4 Burst results for "Bill Mcclane"

"bill mcclane" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:06 min | 11 months ago

"bill mcclane" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"So yeah, it's a really fun project. And I got a shout out, Bill mcclane, again, this retired botanist and just the quotes that he came. He found. We're just like, they're just, I mean, if you go back and if you all want to go back and read this paper, it is just so much fun to hear what the heck was happening out there on the landscape. It was so interesting. Yeah, it's really red. And I mean, we're buddies, right? And I know you and I really respect the work you do, but even if I didn't know all this about you, I don't think I would Bach at saying this is a really amazing paper that takes a lot of interesting historical social sciences and combines it with hard ecology to almost show you sort of a, I hesitate to say prescription for what the landscape should be in this region, but it gives you a better idea of what was going on and what you sort of moving forward, what we can kind of think about in terms of how these ecosystems change and our influence by our actions. But as someone who's done the research and literature reviews and spent hours agonizing over data, how do you take quotes and letters and all of these very anecdotal sort of data points, so to speak and turn them into data that's usable in this context. I mean, what was that process like for you? Was it a learning curve? Or was it something that's kind of like, oh no, we'll just kind of code it as X, Y, and Z and go from there. Well, here's another familiar pet peeve of yours and mine with research is that you're probably not going to go into it thinking I'm going to spend 20 years in a library or I'm going to get ten year or I'm going to get a grant based on this. So you have to have some patience and flexibility, which the modern research world will not allow you for a type of thing. But turning that into data in this particular thing was like it was kind of question driven based on a lot of a couple of debates that were happening with our modern sort of management world. Specifically, I can talk about when is the best time of the year to burn? When did things burn historically? And one of the most tangible results we said is that the burn season historically was October and November in a part of the world. After first freeze, you'd kill back the annual, the vegetation dried out and you get a little dry period. And that primarily wouldn't burn. So you can talk all you want about late summer burns in this part of the world or spring burns. They probably did happen, but they were probably much much rare and much smaller in scale, most likely. So there are a couple of small things like that. Okay, where do we have? We threw out actually a lot of the accounts. We got because they didn't have a tangible variables that we could use. What time of the year was it, you know, what direction was the wind blowing? Where was the fire in the country? What day of the year was it? How big of an area did burn? Was it just, you know, small or was it a huge area? So we sort of said, okay, let's take those data points and try to make something interesting and useful out of those. Lightning. What was the cost? So that was another big thing. You know, you saw a clear trend going from this is exclusively Native American fire for hunting. Then it became Native American fire for I got a bunch of white people on my trail, tracking me in the military, and I'm literally burning to cover up my tracks so they can't track me, you know? Yeah, yeah, right. Or like I'm trying to actually keep these Europeans out of here, and I'm burning because I know they freak out by fire and we know how to manage fire. We know how to deal with fire, right? And then it turned into the source was, you know, all the things we talked about Europeans escaping from their campsite or something like that or it burned over a fire line. And then it became really, really huge source was locomotives like when there was steam powered coal locomotives were going through their little spark and then boom, you know? So that was kind of a fun thing to be able to track that data and say, what was the source? Of fires too. Wow. I mean, you're catching Succession in a lot of different ways. Culturally, historically, actual ecologically, so to speak. And I'm sure landscape context plays a big role in this. And so did you have to kind of also factor in how much the landscape was changing because of European settlement in the context of like you said, when you let a fire today goes two acres and then it Peters out when it hits an industrial cornfield, but historically that could have raged on for thousands of acres. Yeah, that's a great question. And we weren't able to fact that into the fire necessarily what was happening in real time. But it became apparent in some of the quotes like you could just tell, you know, you're talking about grass fires and then you're talking about wheat stubble, or people talking about, well, I just planted these acres of cool season grasses poa and brome around my house to keep the fires away, you know, as much as I can. But then they would talk about this came up over and over and over again was..

Bill mcclane Bach Peters
"bill mcclane" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"bill mcclane" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"When it hits the next cornfield. Exactly. Exactly. Right? So, you know, yeah, if everybody's using fire to burn their to heat their home or to do whatever there's going to be a lot of escaping whatever. So there was still some scariness, let's say around there was a lot of fire out. They're still being used for 1830 to 1850 in my part of the Midwest. A lot of it was escaped. But they were starting to use it. Okay, I'm going to burn off my crops so that I can plow it more easily or I can get my planting in. I'm going to burn off my hay field to increase some productivity and release some nutrients to the soil. I'm going to burn out my cattle pasture or my wood lot just so that I can get more grass in the understory. I'm going to put in a firebreak here around my house. You know, I'm sick of these, you know, snakes. These damn snakes. Yeah. So it changed, and eventually they got good at it. They were still burning into the 19th century. You know, up into the smoky mountain. People were burning a lot. There was a real culture of fire, but it was, you know, if in my little lot here, I want to use fire as a tool, and they learn how to use it. And sort of responsibly. It's really interesting to me. There was a paper that came out about ten years ago. And it was using modus satellite technology, which I don't understand. I don't know anything about it. But they basically yeah, yeah. Some satellite in the computer space world algorithms. They're right. You know, satellites flying over and every time they spotted a fire in North America, they'd be able to pinpoint it and market it down. And so it was like a ten year dot map of every landscape sort of ish fire across North America. And you see these incredibly clear patterns, places that bright up today that are still being burned regularly. And it's very much a cultural thing. And the Ozark mountains, those mountains are being burned constantly. Then they were for a service went back and interviewed every fire escape fire that they could find and every land manager they could finally say, what caused this fire? What's that fire? And it was cultural. All culture. It's like I just learned how to burn my back 40 acres for my grandfather and I've been doing it forever. Or the number one source was arson and feud. I had a feud with this guy. And so I was faster on fire. I swear to God. This was the number one source of fire in the forest service region. Our beef. Yeah. That's not a joke. That is literally I couldn't believe it when I read. It was like 70% for a given year of fires like that. And then when you look at the other place that tend to let up would be like the northern great plains with the weight wheat fields, and that was very much an agricultural. Burn off the stubble, easier to plant and to plow in the future. And, you know, I'm not worried about it escaping because it's an agricultural landscape or in the Flint hills of Kansas. It's like I'm going to burn my cattle pasture because I, you know, I want to do this that in this. And to some extent in the southeast, you know, there's still some kind of a history or a cultural legacy of fire. So it's interesting to me. A lot of people like us who live in cities, you know, we don't have that perspective. What are you talking about? But a lot of the rural folk like if you're a hunter, if you're a fisherman, you know, you got a little acreage, like there's way more of a culture and they have a better relationship with these types of things. That's interesting. You brought that up because I'm thinking now back to my childhood and my uncle, they lived in New Jersey and he would go over and burn his lawn. And I remember being like, what are you doing? And it was one of those things. He's like, ah, the grass is just healthier that way and I just put out of mine. Oh, yeah, okay, whatever. But it's so interesting to hear that perspective over time because yeah, if you grew up again in the northeast like I did, you don't think about this as a regular thing because no one's going out and doing it or if there's a fire set and it gets away, that's a big deal. I mean, that is like local news channels are coming out for that kind of stuff. So it rings true when you hear the cultural elements that kind of drive or don't drive it. But backing up a little bit to like what motivated this search because this is a huge can of worms to try to open. And really get a good grasp on. So what a made you pursue it and B, how did you even start to define the scope of sort of how far you want to kind of look and how far back you want to go with fire history? Yeah, so the last study I was involved in, I have to say was originated by my colleague, Bill mcclane, who was just a cool guy. Like a really old school sort of meat and potatoes. He's almost like a historian. He just loves to lock himself in some weird archival room for days and days with no clear goal of reaping the benefits of this work. Just saying, I'm curious and I want to know more about the settlement and the Native Americans fire and I'm just going to see what's out there. So he actually had been for 20 years probably a retired botanist and going through these archival materials. Like I said, going back as far as he could get 1600s, it was as many written records and accounts as he could find to just sort of create a bibliography of as much information about fire. And a part of the world where we basically did not know very much about what was happening firewall. Like you said, you mentioned earlier, we had these sort of weird anecdotes, but it was less of a, as settlement happened by Europeans further east to west. We actually have a really good record of Native American fire use when you get out to the west because by then people were writing down these anthropogenic account Native Americans, ethnic historians were writing down everything they heard and they wanted to hear how we're using fire and what they were doing and they were a real interest in documenting these tribes what they were doing. But when it came to our part of the country, that hadn't that culture wasn't.

North America Ozark mountains Midwest Flint hills Bill mcclane Kansas New Jersey
"bill mcclane" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"bill mcclane" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"When you go out and get the top jockey pretty much toe right? And I think that's a big telephone. That was the best that I don't think it'll be great off. It's kind of a single on our early pick five. But that number four Irish declaration looks looks good over the number two asset. And the number 34 or five. So we were a 44 to 3 in that order, but the best bet on that four. Okay, but we none of the fourth race. There's an even money shot in this race number six. Honeymoon's over. Yeah, I think honeymoon's over. That was our top call. Here. We were too deep on our early pick five. Honeymoon's over even money. With Blaine, Right? And Kyle fray again. So again, top trainer top jockey combination there. Um, He's basically taking advantage of the conditions that he has run in the past for the $8000 claiming tag in the last two years. He's been way above that for the last, you know, year over year plus But, uh, you got claimed to starts back by Blaine, right? I think they're kind of just looking for a little preparation. Um, and looking for just kind of a pick me up for him. He hasn't won in his last three, and this will be a good spot for him to pick up that way and again, so He's taken advantage of the fact that he did run for 1000 in the past two years, which qualifies him for this race. He's protective spot. He's usually racing in the 25 to 40,000 range and doing well, actually, at that level, so even money I think he's dropping in here against some horses. That he outclasses and claiming is over. Looks good. I think the best value might come with a late run and very, very sharp number. 56 hand to, um, for Reed, France. He's got him in great form right now. Comes off a win for the $8000 tag and then gets protected here. So I like that move that's confident and that the horse is doing well. So I was a six even money on the six and then if you want value, I think it's on the 5 12 the ones to tend to And then for third, I'd look for maybe another late runner. Um, number two cannonball coming, But we were just 65 alone on our exotic early early bet high, moving on to the fifth race. And we had a value play here for a first time Starter. Yeah, this race. It's we've got four. We've got another six horse field. And it's ah maidens. It's our top level meetings, and they just turned three years old. So it's our top level. Young maidens here and four out of the six have never run before, so you're kind of sorting through first time starters. And I think, uh, three of those were interesting. I think this is probably this is the I think this is the biggest vulnerable favorite of the day that number one. It's my house. It's 6 to 5 gets. Kyle has a top trainer but and ran second, beaten only length in his debut and then makes his second start today. But that race we have successfully been playing against that race and making a little money. Um, that race on November 7th was very slow for the level and has not really produced anything out of it. So he did. He did come out and run second in that race. He has a couple good workouts, but it's 6 to 5. He is definitely a week favorite in my opinion, so I was looking for any kind of a first time starter with a little bit of spark, and I think there's a couple of them in there. The top one being number four. Hey, mate at 6 to 1 for Bill McClane, He's a Kentucky bred out of a fire McLean's music who hit well 18% with his first time starters. And Bill McLean does very well 18% with his first time starters as well. He's got some sneaky, good workout. This trainer never works his horses out fast. He does a lot of six furlong type work. Just slow, steady and that last five on the last six furlong work on Hey, mate really pointed him out that 1 14 and four I think really sets him up here. Ondas kind of a sneaky good work, so 61 definitely like teammate. My second call was another first timer. Bogeyman 92 for Blaine, Right, and Catalina Martinez hopping in the battle. There's definitely a few good works there. And definitely good connections. And then if I was going to go, I'd actually throw a 3rd 1st time Starter Number two Command flip sergeant Major for Ed Motor in the last two workouts. There are definitely better than Ed Motor typically shows he's got up the hot writing on Feel Espinosa on and If I was going to go with either of the two experienced horses again, I'd still leave out the low odds favorite on the rail and maybe go with the speedy meant me and Bubba me, Bubba T number five, So I was a four. I mean, I think this race is nobody's run before, but I still had a value placed 6 to 1. On that four came eight. Then we were three bogeyman. I'll use the five meet bubble tea with a little bit of speed. And then the other first time starter command command Sergeant Major, and I was just going to make a statement and go for deep without using the favorite T O End our pick five and pick four. All right, moving on to the six ways today at Golden Gate Fields and I have a little best bet here on number six are bold prints. You are bold prints. It's digging inside the numbers there. You know, you look through his race career, and he's one for 17, which isn't that's not a great record. The starter allowance levels I, really typically the winning profile is recent maiden winner and lightly raced is what what usually wins this type of level. It's a 50,000 star allowance level. But we're looking at one for 17 Honorable Prince. However, he's been kind of wasted at different distances and different surfaces, so he's never hit the board on on dirt, so sometimes over the summer, they've raised him at Pleasanton, and he has a couple races there never hit the board there, and he's also never hit the board and his two tries on turf, so right there You know, and then also the distance. They've also stretched him out a few times. He's run. Well, he's run well, but never really done anything there either. So if you just look back at his synthetic sprints, your golden gate He actually has run very well. And the other thing he does really well is second off the layoff. So the last two times he did this pattern where he had a little bit of a preparation. Where he kind of runs well, but hey, moves way up on that second start, and that's what he's doing Today. He took in November 2 January break. He ran against the field of really salty horses at 20,000 last time Torpedo away is one like about five races over this track in the same 20,000 range. And like I said the cannonball coming earlier in the day, he was second in that race. Horrible Prince was a good third. He was in that race until deep stretch when the race got blown open by torpedo away, finished third, beaten, only 2.5. It's protected again. Here, I think steps way up and runs a better race today. And so it's six at the V 8 to 5 Morning line favorite. I think he's the horse to beat and the kind of the best horse to move forward in this one. And the only other horse we're going to use on the late pick four and pick five was the number five night gig at 2 to 1 for his ego to my own Kyle. Uh, he'll be making his fourth start here over a sprint distance. I'm gonna throw out the last turf effort on him..

Kyle fray Blaine Bill McLean Golden Gate Fields Bill McClane Ed Motor Sergeant Major Reed France Pleasanton Catalina Martinez Kentucky Bubba Espinosa
"bill mcclane" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"bill mcclane" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Now on a plane that went missing last weekend at a walk. County authorities have found the plane as well as the remains of the pilot. You may remember the plane was reported missing on Thursday evening after disappearing from radar investigators tell us that 76 year old Bill McClane from Georgia was killed in that crash. Happening right now. Police and Coleman are looking for this man you see on your screen they say was involved in a deadly stabbing and happened Saturday night near the intersection of highway 1, 57 and Highway 31 offs to say Nathan Winston Stevens left the scene in a car. Last seen wearing a white T shirt, jeans, white shoes with black socks. If you see him or know where he is, please call the Coleman Police Department will starting in the next few weeks. Best for city schools will be going to a blended learning model. Students will who registered for the new model will start the transition on September. The 28. There will be two groups Group A will attend in person learning Monday Tuesday. Group B will go to school Thursday Friday. Everyone will have virtual learning on Wednesday, the best for superintendent Dr Autumn, Jeter says 53% of best, More school parents decided to keep their Children home all year, but 47% are ready to come back to school. Will be a lot of social distancing measures in place. Maybe tape on the floors in the hall way to remind them to space out and what side would walk on? Dr Jenner says that this decision came after speaking with Jefferson County Health officer Dr Mark Wilson, she says this new option is flexible and parents can certainly change their minds. Well, New this morning. We're hearing reports of Internet connection issues for some Tuscaloosa City school students. You got your locals live now from Tuscaloosa on your side looking into it s so I go to what's leading to the problem And what comparison expecting the day ahead. Hey, my cap for parents watching at home. If your Children attend test with city schools, you should have received a text message. Voice, mail or phone called late last night A night, nine PM, alerting you of a network issue in the school system there, So we know that Testa City schools is saying their fiber optic cable that provide Internet Connection is damaged. This means class link isn't working As a result of this fact, I try to log in about half an hour ago, and I had no luck getting in now students. May not be able to access schoolwork and log in for online school today because of this issue, the school district says that they are working to resolve the problem. We're hoping to have some sort of update sometime this morning on the status of their progress. Once we learn more, we'll let you know. Reporting live in Tuscaloosa, we go to a local WC Fox six news underside. All right. Thank you very much. Well, the U. S Corona Virus task force Dr Deborah Burgs in test Colusa. And while she was there, Dr Burke's talked about she was asking about going through college football season during.

Dr Deborah Burgs Nathan Winston Stevens Tuscaloosa Tuscaloosa City school Dr Jenner Bill McClane Coleman Police Department Coleman Dr Autumn Testa City Dr Mark Wilson Georgia superintendent Dr Burke Colusa Jefferson County Jeter officer