23 Burst results for "Bill James"

Daryl Morey on the Sports Analytics Revolution

ESPN Daily

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Daryl Morey on the Sports Analytics Revolution

"So me pawing at this sad window like a hidden aside daryl. I do want to explain the monster. You've created here because the mit sloan sports analytics conference is very well known inside our industry but it is far less stone outside of it. And you and your co founder. Jessica gelman got it going fifteen years ago. Basically in the spirit of moneyball and the spirit of what someone like bill. James did in exploiting data defined undervalued players and strategies and every year you bring together researchers and sacred magicians and wants but now you also get all of these powerbrokers to somehow agreed to be on panels. And i'm talking about owners and athletes and coaches and executives and world leaders like barack obama who was the keynote speaker. One year recently. So i'm just curious first off what sort of thing is stuck in your mind after you wrapped up the conference. Last week. I mean this year. I jumped on the nfc panel actually learned a lot because we had the like the head of mba. Top shots ahead of so rare mark. Cuban who has more More free time than than us to to focus on this and i think teams are obviously the. Nba is out front at the sports top shop. But i think it's just the start of a nba teams exploiting what crypto can do for them as well. It's very confusing to people but I think everyone knows what a barcode as. So if you could have put a barcode on literally anything and no one could copy it. And they can always always know and look up that it's your thing that's been bar coded and that's really all it is you. Can you can really. Nf t anything. The certification estimate The actual item. Nf t could be a combination of physical and digital.

Jessica Gelman Daryl NBA James Barack Obama NFC
"bill james" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

06:56 min | 8 months ago

"bill james" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"I mean, you could you could go down Who's who's listed the Hall of Fame. And among all the Negro League rates, and they played there because players black and weigh wood Barn storm over those decades in the early years, and it's just terrific walking out there and Standing in the center fielder standing in the box. This is where Willie it is where all the greats hit missile where they feel it. And ah No, it's a tiny ball park in that it would seat maybe 10 to 12,000. But it's a big ballpark of you need to. You need to hit it a long way. And this is this is by the by the way, where Not only the Birmingham black bands Uh, you know, set up camp but also the Birmingham Barons, which was an all white team, a time representing the Boston Red Sox, a double a affiliate. So when the black bear arms were on the road, the white they're the white bear. They were at home and vice versa. And it was just amazing because Willie would tell me and I looked it up and this is The case. That when the black players showed up There was a group beyond the right field wall, uh, set off for white customers. And when the white barons played, there is the same group beyond the right field wall. Where were you know? With black players play? The white folks were out there with the white barons played. The black folks were up there, but you know it, burning him one of the most segregated if not the Most segregated City in America until 1964 so, says Martin Luther King. So when Willie style, and I mean that was 20 years earlier when he grew up there, you know, man, imagine the racism and it was illegal to even consider buying a house in a white neighborhood. If you're black family, and it was just terrible, and obviously we You know the history books, you know, tell us about Bull Connor Bull Connor was police officials who took No water hoses and and, you know, police, horses and dogs, You know, just just attacking all these peaceful demonstrators. And you know O'Connor. His actions were televised and helped ignite the civil rights movement and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Well, Connor, by the way, When will he was a kid? He was the play by play, man. The damn parents awake, So I mean, it's It's just a crazy, you know, crazy stuff and it it was wonderful to unearth much of it and Write history that really hasn't been written, You know, going into different angles in different years and in different stories, told by Willing and all these other people, Sam, So it's In the pretty significant and amazing experience. Once the first time you saw Willie Mays play Well, I guess I was old enough or young enough whatever it might beats and see him in the late sixties, early seventies Big year. 1971 because they hadn't been to the postseason since 62. And suddenly Major League Baseball divides the leagues into two divisions of peace. And they had a great year. September They struggled and they had to win the final game in San Diego to overtake the Dodgers and win the division and they used carousel. To beat the Padres. I think it was 5 to 1. And then they lost the best of five Pittsburgh team They dominated throughout that summer, and then Pittsburgh went on to play Baltimore in the World Series. And then that was let mazes last year. His last full year in San Francisco, and it was a good year He was 40. And then he led the league in walks and let the league and on base percentage he stole 23 out of 26 bags. Any that 18 home runs, so that's how effective he was all the way till the end. One thing in your book, you actually go and tell us all the Accomplishments the beginning of time with Willy, But then you put them all into today's analytics and his dance pretty good. Well, Bill James, The Godfather of Analytics, whom I interviewed. Has a great quote that is in the back of the book. And Bill James says. Willie Mays is best season is every year. Just pick one. They're all great. You could. You could face Willey honor, batting average R B eyes, home runs and all the traditional numbers, But there's a whole chapter in their basic willy on all the new numbers, all the advanced statistics. And I interviewed Bill James. You know Sarah's Tom Tango, Rob fire all these people. You know everything about history, know everything about statistics and know everything about baseball. And looking back at Willie's career. He won two MBPs and I walked away from those conversations thinking. In today's world, he could have one between eight and 11. If you look at war No. Wins above replacement. It's It's obviously center in today's game. How teams analyzing valued players Mela 10 War 10 Win. Season. It's just outstanding. It's just wonderful. I mean, it's rare that anyone could do it has been the nine or 10 times since 2000 by hitters, and that's not many. I mean bonds did it three times. Trout did it three times and then Three or four other guys did it once. Will Willie Mays in the sixties over a seven year stretch averaged and war perceived it So it just speaks to his athleticism? His Five tool prominence, his ability and durability, you know, being able to stay in the lineup. I mean in that in that time going back to the fifties, there were 13 straight years. That maze played 150 or more games 13 straight years, 150 plus games. And nobody has ever done that, before or since. Can Most of that street lamp during 154 game season. Until 62 did We break out with a longer season of 162, so maybe just didn't come out of the lineup. He played doubleheaders both ends and played every game in spring training. Practically All Star games. You'd see him all nine innings. And He was a workhorse..

Willie Mays Bill James Bull Connor Bull Connor Baseball Birmingham Barons Negro League Hall of Fame Boston Red Sox Birmingham Pittsburgh Padres Martin Luther King San Francisco San Diego America Dodgers O'Connor Willy
"bill james" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"bill james" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Mcdaniel rights for ESPN and is the CO author of future value. The battle for baseball soul and how teams will find the next superstar and before we get to that Kylie Yesterday we had met Minor League baseball pushing back on the idea that their season has been cancelled to the degree that the organization put out a statement last night But you and I know. The current situation is so fragile and I was thinking back to March when There were initial reports out of London. The London series between the cardinals and cubs who is going to be cancelled and Major League? Baseball push back on that and said now we haven't officially cancelled it and then that came and then earlier this week Bob Nightingale USA Today at a story saying looks like the hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies is going to be cancelled and there was pushback and it was like now. We haven't officially cancelled that yet. Then yesterday we got word yes. It is officially postponed And I feel that way about the minor league season that eventually will probably hear that announcement because the fact is is that on major league. Baseball is list of priorities. It's far down the list and you would expect as they try to make a push to have some sort of a major league season or tournament or whatever form it would take that you know. This is on the back burner. What do you think it's It's one of those things that in talking to agents executives people like that for the last couple of months. It's just been a foregone conclusion that it's gone from very unlikely that there will be a minor league season two in the last few weeks. It's been like Oh there's a zero percents yet. It's not going to happen but I guess there just hasn't been the You know the formal announcement of anything yet and antics earnings of hacking with the draft. Were it's been talked about for of pray about a month now that it's going to be a certain day. Certain around ninety percent. Sure it just hasn't been formally announced yet and on the minor league side it just you know it sounds like there's going to be some version of you get thirty to fifty maybe sixty players Inside your bubble to be part of the season and trying to do that for you know a ball in Aa in all these different levels when there's not that much money to be made and they don't have an agreement there's just like so many different things go on like you're saying it's so far down. Melissa's thanks to try to get done to have like a bio dome in Rome Georgia or something. It just sorta seems silly that they would. That would be something. Anybody would even try to do. Yeah I mean the more people you have in so-called bio dome The less likely it is that you can keep it going. And the priorities are going to be the big leaguers Because they're the guys who would generate the revenue and that's why I don't think baseball would extend it. You mentioned the draft where we stand on that and show. I've talked to a club. Executives talked about their teams running mock drafts and trying to prepare in that way. What you heard Yeah it's another one of those things that the initial day that it was going to was June tenth Once it was announced a little while ago that it could be as late as July twentieth. It quickly became clear that MLB's intent was to have it on June towns and have it be five rounds unless something happens like the waves. Explain to me was if there's a bunch of You know amateur contests that they can. Team can judge off. Then they'll be inclined to want to increase around from five to ten and that was basically one of those two options and I think part of the thinking was both more information but also that would mean. There's a better chance that there would be actual major league. Games would be more cash flow And obviously neither of those are happening and so it just sounds like it's you know for weeks in pretty clear. It's going to land on June tenth and be five rounds In My sorta last check in this morning so I guess we'll breaking news with twenty months ago was that it is not completely official But as of last night like people that are I guess in the know are sort of indicating that it sounds like they're sort of you know dot the i's cross the t's and whatnot so I think it may have been sort of decided in that they are moving in that direction. officially But it is not like he's ready to announce everything has been finished yet. But it sure it sure seems like that. Foregone conclusion somewhere. The minor league season is about to be SORTA wrapped up so we touched last week on how everything going on could potentially Have a huge effect in the scouting community with a lot of the folks being let go or furloughed losing their jobs and I thought about it that you know everything that's going on while when you wrote Yearbook You weren't thinking about the corona virus but so many of the trends that you write about those are in so many of the shifts in the industry that you write about The accelerated by the situation. Yes yeah that's that's something. Eric and I have been staying in touch valid in obviously a- Jefferson tonight as well Because it seems like the sort of trajectory of scouting is to have more remote stuff more data. There's going to be more sort of stat. Cast track man and things like that available and so that means the role of the scout in the area. Scout specifically is lessened There also has been a little bit of movement for Mobile to sort of insert themselves into some of the Work for the team in terms of you know. They've got this video of Scouting Bureau that used to have scouts They've Nassir putting on events under the banner of PD P So there's all these different ways that essentially the areas gut is getting cut out of things that they're less essential than they used to be. And also it's like you know. The people do not know are not like blindsided by a third round. Pick that no one's ever heard of draft age doesn't happen anymore and so it's just it's just more of a process That anyone can shortage plugged it like you can hire Britain's So the the the thought was in the next five. Ten fifteen years the amateur scouting staff For the draft will go from you know fifteen or twenty people when you add together all the crush eckerson scouts for anyone team down to like eight or ten because eventually it will just be that they have stat cast in the SEC in the ACC and so the idea of like having a scout fly in for one day of a Clemson Lsu game To say what he sees will you could. Have you know every inch of what's happening on the field for all three years of the guide? Lsu's career so him gone for one day he can tell you some stuff The flying in for one day for silly Even more than it does now and so the thought is now with the teams that were not inclined to go down that road or have it started going down that road yet. They're going to involuntarily have a draft class where they are going to do more more data and less reports comparatively than they have in the past and they either may like it may like the way it goes because a Lotta these gyms that are making the picks like to be able to be a bigger part of the decision making process Twenty Scouts in the room. You might abate scouts in the room and so maybe they just like that process if they think those eight scouts are good enough And they're also going to go to see like the cost savings would be very obvious when nuzman as much travel and possibly not being as many scouts. And so it just sounds like this whole exercise. will speed up that whether it's ten fifteen twenty years from now it might be three four five six seven years from now were amateur staffs as an example for all the different scouting staff sizes. For both you know. Scouting Minor League games internationally. Things like that We'll start You know getting smaller as a result Because teams will be a little more comfortable with than they were before all this and of course fewer people in relying more on data specifically in your eyes what what are some of the some of the most important data that's going to be relied on by these teams so for the college players Unusually for this draft class is usually good. Drac last overall it's Especially concentrated in sort of SEC. Acc mostly Track record players that you have reports going back to junior year of high school up to junior college. You've got four years of data you've got date on them from when they played it area codes in August before their senior year of high school and then for a lot of these schools. You've got three years of data All through college and a lot of times. It's Golic tender burns at Auburn has been basically the same guy for the last four years. You feel pretty any incremental improvements But he was like a French first-round pick out of high school won. A lot of money. Didn't get it And now is you know looks to be like a mid to late first rounder and so with that guy comparing him to a high school righty. It's not just that he's three years further along and more polished But you have so much data about you. Know what his arm slide And what his spend rates in the shape of his pitches and Obviously just some surface stats about you. Know strikeouts in walks in the SEC is sort of like the most important piece of information you can have for a pitcher on the amateur side. I've seen the most important stuff in terms of trying to stand in for scouting report When you look at Max active yellows so if you get a big enough sample of exit. Bilas for hitter that stands for raw power. Which using idea of how much upside there is. If you sort of believe your player development staff can tap into it That's probably one of the bigger ones If you have a bigger sample obviously like average exit philo or contact rates or another big one on the hitter side for pitchers Teams are now sort of following or have been for years following the The blueprint that Houston laid out of forcing fastball. High Spin curve ball with high spin pairing those two together specifically and so. There's both guys that look like that now. Answer to give you those characteristics Or that have like hyphen. But they haven't optimized the The spin access..

Baseball Major League SEC Minor League London Acc Mcdaniel ESPN Bob Nightingale USA Scouting Bureau cardinals Lsu Kylie MLB Yearbook official Rome Georgia Melissa Auburn
Minor League Baseball Joins MLB in Indefinite Suspension Amid Coronavirus

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Minor League Baseball Joins MLB in Indefinite Suspension Amid Coronavirus

"Yesterday we had met Minor League baseball pushing back on the idea that their season has been cancelled to the degree that the organization put out a statement last night But you and I know. The current situation is so fragile and I was thinking back to March when There were initial reports out of London. The London series between the cardinals and cubs who is going to be cancelled and Major League? Baseball push back on that and said now we haven't officially cancelled it and then that came and then earlier this week Bob Nightingale USA Today at a story saying looks like the hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies is going to be cancelled and there was pushback and it was like now. We haven't officially cancelled that yet. Then yesterday we got word yes. It is officially postponed And I feel that way about the minor league season that eventually will probably hear that announcement because the fact is is that on major league. Baseball is list of priorities. It's far down the list and you would expect as they try to make a push to have some sort of a major league season or tournament or whatever form it would take that you know. This is on the back burner. What do you think it's It's one of those things that in talking to agents executives people like that for the last couple of months. It's just been a foregone conclusion that it's gone from very unlikely that there will be a minor league season two in the last few weeks. It's been like Oh there's a zero percents yet. It's not going to happen but I guess there just hasn't been the You know the formal announcement of anything yet and antics earnings of hacking with the draft. Were it's been talked about for of pray about a month now that it's going to be a certain day. Certain around ninety percent. Sure it just hasn't been formally announced yet and on the minor league side it just you know it sounds like there's going to be some version of you get thirty to fifty maybe sixty players Inside your bubble to be part of the season and trying to do that for you know a ball in Aa in all these different levels when there's not that much money to be made and they don't have an agreement there's just like so many different things go on like you're saying it's so far down. Melissa's thanks to try to get done to have like a bio dome in Rome Georgia or something. It just sorta seems silly that they would. That would be something. Anybody would even try to

Baseball Major League Cardinals London Bob Nightingale Usa Rome Georgia Melissa Cubs
James Bond Sequel ‘No Time to Die’ Postponed Due to Coronavirus Outbreak

First Morning News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

James Bond Sequel ‘No Time to Die’ Postponed Due to Coronavirus Outbreak

"The coronavirus impacting of all things the box office it's because the new James farm bill James Bond film to be delayed and we will get to see the upcoming twenty fifth James Bond movie until November No time to die was scheduled for an early April release but with thousands of Peter still closed in China Japan South Korea and Italy because of coronavirus MGM universal in the film's producers say quote that after careful consideration and thorough evaluation of the global theatrical market place the release of No time to die will be postponed until November twenty twenty it's the first major Hollywood movie delay as corona virus spreads around the globe Jason agents and

Peter China South Korea Italy James Bond Japan MGM Hollywood Jason
"bill james" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"I don't know if anybody does owners, but I've heard it said bye bye team people anything that Benz. Researchers current book would would bear the south teams have recently been doing a lot of a lot more investing in tech, not only just hiring more people in the front office. When there are caps on international spending and draft spending in a soft cap on on even free spending teams have to try to put their money somewhere. And they've been investing more in in technology and in staffing out. There's just been astronomically more hires. I feel like every. Season than than there used to be. Have you been able to see any figures at all in terms of what teams might be investing in these sort of off the field areas? And and do you think that there's any real conceivable way that by knowing that information, he would at least help to alleviate some of the conversation or concern of house spending on players this even we stagnated. I mean, obviously, you know, spending on tech and spending on researchers has gone up. But you know, as I think probably, you know, you guys know as well as I do researchers and same attrition are cheap. Right. Certainly compared to shortstops. So you could fill it entire office with those people, and it's still not gonna come anywhere close to what you'd have to spend on players, which is what makes it a good investment again because you have this three tier salary system if you can find a way of data firing guy in triple A or double who can slot in. And replace the guy you would have to pay ten fifteen twenty million. Dollars to resigns a free agent. That's a tremendous bang for your buck. So yeah, I think I think clearly that's had in fact, but you know, we're back to that issue of of, you know, having more information and more ways to to evaluate players. And again, I don't want to condemn the owners for doing that. I just think that you know, when the consequence is that the owners are keeping more money in the players are getting less. That's when you have to go back to the bargaining table and figure out. Okay. How are we going to have to remedy this? You mentioned in your article the example of the NFL's nineteen eighty seven players strike where the league just put together scab teams in the network show them, and it didn't really seem to hurt the bottom line all that much. You wrote that the NFL's probably the best example of league where players are nearly interchangeable and that that instant sort of broke the power of the NFL players association. This is sort of what Bill James got in some hot water for appear. Going to tweet earlier this offseason when he suggested that the game is what we're watching. We're watching for the teams in our tease over a certain amount of time. We would just forget the players in the players are kind of interchangeable at least more. So, but why do you think baseball is more resistant than football to that? Why is the idea of a scab team in baseball less viable than it might be football? A couple of things one is obviously the players are literally less than honest in baseball where you can actually see their faces on TV. Right. You know, you turn on football game. And for the most part you see about whole bunch of guys in helmets. And you know, if you trade swapped out eighty percent of them for eighty percent of other guys, you know, most fans would guess he knows the difference. If you say, hey, you know, who is unfamiliar names on the jerseys, but you have to squint, right? Whereas if you had scab base. Baseball. And you know, literally didn't know any of the players who are it will just be a lot more immediately apparent and again, also I think football just careers or so short that you're used to you know, teams churning through players. So you know, if you're in a coma for two seasons, and you wake up turn on your favorite football team. You know, you're not gonna recognize the names anyway. Right. Whereas with your players are in a coma for two seasons. I was gonna say if you're gonna come go go over two years because you were playing football, right? But you know in baseball, you'll turn it on. And you might not recognize you know, some of the players who are on your team..

football baseball NFL Bill James eighty percent two years
"bill james" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"The dream is to slow everything. That's happened. The game is to slow by its own admission. They all say they've got a speed problem and science moving too fast. Now, man, we need we need a lot more than no, contact shifts. And everyone's either striking out or hitting home run. Why did the other problem is a transaction? Bassett? Welcome means so much. You can literally mean winning a championship. It doesn't mean nearly no you're right. But adding Goldschmidt under any adding those numbers to your team immediately. Makes you better the next day. We need. MLB red zone. That's what we need. But so adding Paul Goldschmidt matters, adding might go Smith doesn't matter as much and I think that to your red zone point. It also could be said that the place aren't that exciting. Like, how often do you see someone do not that baseball players aren't athletic, and they don't make diving incredible causes a really athlete. It doesn't happen that much like a strike out in a home run. They aren't that exciting compared to a dunk or one hand to catch a home run is still exciting dominate. But but the the game amazing to look at so all or nothing so all or nothing that it's either contact or a solo homerun how many home runs were there solo home runs were there and they're all star game. Like the game has just become. We're all shifting. We're all trying to hit it over the shift, and everyone is trying to take four bases instead of one except for d Gordon Dominic. You know, like a good pickle tobacco. I'm not even kidding good rundown. Man. It's reading Bill James. No, Alex Rodriguez shorts up for the Mariners in the nineties. But seriously, do you remember any baseball highlights, but I can give you football highlights. NBA highlights from years and years ago. Like, the baseball highlights don't stand out cheater running into the stands catching a foul ball that was like ten years ago. Yeah. That was in ninety s that's fair. I've never read a word. I could have told you that? You want a guy you guys wanna do nineties? Mariners lineup. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Also got got. That's always got. He doesn't have anything else. He gave you everything. He's got right there on all the on this. Yeah. No. Thank you. That's not fun. I love nineties. Mariners donlevatar the native OI. Ric flair sixteen times your world heavyweight champion stugatz limousine riding. Steamy Lynne Waylon ailing jet funds, son of a gun and gentleman nature. Boy, Dan overtired..

Mariners Paul Goldschmidt baseball MLB Alex Rodriguez Lynne Waylon Bill James Bassett Gordon Dominic NBA Dan overtired Smith football ten years one hand
"bill james" Discussed on The Lowe Post

The Lowe Post

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on The Lowe Post

"And I think it's a really good one. And right. There's not old. Bill James, I wrote about this, you know, years ago, if you enter the league where other people wind up where do you evolve to you know, so there's less margin for error Bill James writing about baseball. Of course, I don't think the brain is age proof this, you know, if you look at the history of chess, you would assume that as players accumulate knowledge that's wisdom, and it's not physical. And so you can as you get older, you get better and better and better until you die. Right. You're going to be the greatest ever intuitively that feels right? It's why if you watch like the FU flicks the most powerful guy the guy with the old long white beard, accumulated, the most knowledge. It's not the way it works in chess. You have a prime and it coincides roughly, although later that with the physical prime of an athlete and part of that is because it's. There's a, you know, a degree of stamina you need and everything else apart of it is because young man has a bigger imagination more daring than than an old, man. And and the the car Larry in the NBA, I would say I don't think it's about imagination and daring as an older player. Although those are great words to describe how dream on plays for sure for sure, but he's gonna need that to to keep playing at that level. But it's the league changes even in subtle ways. And you've had success your whole life and your whole career doing it your way. And then there are little what happened to Carmelo Anthony mean, that's it is that's that's that's an extreme example almost a hyperbolic example. Right. But it can also happen to a player like dream on where you just assume that basketball brains gonna age just fine. Maybe. Yes. Maybe. No. I don't think I think it's the intuitive to believe that. But I don't know if it's correct. In fact, fair. I I think a best while player's career agewise and so early that I don't know how much that will happen to him either way. But you know, who I liked dream on on the Knicks when you think about crimen by not an extent anymore longs. Doing owns the team not rooting for them. But when you think about the perfect player who's the perfect player to play next to drain on. And then who's the perfect player to play next two Kristaps same guy like those those to work perfectly together. And I think that would be like a t one interested one of the great things about porzingus is that he gives you almost infinite choice among big man partners like because he can shoot you can protect the rim. So you can get someone who's not a great shooter. Someone who's not a great rim-protector get someone who does one and not the other just like who's gonna get on the ball on the ground for loose balls in their front court. Yeah. If you got Kristaps he's tall, right? Like, so you get a guy who can do all that stuff who can pass who you can play five out with still. But who's not going to be a rim defender there is honestly, it's what we're seeing with Anthony Davis who's a better player than porzingas in particular, obviously. But you know, they've they've they're big man pairings are Anthony Davis and classic stretch foreign miratec, Anthony Davis and a bowling ball can't shoot and Julius Reynolds. Oh, but they're both work. That's a good idea. The Anthony David whatever you want put around him it works, which is why the whole league is going to be trying to get Anthony Davis like now, and especially this summer, you may have heard of this company twenty three and me that has gotten a little buds lately. Twenty-three in me is named for the twenty.

Anthony Davis Carmelo Anthony Anthony David Bill James baseball Larry Knicks NBA Kristaps bowling Julius Reynolds
"bill james" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

Chicago's Business Authority

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

"Dot com for a free Ray quotes department Bill Plachy with you here in so Cal the fire situation has been well affected me out in Westlake village evacuation yesterday. And of course, we mentioned earlier about the Rams situation. Forty people in the organization were evacuated including twenty players or coaches, they weren't able to practice on Thursday. They're doing a walk through right now. Also, a northern California. The fires may affect the air quality for that raider charger game. So it will be interesting for the Rams here. The sort of a disjointed week interrupted late week. Do you still think the Rams are a safe able to blow up the Seahawks? I'm not comfortable even putting net in the context. I just think who cares. Because the people's lives are being affected your last minute affected. The whole communities are being wiped out. It's it's it's horrific California. It's apocalypic. That's the way it looks the the videos photos people fleeing, you know, traffic bumper to bumper hit people trying to get away from the blues of smoke and the fire, and I just think at the end of the day. I don't care how the Rams were affected as long as you're healthy families healthy and their houses are okay or they can rebuild their homes. That's what's important. I don't think football really matters. Well. Would be wondering are those that are trying to figure out that ten point spread? You know, how it is? Of course. The people listening right now. See, well, that's great Bill. I understand that. And maybe we're concerned about the families. But is this going to affect the Rams and should I take Seattle on the points? Well, I just I think because football teams don't really practice that much during the week anyway. Right. And they don't, you know, the families get this place, and it would have certainly affect me and my business, but I think in their business they because they played just once a week on on this Sunday. And I don't think I don't know how much preparation was actually disrupted or disjointed. Probably probably if anything prices are usually. I mean, usually what you do you have Wednesday Thursday practices are the key practices. Yeah. But a little practice of Friday walk through the day before that's the way a normal NFL week operates the Thursday, actually is a day that usually you would have a little more practice. So they weren't affected on Thursday. Friday, obviously was not going to be a big practice. I agree with you. I would. Think of anything community would come together it again, I don't expect a big attendance at the game because again, people are or have their last worry about this. None none of football game. But the people who do come to the game. I think there will be unified though, the probably certainly honor the firefighters before the game, they'll honor the first responders it'll be very sentimental and very emotional. And the Rams are probably gonna lift off of that. I would think if anything. All right. So again, the big story today we're talking about Jimmy Butler being traded and just how this whole dynamic works for the NBA right now. As far as these big name players dictating where they want to go. Let me ask you this about I think that's great. Okay. So okay, let let me ask you this again. Power. They're the ones playing. Way. You did your what Bill James said in baseball. You could get rid of every player. Wait. Let me ask you this. How many players in the NBA when when you when people walk in how many players would you pay to see in any sport, you can count them on one hand? Can't you know, actually worth paying would you pay to see how coups McClay would you pay? I mean, you got LeBron. He got Durant. How many players you say when people walk into. Why are you here? I'm here to see this player play. I think in the NBA it's a lot more than other teams NBA 'cause one player can change. You think you think Paul George as a player? People wanna see Jimmy Butler was in Indiana. People didn't apples. Absolutely. All right. So Jimmy Butler is absolutely come on. You really you think? Jimmy Butler is a must follow the NBA watch the NBA. It's all about the stars. Baseball's not as much like your idea of a star. You're bars a little low here. I mean, how many thrill stars are there in the league? Lebron's a star. The ran is a star the Greek freak is a star Greek freak is a star in Milwaukee. No, he's he's a star everywhere. These guys are doing really. So when Milwaukee goes on the row people are like I'm here to see. Absolutely, really. You don't think? So you look at all right. Let's let's let the sponsors talk about hammer. These guys do commercials. How often do you see there? I don't know. How many I mean to? We're just talking about earlier about how Chris Paul so terrible is such a bad teammate. Right. He's got he's on state farm commercials. Every every ten seconds. He's Hugh Blake Griffin's stolen all those commercials. You really now that he's gone from LA. I don't see him and all those commercials. Anyway, still see I think for the most part most players are interchangeable. I mean seriously. And when you wanna you wanna go down a list of all those MBA salaries guy twenty thirty million dollars year, Mike Riley makes thirty million a year. Z gotta moves the needle. I mean seriously is that a guy that moves most people could even pick them out of a wind up. If TV if TV contracts with the TV deals were so big. Yes, they're paying TV networks are the ones paying them all the money. Yes. They can get TV networks to buy. Well, how long is gonna last Bill seriously? I'm all this TD money is being thrown out. It'd made the sports world. So little sports is what's kept cable even in business. And they're saying the cable going to be out of business in about five years. You know television is all going to streaming right now all the major networks are pouring their money into streaming Steph curry, yeah, Joel Embiid, Kevin Durant, Damian Lillard. She must watch must watch moves in the Portland. James harden? Lebron James Devon Booker moves annealing in a convenient Phoenix. Right. Okay. Little Anthony Davis. Who who is who do you think is more popular? This is who you think more popular in New Orleans right now, Anthony Davis or drew Brees the average person the average person they're going to say Anthony Davis. I'm telling you the NBA's like that you high talking about the NFL dwarfs. But not the NFL players doesn't Anthony Davis. I think you know, what I saw most close, by the way, you know that. This World Series last right, right? Right astros. Dodgers high profile game three in Houston. The series. Sixers were in town. They came to the game. Then the most popular person that the fans in the stands people on the field. We're surrounded people were cheering and putting out the phones for wasn't George Springer wasn't Clayton Kershaw? It was joy. Well, don't forget baseball. But let let's remember this. I remember. Ago five years ago. Lebron was playing Kobe this Cavs ours is the Lakers, and they got beat by the Pro Bowl the Pro Bowl which was like touch football game. Right. You're talking about stars versus the game. The Harris poll right Harris poll, you've heard of Harris. No, right. The NFL's most popular sports. No. But then that's what you're talking about. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. The Harris poll does that they do this poll every year, and they try to identify people. That are sports fans. In other words. Are you a sports, right? Yes. I'm a sports fan. They ask people. What is your favorite sport football? Thirty three percents say the NFL the NBA got six percent sex. What time of year was it done the NBA the NBA the NBA's the number two sport in this country. Well, Steve, Steve are you paid for this? Do you wanna raise your right? I get paid. You're right. You're paid to talk about who star Jimmy Butler. So wait a minute now. Well. We're talking Jimmy Butler today because there was a trade. May that is news. That is worth what somebody? Kyle Lowry is making thirty one million dollars. This year is guaranteed. Thirty three point three is a guy. That's moving the needle in Toronto. Is that a is that a must watch in Toronto. Kyle lowry. Yeah. You know, what I believe it probably is really is Hayward a must watch in Boston right now making thirty one million thirty two next part of a Celtic team that has a huge TV contract is gripping mood. We the needle in Detroit. I bet he is really I don't want. Well, it's so so these TV network hops milk making with his Sony TV networks, so TNT is they're all just throwing away money. They're just they wanna burn money. I think they are throwing away money. Because again, if you go back to the stone age, okay, the way that sports was structured back way back in the day EMA when you and I were little kids. It was very simple you pay the stars. In other words, the Willie Mays is the Bill Russell's wilt chamberlain's, the Johnny and notices the stars were paid because those at what people pay. To see everybody else got peanuts. Because you're running a business. It's like the movies. You know, you pay for the star. Because that's who people are going to see this is what's got so out of whack. It's sports. You're just paying guys throwing money at guys that don't actually put people in seat with somebody aren't they aren't just burning the money somebody thinks they do the radius for the NBA finals last year average of nineteen twenty million people watched every one of those games twenty million people. So that's eyeballs on commercials that's eyeballs on the final sluts. Yeah. But let me ask you this about that. You had the scene NBA final matchup for four straight years. He had LeBron aka the Cavs against the Golden State Warriors, by the way, that's a match of the people look forward to then we'll get me started on some of the other rounds of the playoffs. But all right. So is there a match of this year? The will exceed what we've had the last four years. Lebron versus the warriors. Is there any conceivable matchup? Yes. Top this year. Boston gets in there. That would be it. You think Boston will kind of grab it the Red Sox? Dodgers didn't move the Neal though. The lowest rated the World Series outside of two in the history of the sport. Why why did you g Stephen wonder? It's a different sport. They play with a smaller ball. It's baseball not basketball. Question you've ever had an just asked me. I said you said Boston Celtics asked me, why baseball the Red Sox? Don't move the needle not base. Baseball's a different sport. Will why would there be a twenty percent drop in ratings from the previous year dodgers? Why would the dodgers Astros? Get bigger numbers in the Red Sox and the dodgers this. But you you compared sports. So you're the dodger baseball dying. Is there any saving baseball? Or is it this fall? It's it's in a free fall. It's a freedom. Yes, they could change the trend. They could put a pitch clock in there. They could make the games the pace faster the games get him in under three hours. Start to see a million things. Played fewer games. One fifty four right throughout to season. Earlier don't push into football so much. They can do a lot of the market the players more Mike truck walk the walk into the studio. People wouldn't even know who he was. Of course, you don't go to games. It's aren't California's you might have to do. Might not. I'm not gonna sit did you ever have you ever seen my in person? I have see my traffic. Stunner. I used to cover a lot of angel baseball. What if I don't do that anymore? I don't I don't have to go to the games..

NBA Jimmy Butler baseball Lebron James Devon Booker football Rams Dodgers NFL California Anthony Davis Red Sox Boston astros Harris Kevin Durant Bill James Seahawks Westlake Milwaukee
Gordon Hayward of Boston Celtics booed heavily by Utah Jazz fans in homecoming

Dari and Mel

02:21 min | 2 years ago

Gordon Hayward of Boston Celtics booed heavily by Utah Jazz fans in homecoming

"That about any player who really has ever played the sport before. So LeBron is certainly not replaceable. But are baseball players. This was a funny story of me. I don't know if you guys saw this Bill James who

Lebron Bill James Baseball
"bill james" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

13:07 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"We're talking about the man from the train discovering America's most elusive serial killer Bill James is the author, and it's a it's just a terrific very good writer, and and yet, you know, until Bill there was not a lot of his not the sun a name that anybody would have mentioned is being the most prolific serial killer in America. And as you say, we don't know yet, or maybe we can never know the numbers actual numbers. It's fair to say that he was the most elusive in the way in which he operated because he was able to get away for so many years just as his vocation was itinerant logger. But his avocation was definitely somebody who would came to a town with the intent to murder and got away with it for years because really who thinks that there's people out there that do that. I mean, just like even today, we don't think about this people just driving around going up. It's tuesday. I'm really in the mood for a murder. But there are two Mike in Roswell New Mexico by coincidence where I'll be driving through in a couple of weeks. I've got a couple of questions the first one I need you to answer for me. Have you ever seen any evidence macrame seen like one of the actress? Yeah. What any of the actual evidence from any of these crime scenes, the I wouldn't say so I have held held in my hand the axe with which the Velasco murders were committed the it. It's still it's still around and and has been definitively tied to the to the murder scene. The, but I wouldn't say I have evidence now. All right. Do you know where this poem is buried by any chance? No, we don't it disappeared. It was never caught my belief is that he probably went back to Europe. And my guess would be that. He he went back to Europe and continued to murder people. But that is speculation. And we do not know that for sure. Okay. Well, that's all I had to take it out. You pretty much got it all figured out figured he might have worked for the railroad. He got to every place that he did. And maybe Sundays night where layover nights or something like that. But thank you for being on. I appreciate your story. Thank you, Mike. Appreciate that. Actually. That's a really good question though about what was the connection to Sunday's. Why we're why were most of these murderers on a Sunday? What what out in a modern criminal investigation, if a criminal commits the murders on weekends? This is taken to be assigned that he's employed. A and this happens a lot actually up. There are quite a few serial murderers who will walk commit their murderers on weekends the. Because they they work during the week. And then, you know, they have jobs to go to the Miller probably did it on Sunday nights because he would spend the weekend working himself into the perhaps stalking victims. Although I don't I don't know that he's a lot of stocking. But the just working himself into the frame of mind that he could get where he needs to be. The. Do we we do you think he was just kind of tramping it as you know? And and riding the rails. Or was do you think he was paying cash money for a ticket to get on these trains all over the country? No, he was he was just wouldn't have paid cash money for a ticket because he would have been seen. And and and he came into town made no contact with anyone spoke to no one and disappear that was part of his criminal genius, the the, but so he his first crime in the unplanned crime in eighteen ninety eight he did buy a ticket to leave the town. And this this led to a trail forming behind him and police followed his where he had gone onto trains for quite a while the later, he was just it was just that's why you used to railroad. He always always used at the intersection of two railroads. So that would have train came. Bye. He could just hop on. And he wouldn't be caught waiting to hill road year less chance a year. You'll be you'll be stranded waiting for a train to come. Yeah. That's interesting. No, that's an interesting point. Then by the way, when I told you about the the people that were murdered next to the railroad line in the town where I grew up. They that was the short the shoreline. It was the the train no longer existed after like thirty years or so, but it used to be the major commuter railroad between Milwaukee and Chicago, I think or maybe even went further up north up to Green Bay or something. You had a point the other question was raised in there up until one thousand nine hundred eight or thereabouts. He settled in an area for a period of time and committed crimes near that area. After nineteen eighty started just morally more or less tramping. He became a nineteen nineteen oh eight to nineteen Kennedy transition to just running loose crossed the country. What an interesting thing is that he never stole money at one of the ways, you know, what Tim is this line will appear in the newspaper story about it. Money and other valuables were found in the room that and that happens all the time that that that he does not steal anything from the crime scene. Yeah. That definitely is was. There's the accusation about the first crime that that guy little was accused of than it was a robbery and and yet at the same time. Let me ask you about the axe. So the why do you think he would leave the this the murder weapon at the scene? I understand like in the godfather, right? When you wrap the handle and drop the gun because there's no fingerprints for them to find or whatever. But it would seem like even then that would it would be some evidence to to look for somebody. If they're if they leave the axe behind well up. Fingerprints exploded in the understanding of the American public in nineteen hundred four nine five in his first grinds. He just dropped the and left his buddy fingerprints on the on the axe. Mud once people became aware of the fact that fingerprints. Then he would watch the handle the axe in a bucket of water before leaving Santa crowd. He did that blessed every everywhere after the second half of his of his career the which proves that. He was connected to what was going. I probably read newspapers knew what was going on in the world the, but he he just dropped the axe because it would have been awkward to take it with him while he was fleeing. If he once he was out of the house he was. Connected to the murders. But he was carrying an accident. That would have connected him to the murders. Well, okay. So let me just make an argument for that. That that still seems odd to me because you could actually say, I'm a logger. That's why I carry my ads with me, right? I mean, if there's any occupation where somebody could walk out with an axe. It would be either like firefighter or logger the only two that you can have. Did he work as a matter? But but even there I think he didn't add the axes that he used were they lumbering type of axes. Mostly. Like an axe that was found in a woodpile. Almost all of the house. Murderers were. Were houses burnt wood. Cole. But he either wood or coal use an axe to split the wood or break up the coal. We've right. He would he would use the coal act. So would axe whatever you found outside the building. Now that answers actually to my previous question about dropping the ax. I wasn't so much thinking in terms of fingerprint evidence, I was thinking that could lead somebody to find out where he had purchased the acts, but you're saying in every home he picked up the axe from the nearby woodpile and use that so whatever type of acts they had it in the house. That's the one he left behind which is another point about nineteen ten and nineteen ten. It was very common for people to have an axe. Mile outside their house. Is why I connect to the story. I grew up in a small town in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties that we have an accident woodpile outside her house. And I I shopped a lot of Woodward to burn out. My dad tells a similar story about that. He and his brothers. You know, they would have to fight over who is going to be chopping the wood. And and when we were growing up we had an axe around the house. I think we we did a lotta wood shopping. But for some reason, my dad was attached to it. Right. So let me bring in Paxton who's in Chicago on the first time caller line for Bill James author of demand from the train. Very interesting. Paxton guys fascinating. I'm a English teacher. And naturally, I lean pretty heavily on code this time of year. And I I wanted to ask your guest Bill feet. She noticed any no year any parallels between hose vision, you wrote about an essay that murderer always has a guilty conscience really tries to get caught in some of the more famous stories like the black cat. Well, radically berries an accident. His wife's head, right? That's the way he described it. And and when the police come he he's not going to be caught. So, you know, he he had the cat up into the wall. And you know, we tried to get him into the basement and said, look how solid the, but he always tried to give him away the by the way while doing research on a crime book. I I happen to find a a story in a Paris newspaper in eighteen forty six. Which is apparently the original story from which the cast of Amato's is they? The plo. Also, of course, was that was a avid reader crime stories as I'm sure, you know, be a anyway, the answer is no I it. He absolutely was not trying to get caught. In fact, he many many many serial murderers are sort of playing games with the police, and sometimes they want you to know who did it. But they just don't wanna be don't why convicted of it. But that's one thing that's quite unusual about this man is that he had a very unusual aversion to being hot. He he wasn't. He wasn't the absolutely was not trying to get caught. And he was taking very intelligent and very well thought out evasive action not ever to be caught one reason he never took anything from a crime scene. Even you know, if there's one hundred dollars sitting on a shelf there, you wouldn't take it because he knew very well that if he was caught fleeing a crime scene fleeing. The same with something that could be tied to that scene. He a lot of people were executed for that. The no he was he was very the quite unusual extent. A an aversion to being caught. Serious restraint right there. I think for a guy who didn't have any money that that show some discipline. Thank you Paxton. Let's go to Marie who's an Athens, Georgia coast to coast for Bill James Marie. Hi anne. Well, I was calling because I was kinda curious first of all heard you guys talking about the accent? My my brother, and I we were investigating a murder happened after the civil war our family, and he was my great grandfather was he was killed with an axe. And the I think that his wife, and maybe fans did that ended up being a brother-in-law that was convicted of it, and he was left out. And I feel as I guess they hope that some field workers would be blamed for it. But anyway until we were investigating that. And then my better was murdered a year ago, and then his son is in jail for killing a guy about two years ago right now. So there's not a lot of around. But..

murder Bill James Paxton Mike Europe Velasco Bill Roswell Bill James Marie America Chicago Mexico writer plo Miller robbery Kennedy Tim
"bill james" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

13:06 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"From the train discovering America's most elusive serial killer Bill James is the author, and it's it's just a terrific very good writer, and and yet, you know, until Bill there was not a lot. I mean, he is not a name that anybody would have mentioned is being the most prolific serial killer in America. And as you say, we don't know yet, or maybe we can never know the numbers actual numbers. It's fair to say that he was the most allusive in the way in which he operated because he was able to get away for so many years just as his vocation was itinerant logger. But his avocation was definitely somebody who came to a town with the intent to murder and got away with it for years because really who thinks that there's people out there that do that. You know? I mean, just like even today, we don't think about this people just driving around going up. It's tuesday. I'm really in the mood for a murder. But but there are get to Mike in Roswell New Mexico by coincidence where I'll be driving through in a couple of weeks. I've got a couple of questions the first one I need you to answer for me. Have you ever seen any evidence from the crime scene like one of the act? Yeah. I received what any of the actual evidence from any of these crime scenes, the I wouldn't say so I have held held in my hand the axe with which the Alaska murders were committed. The it's it's still it's still around and has been definitively tied to the to the murder scene. The, but I wouldn't say I have physical evidence now. All right. Do you know where this poem Miller is buried by any chance? No, we don't he disappeared. He was never caught my belief is that he probably went back to Europe. And my guess would be that. He he went back to Europe and continued to murder people. But that is speculation. And we do not know that for sure. Okay. Well, that's all I had to stick it out pretty much. Got it all figured out. I figured he might have worked for the world road to every place that he did. And maybe Sundays night layover nights or something like that. But thank you for minimum. Aaron I appreciate your story. Thank you, Mike. Appreciate that. Hey, actually, that's a really good question though about what was the connection to Sunday's? Why we're why were most of these murders on a Sunday where what out in a modern criminal investigation, if a criminal commits the murders on weekends? This is taken to be a sign that he's employed. And this happens a lot actually there are quite a few serial murderers who will commit the murders on weekends the. Because they they work during the week. And then they have jobs to go to the Miller probably did it on Sunday nights because he would spend the weekend working himself into the perhaps stalking has victims. Although I don't I don't know that he's a lot of stocking. But the just working himself into the frame of mind that he could get where he needed to be. The. Do you think he was just kind of tramping it as you know, and riding the rails? Or was do you think he was paying cash money for a ticket to get on these trains all over the country? No, he was he was just wouldn't have paid cash money for a ticket because he would have been seen. And and and he came into town made no contact with anyone spoke to no one, and that was part of his criminal genius, the the, but so he his first crime in the unplanned crime in eighteen ninety eight he did buy a ticket to leave the town. And this this led to a trail forming behind him and police followed his where he had gone onto trains for quite a while the later he was just it was just as why he used to railroad. He always used at the intersection of two railroads so trained came. By the middle of the night. He could just hop on. And he wouldn't be caught waiting, and if you have to hill road year less chance to year, you'll be you'll be stranded waiting for trying to come through. No, that's an interesting point. Then by the way, when I told you about the the people that were murdered next to the railroad line in the town where I grew up. The that was the shore the shoreline it was the train no longer existed. After like thirty years. So, but it used to be the major commuter railroad between Milwaukee and Chicago, I think or maybe even went further up north up to two like Green Bay or something. The other point the question that was raised in there up until nineteen o eight or thereabouts. He settled in an area for a period of time and committed crimes near that area. After nineteen hundred eighty started just morally more or less tramping became a nineteen ninety eight to nineteen candidate transition to just running loose crossed the country. What an interesting thing is that he never stole money. One of the ways, you know, it's him is that lie. This line will appear in the newspaper story about it. Money and other valuables were found in the room that and that happens all the time that that that he does not steal anything from the crime scene. Yeah. That definitely is was. You know, there's the accusation about the first crime that that guy little was accused of that it was a robbery, and and yet, you know. At the same time. Let me ask you about the axe. So the why do you think he would leave the this the murder weapon at the scene? I understand like in the godfather, right? When you wrap the handle and drop the gun because there's no fingerprints for them to find or whatever. But it would seem like even then that would it would be some evidence to to look for somebody. If they're if they leave the axe behind well up. Fingerprints exploded in the understanding of the American public in nineteen four nine five in his first crimes. He just dropped the accent left. His buddy fingerprints on the on the axe mud. Once people became aware of the fact that fingerprints then he would wash the handle the axe in a bucket of water before leaving. He did and blessed every everywhere after the second half of his of his career the so which proves that. He was connected to what was going. I probably read newspapers and knew what was going on in the world. But he just dropped the axe because it would have been awkward to take it with him while he was fleeing if he wants he was out of the house he was. I'm connected to the murders. But if he was carrying an accident that would have connected him to the murders. Well, okay. So let me just make an argument for that. That that still seems odd to me because you could actually say, I'm a logger. That's why I carry my axe with me, right? If there's any occupation where somebody could walk out with an axe. It would be either like firefighter or logger the only two that you can have. OJT work is a matter. But but even there. I think he didn't add the axes that he used were. They lumbering type of axes. Mostly. Like an axe. There was found in a woodpile. Almost all of the house. Orders were. Were houses burnt wood. Cole either wood or coal use an axe to split the wood or break up the coal. We've right. He would use the coal act. So would axe whatever you found outside the building. We'll see now that answers actually to my previous question about dropping the ax. I wasn't so much thinking in terms of fingerprint evidence, I was thinking that could lead somebody to find out where he had purchased the acts, but you're saying in every home he picked up the axe from the nearby woodpile and use that so whatever type of acts they had it in the house. That's the one he left behind which is another point about nineteen ten and nineteen ten. It was very common for people to have an axe. Oh, yeah. Outside their house. This is why I connect to the story. I grew up in a small town in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties that we have an accident woodpile outside our house. And I I shopped a lot of Woodward. Burning out. My dad tells a similar story about that. He and his brothers. You know, they would have to fight over who is going to be chop the wood. And and when we were growing up we had an axe around the house. I don't think we we did a lot of wood shopping. But for some reason, my dad was attached to it. All right. So let me bring in Paxton who's in Chicago on the first time caller line for Bill James, author of the man from the train, very interesting. Paxton guys fascinating. I'm a English teacher. And naturally, I lean pretty heavily on co this time of the year. And I I wanted to ask your guest Bill. She noticed any any parallels between hose a vision, you wrote about an essays that the murderer always has a guilty conscience and really tries to get caught in some of the more famous stories like the black cat ironically, berries, an accident. His wife's head, right? That's the way he described it. And when the police come he he's not going to be caught. So, you know, he he had well the cat up to the wall. And we tried to get him into the basement. Instead of look how solid but you always tried to give him so away. The by the way, while doing research on the crime book, I happened to find a a story in a Paris newspaper in eighteen forty six. Which is apparently the original story for much Casca vermoti Amato's is based. The poll. Also, of course, was it was a avid reader crime stories as I'm sure, you know, the anyway, the answer is no I it. He absolutely was not trying to get caught. In fact, he many many many serial murderers are sort of playing games with the police, and sometimes they want you to know who did it. But they just don't want to be don't be convicted of it. But that's one thing that's quite unusual about this man is that he had a very unusual aversion to being hot. He he wasn't. He wasn't the absolutely was not trying to get caught. And he was taking very intelligent and very well thought out evasive action not ever to be caught one reason he never took anything from a crime scene. Even you know, if there's one hundred dollars sitting on the shelf, there wouldn't take it because he knew very well that if he was caught fleeing a crime scene. The same with something that could be tied to that scene. He a lot of people were executed for that. The no he was he was very the. Quite unusual extent. An anniversary into being caught. Some serious restraint right there. I think for a guy who didn't have any money that that shows some discipline. Thank you Paxton. Let's go to Marie who's an Athens Georgia on coast to coast for Bill James Murray. Hi anne. Well, I was calling because I I was kinda curious first of all you got out talking about the acts, and my my brother, and I we were investigating a murder happened after the civil war in our family. And he was my great. How were made that was he was killed with an axe? And the I think that his wife, and maybe a fan did that ended up being a brother-in-law that was convicted of it. And he was out, and I feel I guess they hope that some field workers would be blamed for it. But anyway until we were investigating that. And then my brother was murdered a year again. And then his son is in jail for killing a guy about two years ago right now. So there's not a lot of it around. But..

murder Bill James Paxton Mike Miller Alaska America Europe Bill Roswell Chicago Mexico writer Aaron Bill James Murray robbery Casca vermoti Amato anne
"bill james" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

13:07 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"We're talking about the man from the train discovering America's most elusive serial killer Bill James is the author, and it's a it's just a terrific very good writer, and and yet, you know. Until bill. There was not a lot. I mean, he is not a name that anybody would have mentioned is being the most prolific serial killer in America. And as you say, we don't know yet. Or maybe we can never know the numbers factual numbers. It's fair to say that he was the most delusive in the way in which he operated because he was able to get away for so many years just as his vocation was logger. But his avocation was definitely somebody who would came to a town with the intent to murder and got away with it for years because really who thinks that there's people out there that do that. I mean, just like even today, we don't think about this people just driving around going up. It's tuesday. I'm really in the mood for murder. But there there are looking to Mike in Roswell New Mexico by coincidence where I'll be driving through in a couple of weeks. I've got a couple of questions the first one I need you to answer for me. Have you ever seen any evidence from the crime scene like the actress? Yeah. What any of the actual evidence from any of these crime scenes, the I wouldn't say so I have held held in my hand the axe with which the Velasco burgers were committed. The it's it's still it's still around and has been definitively tied to the to the murder scene. The. But I wouldn't say I have evidence now. Do you know where this Paul Miller is buried by any chance? No, we don't he disappeared. It was never caught my belief is that he probably went back to Europe. And my guess would be that he went back to Europe and continued to murder people. But that is speculation. And we do not know that for sure. Okay. Well, that's all I had to stick it out. You pretty much got it all figured out figured he might have worked for the road. Replace that he did. And maybe Sundays night layover nights or something like that. But. Thank you for being on air. Appreciate your story. Appreciate that. Actually. That's a really good question though about what was the connection to Sunday's. Why we're why were most of these murders on a Sunday what what are in a modern criminal investigation. If a criminal commits the murders on weekends. This is taken to be a sign that he's employed. A and this happens a lot actually up. There are quite a few serial murderers who will commit the murders on weekends the. Because they they work during the week. And then you know, they have jobs to go to the Miller probably on Sunday nights because he would spend the weekend working himself into the perhaps stalking his victims. Although I don't I don't know that he's a lot of stocking. But the just working himself into the frame of mind that he could get where he needed to be. The. Do we do you think he was just kind of tramping it as and riding the rails? Or was do you think he was paying cash money for a ticket to get on these trains all over the country? No, he was he was just wouldn't have paid cash money for a ticket because he would have been seen. And and and he came into town made no contact with anyone spoke to no one, and that was part of his criminal genius, the the, but so he his first crime in the unplanned crime in eighteen ninety eight he did buy a ticket to leave the town. And this this led to a trail forming behind him and police followed his where he had gone onto trains for quite a while. But later, he was just it was just that's why he used to do you always always used at the intersection of two railroads train came. By the middle of the night. He could just hop on. And he wouldn't be caught waiting to L roads year less chance a year. You'll be you'll be stranded waiting for a train to come. No, that's an interesting point. Then by the way, when I told you about the the people that were murdered next to the railroad line in the town where I grew up the that was the short the shoreline. It was the the train no longer existed bad for like thirty years or so, but it used to be the major commuter railroad between Milwaukee and Chicago, I think or maybe even went further up north up to Green Bay or something. The other question that was raised in there up until nineteen eight or thereabouts. He settled in an area for a period of time and committed crimes near that area. After nineteen o eight. He started just morally more or less tramping. It he became a nineteen ninety eight to nineteen Kennedy transition to just running loose cross the country. What an interesting thing is that he never stole money. What are the ways, you know, it's him is that lie? This line will appear in the newspaper story about it. Money and other valuables were found in the room that and that happens all the time that that that he does not steal anything from the crime scene. That definitely is was. The accusation about the first crime that. Guy little was accused of that it was a robbery and and yet at the same time. Let me ask you about the axe. So the why do you think he would leave the this the murder weapon at the scene? I understand like in the godfather, right? When you wrap the handle and drop the gun because there's no fingerprints for them to find or whatever. But it would seem like even then that it would be some evidence to look for somebody. If they're if they leave the axe behind. Well. Fingerprints exploded in the understanding of the American public in nineteen four ninety five in his first crimes. He just dropped the act and left his money fingerprints on the on the axe mud. Once people became aware of the fact that fingerprints then he would wash the handle the axe in a bucket of water before leaving Santa Clara. He did. And every everywhere after the second half of this of his career, the which proves that. He was connected to what was going. I probably read newspapers knew what was going on in the world the, but he just dropped the axe because it would have been awkward to take it with him while he was fleeing. If he once he was out of the house. He was. I'm connected to the murders. But he was carrying an accident. That would have connected him to the murders. Well, okay. So let me just make an argument for that. That that still seems odd to me because you could actually say, I'm a logger. That's why I carry my ex with me, right? If there's any occupation where somebody could walk out with an axe either like, firefighter or logger, the only two that you're can have. He work as a matter. But but even there I think he did the axes that he used were they lumbering type of axes. Mostly. Like an axe was found in a woodpile. Almost all of the house. Orders were. Were houses burnt wood. Cole. He either wood or coal use an axe to split the wood or break up the coal. We've right. He would use the coal actually would actually whatever you found outside the building. We'll see now that answers actually to my previous question about dropping the ax. I wasn't so much thinking in terms of fingerprint evidence, I was thinking that could lead somebody to find out where he purchased the acts, but you're saying in every home he picked up the axe from the nearby woodpile and use that so whatever type of acts they had it in the house. That's the one he left behind which is another point about nineteen ten and nineteen ten. It was very common for people have an act outside their house. Oh, yeah. It's why I connect to the story. I grew up in a small town in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties is that what we have an accident football outside our house. And I I shopped a lot of woodland. To burning out. My dad tells a similar story about that. He and his brothers. You know, they would have to fight over who is going to be chop the wood. And when we were growing up we had an axe around the house, we we did a lot of wood shopping. But for some reason, my dad was attached to it. All right. So let me bring in Paxton who's in Chicago on the first time caller line for Bill James, author of the man from the train, very interesting. Paxton guys fascinating. English teacher, and naturally I lean pretty heavily on co this time of year. And I wanted to ask your guest Bill. She noticed any. No year any parallels between hose of vision, he wrote her father nets as that murderer always has a guilty conscience and really tries to get caught in some of the more famous stories like the black cat. Radically berries, an accident. His wife's head, right? That's the way he describes it. And and when the police come he he's not going to be caught. So you know, he he had the cat up. Into the wall. And you know, we tried to get brought him into the basement and look how solid Wallace, but he always tried to give him a whole way by the way while doing research at a crime book, I happened to find a a story in a Paris newspaper in eighteen forty six. Which is apparently the original story for my check ask of Amato's is based. The poll. Also, of course, was that was a avid reader crime stories as I'm sure, you know, the anyway, the answer is no I he absolutely was not trying to get caught. In fact, he many many many serial murderers are sort of playing games with the police, and sometimes they want you to know who did it. But they just don't want to be don't why be convicted of it. But that's one thing that's quite unusual about this man is that he had a very unusual aversion to being hot. He didn't. He wasn't. He wasn't the absolutely was not trying to get caught. And he was taking very intelligent and very well thought out evasive action not ever to be caught one reason he never took anything from a crime scene. Even you know, if there's one hundred dollars sitting on a shelf there, you wouldn't take it because he knew very well that if he was caught fleeing a crime scene playing. The same with something that could be tied to that seen. He's a lot of people were executed for that. The no he was he was very the quite unusual extent. A an anniversary into being caught. Serious restraint right there. I think for a guy who didn't have any money that shows some discipline. Thank you Paxton. Let's go to Marie who's an Athens Georgia coast to coast for Bill James Murray. Hi. Well, I was calling because I was kinda curious first of all you got out talking about the acts, and my my brother, and I we were investigating a murder happened after the civil war and our family, and he was my great our me that was he was killed with an axe. And the I think that his wife, and maybe a sense did that ended up being a brother-in-law that was convicted of it, and he was left out. And I guess they hope that some field workers would be blamed for it. But anyway, and so we were investigating that. And then by better was murdered a year ago, and then his son is in jail for killing a guy about two years ago right now. So it's just there's not a lot of it around..

murder Bill James Paxton Paul Miller America Europe Velasco Roswell Chicago writer Mike Mexico Bill James Murray robbery Kennedy Santa Clara stalking
"bill james" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

13:07 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We're talking about the man from the train discovering America's most elusive serial killer Bill James is the author, and it's a it's just a terrific great, very good writer, and and yet, you know, until Bill there was not a lot of his not the sun a name that anybody would have mentioned is being the most prolific serial killer in America. And as you say, we don't know yet, or maybe we can never know the numbers actual numbers. It's fair to say that he was the most allusive in the way in which he operated because he was able to get away for so many years just as his vocation was itinerant logger. But his avocation was definitely somebody who came to a town with the intent to murder and got away with it for years because really who thinks that there's people out there that do that. I mean, just like even today, we don't think about this people just driving around going up. It's tuesday. I'm really in the mood for murder. But there there are two Mike in Roswell New Mexico by coincidence where I'll be driving through in a couple of weeks. I've got a couple of questions the first one I need you to answer for me. Have you ever seen any evidence from a crime scene like the actress? Yeah. What any of the actual evidence from any of these crime scenes, the I wouldn't say so I have held held in my hand the axe with which the Alaska murders were committed. The it's it's still it's still around and has been definitively tied to the to the murder scene. The, but I wouldn't say I have physical evidence. Now, do you know where this Paul Miller was buried by any chance? No, we don't he disappeared. Was. It was never caught my belief is that he probably went back to Europe. And my guess would be that. He he went back to Europe and continued to murder people. But that is speculation. And we do not know that for sure. Okay. Well, that's all I had pick it out you pretty much got it all figured out figured he might have worked for the world road. Got to every place that he did. And maybe Sunday's where lay overnight or something like that. But thank you for being on the air. I appreciate your story. Thank you, Mike. Appreciate that. Actually. That's a really good question though about what was the connection to Sunday's. Why we're why we're most of these murders on a Sunday. What what out in a modern criminal investigation. If a criminal commits the murders on weekends. This is taken to be a sign that he's employed. If a and this happens a lot actually up there, quite a few serial murderers who will commit the murders on weekends the. Because they they work during the week. And then, you know, they have jobs to go to the Miller probably did it on Sunday nights because he would spend the weekend working himself into the perhaps stalking his victims. Although I don't I don't know that he's a lot of stocking. But the just working himself into the frame of mind that he could get where he needed to be. The. Do we we do you think he was just kind of tramping it as you know? And and riding the rails. Or was do you think he was paying cash money for a ticket to get on these trains all over the country? No, he wouldn't have paid cash money for ticket because he would have been seen. And and and he came into town made no contact with anyone spoke to no one, and that was part of his criminal genius, the the, but so he his first crime in the unplanned crime in eighteen ninety eight he did buy a ticket to leave the town. And this this led to a trail forming behind him, and please followed his where he had gone on the trains for quite a while the later he was just it was just as why he used to railroad. He always always use at the intersection of two railroads. So that train came. By the middle of the night. He could just hop on. And he wouldn't be caught waiting to hill road year less chance to year. You'll be you'll be stranded waiting for a train to come to. No. That's an interesting point. Then. By the way, when I told you about the the people that were murdered next to the railroad line in the town where I grew up. They that was the shoe Schorr the shoreline, it was the the train no longer existed after like thirty years or so, but it used to be the major commuter railroad between Milwaukee and Chicago, I think or maybe even went further up north up to Green Bay or something. Had a point the other question that was raised in there up until nineteen o eight or thereabouts. A settled in an area for a period of time and committed crimes near that area. After nineteen eighty started just morally more or less tramping became a nineteen ninety eight to nineteen candidate transition to just running loose crossed the country. What an interesting thing is that he never stole money at one of the ways, you know, what Tim is this line will appear in the newspaper story about it. Money and other valuables were found in the room that and that happens all the time that that he does not steal anything from the crime scene. Yeah. That definitely is was. There's the accusation about the first crime that that that guy little was accused of that it was a robbery, and and yet, you know. At the same time. Let me ask you about the axe. So the why do you think he would leave the this the murder weapon at the scene? I understand like in the godfather, right? When you wrap the handle and drop the gun because there's no fingerprints for them to find or whatever. But it would seem like even then that would it would be some evidence to look for somebody. If they're if they leave the axe behind well up. Fingerprints exploded in the understanding of the American public in nineteen four nine five in his first crimes. He just dropped the acts and left his buddy fingerprints on the on the axe mud. Once people became aware of the fact that fingerprints then he would wash the handle the axe in a bucket of water before leaving the scene of crime. He did and blessed every everywhere the second half of his of his career the which proves that. He was connected to what was going. I probably read newspapers knew what was going on in the world. But he he just dropped the axe because it would have been awkward to take it with him while he was fleeing. If he once he was out of the house he was. Connected to the murders. But if he was carrying an accident that would have connected him to the murders. Well, okay. So let me just make an argument for that. That still seems odd to me because you could actually say I'm a logger. That's why I carry my axe with me, right? If there's any occupation where somebody could walk the next it would be either like, firefighter or logger, the only two that you can have. Oh, work as a minor. But but even there I think he didn't add the axes that he used were they lumbering type of axes. Mostly like an axe was found in a woodpile. Almost all of the house. Orders were. Were houses burnt wood. Cole either wood or coal use an axe to split the wood or break up the coal. We've right. He would use the coal act. What would axe whatever you found outside the building. We'll see now that answers actually to my previous question about dropping the ax. I wasn't so much thinking in terms of fingerprint evidence, I was thinking that could lead somebody to find out where he had purchased the acts, but you're saying in every home he picked up the axe from the nearby woodpile and use that so whatever type of acts they had it in the house. That's the one he left behind which is another point about nineteen ten and nineteen ten. It was very common for people to have an act. Oh, yeah. Outside their house. This is why I connect to the story. I grew up in a small town in the nineteen fifty fifty s and nineteen sixty s we have an accident woodpile outside our house. And I I shopped a lot of Woodward and to burning out my dad tells a similar story about that he and his brothers. You know, they would have to fight over who is going to be chopping the wood. And when we were growing up we had an axe around the house. I think we we did a lot of wood shopping. But for some reason, my dad was attached to it. All right. So let me bring in Paxton who's in Chicago on the first time caller line for Bill James, author of the man from the train, very interesting. Paxton. Guys fascinating. I'm a English teacher. And naturally, I lean pretty heavily on co this time of the year. And I I wanted to ask your guest Bill. She noticed any any parallels between hose a vision, you wrote or Baden essays that the murderer always has a guilty conscience really tries to get caught in some of the more famous stories like the black cat. Well, radically berries an accident. His wife's head, right? That's the way he described it. And when the police come he he's not going to be caught. So, you know, he he had well the cat up into the wall. And we tried to get brought them into the basement. Instead of look how solid the wall was. But he always tried to give him some away. The by the way, while doing research on the crime book, I happened to find a story in a Paris newspaper in eighteen forty six. Which is apparently the original story for much of Amato's is based the po-. Also, of course, was that was a avid reader crimes choices as I'm sure, you know, the anyway, the answer is no I it. He absolutely was not trying to get caught. In fact, he many many many serial murderers are sort of playing games with the police, and sometimes they want you to know who did it. But they just don't want to be don't why be convicted of it. But that's one thing that's quite unusual about this man is that he had a very unusual aversion to being hot. He he wasn't. He wasn't the absolutely what's not trying to get caught. And he was taking very intelligent and very well thought out evasive action not ever to be caught one reason he never took anything from a crime scene. Even if there's one hundred dollars sitting on a shelf there. He wouldn't take it because he knew very well that if he was caught fleeing a crime scene fleeing a scene with something that could be tied to that scene. He's a lot of people were executed for that the so no he was he was very the. Quite unusual extent a anniversary into being caught. Serious restraint right there. I think for a guy who didn't have any money that that shows some discipline. Thank you Paxton. Let's go to Marie who's an Athens Georgia coast to coast for Bill James Murray. Hi anne. Well, I was calling because I I was kinda curious first of all heard you guys talking about the acts, and my my brother, and I we were investigating a murder happened after the civil war and our family, and he was my great. How were made that ran father was he was killed with an axe. And then I think that his wife, and maybe a son did that ended up being a brother-in-law that was convicted of it. And he was rushed out. I guess they hope that some field workers would be blamed for. But anyway until we were investigating that. And then my brother was murdered a year ago, and then his son is in jail for killing God about two years ago right now. So if there's not a lot of it around, but..

murder Bill James Paul Miller Paxton Mike Alaska Europe Bill Roswell America Chicago Mexico writer Bill James Murray robbery Tim anne stalking Schorr
"bill james" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:07 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"We're talking about the man from the train discovering America's most elusive serial killer. Bill James is the author, and it's it's just a terrific very good writer and and yet. Until bill. There was not a lot. He his not. There's not a name that anybody would have mentioned is being the most prolific serial killer in America. And as you say, we don't know yet. Or maybe we can never know the numbers actual numbers. It's fair to say that he was the most allusive in the way in which he operated because he was able to get away for so many years just as it his vocation was itinerant logger. But his avocation was definitely somebody who would came to a town with the intent to murder and got away with it for yourself. Because really who thinks that there's people out there that do that. I mean, just like even today, we don't think about this. We will just driving around going up. It's tuesday. I'm really in the mood for murder. But there are two Mike in Roswell New Mexico by coincidence where I'll be driving through in a couple of weeks. I've got a couple of questions the first one I need you to answer for me. Have you ever seen any evidence from a crime scene like the actress? What any of the actual evidence from any of these crime scenes, the I wouldn't say so I have held held in my hand the axe with which the Velasco murders were committed the it's it's still it's still around and has been definitively tied to the to the murder scene. The. But I wouldn't say I have physical evidence now. All right. Do you know where this poem buried by any chance? No, we don't he disappeared. He was it was never caught my belief is that he probably went back to Europe. And my guess would be that. He he went back to Europe and continued to murder people. But that is speculation. And we do not know that for sure. Okay. Well, that's all I have to take it out. You're pretty much figured out. I figured he might have worked for the road to replace that he did. And maybe Sundays night where they lay overnight or something like that. But thank you for being on the airline. Appreciate destroy. Thank you, Mike. Appreciate that. Actually. That's a really good question about what was the connection to Sunday's? Why we're why were most of these murders on a Sunday? What what out in a modern criminal investigation. If a criminal commits the murders on weekends. This is taken to be a sign that he's employed. A and this happens a lot actually there are quite a few serial murderers who will commit the murders on weekends the. Because they they work during the week. And you know, they have jobs to go to the Miller probably did it on Sunday nights because he would spend the weekend working himself into the perhaps stalking his victims. Although I don't I don't know that he's a lot of stocking. But the just working himself into the frame of mind that he could get where he needed to be. The. We do you think he was just kind of tramping it as you know. And and riding the rails. Or was do you think he was paying cash money for a ticket to get on these trains all over the country? Now, he was he was just wouldn't have paid cash money for a ticket because he would have been seen. And and and he came into town made no contact with anyone spoke to no one, and this fear that was part of his criminal genius, the the, but so he his first crime in unplanned crime in eighteen ninety eight he did buy a ticket to leave the town. And this this led to a trail forming behind him and police followed his where he had gone onto trains for quite a while the later, he was just it was just that's why he used to railroad. He always always used at the intersection of two railroads so train came. By the middle of the night. He could just hop on. And he wouldn't be caught waiting to hill road year less chance a year. You'll be you'll be stranded waiting for trying to come soon. Yeah. That's interesting. No, that's interesting point. Then by the way, when I told you about the the people that were murdered next to the railroad line in the town where I grew up. They that was the shoe short the shoreline. It was the the train no longer existed after like thirty years or so, but it used to be the major commuter railroad between Milwaukee and Chicago, I think or maybe even went further up north up to two like Green Bay or something. The other point you had a question that was raised in there up until nineteen hundred eight or thereabouts. He settled in an area for a period of time and committed crimes near that area. After nineteen eighty started just morally more or less tramping. It became a nineteen ninety eight to nineteen candidate transition to just running loose crossed the country. What an interesting thing is that he never stole money. One of the ways, you know, it's him is this line will appear in the newspaper story about it. Money and other valuables were found in the room that and that happens all the time that that that he does not steal anything from the crime scene. Yeah. That definitely is was. There's an accusation about the first crime that little was accused of that it was a robbery and yet at the same time. Let me ask you about the axe. So the why do you think he would leave the this the murder weapon at the scene? I understand like in the godfather, right? When you wrap the handle and drop the gun because there's no fingerprints for them to find or whatever. But it would seem like even then that would would be some evidence to look for somebody. If they're if they leave the axe behind well. Fingerprints exploded in the understanding of the American public in nineteen point four nine five in his first crimes. He just dropped the accent left. His money fingerprints on the on the axe. Mud once people became aware of the fact that fingerprints. Then he would watch the handle the axe in a bucket of water before leaving the scene of crime. He did and blessed every everywhere after the second half of his of his career the which proves that. He was connected to what was going on probably read newspapers and knew what was going on in the world the, but he he just dropped the axe because it would have been awkward to take it with him while he was fleeing if he wants he was out of the house he was. I'm connected to the murders. But if he was carrying an accident that would have connected him to the murders. Well, okay. So let me just make an argument for that. That still seems odd to me because you could actually say I'm a logger. That's why I carry with me, right? If there's any occupation where somebody could walk the next it would be either like, firefighter or logger, the only two that you can have. Oh, work is a matter. But but even there I think he didn't and the axes that he used were they lumbering type of axes. Mostly. Like an axe was found in a woodpile. Almost all of the house. Voters were. Were houses burnt wood. Cole either wood or coal use an axe to split the wood or break up the coal. We've right. He would use the coal Aksoy. The would axe whatever you found outside the building. We'll see now that answer is actually to my previous question about dropping the ax. I wasn't so much thinking in terms of fingerprint evidence, I was thinking that could lead somebody to find out where he purchased the acts, but you're saying in every home he picked up the axe from the nearby woodpile and use that so whatever type of acts they had it in the house. That's the one he left behind which is another point about nineteen ten or nineteen ten. It was very common for people to have an axe. Outside their house. It's why I connect to the story. I grew up in a small town in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties and that we have an accident with bile outside our house. And I I shopped a lot of Woodward and. Burn out. My dad tells a similar story about that. He and his brothers. You know, they would have to fight over who is going to be chop the wood. And and when we were growing up we had an axe around the house. I think we we did a lot of wood shopping. But for some reason, my dad was attached to it. All right. So let me bring in Paxton who's in Chicago on the first time caller line for Bill James, author of the man from the train, very interesting. Paxton guys fascinating. I'm a English teacher. And naturally, I lean pretty heavily on code this time of the year. And I wanted to ask your guest Bill. She noticed any know any parallels between hose a vision you wrote about in essays. That murderer always has a guilty conscience really tries to you. Get caught in some of the more famous stories like the black cat. Ironically, berries, an accident his wife's head, right? That's the way he described it. And when the police come he he's not going to be caught. So, you know, he he had the cat up into the wall. And you know, we tried to get brought him into the basement. Instead, look how solid law, but he always tried to give him some away the might away while doing research at a crime book. I I happen to find a story in a Paris newspaper in eighteen forty six. Which is apparently the original story for much Casca, the Ahmadi Amato's is they? The poll. Also, of course, was it was a avid reader crime choices as I'm sure, you know, the anyway, I the answer is no I it. He absolutely was not trying to get caught. In fact, he many many many serial murderers are sort of playing games with the police, and sometimes they want you to know who did it. But they just don't want to be don't why be convicted of it. But that's one thing that's quite unusual about this man is that he had a very unusual aversion to being hot. He he wasn't. He wasn't the absolutely was not trying to get caught. And he was taking very intelligent and very well thought out evasive action not ever be caught one reason he never took anything from a crime scene. Even you know, if there's one hundred dollars sitting on a shelf there, you wouldn't take it because he knew very well that if he was caught fleeing a crime scene. Playing a scene with something that could be tied to that scene. He's a lot of people were executed for that. The no he was he was very the quite unusual extent. Hey an anniversary into being caught. Serious restraint right there. I think for a guy who didn't have any money that that show some discipline. Thank you Paxton. Let's go to Marie who's an Athens. Georgia coast-to-coast for Bill James Murray. Hi. Well, I was calling because I I was kinda curious first of all you guys talking about the action. My my brother, and I we were investigating a murder happened after the civil war our family, and he was my great. How were made that was he was killed with an axe? And the I think that his wife, and maybe a son did that ended up being a brother-in-law that was convicted of it, and he was left out. And I feel that I guess they hope that some field workers would be blamed for it. But anyway, so we were investigating that. And then. My brother was murdered a year ago. And then his son is in jail for Carolina guy about two years ago right now. So it's just there's a lot of it around..

murder Bill James Paxton Mike America Europe Roswell writer Chicago Mexico Bill James Murray Velasco Miller Marie Carolina stalking Georgia little Ahmadi Amato
"bill james" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"So we're talking with the Bill James the co author of the man from the train to spring, America's most allusive serial killer. I was playing that song sympathy for the devil. Not for this killer or the one from dismissing. But just because there's a lot of devils that are running around these days including Sundell's getting a big win today. Kind of fun. So the we were just hated the interrupt because you were doing such a great job with the explanation about the similarities between the cases. And I think you were coming up to the end. But I I had to cut you off because we had the heartbreak at the bottom of the hour. To me because I was gonna run out of things to say, but I was able to find. Thirty four of them. Arthur. Thirty four of them, Arthur or something. The the the crimes normally occurred on Sunday nights. I use Kurt on the weekends up until nineteen ten the crimes almost all occurred in areas in which the primary industry was bogging. Her one of the primary industries, logging the doors, doors and windows lot jab shot. I think I mentioned that the there's there are clear geographic patterns in the murderers. If one occurs just south of Portland, the next occurs just north of Portland. So that that would be a link between the. One thing that is odd is that he would would take a lap from inside the house turn the way down low. So you just gave out a little bit of light Hake. The chimney off the lap and set it on the floor usually under a table. And then carry the lamp around with him as he committed the murders. And the other thing is that he would put pull the blankets over the head of a sleeping person a half second before you ate the minute head with an axe. How you did that a lot, and they probably did that to keep the blood from flying back and hitting him hitting him as he was birdieing. Someone the quite a detailed pattern of behavior. Yeah. Very interesting. And so this is starting in the in the late nineteenth century and going to the early twentieth century following along logging lines that actually would be consistent with where this murder happened. It's not that the town that I grew up in as a logging town, but it was in between logging towns, and if you just go north up into Wisconsin where that line started. That was plenty of logging was going on in in Wisconsin. It was it was a state for that matter. Michigan just around the other side of Chicago. So very likely could have could have followed that another thing. I forgot to mention that all in warm weather with one one possible exception. There's one crime that he that he may have his first crime, which was just an outburst of anger and not a planned event. Probably that occurred in cold weather, but he had to flee through cold weather, and after that, he never murdered anybody cold weather. It's always warm weather. We're talking about. America's most allusive serial killer at ninety would he be America's most prolific serial killer. Or is there anybody else who's contending for that? Dubious. Crown? Yeah. You probably might be. But I had this discussion with my with my publisher, which I would have which was that. They were going to watch say was the worst serial murderer in American history or the first or something. Murderer is by its nature done in secret. The that in fact that is that is one of the earliest definitions of the word murderer is killing gun in secret. The because it has done in in secret the facts about it are never fully known and are not normally are fully exposed. And you get a lot of different people who claim to be the worst serial murderer in American And this. history. I don't think anyone has a better claim to that disgusting title, then this this But person. nothing But beats the moment I you see. Don I wouldn't want to make it because the reality That's is we your just child's can't document eyes opening up to a all world of the crimes of possibilities. to be attributed I to didn't know it could do that. really anybody Because one trip to the any forest it's can fair spark to say a world of difference. that if they were the most There successful are some moments serial killer only the.

Kurt America Sundell murder Portland Arthur Wisconsin Bill James Michigan Don I publisher Chicago
"bill james" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

11:38 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"While they were. Listen, if that's what you wanna do. Now, somebody made the point that Dave Roberts. They were sort of in on it. They put two left these in line. Right. New. Happen is the gamesmanship that's going on right now. Just good. I got no problem with that. Now, what about Janet's out this role in theory remembers on this committee and how to get the game more exciting because it's homerun strike out. Homerun strikeout walk or. Changed pitching change there too. Games. Like, I was falling asleep. Again last is talked about THEO told us that like the ball in play stat has gone up like by a full minute. Like it used to be in a minute forty five between every ball put in place. And it's now over three minutes between when you see and feel a guy who's a purist knows the game needs to make changes. Jed has said I believe with either us you guys cap. It was one of the interviews, and we played it he suggested because of all the pitching changes. Maybe you you make a patriot's day for at least two hitter sweaters. So that way if you come in lefty lefty, he can't just come in for one hitter. I don't like it. You don't like it. You're still there. Be free to what you know, employees, whatever strategy they want, but the parade of relievers makes it hard and I love baseball. And they don't have to worry about me. But I've made this point to your car. The last two nights. I'm falling asleep in bed. It was a four and a half hour game. The median time of games of the nine AL LCS, the the nine LCS games. Excuse me is three hours and fifty two minutes. These are long. You can see to that mound visits. The fires. Let them take their time. Once you get to the postseason. I've seen a lack of urgency in those situations. I think it is enhanced how long these games are going think. But at this point, I don't I mean, I'm not worried about the time. Really? No. I know. I three hour game is tough. We we've been saying three hour and five hundred game. There's not one game in the LCS under three hours in twenty five minutes. One two nights ago four hours fell asleep before the start of the thirteenth any I woke up at. I think it was twenty in the morning and they're still doing post game. That's what I mean. Like. It's not good for baseball. And it was a five and ahead of the game the game. It was five. It was over five hours. You're right. It's just not good for the NBA's funny because it's so fast. It's over and to. Pace. It's exciting scoring in the NFL is up the NFL's ratings are coming back. Everybody's getting over whatever. Their big bugaboo was the last couple of years ratings are up. Things are good. There's a lot of scoring like this is an issue for baseball. You're not gonna get young fans when you've got playoff games ending at eleven thirty or twelve thirty a four and a half hour game is a big commitment in the last two nights here. I'm falling asleep sitting on the couch. Complaining about how slow everything was moving. This baseball Bill James, this is what Bill James tweeted the other day Bill James said since baseball exists only to be enjoyed in. Pro baseball is dependent for its existence. And those who enjoy the fact that many people like the old system of a starters in starter accountability is very relevant to debates about our future. Meaning look we love going to a game and seen Chris sale. Started game. Max Scherzer starting a game. John lesser, Jake Arrieta. Starting a game. If they're gonna go to more specialization now where you're gonna get relievers starting games for only one inning. It's gonna make a baseball less appealing and less popular in a day. When baseball needs more people to enjoy it and to watch it's an interesting point from a thoughtful guy. He's. Right. But there comes to a point where hey, our viability matters. If we're going to start eliminating starters, only only the starters get to start in the rest of it. It's going to be matchup baseball for nine innings, and it's going to be a four hour game because we're continually shuttling guys in and out. That's not good for this whole sit there. I'm just telling you I I mean, and I love the game. But you can't expect people in this day and age to sit around for three and a half five four three hours and forty five minutes for four hours watch game. You can't do it. And I think rob Manfred knows that Yahoo does that's the he's the one who put up the committee that the Ozan connect share ideas with us. But he did share that stat about you have to go over three minutes that a ball is put in place craziness. I know you're just sitting there. What are you guys thinking heard you guys talking about it? I think it was during waddles world yesterday. The. Oh, I thought you were talking about the sex the sex doll to of course. Yeah. No. But. Talons full of air. Talking about the cheating. Yes. I referenced we did this in the first cross talk. What Soviet brought up that guy that memorize the pattern crush impress your lock in. If you if calling cards in Vegas legal they can throw you out, but it's not illegal. You can't get arrested for that. If you've got the mind due to absorb information. Implemented and put it into play. Good for you. Joe Nassir as a bench coach. There was just a master. It's stealing Stein's like more power to you. But there is a line, right? You can't the minute. You start using wiretaps and Benach yours and cell phones and invading computers. Right. Like there is a there's there's a line in the Astros. It sounds like cross that line. I'm surprised that not more was done. For major league baseball the cardinals organizations in the who scout right now, or is it that was a real serious thing. 'cause. Stealing proprietary data shale man that gets into all kinds of federal stuff. I think, but I guess BUSTER tweeted too, many officials around baseball are frustrated and a Paul by the MLB decision on Astro spy gate. I love I went light on them. They believe that. Rob manfred. Threatened in the past the come down hard on violators of electronic surveillance rule. And now with crystal clear evidence of Houston breaking rules. Nothing happens. I I'm surprised that they're allowing that I do you wonder if he'll change his tune because or lessee's just dressing it up to not take away from this series. And behind the scenes, maybe they're gonna do some. That's the only thing I could have because I thought that seemed to just totally discard it, right? I think you get I I don't think you can go back on anything. And I I don't know. I I'm with you. I think they probably tried to to minimize the attention shown to it because of the enormity of the stage right now. But I think he's going to have some angry people in the off season at him. I have a response on Twitter from right said, Fred. Why is he not calling in? I can't believe waddled slowly just gave airtime to the banning efforts put forth by the Australia's. Most popular basement dweller. I'm grateful to Tom Waddell, having my back and shooting it down the red leviathan emerges in Philly tonight. All in caps. Don't think free Cameron. Fred is just a crazy optimistic bulls fan about crazy. I don't mean. He's lost his senses. He's just he's crazy in love with the bulls. Yeah. Some sometimes too much though. Yeah. You can be in too much in love with with a team. I mean, he was on the other day needed separation on. I'm like, wait, Fred I mean, maybe when Carter is good. Carter hope. So when Lauren Lowery, right? I mean is Levin. There's a question this year maller. And I we're having this discussion is Levin. Good approve this year that he's any more than just a volume score. Will he show that you can win games with that? Because of Zach LeVine, he's a really athletic high volume scoring guy. But he's he really guy who's going to help a championship contending, not not a defensive guy terribly say he's gonna you know, he's worked on it. But there's only so much. Chris John you may be able to live with running the point where he could expand his offensive game. I'll give you that. I do like Chris done. I can't shoot. There comes a limit to what you can do. He's in good defender. He's good length. He's he's athletic plays with pace athletic. You're right. He can attack the rim. He's one of the few guys on this team that you can really give the ball to and say create a shot. Gary rose year couldn't shoot thirty two years. And then all of a sudden happened take for six man of the year because I couldn't think of anybody else. I was going to go with your Barry Parker, and you guys laughed at me. So I am feeling shame. I went the other direction. I went with a Celtic Jabari Parker. Isaiah thomas. I'm like, are you crazy? He's done. That's a really kept picked. Isaiah Thomas to be done is area. Yeah. You know, something the rest of us, don't I don't do you know, which team is Thomas. He's a bad team is Denver, isn't he? Yeah. I guess that's a good team. Yeah. Denver's good. I was saying wrong. Hold on. Let me double check. Just getting back into it basketball. Well, that's what I mean. Hips, don't lie, man. I don't want that. Isaiah thomas. I want. The other is Thomas. Don't they do spelt differently? He's on the nuggets nuggets. A lot of people. Is making a statement by putting their patriots hat on outside. Yeah. Somebody's got their patriots hat on patriots right out of play right out of her little valise. She brought that. And then she took it. A very friendly. Sh she she stood in front of the studio. Colder patriots had out of her bag put it on took a selfie of us with the patriots had on. And she has moved on took off put back in the back. Didn't even the now, Justin. At least she could have given us the finger something, you know, like double bird. True true. Waddell spent four years in Boston. They're more into Red Sox though than they are especially this time. Right patriot. I always felt like and again when I was there. The patriots were not right. I mean, it's a different era. Now, it has been for the last what seventeen years, but I always thought it was. I mean, this is an argument. I always felt that it was at Saxo Red Sox Celtics with the Bruins just a behind the Celtics. Bruins are a big deal out there. That's true. But Red Sox is like religion. I mean, this especially now they're on the verge of going to the World Series again like what they really care about. You know, the term I worry about. Her my wife's freshman year. Roommate was yeahs daughter. Wow. So go down in Boca Raton in the summertime and hang out with your skis talk over there. I don't think. So I don't know. I don't think she remember how about that. Dad is Gino cappelletti in her roommate's dad is Carl Yastrzemski pretty crass. And it wasn't done intentionally right? It's pretty wild could have been a big sport been a big sports fan and admissions. Yeah, could've you never know. John..

baseball Isaiah thomas patriots rob Manfred Fred Tom Waddell Chris John Bill James bulls Dave Roberts THEO Jed Janet Max Scherzer Chris sale AL NBA NFL Denver Gino cappelletti
"bill james" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"It's just the way my brain works. She put words in there and they do cool things. You put numbers in there and I can feel the gears grinding to a halt. And so I wonder what it is about either you just the way your brain works or where your parents in any way invested in in. The statistics side of it or the numerical side of sports, or is that just naturally what you grew into from your reading? Well, I wouldn't even. I wouldn't even say that I did that because. And the only reason that I think the the reason that I have the reputation that I have is someone who ended the numbers is because when I started as a professional doing this work, at least with with with an audience where some people actually knew my name, this was ESPN dot com. Back in the mid nineties, I was approximate approximately the only one who is doing that sort of thing. It wasn't. I didn't enjoy the stories as well, because I certainly did. It's just that I saw that this is a, this is somewhere I can make my Mark. I, I love the stories. In fact, I've I've, I've I've said many times that that there were two books that that made me what I am. One was yes, the first Bill, James baseball abstract that I read. But the other was a book by Peter Goldbach called bums. An oral history of the Brooklyn Dodgers and that book is pure stories. And for me, I never preferred one over the other. I grew up reading the stories my my favorite baseball book when I was a kid was called more strange, but true baseball story basically euro numbers in that entire book. It was all these crazy stories about, you know, guys, catching baseball thrown off the top of the Washington Monument, that sort of thing. So, and to this day, I still enjoy a good baseball story as much as anything. It's just that when I started there was this void where really there were lots of people writing the stories and very few people writing about the numbers, at least on the internet. And so that's sort of where where where I, where I directed my energies, but I, I appreciate it. Good story as much as anybody. So you've got to university of Kansas. What did you think you wanted to do or study there? I had no idea. I really didn't. I, I was I should not have been in college. I, I should have taken a gap year or a gap life. I, I don't, but but I had. No business being in college because I really had no particular ambition for whatever reason. I didn't know what I wanted to do. I knew I wanted to take classes in the humanities. I enjoyed political science and an English and history, but what would become of that? I had no idea. And then again, I I, I knew I wanted to be to work for Bill James. Someday I, I discovered this my first week at KU. I walked into the the the college bookstore and was just leafing through the baseball books. And I found this book the Bill, James baseball abstract, and I think that I bought it within two days. I'd finished it and I, you know, I knew if I could do one thing, it would be worked for this guy, but I didn't have the intellectual or emotional maturity to know how one would actually go about doing that. So I just sort of mother, my muddled my way. Through the next four years, didn't earn a degree. Didn't come close just had no ambition or didn't what I wanted to do. And then I just lucked into working actually working with Bill. That's why I'm always very quick to tell people how lucky I was because I had no real qualifications. I had no real skills. I did have a deep passion for baseball and for bills work..

baseball Bill James Peter Goldbach Mark Brooklyn Dodgers ESPN Bill Washington Monument four years two days university of Kansas
"bill james" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"It's a little bit of a percentage base. In addition to what you're paying taxes. So it may you've got to build those kind of things into the equation. Yeah. Well, the reason I said eighty goes the new tax rates you want to keep it under eighty two thousand five hundred eighty well eighty two thousand five hundred is the taxable amount. That's after the deductions either itemized or your standard, and it's also after your additional standard deduction if you're sixty five or older, which you would be if you're talking about Medicare. So basically eighty two five goes up to ninety five ninety six thousand of gross income, which is well over the eighty-five because the the issue with the Medicare tax is based on the adjusted gross income before your deductions. Your taxable income is on your tax is based on the adjusted gross income less deductions, so your taxable income if you want to stay in the twenty two percent bracket you need to have your taxable income standard eighty two five. But if you're at eighty two five taxable income, even at the standard deduction yet another twelve for a standard deduction was at ninety four or five. Sixteen hundred ninety ninety six one of gross income while you're way over the eighty-five number there. So it's you're looking at two different numbers, depending upon what you're trying to avoid if you're trying to avoid the next tax bracket. That's the eighty thousand five taxable income if you're looking to avoid the Medicare Erba income-related monthly adjustment that's eighty five thousand adjusted gross income. So we need them to look which number. We're looking at this thing we're trying to avoid. Hey, james. I gotta take a break. If you have any other questions or wanted to discuss this further hold on. And we can do this on the other side of the break. Some wonderful things to talk about strategy wise, they go along with both James call and with Bill bills. Call call or previous caller will sort of rehash. What Bill James was his friend or coworker brother, the younger co worker. Yes. Yes. What they were talking about as well..

Bill James Medicare twenty two percent
California lawmakers send strict 'net neutrality' laws to governor

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:07 min | 2 years ago

California lawmakers send strict 'net neutrality' laws to governor

"Lawmakers in California are sending news sending new net neutrality rules to governor Jerry Brown's desk for his signature after they passed a Bill yesterday to prevent internet service providers from favoring certain websites over others NPR's James, Dubec reports, advocates. Say they're the strongest net neutrality protections in the country. Democrats Scott Weiner who co, wrote the Bill said net neutrality. Is important for, activists and, small businesses vis Isabelle a level playing field an, internet, where we as individuals against the side where we go on the internet. The measure stops internet providers like Comcast in AT and t. from, blocking slowing, down or speeding up access to certain websites but, the industry called the Bill heavy-handed. Saying the internet needs one national policy instead of state-by-state approaches California Democrats portrayed the legislation As. A rebuke of President Trump earlier this year the FCC repealed. Net neutrality rules imposed under the Obama administration California's governor hasn't said if you'll sign the Bill

Bill James Dubec California Bill NPR Candice Piet Murder Barack Obama BBC Mccain President Trump Chile Michelle Bachelet United States Annapolis Augusta Pena UN Michelle Bachelor Washington Windsor Johnston Commissioner
"bill james" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Many box are just flinches of no consequence at all, except some jackass calls a Bach. And third, the rule is completely incomprehensible is Bill James, right? Should baseball just eliminate the Bach. You know, in an era where you know, generally speaking, the Bach gets called when you're trying to pick a runner off or your dry to hold a runner on base because nobody tries to steal anymore. It doesn't seem like it's stealing. I think movement on the basis should be encouraged. So I wouldn't get rid of the Bach I wanted. I want the Pinot runner too. I went to run or to have more of an advantage than you want the the mock you offer all does. That's why I would do it. I, if you make it easier for runners to get picked off, they're not gonna take as big of leads and they're not gonna run hard. Anybody runs anymore is it is. So, I mean, if if why would why want to eliminate all the stolen bases that we have now? I mean, we don't have that many as it is very few in the block actually would keep people from stealing basis. I can't believe I'm doing this, but I've lost my fast track. You take the next one falls chats is my last one. And you get three in a row. Okay. At thirty seven and eighty eight. The Orioles set a new record this week for earliest playoff contention exit in the divisional era, which started in nineteen sixty nine in basketball. There is a belief that you either want to be one of the worst team. So you get a high draft pick or one of the best and contend for a title, but I rarely hear anybody say that about baseball. Is there any advantage to what the Orioles are doing this year or because the baseball draft is more of a long play. You're going to send guys to the miners for few years is a bad season in baseball, just that a bad season and nothing else. Is there any method to what the Orioles madness is this year they have again, they they are now thirty seven and eighty eight. While okay. Yes, tanking is necessary in baseball. I mean, didn't they the Astros and kind of do it. The Astros dude at the cubs did it. The Braves did at the Phillies did it. Yeah. I mean, you the only way to really get better in in the modern in modern major league baseball is two tank and that's exactly what is required. It's it's made to look worse here because first of all, the Orioles are in the best division base way or the Yankees and the Red Sox. And the Red Sox happened to be fifty games over five hundred at least last time I checked. So their earliest to be eliminated in part because the Red Sox are so great, right? Yeah. But here the other end of a major league baseball, you gotta tank. It's the only way you get better and they're very good at tanking. Yeah, they are thirty seven and eighty air Exelon I found it the next three. Okay. A demographic countdown clock made by researchers at..

baseball Orioles Red Sox Bach Astros Bill James Braves basketball Yankees Phillies cubs
New Jersey averts government shutdown with last-minute budget

Morning Edition

01:39 min | 3 years ago

New Jersey averts government shutdown with last-minute budget

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump is expected to spend much of this week narrowing potential candidates to fill retiring justice anthony kennedy seat on the us supreme court the president says he'll announce his choice a week from today new jersey's government remains open this morning as joe hernandez with member station whyy reports the governor signed a budget deal yesterday after a lastminute agreement with state lawmakers new jersey governor phil murphy and democratic state legislators reached a last minute budget deal over the weekend it means the state narrowly avoided a government shutdown which would have been its second in two years republicans criticized the deal though for raising taxes even higher in an already high tax state lebron james is becoming a los angeles laker has kyle stokes with member station k pcc reports james is leaving the nba's cleveland cavaliers after agreeing to a four four year contract with l a worth one hundred fifty four million dollars for years some la laker fans had mixed feelings about lebron success they were inclined to stick up for their favorite player legendary laker kobe bryant now the lakers are coming off their fifth straight losing season fans of hoped a big free agent signing could reverse the team's fortunes and james fits the bill james one one nba title with cleveland and two with miami i'm dave mattingly in washington and this is morning edition at wnyc in new york at five twenty good morning i'm kerry nolan new data indicates that new york city government chose not to.

Kobe Bryant Kerry Nolan Cleveland Los Angeles Whyy Dave Mattingly NPR New York Wnyc Washington Miami Lakers Cleveland Cavaliers NBA Kyle Stokes Lebron James Phil Murphy Joe Hernandez
"bill james" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"bill james" Discussed on The Editors

"We're just trategy uh you know the great baseball writer bill james is to say that wall playing a tabletop baseball game is no substitute for being a manager of men uh that really before they let anybody uh manage men in the game they should play a few hundred hours of tabletop baseball so they know the percentage is cold um and uh i i guess sometimes i do think looking at our our political leaders that may be some of them would would benefit from playing a little more table top wargames uh in refining their strategies with uh with consequences up for little pieces of plastic before they're in the position of doing so with games constantly updated a costly updated versions and there are they better than the classic um some are some aren't some some games some games you can revise your own rules it depends how you're doing it um you know a game like like risk or diplomacy is still very much the same as it was you know long long ago uh but those games also continually evolve just because of the different strategies the people you're playing against it's the michael even watching narcos which i believe the season 3 asean 3 assists were ladies and threes just released and dumb narcos is a series on netflixing which in the first two seasons looks at the da and other players in colombia going after the medellin cartel led by pablo escobar uh it's a written that's a really gripping story the first season was utterly fantastic if you don't know much about the drug wars in colombia this will be really enlightening and scary to watch i thought the second season fell off a little bit with uh as has documented kind of the fall of escobar the third season is about uh moving onto the number to target which was the cali cartel.

baseball michael colombia pablo escobar writer bill james asean medellin cali hundred hours