it's a self inflicted echo chamber like you said. They blocked people on follow people. That disagree disagree with their opinion so all they're surrounded with for an entire election cycle is people just pat him on the back telling them in a right and I'm playing shows in Texas Texas and Oklahoma and Mississippi Alabama and I have fans that are fifty percent one way to present the other way and I'm seeing it. I'm Mike this is not like a cakewalk. For anybody like there's a lot of people who are standing up for either GonNa toe that Party line and I'm Gonna I'm GonNa vote Republican or there's people that are just so have been and so full of hate and not been able to expel it and follow. There was this guy who walked off and just kind of turn the valve open and said it's okay to say. Yeah and then that's win like my whole like certain sides of my family. We're just coming out and you see it on facebook like Holy Shit. You can't write that and then nobody said anything like that. And it's like Oh they've been thinking the whole. It never went away. That's the that's the part of the south is we live in this gigantic underbelly. The shadow that we thought we'd out. Oh I'm just the specific south Let's let's call. It is slavery we like to pretend that that was like this deal. It was like dinosaurs. Distant ancient thing and like my great great great great grandfather owned people for our tobacco form. It's not that far removed. My grandfather remembers a man that owned people at at one point in time like that's how not far back it is and so for. Let's just say for one hundred and fifty years two hundred years. Most of those people have just been quite because they had to be but now it was like Pandora's box somebody just under the lid and said it's cool to say it again. What do you think about the argument though and I kind of go back and forth on this sometimes but I think ultimately I fall on the side of it? I do prefer that they be vocal. Be because like they always think that Shit bill accountable at one right right exactly and now that now that they have opened Pandora's in are just being open and out on front street about it like. Yeah it's really disconcerting in discouraging. Because you're like God damn I didn't realize it was like still this bad but on the other hand is like they were going to be that way anyway so I'd rather us all know where everybody stands. You know what I mean and like you said of an account. It's hard because you see it and you think like is just like you know you're you're racist uncle. That has his thoughts. But then you get on it and there's your best friends from high school you teachers they brought up like people you went to church with hosting this stuff. And you're like oh it's way worse than I thought. It's not just like openly people who are like right like flying the confederate flag on the back of their truck. It's like there's people that you know in love and respect it that that that hell lot hate in your heart and and on the it's nuts 'cause like it'll be somebody who likes I legitimately believed shopped me as a person exactly and made me and made me the way that I am and then I see all this stuff and I'm like how the fuck did I get where I am basing everything saying on this person and this is what they were the whole time. A- just cannot. I can't wrap my head around to take the I agree with that and take the personal out of it end to extend that to where we are I I was on that side of it for a long time. There was that great patent Aswa bid about. I mean I'm not GonNa do the whole a bit. One of his points was if we know who saying it a better or quicker example. Is the Roy Wood Junior B. You know we got rid of the rebel flag but now where my how am I supposed to tell which gas gas station not to go to as a black man in the south you know what I mean. And that's like very funny but also agree with what you're saying you know it's like yeah but now we know who they are but But what I've come to realize it's kind of what cory was talking about and you. It's not just painful to realize that people you love your best friend's your teachers also have some of this inside them. We trump got rid of shame surrounding son. On some of those feelings in the wild depri- right the wild crazy easy racist guy. I'm glad we know who that is so I don't you know I don't want my nephew's around him in my hometown and Blah Blah Blah but the people who were okay with that because has at least. He's on my team. That's part that part's what's dangerous. It's like I know what you mean. Let's get it out in the open but this is a part of me. That's like part of sweeping it under rug made people who were fifty fifty ashamed. Because you you're supposed to be a shame that's the other side of exact. They went somewhere years without saying it because they we were shamed of it. And it's like and that was a good thing right because you're you should be ashamed. Shit and yeah no right people who and it's like let's take the morality we out of it. You know you can hear what I'm saying right now and be like well fuck those people to sure but we need to win an election. Like if you're worried about gay people you have to understand that we need some of those folks to vote our way over. We're talking about real life shit here. Not just what's morally correct or incorrect and so there's a part of me that's like maybe the shame was working man. You know like shame was a good thing especially when it came to. Tha that those kinds of situations like you're not supposed to be vocally do that Shit. We'll we've been talking about race. Let's talk about sexism and how quickly so many people in this country as soon as this dude started just grabbed by the pussy. You and do this and that. How many people I love and respect? We're just like Yemen. All this shit's gone too far and Blah Blah Blah anyway and. I'm like Oh fuck. They thought this the whole time they kept it in fear being judged people also vote that way like in once that starts that whole lot. We can do whatever we want. And I like the guy I I like the way he makes me feel. I don't I don't think he's. That was the biggest thing the folks in my family. That Swan right on that election was just man. He's he says what thanks. Hey He doesn't candy coat anything like He. He just for better for worse and I'm just like yeah it's worse it's like he's the shitty saying is vile and your sure and Yeah you might not be racist. Voting for trump might be massage and it's a homophobic. You're okay with your complaint was shocked. By how many people are complacent in an okay within a shame helped go against all for the sake of team that's turned into it turned into. Are you on the red team on the blue team. And it's like just like like let's us make college football now like if there's one kid who might be like not smart enough to be on our favorite football team but the school somehow make sure he passes we take for that kid man he's fine like blower anytime. There's something goes against our team. We tend to justify as one jennings did nothing wrong exactly but then when it comes to politics. I think that they've painted it that way too. It's like you have to your team and air your enemy. The thing is because like it's fucking. I know I've known table before her. You're saying it's harder when you say like a somebody you know you're close with or whatever saying all this crazy shit and I got I didn't realize that you were like that And it is rough but on the other hand I have known. Multiple people have multiple friends. Who are like? We're raised very Republican Christian conservative and all that and so like. We'll all what they'll like. They are Republican. They'll tell you the Republican vote Republican. But I. I'm like I know you man I've known you for years and like no you're not what do you know what I mean like. I know that you don't believe all that and I don't mean like even they'll say they believe it but you could tell they. Don't I mean if you pick any one individual issue you that you know. They're fine with gay marriage. I think we should be legalized. You know what I mean. They don't have a problem with abortion. Whatever you name it if you one? They're like fall on the left of them but then go and vote Republican just because that's the team their own and they were raised that way and they don't they don't want their mom or daddy to find out they didn't have this election. We'll be a little. They'll they'll even say oh. Go ahead. I'm sorry you go ahead while I was GONNA say like the same people trae is talking about will literally they'll they'll try to the way they'll say the way to say I'm a conservative but I'm one of the good ones is usually they'll go. I'm fiscally conservative right. So they'll say I'm fiscally conservative and then you hit all the check points that would make someone fiscally conservative. And No. They're not they don't WanNa Piss they're fucking we've almost tripled. The national deficit. Is it in the last three years. Yeah that's not. The definition of fiscally conservative. They also just don't identify with the Democrats that they will. They were brought like kids. My Age I'm thirty five and I say kids because I like to feel young kids my age I was. I was brought up Republican. I was brought up the Republican household. You know and it was really funny thing. I I was right around that. Get the Reagan administration is where the Republican Party aligned with the Christian conservative right and then and that was the most genius out. Dude is because really. It wasn't about politics anymore. People don't even look at platforms anymore. It was the baby Jesus versus the people that want to kill babies and it was genius because they call theirself the fucking right. We only had two options. We could be the left or the wrong and and we picked a leg you know so in the eighties. They align themselves with these family core values so now a lot of people when you talk to them. They don't even talk about the fiscal responsibility more. Because that's absolute bullshit. If you look at any statistic they talk about how they're standing up for family values but then you you confront them with the fact. It's okay so the man you voted before he's been married. Three times had multiple fares multiple sexual sexual assault allegations has had women with my head children. With how does that align with your but we're just Jin conservative values antiabortion below. Yeah that's like blow it for also one thing that I actually respect about them that they're better better at than us they really are. He is putting in judges all over this country. And it's scary. Who Don't think abortion is a is a constitutional right? Yeah he's in other words there for a long time other words. Guess what guys policy matters way more than what Donald Trump did with the start fucking wife if they don't want to say it because they like to keep face and have Jerry Falwell Junior. Come out there but they know it. That's something the right knows better than the left. Just they just know Oh. They've realized that they've internalized it. And it's like he's going to put the judges in he's GonNa pass the laws. I wanted to pass fuck what he does in his spare time. Yeah Yeah Well let's we're back is GONNA stick around but The next part of what we're GONNA talk about. y'All aren't good under here for a few months yet because we're GONNA get into talking about the the next album. And obviously that's going to be spoiler territory so the next part you're GONNA have to wait a few months and then it will come out but For now now let's go ahead and sign off on this version Mr Bj Barham. Everybody think over I mean and and We'll see next time skis skew. Excuse me thank you. Thank you and now a tune from the Mayan who should be opening up for God. God Damn American aquarium it's fucking gypsy. Speedboat where I can only come when I'm crying take it away bore Data from the hand Brad Muscle are slam outdoor home. People just go waving crime everyday it.

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